WorldWideScience

Sample records for dermatology life quality

  1. Psychological symptoms and quality of life of dermatology outpatients and hospitalized dermatology patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, R.; Zachariae, C.; Ibsen, H.H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to compare psychological symptoms and health-related quality of life of dermatology patients and healthy controls. The sample consisted of 333 consecutively recruited patients from four dermatology outpatient clinics, 172 hospitalized dermatological patients from...... two university hospitals and 293 matched healthy controls. All patients and controls completed Beck's Depression Inventory, the Brief Symptom Inventory and the Dermatology Life Quality Index. Hospitalized patients were more distressed than outpatients and healthy controls and reported greater...... of dermatology patients, especially among patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis....

  2. Psychological symptoms and quality of life of dermatology outpatients and hospitalized dermatology patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Robert; Zachariae, Claus; Ibsen, Hans Henning

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to compare psychological symptoms and health-related quality of life of dermatology patients and healthy controls. The sample consisted of 333 consecutively recruited patients from four dermatology outpatient clinics, 172 hospitalized dermatological patients from...... impairment of disease-related quality of life than outpatients. More hospitalized patients had suicidal thoughts and were characterized as having severe to moderate depression compared with outpatients and controls. Female patients and younger patients were generally more distressed than male patients...... and older patients, and patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis were more distressed than patients with urticaria and eczemas. Disease-related impairment of quality of life was the main predictor of psychological symptoms, when controlling for diagnosis, age, gender, disease duration and disease...

  3. Why quality of life measurement is important in dermatology clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, A Y; Salek, M S; Abeni, D

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the many ways in which quality of life (QoL) measurement may potentially be advantageous in routine clinical dermatology practice. Thirteen members of the EADV Task Force on Quality of Life, eight dermatologists, three health psychologists, one epidemiologist...

  4. Evaluation of self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İjlal Erturan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by itchy skin lesions. Since adolescents are intensely interested in their physical appearance, chronic skin diseases in this period can adversely affect the development of self esteem. Atopic dermatitis is a skin disease that affects the appearance and there is an heightened attention to the body image in adolescence which is an important period of time in the development of self-esteem. Therefore, we aimed to investigate self-esteem and dermatological quality of life in adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients with atopic dermatitis and 33 healthy controls were included in the study. The Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale and the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI were used for determining self-esteem and quality of life. The Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD Index was used to assess the severity of atopic dermatitis. Results: It was found that patient group had lower self-esteem than healthy controls according to the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale. A statistically significant difference was observed in happiness/satisfaction and anxiety subscale scores between the patients and healthy controls while there was no significant difference between the other sub-scale scores. Mean value of dermatological quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly lower than in healthy controls. A moderate negative correlation was found between self-esteem and CDLQI scores among adolescents with atopic dermatitis. Discussion: This study results have shown that self-esteem and dermatological quality of life were adversely affected in adolescents with atopic dermatitis irrespective of gender. These patients should be examined psychiatrically besides dermatological examination and treatment. We suggest that improvement will be observed in self-esteem and quality of

  5. Quality of life among dermatology patients: a systematic review of investigations using qualitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanminder; Ehsani-Chimeh, Nazanin; Kornmehl, Heather; Armstrong, April W

    2017-07-13

    Quality of life may be assessed using quantitative or qualitative methods. Quantitative methods are commonly used in research settings; however, they may fail to capture the full range of patient experiences and impact on quality of life. Qualitative methods may be used to address this limitation. In this systematic review, we aim to synthesize data from articles utilizing qualitative methods to assess quality of life in dermatology patients. We performed a systematic review search using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and SCOPUS databases. The search was conducted using the following search criteria: ("Dermatology" [MeSH]) AND ("Quality of Life" [MeSH]), AND ("Qualitative Research" [MeSH]), searching literature spanning from January 1, 1946- October 5, 2016. The systematic review of 15 articles included 533 dermatology patients. Patients expressed frustration over the unpredictability of disease symptoms and having to compensate for the subsequent limitations by altering their daily routines. Patients also reported profound helplessness due to chronic skin disease and social isolation in an effort to hide their disease. Patients noted the patient-provider relationship as a source of support and information exchange, with the goal to form easy to use treatment plans that met both physician and patient expectations. Qualitative assessment of patient quality of life can provide new insights into the patient experience and the impact of their skin disease. Qualitative methodology may capture meaningful information that may be overlooked by quantitative methods, and it should be included in quality of life research.

  6. Correlation Between Dermatology Life Quality Index and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index in Patients with Psoriasis Treated with Ustekinumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselvig, Jeanette Halskou; Egeberg, Alexander; Loft, Nikolai Dyrberg

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring of biological treatment efficacy for psoriasis is based on clinical evaluation and patient's quality of life. However, long-term correlation between Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) in real life has not been studied in patients treated...

  7. Japanese version of the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index: Translation and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Yuko; Tanaka, Masaru; Futei, Yuko; Kamo, Toshiko; Basra, Mohammad Khurshid Azam; Finlay, Andrew Yule

    2017-08-01

    Skin conditions affect the quality of life (QoL) of patients and their family. To assess family members' QoL, a questionnaire uniquely designed for family members is necessary. We translated the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI), originally created and validated by Basra et al., into Japanese, and evaluated its reliability and validity. For psychometric evaluations, 150 dermatology patients and their family members were included. The Japanese version of the FDLQI showed high test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.95) and internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86). FDLQI scores significantly correlated with DLQI scores (r = 0.58, P Family members of patients with inflammatory skin diseases showed higher FDLQI scores than those with isolated lesions, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.062, Mann-Whitney U-test). Responsiveness to change was demonstrated in a group in which the patient's skin condition was assessed as improved (n = 37, r = 0.46, P < 0.01) but not in that in which it became worse. The difference of the change between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Additionally, the change in FDLQI scores and GQ were significantly correlated (r = 0.40, P < 0.01). Exploratory factor analysis suggested essential unidimensionality of the instrument. We showed acceptable validity and responsiveness of this Japanese version of FDLQI. Further clinical epidemiological studies are required to confirm this. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Impact on Quality of Life in Dermatology Patients Attending an Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre-Sánchez, A; de Perosanz-Lobo, D; Pascual-Sánchez, A; Pindado-Ortega, C; Fonda-Pascual, P; Moreno-Arrones, Ó M; Jaén-Olasolo, P

    2017-12-01

    Dermatological complaints have been estimated to represent up to 5-10% of all the visits to emergency departments. The main objective of our study was to determine how affected is the Health related Quality of Life (HRQL) in a series of patients attending an emergency department due to skin symptoms. A prospective study during one month (July 2016) was conducted in a hospital with full-time on-call dermatologists. The Short-Form SF-12v2 Health Survey and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) were offered to all the patients over 18 years old attending the emergency department with cutaneous complaints. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics were also collected. In total 108 patients completed the study. Mean age found was 45.1±16.1 years. Mean DLQI score found was 10.56±6.12. Fifty-three patients (49%) had a score of 11 or higher in the DLQI questionnaire. Most affected subscales were "Symptoms and Feelings" in DLQI scale and "Overall Health" and "Vitality" for the SF-12. A very significant difference (p<0.0001) was found between women's (12.4±5.7) and men's (7.5±5.6) DLQI mean score (mean difference of 4.9; 95% confidence interval of the difference: 2.7-7.1). Patients visiting emergency units with cutaneous complaints seem to feel a moderate-large impact on their quality of life which is mainly related to the symptoms and feelings that they are experiencing. This impact is significantly higher among women. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Pictorial Representation of Illness and Self Measure (PRISM): A novel visual instrument to measure quality of life in dermatological inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühleisen, Beda; Büchi, Stefan; Schmidhauser, Simone; Jenewein, Josef; French, Lars E; Hofbauer, Günther F L

    2009-07-01

    To validate the PRISM (Pictorial Representation of Illness and Self Measure) tool, a novel visual instrument, for the assessment of health-related quality of life in dermatological inpatients compared with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the Skindex-29 questionnaires and to report qualitative information on PRISM. In an open longitudinal study, PRISM and Skindex-29 and DLQI questionnaires were completed and HRQOL measurements compared. Academic dermatological inpatient ward. The study population comprised 227 sequential dermatological inpatients on admission. Patients completed the PRISM tool and the Skindex-29 and DLQI questionnaires at admission and discharge. PRISM Self-Illness Separation (SIS) score; Skindex-29 and DLQI scores; and qualitative PRISM information by Mayring inductive qualitative context analysis. The PRISM scores correlated well with those from the Skindex-29 (rho = 0.426; P quality of life questionnaires to assess changes in the burden of suffering during hospitalization. Inductive qualitative context analysis revealed impairment of adjustment and self-image as major aspects. Patients overall expected symptomatic and functional improvement. In patients with psoriasis and leg ulcers, many expected no treatment benefit. The PRISM tool proved to be convenient and reliable for health-related quality of life assessment, applicable for a wide range of skin diseases, and correlated with DLQI and Skindex-29 scores. With the PRISM tool, free-text answers allow for the assessment of individual information and potentially customized therapeutic approaches.

  10. To what extent is quality of life impaired in vitiligo? A multicenter study on Italian patients using the dermatology life quality index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingordo, Vito; Cazzaniga, Simone; Medri, Matelda; Raone, Beatrice; Digiuseppe, Maria Donata; Musumeci, Maria Letizia; Romano, Ivana; Fai, Dario; Pellegrino, Michele; Pezzarossa, Enrico; Di Lernia, Vito; Peccerillo, Francesca; Battarra, Vincenzo Claudio; Sirna, Riccardo; Patrizi, Annalisa; Naldi, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    It is believed that vitiligo has an impact on the overall patient quality of life (QoL). To estimate QoL in a fairly large sample of Italian vitiligo patients by using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire. One hundred and sixty-one vitiligo patients referred to 9 dermatological centers were offered to participate by filling in the Italian version of the DLQI questionnaire. The mean total DLQI score was 4.3 (SD ±4.9; range: 0-22). In multivariate analysis, DLQI >5 was associated with female gender, stability of the disease over time and involvement of the face at disease onset. The impairment of QoL is overall limited in Italian vitiligo patients, especially if it is compared with results from other available studies. This could be due to cultural and ethnic characteristics of the sample.

  11. Patients with tattoo reactions have reduced quality of life and suffer from itch: Dermatology Life Quality Index and Itch Severity Score measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton Carlsen, K; Serup, J

    2015-02-01

    Tattoos are a trend with increasing side-effects. The burden of local reaction with swelling, itching and discomfort may impel sufferers to consult medical assistance. To assess tattoo reactions and their influence on quality of life and itching by utilizing the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scoring system and Itch Severity Scale (ISS). Patients attending the 'Tattoo Clinic' at Bispebjerg University Hospital, Denmark with tattoo problems spanning more than 3 months were invited. Forty patients participated during September-November 2012. Patients attending their routine consultations completed the ISS and DLQI questionnaires. Patients with tattoo reactions experienced reduced quality of life, DLQI score 7.4 and were burdened by itch, ISS score 7.2. Both DLQI and ISS results attained the level of discomfort of known skin diseases such as psoriasis, pruritus and eczema albeit the typical tattooed affected areas are smaller. Sufferers of tattoo reactions have reduced quality of life and are often burdened by itching attaining the level of other cumbersome afflictions recognized as dermatological diseases associated with itch. Tattoo reactions warrant diagnosis and treatment with same professional intent shared with other skin diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Polish version of Skindex-29: psychometric properties of an instrument to measure quality of life in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowski, Konrad; Steuden, Stanisława; Bereza, Bernarda

    2014-02-01

    Skin conditions have a negative impact on quality of life and it is necessary to quantify this impact. Skindex-29 is a self-report questionnaire developed to measure dermatology-specific quality of life. The objective of this study is to adapt this questionnaire to Polish conditions. The adaptation procedure involved the works on the linguistic content of the items and testing psychometric properties of the Polish version of Skindex-29, including item characteristics, factorial structure, aspects of reliability and validity. Two-hundred and ninety patients (63.4% women and 35.2% men) suffering from a range of skin conditions were recruited from several dermatological out-patient and in-patient clinics in Poland. Quality of life was measured using Skindex-29 and appropriate clinical data were collected. The global score of Skindex-29 showed the normal distribution. Cronbach's α reliability coefficients were found to be high to very high for all Skindex-29 indexes. Factor analysis yielded four factors, in contrast to the original version of the questionnaire, for which a three-factor solution had been reported. Skindex-29 validity was demonstrated by showing the differences in the quality of life scores across different diagnostic categories, and between in-patients and out-patients. Skindex-29 global scores were found to be significantly predicted by the localization of the skin lesions on legs, anogenital areas and palms. The findings of this study support reliability and validity of the Polish version of Skindex-29, but they also raise questions to its three-factor structure.

  13. Effect of occurrence of vitiligo in children over quality of life of their families: A hospital-based study using family dermatology life quality index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Gahalaut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitiligo in an adult patient has a profound effect on the quality of life (QoL of that particular patient. Although it is known that vitiligo in adult patient affects QoL in their family, very little information is available regarding QoL in a family having children suffering from vitiligo. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional, hospital-based study to ascertain the effect children suffering from vitiligo have on the QoL of their respective families. Study participants were fifty healthy parent/immediate caregivers of fifty corresponding children suffering from vitiligo. The QoL in the family of these vitiliginous children was assessed with the help of Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI. Results: There was significantly more impairment of FDLQI among respondents if vitiliginous child was female compared to male. The total FDLQI showed a significant negative correlation with duration of vitiligo in children. Analysis of individual items in FDLQI revealed emotional distress as the most impaired facet of FDLQI and housework as the least affected item. Conclusion: Presence of vitiligo in children affects the QoL of that particular child and his/her family. This impairment of FDLQI is more if the child suffering from vitiligo is female. Treatment of vitiligo in pediatric age group should include psychological counseling and support for the child as well as their parents/caregivers.

  14. Determining the minimal clinically important difference and responsiveness of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI): further data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basra, M K A; Salek, M S; Camilleri, L; Sturkey, R; Finlay, A Y

    2015-01-01

    To determine the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and its responsiveness to change in inflammatory skin diseases. A longitudinal study: at stage 1, patients completed the DLQI and a disease severity global question; at stage 2, a global rating of change in quality of life (QoL; Global Rating of Change Questionnaire, GRCQ) was added and used as an anchor to measure the MCID of the DLQI. 192 patients completed stage 1 and 107 completed stage 2. The mean DLQI score at stage 1 was 9.8 and 7.4 at stage 2 with a mean change of 2.4 (p < 0.0001). 31 patients experienced a 'small change' in their QoL (±3 and ±2) on the GRCQ. The mean corresponding change in DLQI scores was 3.3, which is regarded as the approximate MCID. Previous estimates of the MCID of the DLQI have varied from 3 to 5. Although this study demonstrated a MCID of 3.3, we recommend that the MCID in inflammatory skin diseases should be 4. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Quality of life measurement in acne. Position Paper of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Task Forces on Quality of Life and Patient Oriented Outcomes and Acne, Rosacea and Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernyshov, P. V.; Zouboulis, C. C.; Tomas-Aragones, L.; Jemec, G. B.; Manolache, L.; Tzellos, T.; Sampogna, F.; Evers, A. W. M.; Dessinioti, C.; Marron, S. E.; Bettoli, V.; van Cranenburgh, O. D.; Svensson, A.; Liakou, A. I.; Poot, F.; Szepietowski, J. C.; Salek, M. S.; Finlay, A. Y.

    2018-01-01

    Acne causes profound negative psychological and social effects on the quality of life (QoL) of patients. The European Dermatology Forum S3-Guideline for the Treatment of Acne recommended adopting a QoL measure as an integral part of acne management. Because of constantly growing interest in

  16. Psoriasis area severity index (pasi) and the dermatology life quality index (dlqi): the correlation between disease severity and quality of life in patients of psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.; Shaikh, Z.I.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the correlation between Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) in patients of psoriasis. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Both outdoor and indoor patients of Dermatology Department, Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi for duration of 6 months i.e. from 6th Oct 2014 to 5th Apr 2014 were selected. Material and Methods: A total of 155 patients of chronic plaque psoriasis diagnosed clinically, ranging from 20 to 80 years of age and of either gender were included in the study. A careful history and clinical examination was done and for each case PASI and DLQI were calculated and registered in the designed proforma. Data were entered and analyzed in SPSS version-17.0. Mean and standard deviations were calculated for quantitative variables like age, PASI and DLQI. Frequencies and percentages were calculated for qualitative variables like gender. Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) (+1,-1) was calculated between mean PASI and mean DLQI. A p-value <0.05 was considered as significant. Stratification was done for age and gender and post stratification correlation was calculated. Results: Out of 155 patients studied, 110 (70.97%) were males and 45 (29.03%) were females. Ages of the patients ranged from 20-80 years (mean age 49.5 +- 15.6 years). Mean PASI score was 27.92 +- 5.83 and DLQ1 was 11.46 +- 4.22. The value of Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was 0.1324 which showed weak correlation between PASI and DLQ1 with p-value of 0.100. Weak correlation (r=-0.3394) in age 51-80 years while very weak correlation (r=-0.0651) in age 20-50 years was noted. PASI and DLQ1 showed weak correlation in males (r=0.132) and in females (r=0.461). Conclusion: This study concluded that there is a weak correlation between PASI and DLQI.

  17. An audit of the impact of a consultation with a paediatric dermatology team on quality of life in infants with atopic eczema and their families: further validation of the Infants' Dermatitis Quality of Life Index and Dermatitis Family Impact score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, P E; Lewis-Jones, M S

    2006-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) accounts for 10-20% of referrals to secondary care dermatology, often requiring multiple visits and occupying much valuable time and resources. We audited the usefulness (ease of use, reliability and sensitivity to change) of two simple and easy to use quality of life (QoL) measures, the Infants' Dermatitis Quality of Life Index (IDQOL) and Dermatitis Family Impact (DFI), for assessing the impact on QoL of AD in infants and their families in a routine clinical setting. We also examined the impact of an initial consultation with a dermatology team on AD severity and QoL impairment from the parent's perspective. The parents of 203 infants (mean age 19.8 months) with AD attending paediatric dermatology clinics completed the DFI and IDQOL. The parents of 50 of these infants completed both questionnaires before first and second consultations. In the 203 children the mean of both the IDQOL and DFI scores was 8.47 (median 8 and 7 and SD 5.8 and 6.5, respectively). The IDQOL and DFI correlated well (r(s) = 0.776, P emotional distress. In both measures these domains also correlated most strongly with eczema severity. After dermatology consultation the median global severity score, rated by 50 parents, fell from 2 (SD 0.83) to 1 (SD 0.8; 95% confidence interval, CI 0.5-1), the median IDQOL score fell from 8 (SD 5.92) to 5.5 (SD 5.92; 95% CI 2-5.5) and the median DFI score fell from 9 (SD 6.45) to 3 (SD 6.56; 95% CI 2-5.5). In 50 infants the median IDQOL scores for those infants with global AD severity scores of 1, 2 and 3 were 5 (SD 5.65), 8 (SD 4.27) and 14 (SD 5.67), respectively and improved by 10%, 38% and 64%, respectively while the median DFI scores improved by 54%, 56% and 79%, respectively. The most improved IDQOL items were the time taken to get to sleep and difficulty at mealtimes and the most improved DFI domains were tiredness/exhaustion and emotional distress in the parents. We have provided further important information on the effects of

  18. Quimp (QUality of life IMPairment): an addition to the Quality of Life lexicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernyshov, P. V.; Linder, M. D.; Pustišek, N.; Manolache, L.; Szepietowski, J. C.; Tomas-Aragones, L.; Marron, S. E.; Poot, F.; Augustin, M.; Bewley, A.; van Cranenburgh, O. D.; Jemec, G. B.; Salek, N. N.; Sampogna, F.; Svensson, A.

    2017-01-01

    There has been a constant growth in the number of publications each year concerning "quality of life (QoL)" and "dermatology," since the publication of the Dermatology Life Quality Index in 1994. Numerous dermatology and disease-specific QoL instruments have since been created. Quality of life is

  19. A Web-based, educational, quality-of-life intervention for patients with a chronic skin disease: feasibility and acceptance in routine dermatological practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cranenburgh, Oda D.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; de Rie, Menno A.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; de Korte, John

    2015-01-01

    Chronic skin diseases have a negative impact on patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Patient education might contribute to HRQoL improvement. We developed a web-based, educational, HRQoL intervention for patients with a chronic skin disease. We aimed to assess 1) the feasibility of

  20. The Impact of Chronic Skin Disease on Daily Life (ISDL): a generic and dermatology-specific health instrument.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, A.W.M.; Duller, P.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Valk, P.G.M. van der; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Gerritsen, M.J.P.; Otero, E.; Verhoeven, E.W.M.; Verhaak, C.M.; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In dermatological research and clinical practice, there is a need for comprehensive self-report instruments that assess a broad spectrum of health implications of chronic skin diseases, including generic and skin-specific aspects of disease-related quality of life. The advantages of

  1. [Quality assessment of dermatology in the G-DRG system 2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg, T; Hensen, P; Rompel, R; Roeder, N

    2004-11-01

    Since January 2004, all German hospitals have been obliged to operate with a new hospital funding system based on DRGs. For the DRG system to serve as a fair basis for reimbursement requires that the dermatologic services be adequately covered in the classification system. The German Dermatologic Society (DDG) in cooperation with the DRG-Research Group of the University Hospital Muenster carried out a DRG evaluation study. Based on these results, suggestions for the adjustment of the G-DRG system were proposed by the DDG in the G-DRG adaptation round for 2004. Based on data of the DRG evaluation project (14,555 dermatological cases from 19 hospitals) the homogeneity in the G-DRG system 2004 was examined and compared with the quality of depiction in the G-DRG version 1.0. The correlation between expenditure and case mix index in the hospitals improved in the G-DRG system 2004. Most proposals submitted by the German Dermatologic Society for the adaptation into the G-DRG system 2004 were accepted. Some fundamental problems such as reimbursement of high cost drugs and special services, as well as the reimbursement of high and low outliers, were only marginally addressed. The G-DRG system 2004 will need to be continuously adapted in the field of dermatology. Based on this work, the German Dermatologic Society has made suggestions to be adapted in the G-DRG system 2005 and submitted them to the German DRG Institute.

  2. Quality of Life of Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Marciniak; Adam Reich; Jacek C. Szepietowski

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic dermatitis in children. The influence of AD on quality of life of parents of children with AD was studied using the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI). Fifty children with AD were included in the study (age range 2–24 months) together with their parents. Children’s AD was found to influence the quality of life of both parents; however, it had a more significant influence on quality of life of moth...

  3. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  4. Assessment of the quality of life of pediatric patients at a center of excellence in dermatology in southern Brazil Avaliação da qualidade de vida dos pacientes pediátricos de um centro de referência em dermatologia no sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Blessmann Weber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Skin diseases cause negative impact on the emotional state, social relationships and daily activities, due to the stigma caused by the appearance of the lesions. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the quality of life of pediatric patients with skin diseases attending a dermatology service, compare the scores obtained among the dermatoses found in the sample and associate them to the variables, in addition to observing how the skin disease specifically affects quality of life. METHODS: Cross-sectional study, with patients between 5 and 16 years attending the Dermatology Service of the University of Health Sciences of Porto Alegre, Brazil, between July 2010 and February 2011. The data collection instruments were the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire and the AUEQI questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were interviewed, with mean age of 9,66 years. The main dermatoses were atopic dermatitis (29.8%, warts (13% and molluscum contagiosum (7.5%. Chronic diseases (73.9% were the most prevalent. The overall mean Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index score was 5.01 for chronic dermatoses and 2.07 for acute illnesses, indicating a compromised quality of life among chronically ill patients. The comparison between the scores obtained with the AUEQI scale and the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index scores indicates that the overall quality of life is less affected than the specific quality of life related to the dermatosis. CONCLUSIONS: The data presented reinforce how important it is that the patients, their families and caregivers understand the symptoms, triggers and treatment of the skin disease in question. This information facilitates adherence to the treatment and justifies the conduct adopted by the dermatologist.FUNDAMENTOS: Doenças dermatológicas, em razão dos estigmas pela aparência das lesões, são fonte de impacto negativo no estado emocional, relações sociais e atividades cotidianas

  5. [Certificate "Tropical and Travel Dermatology (DDA)": quality-assured medical education for dermatologists with a "migration perspective"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, P; Nenoff, P; Schliemann, S; Tittelbach, J; Reinel, D

    2014-10-01

    Under the conditions of economic pressure in the medical system and the DRG system for hospitals in Germany, so-called "uneconomic" services and fields of specialized dermatologic competence such as pediatric dermatology, trichology, occupational dermatology and tropical dermatology are increasingly being neglected. While hospitals tend to train fewer residents in these subspecialties, there is a demand for additional high-quality training opportunities that are certified by the German Dermatologic Academy (DDA). Tropical and travel-related skin diseases are more frequently observed in Germany which can be explained by the increased world-wide travel activities, but also by the international migration from developing countries into Europe. Furthermore, dermatologists trained in Germany are working more and more also internationally. Thus, they require knowledge and experience in tropical and travel-related dermatology. The certificate "Tropical and Travel Dermatology (DDA)" was developed and published in 2013 in a cooperation between the International Society for Dermatology in the Tropics in cooperation with the German Academy of Dermatology (DDA). It consists of 3 full day teaching modules (basic, additional and special seminar). The first seminar cycle in 2013/2014 showed a high demand from dermatologists in hospitals and private practices. While the basic and the special seminars were held in Germany, the additional seminar took place in cooperation with the Regional Dermatology Training Center (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania. Many attending dermatologists fulfilling the requirements for the new certificate have practiced in developing countries or plan to do so. In order to gain practical experience on the basis of the knowledge acquired in the qualifying seminars, the International Society for Dermatology in the Tropics supports dermatologists to find internships and work placements in dermatological units in developing countries.

  6. Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Military Child Education DSN: (315) 477-9422 COMM: (808) 477-9422 Individual Contacts Branch Chief, Quality Directory Media Inquiries Home : Resources : Quality of Life J102 Quality of Life and Military Child Education Branch PACOM Quality of Life and Education Facebook Page | USPACOM SAPR 24/7 Emergency Lines and

  7. Health related quality of life in patients with actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennvall, Gunnel Ragnarson; Norlin, J M; Malmberg, I

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common skin condition that may progress to non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). The disease may influence Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), but studies of HRQoL in patients with AK are limited. The purpose of the study was to analyze HRQoL in patients......-center setting. Dermatologists assessed AK severity and patients completed: Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (AKQoL), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), and EQ-5D-5 L including EQ-VAS. Differences between categorical subgroups were tested with Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The relationship between...... with different severity levels of AK treated in dermatology specialist care using generic and disease-specific HRQoL instruments and to analyze their relationship. METHODS: AK patients who visited dermatological clinics in Denmark were included in an observational, cross-sectional, study in a multi...

  8. Cooperation between the occupational health insurance and physicians practicing occupational dermatology: optimization potential in quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Peter; Aberer, Werner; Bauer, Andrea; Diepgen, Thomas Ludwig; Drexler, Hans; Fartasch, Manigé; John, Swen Malte; Schuhmacher-Stock, Uta; Wehrmann, Wolfgang; Weisshaar, Elke

    2014-05-01

    Quality assurance is a task of the medical profession, but it is also a duty of the occupational health insurance (OHI). Data on the interaction quality between physicians practicing occupational dermatology and the OHI are limited. An online survey was performed in 854 German members of the Working Group on Occupational and Environmental Dermatology in October 2013. Items included demographic data, a judgment on the cooperation between the dermatologists and OHI companies, an economic grading of the current compensation scheme, and prioritization of optimization tasks. 182 members (21.3 % of the invited population) participated in the survey. The cooperation with the OHI companies was judged as "very good" by 10.8 %, as "good" by 56.7  %, as "satisfactory" by 24.2 %, as "sufficient" by 7.0 % and as "inadequate" by 1.3 %. 93.4 % of the interviewed mentioned problems and improvement potentials in the cooperation of their practice or clinic with OHI companies. Main points of criticisms were reimbursement (44.7 %), followed by impairments of the treatment options (36.5 %) and the delay or scope of the treatment in the dermatologist's procedure (29.4 %). While most physicians practicing occupational dermatology give a positive judgment of their cooperation with OHI companies, quality optimization potentials exist regarding the reimbursement of dermatological services, especially regarding time-intensive counselling in the prevention of occupational skin diseases, in the enablement of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures according to current guidelines and in a timely preventive intervention to use the therapeutic window before chronification of skin diseases may occur. © 2014 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Measuring health-related quality of life in pediatric psoriasis: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randa, Hilde; Todberg, Tanja; Seiding Larsen, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    investigators (HR, TT). Results: Of 561 abstracts screened, 266 papers were selected for full-text review, and 20 papers met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies (n=18) recruited patients from specialized dermatology clinics. The Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) was the most commonly...

  10. The suitability of quality-of-life questionnaires for psoriasis research - A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Korte, John; Mombers, Femke M. C.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Bos, Jan D.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To critically appraise the suitability of current quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaires for psoriasis research. Data Sources: Computerized searches of 5 bibliographic databases. Questionnaire Selection: Predefined criteria were used to identify QOL questionnaires in dermatologic studies.

  11. Chronic tattoo reactions cause reduced quality of life equaling cumbersome skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Katrina Hutton; Serup, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    applied to patients with chronic tattoo reactions, tattoo complaints and impact on quality of life that were comparable to patients presenting cumbersome dermatological disease such as psoriasis, eczema and pruritus, which often show widespread effects to the skin, were uncovered. In conclusion, chronic...... impacts, including the effect on quality of life, should be studied. Itch severity and influence on quality of life can be measured objectively. The Itch Severity Scale and Dermatology Life Quality Index scoring systems have been applied to different dermatological diseases. When ISS and DLQI scores were...... tattoo reactions should be ranked as a cumbersome dermatological disease and, accordingly, given priority attention and qualified treatment by the public health care system....

  12. Dyslipidemia in Dermatological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Chetana; Shenoy, Manjunath Mala; Rao, Gururaja K.

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are one of the common metabolic disorders. A link between dermatological disorders like psoriasis and dyslipidemia has been established in the recent past. Many dermatological disorders could have a systemic inflammatory component which explains such association. Chronic inflammatory dermatological disorders could also have other metabolic imbalances that may contribute to dyslipidemia. Presence of such abnormal metabolism may justify routine screening of these disorders for associated dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities and early treatment of such comorbidities to improve quality of life. Some of the drugs used by dermatologists such as retinoids are also likely to be a cause of dyslipidemia. Hence, it is imperative that the dermatologists obtain scientific knowledge on the underlying mechanisms involved in dyslipidemia and understand when to intervene with therapies. A systematic review of the English language literature was done by using Google Scholar and PubMed. In this review, attempts are made to list the dermatological disorders associated with dyslipidemia; to simplify the understanding of underlying mechanisms; and to give a brief idea about the interventions. PMID:26713286

  13. Dermatology on instagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Boyers, Lindsay; Quest, Tyler; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-07-15

    The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Instagram. The most popular professional dermatological organizations, dermatology journals, and dermatology related patient advocate groups on Facebook and Twitter, determined from a prior study, were searched for established profiles on Instagram. In addition, dermatology-related terms (i.e. dermatology, dermatologist, alopecia, eczema, melanoma, psoriasis, and skin cancer) and dermatology-related hashtags (i.e. #dermatology, #dermatologist, #melanoma, #acne, #psoriasis, and #alopecia) were searched. None of the top ten dermatological journals or professional dermatological organizations were found on Instagram. Although only one of the top ten patient advocate groups related to dermatology conditions, Melanoma Research Foundation, had an Instagram presence, there were many private offices, cosmetic products, and some patient advocacy groups. This novel social networking platform could grant dermatology journals and other professional organizations a unique opportunity to reach younger demographic populations, particularly women, with the potential for true educational and life-changing impact.

  14. Dermatologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Simón Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologic emergencies represent about 8–20% of the diseases seen in the Emergency Department of hospitals. It is often a challenge for primary care physicians to differentiate mundane skin ailments from more serious, life threatening conditions that require immediate intervention. In this review we included the following conditions: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrosis, pemphigus vulgaris, toxic shock syndrome, fasciitis necrotising, angioedema/urticaria, meningococcemia, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  15. Preditores de qualidade de vida em pacientes com melanoma cutâneo no serviço de dermatologia do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre Predictors of quality of life in patients with skin melanoma at the dermatology department of the Porto Alegre Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Tremel Barbato

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Alguns sintomas presentes nos pacientes com melanoma estão diretamente relacionados à tensão psicológ ica, o que reforça a necessidade de avaliar a qualidade de vida em todas as fases da doença. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a qualidade de vida dos pacientes diagnosticados com melanoma por meio do questionário Fact-G. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo transversal que incluiu todos os pacientes em seguimento no serviço de dermatologia do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre entre julho e dezembro de 2006. RESULTADOS: Sessenta pacientes foram incluídos. A idade média foi de 55,6 anos. O nível de escolaridade até primeiro grau foi correlacionado a escores mais baixos no Fact-G. Os pacientes com história familiar apresentaram maiores escores de QoL em três das quatro categorias avaliadas: bem-estar físico, emocional e funcional (P BACKGROUNDS: Some symptoms present in melanoma patients are directly related to psychological stress, which emphasizes the need to evaluate quality of life (QoL in these patients at all the stages of their disease. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate quality of life in a sample of patients diagnosed with melanoma, using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G questionnaire. METHODS: A descriptive, cross sectional study was conducted between July and December, 2006 with all patients with skin melanoma receiving follow-up care at the Department of Dermatology of the Porto Alegre Teaching Hospital, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. RESULTS: Sixty patients were included in the study. Mean age was 55.6 years. Poor education level (primary school or less was associated with a poorer FACT-G score. Patients with a family history of the disease had higher QoL scores in 3 of the 4 categories evaluated: physical, emotional and functional wellbeing (p<0.01. QoL scores were higher in married patients (82.42 compared to single patients (70.28 (p<0.01. Patients with metastases

  16. Quality of life technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wac, Katarzyna; Fiordelli, M.; Gustarini, M.

    2015-01-01

    Inevitably, as basic human needs are assured in any developed society, differentiating factors for quality of life (QoL) relate to a greater capacity to make informed decisions across daily life activities, especially those related to health. The availability of powerful, personalized, and wearable...

  17. Development of a quality-of-life instrument for autoimmune bullous disease: the Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaratnam, Deshan F; Hanna, Anna Marie; Chee, Shien-ning; Frew, John W; Venugopal, Supriya S; Daniel, Benjamin S; Martin, Linda K; Rhodes, Lesley M; Tan, Jeremy Choon Kai; Wang, Charles Qian; Welsh, Belinda; Nijsten, Tamar; Murrell, Dédée F

    2013-10-01

    Quality-of-life (QOL) evaluation is an increasingly important outcome measure in dermatology, with disease-specific QOL instruments being the most sensitive to changes in disease status. To develop a QOL instrument specific to autoimmune bullous disease (AIBD). A comprehensive item generation process was used to build a 45-item pilot Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (ABQOL) questionnaire, distributed to 70 patients with AIBD. Experts in bullous disease refined the pilot ABQOL before factor analysis was performed to yield the final ABQOL questionnaire of 17 questions. We evaluated validity and reliability across a range of indices. Australian dermatology outpatient clinics and private dermatology practices. PATIENTS AND EXPOSURE: Patients with a histological diagnosis of AIBD. The development of an AIBD-specific QOL instrument. Face and content validity were established through the comprehensive patient interview process and expert review. In terms of convergent validity, the ABQOL was found to have a moderate correlation with scores on the Dermatology Life Quality Index (R = 0.63) and the General Health subscale of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (R = 0.69; P = .009) and low correlation with the Pemphigus Disease Area Index (R = 0.42) and Autoimmune Bullous Disease Skin Disorder Intensity Score (R = 0.48). In terms of discriminant validity, the ABQOL was found to be more sensitive than the Dermatology Life Quality Index (P = .02). The ABQOL was also found to be a reliable instrument evaluated by internal consistency (Cronbach α coefficient, 0.84) and test-retest reliability (mean percentage variation, 0.92). The ABQOL has been shown to be a valid and reliable instrument that may serve as an end point in clinical trials. Future work should include incorporating patient weighting on questions to further increase content validity and translation of the measure to other languages. anzctr.org.au Identifier: ACTRN12612000750886.

  18. Quality of life in vitiligo patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teovska Mitrevska, Natasa; Eleftheriadou, Viktoria; Guarneri, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Quality of life is defined by the World Health Organization as "individuals' perceptions of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards and concerns." Often overlooked in the past, it is nowadays considered, in a more holistic view of medicine, a decisive factor to understand the impact of diseases and improve the quality of medical care. Such evaluation is particularly relevant for dermatological diseases, because visibility of the lesions can significantly affect self-esteem and social relationships. Vitiligo represents an emblematic case: often disfiguring and located in visible areas, confused in the past (and, in many world regions, even in the present) with leprosy, often perceived by physicians as a harmless, purely cosmetic problem, it significantly decreases the quality of life of affected persons. After a brief overview on definition, usefulness and methods for the assessment of quality of life, the authors examine the peculiarities of its relationship with skin diseases, particularly vitiligo. The state of the art of knowledge and research in this field is presented, together with data showing usefulness and positive results of a multidisciplinary approach, which adequately keeps into account perceived quality of life, on patient's satisfaction, adherence to treatment protocols and, ultimately, better outcome of treatments. In this context, an important role can be played by support communities, groups of patients and dedicated associations and societies, connected through modern communication networks like the Internet. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of Store and Forward Teledermatology on Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, John D.; Warshaw, Erin M.; Edison, Karen E.; Kapur, Kush; Thottapurathu, Lizy; Raju, Srihari; Cook, Bethany; Engasser, Holly; Pullen, Samantha; Parks, Patricia; Sindowski, Tom; Motyka, Danuta; Brown, Rodney; Moritz, Thomas E.; Datta, Santanu K.; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Marty, Lucinda; Reda, Domenic J.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Although research on quality of life and dermatologic conditions is well represented in the literature, information on teledermatology’s effect on quality of life is virtually absent. Objective To determine the effect of store and forward teledermatology on quality of life. Design Two-site, parallel-group, superiority randomized controlled trial. Setting Dermatology clinics and affiliated sites of primary care at 2 US Department of Veterans Affairs medical facilities. Participants Patients being referred to a dermatology clinic were randomly assigned, stratified by site, to teledermatology or the conventional consultation process. Among the 392 patients who met the inclusion criteria and were randomized, 326 completed the allocated intervention and were included in the analysis. Interventions Store and forward teledermatology (digital images and a standardized history) or conventional text-based consultation processes were used to manage the dermatology consultations. Patients were followed up for 9 months. Main Outcome Measures The primary end point was change in Skindex-16 scores, a skin-specific quality-of-life instrument, between baseline and 9 months. A secondary end point was change in Skindex-16 scores between baseline and 3 months. Results Patients in both randomization groups demonstrated a clinically significant improvement in Skindex-16 scores between baseline and 9 months with no significant difference by randomization group (P=.66, composite score). No significant difference in Skindex-16 scores by randomization group between baseline and 3 months was found (P=.39, composite score). Conclusions Compared with the conventional consultation process, store and forward teledermatology did not result in a statistically significant difference in skin-related quality of life at 3 or 9 months after referral. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00488293 PMID:23426111

  20. Dermatology consultations significantly contribute quality to care of hospitalized patients: a prospective study of dermatology inpatient consults at a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Fabrizio; Guren, Lauren; Fernandez, Anthony P; Sood, Apra

    2016-10-01

    Cutaneous abnormalities are common in hospitalized patients but are frequently missed or misdiagnosed by admitting teams. Inpatient dermatology consultations provide important information to help diagnose and manage these patients. However, few studies have analyzed dermatology inpatient consultations and their effect. We prospectively collected information for 691 consecutive dermatology consultations from November 2013 to November 2014. Patients ranged in age from newborns to 97 years old. The internal medicine service requested the most consultations (45%). Only 6.5% of consultations were requested within 24 hours of appearance of cutaneous findings. Before consultation, 70.3% of patients did not receive treatment for or based on their cutaneous findings. Dermatology consultation resulted in treatment change in 81.9% of patients. The most common diagnoses were drug rash and contact dermatitis. Biopsies confirmed 71.7% of the initial bedside diagnoses by the dermatology consultation team. Common skin diseases were responsible for the majority of dermatology consultations. Most patients were not treated for their cutaneous conditions before the dermatology consultation. Dermatology consultations resulted in treatment changes in the majority of cases. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  1. Quality of life, self-esteem and psychosocial factors in adolescents with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Gustavo Nunes; Santos, Laís Araújo dos; Sobral Filho, Jader Freire

    2015-01-01

    Dermatological diseases, among which acne vulgaris, have psychological impact on the affected generating feelings of guilt, shame and social isolation. To compare quality of life, self-esteem and other psychosocial variables amongst adolescents with and without acne vulgaris, and between levels of severity. Cross-sectional observational study in a sample of 355 high school students from the city of João Pessoa. Data collection was performed with questionnaires and clinical-dermatological evaluation. The primary variables were the incidence of AV; quality of life, set by the Children's Dermatology Quality of Life Index and Dermatology Quality of Life Index; and self-esteem, measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. For calculation of statistical tests, we used the SPSS 20.0 software, considering p=0.05. The sample, with an average age of 16, showed 89.3% prevalence of acne vulgaris. The most prevalent psychosocial issue was "afraid that acne will never cease", present in 58% of affected youth. The median score of Quality of Life in Children's Dermatology Index was different amongst students with and without acne vulgaris (p=0.003), as well as the Quality of Life in Dermatology (p=0.038) scores, so that students with acne vulgaris have worse QoL. There was a correlation between the severity of acne vulgaris and worse quality of life. Self-esteem was not significantly associated with the occurrence or severity of acne vulgaris. acne vulgaris assumes significance in view of its high prevalence and the effect on quality of life of adolescents, more severe at the more pronounced stages of disease (pacne vulgaris should be valued in the management of patients with this condition.

  2. Dermatology Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Store Welcome Calendar of Events Find a Dermatology DO Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm ... of Trustees Contact Us Ethics Foundation for Osteopathic Dermatology What is the FOD? Foundation Levels of Giving ...

  3. Dermatology Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Store Welcome Calendar of Events Find a Dermatology DO Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm ... of Trustees Contact Us Ethics Foundation for Osteopathic Dermatology What is the FOD? Foundation Levels of Giving ...

  4. Life quality index revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2004-01-01

    The derivation of the life quality index (LQI) is revisited for a revision. This revision takes into account the unpaid but necessary work time needed to stay alive in clean and healthy conditions to be fit for effective wealth producing work and to enjoyable free time. Dimension analysis...... at birth should not vary between countries. Finally the distributional assumptions are relaxed as compared to the assumptions made in an earlier work by the author. These assumptions concern the calculation of the life expectancy change due to the removal of an accident source. Moreover a simple public...... consistency problems with the standard power function expression of the LQI are pointed out. It is emphasized that the combination coefficient in the convex differential combination between the relative differential of the gross domestic product per capita and the relative differential of the expected life...

  5. Quality of Life in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norina Popovici

    2016-01-01

    Many times we wondered why people want a certain comfort in exchange for sacrifices on longterm: we want houses, cars, holidays, quality services. All our life we work and give up many tothings (maybe more important than achieving material benefits. It's about quality of life. In thispaper we analyzed the quality of life in Europe addressing several factors, such as subjective wellbeing,living standards and material constraints, work-life balance, family life and social life,health and education.

  6. Current Quality-of-Life Tools Available for Use in Contact Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietlik, Jacquelyn; Reeder, Margo

    2016-01-01

    Contact dermatitis is a common dermatologic condition that can cause significant impairment in patients' overall quality of life (QoL). This impact is separate and potentially more clinically relevant than one's disease "severity" in contact dermatitis and should be consistently addressed by dermatologists. Despite this, QoL tools specific to contact dermatitis are lacking, and there is little consistency in the literature regarding the tool used to evaluate clinical response to therapies. Measurements currently available to evaluate disease-related QoL in contact dermatitis fit into 1 of the following 3 general types: generic health-related QoL measures, dermatology-related QoL measures, or specific dermatologic disease-related QoL measures. This article reviews the strengths and weaknesses of existing QoL tools used in contact dermatitis including: Short Form Survey 36, Dermatology Life Quality Index, Skindex-29, Skindex-16, Dermatology-Specific Quality of Life, and Fragrance Quality of Life Index.

  7. Quality of life and maladjustment associated with hair loss in women with alopecia androgenetica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van der Donk (J.); J.A.M. Hunfeld (Joke); J. Passchier (Jan); K.J. Knegt-Junk (K.); C. Nieboer (C.)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractQuality of life and maladjustment related to hair loss were studied by means of a standardized interview in a group of 58 women with alopecia androgenetica who applied for treatment at the Department of Dermatology. The hair loss was found to have a negative influence on the quality of

  8. Loss of Work Productivity and Quality of Life in Patients With Autoimmune Bullous Dermatoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan, K; Hitzig, S L; Knowles, S; Drucker, A M; Mittmann, N; Walsh, S; Shear, N H

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about quality of life and work productivity in autoimmune bullous dermatoses (AIBDs). To determine the impact of AIBDs on quality of life and work productivity. An observational cross-sectional study took place between February and May 2013 at an AIBD tertiary referral centre. Ninety-four patients were included. All participants completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment-Specific Health Problem questionnaires. Responders to treatment had less impairment (Pwork missed. Those with a higher Dermatology Life Quality Index score had greater work impairment and overall activity impairment (P=.041, P=.024). Nonresponders had increased impairment while working (Pwork impairment (PWork Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire domains. AIBD has the potential to be a large burden on ability to work and quality of life. Larger studies are needed to clarify how these domains change over time and whether or not they improve with treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Chronic disease influences over 40 major life-changing decisions (MLCDs): a qualitative study in dermatology and general medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Z U; Finlay, A Y; Bolton, C E; George, L; Halcox, J P; Jones, S M; Ketchell, R I; Moore, R H; Salek, M S

    2014-10-01

    Chronic disease not only impairs patients' psycho-social well-being but also influences major life-changing decisions (MLCDs). There is little information about the types of MLCDs affected and the long-term consequences. The aims were to identify the MLCDs influenced by chronic disease, to define 'MLCD' and to suggest support strategies for patients taking MLCDs. Adult dermatology patients explained how their chronic disease had influenced MLCDs in individual interviews. Adult patients from other medical specialities gave similar information by postal survey. NVivo8 software was used for qualitative analysis of data. Themes were categorized through a coding-recoding iterative process. There were 308 evaluable responses (male 55.2%; mean age = 51.8 years, mean disease duration = 19 years) from the 365 (55.7%) responses to the 655 patient invitations. These were used to generate themes to conceptualize 'MLCDs'. The most frequently reported MLCDs in the dermatology interviews concerned career choice (66%), job (58%), choice of clothing (54%), relationships (52%), education (44%), stopping swimming (34%), moving abroad (32%), not socializing (34%), wearing make-up (22%) and having children (22%). In the postal survey early retirement (40.6%), impact on job (29.4%), having children (24.8%), career choice (22.4%) and relationships (15.5%) were most commonly reported. The number of MLCDs reported by individuals was inversely related to age. Forty-one affected MLCD themes were grouped into 18 MLCD categories. A definition of MLCD was developed and strategies suggested to support patients. Chronic diseases influence a wide range of MLCDs. MLCDs are a novel domain in disease burden assessment. Clinicians' knowledge about this is important in patient management. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  10. Quality of life in lepromatous leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Demir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae bacillus affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system. Leprosy can lead to severe deformities depending on the extent of the disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the quality of life of patients with lepromatous leprosy. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients with lepromatous leprosy and 35 healthy controls were included in the study. The patients were evaluated with the Turkish version of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. The relationship of quality of life with age, gender, marital status, and the grade of the visual impairment was studied and compared with the healthy controls. Results: Total and all the subgroup DLQI scores were higher in the leprosy group than in the control group (p<0.05. The patients with grade 2 visual impairment were more severely affected by the disease with regard to symptoms/feelings and school/work life as compared to the patients with grade 1 visual impairment (p=0.04, p=0.03, respectively. SF-36 physical functioning, physical role functioning, general health perceptions, vitality, social role functioning, and emotional role functioning scores were statistically lower in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: We observed that DLQI scores were lower in patients with lepromatous leprosy than in the control group, while increasing impairment in eyes was found to have a negative impact on quality of life. The SF-36 revealed that physical functioning, physical role functioning, general health perceptions, vitality, social role functioning, emotional role functioning, and mental health were negatively influenced in patients with lepromatous leprosy.

  11. The Quality of Life and Depressive Mood among Korean Patients with Hand Eczema

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Mi; Han, Tae Young; Lee, June Hyunkyung; Son, Sook-Ja

    2012-01-01

    Background Hand eczema is a disease frequently observed in dermatological practice. This condition has negative emotional, social, and psychological effects due to its impact on daily life and morphological appearance. Due to its considerable effect on the quality of life, this disease can lead to depression. However, not many studies have been performed on the quality of life and depression in hand eczema patients. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between...

  12. Energy and quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasten, Cesar; Santamarina, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Energy is required to sustain life. A human-centered analysis of the worldwide energy situation is conducted in terms of quality of life-related variables that are affected, but not directly determined, by energy consumption. Data since 1980 show a continuous global increase in both energy consumption and quality of life, and lower population growth in countries with higher quality of life. Based on these trends, we advance non-linear energy consumption predictions and identify various plausible scenarios to optimally steer future energy demands, in order to maximize quality of life. The scenarios consider the coupling between energy consumption rate per capita, quality of life, population growth, social inequality, and governments’ energy-for-life efficiency. The results show the energy cost of increasing quality of life in the developing world, energy savings that can be realized by limiting overconsumption without impacting quality of life, and the role of governments on increasing energy-for-life efficiency and reducing social inequality. - Highlights: ► Energy consumption is inherently coupled to quality of life and population growth. ► Limiting overconsumption can keep 2040 energy consumption at 2010 levels. ► Restricting population growth has a minor effect on future energy demand. ► Social inequality reduction increases quality of life with a minor energy use. ► Increasing energy-for-life efficiency can keep 2040 energy use at 2010 levels.

  13. Evaluating PRISM (Pictorial Representation of Illness and Self Measure) as a measure of life quality for children with skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melbardis Jørgensen, K.; Jemec, G.B.E.

    2011-01-01

    of age-dependant cognitive development on children's self-reported QoL. Methods and materials: A total of 43 children of both sexes aged 5-16, with a diagnosed dermatologic disease were asked to complete both PRISM and CDLQI. Children with a mental handicap, children who did not speak Danish or who were......Background: Changes in Quality of Life (QoL) are increasingly being used as an outcome measure in dermatology. For pediatric dermatology this poses special problems due to the natural cognitive development of the patients. QoL is mostly assessed using questionnaires. The use of a non......-verbal instrument may therefore be of particular relevance to pediatric patients. Purpose: To evaluate PRISM (Pictorial Representation of Illness and Self Measure) as a non-verbal measure of QoL for children with skin diseases compared to CDLQI (Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index) and the possible influence...

  14. Dermatology case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mota

    2017-07-01

    In the present case, the patient was referred to the dermatology department due to an atypical lesion with an uncommon location, revealing the importance of a whole body examination in patients with this disease.

  15. Dermatology in Doximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-02-17

    Doximity, currently the largest online social networking service for United States (US) health care professionals and medical students, provides a wide variety of content to a large audience. In fact, its database includes 1,078,305 physicians in the US. It is therefore important to evaluate this content from time to time. Our objective is to analyze both the residency rankings and news content presented in Doximity, with respect to dermatology. The study compared the residency rankings created by Doximity to another dermatology residency ranking system that used a different algorithm. In terms of dermatology content, seven dermatology-related search terms were entered into the Doximity search query and data was collected on the first 20 "relevant" articles. Our study evaluated a total of 140 articles. The search term "skin cancer" yielded the most articles totaling 6,001. Informative articles were the most common type of article for each content item searched except for "dermatology", yielding research articles as the most common content type (70%). The search term "melanoma awareness" had the largest number of shares (19,032). In comparing dermatology residency rankings on Doximity with another ranking system that accounted for scholarly achievement, there was 50% overlap. In conclusion, it is vital to evaluate content on social media websites that are utilized by US medical students and health care professionals. We hope this information presented provides an up-to-date analysis on the quality of one particular social media platform.

  16. Unwanted facial hair removal with laser treatment improves quality of life of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziar, Ali; Farsi, Nader; Mandegarfard, Manijeh; Babakoohi, Shahab; Gorouhi, Farzam; Dowlati, Yahya; Firooz, Alireza

    2010-02-01

    Unwanted facial hair can have adverse psychological effects on women and reduce their quality of life. To assess the effects of unwanted facial hair removal with laser on improving quality of life. In this study, 70 patients treated for unwanted facial hair by laser were assessed by Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire on admission and 3 months later after three sessions of laser treatment. The DLQI score before treatment was 9.42 +/- 5.99, which was reduced to 3.12 +/- 3.40 after laser treatment (p facial hair removal with laser can improve the quality of life of patients.

  17. Psychiatric morbidity and quality of life in vitiligo patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Podaralla; Rajni, Tenali

    2014-07-01

    Vitiligo has underlying mental illness but mostly not diagnosed and never used psychiatric medication. Hence, the problem persists affecting mostly the individual's quality of life. Assessing the quality of life, level of depression, and self-esteem of patients with vitiligo and give psychiatric medication for underlying mental illness. The study conducted at Owaisi Hospital Research Centre, Hyderabad. The patients registered for dermatologist consultation were also registered for consultation with psychiatrist to rule out any mental illness after detailed evaluation using standardized scales. Patients suffering with vitiligo had depression and low self-esteem; their quality of life was disturbed. The findings provide the role of Mental Health Professionals involved in the field of dermatology for the patients suffering with vitiligo.

  18. Quality of life and emotional state in chronic skin disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pärna, Ene; Aluoja, Anu; Kingo, Külli

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between chronic inflammatory skin conditions and patients' emotional state and quality of life. The following self-rated questionnaires were used: Emotional State Questionnaire, a self-report scale assessing depression and anxiety symptoms; Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI); and RAND-36, a measure of health-related quality of life. The study group comprised 40 patients with psoriasis, 40 with eczema, 40 with acne, 15 with seborrhoeic dermatitis and 40 healthy controls. Patients with chronic skin diseases had lower DLQI and lower RAND-36 physical functioning scores, more perceived physical limitations and pain, and lower emotional well-being and general health ratings compared with the control group. In conclusion, chronic skin diseases are associated with symptoms of emotional distress, in particular insomnia and general anxiety.

  19. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W

    2015-01-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis...

  20. A quality-of-life study of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalla, A; García-Doval, I; Peón, G; de la Torre, C

    2013-11-01

    The study of quality of life in patients with skin disorders has become more important in recent decades. In the case of lupus erythematosus, most quality-of-life studies have focused on the systemic form of the disease, with less attention being paid to the cutaneous form. The main objective of this study was to evaluate quality of life in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) using a dermatology-specific questionnaire: the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Our secondary objective was to investigate associations between DLQI scores and other aspects of the disease. Thirty-six patients with CLE completed the DLQI questionnaire. Other factors assessed were disease severity (measured using the Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Disease Area and Severity Index), time since diagnosis, body surface area affected, previous and current treatments, and the presence of criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). According to the DLQI, CLE had a moderate, very large, or extremely large effect on quality of life in 50% of the patients analyzed (18/36). No significant associations were found between DLQI scores and disease severity, time since diagnosis, body surface area affected, number, type, or duration of pharmacologic treatments, or the presence or absence of SLE criteria. CLE has a significant and lasting effect on patient quality of life. This effect is probably primarily due to multiple factors, including the chronic nature of the disease, the visibility of the lesions, and the fact that they can cause disfigurement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of Vitiligo on Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Sánchez, M A; Vargas-Salinas, M; Peralta-Pedrero, M L; Olguín-García, M G; Jurado-Santa Cruz, F

    2017-09-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic autoimmune skin disease caused by the destruction of melanocytes. Although quality of life (QOL) in vitiligo has been studied in different countries, it has not yet been investigated in Mexico. The aim of this study was to assess the QOL of Mexican patients with vitiligo. We conducted a cross-sectional study at the research unit of Centro Dermatológico Dr. Ladislao de la Pascua in Mexico City. We included adults with vitiligo and excluded those with other pigmentation disorders or a neurological or psychiatric disorder. Patients on psychoactive medications were also excluded. All the patients were administered the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), a vitiligo-specific quality of life instrument (the VitiQoL), and the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories. We studied 150 patients with vitiligo (103 women [68.7%] and 47 men [31.3%]). The median (interquartile range) age was 38 (20) years. The mean (SD) scores on the DLQI and VitiQoL were 5.2 (5.4) and 32.1 (22.7) out of total possible scores of 30 and 90, respectively. The correlation between questionnaire scores was 0.675 (P<.001). Patients with genital involvement scored significantly worse on the VitiQoL than those without lesions in this area (43.95 [28.4]) vs. 28.98 [20.08], P<.001). The prevalence of depression and anxiety was 34% and 60%, respectively. Vitiligo has a minimal impact on the QOL of our patients. QOL was worse in patients with genital lesions. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. The Quality of Working Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Ronald J.

    1979-01-01

    Defines the concept "quality of working life," why interest in this has increased, and why guidance counselors and students should understand it. Quality of working life means more than job satisfaction or flexible working hours. It helps guidance teachers understand attitudes and expectations of students embarking on their first job.…

  3. Dermatology case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Moreira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, with advances in the understanding of the disease, general improvement in health standards and nutrition, scurvy is now rarely encountered. Dermatologic signs may be the only manifestation and are often misdiagnosed. Awareness of manifestations and prompt diagnosis are essential because, with appropriate vitamin replacement, scurvy is readily treated. We report the case of an adolescent whose diagnosis of scurvy was based on the recognition of dietary risk factors, the presence of dermatologic manifestations and the rapid resolution of skin lesions when vitamin C supplements were initiated.

  4. Quality of Life of Parents of Children with Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Joanna; Reich, Adam; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2017-06-09

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic dermatitis in children. The influence of AD on quality of life of parents of children with AD was studied using the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI). Fifty children with AD were included in the study (age range 2-24 months) together with their parents. Children's AD was found to influence the quality of life of both parents; however, it had a more significant influence on quality of life of mothers than that of fathers (mean FDLQI: 17.1 ± 5.3 vs. 14.7 ± 5.8 points; p children's AD, mothers spent more time caring for them and carried out more household duties. Childhood AD had a greater impact on quality of life of fathers through influence on their work or education. The influence of AD on the quality of life of family members is significant, and this should be taken into account in the therapeutic process.

  5. Analysis of the Quality of Clinical Trials Published in Spanish-Language Dermatology Journals Between 1997 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclemente, G; Pardo, H; Sánchez, S; Bonfill, X

    2016-01-01

    The value of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) undertaken to identify an association between an intervention and an outcome is determined by their quality and scientific rigor. To assess the methodological quality of RCTs published in Spanish-language dermatology journals. By way of a systematic manual search, we identified all the RCTs in journals published in Spain and Latin America between 1997 (the year in which the CONSORT statement was published) and 2012. Risk of bias was evaluated for each RCT by assessing the following domains: randomization sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding of patients and those assessing outcomes, missing data, and patient follow-up. Source of funding and conflict of interest statements, if any, were recorded for each study. The search identified 70 RCTs published in 21 journals. Most of the RCTs had a high risk of bias, primarily because of gaps in the reporting of important methodological aspects. The source of funding was reported in only 15 studies. In spite of the considerable number of Spanish and Latin American journals, few RCTs have been published in the 15 years analyzed. Most of the RCTs published had serious defects in that the authors omitted methodological information essential to any evaluation of the quality of the trial and failed to report sources of funding or possible conflicts of interest for the authors involved. Authors of experimental clinical research in dermatology published in Spain and Latin America need to substantially improve both the design of their trials and the reporting of results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of quality of life in patients with post kalaazar dermal leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Biplab; Murti, Krishna; Siddiqui, Niyamat Ali; Das, Pradeep; Lal, Chandra Shekhar; Babu, Rajendra; Rastogi, Manoj Kumar; Pandey, Krishna

    2017-07-24

    Post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) is a dermatological disorder caused by protozoal parasite Leishmania donovani. PKDL cases are thought to be a reservoir of parasites and may increase cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The disease is not life threatening but cosmetic disfigurement associated with it may impair the patients' quality of life. This study aimed to assess the health related quality of life in patients with post kalaazar dermal leishmanasis for the first time. A total of 92 PKDL cases and 96 healthy participants filled out the questionnaires. The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and SF 36 questionnaire were used to assess the quality of life. Data on socio-demographic and clinical features were also collected. The collected data were analyzed by using SPSS software (version 16), Student's t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied for comparison of means. PKDL patients experienced very large impact on their quality of life. The mean score of DLQI was 11.41. Highest impact was found in symptoms and feelings and lowest impact was observed for personal relationship domain. Patients below 20 years age group found to have lower quality of life. There was a significant difference in mean DLQI scores with regard to age and severity of lesions (P  0.05). PKDL significantly impaired the patient's quality of life. Further studies to assess the impact of treatment on quality of life in these patients are recommended.

  7. Instruments to assess stigmatization in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimitre; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2017-11-03

    Stigmatization is the assignment of negative perceptions to an individual because of a perceived difference from the population at large. Skin conditions are frequently the reason of social rejection with a consequent negative influence on the personal and social life of patients. The aim of the current study was to review the available instruments that can be successfully utilized to measure the stigmatization level among dermatological patients. We performed our search on PubMed up to November 2016 and utilized combinations of key phrases containing such words as stigmatization, skin, dermatology, names of various skin conditions (psoriasis, vitiligo, acne, etc.), measurement. The search found a considerable number of articles - 548. After filtering them through a precise selection process, 58 articles remained. We concentrated only on the methodological aspects to assess stigmatization in various dermatoses. The review ascertained that there exist numerous instruments in the form of questionnaires. They were utilized in various researches in order to assess the stigmatization level in patients with skin problems. We divided them into two main groups: dermatology specific instruments (6 questionnaires) and dermatosis/disease specific ones (8 questionnaires). It is recommended to use dermatology-specific instruments to compare the stigmatization level in various skin conditions. They can be utilized as well as a first line tools to study the feeling of stigmatization in specific skin diseases; however, where it is possible, they should be supplemented with the disease-specific instrument for deeper analysis of both qualities of life and stigmatization.

  8. Steps towards single source--collecting data about quality of life within clinical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Fleur; Ständer, Sonja; Breil, Bernhard; Dugas, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Information about the quality of life from patients being treated in routine medical care is important for the attending physician. This data is also needed in research for example to evaluate the therapy and the course of the disease respectively. Especially skin diseases often negatively affect the quality of life. Therefore we aimed to design a concept to collect such data during treatment and use it for both medical care and research in the setting of dermatology. We performed a workflow analysis and implemented a designated form using the tools of the local clinical information system. Quality of life data is now collected within the clinical information system during treatment and is used for discharge letters, progress overviews as well as research about the treatment and course of disease. This concept which contributes to the single source approach was feasible within dermatology and is ready to be expanded into other domains.

  9. Association of Resilience With Depression and Health-Related Quality of Life for Patients With Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirby, Joslyn S; Butt, Melissa; Esmann, Solveig

    2017-01-01

    : To investigate the correlation among resilience, depression, and HRQOL for patients with HS. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional survey study of 154 patients from 2 referral centers in the United States and in Denmark was conducted from June 1, 2016, to March 31, 2017. Patients were......) the Dermatology Life Quality Index. The main outcome of interest was the HRQOL as measured by the Dermatology Life Quality Index. Results: All 154 patients submitted a completed survey. The mean (SD) age of the participants was 40.93 (13.5) years; most participants were women (130 [84.4%]), and most participants...

  10. The Reporting of Observational Research Studies in Dermatology Journals A Literature-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langan, Sinead; Schmitt, Jochen; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan; Svensson, Ake; von Elm, Erik; Williams, Hywel

    Objective: To assess the quality of reporting in observational studies in dermatology. Data Sources: Five dermatology journals-the Archives of Dermatology, the British Journal of Dermatology, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, and Acta

  11. Health and Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje; Lenk, Christian (ed.); Aumüller, Gerhard (ed.)

    How could one define health and disease? On what presuppositions, and oughtwe look for such definitions? Does quality of life inherit a subjective orobjective evaluation? Are health and quality of life culture dependentconcepts? Under the conditions of technologically advanced medicine...... and thecommon tendency towards a hedonistic lifestyle such questions come intofocus. Hence, one question is of special relevance: which role does healthplay in our quality of life? The contributions of this interdisciplinaryvolume aim at the clarification of the various concepts in use.Internationally well......-known scholars and scientists such as AlfredMusschenga, Alfons Labisch, Lennart Nordenfelt, Peter Janich, Henrik Wulffand several others outline the framework for a more comprehensive anddemanding concept of health and quality of life including philosophical andcultural aspects as well as medical...

  12. Cumulative life course impairment in other chronic or recurrent dermatologic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, Kristina S; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2013-01-01

    but massive psychosocial impairment in specific communities such as vitiligo, are all suitable for further studies. Life course studies are particularly suitable for skin diseases due to their often chronic recurrent course, low mortality and their psychosocial aspects. The development of a stronger empirical...

  13. Quality of Life in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Norina Popovici; Camelia Moraru

    2016-01-01

    Human behavior is based on certain causes related to the satisfaction of the unlimited needsthat we have. Nothing enters into the human consciousness if it is not driven by a particularinterest. Many times we wondered why people want a certain comfort in exchange for sacrifices on longterm: we want houses, cars, holidays, quality services. All our life we work and give up many tothings (maybe) more important than achieving material benefits. It's about quality of life. In thispaper we anal...

  14. Review of quality of life studies in women with alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Davis, MD, MS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alopecia is a dermatologic condition that affects the pilosebaceous unit in both men and women. In addition to a thorough medical history and physical examination, a host of diagnostic tools may be warranted to differentiate nonscarring and scarring alopecias. Female pattern hair loss represents the most common form of hair loss experienced by up to 40% of women by a certain age. Although alopecia is a benign disorder, even the most negligible amount of hair loss can be devastating to a patient’s self-esteem, self-image, and overall quality of life. We present this comprehensive review of quality of life studies in women with alopecia to describe the multitude of feelings and emotions associated with the disorder and remind dermatologists of the psychological impact it can have on women.

  15. Health-related quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimović, Nataša; Janković, Slavenka; Marinković, Jelena; Sekulović, Lidija K; Zivković, Zorica; Spirić, Vesna T

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing condition that can have considerable effects on the patients' quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study was to measure the health-related QOL in patients with AD, using generic and specific instruments, to compare the scores obtained by different instruments and to verify the relationship between them. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 132 outpatients with AD. To assess the QOL, Short Form 36 (SF-36), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) were administered. In order to assess the disease severity of AD, we used the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) and physician assessment of disease severity. Stressful life events during the last 12 months were assessed with Paykel's Interview for Recent Life Events. Patients with AD had inferior social functioning and mental health scores compared with the general population. The correlations between the DLQI and SF-36 were found for the mental components of the QOL. Increasing disease severity was associated with greater impairment in QOL in both, children and adults. Our study found the influence of the stressful life events on the role emotional of AD patients. These results demonstrate that AD influences health-related QOL, especially in children. This study supports the decision to use both generic and skin-specific instruments to assess the impact of AD on QOL. © 2011 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  16. The Quality of Life and Depressive Mood among Korean Patients with Hand Eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mi; Han, Tae Young; Lee, June Hyunkyung; Son, Sook-Ja

    2012-11-01

    Hand eczema is a disease frequently observed in dermatological practice. This condition has negative emotional, social, and psychological effects due to its impact on daily life and morphological appearance. Due to its considerable effect on the quality of life, this disease can lead to depression. However, not many studies have been performed on the quality of life and depression in hand eczema patients. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between the quality of life, depression, and disease severity in hand eczema patients in South Korea. A total of 138 patients with hand eczema participated in this study. The patients' quality of life was assessed by a self-administered questionnaire using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Data on patients suffering from depression was obtained using the Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II). The disease severity was determined during the clinical examination, according to the Hand Eczema Severity Index (HECSI). We found positive associations between DLQI and HECSI scores (peczema negatively affected the quality of life and mood of patients relative to the disease severity. Therefore, we suggest that quality of life modification and emotional support should be included as a part of treatment for hand eczema.

  17. Quality of life in Swedish children with congenital ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Gånemo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital ichthyosis encompasses a large group of keratinizing disorders with widespread scaling and a variable degree of erythema. Little is known about the quality of life in children with congenital ichthyosis and the impact of the disease on their family. Fifteen children aged 5-16 years with lamellar ichthyosis, Netherton’s syndrome, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis or Harlequin ichthyosis, were investigated concerning the effect of their ichthyosis on their quality of life. This was measured with the established Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI, and the Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire (DFI modified by substituting the word ichthyosis for eczema. The questionnaires covered the preceding seven days and each had a maximum score of 30: the higher the score, the greater the Quality of Life impairment. The median score was 9.0 (range 2-19 for the CDLQI and 9.0 (range 3-21 for DFI. There was a significant correlation between the DFI and the CDLQI scores. The item in the CDLQI questionnaire that showed the highest score was “itchy, scratchy, sore or painful skin” and the most highly scored item in the DFI questionnaire was effect on “housework, e.g. washing, cleaning”; both items related to the children’s symptoms. The results of the study clearly establish that congenital ichthyosis impairs the quality of life of the affected children and their families.

  18. Quality of life issues and measurement in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan X

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Xi Tan1, Steven R Feldman2, Rajesh Balkrishnan11Department of Clinical, Social and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USAAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic immunologic disease characterized by red papules and plaques with a silver colored scale. The impact of psoriasis on patients’ overall quality of life is significant, broad, and deep, including effects on emotional wellbeing, psychological stress, self-esteem, relationship, work, social activities, financial burden, and even physical function. Although there are various measures available for assessing health-related quality of life (HRQoL in research studies, there is no consensus on which measure is best to use in clinical practice or for research comparing different treatments. Choosing treatments based on patients’ specific individual preferences, goal-orientation, and close, attentive cooperation between patients and their doctors may be an effective strategy that can be applied to improve patients’ quality of life.Keywords: treatment, health related quality of life, HRQoL

  19. Can laser treatment improve quality of life of hirsute women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alizadeh N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Narges Alizadeh,1 Sharad Ayyoubi,2 Mohammadreza Naghipour,3 Rasool Hassanzadeh,2 Zahra Mohtasham-Amiri,3 Shirin Zaresharifi,4 Kaveh Gharaei Nejad1 1Dermatology Department, School of Medicine, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, 2General Practice, School of Medicine, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, 3Community Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, 4General Practitioner, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Background: Hirsutism can have negative impacts on psychosocial aspects of women’s lives and reduce their quality of life (QOL. The aim of this study was to assess the QOL of these women during laser treatment. Patients and methods: Eighty-eight women with unwanted facial hair underwent laser therapy. Each patient completed a questionnaire consisting of a modified Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and visual analog scale (VAS before the first, third, and fifth sessions of laser therapy. Interval between the sessions was 4–6 weeks. Statistical analyses were done using SPSS software version18. Results: The DLQI scores before treatment, and at third and fifth sessions were 7.75±2.36, 5.55±1.88, and 4.14±0.64, respectively (P<0.0001. Also, VAS scores had a decreasing trend between the first and second treatment sessions as the mean patient VAS score fell from 10±0.04 to 5.53±2.41 (P<0.0001. The DLQI scores were significantly different according to areas of hair growth and number of involved areas. There were no significant differences with regard to response to treatment and mean of DLQI score according to the level of education, marital status, and employment status. Conclusion: Hair removal with laser therapy can improve the QOL in hirsute women. Also, socioeconomic status does not affect the satisfaction rate of laser therapy for hair removal. Keywords: hirsutism, laser, quality of life, satisfaction, psychosocial

  20. The use of quality benchmarking in assessing web resources for the dermatology virtual branch library of the National electronic Library for Health (NeLH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel Boulos, M N; Roudsari, A V; Gordon, C; Muir Gray, J A

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, the U.K. National Health Service Information for Health Strategy proposed the implementation of a National electronic Library for Health to provide clinicians, healthcare managers and planners, patients and the public with easy, round the clock access to high quality, up-to-date electronic information on health and healthcare. The Virtual Branch Libraries are among the most important components of the National electronic Library for Health. They aim at creating online knowledge based communities, each concerned with some specific clinical and other health-related topics. This study is about the envisaged Dermatology Virtual Branch Libraries of the National electronic Library for Health. It aims at selecting suitable dermatology Web resources for inclusion in the forthcoming Virtual Branch Libraries after establishing preliminary quality benchmarking rules for this task. Psoriasis, being a common dermatological condition, has been chosen as a starting point. Because quality is a principal concern of the National electronic Library for Health, the study includes a review of the major quality benchmarking systems available today for assessing health-related Web sites. The methodology of developing a quality benchmarking system has been also reviewed. Aided by metasearch Web tools, candidate resources were hand-selected in light of the reviewed benchmarking systems and specific criteria set by the authors. Over 90 professional and patient-oriented Web resources on psoriasis and dermatology in general are suggested for inclusion in the forthcoming Dermatology Virtual Branch Libraries. The idea of an all-in knowledge-hallmarking instrument for the National electronic Library for Health is also proposed based on the reviewed quality benchmarking systems. Skilled, methodical, organized human reviewing, selection and filtering based on well-defined quality appraisal criteria seems likely to be the key ingredient in the envisaged National electronic Library for

  1. Geographical conceptualization of quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murgaš František

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The conceptualization of quality of life in terms of geography is based on two assumptions. The first assumption is that the quality of life consists of two dimensions: subjective and objective. The subjective is known as ‘well-being’, while the objective is the proposed term ‘quality of place’. The second assumption is based on the recognition that quality of life is always a spatial dimension. The concept of quality of life is closely linked with the concept of a good life; geographers enriched this concept by using the term ‘good place’ as a place in which the conditions are created for a good life. The quality of life for individuals in terms of a good place overlaps with the quality of life in society, namely the societal quality of life. The geographical conceptualisation of quality of life is applied to settlements within the city of Liberec.

  2. Asthma Outcomes: Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sandra R.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Cabana, Michael D.; Foggs, Michael B.; Halterman, Jill S.; Olson, Lynn; Vollmer, William M.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Taggart, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Background “Asthma-related quality of life” refers to the perceived impact that asthma has on the patient’s quality of life. Objective National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies convened an expert group to recommend standardized measures of the impact of asthma on quality of life for use in future asthma clinical research. Methods We reviewed published documentation regarding the development and psychometric evaluation; clinical research use since 2000; and extent to which the content of each existing quality of life instrument provides a unique, reliable, and valid assessment of the intended construct. We classified instruments as core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to the study’s aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop convened in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Eleven instruments for adults and 6 for children were identified for review. None qualified as core instruments because they predominantly measured indicators of asthma control (symptoms and/or functional status); failed to provide a distinct, reliable score measuring all key dimensions of the intended construct; and/or lacked adequate psychometric data. Conclusions In the absence of existing instruments that meet the stated criteria, currently available instruments are classified as either supplemental or emerging. Research is strongly recommended to develop and evaluate instruments that provide a distinct, reliable measure of the patient’s perception of the impact of asthma on all of the key dimensions of quality of life, an important outcome that is not captured in other outcome measures. PMID:22386511

  3. Body image and quality of life in a Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui Lobera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui Lobera1, Patricia Bolaños Ríos21Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain; 2Behavior Science Institute, Seville, SpainPurpose: The aim of the current study was to analyze the psychometric properties, factor structure, and internal consistency of the Spanish version of the Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI-SP as well as its test–retest reliability. Further objectives were to analyze different relationships with key dimensions of psychosocial functioning (ie, self-esteem, presence of psychopathological symptoms, eating and body image-related problems, and perceived stress and to evaluate differences in body image quality of life due to gender.Patients and methods: The sample comprised 417 students without any psychiatric history, recruited from the Pablo de Olavide University and the University of Seville. There were 140 men (33.57% and 277 women (66.43%, and the mean age was 21.62 years (standard deviation = 5.12. After obtaining informed consent from all participants, the following questionnaires were administered: BIQLI, Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2, Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ, Self-Esteem Scale (SES, and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R.Results: The BIQLI-SP shows adequate psychometric properties, and it may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different physical conditions. A more positive body image quality of life is associated with better self-esteem, better psychological wellbeing, and fewer eating-related dysfunctional attitudes, this being more evident among women.Conclusion: The BIQLI-SP may be useful to determine the body image quality of life in different contexts with regard to dermatology, cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, and endocrinology, among others. In these fields of study, a new trend has emerged to assess body image-related quality of life.Keywords: body appreciation, wellbeing, self-esteem, social

  4. Quality of life and psychosocial aspects in Greek patients with psoriasis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Christodoulou, Christos; Stefanaki, Christina; Livaditis, Miltiadis; Tsatovidou, Revekka; Kouskoukis, Constantinos; Petridis, Athanasios; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common, long-term skin disease associated with high levels of psychological distress and a considerable adverse impact on life. The effects of psoriasis, beyond skin affliction, are seldom recognized and often undertreated. The aim of the study is to evaluate the quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem and loneliness in patients with psoriasis. Eighty-four patients with psoriasis were enrolled in the study. The quality of life, depression and anxiety, loneliness and self-esteem of the patient were assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the UCLA loneliness Scale (UCLA-Version 3) and Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale, respectively. The Dermatology Quality of Life Index score among psoriasis patients was 12.61 ± 4.88. They had statistically significantly higher scores according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale -anxiety subscale (p=0.032)-compared with healthy volunteers. Moreover, a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the UCLA-scale (p=0.033) and RSES-scale (pself-esteem than male patients. Psoriasis is a distressing, recurrent disorder that significantly impairs quality of life. Therefore, the recognition and future management of psoriasis may require the involvement of multi-disciplinary teams to manage the physical, psychological and social aspects of the condition, as is the case for systemic, long-term conditions.

  5. Soldier Quality of Life Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    SUSTAINMENT LOGISTICS EMOTIONS QUALITY OF LIFE MENTAL READINESS FUEL DEMAND REDUCTION FEEDBACK ARMY PERSONNEL ARMY...QoL as a measure of how well a given camp supports the physical and mental (to include the cognitive, social, and emotional dimensions) readiness of...housing fewer than 1,000 personnel. Larger FOBs have significantly more capabilities (e.g., food courts with contractor-prepared, name brand fast foods

  6. Quality of life philosophy I. Quality of life, happiness, and meaning in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2003-12-01

    In the Danish Quality of Life Survey, we asked 10,000 people about their quality of life with the validated SEQOL questionnaire with more than 300 questions on their quality of life. How did they feel? How content were they with their lives? How happy were they? Did they feel their needs were fulfilled? And many more questions. We asked the questions we believed to be important for their quality of life (QOL). The results were quite surprising and forced us to recontemplate the following philosophical questions: What is quality of life, happiness, and meaning in life? What is a human being? Do we need a new biology? Is the brain the seat of consciousness? How do we seize the meaning of life and by doing so, will we become well again? What are the key concepts of quality of life? The meaning of life is connectedness and development. It is about realizing every opportunity and potential in one"s existence. The opportunities must be found and acknowledged. What do you find when you find yourself deep down? You find your real self and your purpose in life. You realize that you are already a part of a larger totality. Antonovsky called it "coherence". Maslow called it "transcendence". Frankl called it "meaning of life". We call it simply "being". To test if these philosophical questions are actually relevant for medicine, we looked at the consequences for patients being taught the quality of life philosophy. Quite surprisingly we learned from our pilot studies with "quality of life as medicine" that just by assimilating the basic concepts of the quality of life philosophy presented in this series of papers, patients felt better and saw their lives as more meaningful. The improvement of the patient"s personal philosophy of life seems to be the essence of holistic medicine, helping the patient to assume more responsibility for his or her own existence.

  7. General quality of life of patients with acne vulgaris before and after performing selected cosmetological treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilicka, Karolina; Maj, Joanna; Panaszek, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background Achieving a satisfying quality of life for a patient by applying individually matched therapy is, simultaneously, a great challenge and a priority for contemporary medicine. Patients with visible dermatological ailments are particularly susceptible to reduction in the general quality of life. Among the dermatological diseases, acne causes considerable reduction in the quality of life and changes in self-perception that lead to the worsening of a patient’s mental condition, including depression and suicidal thoughts. As a result, difficulties in contact with loved ones, as well as social and professional problems are observed, which show that acne is not a somatic problem alone. To a large extent, it becomes a part of psychodermatology, becoming an important topic of public health in social medicine practice. Pharmacological treatment of acne is a challenge for a dermatologist and often requires the necessity of cooperating with a cosmetologist. Cosmetological treatments are aimed at improving the condition of the skin and reduction or subsiding of acne skin changes. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the influence of selected cosmetological treatments on the general quality of life of patients with acne. Materials and methods The study group consisted of 101 women aged 19–29 years (x¯=22.5 years, SD =2.3 years). All subjects were diagnosed with acne vulgaris of the face. In the study group, the acne changes occurred over the course of 3–15 years (x¯=8.1 years, SD =2.7 years). Selected cosmetological treatments (intensive pulsing light, alpha-hydroxy acids, cavitation peeling, needle-free mesotherapy, diamond microdermabrasion and sonophoresis) were performed in series in the number depending on the particular patient’s chosen treatment, after excluding contraindications. General quality of life of the patients was estimated using the Skindex-29 and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaires, before and after the cosmetological

  8. Disease activity in and quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, U; Gudbjornsson, B; Iversen, L.

    2017-01-01

    capacity with little or no ability to perform self-care or everyday tasks was reported by 21% of the patients. Patients between 45 and 60 years of age reported the most impaired quality of life in comparison to the control group. Conclusion: PAM seriously affects social functioning. Whether early......-assessed disease activity, and patient’s education and work status were recorded. Data from the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, Health Assessment Questionnaire and Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire were gathered and correlated with disease duration, pain, and general well-being (visual analogue scale...

  9. Quality of Life Philosophy I. Quality of Life, Happiness, and Meaning in Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Danish Quality of Life Survey, we asked 10,000 people about their quality of life with the validated SEQOL questionnaire with more than 300 questions on their quality of life. How did they feel? How content were they with their lives? How happy were they? Did they feel their needs were fulfilled? And many more questions. We asked the questions we believed to be important for their quality of life (QOL. The results were quite surprising and forced us to recontemplate the following philosophical questions: What is quality of life, happiness, and meaning in life? What is a human being? Do we need a new biology? Is the brain the seat of consciousness? How do we seize the meaning of life and by doing so, will we become well again? What are the key concepts of quality of life? The meaning of life is connectedness and development. It is about realizing every opportunity and potential in one’s existence. The opportunities must be found and acknowledged. What do you find when you find yourself deep down? You find your real self and your purpose in life. You realize that you are already a part of a larger totality. Antonovsky called it “coherence”. Maslow called it “transcendence”. Frankl called it “meaning of life”. We call it simply “being”.To test if these philosophical questions are actually relevant for medicine, we looked at the consequences for patients being taught the quality of life philosophy. Quite surprisingly we learned from our pilot studies with “quality of life as medicine” that just by assimilating the basic concepts of the quality of life philosophy presented in this series of papers, patients felt better and saw their lives as more meaningful. The improvement of the patient’s personal philosophy of life seems to be the essence of holistic medicine, helping the patient to assume more responsibility for his or her own existence.

  10. Aerospace dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Arora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  11. Aerospace Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionarily, man is a terrestrial mammal, adapted to land. Aviation and now space/microgravity environment, hence, pose new challenges to our physiology. Exposure to these changes affects the human body in acute and chronic settings. Since skin reflects our mental and physical well-being, any change/side effects of this environment shall be detected on the skin. Aerospace industry offers a unique environment with a blend of all possible occupational disorders, encompassing all systems of the body, particularly the skin. Aerospace dermatologists in the near future shall be called upon for their expertise as we continue to push human physiological boundaries with faster and more powerful military aircraft and look to colonize space stations and other planets. Microgravity living shall push dermatology into its next big leap-space, the final frontier. This article discusses the physiological effects of this environment on skin, effect of common dermatoses in aerospace environment, effect of microgravity on skin, and occupational hazards of this industry.

  12. Life quality assessment among patients with atopic eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, E A; Wulf, H C; Stegmann, H; Jemec, G B E

    2006-04-01

    Quantification of quality of life (QoL) related to disease severity is important in patients with atopic eczema (AE), because the assessment provides additional information to the traditional objective clinical scoring systems. To measure health-related QoL (HRQoL) in patients with AE; to analyse discriminant, divergent and convergent validity by examining the association between various QoL methods; and to examine the association between disease severity assessed by an objective Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) and QoL. HRQoL was assessed at two visits at a 6-monthly interval in 101 patients with AE and 30 controls with one dermatology-specific questionnaire [Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) or Children's DLQI (CDLQI)], one generic instrument (SF-36) and three visual analogue scales (VASs) of severity and pruritus. Objective SCORAD was used to measure disease severity. Patients with AE had significantly lower QoL than healthy controls and the general population. DLQI /CDLQI, pruritus, and patient and investigator overall assessment of eczema severity were significantly (P mental component score of SF-36 (P = 0.019). AE has an impact on HRQoL. Patients' mental health, social functioning and role emotional functioning seem to be more affected than physical functioning. A simple VAS score of patients' assessment of disease severity showed the highest and most significant correlations with most of the HRQoL methods used. There is evidence to support the ability of patients with AE to make an accurate determination of their disease severity and QoL.

  13. Quality-of-life in technological society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractABSTRACT Effects of technology on the quality of human life can be assessed by comparing quality of life in more and in less modern societies. The quality of life in a society can be measured by how long and happy its inhabitants live. Using these indicators I start with a

  14. Clinical profile and impact on quality of life: Seven years experience with patients of alopecia areata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf Al-Mutairi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alopecia areata (AA is the most common cause of localized, non-scarring alopecia. Stress and other psychological factors have been implicated in the causation of the disease, and it is also found to alter the course of the disease process. Unfortunately no one has studied the impact of AA on the quality of life, which includes the social life of the patients. Aim: To study the clinical profile and impact of alopecia areata on the quality of life, including the social life of adult patients with severe forms of the disease. Methods: The present study determined the clinical pattern of AA and its impact on the quality of life (QOL in all the patients with severe forms of alopecia areata attending the Dermatology Outpatient Department. Results: The male : female ratio was 1.86 : 1. Most (58.03% of the patients were between 21 and 40 years of age. Almost 40% of the patients had associated systemic disease or other dermatological disorders. A family history of AA was found in 593 (20.02% of the patients. Nail changes were observed in 297 (10% of the patients. There were significant differences between the mean Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI score in cases with severe forms of AA and controls ( p0 < 0.001. Conclusions: Severe forms of alopecia areata had a major impact on the psychosocial well-being of the patients. These individuals had to be treated early, and they required more than just prescription drugs. Educational and psychological support in addition to medical therapy for AA could improve their long-term physical outcomes.

  15. Improving the quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyono, H

    1993-12-01

    It is encouraging that most developing countries now have population policies, but it is discouraging that some countries have been unable to implement their policies. Therefore, Indonesia believes technical cooperation should be strengthened among developing countries. International cooperation is working in 108 developing countries, but the desired impact has yet to be reached, and the quality of life in many countries is still unacceptable. For example, life expectancy at birth in developing countries is 14-17 years shorter for females and 10-13 years shorter for males as compared to developed countries which have superior health and welfare systems. The speed of population growth is also hindering efforts to help improve living conditions, and the biggest increase in growth will occur in Asia and Africa. This will increase the numbers of poor, hungry, and illiterate in developing countries and will lead to a lack of arable land, deterioration in education, and increase in unsafe sanitation. In order to slow population growth, quality family planning (FP) services must be provided to those who want them. By the year 2000, developed countries and donors should be ready to provide half of the required US$10.5 billion to FP services in developing countries. In Indonesia, population programs and policies have been governed by the National FP Coordinating Board as well as by the State Ministry for Population and the Environment, which was divided into two ministries in 1993 in order to deal with the enormity and seriousness of the two issues.

  16. APPROACHES TO QUALITY OF LIFE ANALYSISQUANTICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa E. Danilina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews different approaches to quality of life measurement used in Russian and international statistics. It outlines the essence of J. Stiglitz’s recommendations on development of quality of life statistical indicators, analyses proposals and practical application of innovative approaches of quality of life measurement by the French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE. The paper reviews Rosstat’s (Russian Federal State Statistics Service new research as well as an independent research in the area of quality of life research. The authors make proposals to extend the list of aspects analyzed an quality of life research and underline the importance of such a review through regional specifics. They suggest extending the system of quality of life statistical indicators by certain coefficients characterizing economic development disparity and its influence on the quality of life.

  17. Family Life Quality and Emotional Quality of Life in Chinese Adolescents with and without Economic Disadvantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Lee, T. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Chinese secondary school students (N = 2758) responded to measures of perceived family life quality (parenting quality and parent-child relational quality) and emotional quality of life (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem). Parenting quality included different aspects of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge,…

  18. Impact of Avène hydrotherapy on the quality of life of atopic and psoriatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, C; Sibaud, V; Merial-Kieny, C

    2011-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis engender a significant deterioration in patients' quality of life. Although the efficacy of patient management at the Avène hydrotherapy centre has been demonstrated by clinical studies, few data relating to changes in the quality of life following therapeutic management are available. The objective of this study was to evaluate the short- and medium-term effects of hydrotherapy not only on the patients' quality of life, but also on the quality of life of the parents of the treated children. In this 6-month longitudinal observational study, adult (n = 174) and paediatric (n = 212) atopic patients and psoriatic patients (n = 262) had to complete questionnaires relating to the quality of life at the beginning (D0) and after 3 weeks hydrotherapy (W3), and then, 3 (M3) and 6 months (M6) later. The dermatology life quality index (DLQI) and the Short-Form-12 Health Survey (SF-12) generic questionnaire were given to adult patients. The children's dermatological life quality index (CDLQI) was given to paediatric patients, and the SF-12 to their parents. At D0, the DLQI score was 29.7 ± 20.1 and 26.9 ± 18.9 for atopic and psoriatic patients, respectively. At W3, this score had decreased significantly to reach 16.8 ± 14.9 (P hydrotherapy centre significantly improved the quality of life of patients suffering from skin diseases. This improvement persisted 3 and 6 months after management by hydrotherapy. © 2010 The Authors. JEADV © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. Validation of a quality-of-life instrument for patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, John S; Matthews, B Alex; Neuburg, Marcy; Logan, Brent R; Burzynski, Mary; Nattinger, Ann B

    2006-01-01

    To validate a disease-specific quality-of-life instrument--the Skin Cancer Index--intended to measure quality-of-life issues relevant to patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer. Internal reliability, convergent and divergent validity with existing scales, and factor analyses were performed in a cross-sectional study of 211 patients presenting with cervicofacial nonmelanoma skin cancer to a dermatologic surgery clinic. Factor analyses of the Skin Cancer Index confirmed a multidimensional scale with 3 distinct subscales-emotional, social, and appearance. Excellent internal validity of the 3 subscales was demonstrated. Substantial evidence was observed for convergent validity with the Dermatology Life Quality Index, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Lerman's Cancer Worry Scale, and Medical Outcomes Survey Short-Form 12 domains for vitality, emotion, social function, and mental health. These findings validate a new disease-specific quality-of-life instrument for patients with cervicofacial nonmelanoma skin cancer. Studies on the responsiveness of the Skin Cancer Index to clinical intervention are currently under way.

  20. Consumer Empowerment in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Heather E.; Busse, Kristine L.; Dellavalle, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Health care consumers increasingly confront and collaborate with their medical providers. We describe consumer success in other medical fields and in dermatology, especially dermatologic disease advocacy and improving dermatologist-patient interactions. PMID:19254661

  1. Quality of life and severity of skin changes in the dynamics of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Owczarek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease with periods of recurrence and remission. The skin changes which are typical of this disease can have a considerable effect on the patient’s psychological state, self-esteem and body image. It can also affect the patient’s functioning in all areas of life and quality of life. Aim : The present study characterized the patient needs to improve the quality of life in specified areas in patients depending on the severity of psoriatic changes. Material and methods: The study was conducted in two stages on 100 patients aged from 18 to 66. A dermatological examination was conducted in stage one. Patients’ dermatological condition was assessed with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI. Clinical and socio-economic information was collected in stage two using a questionnaire, a medical interview and a standardized questionnaire measuring quality of life, the WHOQOL-BREF. Results: The following factors had the greatest effect on the general quality of life and quality of health ratings in the studied sample: severity of psoriatic changes, duration of the most recent recurrence and sex. Severity of psoriatic changes had a negative effect on the patient’s somatic, psychological, environmental and social functioning. Duration of the most recent recurrence had a negative effect on social functioning. Practical implications of this study allow dermatologists to determine the appropriate therapeutic intervention which improves the quality of life of these patients on the one hand, and will increase patient’s involvement in the process of treatment on the other hand. Conclusions : Quality of life is more impaired by more severe chronic skin disease.

  2. Dermatology on Snapchat

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Ravi R; Yazd, N Kuseh Kalani; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2017-01-01

    Launched in 2011, Snapchat is one of the newest social media platforms with over 158 million active daily users. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Snapchat. We searched for Snapchat accounts for the top ten most popular dermatology journals, professional dermatological organizations, and dermatology-related patient advocate groups on social media. None of the above-mentioned entities were found on Snapchat. Plastic surgeons were found to primarily utilize ...

  3. Measuring impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps section on training in US dermatology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Kristina M; Stratman, Erik J

    2013-07-01

    JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries are intended to aid in the interpretation of the literature to make it more practical and applicable to daily patient care. Practice Gaps commentaries have had an impact on physician clinical practice and dermatology residency curricula. To assess the impact of JAMA Dermatology Practice Gaps commentaries on dermatology residency training programs in the United States, including journal club discussions and local quality improvement activities. A web-based questionnaire of 17 questions was sent via e-mail to US dermatology residency program directors (PDs) in February 2012. Program director report of incorporating Practice Gaps themes and discussions into resident journal club activities, clinical practice, quality improvement activities, or research projects in the residency programs, as a result of a Practice Gaps commentary. Of the 114 surveys distributed to US dermatology residency PDs, 48 were completed (42% response rate). Sixty percent of PDs reported familiarity with the Practice Gaps section of JAMA Dermatology, and 56% discuss these commentaries during resident journal club activities. Quality improvement and research projects have been initiated as a result of Practice Gaps commentaries. Practice Gaps commentaries are discussed during most dermatology residency journal club activities. Practice Gaps have had an impact on physician practice and dermatology residency curricula and can serve as a tool for enhanced continuing medical education and quality improvement initiatives.

  4. QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG ADOLESCENTS WITH ACNE IN A TERTIARY REFERRAL CENTRE IN BANGALORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belliappa Pemmanda Raju

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acne is a common problem in adolescent children and has a considerable impact on their quality of life. AIMS The impact of acne on quality of life (QoL in Indian adolescent patients remains undocumented. The study was undertaken to detect the impact of acne vulgaris in adolescents on the QoL using 2 questionnaires: The Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI and the Cardiff Acne Disability Index (CADI. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a hospital-based, prospective, cross-sectional, pre-structured, questionnaire-based study done on 140 consenting individuals, who attended the Acne Clinic of our Dermatology Outpatient Department. Acne vulgaris was graded using simple grading system. QoL was measured using a combination of skin disease-specific (Children’s Dermatological Life Quality Index (CDLQI and acne-specific (Cardiff Acne Disability Index (CADI questionnaires. RESULTS The study population included 140 cases with a female to male ratio of 1.5:1. Comedones (123, 87.9% were the most common type of lesion. Grade I acne was the most common clinical type (76.4%. There was a statistically significant difference between acne severity and gender. The overall mean CDLQI score (7.21 of max. 30 and the overall mean CADI score (4.8 of max. 15 were low, indicating a mild impairment of QoL among adolescents. Statistically significant association was noted between CDLQI and CADI scores and grade of acne. There was no statistically significant association noted between CDLQI and CADI scores and gender. CONCLUSION Though acne had impact on patient’s QoL, it was less severe in our study. The CDLQI and CADI questionnaires represent simple and reliable instruments for the assessment of QoL among adolescents and should be incorporated when managing acne patients to provide better and appropriate care.

  5. Evaluation of Adolescents Diagnosed with Acne Vulgaris for Quality of Life and Psychosocial Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyüboglu, Murat; Kalay, Incilay; Eyüboglu, Damla

    2018-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition which affects most adolescents. It has a major impact on quality of life and psychosocial well-being. Aims: The aims of the study were to examine the psychosocial effects of acne on adolescents and changes in quality of life, and to reveal any difference in the possible effect between genders. In addition, an investigation of the association between acne severity and quality of life as well as psychosocial stress was conducted. Materials and Methods: The present study included 164 adolescents with a mean age of 12–18 years and was diagnosed with acne vulgaris without any previous treatment. The control group consisted of 188 healthy volunteers. Acne severity was evaluated by the global acne grading system. All patients filled in a Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index, Pediatric Quality of Life Questionnaire (PedsQL), and a Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Results: The scores of SDQ and PedsQL were significantly lower in the case group. There was no significant correlation found between the genders in the control group for acne severity and scale scores. No significant correlation was found between acne severity and psychosocial challenges. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that acne has a significant effect on quality of life for adolescents, and this has an impact on their psychosocial life. Another important finding of the present study is that worsening in quality of life is not affected by some factors such as duration, severity of acne and age. PMID:29692454

  6. Predictors of Longitudinal Quality of Life in Juvenile Localized Scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardalan, Kaveh; Zigler, Christina K; Torok, Kathryn S

    2017-07-01

    Localized scleroderma can negatively affect children's quality of life (QoL), but predictors of impact have not been well described. We sought to identify predictors of QoL impact in juvenile localized scleroderma patients. We analyzed longitudinal data from a single-center cohort of juvenile localized scleroderma patients, using hierarchical generalized linear modeling (HGLM) to identify predictors of QoL impact. HGLM is useful for nested data and allows for evaluation of both time-variant and time-invariant predictors. The number of extracutaneous manifestations (ECMs; e.g., joint contracture and hemifacial atrophy) and female sex predicted negative QoL impact, defined as a Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index score >1 (P = 0.019 for ECMs and P = 0.002 for female sex). As the time since the initial visit increased, the odds of reporting a negative QoL impact decreased (P scleroderma than cutaneous features. Further study is required to determine which ECMs have the most impact on QoL, which factors underlie sex differences in QoL in localized scleroderma, and why increasing the time since the initial visit appears to be protective. An improved understanding of predictors of QoL impact may allow for the identification of patients at risk of poorer outcomes and for the tailoring of treatment and psychosocial support. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Inpatient Consultative Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Shinohara, Michi M

    2015-11-01

    Dermatology consultation can improve diagnostic accuracy in the hospitalized patient with cutaneous disease. Dermatology consultation can streamline and improve treatment plans, and potentially lead to cost savings. Dermatology consultants can be a valuable resource for education for trainees, patients, and families. Inpatient consultative dermatology spans a breadth of conditions, including inflammatory dermatoses,infectious processes, adverse medication reactions, and neoplastic disorders, many of which can be diagnosed based on dermatologic examination alone, but when necessary, bedside skin biopsies can contribute important diagnostic information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. General quality of life of patients with acne vulgaris before and after performing selected cosmetological treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chilicka K

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Karolina Chilicka,1 Joanna Maj,2 Bernard Panaszek3 1Department of Cosmetology, Opole Medical School, Opole, 2Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, 3Department of Internal Medicine and Allergy, Wroclaw Medical University, Wrocław, Poland Background: Achieving a satisfying quality of life for a patient by applying individually matched therapy is, simultaneously, a great challenge and a priority for contemporary medicine. Patients with visible dermatological ailments are particularly susceptible to reduction in the general quality of life. Among the dermatological diseases, acne causes considerable reduction in the quality of life and changes in self-perception that lead to the worsening of a patient’s mental condition, including depression and suicidal thoughts. As a result, difficulties in contact with loved ones, as well as social and professional problems are observed, which show that acne is not a somatic problem alone. To a large extent, it becomes a part of psychodermatology, becoming an important topic of public health in social medicine practice. Pharmacological treatment of acne is a challenge for a dermatologist and often requires the necessity of cooperating with a cosmetologist. Cosmetological treatments are aimed at improving the condition of the skin and reduction or subsiding of acne skin changes.Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the influence of selected cosmetological treatments on the general quality of life of patients with acne.Materials and methods: The study group consisted of 101 women aged 19–29 years (x̅  =22.5 years, SD =2.3 years. All subjects were diagnosed with acne vulgaris of the face. In the study group, the acne changes occurred over the course of 3–15 years (x̅ =8.1 years, SD =2.7 years. Selected cosmetological treatments (intensive pulsing light, alpha-hydroxy acids, cavitation peeling, needle-free mesotherapy, diamond microdermabrasion and sonophoresis were performed in

  9. Noise and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Seidman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Noise is defined as an unwanted sound or a combination of sounds that has adverse effects on health. These effects can manifest in the form of physiologic damage or psychological harm through a variety of mechanisms. Chronic noise exposure can cause permanent threshold shifts and loss of hearing in specific frequency ranges. Noise induced hearing loss (NIHL is thought to be one of the major causes of preventable hearing loss. Approximately 10 million adults and 5.2 million children in the US are already suffering from irreversible noise induced hearing impairment and thirty million more are exposed to dangerous levels of noise each day. The mechanisms of NIHL have yet to be fully identified, but many studies have enhanced our understanding of this process. The role of oxidative stress in NIHL has been extensively studied. There is compelling data to suggest that this damage may be mitigated through the implementation of several strategies including anti-oxidant, anti-ICAM 1 Ab, and anti JNK intervention. The psychological effects of noise are usually not well characterized and often ignored. However, their effect can be equally devastating and may include hypertension, tachycardia, increased cortisol release and increased physiologic stress. Collectively, these effects can have severe adverse consequences on daily living and globally on economic production. This article will review the physiologic and psychologic consequences of noise and its effect on quality of life.

  10. Patients with tattoo reactions have reduced quality of life and suffer from itch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutton Carlsen, K; Serup, J

    2015-01-01

    Life Quality Index (DLQI) scoring system and Itch Severity Scale (ISS). METHODS: Patients attending the 'Tattoo Clinic' at Bispebjerg University Hospital, Denmark with tattoo problems spanning more than 3 months were invited. Forty patients participated during September-November 2012. Patients...... attending their routine consultations completed the ISS and DLQI questionnaires. RESULTS: Patients with tattoo reactions experienced reduced quality of life, DLQI score 7.4 and were burdened by itch, ISS score 7.2. Both DLQI and ISS results attained the level of discomfort of known skin diseases...... such as psoriasis, pruritus and eczema albeit the typical tattooed affected areas are smaller. CONCLUSION/DISCUSSION: Sufferers of tattoo reactions have reduced quality of life and are often burdened by itching attaining the level of other cumbersome afflictions recognized as dermatological diseases associated...

  11. Researching quality of life in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Tonón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of quality of life considers at the same time objective and subjective circumstances of people life. In 1995 was created the International Society for Quality of Life Studies (ISQOLS whose purposes are to promote and encourage research in the field of quality-of-life studies and provide an organization through which all academic and professional researchers interested in QOL studies may coordinate their efforts to advance the field of QOL studies within various disciplines. In the case of Argentina since 2004, the Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad Nacional de Lomas de Zamora has organized the Research Program in Quality of life to develop different kind of projects about quality of life in different fields, trying to be considered by national institutions that decide public policies. 

  12. Evaluation of acne quality of life, loneliness and life satisfaction levels in adolescents with acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İjlal Erturan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Acne vulgaris is a dermatological disorder mainly seen in adolescents. Psychiatric morbidity has been reported in these patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the quality of life, loneliness and life satisfaction levels in adolescents with acne vulgaris. Materials and Methods: A total of 264 adolescents with acne and 250 controls were included in the study. Acne severity was determined by the Global Acne Grading System (GAGS. Acne Quality of Life Scale (AQOL; developed by Gupta et al., UCLA Loneliness scale (ULS; developed by Russell, Peplau & Ferguson (1978, and the Life Satisfaction Scale (LSS; developed by Diener et al. were used to asses life quality, loneliness and life satisfaction levels, respectively in adolescents with acne and in controls. Results: The mean AQOL and the mean ULS scores were significantly higher in patients (13.67±4.75 vs 11.14±2.94, p<0.001 and 32.15±8.46 vs 30.52±8.70,p=0.031, respectively. The mean LSS score was significantly lower in acne patients (21.82±6.40 than in controls (23.04±6.45, p=0.033. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean LSS scores between the mild, moderate and severe acne patients (22.15±6.32, 21.61±6.20, 16.00±7.26, respectively; Kruskal Wallis Test p=0.036. While there was no significant difference in the mean ULS and LSS scores between the genders. The mean ALQI score was significantly higher in males than in females (p=0.004. Conclusion: Our results indicated that acne quality of life and life satisfaction levels were significantly reduced while loneliness levels were significantly increased in adolescents with acne compared to controls. Our study is important in terms of being the first study investigating the loneliness and life satisfaction levels in acne patients and the relationship between these parameters and severity of acne.

  13. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents...... treatment. The database has revealed that overall, the quality of care of NMSC in Danish dermatological clinics is high, and the database provides the necessary data for continuous quality assurance....

  14. Quality of Life in Macau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, Ricardo; Davey, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    We report the initial findings of an ongoing, long-term investigation into subjective quality of life in Macau, a Special Administrative Region of China. Data were collected via quarterly public surveys (2007 to 2009; n = 8,230), as part of the Macau Quality of Life Report. The main aims of the study were to: (a) ascertain the public's…

  15. Quality of life in obese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lital Moro Bass

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess quality of life in obese children. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 30 obese children who attended the Health Promotion Center of Einstein Program in Paraisópolis Community. The following instruments were applied: quality of life assessment questionnaire; a questionnaire prepared by the authors and a survey in medical charts. Rresults: In the group of 30 obese children, 57% were female, ages ranging from four to ten years. The mean total score obtained through the quality of life assessment of obese children was 48.5. As to the four factors considered in the quality of life scale, leisure achieved the highest score, and autonomy the lowest. Regarding the results concerning each item of the quality of life assessment scale, the highest ranked items were those related to birthday parties and vacations. The lowest were related to admission to hospital and be away from the family. Cconclusion: The findings of the present study concerning the general score of quality of life assessment in obese children was lower than those observed in studies evaluating quality of life in healthy children and children with associated disease, but no negative impact in the quality of life of obese children was demonstrated, although the total score was close to the cutoff score (< 48.

  16. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC DETERMINANTS OF QUALITY OF LIFE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    the quality of life depressed patients and also to assess the predictors of patients' subjective QOL. .... Table 2: Relationship between overall quality of life, sociodemographic variables and number of ..... work . Several depressive episodes predicted poorer overall QOL in this study. ... Family and religious support, which.

  17. Patients' quality of life post thyroidectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, E C

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate health related quality of life post thyroidectomy for hyperthyroidism with respect to clinical benefit and patient satisfaction. This is one of the first such studies in the literature evaluating quality of life post thyroidectomy for hyperthyroidism.

  18. Atopic dermatitis: impact on the quality of life of patients and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misery, L; Finlay, A Y; Martin, N; Boussetta, S; Nguyen, C; Myon, E; Taieb, C

    2007-01-01

    The impact of atopic dermatitis (AD) on the patient's quality of life is relatively well known. However, the influence on the patient's spouse has never been studied. To evaluate the impact of AD on the quality of life, sleeping and sexual life of patients and their partners. In this cross-sectional study, patients and their partners completed a number of questionnaires asking about their general health and their quality of life [Short Form 12, Epworth, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI)] and completed an idiosyncratic measure asking about their sexual functioning. AD severity was clinician rated using Scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). A total of 266 patients were included. The mean DLQI score was 8.8. The physical and mental composite 12 scores were 50.7 and 39.5, respectively. These 3 scores were significantly related to SCORAD. A decrease in sexual desire due to AD was noted in 57.5% of patients. The quality of life of partners did not appear to be particularly impaired, but 36.5% reported that the appearance of eczema had an impact on their sex life. The influence of AD on sex life is significant both for the patients and their partners. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Quality in modern Nordic working life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Bramming, Pia; Holt, Helle

    2013-01-01

    quality issues of modern working life. Welfare research, working environment research, and human resource management (HRM) research attack the multiple challenges of working life in different ways and share the overall objective of solving issues in modern working life. Research from the three...... of the perspectives are applied at the same time in the same study. Our results show that while the perspectives share a common interest in solving the problems of the overlapping working life (OWL), they do so with different methods and criteria for success, and offer different solutions. We propose the concept “OWL...... theme reflects an approach to solving the issues of modern working life through improvements of the working life balance. The quality theme reflects an approach to solving issues in modern working life by addressing quality of work, preventing stress, burnout, etc. The review only finds three studies...

  20. Biologics and dermatology life quality index (DLQI) in the Australasian psoriasis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Diana; Photiou, Louise; Tacey, Mark; Dolianitis, Con; Varigos, George; Foley, Peter; Baker, Chris

    2017-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic condition that may require long-term treatment for disease control. This analysis utilizes data from the Australasian Psoriasis Registry with particular attention to the impact of biologic therapy on DLQI, and the differences between the biologics in terms of DLQI score change. A retrospective review of patients enrolled in the Australasian Psoriasis Registry from April 2008 to August 2016 was conducted. All subjects from the registry that had DLQI and Psoriasis Assessment Severity Index (PASI) scores recorded at a baseline time point of treatment commencement, in addition to week 12 and 24 post commencement were included in the study. A window of ±3 weeks was permitted at these time points. Multivariate linear regression analysis was undertaken to identify significant predictors associated with change in DLQI. Significant predictors of reduction in DLQI and PASI score from baseline to week 24 include use of adalimumab, infliximab, secukinumab and ustekinumab. Other therapies, including etanercept and oral systemic agents did not show significant change. Each class of biologic showed significant reductions in DLQI score, with IL-12/23 blockade showing the greatest reduction. Significant predictors of lack of reduction in DLQI score include a baseline PASI score psoriasis who are treated with biologics show the greatest reduction in DLQI score, compared with other treatments. Australian dermatologists are prescribing biologics when patients qualify for them in keeping with current guidelines.

  1. Attachment Styles of Dermatological Patients in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabó, Csanád; Altmayer, Anita; Lien, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Attachment styles of dermatological outpatients and satisfaction with their dermatologists were investigated within the framework of a multicentre study conducted in 13 European countries, organized by the European Society for Dermatology and Psychiatry. Attachment style was assessed with the Adult......, and experienced similar rates of anxiety in relationships as did the controls. Participants who had secure attachment styles reported stressful life events during the last 6 months significantly less often than those who had insecure attachment styles. Patients with secure attachment styles tended to be more...... satisfied with their dermatologist than did insecure patients. These results suggest that secure attachment of dermatological outpatients may be a protective factor in the management of stress....

  2. Selected aspects of quality of life in atopic dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kasznia-Kocot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic dermatological disease of multifactorial pathogenesis with persistent pruritus and extreme skin dryness including typical skin changes caused by many interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The study aims to evaluate the selected aspects of quality of life in AD. Material and methods. To what extent does the disease affect the daily practice of the patient and their family, what are their expenditures in connection with the treatment, and also how they perceive themselves and emotional, sexual, social behavior. 71 adult subjects 48(68% women and 23 (32% men were selected from the allergology clinics in the region of Silesia for this questionnaire based study. Results. Pruritus was felt by everyone, skin pain by 69%, and skin burning by 86%. The great majority of subjects had some constrains in doing housework due to skin complaints. The disease also affected professional work and school achievements. Almost everyone agreed that money spent on medication purchase and skin care agents impacted on financial resources. Atopic dermatitis affected 75% in social functioning, leisure time, sports practicing. The disease affected self-esteem level and confidence. Half of the examined subjects experienced bad feelings in contact with a partner, or felt stigmatized by negative reactions of the environment because of the skin appearance. Often atopic dermatitis caused problems with sound sleep (65% various emotional disorders and also disorders in the sexual sphere (32%. Every fourth subject felt depressed and every seventh thought of suicide. Conclusions. Atopic dermatitis is a disease which adversely influences many aspects of life and undoubtedly impairs the quality of life in a serious and distressing way. Therefore its treatment should be supported by psychotherapy.

  3. Quality of life psychosocial characteristics in Greek patients with leg ulcers: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Armyra, Kalliopi; Christodoulou, Christos; Sgontzou, Themis; Karypidis, Dimitrios; Kontochristopoulos, George; Liordou, Fotini; Zakopoulou, Nikoletta; Zouridaki, Eftychia

    2016-10-01

    Chronic leg ulcers are a public health problem that can have a significant impact on the patient's physical, socioeconomic and psychological status. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem and loneliness in patients suffering from leg ulcers. A total of 102 patients were enrolled in the study. The quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem and loneliness of the patient were assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale (RSES) and the UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-Version 3), respectively. The mean DLQI score was 13·38 ± 2·59, suggesting a serious effect on the quality of life of patients. Those with leg ulcers had statistically significant higher scores according to the HADS-total scale (P = 0·031) and HADS-anxiety subscale (P = 0·015) compared with healthy volunteers. Moreover, a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups concerning the UCLA-scale (P = 0·029). Female patients presented with a higher score of anxiety (P = 0·027) and social isolation (P = 0·048), and worse quality of life (P = 0·018) than male patients. A severe quality of life impairment was documented, reflecting a significant psychosocial impact on patients with leg ulcers. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Clinical characteristics and quality of life of seborrheic dermatitis patients in a tropical country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manapajon Araya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin condition that can have a negative impact on a patient′s quality of life. Few studies have been conducted to assess the clinical characteristics of the disease and quality of life of the patients, especially in tropical countries. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinical characteristics and quality of life of patients with seborrheic dermatitis in Thailand. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed at a university-based hospital and tertiary referral center in Bangkok, Thailand. The validated Thai version of the dermatology life quality index (DLQI was used to evaluate patients′ quality of life. Results: A total of 166 participants were included. One hundred and forty-seven patients (88.6% experienced multiple episodes of the eruption. The mean of outbreaks was 7.8 times per years, ranging from once every 4 years to weekly eruption. The most common factor reported to aggravate seborrheic dermatitis was seasonality (34.9%, especially hot climate. The mean (SD of the total DLQI score was 8.1 (6.0 with a range of 0 to 27. There was no statistically significant difference between the two DLQI categories regarding duration of disease, extent of involvement, symptoms or course of the disease. Conclusion: Although mild and asymptomatic, seborrheic dermatitis can have a great impact on the quality of life. Youth, female gender, and scalp lesions were significantly associated with higher DLQI scores.

  5. Appraisal Of Quality Of Life Of Diabetic Patients, Including Life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review showed that patients with diabetes mellitus had signi cantly low ... of life (physical health, psychological health, social relations, and environment). ... of quality of life regarding gender, age, or the level of education of the patients. ... neuropathy, impaired vision, elevated blood lipids and amputation of toes or feet.

  6. [Quality of life and life project, two inseparable concepts?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconstanza, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    The construction of a life project within a long-stay unit for people living with chronic psychiatric disorders must take into account a dimension of care centred around the quality of life and the care provided "here and now". Here, the concept of care finds its full meaning. The example of a long-stay psychiatric unit.

  7. Tofacitinib improves pruritus and health-related quality of life up to 52 weeks: Results from 2 randomized phase III trials in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Steven R; Thaçi, Diamant; Gooderham, Melinda; Augustin, Matthias; de la Cruz, Claudia; Mallbris, Lotus; Buonanno, Marjorie; Tatulych, Svitlana; Kaur, Mandeep; Lan, Shuping; Valdez, Hernan; Mamolo, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that improves clinical measures of psoriasis. We sought to assess patient-reported outcomes in tofacitinib-treated patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis over 52 weeks. In 2 identical, phase III studies (Oral treatment for Psoriasis Trial Pivotal 1 [NCT01276639], n = 901, and Pivotal 2 [NCT01309737], n = 960), patients were randomized 2:2:1 to receive 5 or 10 mg of tofacitinib or placebo, twice daily. At week 16, placebo-treated patients were re-randomized to tofacitinib. Dermatology Life Quality Index score, Itch Severity Item score, Patient Global Assessment score, and patient satisfaction were assessed. Baseline Dermatology Life Quality Index score indicated substantial health-related quality of life impairment. At week 16, a greater proportion of patients achieved Dermatology Life Quality Index score of 1 or less (no effect of psoriasis on health-related quality of life) with tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg twice daily versus placebo (Oral treatment for Psoriasis Trial Pivotal 1/2: 26.7%/28.6% and 40.2%/48.2% vs 4.6%/6.0%, respectively; P tofacitinib doses versus placebo (P tofacitinib versus placebo (P Tofacitinib demonstrated improvement in health-related quality of life and patient-reported symptoms that persisted over 52 weeks. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality of Life Theory III. Maslow Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Soren Ventegodt; Joav Merrick; Niels Jorgen Andersen

    2003-01-01

    In 1962, Abraham Maslow published his book Towards a Psychology of Being, and established a theory of quality of life, which still is considered a consistent theory of quality of life. Maslow based his theory for development towards happiness and true being on the concept of human needs. He described his approach as an existentialistic psychology of self-actualization, based on personal growth.When we take more responsibility for our own life, we take more of the good qualities that we have i...

  9. Predictive value of obsessive compulsive symptoms involving the skin on quality of life in patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bez, Yasin; Yesilova, Yavuz; Arı, Mustafa; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Alpak, Gokay; Bulut, Mahmut

    2013-11-01

    Acne is one of the most common dermatological diseases, and obsessive compulsive disorder is among the most frequent psychiatric conditions seen in dermatology clinics. Comorbidity of these conditions may therefore be expected. The aim of this study was to measure obsessive compulsive symptoms and quality of life in patients with acne vulgaris, compare them with those of healthy control subjects, and determine whether there is any predictive value of obsessive compulsive symptoms for quality of life in patients with acne. Obsessive compulsive symptoms and quality of life measurements of 146 patients with acne vulgaris and 94 healthy control subjects were made using the Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Questionnaire and Short Form-36 in a cross-sectional design. Patients with acne vulgaris had lower scores for physical functioning, physical role dysfunction, general health perception, vitality, and emotional role dysfunction. They also had higher scores for checking, slowness, and rumination. The only predictor of physical functioning and vitality dimensions of health-related quality of life in these patients was rumination score. Obsessive compulsive symptoms in patients with acne vulgaris are higher than in controls, and this may correlate with both disease severity and quality of life for patients.

  10. Impact of Cosmetic Camouflage on the Quality of Life of Children With Skin Disease and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsberg, Jennifer M; Weinstein, Miriam; Shear, Neil; Lee, Michelle; Pope, Elena

    2016-05-01

    Cosmetic camouflage is known to improve quality of life in adults. Few data are available regarding cosmetic camouflage in children, and thus it is not often selected as a mode of treatment. We sought to determine whether cosmetic camouflage leads to improved quality of life of pediatric patients with visible dermatoses and their parent or primary caregiver. Patients aged 5 to 17 years with visible skin disease and their parent were assessed with the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) and the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI) before and after consultation regarding cosmetic camouflage. Twenty-two children with skin conditions were included in the study. The mean CDLQI decreased from 6.82 (SD = 1.28) to 3.05 (SD = 0.65; P = .0014), while the mean FDLQI decreased from 7.68 (SD = 1.15) to 4.68 (SD = 0.92; P = .0012). Our study highlighted improvement in quality of life in patients with skin disorders who were managed with cosmetic camouflage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Quality-of-life and spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzini, Raquel Gehrke; Mosqueiro, Bruno Paz; Zimpel, Rogério R; Bandeira, Denise Ruschel; Rocha, Neusa S; Fleck, Marcelo P

    2017-06-01

    Spirituality has been identified as an important dimension of quality-of-life. The objective of this study was to review the literature on quality-of-life and spirituality, their association, and assessment tools. A search was conducted of the keyterms 'quality-of-life' and 'spirituality' in abstract or title in the databases PsycINFO and PubMed/Medline between 1979-2005, complemented by a new search at PUBMED from 2006-2016. Quality-of-life is a new concept, which encompasses and transcends the concept of health, being composed of multiple domains: physical, psychological, environmental, among others. The missing measure in health has been defined as the individual's perception of their position in life in the context of culture and value system in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards, and concerns. There is consistent evidence of an association between quality-of-life and religiosity/spirituality (R/S), through studies with reasonable methodological rigour, using several variables to assess R/S (e.g. religious affiliation, religious coping, and prayer/spirituality). There are also several valid and reliable instruments to evaluate quality-of-life and spirituality. Further studies are needed, however, especially in Brazil. Such studies will provide empirical data to be used in planning health interventions based on spirituality, seeking a better quality-of-life. In the last 10 years, research is consistently growing about quality-of-life and spirituality in many countries, and also in many areas of health research.

  12. Quality of life after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, F; Dagneaux, L

    2018-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) results in a high degree of patient satisfaction, as it provides patients with considerable medium- and long-term benefits in terms of quality of life, pain relief and function. Nevertheless, the literature reports that up to 30% of patients are dissatisfied. This dissatisfaction is directly related to the patients' quality of life, which they deem insufficient. Their quality of life depends on many physical, behavioural, social and psychological factors that are not taken into account by functional outcome scores. After describing the principles of quality of life evaluation after TKA, we will assess the effects of patient-related factors, the surgical technique and postoperative program through an exhaustive review of the literature. Patient expectations after TKA will then be outlined, particularly return to work and return to sports. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Dimensionality reduction of quality of life indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Jindrová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selecting indicators for assessing the quality of life at the regional level is not unambigous. Currently, there are no precisely defined indicators that would give comprehensive information about the quality of life on a local level. In this paper we focus on the determination (selection of groups of indicators that can be interpreted, on the basis of studied literature, as factors characterizing the quality of life. Furthermore, on the application of methods to reduce the dimensionality of these indicators, from the source of the database CULS KROK, which provides statistics on the regional and districts level. To reduce the number of indicators and the subsequent creation of derived variables that capture the relationships between selected indicators multivariate statistical analysis methods, especially method of principal components and factor analysis were used. This paper also indicates the methodology grant project “Methodological Approaches to assess Subjective Aspects of the life quality in regions of the Czech Republic”.

  14. Physical Activity Improves Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Physical activity improves quality of life Updated:Mar 2,2015 ... proven to improve both mental and physical health. Physical activity boosts mental wellness. Regular physical activity can relieve ...

  15. Bicycles, transportation sustainability, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The research presented in this report focuses on the exploration of a variety of objective and subjective quality of life indicators and approaches for bicycle transportation using a mixed methods approach. The authors have created a conceptual frame...

  16. Impact of chronic urticaria on quality of life and work in Japan: Results of a real-world study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Asako; Tani, Yumiko; Kaneko, Naoko; Hide, Michihiro

    2018-06-13

    Little attention has been given to the burden of chronic urticaria (CU) in Japan compared with other skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis. The primary objective of the RELEASE study was to evaluate the real-life quality-of-life impairment in CU patients in Japan. Data were collected from 1443 urticaria, 1668 AD and 435 psoriatic patients; 552 urticaria patients who presented urticaria symptoms for over 6 weeks were defined as CU. The mean Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) total score was 4.8, 6.1 and 4.8 in CU, AD and psoriatic patients, respectively. Disease control of urticaria evaluated by the Urticaria Control Test (UCT) and DLQI exhibited a strong correlation with a Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of -0.7158. CU and AD patients had relatively higher scores in all Work Productivity and Activity Impairment - General Health subscales except for absenteeism. At the time of the survey, approximately 64% of CU patients reported UCT scores of <12 and demonstrated higher work productivity loss and activity impairment versus patients with UCT scores of ≥12. Patients with lower UCT scores also displayed a higher percentage of dissatisfaction with their health state and the treatment they received. Approximately 85% of patients with CU had visited dermatology clinics, and less than 20% had visited hospital, indicating existence of a highly burdened population outside specialized centers. These results highlight the unmet medical needs of CU patients, suggesting the need to increase awareness of CU burden among both physicians and patients and to pursue improved real-life patient care. © 2018 Novartis K.K. The Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Dermatological Association.

  17. Thalidomide in dermatology: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of thalidomide in relation to dermatology is well- known and enough data is available in the literature about various aspects of thalidomide. Despite being an interesting and useful drug for many dermatoses, it is associated with many health hazards including the birth defects, phocomelia. We hereby present a comprehensive review about thalidomide and its application in dermatology.

  18. Money and the Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luburić Radoica

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the influence of money on the quality of life, in the light of the major importance it has on all aspects of our lives. Bearing in mind that money is an everyday, inseperable and unavoidable companion, with all its advantages and power, as well as its numerous challenges, risks and temptations, it inevitably affects all segments of the quality of life. The relation between money and quality of life, therefore, can be viewed not only theoretically, but also at a practical level. In the times we live in, which have been labelled the digital age, with ever increasing change, the key questions which arise are whether and to what extent do people really manage their money, and to what extent does money manage people and their lives, do people own money or does money own people? Although it sounds paradoxical, money causes people financial worries, whether they have it or whether they do not and so can significantly influence their quality of life. Standard macro-economic indicators, traditionally used as measures of the well-being of society, do not always give a real and complete picture of the quality of life, as this encompasses the way of life, as well as the standard of living. The quality of life includes the whole spectrum of factors, not only economic, but also many others which lead to satisfaction, both material and spiritual. These can include financial and material living conditions, employment, health, education, leisure time and social activities, economic and physical safety, human rights and freedoms, protection of the environment and overall life satisfaction. This paper analyses the direct and indirect connections between effective and efficient money management and the aforementioned factors which are decisive in forming the quality of life.

  19. General measures and quality of life issues in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis generally does not affect survival but has significant detrimental effect on quality of life (QOL, which may be comparable to that of ischemic heart disease, diabetes, depression, and cancer. The foremost important thing in the management of psoriasis is counseling of the patient. The clinician needs to be empathetic and spend adequate time with the patient and educating the patient about psoriasis. Clinicians should make it clear to the patient that the primary goal of treatment is control of the disease rather than cure. Eating a balanced and low glycemic diet could be an important adjuvant factor in the prevention and treatment of moderate nonpustular psoriasis. Obese people are more likely to have severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis than people with an average body mass index. Dietary supplementation with oily fish, rich in n-3 fatty acids, in psoriasis had shown mixed results in trials. Promising results have been documented for parenteral application of n-3 fatty acid, but not with oral supplementation. Increased smoking or alcohol abuse increases the risk of developing psoriasis and may influence disease severity, and hence must be avoided. Soaking in warm water with bath oil can be done in extensive psoriasis for hydration and emollient effect, and bland soaps or soap substitutes should be used; antiseptics should be avoided as they may irritate the skin. Relatively small, localized patches of psoriasis may improve with occlusion, i.e., waterproof adhesive dressings. The use of emollients is an internationally accepted standard adjunctive to the treatment of psoriasis. Dermatology Life Quality Index is a psychometrically sound and responsive measure of psoriasis-specific outcomes and most comprehensively captures the impact of clinical signs and symptoms on patient's well-being.

  20. Dermatology on Snapchat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravi R; Yazd, N Kuseh Kalani; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2017-07-15

    Launched in 2011, Snapchat is one of the newest social media platforms with over 158 million active daily users. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Snapchat. We searched for Snapchat accounts for the top ten most popular dermatology journals, professional dermatological organizations, and dermatology-related patient advocate groups on social media. None of the above-mentioned entities were found on Snapchat. Plastic surgeons were found to primarily utilize the application, although one prominent dermatologist was also found. It was theorized that the brevity of the "snaps" was a contributing factor for dermatological organizations to not use the application. However, Snapchat in the right practice setting may be useful for dermatologists, not only to educate followers, but also as a marketing tool to Millennials.

  1. Fragrance allergy and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisterberg, Maria V; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fragrance ingredients can cause contact allergy, which may affect quality of life (QoL). However, few studies have investigated this topic. OBJECTIVES: To investigate QoL life among subjects with a fragrance allergy as compared with other eczema patients. METHODS: A case-control survey...

  2. The Quality of Life in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Ming

    2009-01-01

    The AsiaBarometer of 1,000 respondents shows that Hong Kong people have a great desire for materialistic attainment, and such an emphasis on materialism bodes ill for their quality of life. Negative assessments of the public life sphere, which encompasses the natural environment, the social welfare system, and the democratic system, also detract…

  3. Willingness to pay and quality of life in patients with rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beikert, F C; Langenbruch, A K; Radtke, M A; Augustin, M

    2013-06-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis affecting >2% of the population. Willingness to pay (WTP) is a well established method which reflects the individual burden of disease. Evaluation of WTP and quality of life (QoL) in patients with rosacea. Nationwide postal survey on adult patients with rosacea affiliated with the German rosacea patient advocacy group. WTP was evaluated by three standardized items and compared to historical data on vitiligo (n = 1023). QoL was assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Data from n = 475 rosacea patients (79.9% women, mean age 56.3, range 26-90) were analysed. On average, patients were willing to pay € 2880 (median € 500) for complete healing compared with € 7360 (median € 3000) in vitiligo. Relative WTP was higher in women; the highest sums were registered for the age group 21-30 years. The extent of facial involvement predicted a higher relative WTP, whereas WTP decreased with the duration of symptoms and age. Mean DLQI total score was 4.3 compared to 7.0 in vitiligo. In rosacea, the highest values were observed in patients 10) were less frequent (11%) than in vitiligo (24.6%). The correlation between WTP and DLQI was significant (e.g. r = 0.249, P = 0.000 for relative WTP). Rosacea patients show a moderate WTP and average QoL reduction is mild. WTP proved to be a valid tool to assess patients' burden of disease. Patient education and the development of effective treatment options might still improve patients' satisfaction. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  5. Fragrance allergy and quality of life - development and validation of a disease-specific quality of life instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisterberg, Maria V; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2014-02-01

    Fragrance allergy is a lifelong condition that may give rise to permanent or recurrent contact dermatitis and may affect quality of life (QoL). The effect on QoL has not yet been investigated, and no disease-specific QoL instrument for fragrance allergy exists. To develop and validate a disease-specific instrument to investigate QoL among fragrance-allergic subjects. A fragrance QoL instrument (FQL index) was developed on the basis of narratives from 68 fragrance-allergic subjects, and consisted of 13 items. It was tested in a postal survey among 1650 participants patch tested at Gentofte University Hospital (2000–2010). The survey included other QoL instruments [Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and Short Form 36 (SF36) version 2] and questions on eczema severity (response rate of 66%). A retest was conducted after 3–6 months (response rate of 72.5%). The FQL index showed a significant and strong correlation with the DLQI (rS = 0.70), and disease severity, but a weak correlation with SF36 [mental component summary score, rS = − 0.22; physical component summary score, rS = − 0.31]. Good reliability and responsiveness to changes in disease severity were seen. The FQL index is a good instrument with which to investigate QoL in subjects with fragrance allergy. Good correlations with the DLQI and self-estimated disease severity were seen, and it showed good reliability, reproducibility and ability to distinguish changes in disease severity.

  6. Refining dermatology journal impact factors using PageRank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellavalle, Robert P; Schilling, Lisa M; Rodriguez, Marko A; Van de Sompel, Herbert; Bollen, Johan

    2007-07-01

    Thomson Institute for Scientific Information's journal impact factor, the most common measure of journal status, is based on crude citation counts that do not account for the quality of the journals where the citations originate. This study examines how accounting for citation origin affects the impact factor ranking of dermatology journals. The 2003 impact factors of dermatology journals were adjusted by a weighted PageRank algorithm that assigned greater weight to citations originating in more frequently cited journals. Adjusting for citation origin moved the rank of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology higher than that of the Archives of Dermatology (third to second) but did not affect the ranking of the highest impact dermatology journal, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. The dermatology journals most positively affected by adjusting for citation origin were Contact Dermatitis (moving from 22nd to 7th in rankings) and Burns (21st to 10th). Dermatology journals most negatively affected were Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery (5th to 14th), the Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery (19th to 27th), and the Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings (26th to 34th). Current measures of dermatology journal status do not incorporate survey data from dermatologists regarding which journals dermatologists esteem most. Adjusting for citation origin provides a more refined measure of journal status and changes relative dermatology journal rankings.

  7. A Study of Depression and Quality of Life in Patients of Lichen Planus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena S. Sawant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise cause of lichen planus is unknown, but the disease seems to be immunologically mediated. It is a psychocutaneous disorder. Due to scarcity of Indian studies in this field, we decided to study in patients of lichen planus the prevalence of depression and quality of life with comparison of the same in both the genders. Patients diagnosed as having lichen planus by consultant dermatologist were enrolled after informed consent and ethics approval. 45 patients were screened, of which 35 who satisfied the criteria were taken up for the study. A semistructured proforma was designed to collect the necessary information with administration of dermatology life quality index and Beck’s depression inventory. While 25% were depressed with females being more affected than males, quality of life was impaired in more than 90% patients. Impairment was maximum due to symptoms and illness feelings, disturbed daily activities, or work and time consumption in treatment. There was a strong association between depression and impairment in quality of life in both the genders. This study helps in early identification of psychological problems in lichen planus patients and in planning their future course of management, hence reducing the lack of productivity and improving the prognosis and quality of life.

  8. Quality of life in patients with erythema nodosum leprosum in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Felix B; Kiung, Sze T; Yap, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data on quality of life issues in patients with leprosy suffering from erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL). Thus, we aim to study the effect of ENL on quality of life. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Hansen's Clinic, Hospital Kuala Lumpur between January 2010 and December 2013 among patients with multibacillary leprosy using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). A total of 153 patients participated with 31.4% suffering from ENL. The mean age at presentation was 40.5 ± 16.49 years. The mean DLQI was 7.1 ± 3.72. Patients with ENL were younger (mean age 36.5 vs. 42.4, P = 0.026), had higher mean bacteriologic index (4.3 vs. 3.8, P = 0.004), had physical deformities (47.9% vs. 31.4%, P = 0.049), and had higher mean DLQI score (9.1 vs. 6.2, P leisure. Personal relationship had the lowest effect. Quality of life impairment in patients with leprosy in Malaysia is moderate, with larger effect among patients with ENL. The impairment in ENL is comparable to itchy skin conditions such as urticarial and is worse than chronic skin disease such as psoriasis. Thus, it is essential that management of leprosy incorporate quality of life issues.

  9. Influence of childhood scleroderma on physical function and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baildam, Eileen M; Ennis, Holly; Foster, Helen E; Shaw, Lindsay; Chieng, Alice S E; Kelly, Jane; Herrick, Ariane L; Richards, Helen L

    2011-01-01

    there have been few studies of quality of life in childhood scleroderma and these focused predominantly on self-perception and the influence of skin lesions. Our cross-sectional study aimed to describe the influence of childhood scleroderma on physical function and quality of life in relation to clinical and demographic measures. children with either localized scleroderma or systemic sclerosis (SSc) attending pediatric rheumatology clinics, together with their parents or guardians, were asked to complete a set of 4 validated measures. Clinical and demographic data were provided by consultant pediatric rheumatologists. in total, 28 children and their parents/guardians participated in the study (68% female, median age 13 yrs; 86% localized scleroderma, 14% SSc). The median Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) score was 0.1 (range 0-3, 0 indicating no impairment), the median Child Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) score was 5 (range 0-30, 0 indicating no impairment), and the median Child Quality of Life Questionnaire (CQOL) function score was 26 (range 0-105, 0 indicating no impairment). Family activity, measured by the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ-PF50), was also moderately impaired by scleroderma, with a median score of 83 (0-100, 100 indicating no impairment). scleroderma had only a moderate effect on quality of life and physical function as measured by the 4 validated instruments. Although a small number of children reported greater impairment, this is an encouraging finding, given its potential disfiguring and debilitating effects.

  10. Body Image, Self-esteem, and Quality of Life in Patients with Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazik, Hulya; Nazik, Selcuk; Gul, Feride C

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that may affect the visible areas of body. Hence, the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image can be affected in psoriasis patients. We aimed in the present study to assess the effects of psoriasis on the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image. The study included 92 patients with psoriasis, along with 98 control participants. The sociodemographic characteristics of the patients were assessed, their Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) scores were calculated to determine the clinical severity of the psoriasis, and the values were recorded. In addition, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Body Image Scale, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale results were evaluated. When the control and psoriasis groups were evaluated regarding the DLQI, self-esteem, and body image, quality of life was found to be more negatively affected in the psoriasis group than the controls, which was statistically significant ( P self-esteem ( P self-esteem ( P self-esteem ( r = 0.448), however, it was negatively correlated with the body image ( r = -0.423). Psoriasis may negatively affect quality of life, self-esteem, and body image, and may also cause psychosocial problems. An assessment of new approaches on this issue may contribute to developments in the treatment of and rehabilitation from this disease.

  11. A Study of Depression and Quality of Life in Patients of Lichen Planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Neena S.; Vanjari, Nakul A.; Khopkar, Uday; Adulkar, Satish

    2015-01-01

    The precise cause of lichen planus is unknown, but the disease seems to be immunologically mediated. It is a psychocutaneous disorder. Due to scarcity of Indian studies in this field, we decided to study in patients of lichen planus the prevalence of depression and quality of life with comparison of the same in both the genders. Patients diagnosed as having lichen planus by consultant dermatologist were enrolled after informed consent and ethics approval. 45 patients were screened, of which 35 who satisfied the criteria were taken up for the study. A semistructured proforma was designed to collect the necessary information with administration of dermatology life quality index and Beck's depression inventory. While 25% were depressed with females being more affected than males, quality of life was impaired in more than 90% patients. Impairment was maximum due to symptoms and illness feelings, disturbed daily activities, or work and time consumption in treatment. There was a strong association between depression and impairment in quality of life in both the genders. This study helps in early identification of psychological problems in lichen planus patients and in planning their future course of management, hence reducing the lack of productivity and improving the prognosis and quality of life. PMID:25802892

  12. Adult education and the quality of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijnman, Albert

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the complementary role of adult education in influencing people's objective and subjective quality of life. The analytical strategy used to achieve this end is to estimate parameters in a path model which includes both objective indicators such as occupational status and earned income, and subjective indicators such as job satisfaction and perceived personal wellbeing. The investigation builds on Swedish data and employs the LISREL method in the fitting of the model to the data. The results indicate that adult education positively influences objective indicators of the quality of life. Even though adult education is found to relate to measures of perceived personal wellbeing, the hypothesis that it also influences the way men assess their life situation and evaluate their subjective quality of life cannot be confirmed.

  13. Does age or gender influence quality of life in children with atopic dermatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, K L E; Leung, T F; Wong, K Y; Chow, C M; Chuh, A; Ng, P C

    2008-11-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is impaired in children with atopic dermatitis (AD) but the various aspects of QoL may not be equally affected. Aim. To evaluate if age and gender affect some aspects of QoL in children with AD. The Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) was used for all children with AD seen at a paediatric dermatology clinic over a 3-year period. Disease severity was assessed using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) and Nottingham Eczema Severity Score (NESS) tools. We reviewed CDLQI in 133 children (70 male and 63 female; age range 5-16 years) with AD. Itch, sleep disturbance, treatment and swimming/sports were the four aspects of QoL issues that were most commonly affected, in 50%, 47%, 38% and 29% of patients, respectively. Problems with interpersonal issues (friendship, school/holidays, and teasing/bullying) occurred in only a minority of children (genders similarly but were generally more common in children gender are relevant factors in QoL, with the issue of clothes/shoes being more troublesome for girls. itch and sleep disturbance seem to be a problem mainly in younger children.

  14. Quality of life in pediatric patients before and after cosmetic camouflage of visible skin conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramien, Michele L; Ondrejchak, Sandra; Gendron, Roxanne; Hatami, Afshin; McCuaig, Catherine C; Powell, Julie; Marcoux, Danielle

    2014-11-01

    Visible vascular and pigmentary conditions have a negative impact on children's and adolescents' quality of life (QoL). We sought to quantitate the effect of visible skin anomalies and their camouflage on QoL. In all, 41 patients, 5 years of age and older, were taught to use cosmetic camouflage. QoL was assessed using the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) before and 6 months after the intervention. Satisfaction and use were evaluated after 1 and 6 months. Baseline QoL scores revealed a small impact of vascular anomalies (CDLQI score 4.2) and a small to moderate effect of pigmentary anomalies (CDLQI score 6.1). Six months after the intervention, QoL improved in the study population as a whole (CDLQI score 5.1 vs 2.1, Pcamouflage was well tolerated and patients with pigmentary anomalies were more likely to continue using the products. Limitations include small study population, few male patients, cultural influences not addressed, and limited range of conditions. Children and teenagers with visible vascular and pigmentary anomalies experience an impairment of QoL that is abrogated by introduction to use of cosmetic camouflage. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Swiss (German) Version of the Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Larissa S; Schubert, Maria; Göksu, Yasemin; Esmann, Solveig; Vinding, Gabrielle R; Jemec, Gregor B E; Hofbauer, Günther F L

    2018-04-18

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a sun-induced skin lesion that may progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Recently, the Actinic Keratosis Quality of Life questionnaire (AKQoL) was designed for patients with AK in Denmark as a specific quality of life instrument for AK patients. The objective of this study was to adapt the AKQoL for the German language region of Switzerland and to evaluate its psychometric properties (validity, reliability). Translation and cultural adaptation of the questionnaire were assessed by using the technique of cognitive interviewing. During the translation process, 34 patients with AK from the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, were interviewed in 3 sessions of cognitive interviewing. The translated questionnaire was then distributed together with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) to a second group of 113 patients for validation and reliability testing. Within this group, we measured the internal consistency by the Cronbach coefficient α and Spearman correlation coefficient between the AKQoL and the DLQI. The problems encountered during the translation process led to changes in 5 categories as described by Epstein: stylistic changes, change in breadth, change in actual meaning, change in frequency and time frame, change in intensity. We found a Cronbach α of 0.82, an acceptable internal consistency. The Spearman correlation coefficient between total scores of AKQoL and DLQI was 0.57. We culturally adapted and validated a Swiss (German) version of the AKQoL questionnaire applicable for the population of a university center in Switzerland to measure and monitor the quality of life in patients with AK. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Diversity in Dermatology Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, Abby S; Enos, Clinton W

    2017-10-01

    Given the change in our population to one that is more racially and ethnically diverse, the topic of diversity in dermatology residency programs has gained attention. In a field that has become highly competitive, diversity is lagging behind. What are the reasons for this? The existing diversity among medical school matriculants is reflective of the applicant pool, and although modest, there has been an increase in applications and acceptances from minority populations. However, these proportions do not carry through to the population applying to dermatology residency. Making sense of this and planning how to recruit a more diverse applicant pool will improve the quality and cultural competency of future dermatologists. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dermatology on pinterest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitsitt, Jacob; Mattis, Daiva; Hernandez, Melia; Kollipara, Ramya; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2015-01-15

    Pinterest is a social media internet service utilized by individuals, organizations, and businesses to collect and share ideas related to projects or interests. The literature related to dermatology-related content on Pinterest is scarce. This study aims to investigate the presence of dermatology related content available on Pinterest. Investigators searched five terms related to dermatology in the "pins" and "boards" search categories of pinterest. The first 20 results were evaluated for content and assigned to a content group of "advocacy," "informative," or "home remedies." Boards were also categorized as being posted by an MD or professional society versus others. The top ten dermatology journals were also searched for under the boards category. Informative pins were the most common (49%) followed by advocacy (37%) and home remedies (14%). Informative boards were the most common (53%) followed by home remedies (31%) and advocacy (16%).We identified that only 24% of boards were created by either M.D.s or advocacy organizations. The top ten dermatology journals identified by prior studies had little presence, with only one board posted by JAMA Dermatology. Our study contributes to a growing body of data that dermatology organizations are relatively absent from new social media sites, and Pinterest represents a potential outlet for targeted intervention in high-risk groups for skin disease.

  18. STRATEGIC MARKETING AND QUALITY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ploesteanu Mara Gabriela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Theme The strategic marketing phase is one of systematic and continuous analysis of market needs in which the concepts of high performance products or services are developed, further provide the qualitative difference to customer, and which target different categories of consumers, ensuring long-term competitive advantages while increasing their personal welfare and the one society in general. Objectives of the Research The main purpose of our article is to make a documentary study of strategic marketing and quality of life concepts, wanting to emphasize the link between the two, the evolution stages of the concept quality of life and their integration into the concept of quality of life marketing. Research Methodology In order to achieve that goal, a documentary study was conducted, that took into account the conceptualization of the term quality of life marketing. Results The link between quality of life and marketing is even more obviously given by the new paradigm of it - relationship marketing. This focuses on building long term relationships with clients, based on their level of satisfaction felt in relation to company’s products and services. Starting from this philosophy of relationship marketing, we can say that marketers are inclined towards a subjective definition of quality of life, depending on individual needs and their level of satisfaction Implications The term of quality of life has been introduced in the marketing literature in the last decade and is defined as a marketing practice designed to improve the welfare of clients while maintaining the welfare of other stakeholders of the company. This concept comes as a sequel of the concerns of the relational marketing specialists to provide a high quality offer to customers and add value to all other stakeholders interested in the smooth running of the company (suppliers, distributors, shareholders, employees, general public and various public bodies interacting with the

  19. Quality of life philosophy VI. The concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2003-12-01

    The about a hundred central concepts related to research in the global quality of life can, in a holistic medical frame of interpretation, be organized under ten abstract key concepts: existence, creation of the world, state of being, daily living, talents, relations, sex, health, personal development, and therapy with subthemes as discussed in this paper. The paper shows that the concepts in each group can be seen as related to each other in a quite intuitive and logical way, to give a coherent quality of life philosophy that allows the physician to encourage, inspire, and support his patient. In every consultation, one new concept and idea of existence can be taught to the patient, helping him or her to realize the meaning of life, the source of joy, and the reason for the actual suffering. In this way, we help the patient to mobilize hidden and known resources and to improve quality of life, subjective health, and the ability to function. The concepts were harvested in 2003 at a Nordic seminar on quality of life research, held in Sweden. Life does not only cohere on the inside, but also on the outside. The same power that ties together all the cells in our body, seems to tie us together in relationships and new wholeness. This power evolves into new kinds of relations that unite on more and more complex levels, with the global ecosystem as the highest known level. Our intentions come from this coherent matrix of life. In the beginning of our life, the web of life itself gave birth to our fundamental purpose of life. The abstract purpose determines the frame of interpretation of reality: How we will perceive ourselves throughout life, our inner life, and the world around us. The frame of interpretation is pitched in language and concepts, in fact it creates our perceptions. Based on these perceptions and our purposes of life, our behavior arises. Our consciousness evolves through the witnessing of our behavior and through the response caused by it. Through the

  20. Quality of Life Philosophy VI. The Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The about a hundred central concepts related to research in the global quality of life can, in a holistic medical frame of interpretation, be organized under ten abstract key concepts: existence, creation of the world, state of being, daily living, talents, relations, sex, health, personal development, and therapy with subthemes as discussed in this paper. The paper shows that the concepts in each group can be seen as related to each other in a quite intuitive and logical way, to give a coherent quality of life philosophy that allows the physician to encourage, inspire, and support his patient. In every consultation, one new concept and idea of existence can be taught to the patient, helping him or her to realize the meaning of life, the source of joy, and the reason for the actual suffering. In this way, we help the patient to mobilize hidden and known resources and to improve quality of life, subjective health, and the ability to function. The concepts were harvested in 2003 at a Nordic seminar on quality of life research, held in Sweden. Life does not only cohere on the inside, but also on the outside. The same power that ties together all the cells in our body, seems to tie us together in relationships and new wholeness. This power evolves into new kinds of relations that unite on more and more complex levels, with the global ecosystem as the highest known level.Our intentions come from this coherent matrix of life. In the beginning of our life, the web of life itself gave birth to our fundamental purpose of life. The abstract purpose determines the frame of interpretation of reality: How we will perceive ourselves throughout life, our inner life, and the world around us. The frame of interpretation is pitched in language and concepts, in fact it creates our perceptions. Based on these perceptions and our purposes of life, our behavior arises. Our consciousness evolves through the witnessing of our behavior and through the response caused by

  1. Health-related quality of life and hand eczema--a comparison of two instruments, including factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenhammar, Lena-Marie; Nyfjäll, Mats; Lindberg, Magnus; Meding, Birgitta

    2004-06-01

    Hand eczema is a disease of long duration, affecting the individual and society. The purpose of this study of 100 patients (51 females and 49 males) at an occupational dermatology clinic was to investigate whether the generic questionnaire Short Form-36 (SF-36), and the dermatology-specific Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) are appropriate for assessing health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with hand eczema, and whether gender differences in HRQL could be detected. HRQL was affected by hand eczema, measured with both SF-36 and DLQI. The SF-36 showed more impaired HRQL for females than for males, in the mental health dimension, whereas no gender-related differences were detected with the DLQI. To compare the instruments we used factor analysis, with a polychoric correlation matrix as input, thus taking the ordinal aspect of the data into account. There was a high correlation between the instruments for physical health, but lower for mental health. In this context our interpretation of the factor analysis is that the SF-36 measures mental health better than the DLQI. The SF-36 therefore appears suitable for use in future studies for measuring HRQL, and gender differences in HRQL, in persons with reported hand eczema.

  2. Vitamin E in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abid Keen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin E is an important fat-soluble antioxidant and has been in use for more than 50 years in dermatology. It is an important ingredient in many cosmetic products. It protects the skin from various deleterious effects due to solar radiation by acting as a free-radical scavenger. Experimental studies suggest that vitamin E has antitumorigenic and photoprotective properties. There is a paucity of controlled clinical studies providing a rationale for well-defined dosages and clinical indications of vitamin E usage in dermatological practice. The aim of this article is to review the cosmetic as well as clinical implications of vitamin E in dermatology.

  3. [Quality of life after extensive pelvic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levý, M; Lipská, L; Visokai, V; Šimša, J

    Multiorgan resections in the small pelvis are standard procedures in oncosurgery and some indications have no alternative. In advanced pelvic cancer, pelvic exenteration with en bloc resection of the involved organs and structures, including portions of the bony pelvis, is indicated. The 5-year survival rate is fairly good, around 50%, but little is known about the long-term quality of life. The aim was to describe the quality of life of long-term total pelvic exenteration survivors. In total, 63 pelvic exenterations were performed between 2000 to 2015 at the Department of Surgery, Thomayer Hospital, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, mostly for primary or relapsed rectal cancer. In this retrospective cohort study, the quality of life was assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 3.0) and the EORTC QLQ-CR29 questionnaires. The completed questionnaires were scored according to EORTC instructions. At the time of this survey, 24 patients after TPE were surviving longer than one year after the surgery. The five-year survival of all patients was 49%, median survival 4.6 years, and median follow-up 15 months. Most of our patients reported a good level of their physical, emotional, cognitive and social functions. Some patients reported a worse body image, and of course a worsening in their sexual life. Regarding symptom-oriented questions, some patients evaluated the necessity of more frequent care of the stomia as slightly problematic; most patients reported impotence (men) or painful sexual intercourse (women). Long-term quality of life in survivors of pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer is comparable with reported results following primary rectal cancer resection with the exception of the sexual function. The quality of life gradually improves in the course of weeks to months from the surgery. pelvic exenteration quality of life.

  4. Quality of life theory III. Maslow revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav; Andersen, Niels Jørgen

    2003-10-13

    In 1962, Abraham Maslow published his book Towards a Psychology of Being, and established a theory of quality of life, which still is considered a consistent theory of quality of life. Maslow based his theory for development towards happiness and true being on the concept of human needs. He described his approach as an existentialistic psychology of self-actualization, based on personal growth. When we take more responsibility for our own life, we take more of the good qualities that we have into use, and we become more free, powerful, happy, and healthy. It seems that Maslow's concept of self-actualization can play an important role in modern medicine. As most chronic diseases often do not disappear in spite of the best biomedical treatments, it might be that the real change our patients have for betterment is understanding and living the noble path of personal development. The hidden potential for improving life really lies in helping the patient to acknowledge that his or her lust for life, his or her needs, and his or her wish to contribute, is really deep down in human existence one and the same. But you will only find this hidden meaning of life if you scrutinize your own life and existence closely enough, to come to know your innermost self.

  5. Quality of Life Theory III. Maslow Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1962, Abraham Maslow published his book Towards a Psychology of Being, and established a theory of quality of life, which still is considered a consistent theory of quality of life. Maslow based his theory for development towards happiness and true being on the concept of human needs. He described his approach as an existentialistic psychology of self-actualization, based on personal growth.When we take more responsibility for our own life, we take more of the good qualities that we have into use, and we become more free, powerful, happy, and healthy. It seems that Maslow�s concept of self-actualization can play an important role in modern medicine. As most chronic diseases often do not disappear in spite of the best biomedical treatments, it might be that the real change our patients have for betterment is understanding and living the noble path of personal development. The hidden potential for improving life really lies in helping the patient to acknowledge that his or her lust for life, his or her needs, and his or her wish to contribute, is really deep down in human existence one and the same. But you will only find this hidden meaning of life if you scrutinize your own life and existence closely enough, to come to know your innermost self.

  6. Hope as a Psychological Factor Affecting Quality of Life in Patients With Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szramka-Pawlak, Beata; Hornowska, Elżbieta; Walkowiak, Hanna; Zaba, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical observations and medical reports indicate that psoriasis has a tremendous impact on patients' lives, lowering their quality in many important areas. However, the vast majority of research deals only with health-related issues. This study aimed to compare the general quality of life of psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers by examining psychological variables thought to modify the quality of life. 42 patients with psoriasis and 42 healthy volunteers matched for gender, age and education level were tested. Flanagan Quality of Life Scale was used to evaluate general quality of life. Basic hope level was assessed with Basic Hope Inventory. Trait hope was estimated using Trait Hope Scale. Psoriasis Area Severity Index was used to assess the severity of the disease. Psoriasis patients have a significantly lower overall quality of life ( p  = 0.05), modified by Physical and Material Well-being ( p  = 0.01), Personal Development and Fulfillment ( p  = 0.03), and Recreation ( p  = 0.04). They also have lower levels of trait hope ( p  = 0.04) and its agency component ( p  = 0.01). There were moderate, negative significant correlations with basic hope and such components of quality of life as Physical and Material Well-being ( p  = 0.03, r  = - 0.34) and Relations with other People ( p  = 0.02, r  = - 0.35). These results support the hypothesis of a reduced general quality of life and trait hope in psoriatics. Thus, psychological help for people suffering from dermatological disorders might be as important as medical intervention. Basic hope can be treated as a resource in coping with these disorders and trait hope as a resource conducive to well-being.

  7. The impact of acne vulgaris on quality of life and psychic health in young adolescents in Greece. Results of a population survey*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoula, Eleni; Gregoriou, Stamatis; Chalikias, John; Lazarou, Dimitris; Danopoulou, Ifigenia; Katsambas, Andreas; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acne vulgaris can severely affect social and psychological functioning. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of acne vulgaris and its severity on Quality of Life of young adolescents in Greece. METHODS We conducted a questionnaire based survey among 1560 adolescent between the ages of 11 and 19 years old and 1531 of these were completed. Adolescents with acne filled all the questions including the Children Dermatology Life Quality Index. Adolescents without acne filled the questions about age, family history of acne, stress and smoking. Data were analyzed with Pearson Chi Square test. RESULTS Acne prevalence was 51.2% affecting both sexes equally. Self reported mild acne was present in 71.2% and moderate-severe acne in 28.8% of the study population. The mean age of the study population was 15.77y. The median score of Children Dermatology Life Quality Index was 4.02. The impact of acne on quality of life is associated with the severity of the acne (pacne experience greater psychosocial and emotional impairment (pacne (pacne are factors that also influence their quality of life. Girls and boys are equally affected. Stress and heredity are correlated with acne and its severity (pacne. CONCLUSION Acne affects Quality of Life of young adolescents in Greece. The impact is proportional to the severity of acne. More severe acne is associated with greater effect on quality of life with implications for self esteem, body image and relationships with others. PMID:23197205

  8. Quality of Life and Psychosocial Implications in Patients with Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Platsidaki, Eftychia; Christodoulou, Christos; Efstathiou, Vasiliki; Dessinioti, Clio; Tzanetakou, Vasiliki; Korkoliakou, Panagiota; Zisimou, Chrisa; Antoniou, Christina; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a long-term skin disorder associated with high levels of psychological distress and significant life impact. To evaluate the quality of life, depression, anxiety, loneliness, and self-esteem in patients with HS. Ninety-four patients with HS were enrolled in the study. The quality of life, depression, anxiety, loneliness, and self-esteem of the patients were assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-Version 3), and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. The DLQI mean score was 11.43 ± 6.61 in patients with HS. The patients with HS presented statistically significantly higher anxiety (6.41 ± 3.31 vs. 5.00 ± 1.59, p loneliness and social isolation scores (42.86 ± 8.63 vs. 35.57 ± 6.17, p < 0.001) and lower self-esteem scores (18.91 ± 1.79 vs. 19.77 ± 2.53, p = 0.008) than the healthy controls. HS is a distressing, recurrent disease that impairs quality of life. We can suggest services that allow an integrated approach, which includes psychosocial support, offering the patients relief from isolation and an opportunity to share common experiences. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Planning urban settlements for quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boje Groth, N.; Hansen, K.E.; Björnberg, U.

    Notatet er et indlæg på den Europæiske Økonomiske Kommissions (ECE) konference om by- og regionforskning, tema II: "Research on the Quality of Life in Urban Settlements, Warszawa, maj 1976. I notatet opstilles en begrebsramme for livskvalitetsbegrebet, og man diskuterer hvorledes livskvalitetsana......Notatet er et indlæg på den Europæiske Økonomiske Kommissions (ECE) konference om by- og regionforskning, tema II: "Research on the Quality of Life in Urban Settlements, Warszawa, maj 1976. I notatet opstilles en begrebsramme for livskvalitetsbegrebet, og man diskuterer hvorledes...

  11. Health-Related Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Louise; Sørensen, Jan; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare validity, reliability, and responsiveness of generic and disease specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Two samples of patients completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), EuroQol (EQ)-5D......, 15D, Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life Scale (RAQoL), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, fatigue, and global RA. Validity (convergent, discriminant, and known-groups) was evaluated in a cross-section of 200 patients. Reliability was evaluated...

  12. Quality of life in children with epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Nadkarni, Jayashree; Jain, Arti; Dwivedi, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a chronic medical condition with many co-morbid features. It has been observed that children with epilepsy (CWE) have a compromised quality of life (QOL). Objective: To assess the QOL in CWE and to study the various factors affecting QOL among CWE. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 102 CWE aged 5-15 years of either sex. QOL was measured by Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire, a 76-item, parent-reported questionnaire. Cronbach alpha ...

  13. Body image, self-esteem, and quality of life in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Nazik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that may affect the visible areas of body. Hence, the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image can be affected in psoriasis patients. Objectives: We aimed in the present study to assess the effects of psoriasis on the quality of life, self-esteem, and body image. Materials and Methods: The study included 92 patients with psoriasis, along with 98 control participants. The sociodemographic characteristics of the patients were assessed, their Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI scores were calculated to determine the clinical severity of the psoriasis, and the values were recorded. In addition, Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, Body Image Scale, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale results were evaluated. Results: When the control and psoriasis groups were evaluated regarding the DLQI, self-esteem, and body image, quality of life was found to be more negatively affected in the psoriasis group than the controls, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001, and self-esteem (P < 0.001 and body image (P < 0.001 were found to be significantly lower. Educational status significantly affected self-esteem (P < 0.001 and body image (P = 0.021, however, quality of life was not significantly affected by this parameter (P = 0.345. PASI was positively correlated with the quality of life (r = 0.703 and self-esteem (r = 0.448, however, it was negatively correlated with the body image (r = −0.423. Conclusions: Psoriasis may negatively affect quality of life, self-esteem, and body image, and may also cause psychosocial problems. An assessment of new approaches on this issue may contribute to developments in the treatment of and rehabilitation from this disease.

  14. Quality of life and cost of illness in patients with psoriasis in Malaysia: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min Moon; Chang, Choong Chor; Chan, Lee Chin; Heng, Agnes

    2013-03-01

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated, chronic, inflammatory skin disease which affects approximately 2% of the world's population. It has a major impact on the patient's quality of life (QoL), influencing career, social activities, family relationships, and all other aspects of life. Many studies have described the various ways in which psoriasis can affect a patient's life. Very little is known, however, about the impact of psoriasis on the QoL of patients treated in Malaysia and the cost of illness in this region. This study aims to describe the extent to which psoriasis affects the QoL of patients treated in government-run dermatology clinics in Malaysia and to estimate the cost of illness. A total of 250 psoriasis patients treated at eight dermatology clinics in government-run hospitals in Malaysia were studied. The severity of psoriasis was assessed by dermatologists. Quality of life was evaluated using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and Version 2 of the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12v2). Scores on the SF-12v2 of healthy subjects and of patients with other medical conditions, such as depression, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease, were also assessed for comparison. The costs of dermatology outpatient consultant fees, medications, investigations, procedures, transportation, over-the-counter medications, and hospitalization were retrospectively estimated using questionnaires. The cohort studied had a median Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) score of 9.9 and a median DLQI score of 10.0. The average SF-12v2 scores were 43.68 (standard deviation [SD] 9.23) and 42.25 (SD 10.7) on the Physical Health Summary and Mental Health Summary, respectively. The impact of disease on QoL was found to be greater in those with more extensive psoriatic lesion involvement, in younger patients, and in those with psoriatic arthropathy. Psoriasis was found to affect QoL in both genders equally. Body mass index had no effect on the severity of

  15. Dermatologic radiotherapy and thyroid cancer. Dose measurements and risk quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1983-01-01

    Thyroid doses for various dermatologic radiation techniques were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters and ionization rate meters in an Alderson-Rando anthropomorphic phantom. The effects of changes in radiation quality and of the use or nonuse of treatment cones and thyroid shields were evaluated in detail. The results indicate that the potential risk of radiogenic thyroid cancer is very small when proper radiation protection measures are used. The probability of radiogenic thyroid cancer developing and the potential mortality risk were assessed quantitatively for each measurement. The quantification of radiation risks allows comparisons with risks of other therapeutic modalities and the common hazards of daily life

  16. Conceptualization, development and validation of T-QoL© (Teenagers' Quality of Life): a patient-focused measure to assess quality of life of adolescents with skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basra, M K A; Salek, M S; Fenech, D; Finlay, A Y

    2018-01-01

    Skin disease can affect the quality of life (QoL) of teenagers in a variety of different ways, some being unique to this age group. To develop and validate a dermatology-specific QoL instrument for adolescents with skin diseases. Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with adolescents with skin disease to gain in-depth understanding of how skin diseases affect their QoL. A prototype instrument based on the themes identified from content analysis of interviews was tested in several stages, using classical test theory and item response theory models to develop this new tool and conduct its psychometric evaluation. Thirty-three QoL issues were identified from semistructured interviews with 50 adolescents. A questionnaire based on items derived from content analysis of interviews was subjected to Rasch analysis: factor analysis identified three domains, therefore not supporting the validity of T-QoL as a unidimensional measure. Psychometric evaluation of the final 18-item questionnaire was carried out in a cohort of 203 adolescents. Convergent validity was demonstrated by significant correlation with Skindex-Teen and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) or Children's DLQI. The T-QoL showed excellent internal consistency reliability: Cronbach's α = 0·89 for total scale score and 0·85, 0·60 and 0·74, respectively, for domains 1, 2 and 3. Test-retest reliability was high in stable volunteers. T-QoL showed sensitivity to change in two subgroups of patients who indicated change in their self-assessed disease severity. Built on rich qualitative data from patients, the T-QoL is a simple and valid tool to quantify the impact of skin disease on adolescents' QoL; it could be used as an outcome measure in both clinical practice and clinical research. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Ways that Social Change Predicts Personal Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chau-Kiu; Leung, Kwok

    2010-01-01

    A notable way that social change affects personal quality of life would rely on the person's experience with social change. This experience may influence societal quality of life and quality of work life, which may in turn affect personal quality of life. Additionally, the experience of social change is possibly less detrimental to personal…

  18. Quality of Life After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Laura M; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an introduction to quality of life (QOL) outcomes after bariatric surgery and a summary of the current evidence. QOL has been emphasized in bariatric surgery since the NIH Consensus Conference statement in 1991. Initial studies were limited to 1- and 2-year follow-up. More recent findings have expanded the follow-up period up to 12 years, providing a better description of the impact on long-term QOL. Overall, there is little to no consensus regarding the definition of QOL or the ideal survey. Bariatric surgery has the greatest impact on physical QOL, and the impact on mental health remains unclear. There are some specific and less frequently reported threats to quality of life after bariatric surgery that are also discussed. Obesity has a definite impact on quality of life, even without other comorbidities, and surgery for obesity results in significant and lasting improvements in patient-reported quality of life outcomes. This conclusion is limited by a wide variety of survey instruments and absence of consensus on the definition of QOL after bariatric surgery.

  19. Quality of Life in adults who stutter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Sonneville (Caroline); C.A.M. Bouwmans-Frijters (Clazien); M-C. Franken (Marie-Christine)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Although persistent developmental stuttering is known to affect daily living, just how great the impact is remains unclear. Furthermore, little is known about the underlying mechanisms which lead to a diminished quality of life (QoL). The primary objective of this study is to

  20. Hand eczema severity and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, Tove; Andersen, Klaus E; Brandao, Francisco M

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hand eczema is a chronic disease with negative impact on quality of life (QoL). In this study, QoL in hand eczema patients is assessed and related to age, sex, severity, and diagnostic subgroups. Methods: A total of 416 patients with hand eczema from 10 European patch...

  1. Factors influencing quality of life in asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-kalemji, Abir; Petersen, Karin Dam; Sørensen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The quality of life (QOL) in persons with asthma is reduced and different factors such as demography, asthma severity and psychiatric comorbidity play an influential role. However, little is known about the interplay of these factors. OBJECTIVE: To describe QOL in relation to asthma...

  2. Quality of Life Among Radiation Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is a general term applied to the totality of physical, psychological, and social functioning. The World Health Organization (WHO) regards health as a state of complete physical, mental, and social well being, and not merely the absence of disease. Every person's life is different, and thus the way in which each person experiences a QOL is unique. Individuals lead complex lives that have many dimensions. A QOL approach recognizes that there are many different aspects of living that may contribute to quality. In this study, Quality of life was evaluated using the Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire for one hundred and fifty radiation workers who handled ionizing radiation for at least twelve years, and one hundred fifty control individuals who did not knowingly come in contact with any radiation source., the QOL effects on work and achievements were also evaluated. Results revealed that radiation workers have lower quality of life compared to those who never come in contact with a radiation source

  3. Quality of Life in Crohn's Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gabalec, L.; Bureš, J.; Šedová, Michaela; Valenta, Zdeněk

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, Suppl. 3 (2007), A138-A138 ISSN 0017-5749. [United European Gastroenterology Week /15./. 27.10.2007-31.10.2007, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : quality of life * Crohn´s disease * inflammatory bowel disease Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  4. Quality of Life in Childhood Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PQLI, Version 4.0 and a standardized headache assessment were completed by children and parents, in a survey of 572 consecutive patients (mean age, 11.4 +/- 3.6 years who presented with headaches at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Ohio.

  5. Quality of life to the end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Ilora G

    2005-01-01

    Quality of life is a subjective concept, yet there have been some real and constructive attempts to measure the quality of a person's life so that meaningful comparisons can be made during treatment and as disease progresses. In this paper the multifaceted nature of quality of life is explored and the ways that the communication of healthcare professionals with a patient can dramatically influence the patient's sense of personal dignity and worth. Inherent in this are the relationships with the family, particularly with children in the family, who may suffer greatly in bereavement. Pressures on patients may make them feel a burden, as if they would be better off dead and certainly as if others may be better off without them still alive. This sense of being a burden is often behind requests for death hastening acts such as euthanasia. The fundamental difference between euthanasia and the cessation of futile treatments is also explored. The pivotal role of good communication is the route to ensuring that issues are addressed, with hope maintained for the patient to live as well as possible until they die, and that patients' quality of life is maximized.

  6. Product Life Cycle - Quality Management Issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alting, Leo; Majstorovic, Vidosav D.

    2004-01-01

    The strategic goal of our country is European and world integration. Within this context the management of sustainable development considered from the aspect of product’s life cycle and its quality management represents a real challenge for researchers, economy and educational system. The aim...

  7. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC DETERMINANTS OF QUALITY OF LIFE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    Background: Improving Quality of Life (QOL) is the ultimate goal of treatment for patients with depression. A large store of studies have ... Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study of depressed outpatients over a period of 6 months. Sociodemographic variables ..... schizophrenia: relationship to sociodemographic factors,.

  8. Evaluating of Life Quality in Patients with Acne Vulgaris Using Generic and Specific Questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghaderi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease that can adversely affect the quality of life of patients. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of life in patients with acne vulgaris. Methods. This study was carried out on 70 patients with acne vulgaris (28 males, 42 females. All the patients filled out two Persian versions of questionnaires: short form 36 (SF-36 and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI. The obtained data were analyzed by using SPSS software (version 17. Results. The scores for physical functioning, social functioning, and bodily pain domains in patients were over 70%, but the scores for role physical, general health, vitality, role emotional, and mental health in patients were under 70%. Scores on the DLQI in patients with acne vulgaris ranged from 0 to 22 (mean ± SD, 8.18 ± 4.83. After comparing mean score of DLQI with respect to gender and age, it was found that the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion. Acne vulgaris has a significant effect on the quality of life. There was not any significant gender or age related difference in QOL.

  9. Skin Reactions and Quality of Life after X-Ray Therapy of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skiveren, J.; Daugbjerg, H.; Wulf, H. C.; Mikkelsen, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is often treated by surgery or X-ray therapy. The consequences of X-ray therapy on the patients health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) have so far not been described. Objectives. To quantify quality of life in BCC patients before and after X-ray therapy compared with matched healthy controls. Materials. Twenty-five patients (mean age 69) with BCC completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) before and two weeks and three months after X-ray therapy and their results were compared with the DLQI scores for 25 matched controls. Results. Compared to the healthy controls the patients' DLQI score was significantly higher before and 2 weeks after X-ray therapy ( ρ=0.005;ρ=0.000). The patients' DLQI score decreased significantly from baseline to three months after X-ray therapy (ρ=0.024), when it became similar to that of the healthy controls (ρ=0.819). Three months after X-ray therapy eight patients had no skin reactions, 11 had slight atrophy, pigmentation change, and/or some hair loss, four had patch atrophy, moderate telangiectasia, and/or total hair loss. Conclusions. BCC has a negative effect on patients' quality of life. The study shows that HRQOL normalises shortly after X-ray therapy, despite minor skin manifestations.

  10. Quality of Life Theory II. Quality of Life as the Realization of Life Potential: A Biological Theory of Human Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents one of the eight theories of the quality of life (QOL used for making the SEQOL (self-evaluation of quality of life questionnaire or the quality of life as realizing life potential. This theory is strongly inspired by Maslow and the review furthermore serves as an example on how to fulfill the demand for an overall theory of life (or philosophy of life, which we believe is necessary for global and generic quality-of-life research.Whereas traditional medical science has often been inspired by mechanical models in its attempts to understand human beings, this theory takes an explicitly biological starting point. The purpose is to take a close view of life as a unique entity, which mechanical models are unable to do. This means that things considered to be beyond the individual's purely biological nature, notably the quality of life, meaning in life, and aspirations in life, are included under this wider, biological treatise. Our interpretation of the nature of all living matter is intended as an alternative to medical mechanism, which dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. New ideas such as the notions of the human being as nestled in an evolutionary and ecological context, the spontaneous tendency of self-organizing systems for realization and concord, and the central role of consciousness in interpreting, planning, and expressing human reality are unavoidable today in attempts to scientifically understand all living matter, including human life.

  11. Mobile applications in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Ann Chang; Endly, Dawnielle C; Henley, Jill; Amir, Mahsa; Sampson, Blake P; Moreau, Jacqueline F; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2013-11-01

    With advancements in mobile technology, cellular phone-based mobile applications (apps) may be used in the practice and delivery of dermatologic care. To identify and categorize the variety of current mobile apps available in dermatology for patients and providers. Dermatology-related search terms were queried in the online app stores of the most commonly used mobile platforms developed by Apple, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, and Windows. Applications were assigned to categories based on description. Popularity, price, and reviews were recorded and target audiences were determined through websites offering online mobile apps. Number, type, and price of mobile apps in dermatology. A total of 229 dermatology-related apps were identified in the following categories: general dermatology reference (61 [26.6%]), self-surveillance/diagnosis (41 [17.9%]), disease guide (39 [17.0%]), educational aid (20 [8.7%]), sunscreen/UV recommendation (19 [8.3%]), calculator (12 [5.2%]), teledermatology (8 [3.5%]), conference (6 [2.6%]), journal (6 [2.6%]), photograph storage/sharing (5 [2.2%]), dermoscopy (2 [0.9%]), pathology (2 [0.9%]), and other (8 [3.5%]). The most reviewed apps included Ultraviolet ~ UV Index (355 reviews), VisualDx (306), SPF (128), iSore (61), and SpotMole (50). There were 209 unique apps, with 17 apps existing on more than 1 operating system. More than half of the apps were offered free of charge (117 [51.1%]). Paid apps (112 [48.9%]) ranged from $0.99 to $139.99 (median, $2.99). Target audiences included patient (117 [51.1%]), health care provider (94 [41.0%]), and both (18 [7.9%]). The widespread variety and popularity of mobile apps demonstrate a great potential to expand the practice and delivery of dermatologic care.

  12. Fibromyalgia, Spirituality, Coping and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biccheri, Eliane; Roussiau, Nicolas; Mambet-Doué, Constance

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the impact of spirituality on coping strategies and on the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. The study was carried out on 590 people suffering from fibromyalgia. The data were collected with the French version of the WCC-R (The Ways of Coping Checklist: Cousson et al. 1996), the questionnaire of spirituality (Evaluation de La Spiritualité: Renard and Roussiau, 2016) and Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaire, translated into French (Blais et al. 1989). An analysis carried out with the software SPSS and Hayes' models showed that both problem-focused coping and coping through social support seeking are mediating variables that enable an indirect link between spirituality and quality of life.

  13. The efficacy of a health-related quality-of-life intervention during 48 weeks of biologic treatment of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, Cecilia A. C.; Spuls, Phyllis I.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; de Rie, Menno A.; Legierse, Catharina M.; de Korte, John

    2012-01-01

    Background: Interest in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcome research in dermatology is increasing, especially in the systemic treatment of psoriasis with biologic agents. In other specialties, such as oncology, the application of a HRQoL intervention is considered to be an aid for

  14. Quality of life of patients with strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo de Barros Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the impact of strabismus on quality of life. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 101 individuals aged 7-67 years with strabismus. They were interviewed and made to answer a questionnaire with 20 questions intended to assess the individual's interaction with their social and working environment, sensory perception, and limitations in their daily lives. There were five types of possible responses for each question: never, rarely or very few times, sometimes, frequently, and always. The questionnaire was based on the AS-20 and contained 11 questions assessing psychosocial aspects and 9 questions assessing functional aspects. Among those who were interviewed, 24.8% had undergone surgical correction of strabismus. Results: We observed a significant impact of strabismus on the quality of life of the interviewed individuals. Feelings of sadness and inferiority because of strabismus were reported by 74.2% and 58.4% respondents, respectively. In terms of functionality, 12.1% reported difficulty in reading, 14% said they had difficulty in depth perception (stereopsis, and 17.8% frequently or always associated pain or burning sensation in the eyes to strabismus. A significant difference was detected in the quality of life scores for the psychosocial aspect among patients who had and had not undergone surgery (Wilcoxon test, 158; p<0.001. Individuals who had undergone surgery had a better quality of life from the psychosocial perspective. Conclusions: In this evaluation, we found a significant negative interference of strabismus on quality of life from both the functional and psychosocial perspectives. This demonstrated the importance of treatment for strabismus, regardless of age, because it can interfere with the functional well-being of the individual.

  15. Self-reported skin symptoms and skin-related quality of life among Latino immigrant poultry processing and other manual workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, Sara A; Newman, Jill C; Pichardo-Geisinger, Rita; Mora, Dana C; Chen, Haiying; Feldman, Steven R; Arcury, Thomas A

    2014-05-01

    Manual labor employment occurs in environments with exposures likely to impact skin-related quality of life (SRQOL). The objectives of this paper are to (1) document the dimensions of SRQOL, (2) examine its association with skin symptoms, and (3) identify the predictors of SRQOL in Latino manual workers. A population-based survey of 733 Latino manual workers obtained Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and skin symptoms in the prior year. Two-thirds of workers were employed in production. Skin symptoms in prior year were reported by 23%. Impaired SRQOL was reported by 23%. In multivariate analyses, reduced SRQOL was associated with age, occupation, childhood indigenous language use, and experience of skin symptoms in the prior year. Despite overall high SRQOL exposures in some immigrant occupational groups produce reduce SRQOL. This rural, immigrant population faces significant obstacles to obtaining dermatological care; efforts are needed to improve their SRQOL. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Probiotics in dermatologic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs-Tarlovsky, Vanessa; Marquez-Barba, María Fernanda; Sriram, Krishnan

    2016-03-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that beneficially affect the host when administered in adequate amounts. They have an excellent safety profile. Probiotics have been used as immunomodulators in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to summarize the available evidence concerning the use of different strains of probiotics in dermatology practice. We conducted a literature review of English and Spanish publications listed in standard databases (PubMed, Ovid, Google Scholar, Medline, and EBSCO), between 1994 and 2015 using the words "probiotics" and "dermatology." We found ∼70 studies containing these criteria and selected 42 in which probiotics were used for dermatologic purposes. We found enough evidence to recommend the use of probiotics in specific conditions in dermatology practice, especially in children with atopic dermatitis. Further well-designed, large population based trials are needed to validate the use of probiotics in dermatology practice, including innovative therapies to rebuild skin barrier defects, protection against microbial colonization, and restoration of immunologic balance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. PLANNING THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR TIMISOARA GROWTH POLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina-Livia POPA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show that planning the quality of life at local level through economic development can be a new approach for policy makers and community in improving quality of life. In this purpose, the Quality Function Deployment (QFD model will be use to planning the quality of life and to identify the main directions of economic development to support improving the quality of life at the level of Timisoara Growth Pole from Romania. The dimensions of quality of life are analyzed starting from the point of view of inhabitants. The results include a new approach in which the dimensions of quality of life are the key element that orients economic development in order to improve the quality of life of human being. The case study results refer to the main elements of quality of life at Timisoara Growth Pole and the relevant directions of economic development to improve the quality of life for Timisoara Growth Pole.

  18. Methodologies for defining quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glicken, J. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engi, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-10

    Quality of life as a concept has been used in many ways in the public policy arena. It can be used in summative evaluations to assess the impacts of policies or programs. Alternatively, it can be applied to formative evaluations to provide input to the formation of new policies. In short, it provides the context for the understanding needed to evaluate the results of choices that have been made in the public policy arena, or the potential of choices yet to be made. In either case, the public policy question revolves around the positive or negative impact the choice will have on quality of life, and the magnitude of that impact. This discussion will develop a conceptual framework that proposes that an assessment of quality of life is based on a comparison of expectations with experience. The framework defines four basic components from which these expectations arise: natural conditions, social conditions, the body, and the mind. Each one of these components is generally described, and associated with a general policy or rhetorical category which gives it its policy vocabulary--environmental quality, economic well-being, human health, and self-fulfillment.

  19. Quality of life in vitiligo patients: a report from Razi referral University Hospital in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feizy V

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to assess the quality of life in vitiligo sufferers and its relationship with a number of variables such as age, gender, educational level, place of residence, marital status, disease duration, disease extension, visibility of lesions and skin phototype (SPT. Methods: In this study we evaluate the quality of life in patients with vitiligo attending Razi Hospital in July and August 2005. Permission from Professor Finlay was obtained to use the DLQI (Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire to evaluate the quality of life. One hundred patients with at least one vitiligo patch (age range= 14–57 answered the question-naire. Other survey questions about mentioned variables were also answered. Scoring was done according to Finlay`s guidelines. The higher the score, the greater the impairment of quality of life. Results: The mean DLQI score in our study was 8.16 (sd=5.423 with a minimum of 0 and a maximum of 28. There were statistically significant relationships between DLQI scores and marital status, skin phototype and disease extension independently, but not between DLQI scores and other variables. The mean DLQI score was significantly higher in married compared to single patients. In fact this difference was significant in women. Married women had a statistically higher score than single women while single and married men had no significant difference. Patients with Skin Phototype IV showed a higher DLQI score than other SPTs, which was statistically notable (p=0.000. The patients with more disease extension had higher score that was statistically significant (p=0.000. Conclusions: This study shows that vitiligo has a major impact on the quality of life and indicates specific groups that are most affected by the disease. Hence, dermatologists should pay attention to the psychologic effects of this cosmetic disease and try to decrease its extension and disfiguring effects by various treatment modalities.

  20. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Living with diabetes: quality of care and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Isla Pera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Isla PeraDepartment of Public Health Nursing, Mental and Mother and Child Health, University of Barcelona, SpainBackground: The aim of this research was to characterize the experience of living with diabetes mellitus (DM and identify patients’ opinions of the quality of care received and the results of interventions.Methods: A descriptive, exploratory evaluation study using qualitative methodology was performed. Participants consisted of 40 adult patients diagnosed with DM and followed up in a public hospital in Barcelona, Spain. A semistructured interview and a focus group were used and a thematic content analysis was performed.Results: Patients described DM as a disease that is difficult to control and that provokes lifestyle changes requiring effort and sacrifice. Insulin treatment increased the perception of disease severity. The most frequent and dreaded complication was hypoglycemia. The main problems perceived by patients affecting the quality of care were related to a disease-centered medical approach, lack of information, limited participation in decision-making, and the administrative and bureaucratic problems of the health care system.Conclusion: The bureaucratic circuits of the health care system impair patients’ quality of life and perceived quality of care. Health professionals should foster patient participation in decision-making. However, this requires not only training and appropriate attitudes, but also adequate staffing and materials.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, health care quality, quality of life, qualitative research

  2. The quality of life and satisfaction with life of women who are childless by choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bień

    2017-05-01

    A positive correlation was found between satisfaction with life and overall quality of life, general perceived health, and all quality of life domains. Higher satisfaction with life scores in childless women are correlated with a higher quality of life scores and better perceived health.

  3. Cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeiro, Brian S

    2013-01-01

    Cyclosporine is an immunomodulatory medication that is efficacious and approved for atopic dermatitis in dogs and allergic dermatitis in cats; it has also been used to successfully manage a variety of immune-mediated dermatoses in dogs and cats. This article reviews the use of cyclosporine in veterinary dermatology including its mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, side effects, and relevant clinical updates. Dermatologic indications including atopic/allergic dermatitis, perianal fistulas, sebaceous adenitis, and other immune-mediated skin diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Economic growth - environmental protection - quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumm, J.

    1975-01-01

    This is an investigation into the assumption that uncontrolled economic growth puts a burden on the natural environment and lowers the quality of life. This analysis of the natural, technical, economic, and social environment answers the following questions: 1) which development will production and consumption take up to the year 2000; 2) extent of environmental burden to be expected as a result thereof; 3) influence of needs and valid standard of values thus prevailing; 4) administrative measures for environmental policies; 5) influence of environmental policies on the quality of life; 6) possibility of economic growth while the natural environment is sufficiently protected at the same time. The man-environment model presented elucidates the interrelations between economic development and the natural and social environment; it checks the effectiveness of alternate environmental protection measures. (HP) [de

  5. Quality of life in children with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayashree Nadkarni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is a chronic medical condition with many co-morbid features. It has been observed that children with epilepsy (CWE have a compromised quality of life (QOL. Objective: To assess the QOL in CWE and to study the various factors affecting QOL among CWE. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 102 CWE aged 5-15 years of either sex. QOL was measured by Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE questionnaire, a 76-item, parent-reported questionnaire. Cronbach alpha was used to determine the internal consistency of the subscales and Pearson correlation to determine construct validity. The t-test and analysis of variance were used to compare mean QOLCE scores. Results: Factors affecting QOL included age, place of residence, socioeconomic condition, maternal education, seizure type and frequency and number of antiepileptic drugs. Conclusion: CWE have a relatively compromised QOL and comprehensive care needs to go beyond the attempt of controlling seizures.

  6. Quality of life in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Jayashree; Jain, Arti; Dwivedi, Rashmi

    2011-10-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic medical condition with many co-morbid features. It has been observed that children with epilepsy (CWE) have a compromised quality of life (QOL). To assess the QOL in CWE and to study the various factors affecting QOL among CWE. The sample consisted of 102 CWE aged 5-15 years of either sex. QOL was measured by Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire, a 76-item, parent-reported questionnaire. Cronbach alpha was used to determine the internal consistency of the subscales and Pearson correlation to determine construct validity. The t-test and analysis of variance were used to compare mean QOLCE scores. Factors affecting QOL included age, place of residence, socioeconomic condition, maternal education, seizure type and frequency and number of antiepileptic drugs. CWE have a relatively compromised QOL and comprehensive care needs to go beyond the attempt of controlling seizures.

  7. Quality of life of eye amputated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Ekholm, Ola; Prause, Jan U

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate eye-amputated patients’ health-related quality of life, perceived stress, self-rated health, job separation because of illness or disability and socioeconomic position. Methods: Patients were recruited from a tertiary referral centre situated in Copenhagen. Inclusion criteria......-administered questionnaire containing health-related quality of life (SF-36), the perceived stress scale and answered questions about self-rated health, job changes because of illness or disability and socioeconomic status. These results were compared with findings from the Danish Health Interview Survey 2005. Results...... and self-rated health of many eye-amputated patients are drastically changed. Eye amputation has a marked negative influence on job separation because of illness or disability and on socioeconomic position....

  8. [Quality of work life in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, María Olga Quintana; Klijn, Tatiana Maria Paravic

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with aspects that are related to work, quality of life, and its relationship with the nursing staff within the Mexican context. Professionals in health areas present alterations that are commonly overlooked and barely dealt with, especially when the person is a woman and, the care they give to patients, families, and/or friends, or community members, precede their own self care. In the case of institutions or work areas, even when the job provides human beings with several benefits, it usually lacks the proper conditions to perform the job, carries negatives aspects or pathological conditions, all which can relate to poor levels of Quality of Life at Work. Members of the nursing team need to perform their work in the best possible conditions in order to maintain their physical and mental health.

  9. Otitis Media and Caregiver Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Christian Hamilton; Godballe, Christian; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Otitis media in children may have a considerable impact on caregiver quality of life. The disease-specific Caregiver Impact Questionnaire is designed to assess caregiver quality of life in relation to child otitis media. Assessment of the psychometric properties of this instrument...... is limited. This study assesses the psychometric properties of this instrument including validity, reproducibility, responsiveness, and interpretability. STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal validation study. SETTING: Secondary care units. METHODS: Analyses were based on data from 435 families. Validity was assessed...... Danish version of the Caregiver Impact Questionnaire is a valid and reproducible measurement tool that is also sensitive to measuring change in the current setting. A change score representing minimal important change as perceived by the respondent is proposed. Results of this study support the use...

  10. Dermatology in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The intensive care unit (ICU represents a special environment for patients. We analyzed patients in the ICU/ high care unit (HCU with respect to dermatology counselling and skin problems.Setting: Academic Teaching Hospital over a 10 month period.Methods: The total number of patients of the ICU was 1,208 with a mean stay of 4.1 days. In the HCU the mean stay was 16 days. Diagnosis leading to admission were analyzed. All files of dermatological counselling were evaluated in detail.Results: Fifty-five patients with dermatologic problems were identified: 19 women and 26 males. The age ranged from 22 to 90 years of life (mean ± standard deviation: 67.2 ± 17.4 years. The total number of consultations were 85. The range of repeated dermatological consultation ranged from two to ten. The major reasons were skin and soft tissue infections, adverse drug reactions, chronic wounds including pressure sores and skin irritation or dermatitis. Pre-existing skin conditions may complicate the treatment and care during ICU/HCU stay.Conclusion: A tight collaboration between of the medical staff of ICU/HCU and dermatology department will ensure a rapid diagnosis and treatment of various skin conditions in the ICU, without increasing the costs significantly. Interdisciplinary education of nursing staff contributes to improved skin care in the ICU/HCU and helps to prevent acute skin failure.

  11. Defining quality of nursing work life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Beth A; Anderson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    As the largest single employee component of hospitals, nurses are critical to the functioning of the organization, and improving employee productivity continues to be a common theme in the health care literature. However, any increased productivity will be transitory if achieved at the expense of the quality of nurses' work life (QNWL), since improvement in the QNWL is prerequisite to improved productivity. The conceptual components of the concept of QNWL that differentiate QNWL from the concept job satisfaction are explored.

  12. Quality of patients life with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bičíková, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is dealing with the quality of life of patients with celiac disease. In the theoretical part, I am presenting the characteristics of celiac disease and I am describing its history briefly. For better orientation in the issue, I also joined a description of the anatomy of the small intestine and pathophysiology of celiac disease. In this thesis I am also dealing with incidence of disease, etiology and risk factors participating in the development of celiac disease, symptoms and the...

  13. Psychoactive Drugs and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed on a representative sample of the Danish population in order to investigate the connection to the use of psychoactive drugs and quality of life (QOL by way of a questionnaire-based survey. The questionnaire was mailed in February 1993 to 2,460 persons aged between 18 and 88, randomly selected from the CPR (Danish Central Register, and 7,222 persons from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959–61.A total of 1,501 persons between the ages 18 and 88 years and 4,626 persons between the ages 31 and 33 years returned the questionnaire (response rates of 61.0% and 64.1%, respectively. Variables investigated in this study were ten different psychotropic drugs and quality of life.Our study showed that over half the Danish population had used illegal psychotropic drugs. The most commonly used was cannabis (marijuana though experience of this drug appeared not to co-vary with QOL to any significant extent. Cocaine, amphetamine, and psilocybin had been used by 1.2 to 3.3% of the population and this varied with QOL to a clear albeit small extent. LSD has been used by 1.2% of the population and the users had a QOL score 10% lower than those who had never used psychotropic drugs. The group with the lowest quality of life was found to be persons who had used heroin, morphine, methadone, and a mixture of alcohol and tranquilizers (10–20% below the group with the highest quality of life.

  14. Quality of life in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Zamzam

    2012-10-01

    Conclusion: Quality of life is impaired in patients with COPD and it deteriorates considerably with increasing severity of disease. Increasing severity of COPD is associated with a significant increase in SGRQ-C score. A higher smoking index affects the COPD subjects’ QOL especially with patients’ symptoms and impact of disease. Psychological assessment and psychiatric consultation are important for improving COPD symptoms, QOL and for early detection and treatment of superimposed psychiatric symptoms that could worsen COPD condition and seriously affect QOL.

  15. American Osteopathic College of Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Store Welcome Calendar of Events Find a Dermatology DO Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm ... of Trustees Contact Us Ethics Foundation for Osteopathic Dermatology What is the FOD? Foundation Levels of Giving ...

  16. Nuclear energy and the quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett Lewis, W [Scientific Advisory Committee of the Secretary-General of the United Nations and of the IAEA, Vienna (Austria); Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (Canada)

    1972-07-01

    By setting up goals for the quality of life and working hard towards them, the endeavour will guide the ways in which we develop nuclear energy (he writes). In its turn controlled nuclear energy will make possible ways of life for all mankind that can have the quality of our ideals. I will discuss the ' Quality of Life' first because some have doubts, recalling several aspersions on nuclear energy by detractors; in particular, that it will cause radioactive pollution, it will cause thermal pollution, from the radiation people will die of cancer, there are terrible genetic hazards, managing radioactive wastes is an unsolved problem and there is not enough uranium. Science can, however, be reassuring about all those points. There is also a false hope that fusion power from deuterium will be so clean and cheap and the supply so inexhaustible that man's energy problems will one day be solved for ever. The true state of affairs appears to be that without the further development of nuclear fission power there would be massively more starvation and malnutrition in the world, and all the diseases that go with them. Fortunately, however, there is no rational argument for stopping or delaying nuclear energy development. Recycled uranium and thorium are effectively inexhaustible sources.

  17. Stress and skin disease quality of life: the moderating role of anxiety sensitivity social concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, L J; Witcraft, S M; McCowan, N K; Brodell, R T

    2018-04-01

    Stress is an important factor in the onset, exacerbation and reoccurrence of many skin diseases. Little is known about psychological risk factors that affect the association between stress and dermatological conditions. One relevant factor that may modulate this link is anxiety sensitivity (AS) social concerns - the propensity to respond fearfully to anxiety-related sensations (e.g. sweating, flushing) owing to perceived social consequences (e.g. rejection or humiliation). To gain insight into psychological factors affecting skin disease, we examined the moderating role of AS social concerns in the relationship between stress and skin disease quality of life (QoL). Participants [n = 237 (161 female), mean ± SD age 34·18 ± 9·57 years] with active skin disease symptoms were recruited online and completed questionnaires assessing stress, AS social concerns, skin disease QoL and global skin disease symptom severity. AS social concerns moderated the association between stress and skin-related emotional and social functioning in adults with skin disease. Stress was a significant predictor of the impairment associated with skin disease. Stress was linked to skin disease-related emotional and functional impairment associated with skin disease among individuals with high AS social concerns. These results highlight the potential for AS reduction interventions to break the vicious cycle of stress and skin disease symptoms and to improve psychosocial well-being in dermatology patients. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Quality of life after permanent prostate implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arterbery, V. Elayne; Frazier, Arthur; Dalmia, Praveen; Porter, Arthur

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the quality of life in patients who have received a permanent transperineal ultrasound guide prostate implant. There is increasing recognition that prostate cancer therapy impacts significantly on the patients ability to pursue relational, occupational and social interests. With the substantially expanded patient role in directing treatment for prostate cancer, the importance of examining quality of life outcomes in addition to survival has been underscored. Materials and Methods: 51 sequential patients with clinically localized prostate cancer who underwent permanent prostate implantation from September 1995 to October 1996 were evaluated. All patients were clinically staged as T1c or T2a and received implant with Iodine 125 or Palladium 103 as definitive treatment. Data was collected using the EORTC genitourinary group questionnaire and supplemental questions during an interview. Results: Urinary symptoms such as nocturia, frequency and dysuria were the most pronounced in the first two months after implant and then decreased in the majority of patients. The EORTC questionnaire was administered at 6 months and examined urinary quality, sexual quality and perception of symptoms. With regard to urinary quality, 17% had mild dysuria at 6 months and 40% noted that they urinated more frequently than pre implant. No patient had hematuria and 0 % were incontinent. 3% stated that they had occasional loss of minimal urine with severe urgency. Only 2% required intermittent self catheterization after implant secondary to obstructive symptoms. Over 90% were on an alpha blocker post implant for a minimum of 6 weeks. 0% reported psychological distress and 3% noted a disruption in social or family life. 15% experienced some fatigue and 10% noted a decreased functional status but only 1% a decreased role function. Additional questions addressed lifestyle and work issues. 100% would have an implant again as definitive treatment and 98% would recommend the

  19. Possibilities of modern photography in dermatology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galkina E.M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

     

     

    The purpose of the article was to research necessary conditions for creating high — quality images which allow to display all features of pathological process on skin more complete and authentically. That is also an integral part of modern dermatology. The usage of photographic documentation is necessary to improve students’ training, for doctor’s practical activities using the experience of the clinic, creating medical literature, and it is a unique and valuable contribution to diagnostics of dermatological diseases.

  20. Quality of life in the context of psychology and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Kulikowski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article various ways to recognize the concept of quality of life are presented. The author attempted to show what factors may influence quality of life, and how this issue is recognized in the context of medicine and psychology. Attention was also paid to the subjective and objective aspects of quality of life. The author attempted to demonstrate that the patient’s quality of life, especially in the context of rheumatology, cannot be considered one-dimensional, only in the field of medicine or psychology. Evaluation and planning of activities designed to improve and maintain the patient’s quality of life require an eclectic approach, taking into account psychological and medical aspects of the patient’s life. The text is divided into three parts: quality of life in medical science, quality of life and happiness in psychological approaches, and quality of life in rheumatology.

  1. Quality of life after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Smajlović

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The liver is the largest gland and, apart from the skin, also the biggest organ in the body. They are a central laboratory for processing proteins, carbohidrates and fat, and they also detoxify our body.Liver failure is a result of cronic or acute liver disease or hepatic impairment. Many diseases of the liver are accompained by icterus as a result of increased level of bilirubin in the system. Today we can live without other organs important for metabolism, such as eg. the kidney or pancreas, because their function can be replaced. But we cannot live without the liver because their functions are too varied and complex. Therefore, when we have incurable disease of the liver we need liver transplantation.Life with a child who needs liver transplantation is very hard for all family members. Especially at the begining of treatment, life for all family members, and in particular for the parents, is very stressfull.Nurses must have sufficinet knowledge, she should be able to talk to parents in plain language with a high degree of optimism. We make them feel that they are not alone and we encourage them. Nurses must believe in successful treatment, so that they can inspire courage in parents.Quality of life is not in perfection, but rather in the way how we manage to live with imperfection. A person who is in any way affected, can perceive his quality of life as very good. Here, his personal attitude and attitude to his surrondings is most important. This is a higher quality than that obtainable by knowledge alone and which can be measured or evaluated.

  2. Pediatric dermatology training survey of United States dermatology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Mazza, Joni M; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Variability exists in pediatric dermatology education for dermatology residents. We sought to formally assess the pediatric dermatology curriculum and experience in a dermatology residency program. Three unique surveys were developed for dermatology residents, residency program directors, and pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors. The surveys consisted of questions pertaining to residency program characteristics. Sixty-three graduating third-year residents, 51 residency program directors, and 18 pediatric dermatology fellowship program directors responded. Residents in programs with one or more full-time pediatric dermatologist were more likely to feel very competent treating children and were more likely to be somewhat or extremely satisfied with their pediatric curriculums than residents in programs with no full-time pediatric dermatologist (50.0% vs 5.9%, p = 0.002, and 85.3% vs 52.9%, p dermatology fellowships were much more likely to report being extremely satisfied than residents in programs without a pediatric dermatology fellowship (83.3% vs 21.2%; p dermatology residency programs to continue to strengthen their pediatric dermatology curriculums, especially through the recruitment of full-time pediatric dermatologists. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Tropical dermatology: marine and aquatic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Vidal; Lupi, Omar; Lonza, Juan Pedro; Tyring, Stephen K

    2009-11-01

    Dermatoses caused by marine organisms are frequently seen in dermatology clinics worldwide. Cutaneous injuries after exposure to marine environments include bacterial and fungal infections and lesions caused by aquatic plants and protists. Some of these diseases are well known by dermatologists, such as Vibrio vulnificus septicemia and erysipeloid, but others are uncommon, such as envenomation caused by ingestion or contact with certain dinoflagellates or cyanobacteria, which are associated with rashes that can begin within minutes after exposure. Many marine/aquatic invertebrates, such as sponges, cnidarians, echinoderms, crustaceans, and mollusks, are associated with different kinds of dermatologic lesions that can vary from irritant or allergic contact dermatitis to physical trauma and envenomations. These cutaneous lesions may result in mild local reactions or can be associated with severe systemic reactions. Invertebrate animals, such as cnidarians, sea urchins, and worms, and aquatic vertebrates, such as venomous fishes and stingrays, are commonly associated with skin lesions in many countries, where they can constitute occupational dermatoses among fishermen and scuba divers, but they can also be observed among persons who contact these animals in kitchens or beaches. The presence of unusual lesions, a recent travel history, and/or a report of contact with an aquatic environment (including ownership of a marine or freshwater aquarium) should alert the dermatologist to the etiology of the cutaneous problems. After completing this learning activity, participants should be able to recognize the cutaneous manifestations of marine/aquatic infections, bites, stings, and wounds, etc., treat the cutaneous manifestations of marine/aquatic injuries, and help prevent marine/aquatic injuries.

  4. Impact of active and stable psoriasis on health-related quality of life: the PSO-LIFE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudén, E; Herrera, E; Puig, L; Sánchez-Carazo, J L; Toribio, J; Perulero, N

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of psoriasis on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) using different questionnaires. Prospective observational study of patients with plaque psoriasis of at least 6 months' duration stratified by active and stable disease. The patients were evaluated at baseline, 7 days, and 12 weeks. At the 3 visits, the investigators recorded sociodemographic and clinical data and the patients completed the following HRQOL questionnaires: the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), the Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI), and psoriasis quality of life questionnaire (PSO-LIFE). In total, 304 patients (182 with active psoriasis and 122 with stable psoriasis) were evaluated. The mean (SD) age was 45.3 (14.5) years, and 56.3% of the group were men. At baseline, the mean (SD) psoriasis and area severity index (PASI) score was 17.0 (7.4) in patients with active disease and 5.6 (5.3) in those with stable disease; a reduction was seen in PASI scores during the evaluation period (P<.01). The mean (SD) score on the PSO-LIFE questionnaire increased significantly from 57.4 (20.4) to 72.2 (19.6) in patients with active psoriasis and from 76.4 (20.6) to 82.3 (18.3) in those with stable disease (P<0.01 in both groups). The difference in standardized mean scores between the 2 groups was 0.79 for the DLQI, 0.62 for the PDI, and 0.85 for the PSO-LIFE questionnaire. The impact of psoriasis on HRQOL as assessed by the PSO-LIFE questionnaire was greater in patients with lesions in visible areas than in those with less visible lesions (P<.01). Changes in PSO-LIFE and PASI scores were moderately and significantly correlated (r=-0.4). The impact of psoriasis on HRQOL is higher in patients with active disease. The PSO-LIFE questionnaire showed a greater tendency to discriminate between active and stable psoriasis than either the DLQI or the PDI. PSO-LIFE scores correlated significantly with lesion site and disease severity as measured by PASI. Copyright

  5. Clinical decision making in dermatology: observation of consultations and the patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaj, F M; Salek, M S; Basra, M K A; Finlay, A Y

    2010-01-01

    Clinical decision making is a complex process and might be influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Little is known about this process in dermatology. The aim of this study was to explore the different types of management decisions made in dermatology and to identify factors influencing those decisions from observation of consultations and interviews with the patients. 61 patient consultations were observed by a physician with experience in dermatology. The patients were interviewed immediately after each consultation. Consultations and interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and their content analysed using thematic content analysis. The most common management decisions made during the consultations included: follow-up, carrying out laboratory investigation, starting new topical treatment, renewal of systemic treatment, renewal of topical treatment, discharging patients and starting new systemic treatment. Common influences on those decisions included: clinical factors such as ineffectiveness of previous therapy, adherence to prescribing guidelines, side-effects of medications, previous experience with the treatment, deterioration or improvement in the skin condition, and chronicity of skin condition. Non-clinical factors included: patient's quality of life, patient's friends or relatives, patient's time commitment, travel or transportation difficulties, treatment-related costs, availability of consultant, and availability of treatment. The study has shown that patients are aware that management decisions in dermatology are influenced by a wide range of clinical and non-clinical factors. Education programmes should be developed to improve the quality of decision making. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Health-related quality of life in Danish children with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabom, Anne; Nguyen, Dan; Fisker, Niels

    2017-01-01

    have considerable impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adult patients. Half the patients with C1-INH-HAE develop symptoms before the age of 10 years. However, the HRQoL in children with C1-INH-HAE is almost unexplored. Objective: To investigate HRQoL in Danish children with C1...... were the PedsQL (Child Self-Report and Parent Proxy-Report forms); the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index; a nonvalidated, diseasespecific quality-of-life questionnaire; and two visual analog scales that rated general health. Results: The HRQoL scores in our study were comparable with the normal...... the Parent Proxy-Report form carried the disease. Conclusion: Overall, the children assessed on average had a normal HRQoL and better than those with other common skin disorders. However, according to our findings, health care providers should be especially attentive to HRQoL when children with C1-INH...

  7. Doctors’ Support – An important part of medical therapy and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Jaworski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The correct patient – doctor relationship is important in shaping the whole process of treatment. The scientific studies highlight the various irregularities in this relationship and its negative impact on the effectiveness of medical treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between levels of doctors’ support and attitude to certain aspects of the treatment process and quality of life among patients with psoriasis. Material and Methods: The study was conducted on 50 patients with psoriasis aged from 21 to 78 who are treated in dermatological clinics. The Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI was used to assess the severity of psoriatic skin changes. The patients completed a questionnaire for the assessment of receive doctors’ support, and its relationship with the attitude towards the disease. The research tool was developed based on literature review. Results: The level of doctors’ support had a direct impact on the patients’ attitude the disease, including attitudes towards the treatment and medical personnel, as well as adherence to medical recommendations; and indirectly on satisfaction with the treatment and the quality of life. Conclusions: Results of this study have shown clear evidence the importance of the level of doctors’ support in psoriasis which could help to improve the overall functioning of these patients. The level of doctors’ support indirectly affects the quality of life in patients with psoriasis.

  8. Correlates of self-reported quality of life in adults and children with morphea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shinjita; Bernstein, Ira; Jacobe, Heidi

    2014-05-01

    Determining a disease's impact on life quality is important in clinical decision making, research, and resource allocation. Determinants of quality of life (QOL) in morphea are poorly understood. We sought to ascertain demographic and clinical variables correlated with negative impact on self-reported QOL in morphea. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of the Morphea in Adults and Children cohort. Symptoms (pruritus and pain) and functional impairment were correlated with decreased QOL in children and adults. This was true in both sexes and was independent of subtype and age. Patient-reported QOL correlated with physician-based measures of disease severity in adults, but not in children. Patients with linear and generalized morphea had the greatest impact on QOL. Small sample size is a limitation. Symptoms and functional impairment were determinants of impaired life quality in both children and adults independent of morphea subtype. These results suggest that clinicians should consider suppressing the accumulation of new lesions (when rapidly accumulating) and symptoms (pain and pruritus) in the treatment of patients with morphea. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Children's quality of life after adenotonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanmaz, A; Muderris, T; Bercin, S; Kiris, M

    2013-01-01

    Although adenotonsillectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures in the pediatric population, its impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) has not been well established. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of adenotonsillectomy on children's HRQL. Parents of the children who underwent adenotonsillectomy were invited to our clinic approximately one year after the surgery for a face-to-face survey to evaluate their child's HRQL. In total, 119 parents of children who underwent adenotonsillectomy for different reasons were interviewed. To quantify the benefit of the operation, the Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory (GCBI) was used. The mean GCBI score was 58 +/- 17.5 (minimum -22.9, maximum 79.2), indicating an increase in overall HRQL. Gender had no influence on the GCBI scores (p > 0.05). Satisfaction scores of the children aged 2-6 years were significantly higher than those of other age groups. Surgical treatment of chronic adenotonsillar disease has a positive impact on children's HRQL. Although surgery is highly effective in all age groups, in terms of children's quality of life, better results can be obtained if the operation is done in the earliest years of life.

  10. Quality of life in patients with erythema nodosum leprosum in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix B Yap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a paucity of data on quality of life issues in patients with leprosy suffering from erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL. Thus, we aim to study the effect of ENL on quality of life. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Hansen's Clinic, Hospital Kuala Lumpur between January 2010 and December 2013 among patients with multibacillary leprosy using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI. Results: A total of 153 patients participated with 31.4% suffering from ENL. The mean age at presentation was 40.5 ± 16.49 years. The mean DLQI was 7.1 ± 3.72. Patients with ENL were younger (mean age 36.5 vs. 42.4, P = 0.026, had higher mean bacteriologic index (4.3 vs. 3.8, P = 0.004, had physical deformities (47.9% vs. 31.4%, P = 0.049, and had higher mean DLQI score (9.1 vs. 6.2, P < 0.001. All the DLQI domains were higher in patients suffering from ENL except the treatment domain. Symptoms and feeling was the domain with the largest effect followed by daily activities and leisure. Personal relationship had the lowest effect. Conclusion: Quality of life impairment in patients with leprosy in Malaysia is moderate, with larger effect among patients with ENL. The impairment in ENL is comparable to itchy skin conditions such as urticarial and is worse than chronic skin disease such as psoriasis. Thus, it is essential that management of leprosy incorporate quality of life issues.

  11. Acne Vulgaris and Quality of Life Among Young Adults in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Priya Cinna T; Nair, Dhanya G

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic condition affecting more than 85% of adolescents and young adults. It is one of the most common diseases affecting humanity and its impact on quality of life (QoL) is important. The impact of acne on QoL in Indian patients remains undocumented. The study was undertaken to detect the impact of acne vulgaris and related factors that may influence the QoL. Materials and Methods: This was a hospital-based, prospective, cross-sectional, prestructured, questionnaire-based study done on 140 consenting individuals, who attended the Dermatology outpatient department. Acne vulgaris was graded using simple grading system. QoL was measured using a combination of skin disease-specific (Dermatological Life Quality Index (DLQI)) and acne-specific (Cardiff Acne Disability Index (CADI)) questionnaires. Results: Majority of our study population were students (103, 73.6%). Face (139, 99.3%) was the commonest site of acne and comedones 133, 95% were the commonest type of lesion. Most of the individuals 66, 47.1% were observed to have grade 1 acne. The mean DLQI score was 6.91 and the mean CADI score was 5.2. Association between the scores was statistically significant. Age, occupation, marital status, family, and treatment history played a role in affecting the QoL. Diet, smoking, and alcohol did not influence the QoL. Conclusion: Though acne had impact on patient's QoL, it was less severe in our study. It is important for health professionals to incorporate QoL measurements when managing acne patients to provide better and appropriate care. PMID:25657394

  12. Health-related quality of life in psoriasis: an analysis of Psocare project patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandonaro, F; Altomare, G; Berardesca, E; Calzavara-Pinton, P; Chimenti, S; Girolomoni, G; Peserico, A; Guerra, A Puglisi; Vena, G A; Polistena, B; Ayala, F

    2011-06-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic, immune-mediated skin disorder that may be complicated by psoriatic arthritis in up to one-third of patients. Psoriasis treatments are increasingly effective, yet more expensive, thus requiring rational decision-making on interventional priorities. The ability to perform cost-utility analyses is hindered by the lack of algorithms that allow the inference of utility measures, like QALY, from specific dermatological health-related quality-of-life (HR-QoL) measures (e.g. Dermatology Life Quality Index [DLQI]). This study aimed to assess whether psoriasis-related HR-QoL data (DLQI) could be used to obtain utility measures for use in economic analyses. Psoriasis patients attending 11 Italian Psocare project treatment centers over a 19-day period were enrolled and completed a questionnaire, including several HR-QoL scales and sociodemographic/clinical data, and underwent a clinical examination. Data were subjected to a Multiple Correspondence Analysis and multiple regression analysis to determine the contribution of single items to the HR-QoL. DLQI and Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) scores were most closely correlated with the EuroQol health status index. Age and gender were considered confounding factors, while pain and arthritis contributed significantly to HR-QoL deterioration. For disease severity, the need for hospitalization and the number of examinations, but not the Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI), contributed to HR-QoL deterioration. Recent historical clinical and HR-QoL data from psoriasis patients can reproducibly define a health status index, such as the EuroQol SD-5Q, that could be used reliably to estimate QALYs for use in cost-utility analyses to compare the cost-benefit profiles of competing therapies.

  13. Correlations among steroid fear, acceptability, usage frequency, quality of life and disease severity in childhood eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Kam Lun; Tsang, Yin Ching K; Pong, Nga Hin; Luk, David C K; Lee, Vivian W; Woo, Wing Man; Lam, Chak Yiu Justin; Yeung, Yun Ting Eunice; Chau, Yiu Shing Sunny; Chui, Ka Kam Kenneth; Li, Ka Hin Gabriel; Leung, Ting Fan

    2015-10-01

    Topical corticosteroids (CSs) are the mainstay of treatment for eczema but CS phobia and fears are prevalent and influence therapeutic efficacy. To quantify if CS acceptability and fear affect patients' quality-of-life (QoL). Patients with eczema managed in the pediatric dermatology outpatient clinic of a university hospital were surveyed. Nottingham Eczema Severity Score (NESS) for severity, Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) for QoL, CS fear, acceptability and reported frequency of CS use were measured with quantified questions. CS fears were prevalent among parents and caregivers of patients with eczema. Fifty-eight percent of parents reported general acceptability of CS as being very good or good, and many applied CS to their child regularly every week. However, >40% of parents reported CS fear "always" or "often", 41% reported that they "always" or "often" apply CS only when eczema got worse, 57% would discuss CS fear with their doctors, 30% would request CS-sparing medications and 14% "always" or "often" use traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Fears were predominantly interpersonal and less often iatrogenic in nature. Skin problems were the most concerned side effects of CS. CS acceptability, frequency of CS usage, CS fear and usage of alternative medications were independent domains in eczema management: CS fears correlated with CDLQI; CS usage frequency correlated with NESS and negatively with parental education; and CS acceptability correlated with parental education. Ordinal logistic regressions showed worse QoL was associated with more CS fear (odds ratio: 1.092 [95% CI: 1.023-1.165], p = 0.008). The extent of CS fears is independent of CS acceptability, but correlates with patients' QoL. Desensitization of parental CS fears should be integral part of eczema education and therapeutics in order to improve therapeutic efficacy and patients' QoL.

  14. Measuring of quality of life in autoimmune blistering disorders in Poland. Validation of disease - specific Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (ABQOL) and the Treatment Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (TABQOL) questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinska-Bienias, Agnieszka; Jakubowska, Beata; Kowalewski, Cezary; Murrell, Dedee F; Wozniak, Katarzyna

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune bullous dermatoses (AIBD) are rare, severe diseases resulting from some antibodies activity against the different adhesion structures within the skin and/or mucosa. Few studies investigated quality of life (QOL) in AIBD by generic and dermatology-specific instruments, all reporting strong impact on QOL. Recently, disease-specific measurement tools have been developed: Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (ABQOL) and Treatment of Autoimmune Bullous Disease Quality of Life (TABQOL) questionnaires. The aim of this study was to test the reliability and validity of ABQOL and TABQOL by developing the first foreign language versions and to evaluate ABQOL and TABQOL in Polish patients. The study enrolled 80 patients from the tertiary referral center for AIBD at the outpatient clinic or on admission to the hospital. Sixty six patients completed the 17-item questionnaires of each ABQOL and TABQOL at day 0 and after 5-7 days. Both questionnaires were translated into Polish according to protocol. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability were high (Cronbach α=0.95 for ABQOL, α=0.87 for TABQOL), (R=0.98 for ABQOL, R=0.86 for TABQOL). In convergent validity, the correlation of ABQOL and TABQOL was strong (R=0.81), but low with objective disease activity scales. The strongest impact of AIBD on QOL has been observed in flares and in patients with the onset below 70 years of age. The patients with bullous pemphigoid had the highest QOL compared to other AIBD patients. The ABQOL and TABQOL are reliable and valid instruments for the assessment of QOL in AIBD. Copyright © 2016 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Baby Doe and the Search for a Quality Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, T. Hennessy; Hecimovic, Anton

    1985-01-01

    The author reviews quality of life arguments proposed in Baby Doe cases involving severely handicapped infants and views quality of life in terms of six dimensions: educability, relationships, residence, access, technology, and medical considerations. (CL)

  16. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Dermatology Outpatients: Results From a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; Khurrum, Huma; Al-Natour, Sahar H; Alghamdi, Waleed; Mubki, Thamer; Alzolibani, Abdulatif; Hafez, Dhafer Mohammed Y; AlDraibi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and practice of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among dermatology patients in the Arab world. The aim of this study was to determine knowledge and attitudes about CAM, prevalence of its use, reasons for its use, and types of CAM used in dermatology patients in Saudi Arabia. This was a national survey of various regions of Saudi Arabia. In this cross-sectional study, dermatology outpatients were interviewed using a questionnaire. Sociodemographic characteristics, acceptability, utilization pattern, and reasons for CAM use were elicited. Dermatology life quality index (DLQI) was obtained. Overall, 1901 patients returned complete questionnaires out of 2500 distributed (76% response rate). Of these, 808 (40%) were CAM users, and the majority were woman (55.1%), with a mean age of 31.6±12 years. Most were literate (71.2%) and just over half were married (51.9%). Patients with acute skin diseases were found to be more likely to use CAM (P=.027). The mean DLQI score was higher (worse quality of life) among CAM users than among nonusers (P=.002). The results showed that 315 of 801 (40%) and 250 of 601 (30%) CAM users agreed that CAM methods are safer and more effective than modern medicine, respectively, and 83% will continue to use CAM in future. The most commonly used CAM modalities were vitamins, prayers, natural products, and herbs. Responses indicated that 379 of 803 (47.2%) CAM users did not consult their doctor before using CAM, and 219 of 743 (30%) did not obtain sufficient answers regarding CAM use from their dermatologists. There is a significant use of CAM among dermatology outpatients in Saudi Arabia. In view of the common belief that CAM has fewer side effects than conventional medicine, dermatologists need to increase their awareness of CAM. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Quality of Work Life - A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mily Velayudhan, T. K., Dr.; Yameni, M. D.

    2017-05-01

    The main objective or the purpose of this research is to investigate and identify the significance of work environment towards the performance and also to study the effectiveness of the QWL in the organization. Methods/Analysis:In order to meet the stated objectives a structured questionnaire was framed and data was collected using convenience sampling from 123 employees of the steel manufacturing organization in Chennai, and to study the significant association chi-square was used by the researcher. Findings:QWL of the employees of this steel company can be improved by conducting some more training classes for the employees who are falling in the category of more than 3 to 4 years of experience and >4 years of experience which would boost their self confidence and help them attain their level of satisfaction. Similarly the organization can give some more security to the employees falling in the category of 41 and above so that they feel quite secure in the hand of organization and they can give their paramount performance. Novelty/Improvement:This empirical article on Quality of Work life - A Study’s structured questionnairecan be applied as an Employee opinion Survey taken in once in 6 months on knowing the quality of work life. By doing this survey organizations can get to know the quality of work life of the employees and take necessary steps to improve the QWL among all the Employees. It also helps the employers to know that their employees who are working in their organization are happily working leading to good QWL which will boost up their performance to come happily daily to their work place.

  18. Health-Related Quality of Life in Chronic Pruritus: An Analysis Related to Disease Etiology, Clinical Skin Conditions and Itch Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warlich, Benjamin; Fritz, Fleur; Osada, Nani; Bruland, Philipp; Stumpf, Astrid; Schneider, Gudrun; Dugas, Martin; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Ständer, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown if health-related quality of life (HRQoL) differs between diseases associated with chronic pruritus (CP). To analyze HRQoL in relation to age, gender, skin lesions (primary vs. scratch-induced secondary) and itch intensity. Consecutive patients of our itch clinic were assessed with the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). In 510 CP patients (282 females; median age, 61.4 years), DLQI scores and VAS values were highly correlated, irrespective of the type of skin lesion. Overall, women had a lower HRQoL compared to men (females: 10.7 ± 6.7, males: 8.9 ± 6.7), but female gender was only associated with worse quality of life in patients skin lesion or underlying cause. With limitations to item bias, DLQI is a suitable instrument for estimating quality of life impairment by CP. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Quality of life before surgical ICU admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando J; Santos, Cristina C; Barros, Henrique

    2007-11-12

    Examining the quality of life (QOL) of patients before ICU admission will allow outcome variables to be compared and analyzed in relation to it. The objective of this study was to analyze QOL of patients before admission to a surgical ICU and to study its relationship to outcome and to the baseline characteristics of the patients. All adult patients consecutively admitted to the surgical ICU between November 2004 and April 2005, who underwent non-cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this observational and prospective study. The following patient characteristics were recorded: age, gender, body mass index, ASA physical status, type and magnitude of surgical procedure, length of stay (LOS), in ICU and in hospital, mortality, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS), history of co-morbidities and quality of life survey score (QOLSS). The relationships between QOLSS and ICU variables and outcome were evaluated. The relationship between the total QOLSS and each variable or outcome was assessed by multiple linear regression. One hundred eighty seven patients completed the study. The preadmission QOLSS of the patients studied was 4.43 +/- 4.90; 28% of patients had a normal quality of life (0 points), 38% had between 1 and 5 points (considered mild deterioration), 21% had between 6 and 10 points (moderate deterioration), 10% had between 11 and 15 points (considered major deterioration) and 3% had more than 15 points (severe limitation of quality of life). A worse preadmission QOLSS was associated with higher SAPS II scores, with older patients (age> 65 years) and with ASA physical status (ASA III/IV). Total QOLSS was significantly worse in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities and in patients more severely ill at ICU admission. Patients who died in the ICU and in hospital had worse QOLSS scores compared to those who survived. However, no statistical differences in QOLSS were found in relation to longer ICU stays (ICU LOS). Preadmission QOL correlates with

  20. Quality of life before surgical ICU admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Examining the quality of life (QOL of patients before ICU admission will allow outcome variables to be compared and analyzed in relation to it. The objective of this study was to analyze QOL of patients before admission to a surgical ICU and to study its relationship to outcome and to the baseline characteristics of the patients. Methods: All adult patients consecutively admitted to the surgical ICU between November 2004 and April 2005, who underwent non-cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this observational and prospective study. The following patient characteristics were recorded: age, gender, body mass index, ASA physical status, type and magnitude of surgical procedure, length of stay (LOS, in ICU and in hospital, mortality, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS, history of co-morbidities and quality of life survey score (QOLSS. The relationships between QOLSS and ICU variables and outcome were evaluated. The relationship between the total QOLSS and each variable or outcome was assessed by multiple linear regression. Results: One hundred eighty seven patients completed the study. The preadmission QOLSS of the patients studied was 4.43 ± 4.90; 28% of patients had a normal quality of life (0 points, 38% had between 1 and 5 points (considered mild deterioration, 21% had between 6 and 10 points (moderate deterioration, 10% had between 11 and 15 points (considered major deterioration and 3% had more than 15 points (severe limitation of quality of life. A worse preadmission QOLSS was associated with higher SAPS II scores, with older patients (age> 65 years and with ASA physical status (ASA III/IV. Total QOLSS was significantly worse in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities and in patients more severely ill at ICU admission. Patients who died in the ICU and in hospital had worse QOLSS scores compared to those who survived. However, no statistical differences in QOLSS were found in relation to longer ICU stays

  1. Quality of life in asthma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Noronha Ferreira; Ulisses Brito; Pedro Lopes Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a study whose main aim is the measurement of the Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of patients with asthma and the presentation of a first draft of normative values as measured by the SF-6D for asthma patients. In addition, we investigate how far non-disease-specific HRQoL measures can distinguish groups in terms of sociodemographic characteristics.The Portuguese versions of the EQ-5D, SF-6D, AQLQ(S) and ACQ were administered using personal interviews to a repres...

  2. Quality of life issues relating to endocrine treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1999-01-01

    for measuring health-related quality of life should assess both overall and disease-specific quality of life. Data from two large studies of bicalutamide monotherapy show that this non-steroidal antiandrogen is associated with significant health-related quality of life advantages in the treatment of patients...

  3. Quality of working life of nurses and its related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Tayebeh; Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Azizi-Fini, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    Nurses as the largest group of health care providers should enjoy a satisfactory quality of working life to be able to provide quality care to their patients. Therefore, attention should be paid to the nurses' working life. This study aimed to investigate the quality of nurses' working life in Kashans' hospitals during 2012. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 200 nurses during 2012. The data-gathering instrument consisted of two parts. The first part consisted of questions on demographic information and the second part was the Walton's quality of work life questionnaire. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software. For statistical analysis T test and one way ANOVA were used. The results of the study showed that 60% of nurses reported that they had moderate level of quality of working life while 37.1% and 2% had undesirable and good quality of working life, respectively. Nurses with associate degrees reported a better quality of working life than others. A significant relationship was found between variables such as education level, work experience, and type of hospital with quality of working life score (P quality of working life score of nurses with employment status (P = 0.061), salary (P = 0.052), age, gender and marital status (P > 0.05). Nurses' quality of work life was at the moderate level. As quality of work life has an important impact on attracting and retaining employees, it is necessary to pay more attention to the nurses' quality of work life and its affecting factors.

  4. Flexible work-arrangements and the quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nierop, C.

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt has been made to measure the consequences for the quality of life of working with a part-time and/or temporary contract. Quality of life has been defined in a utilitarian and a liberal way. In the utilitarian definition, the quality of life is determined by the

  5. Quality of Life of Students with Disabilites Attending Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal Fathi; Theeb, Raied Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    In spite of increasing number of students with disabilities in universities, there is limited research on quality of life of these students. This study aimed to identify the quality of life level of undergraduate students with disabilities at Jordanian universities. The sample consisted of (147) students. A quality of life scale was constructed,…

  6. Determinants and predictors of quality of life of hypertension and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL) is emerging as an important outcome in hypertension and diabetes studies. This study aimed to assess the quality of life of hypertension and diabetes patients, in comparison with healthy individuals, to determine socio-demographic and other characteristics affecting quality of life ...

  7. A Literature Review on Quality Teacher’s Working Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak Siti Intan Diyana

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of work life is becoming an imperative issue to achieve the goals of the organization in every sector whether it is education, tourism, service sector, manufacturing, banking sector and other. Quality of work life it about work environment, reward, organizational commitment, recognition, participative management, work life balance, welfare facilities, proper grievances handling, job satisfaction and other. High quality of work life can give a result in better organizational performance, effectiveness and innovativeness. Quality of work life also affects the social responsibility. This is because quality of work life can improves the family life as well as work life of the individual. This paper focuses and analyse the literature review on the quality of teacher work life.justified.

  8. Quality of life in elderly age: areas of concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melehin A.I.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The quality of life in elderly age has special features, depending primarily on the state of health, assessment of the spent life, internal standards, support and ability to operate effectively in changing circumstances. In later ages estimation of quality of life affects the mechanisms of pathogenesis of somatic and mental disorders. Up to date there is no agreement among researchers on criteria of identification and assessment of the quality of life in later ages. This article describes the modern understanding of quality of life and its components. It highlights the issues impeding the improvement of quality of life. The article lists the methods for the evaluation of quality of life in later ages. It also presents the analysis of the main factors affecting the quality of life in elderly patients.

  9. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  10. [LED lights in dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, C; Pelletier-Aouizerate, M; Cartier, H

    2017-04-01

    The use in dermatology of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) continues to be surrounded by controversy. This is due mainly to poor knowledge of the physicochemical phases of a wide range of devices that are difficult to compare to one another, and also to divergences between irrefutable published evidence either at the level of in vitro studies or at the cellular level, and discordant clinical results in a variety of different indications: rejuvenation, acne, wound healing, leg ulcers, and cutaneous inflammatory or autoimmune processes. Therapeutic LEDs can emit wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet, through visible light, to the near infrared (247-1300 nm), but only certain bands have so far demonstrated any real value. We feel certain that if this article remains factual, then readers will have a different, or at least more nuanced, opinion concerning the use of such LED devices in dermatology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Homeopathy in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolle, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Alternative methods are commonly used in patients with dermatologic diseases, with homeopathy being one of the most common. Homeopathy was developed by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) and is based on the law of similars and the law of infinitesimals. It is a regulatory therapy where high dilutions of particular compounds are thought to induce a counterreaction in the organism. In dermatology, homeopathy is often used in atopic dermatitis, other forms of eczema, psoriasis, and many other conditions. To date, however, there is no convincing evidence for a therapeutic effect. There are only a few controlled trials, most of them with negative results. The few studies with positive results have not been reproduced. Acceptance by the patient seems largely based on counseling and emotional care rather than on objective responses to the homeopathic drugs.

  12. Nocebo effect in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Sonthalia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocebo effect, originally denoting the negative counterpart of the placebo phenomenon, is now better defined as the occurrence of adverse effects to a therapeutic intervention because the patient expects them to develop. More commonly encountered in patients with a past negative experience, this effect stems from highly active processes in the central nervous system, mediated by specific neurotransmitters and modulated by psychological mechanisms such as expectation and conditioning. The magnitude of nocebo effect in clinical medicine is being increasingly appreciated and its relevance encompasses clinical trials as well as clinical practice. Although there is hardly any reference to the term nocebo in dermatology articles, the phenomenon is encountered routinely by dermatologists. Dermatology patients are more susceptible to nocebo responses owing to the psychological concern from visibility of skin lesions and the chronicity, unpredictable course, lack of ′permanent cure′ and frequent relapses of skin disorders. While finasteride remains the prototypical drug that displays a prominent nocebo effect in dermatologic therapeutics, other drugs such as isotretinoin are also likely inducers. This peculiar phenomenon has recently been appreciated in the modulation of itch perception and in controlled drug provocation tests in patients with a history of adverse drug reactions. Considering the conflict between patients′ right to information about treatment related adverse effects and the likelihood of nocebo effect stemming from information disclosure, the prospect of ethically minimizing nocebo effect remains daunting. In this article, we review the concept of nocebo effect, its postulated mechanism, relevance in clinical dermatology and techniques to prevent it from becoming a barrier to effective patient management.

  13. Hepatitis C in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zonunsanga

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C is a serious public health problem all over the world. It is caused by a single stranded RNA virus. Most acute infections are subclinical, but in 75% of individuals, infection leads to a chronic hepatitis, which in some cases can progress to cirrhosis and occasionally development of hepatoma. It has wide range of dermatological manifestations. This review article deals with the overview of epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, management and prevention.

  14. Evaluation of anxiety, depression, and quality of life in patients with acne vulgaris, and quality of life in their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Duman

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Acne vulgaris does not have an effect on quality of life and the risk of anxiety or depression. In the cases of acne, when the quality of life decreases, the risk of depression as well as anxiety increases and the quality of life of the family members is negatively affected. Acne vulgaris negatively affects the quality of life of the family members of the patients.

  15. Evaluation of patient satisfaction in pediatric dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sarah; Miller, Jonathan; Burrows, James F; Bertha, Ben Khallouq; Rosen, Paul

    2017-11-01

    There remains a lack of investigation into which factors patients and families value the most in their experience at pediatric dermatology clinics. Most of the current literature on quality improvement in dermatology does not encompass the pediatric population. To determine the drivers that are most predictive of a positive patient experience, we observed the indirect relationship between several factors of the patient experience and their role in patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction surveys were distributed after their visits to patients at four pediatric dermatology clinics in one children's academic health system. Data were collected and organized into the top 30 survey variables with which patients expressed satisfaction on a 5-point Likert scale. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients (r) for each variable with regard to "likelihood of your recommending our practice to others" were calculated. A total of 516 families completed patient satisfaction surveys. Analyses of top box scores showed that the strongest predictors of patient satisfaction were the likelihood of recommending care provider (r = .77, P = dermatology. Identifying such variables that shape patients' assessments of their experience can guide future quality improvement plans in the specialty. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Contact sensitisation in hand eczema patients-relation to subdiagnosis, severity and quality of life: a multi-centre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T.; Andersen, K.E.; Brandao, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Contact sensitisation has been identified as a factor associated with poor prognosis for patients with hand eczema. Objectives To study implications of contact sensitisation with respect to severity, quality of life (QoL) and subdiagnosis of hand eczema. Methods The study was performed...... and presence of contact sensitisation were independent risk factors for increased severity as measured by Hand Eczema Severity Index. Furthermore, the severity of hand eczema increased by the number of contact sensitisations detected (P = 0.023). High age and personal history of atopic eczema were independent...... risk factors for low QoL, as measured by Dermatology Life Quality Index, and atopic eczema as well as allergic contact dermatitis as subdiagnosis was associated with increased sick leave. Conclusion Diagnostic subgroups were not found to be related to specific allergens. Contact sensitisation was found...

  17. Short-contact clobetasol propionate shampoo 0.05% improves quality of life in patients with scalp psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jerry; Thomas, Richard; Wang, Béatrice; Gratton, David; Vender, Ronald; Kerrouche, Nabil; Villemagne, Hervé

    2009-03-01

    Scalp psoriasis has a considerable impact on the quality of life (QOL) of patients, and most patients are dissatisfied with available treatments. Clobetasol propionate shampoo 0.05% has been shown to be effective and safe for moderate to severe scalp psoriasis. We evaluated the effect of clobetasol propionate shampoo on QOL and the degree of participant satisfaction with the product. Participants received once-daily treatment for up to 4 weeks. Their QOL and degree of satisfaction were evaluated by questionnaires. The mean (standard deviation) Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) score decreased significantly from 7.0 (4.9) at baseline to 3.2 (3.2) at week 4 (Pshampoo improved the QOL of participants and resulted in high satisfaction.

  18. Dermatology in the new millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jayakar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatology in the new millennium will have to focus on the demands, hopes, and satisfaction of those who look at themselves as having skin liaments. Governments may modify this by declaring some unperceived needs as important and therefore fundable and others as unimportant. Hopefully there should be equity, the women will be equal to men, and poor countries equal to the rich. The importance of skin to the individual will not diminish and hopefully will be better recognized by funding agencies. The costs of treating skin diseases will always be an issue, and the case for treating skin diseases will have to be made in the competitive world of much life threatening disease. Dermatologists may themselves opt out of treating conditions which governance deems important. An example would be all breaks in surface continuity of the skin which other professions might wish to take over as leg ulcers, the diabetic foot ulcer, the pressure sore, or burns.

  19. Quality of Life Theory I. The IQOL Theory: An Integrative Theory of the Global Quality of Life Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life (QOL means a good life and we believe that a good life is the same as living a life with a high quality. This paper presents the theoretical and philosophical framework of the Danish Quality of Life Survey, and of the SEQOL, QOL5, and QOL1 questionnaires.The notion of a good life can be observed from subjective to the objective, where this spectrum incorporates a number of existing quality of life theories. We call this spectrum the integrative quality-of-life (IQOL theory and discuss the following aspects in this paper: well being, satisfaction with life, happiness, meaning in life, the biological information system (�balance�, realizing life potential, fulfillment of needs, and objective factors.The philosophy of life outlined in this paper tries to measure the global quality of life with questions derived from the integrative theory of the quality of life. The IQOL theory is an overall theory or meta-theory encompassing eight more factual theories in a subjective-existential-objective spectrum. Other philosophies of life can stress other aspects of life, but by this notion of introducing such an existential depth into the health and social sciences, we believe to have taken a necessary step towards a new humility and respect for the richness and complexity of life.

  20. Esthetic and cosmetic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto; Berger, Uwe; Abdel-Naser, Mohammed Badawy

    2008-01-01

    The field of esthetic and cosmetic dermatology has gained remarkable interest all over the world. The major advantage of recent years is the high scientific levels of the most significant new developments in techniques and pharmacotherapy and other nonsurgical approaches. The present paper reviews selected fields of interest under this view. Sexual hormones are involved in the aging process of men and women. Skin function, in particular the epidermal barrier, is affected by a loss of endocrine activity. Hormone replacement therapy has only recently been introduced in treatment of aging males. This is an area of gender-medicine in dermatology with a strong well-aging attempt. Botulinum toxin therapy for hyperfunctional lines has become not only well-established but evidence-based medicine on its highest level. Recent advantages were gained in objective evaluation and monitoring the effect. Digital imaging techniques with various facets have been introduced to assess the achievements of treatment in the most objective way. This may become an example for other techniques as peeling, laser therapy, or radiofrequency in esthetic and cosmetic dermatology. Botulinum toxin has become a valuable tool for brow lifts. Details of the technique are discussed. Cellulite is a strongly female gender-related condition. During the past decades numerous treatments had been recommended but only recently a more critical scientific approach led to improvements in therapy of this common and disfiguring condition. Three major approaches are developed: (a) skin loosing with techniques such as subcision, (b) skin tightening with radiofrequency and other approaches, and (c) improving circulation in blood and lymphatic microvasculature using both physical treatments and pharmacotherapy. The last two chapters are devoted to body sculpturing by lipotransfer and lipolysis. Lipotransfer for facial or body sculpturing has a history of about 100 years. Nevertheless, recently the role of adult stem

  1. The quality of life and satisfaction with life of women who are childless by choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bień, Agnieszka; Rzońca, Ewa; Iwanowicz-Palus, Grażyna; Lecyk, Urszula; Bojar, Iwona

    2017-05-11

    Objective. The study attempts to identify and analyze factors affecting the quality of life and satisfaction with life of women who are childless by choice. Materials and method. The research instruments used were: the WHOQOL-Bref questionnaire and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and author's own questionnaire. Results. A better overall quality of life, perception of own health and quality of life in all the specific domains analyzed was found among childless women living in cities, college/university-educated, and with a good or very good financial standing. Conclusions. A positive correlation was found between satisfaction with life and overall quality of life, general perceived health, and all quality of life domains. Higher satisfaction with life scores in childless women are correlated with a higher quality of life scores and better perceived health.

  2. Probiotics, Prebiotics, and Synbiotics for the Treatment and Prevention of Adult Dermatological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notay, Manisha; Foolad, Negar; Vaughn, Alexandra R; Sivamani, Raja K

    2017-12-01

    Probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic supplementation is becoming more prevalent nowadays. Clinical studies have demonstrated some of the medical benefits of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics within dermatology but an evidence-based review of their effects in adults is needed. The aim of this study was to identify evidence for the use of supplementation with probiotics, prebiotics, or synbiotics for the prevention and treatment of dermatological diseases in adults. We conducted a search of the Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials and EMBASE electronic databases from 1 January 1946 to 11 January 2017. Trials examining supplementation in the treatment of dermatological diseases using oral or topical probiotics, synbiotics, and prebiotics in adults over the age of 18 years were selected. Of 315 articles, 12 met the inclusion criteria. Nutritional supplementation with probiotics and prebiotics was shown to improve atopic dermatitis (AD) symptomatology, quality of life, or clinical severity in six of nine studies. One study in psoriasis was shown to improve inflammatory markers, and one study suggested that probiotics could be used as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of acne. Preliminary studies are optimistic for the use of some strains of probiotics for symptomatic and clinical improvement in AD, and as adjunctive treatment with antibiotics for acne. Further research is necessary to better assess how probiotics and prebiotics may be used within dermatology.

  3. Health, Quality of Life and Population Density: A Preliminary Study on "Contextualized" Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassio, Omar; Rollero, Chiara; De Piccoli, Norma

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life concerns individual (physical and psychological health), interpersonal (social relationships) and contextual (environment) aspects, which are both subjective and objective. In considering contextual characteristics, empirical findings have demonstrated that people's relation to their living environment is a key issue for their…

  4. A Literature Review on Quality Teacher’s Working Life

    OpenAIRE

    Ishak Siti Intan Diyana; Abd Razak Nordin; Hussin H.; Fhiri @ Daud Nur Suriaty; Ishak Aida Shakila

    2018-01-01

    Quality of work life is becoming an imperative issue to achieve the goals of the organization in every sector whether it is education, tourism, service sector, manufacturing, banking sector and other. Quality of work life it about work environment, reward, organizational commitment, recognition, participative management, work life balance, welfare facilities, proper grievances handling, job satisfaction and other. High quality of work life can give a result in better organizational performanc...

  5. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-01-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures. (orig.)

  6. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-03-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures.

  7. MOTIVASI KERJA GURU HONORER DITINJAU DARI QUALITY OF WORK LIFE

    OpenAIRE

    HARIWIBOWO, HERWINDO; ROSALINDA, IRMA; KHAIR, ADE SHABRINA

    2015-01-01

    Motivation work temporary teachers are needed in education. With a high work motivation is expected teachers will have quality in transferring knowledge to learners. One study to measure work motivation is related to quality of work life. This study aims whether there is influence of quality of work life on the motivation of teachers work honorary. Researcher used scale quantitative methods psychology. Researcher used adapted instrument, namely Motivation Teacher Work and Quality of Work Life...

  8. Energy demand and life quality in America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.

    2004-01-01

    Being considered an intermediate growth among projections of technological development expressive or of development restricted by ecological considerations, in the next 50 years, the demand of primary energy in the countries of the American continent arrived to value sufficiently high to allow to consent at levels of quality of life but next to those enjoyed at the moment in developed countries. There will be an expansion substantial of electric power demand that rots to require the installation, in countries of Latin America and Caribbean, of power plants with total capacity of the order of 400 GW until half-filled of century. The resource to the nuclear source was accentuated starting from the decade of 2020 and an enormous challenge for the governments of the region it will be the one of driving the construction of about 2.300 MW/year nuclear power plants between 2020 and 2050. (Author)

  9. Quality of life in psoriasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Matthias; Radtke, Marc Alexander

    2014-08-01

    Patient-reported outcomes are major components of decision making in clinical research, reimbursement, health policy and health care for psoriasis. The most important construct in patient-reported outcomes is health-related quality of life (HRQoL) which encompasses the individual's well-being with respect to health. HRQoL cannot directly be measured but is assessed in single dimensions, especially physical, emotional, social and functional aspects. For this, disease- and condition-specific instruments are used. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the skin as well as other tissues and organ systems. Patients suffer from a large scale of impairments, for example, physical symptoms, stigmatization and embarrassment, psychological strain and disabilities in profession. Improvement of HRQoL is a major objective of disease management. Current knowledge on determinants of HRQoL and the treatments available increase QoL in clinical care.

  10. Quality of life after planned neck dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwae, Shigemichi; Hirayama, Yuji; Komatsu, Hirokazu

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of planned neck dissection (PND) after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on quality of life (QOL) by using a self-administered neck dissection questionnaire and an arm abduction test. Subjects are fourteen patients who had undergone CCRT followed by planned selective neck dissection for the treatment of mesopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. The findings of the survey were compared with thirty-two patients who had undergone CCRT alone. Patients without PND had better scores on measures of pain, constriction, numbness and appearance of the neck, but had no advantage about arm abduction. After PND, the patients who had dissected dominant hand side had lower satisfaction compared with those who had dissected non-dominant hand side. (author)

  11. Diversity in the dermatology workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Jorge A; Pandya, Amit G

    2016-12-01

    The United States is becoming increasingly diverse, and minorities are projected to represent the majority of our population in the near future. Unfortunately, health disparities still exist for these groups, and inequalities have also become evident in the field of dermatology. There is currently a lack of diversity within the dermatology workforce. Potential solutions to these health care disparities include increasing cultural competence for all physicians and improving diversity in the dermatology workforce. ©2016 Frontline Medical Communications.

  12. Quality of life after carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most studies documenting beneficial outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CE are limited to mortality and morbidity rates, costs, and length of hospital stay (LOS. Few have examined the dependency of patients and how they perceive their own health changes after surgery. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quality of life and independence in activities of daily living (ADL and to study its determinants. Methods Sixty-three patients admitted in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU after CE were eligible for this 14-month follow-up study. Patients were contacted 6 months after discharge to complete a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36 and to have their dependency in ADL evaluated. Results Among 59 hospital survivors at 6 months follow-up, 43 completed the questionnaires. Sixty-three percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients had worse SF-36 scores for all domains except bodily pain than a general urban population, and comparison with a group of patients 6 months after surgical ICU discharge showed no differences. Six months after PACU discharge, the Lawton Instrumental Activities of ADL Scale and the Katz Index of ADL demonstrated higher dependency scores (5.9 ± 2.2 versus 4.3 ± 2.4 and 0.3 ± 0.8 versus 0.6 ± 0.9, p Conclusion Patients undergoing CE have improved self-perception of quality of life despite being more dependent. Almost all their scores are worse than those in an urban population. We could identify no predictors of greater dependency in ADL tasks six months after PACU discharge.

  13. Energy, EROI and quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Jessica G.; Hall, Charles A.S.; Balogh, Stephen; Gupta, Ajay; Arnold, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The near- and long-term societal effects of declining EROI are uncertain, but probably adverse. A major obstacle to examining social implications of declining EROI is that we do not have adequate empirical understanding of how EROI is linked, directly or indirectly, to an average citizen′s ability to achieve well-being. To evaluate the possible linkages between societal well-being and net energy availability, we compare these preliminary estimates of energy availability: (1) EROI at a societal level, (2) energy use per capita, (3) multiple regression analyses and (4) a new composite energy index (Lambert Energy Index), to select indicators of quality of life (HDI, percent children under weight, health expenditures, Gender Inequality Index, literacy rate and access to improved water). Our results suggest that energy indices are highly correlated with a higher standard of living. We also find a saturation point at which increases in per capita energy availability (greater than 150 GJ) or EROI (above 20:1) are not associated with further improvement to society. - Highlights: • Large quantities of high quality energy appears to contribute to social well-being. • LEI examines the quantity, efficiency and distribution of energy within the system. • EROI SOC of SOC of 20–30:1, 100–200 GJ/capita and LEI 0.2–0.4. • Improvement in well-being levels off at: EROI SOC >30:1, >200 GJ/capita and LEI>0.4

  14. Type 2 diabetes and quality of life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aikaterini; Trikkalinou; Athanasia; K; Papazafiropoulou; Andreas; Melidonis

    2017-01-01

    It is true that a primary goal of diabetes early diagnosis and treatment is quality of life(QoL). The term QoL is still confusing but it is agreed that it composes of four components:The physical component, mental, cogitative component, psychological and social component. Many articles have been written addressing those four components. During the last five years 15500 articles and reviews have been written addressing diabetes and coronary arterial disease, 16100 addressing diabetes and renal function, 28900 addressing diabetes and retinopathy, 16800 addressing diabetic foot ulcers and other 26300 addressing diabetic neuropathy. Moreover 17200 articles are dealing with diabetic sexual dysfunction, 24500 with the correlation of diabetes and depression 17500 about diabetes and dementia, only 1 about diabetes and family functioning and 1950000 about diabetes and QoL, indicating the worldwide interest. In order to confront this metabolic anomaly and its consequences, researchers developed numerous generic and disease specific psychometric tools. With the aid of those psychometric tools the scientific community has started to realize the gruesome effect of diabetes on patients’ lives. Diabetic’s QoL becomes worse when complications start to develop or comorbidities coexist. Dominant amongst complications, in health-related quality of life(HRQoL) lowering, but not related to risk factors(genetic, the weight of birth, or others) is coronary arterial disease followed by renal failure, blindness, and the combination of micro-and macrovascular complications and in some studies by sexual dysfunction. Moreover many are the comorbidities which deteriorate further the effect of diabetes in a patient life. Among them obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, depression, arthritis are the most common. Most intriguing field for research is the interaction of diabetes and depression and in some cases the progression to dementia. Many aspects and combinations of actions are under

  15. Differential time preferences for money and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parouty, M. B. Y.; Le, Hoa; Krooshof, D.; Postma, M. J.

    Background This study provides an empirical investigation into differential time preferences between money and quality of life. Thus far, time preference investigations in health have mostly involved life-years gained and lives saved. However, the quality-adjusted life-year, which is recommended by

  16. Subjective Quality of Life and Perceived Adequacy of Social Support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One such major concern pertains to the very general experiences of life of the elderly and associated factors. The purpose of this study was then to specifically assess the subjective quality of life and perceived adequacy of social support and the possible socio-demographic factors making differences in quality of life.

  17. Parenting the Premature Infant: Balancing Vulnerability and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiser, C.; Eiser, J. R.; Mayhew, A. G.; Gibson, A. T.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Relationships between child quality of life (QOL), maternal well-being and parenting were explored in a questionnaire study. Method: Mothers of 126 full-term (FT) and 91 pre-term (PT) infants during the child's second year of life completed measures of their own and the child's quality of life and behavioural difficulties. We developed…

  18. OCT in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, John; Welzel, Julia

    OCT is increasingly interesting for non-invasive skin imaging in Dermatology. Due to its resolution and imaging depth, OCT is already routinely established for diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer, whereas for pigmented lesions, the resolution is still not high enough. OCT has also a high value for monitoring of treatment effects, for example to control healing after non-surgical topical treatment of basal cell carcinomas. In summary, there are several indications for applications of OCT to image skin diseases, and its importance will grow in the future due to further technical developments like speckle variance OCT.

  19. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  20. Dermatological laser treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moerk, N.J.; Austad, J.; Helland, S.; Thune, P.; Volden, G.; Falk, E.

    1991-01-01

    The article reviews the different lasers used in dermatology. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of naevus flammeus (''portwine stain'') where lasers are the treatment of choice. Argon laser and pulsed dye laser are the main lasers used in vascular skin diseases, and the article focuses on these two types. Copper-vapour laser, neodymium-YAG laser and CO 2 laser are also presented. Information is provided about the availability of laser technology in the different health regions in Norway. 5 refs., 2 figs

  1. Obesity and dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinfeld, Noah S

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a number of dermatoses. It affects cutaneous sensation, temperature regulation, foot shape, and vasculature. Acanthosis nigricans is the most common dermatological manifestation of obesity. Skin tags are more commonly associated with diabetes than with obesity. Obesity increases the incidence of cutaneous infections that include: candidiasis, intertigo, candida folliculitis, furunculosis, erythrasma, tinea cruris, and folliculitis. Less common infections include cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, and gas gangrene. Leg ulcerations, lymphedema, plantar hyperkeratosis, and striae are more common with obesity. Hormonal abnormalities and genetic syndromes (Prader-Willi) are related to obesity and its dermatoses; however, cellulite is not related to obesity.

  2. Spa therapy in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeba Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spa therapy constitutes the use of mineral springs and thermal mud to soothe and heal various ailments. Like the mineral springs, seas and oceans are also important centers for spa therapy of which the most important is Dead Sea (DS. DS has been famous for thousands of years for its miraculous curative and cosmetic properties. Intensive research is going on using DS minerals in a wide range of dermatological conditions especially psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and other eczemas and several papers have been published in various international and pharmacological journals.

  3. Task Shifting in Dermatology: A Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Danielle N; Langan, Sinéad M; Freeman, Esther E

    2017-11-01

    Can task shifting be used to improve the delivery of dermatologic care in resource-poor settings worldwide? Task shifting is a means of redistributing available resources, whereby highly trained individuals train an available workforce to provide necessary care in low-resource settings. Limited evidence exists for task shifting in dermatology; however, studies from psychiatry demonstrate its efficacy. In the field of dermatology there is a need for high-quality evidence including randomized clinical trials to validate the implementation of task shifting in low-resource settings globally.

  4. Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms and Quality of Life in mothers of Children With Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, S; Usak, E; Ozen, S; Gorpelioglu, C

    2017-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children and it can negatively affect both children and their families. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of atopic dermatitis on quality of life related to maternal health and maternal obsessive compulsive symptoms. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the pediatric and dermatology polyclinics. The SCORAD index was used for determining the severity of disease, and the Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory (MOCI) and SF-36 form were applied to the participants' mothers. A total of 120 children and their mothers participated the study. Comparing the atopic dermatitis group and the healthy control group, no statistically significant differences were seen in terms of MOCI and SF-36 scores, except for the physical functioning subscore. The results showed that having a child with atopic dermatitis and the severity of the disease do not influence their mothers in terms of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and health-related quality of life, except for physical functioning scores. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Willingness to pay and quality of life in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beikert, F C; Langenbruch, A K; Radtke, M A; Kornek, T; Purwins, S; Augustin, M

    2014-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a frequent and burdensome disease. The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the willingness to pay (WTP) and quality of life (Qol) in AD patients and (2) to compare the results with data on other chronic skin diseases. To collect data, a non-interventional, cross-sectional nationwide postal survey on adult patients with clinically diagnosed AD was performed; socio-demographic data, clinical features/symptoms, WTP and QoL were recorded. WTP was assessed in three different approaches, including relative and absolute figures. Data from n = 384 AD patients (mean age 42.0, range 18-92, 69.8 % female) were analyzed. WTP for complete healing was on median 1,000 (average 11,884) and exceeded WTP in rosacea (median 500) but not in vitiligo (median 3,000). Mean Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) was 8.5 (vitiligo 7.0; psoriasis 6.7; rosacea 4.3) and correlated with pruritus, xerosis and disturbed sleep. WTP and DLQI correlated only marginally (r s = 0.134, p = 0.01). In conclusion, AD patients show high WTP and markedly reduced QoL compared to other chronic skin diseases.

  6. In psoriasis, levels of hope and quality of life are linked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawro, Tomasz; Maurer, Marcus; Hawro, Marlena; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Cierpiałkowska, Lidia; Królikowska, Monika; Zalewska, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Psychological resources such as hope have been suggested to positively influence quality of life (QoL) in chronic disorders. Here, we determined hope levels of psoriasis vulgaris in-patients and analyzed their relation to QoL. A total of 60 (29 male) patients were assessed for their QoL with a generic tool (WHOQOL-BREF) and a skin disease-specific instrument, the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Hope levels were determined by use of the Basic Hope Inventory. We found a positive correlation between hope and all domains of WHOQOL-BREF (physical: r = 0.446, p = 0.000; psychological r = 0.464, p = 0.000; social r = 0.302, p = 0.019; environmental r = 0.480, p = 0000; and global r = 0.501, p = 0.000) and a negative correlation with DLQI (r = -0.281, p = 0.030) indicating higher QoL in patients with high hope. Hope was not correlated with disease severity or duration. Hope may play a substantial role in preventing QoL impairment in psoriasis. Psychotherapeutic interventions aimed at strengthening hope could improve QoL in this condition.

  7. Assessment of Life Quality Index Among Patients with Acne Vulgaris in a Suburban Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Neirita; Rajaprabha, Radha K

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of adolescents, often extending into adulthood. Psychosocial impact of acne on health-related quality of life (QoL) has been identified, but it remains under-evaluated, especially in Indian patients. This study was aimed to assess the impact of acne and its sequelae on the QoL. This was a hospital-based, prospective, cross-sectional study done between June and November 2014 on 114 consenting patients above 15 years of age with acne vulgaris. Acne vulgaris and its sequelae were graded, and QoL was assessed by using Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire. Most cases (64%) were between 15 and 20 years. Females (57%) outnumbered males. Facial lesions (61.4%) and grade II acne were most common. Mean DLQI score was 7.22. DLQI scores were statistically influenced by the age of the patient, duration and grade of acne, acne scar, and postacne hyperpigmentation. This study showed significant impairment of QoL in acne patients. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris are important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment.

  8. Clinical profile and quality of life of patients with occupational contact dermatitis from New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Riti; Sharma, Vinod K; Ramam, M; Sethuraman, Gomathy; Yadav, Chander P

    2015-09-01

    Data regarding occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) and its effect on quality of life (QOL) in India are limited. To evaluate patients with OCD and record the outcome of treatment. All patients with OCD were evaluated for severity of disease (by the use of physician global assessment) and its effect on QOL (by use of the Dermatology Life Quality Index) questionnaire) at the first visit and after 3 months of treatment. Among 117 patients with OCD, hand eczema was present in 81.2%. Positive patch test reactions were found in 76%. The most common allergens were Parthenium hysterophorus and potassium dichromate. The most frequent diagnosis was occupational allergic contact dermatitis (OACD) (57%), caused by farming and construction work, followed by occupational irritant contact dermatitis (OICD) (24%), caused by wet work. Severe psychosocial distress was recorded in 62.5% of patients. After 3 months of treatment, 83% improved significantly, and 54% had improvement in QOL. Farmers were most frequently affected, followed by construction workers and housewives. OACD was found at a higher frequency than OICD. The most frequent allergens were Parthenium hysterophorus in farmers, potassium dichromate in construction workers, and vegetables in housewives. OCD has a significant impact on QOL. Patch testing, in addition to standard treatment, improves the outcome considerably. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Camouflage for patients with vitiligo vulgaris improved their quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanioka, Miki; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Kato, Mayumi; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2010-03-01

    Cosmetic camouflage is important for patients with vitiligo vulgaris. However, few studies have investigated its benefit for vitiligo patients. To analyze the psychological effects on patients with vitiligo vulgaris by camouflage lessons performed in vitiligo clinics in Kyoto University Hospital and Fukui Red Cross Hospital, Dermatological Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaires were collected before and 1 month after camouflage lessons. Patients with vitiligo vulgaris, who visited our clinics in 2008 and had never experienced camouflage, were enrolled in this study. They took camouflage lessons and continued subsequent self-camouflage for 1 month. Control patients took no lessons and no camouflage. Camouflage improved the scores of DLQI when compared with those without camouflage (P = 0.005). Camouflage improved DLQI scores from 5.90 to 4.48. In DLQI subcategories, camouflage lessons improved a subcategory of "symptoms and feelings" (P = 0.0037). These data supported the idea that camouflage for patients with vitiligo not only covers the white patches but also improves their quality of life.

  10. Anxiety, depression and impaired health-related quality of life in patients with occupational hand eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Dana; Schmid-Ott, Gerhard; Finkeldey, Florence; John, Swen Malte; Dwinger, Christine; Werfel, Thomas; Diepgen, Thomas L; Breuer, Kristine

    2012-10-01

    Occupational hand eczema is one of the most frequent occupational diseases. Few data about the prevalence of mental comorbidities are available. Objectives. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of anxiety, depression symptoms, the impairment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and their correlates in patients with occupational hand eczema. A test battery consisting of the German versions of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) as a specific instrument and the Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36) as a generic instrument for HRQoL was applied in 122 patients. The severity of hand eczema was assessed with the Osnabrueck Hand Eczema Severity Index (OHSI). Twenty per cent of patients had a positive anxiety score, and 14% had a positive depression score. Higher anxiety levels, a greater impairment in the SF-36 mental component summary score and a higher DLQI category score for symptoms and feelings was detected in females than in males. The OHSI correlated with the impairment in HRQoL, and an association of severe hand eczema with symptoms of anxiety and depression was found in males. We found a high prevalence of anxiety and depression in our study population of patients with occupational hand eczema. Preventive measures should consider the psychosocial implications of occupational hand eczema. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Measurement of quality of life II. From the philosophy of life to science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav; Andersen, Niels Jørgen

    2003-10-13

    We believe it should be possible to make operational the philosophical ideas of the good life in order to make it the object of scientific research. The Quality of Life Research Center in Copenhagen, Denmark has therefore spent the last several years with these questions and tried to find practical and evidence-based scientific solutions. This paper describes the theoretical road taken in moving from the abstract philosophy of life to the actual questionnaire. It presents an important aspect of our work with the quality-of-life (QOL) concept though the last decade. We have developed the quality-of-life philosophy; the SEQOL, QOL5, and QOL1 questionnaires; the quality-of-life theory; and the quality-of-life research methodology. We carried out quality-of-life population surveys and developed techniques for improving quality of life with the chronically sick patient. This paper presents the struggle to create a rating scale for the generic measurement of the global quality of life, based on quality-of-life theory, derived from quality-of-life philosophy. The developed rating scale is a ratio scale combining a Likert scale, a visual analogue scale, and a numerical scale, to a reduced combination scale. This allows for the extraction of as much information from the respondents as possible without exhausting them unduly or demanding more than can be reasonably expected.

  12. Why Quality of Work Life Doesn't Always Mean Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah Shaw

    1981-01-01

    From participatory management to autonomous work groups, the quality of work life movement has made an impact on U.S. corporations. To make the quality of work life connection, commitment must originate with top management. (Author)

  13. Impact of a dermatology wiki website on dermatology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimkhani, Chante; Boyers, Lindsay N; Ellis, Lixia Z; Brice, Sylvia; Chen, David L; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2015-01-15

    The Dermatology Education Wiki (dermwiki) website serves as a resource platform for medical students and residents. The readily accessible interface provides dermatology articles, survival guides, didactic lectures, and links to faculty talks as well as research opportunities. To assess medical student and resident satisfaction with the dermwiki website. Fourth-year medical students taking a dermatology elective were provided with a temporary password to access relevant dermwiki information. A satisfaction survey was created to assess whether medical students found the website helpful. Second- and third-year dermatology residents were also surveyed to compare satisfaction scores prior to and after the introduction of the dermwiki website. End-of-rotation medical student exam scores were tabulated and compared to the average scores from years prior to the development of the dermwiki website. Medical students rated the dermatology elective with the dermwiki website higher than rotations without a wiki (8.12 vs 7.31). Students planning to go into dermatology were more satisfied with the dermwiki website, reported accessing the website more frequently (11 times vs 9.5 times), and reported more time spent studying (12.2 hours vs 6.7 hours) than students not going into dermatology. End-of-rotation medical student exam scores did not differ from those prior to the development of the demwiki website. Ten second- and third-year dermatology residents unanimously stated that they were more satisfied with the program after the institution of the dermwiki website. Overall, addition of the dermwiki website to the dermatology elective curriculum has improved medical student and resident satisfaction scores. The improvement is greater among students planning to enter the field of dermatology. This study serves as a model for the incorporation of internet-based interactive tools to transform and supplement the learning environment.

  14. Health profile and quality of life of elderly with hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Freire de Almeida Vitorino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the quality of life of hypertensive elderly women in the Family Health Strategy. Method: cross-sectional, descriptive and quantitative study that evaluated 60 hypertensive older women using the tool World Health Organization Quality of Life with 26 items divided into four domains: social relations, psychological, physical and environment. Results: regarding the quality of life in all domains, except the psychological domain, the quality of life was considered regular. The psychological domain demonstrated a quality of life that needs to improve. Some questions are presented as unsatisfactory, such as the items: pain and discomfort, dependence on antihypertensive medications, negative feelings, lack of health care and recreation. Conclusion: understanding the health profile and the quality of life of hypertensive elderly women allows better knowledge about them and their adaptation to the condition imposed by the disease, offering support for planning care strategies and health education interventions.

  15. Evaluation of quality of life in oncology clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarema, A.; Marzecki, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In 18 patients with various malignancies the quality of life was evaluated with the use of the SF-36 questionnaire before and after radiotherapy. The quality of life was better among patients whose physical condition was better both before and after radiotherapy. The quality of life deteriorated after radiotherapy in patients whose physical status before treatment was evaluated as more serious. After the treatment the correlation was found between the global evaluation of quality of life and the intensity of pain and physical disability. However, both before and after radiotherapy the correlation was found between global quality of life and the severity of depression. The subjective estimation of quality of life by cancer patients did not correlate with the clinical evaluation of the severity of their state in doctor's opinion. (author)

  16. Depression and quality of life in patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schram, Miranda T; Baan, Caroline A; Pouwer, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes patients are known to have a worse quality of life than individuals without diabetes. They also have an increased risk for depressive symptoms, which may have an additional negative effect on their quality of life. This systematic review summarizes the current knowledge on the associatio...... symptoms. Therefore, increased awareness and monitoring for depression is needed within different diabetes care settings.......Diabetes patients are known to have a worse quality of life than individuals without diabetes. They also have an increased risk for depressive symptoms, which may have an additional negative effect on their quality of life. This systematic review summarizes the current knowledge on the association...... between depressive symptoms and quality of life in individuals with diabetes. A systematic literature search using MEDLINE, Psychinfo, Social SciSearch, SciSearch and EMBASE was conducted from January 1990 until September 2007. We identified studies that compared quality of life between diabetic...

  17. Quality of life of elderly cancer patients under radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres de Oliveira, Patricia; Corte Pereira, Beltrina da Purificacao

    2004-01-01

    This research analyzed the effects of radiotherapy in the quality of life of elderly patients suffering from prostatic cancer. Our aim was to verify the psychometric properties of the Quality of Life Index (QLI), by Ferrans and Powers, describing the social-demographic characteristics that affect the quality of life; and patients concept of quality of life and their perception of how radiotherapy interferes with the quality of life. Interviews were carried out with a sample of seven elderly patients suffering from prostatic cancer. Two different approaches were utilized: descriptive and qualitative statistics. The results show that the QLI may have useful application in our field in the identification of those aspects of quality of life affected by cancer. (author)

  18. Subjective Quality of Life and Perceived Adequacy of Social Support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    psychological processes, socio-demographic factors and subjective quality of life have often .... function of religious involvement, spirituality and personal meaning in life ...... Unpublished MA Thesis: Department of Psychology, AAU. Baarsen ...

  19. Health related quality of life and sociodemographic characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health related quality of life and sociodemographic characteristics among Iranian ... for the groups of students due to the modern highly stressful education period. ... of life among the male and female students in the Islamic Azad University of ...

  20. [Quality of life during and after therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Julien

    2015-01-01

    With a three-fold increase in life expectancy between 1770 and 1970 in western countries, but no significant improvement since then, quality of life (QoL) has progressively become more and more important for healthcare evaluation. Using the classical evidence-based methods, QoL remains, however, quite difficult to assess and to analyse. Colorectal cancer is a frequent and severe disease. Major therapeutic advances have, however, been made during the past two decades. Currently 75% of patients with a non metastatic disease may expect, after surgical removal of their primary tumor; a long lasting remission. This is also the case in 40% of patients with metastatic disease suitable for surgery. Finally, in non-surgical, advanced disease stage cases, median overall survival moved from 6 to 30 months. As treatment duration and percentage of remissions increased, QoL has been more and more studied in these patients. Follow-up of patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy following complete surgical removal showed treatment-induced side effects impairing long term QoL. This has led to stopping rules. International consortiums have been developed in order to perform extremely large clinical trials so as to decrease the duration of adjuvant treatments, and thus limit the occurrence of the long lasting side effects impairing QoL. In patients with a more advanced disease, de-escalation of treatment intensity has been successfully evaluated, leading to the use of maintenance therapy, in order to preserve both patients' survival and QoL. These approaches have simplified treatment schedules, decreased the incidence of clinically relevant side effects and significantly improved patients QoL. They are currently part of our practice routine. If QoL seems today important in clinical trials and medico-economic assessment of new anti-cancer agents, it may be tomorrow integrated in daily practice through dedicated software in day hospital units in order to better choose each patients

  1. Excessive sleep duration and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohayon, Maurice M; Reynolds, Charles F; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-06-01

    Using population-based data, we document the comorbidities (medical, neurologic, and psychiatric) and consequences for daily functioning of excessive quantity of sleep (EQS), defined as a main sleep period or 24-hour sleep duration ≥ 9 hours accompanied by complaints of impaired functioning or distress due to excessive sleep, and its links to excessive sleepiness. A cross-sectional telephone study using a representative sample of 19,136 noninstitutionalized individuals living in the United States, aged ≥ 18 years (participation rate = 83.2%). The Sleep-EVAL expert system administered questions on life and sleeping habits; health; and sleep, mental, and organic disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision; International Classification of Sleep Disorders: Diagnostic and Coding Manual II, International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th edition). Sleeping at least 9 hours per 24-hour period was reported by 8.4% (95% confidence interval = 8.0-8.8%) of participants; EQS (prolonged sleep episode with distress/impairment) was observed in 1.6% (1.4-1.8%) of the sample. The likelihood of EQS was 3 to 12× higher among individuals with a mood disorder. EQS individuals were 2 to 4× more likely to report poor quality of life than non-EQS individuals as well as interference with socioprofessional activities and relationships. Although between 33 and 66% of individuals with prolonged sleep perceived it as a major problem, only 6.3 to 27.5% of them reported having sought medical attention. EQS is widespread in the general population, co-occurring with a broad spectrum of sleep, medical, neurologic, and psychiatric disorders. Therefore, physicians must recognize EQS as a mixed clinical entity indicating careful assessment and specific treatment planning. © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  2. Life satisfaction and air quality in London

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKerron, George; Mourato, Susana

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of research in economics concerns self-reported happiness, or life satisfaction (LS), and its relationship to a wide range of other variables. The findings of this research tend to highlight the importance of non-income aspects of individuals' life conditions. These findings are strongly complementary to themes within the sustainable development discourse. Firstly, they suggest ways in which we might consume less without compromising on our current levels of LS. And secondly, they help demonstrate the immediate LS benefits that could be gained from higher levels of environmental quality (EQ). However, the empirical evidence for the link between EQ and LS is, to date, somewhat weak, due in part to a lack of EQ data at a level of detail to match the individual-by-individual resolution of LS measures. This small, exploratory study therefore seeks to assess how the use of EQ data at very high spatial resolution could advance the empirical literature examining connections between LS and EQ levels, focusing on air quality in particular. It collects original survey data for approximately 400 Londoners, and uses geographical information system (GIS) software to calculate pollutant concentrations in the immediate vicinity of their homes. It uses this data to estimate maximum likelihood regression models explaining LS ratings in terms of a range of individual, household and local variables. Both perceived and measured air pollution levels are significantly negatively associated with the LS of the survey respondents, even when controlling for a wide range of other effects. An increase of 10 μg/m 3 in annual mean nitrogen dioxide concentration appears to correspond on average to a drop of nearly half a point of LS on an 11-point rating scale. These findings cannot yet be generalised with confidence. However, if they were confirmed by larger future studies, they would appear to strengthen and extend existing arguments in favour of policies to reduce urban air

  3. Life satisfaction and air quality in London

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKerron, George; Mourato, Susana [Department of Geography and Environment, and Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    A growing body of research in economics concerns self-reported happiness, or life satisfaction (LS), and its relationship to a wide range of other variables. The findings of this research tend to highlight the importance of non-income aspects of individuals' life conditions. These findings are strongly complementary to themes within the sustainable development discourse. Firstly, they suggest ways in which we might consume less without compromising on our current levels of LS. And secondly, they help demonstrate the immediate LS benefits that could be gained from higher levels of environmental quality (EQ). However, the empirical evidence for the link between EQ and LS is, to date, somewhat weak, due in part to a lack of EQ data at a level of detail to match the individual-by-individual resolution of LS measures. This small, exploratory study therefore seeks to assess how the use of EQ data at very high spatial resolution could advance the empirical literature examining connections between LS and EQ levels, focusing on air quality in particular. It collects original survey data for approximately 400 Londoners, and uses geographical information system (GIS) software to calculate pollutant concentrations in the immediate vicinity of their homes. It uses this data to estimate maximum likelihood regression models explaining LS ratings in terms of a range of individual, household and local variables. Both perceived and measured air pollution levels are significantly negatively associated with the LS of the survey respondents, even when controlling for a wide range of other effects. An increase of 10 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in annual mean nitrogen dioxide concentration appears to correspond on average to a drop of nearly half a point of LS on an 11-point rating scale. These findings cannot yet be generalised with confidence. However, if they were confirmed by larger future studies, they would appear to strengthen and extend existing arguments in favour of policies to reduce

  4. Quality of life after carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando José; Quevedo, Susana; Barros, Henrique

    2008-11-20

    Most studies documenting beneficial outcomes after carotid endarterectomy (CE) are limited to mortality and morbidity rates, costs, and length of hospital stay (LOS). Few have examined the dependency of patients and how they perceive their own health changes after surgery. The aim of the present study was to evaluate quality of life and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) and to study its determinants. Sixty-three patients admitted in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) after CE were eligible for this 14-month follow-up study. Patients were contacted 6 months after discharge to complete a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) and to have their dependency in ADL evaluated. Among 59 hospital survivors at 6 months follow-up, 43 completed the questionnaires. Sixty-three percent reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients had worse SF-36 scores for all domains except bodily pain than a general urban population, and comparison with a group of patients 6 months after surgical ICU discharge showed no differences. Six months after PACU discharge, the Lawton Instrumental Activities of ADL Scale and the Katz Index of ADL demonstrated higher dependency scores (5.9 +/- 2.2 versus 4.3 +/- 2.4 and 0.3 +/- 0.8 versus 0.6 +/- 0.9, p < 0.001 and p = 0.047). Sixty-five percent and 33% were dependent in at least one activity in instrumental and personal ADL, respectively. Patients dependent in at least one ADL task had higher Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) scores (1.0 versus 1.5, p = 0.017). After controlling for multiple comparisons, no significant differences were found. Patients undergoing CE have improved self-perception of quality of life despite being more dependent. Almost all their scores are worse than those in an urban population. We could identify no predictors of greater dependency in ADL tasks six months after PACU discharge.

  5. Measurement properties of adult quality-of-life measurement instruments for eczema: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinl, D; Prinsen, C A C; Deckert, S; Chalmers, J R; Drucker, A M; Ofenloch, R; Humphreys, R; Sach, T; Chamlin, S L; Schmitt, J; Apfelbacher, C

    2016-03-01

    The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative has identified quality of life (QoL) as a core outcome domain to be evaluated in every eczema trial. It is unclear which of the existing QoL instruments is most appropriate for this domain. Thus, the aim of this review was to systematically assess the measurement properties of existing measurement instruments developed and/or validated for the measurement of QoL in adult eczema. We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed and Embase identifying studies on measurement properties of adult eczema QoL instruments. For all eligible studies, we assessed the adequacy of the measurement properties and the methodological quality with the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. A best evidence synthesis summarizing findings from different studies was the basis to assign four degrees of recommendation (A-D). A total of 15 articles reporting on 17 instruments were included. No instrument fulfilled the criteria for category A. Six instruments were placed in category B, meaning that they have the potential to be recommended depending on the results of further validation studies. Three instruments had poor adequacy in at least one required adequacy criterion and were therefore put in category C. The remaining eight instruments were minimally validated and were thus placed in category D. Currently, no QoL instrument can be recommended for use in adult eczema. The Quality of Life Index for Atopic Dermatitis (QoLIAD) and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) are recommended for further validation research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Quality of Working Life of Nurses and its Related Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Moradi, Tayebeh; Maghaminejad, Farzaneh; Azizi-Fini, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nurses as the largest group of health care providers should enjoy a satisfactory quality of working life to be able to provide quality care to their patients. Therefore, attention should be paid to the nurses’ working life. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the quality of nurses' working life in Kashans' hospitals during 2012. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 200 nurses during 2012. The data-gathering instrument consisted of two parts. T...

  7. Preoperative Quality of Life in Patients with Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suk, Hyoam; Kwon, Oh Kyung; Yu, Wansik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the socio-personal and clinical factors that can affect preoperative quality of life to determine how to improve preoperative quality of life in patients with gastric cancer. Materials and Methods The preoperative quality of life data of 200 patients (68 females and 132 males; mean age 58.9?12.6 years) with gastric cancer were analyzed according to socio-personal and clinical factors. The Korean versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (E...

  8. Quality of life in ostomy patients: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri; Rassouli,Maryam; Dabirian,Azam; Yaghmaie,Farideh

    2010-01-01

    Aazam Dabirian, Farideh Yaghmaei, Maryam Rassouli, Mansoureh Zagheri TafreshiNursing and Midwifery School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranPurpose: Therapeutic procedures may not only treat disease but also affect patient quality of life. Therefore, quality of life should be measured in order to assess the impact of disease and therapeutic procedures. To identify clients' problems, it is necessary to assess several dimensions of quality of life, including p...

  9. Depression and quality of life in patients on long term hemodialysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depression and quality of life in patients on long term hemodialysis at a national ... Quality of Life instrument were used to assess depression and quality of life. ... Haemodialysis patients who obtained low scores on quality of life measures ...

  10. Pain, Itch, Quality of Life, and Costs after Herpes Zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijck, Albert J M; Aerssens, Yannick R

    2017-07-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia are known to have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life, but the incidence and severity of itch and its relation with pain and quality of life in the long term are still relatively unknown. The aim of this study was to measure the presence and severity of pain and itch and impact on quality of life in patients over 50 years old with HZ. We enrolled 661 patients with HZ in this 12-month observational study. Patient data were collected via a web-based questionnaire. Outcomes were pain, itch, burden of illness, impact on patient's daily life, impact on quality of life, and healthcare costs. At inclusion, 94% of patients reported any pain, 74.3% significant pain, and 26% severe pain. After 3 months, 18.8% of patients suffered from postherpetic neuralgia. At inclusion, 70.8% of patients had any itch, 39.2% significant itch, and 7.3% severe itch. The occurrence of pain increases costs and has a high impact on the quality of life, lowering EQ-5D scores by an average of 18%. In contrast, itch has little effect on the quality of life. Pain and itch are highly prevalent months after HZ. Pain caused by HZ has a large impact on quality of life, burden of illness, impact on daily life, and health care costs for these patients. The impact of itch on quality of life is relatively small. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  11. Comorbidities, metabolic risk profile and health-related quality of life in German patients with plaque-type psoriasis: a cross-sectional prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Arnd; Kupke, Carina; Behzad, Melika; Hertl, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Patients with psoriasis experience a higher risk of cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities and have a high burden of treatment. There is still a gap between treatment options and quality of care. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic data, comorbidities, and the limitations of quality of life in patients with plaque-type psoriasis. This epidemiological evaluation was designed as a single-center, cross-sectional, prospective study in Marburg, Germany. To investigate the association between mild to severe psoriasis and comorbidities, data were obtained from 133 patients. The average Psoriasis Area and Severity Index was 13.4, and the average Dermatology Life Quality Index was 6.3. Among the patients with severe psoriasis, 95% had been prescribed systemic treatments. Comorbidities were evaluated, with depression 30.8%, arterial hypertension 39.1%, and hypercholesterolemia 20.3% in all patients. Our findings underscore the importance of cardiovascular and metabolic risk screening for all patients with psoriasis. There is still a need for systemic treatments and the definition of treatment goals for psoriasis as a systemic inflammatory disease. Such goals should integrate parameters that include comorbidities and an improvement in health-related quality of life. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  12. Health related quality of life among insulin-dependent diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalto, A M; Uutela, A; Aro, A R

    1997-01-01

    This crossectional questionnaire study examined the associations of health factors and psychosocial factors with Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) in a sample of adult type I diabetic patients (n = 385). Health related quality of life was measured by the Finnish version of MOS SF-20. Psychos......This crossectional questionnaire study examined the associations of health factors and psychosocial factors with Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) in a sample of adult type I diabetic patients (n = 385). Health related quality of life was measured by the Finnish version of MOS SF-20...

  13. Barrier protective use of skin care to prevent chemotherapy-induced cutaneous symptoms and to maintain quality of life in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wohlrab J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Wohlrab,1 Nikola Bangemann,2 Anke Kleine-Tebbe,3 Marc Thill,4,5 Sherko Kümmel,6 Eva-Maria Grischke,7 Rainer Richter,8 Sophie Seite,9 Diana Lüftner10 1Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Halle (Saale, 2Interdisciplinary Breast Centre, University Hospital Charité Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany, 3Breast Centre DRK Hospital, Berlin, 4Breast Centre University of Lübeck, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Lübeck, 5Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Agaplesion Markus Hospital, Frankfurt am Main, 6Breast Centre and Clinic of Senology, Hospital Essen-Mitte, Essen, 7Breast Centre University of Tübingen, Department of Gynaecology, Tübingen, 8L'Oréal, Deutschland GmbH, Düsseldorf, 9La Roche-Posay, Dermatological Laboratories, Asnières, France; 10University Hospital Charité Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumour Immunology, Berlin, Germany Purpose: Chemotherapy with anthracyclines, taxanes, or alkylating agents often causes cutaneous side effects. Nonspecific inhibition of the proliferative activity of keratinocytes has antidifferentiation effects that lead to defects in the barrier function and, thus, to dry, itchy, and irritable skin. These cutaneous symptoms reduce the quality of life of the patients considerably. Conditioning with topical application of niacinamide uses the cytoprotective and barrier stabilizing effect of vitamin B3. Patients and methods: A multicenter randomized crossover study investigated the influence of the test preparation on the quality of life compared to standard care for 73 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant or neoadjuvant cytostatic therapy. Primary target parameter was the Dermatology Life Quality Index with its respective subscales after 6 weeks of a twice-daily application of the respective preparations. Additionally, specific symptoms such as pruritus, dryness, and

  14. Quality of life in epilepsy in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadi, Altaf; Patenaude, Bryan; Nirola, Damber Kumar; Deki, Sonam; Tshering, Lhab; Clark, Sarah; Shaull, Lance; Sorets, Tali; Fink, Guenther; Mateen, Farrah

    2016-07-01

    To assess the quality of life in epilepsy (QOLIE) among adults in the lower middle-income country of Bhutan and assess the potential demographic and clinical associations with better QOLIE. People with clinically diagnosed epilepsy were prospectively enrolled at the Jigme Dorji Wangchuck National Referral Hospital in Thimphu (2014-2015). Regression models were constructed to assess the potential impact of age, sex, residence in the capital city, wealth quintile, educational attainment, seizure in the prior year, seizures with loss of consciousness, self-reported stigma score, and need for multiple antiepileptic drugs. The mean Bhutanese QOLIE-31 score among 172 adults (mean age 31.1 years, 93 female) was 48.9/100±17.7. Younger age, lower educational attainment level, and increased self-perceived stigma were each observed to have an independent, negative association with QOLIE (pEducation appeared to be most strongly associated with QOL at the high school and college levels. There are potentially modifiable associations with low QOLIE. Addressing the educational level and self-perceived stigma of PWE may have an especial impact. The low QOLIE in Bhutan may reflect cultural approaches to epilepsy, health services, or other factors including those outside of the health sector. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quality of Life in Sarcopenia and Frailty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, René; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Arnal, Jean-François; Bautmans, Ivan; Beaudart, Charlotte; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike; Biver, Emmanuel; Boonen, Steven; Brandi, Maria-Luisa; Chines, Arkadi; Cooper, Cyrus; Epstein, Sol; Fielding, Roger A.; Goodpaster, Bret; Kanis, John A.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Laslop, Andrea; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Mañas, Leocadio Rodriguez; Mitlak, Bruce H.; Oreffo, Richard O.; Petermans, Jean; Reid, Kieran; Rolland, Yves; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Tsouderos, Yannis; Visser, Marjolein; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The reduced muscle mass and impaired muscle performance that defines sarcopenia in older individuals is associated with increased risk of physical limitation and a variety of chronic diseases. It may also contribute to clinical frailty. A gradual erosion of quality of life (QoL) has been evidenced in these individuals, although much of this research has been done using generic QoL instruments, particularly the SF-36, which may not be ideal in older populations with significant comorbidities. This review and report of an expert meeting, presents the current definitions of these geriatric syndromes (sarcopenia and frailty). It then briefly summarises QoL concepts and specificities in older populations, examines the relevant domains of QoL and what is known concerning QoL decline with these conditions. It calls for a clearer definition of the construct of disability and argues that a disease-specific QoL instrument for sarcopenia/frailty would be an asset for future research and discusses whether there are available and validated components that could be used to this end and whether the psychometric properties of these instruments are sufficiently tested. It calls also for an approach using utility weighting to provide some cost estimates and suggests that a time trade off study could be appropriate. PMID:23828275

  16. Quality of life in breast cancer sufferers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouman, Ahmed Essmat; Abou El Ezz, Nahla Fawzy; Gado, Nivine; Ibrahim Goda, Amal Mahmoud

    2016-08-08

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to measure health-related quality of life (QOL) among patients with early stage cancer breast under curative treatment at department of oncology and nuclear medicine at Ain Shams University Hospitals. Identify factors affecting QOL among these patients. Design/methodology/approach - A cross-sectional study measured QOL among early stage female breast cancer (BC) patients and determined the main factors affecting their QOL. Three interviewer administered questionnaires were used. Findings - The physical domain mostly affected in BC patients and the functional domain least. Socio-demographic factors that significantly affected BC patients QOL scores were patient age, education, having children and family income. Specific patient characteristics include caregiver presence - a factor that affected different QOL scores. Age at diagnosis, affection in the side of the predominant hand, post-operative chemotherapy and difficulty in obtaining the medication were the disease-related factors that affected QOL scores. Originality/value - The final model predicting QOL for early stage female BC patients included age, education and difficulty in obtaining the medication as determinants for total QOL score. Carer presence was the specific patient characteristic that affected different QOL scores.

  17. Technology and quality of life outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher

    2010-02-01

    To discuss recent technological advances in quality of life (QOL) data collection and guidance for use in research and clinical practice. The use of telephone-, computer-, and web/internet-based technologies to collect QOL data, reliability and validity issues, and cost will be discussed, along with the potential pitfalls associated with these technologies. Health care literature and web resources. Technology has provided researchers and clinicians with an opportunity to collect QOL data from patients that were previously not accessible. Most technologies offer a variety of options, such as language choice, formatting options for the delivery of questions, and data management services. Choosing the appropriate technology for use in research and/or clinical practice primarily depends on the purpose for QOL data collection. Technology is changing the way nurses assess QOL in patients with cancer and provide care. As stakeholders in the health care delivery system and patient advocates, nurses must be intimately involved in the evaluation and use of new technologies that impact QOL and/or the delivery of care. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quality of life in patients with hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Iris; Santos, Alicia; Webb, Susan M

    2015-08-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is impaired in patients with adults with growth hormone deficiency (AGHD) of any cause, especially if additional hypopituitarism is present, and improves after replacement therapy with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). This review includes relevant publications since 2013. Recent findings confirm that most patients with AGHD who improve their QoL after rhGH therapy experience persistent effects for years, if replacement therapy is maintained. Sometimes, however, QoL may not normalize completely, especially if it is caused by a craniopharyngioma (because of concomitant neuropsychological comorbidities that affect autonomy and cognitive function), or functional pituitary tumours, i.e., in Cushing's disease, in which chronic brain exposure to hypercortisolism is associated with more depression, anxiety, loss of memory and emotional distress. Another group in which QoL and energy rarely normalize despite improving after rhGH is hypopituitarism because of traumatic brain injury. Worse QoL is seen in patients who also suffer insomnia, depression, negative illness perceptions and are treated in a rural (compared with an urban) healthcare environment. Better QoL after rhGH is seen in AGHD patients who are not depressed, after successful surgery, living in Europe (rather than the USA), with poorer baseline QoL scores, less obesity and no impaired vision. Further improvement of QoL may be possible with individualized psychosocial interventions.

  19. Splash Safety During Dermatologic Procedures Among US Dermatology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korta, Dorota Z; Chapman, Lance W; Lee, Patrick K; Linden, Kenneth G

    2017-07-01

    Dermatologists are at potential risk of acquiring infections from contamination of the mucous membranes by blood and body fluids. However, there are little data on splash safety during procedural dermatology. To determine dermatology resident perceptions about splash risk during dermatologic procedures and to quantify the rate of protective equipment use. An anonymous on-line survey was sent to 108 United States ACGME-approved dermatology residency programs assessing frequency of facial protection during dermatologic procedures, personal history of splash injury, and, if applicable, reasons for not always wearing facial protection. A total of 153 dermatology residents responded. Rates of facial protection varied by procedure, with the highest rates during surgery and the lowest during local anesthetic injection. Over 54% of respondents reported suffering facial splash while not wearing facial protection during a procedure. In contrast, 88.9% of respondents correctly answered that there is a small risk of acquiring infection from mucosal splash. Residency program recommendations for facial protection seem to vary by procedure. The authors' results demonstrate that although facial splash is a common injury, facial protection rates and protective recommendations vary significantly by procedure. These data support the recommendation for enhanced facial protection guidelines during procedural dermatology.

  20. The effect of women's employment on children's quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayeh Ghanbari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life in adolescence period determines individual's future. The effect of maternal employment on children's quality of life is important and undeniable issue. This study aimed to investigate and compare the quality of life among children of employed and housewife women. In this study, the participants included selected school children's employed and housewife mothers. The tools for data collection consisted of a questionnaire which was distributed among 671 middle-high school and high school students (304 have employed mothers and 367 have housewives mothers. In this study, the level of significance was considered. Results showed that the life quality of children of employed mothers and housewife mothers in the two groups is statistically significant. Quality of life in employed mothers in the mental, physical, social relations, emotional, religious, achieve life goals, leisure time and economic dimension were higher than housewife mothers but there was not any significant different among employed mothers' children and housewife mothers' children in dimensions of relationships with parents. Girls' quality of Life was more than boys, in the teacher mothers was higher than other occupations and in the exceptional talents school was more than other schools. This study found that maternal employment has effect on children's quality of life, so employed mothers' children have high quality of life.

  1. Nanotechnology in Dermatology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, João Roberto; Antônio, Carlos Roberto; Cardeal, Izabela Lídia Soares; Ballavenuto, Julia Maria Avelino; Oliveira, João Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community and general public have been exposed to a series of achievements attributed to a new area of knowledge: Nanotechnology. Both abroad and in Brazil, funding agencies have launched programs aimed at encouraging this type of research. Indeed, for many who come into contact with this subject it will be clear the key role that chemical knowledge will play in the evolution of this subject. And even more, will see that it is a science in which the basic structure is formed by distilling different areas of inter-and multidisciplinary knowledge along the lines of new paradigms. In this article, we attempt to clarify the foundations of nanotechnology, and demonstrate their contribution to new advances in dermatology as well as medicine in general. Nanotechnology is clearly the future. PMID:24626657

  2. Morgellons in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harth, Wolfgang; Hermes, Barbara; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2010-04-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is the most frequent delusional disorder in dermatology. In DP there is a fixed belief of a usually skin-related invasion or infestation by a number of alleged infectious species (usually parasites and bacteria), whose identity has varied over the decades. Since 2002 worldwide an increasing number of patients have complained of unverifiable fibers and filaments in or on the skin, associated with numerous nonspecific complaints (arthralgias, altered cognitive function and extreme fatigue). This entity has been named "Morgellons disease" by the patients themselves, although medical evidence for its existence is lacking. As an example, we discuss a 55-year-old woman who complained of Morgellons disease and was treated as if she had DP. Currently the delusional assumption of infestation with Morgellons should be considered as a new type of DP with some kind of inanimate material. We therefore recommend in case of DP including Morgellons the use of the broader term "delusional infestation".

  3. Coal tar in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofzen, J.H.J.; Aben, K.K.H.; Van Der Valk, P.G.M.; Van Houtum, J.L.M.; Van De Kerkhof, P.C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Dermatology

    2007-07-01

    Coal tar is one of the oldest treatments for psoriasis and eczema. It has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antipruritic and antimitotic effects. The short-term side effects are folliculitis, irritation and contact allergy. Coal tar contains carcinogens. The carcinogenicity of coal tar has been shown in animal studies and studies in occupational settings. There is no clear evidence of an increased risk of skin tumors or internal tumors. Until now, most studies have been fairly small and they did not investigate the risk of coal tar alone, but the risk of coal tar combined with other therapies. New, well-designed, epidemiological studies are necessary to assess the risk of skin tumors and other malignancies after dermatological use of coal tar.

  4. Garlic in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Pazyar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L. fam. Alliaceae is one of the best-researched, best-selling herbal remedies and is also commonly used for treating various health problems. Garlic is widely known for its biological properties and plays an important role as an antioxidant. The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize all dermatologic-oriented in vitro and in-vivo experiments and clinical trials on garlic preparations. Extensive literatures search was carried out and twenty three studies were included. The results suggest that oral administration of garlic is effective on immunologic properties, cutaneous microcirculation, protection against UVB and cancer treatment. Additionally, topical application of garlic extract can potentially be effective on psoriasis, alopecia areata, keloid scar, wound healing, cutaneous corn, viral and fungal infection, leishmaniasis, skin aging and rejuvenation. Clinical effectiveness of oral and topical garlic extract is not sufficiently and meticulously explored as so far.

  5. Quality of Life and Quality of Support for People with Severe Intellectual Disability and Complex Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadle-Brown, J.; Leigh, J.; Whelton, B.; Richardson, L.; Beecham, J.; Baumker, T.; Bradshaw, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: People with severe and profound intellectual disabilities often spend substantial time isolated and disengaged. The nature and quality of the support appears to be important in determining quality of life. Methods: Structured observations and staff questionnaires were used to explore the quality of life and quality of support for 110…

  6. Socioeconomic and sociocultural determinants of psychological distress and quality of life among patients with psoriasis in a selected multi-ethnic Malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Zhenli; Bong, Yii Bonn; Tan, Leng Leng; Lim, Shu Xian; Yong, Adrian Sze Wai; Ch'ng, Chin Chwen; Tan, Maw Pin; Thevarajah, Suganthi; Ismail, Rokiah

    2017-02-01

    Patients with psoriasis may have increased risk of psychological comorbidities. This cross-sectional study aimed at determining associations between sociocultural and socioeconomic factors with the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS) scores and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scores. Adult patients with psoriasis were recruited from a Dermatology outpatient clinic via convenience sampling. Interviews were conducted regarding socio-demographic factors and willing subjects were requested to complete the DASS and DLQI questionnaires. The Pearson χ 2 test, Fisher's exact test and multivariate logistic regression were used for statistical analysis to determine independent predictors of depression, anxiety, stress and severe impairment of quality of life. Unadjusted analysis revealed that depression was associated with Indian ethnicity (p = .041) and severe impairment of quality of life was associated with Indian ethnicity (p = .032), higher education (p = .013), higher income (p = .042), and employment status (p = .014). Multivariate analysis revealed that Indian ethnicity was a predictor of depression (p = .024). For stress, tertiary level of education (p = .020) was an independent risk factor while a higher monthly income was a protective factor (p = .042). The ethnic Indians and Malays were significantly more likely than the ethnic Chinese to suffer reduced quality of life (p = .001 and p = .006 respectively) and subjects with tertiary education were more likely to have severe impairment of quality of life (p = .002). Our study was unique in determining sociocultural influences on psychological complications of psoriasis in a South East Asian population. This has provided invaluable insight into factors predictive of adverse effects of psoriasis on psychological distress and quality of life in our patient population. Future studies should devise interventions to specifically target at risk groups in the development of strategies to

  7. A comparative study of the impairment of quality of life in Czech children with atopic dermatitis of different age groups and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiráková, Anna; Vojáčková, Naděžda; Göpfertová, Dana; Hercogová, Jana

    2012-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) still remains one of the most common childhood inflammatory skin diseases. As a chronic disease, it can have a physical and psychological effect on social functioning of the affected child as well as their family. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of life of children with AD of different age groups and their families. A total of 203 children with a diagnosis of AD from newborn to 18 years of age and 202 of their parents took part in our study (as one parent did not return the questionnaire). All participants, according to their age, completed the following questionnaires: Infants' Dermatitis Quality of Life Index (IDQOL); Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) - text and cartoon version; and Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire (DFI). The mean total IDQOL score in our study was 8.18 (SD = 5.84, n = 120). The mean total CDLQI scores in the groups of children from 7 to 13 and from 14 to 18 years were 8.58 (SD = 4.98, n = 48) and 9.89 (SD = 5.26, n = 35). There was also a proven influence of the child's AD on the quality of life of his parents with the mean score: 7.98 (SD = 6.41, n = 202). The study demonstrated and confirmed that AD significantly impairs the children's quality of life in all age groups and also quality of life of their families. Such data give us patient-oriented information that is of great importance for understanding the situation of individuals with AD and its influence on members of their family. © 2012 The International Society of Dermatology.

  8. Scoping review of pediatric tonsillectomy quality of life assessment instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Stephen Shih-Teng; Peters, Micah D J; Dharmawardana, Nuwan; Stew, Benjamin; Ooi, Eng Hooi

    2017-10-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing or recurrent tonsillitis have detrimental effects on the child's physical health and quality of life. Tonsillectomy is commonly performed to treat these common conditions and improve the child's quality of life. This scoping review aims to present a comprehensive and descriptive analysis of quality of life questionnaires as a resource for clinicians and researchers when deciding which tool to use when assessing the quality of life effects after tonsillectomy. A comprehensive search strategy was undertaken across MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Embase, and Cochrane CENTRAL. Quality of life questionnaires utilized in studies investigating pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy for chronic tonsillitis or sleep-disordered breathing were included. Methodological quality and data extraction were conducted as per Joanna Briggs Institute methodology. Ten questionnaires were identified, consisting of six generic and four disease-specific instruments. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory was the most commonly utilized generic questionnaire. The Obstructive Sleep Apnea-18 was the most commonly utilized disease-specific questionnaire. This review identified a range of generic and disease-specific quality of life questionnaires utilized in pediatric patients who have undergone tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy for sleep-disordered breathing or chronic tonsillitis. Important aspects of each questionnaire have been summarized to aid researchers and clinicians in choosing the appropriate questionnaire when evaluating the quality of life effects of tonsillectomy. NA Laryngoscope, 127:2399-2406, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Principles of urban quality of life for a neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamam Serag El Din

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Urban quality of life is a notion that has been discussed recently in various studies as a response to many problems facing the new towns all over the world as well as in Egypt. The purpose of this paper is to decompose the term urban quality of life into other more precise terms such as quality, quality of life and urban/urban planning. The paper also aims to address the notion of sustainable development and tries to understand its relationship with the notion of quality of life. Further, it deduces urban quality of life definition and dimensions. On the other hand this paper discusses contemporary urban planning theories and approaches raised in the late of twentieth century in order to provide a high and sustainable quality of life and protect the natural environment. Finally, a matrix concluding the relationship between the principles of these contemporary urban planning theories and approaches and urban quality of life dimensions is developed, in order to achieve a set of principles that address environmental, physical, mobility, social, psychological, economical and political concerns called urban quality of life principles. These principles represent a guide useful for participants of the design process and for policy makers.

  10. Quality of life as assessed by adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestro-Gonzalez, Alba; Bilbao-Leon, M Cruz; Zuazua-Rico, David; Fernandez-Carreira, Jose M; Baldonedo-Cernuda, Ricardo F; Mosteiro-Diaz, M Pilar

    2018-01-01

    We explored the quality of life of adults with cerebral palsy without an intellectual disability and the predictors of quality of life. Because cerebral palsy is a disease that manifests in childhood, much of the research into quality of life for those dealing with it focuses on children; there are few studies that evaluate the quality of life of adults with cerebral palsy. Therefore, it is important to consider their perceptions in order to improve their general wellbeing and self-determination. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Quality of life was measured using the GENCAT Quality of Life Scale. Demographic and personal variables were also collected and examined. Participants comprised 75 adults (58.7 percent men, mean age = 40.84 years) with cerebral palsy who were members of the National Cerebral Palsy Association of Spain between 2014 and 2015. A linear multivariate model was examined as well. The overall mean score indicator of participants' quality of life was 103.29, which corresponds to the 56.6th percentile on the GENCAT scale. Examining the level of qualification, we found significant differences in the factors "personal development" and "self-determination," and those with a university education obtained higher scores than their less-educated counterparts. Having a partner was related to higher quality of life standard scores. After constructing a linear model, it was observed that maintaining sexual relationships was another factor that increased participants' quality of life. This study highlights the importance of social and romantic relationships to achieve a better quality of life in adults with cerebral palsy who do not have an intellectual disability. Social integration and sexuality education programs should be developed to improve their quality of life.

  11. Estimation of quality of life in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, S; Ramachandran, A

    2012-11-01

    Since haemodialysis is an expensive treatment modality for chronic renal failure patients, it is very essential to assess the outcome of therapy in terms of quality of life. The primary objective of the study was to estimate the effect of patient counselling in quality of life of end stage renal disease patients opting haemodialysis using World Health Organisation Quality of life scale and to assess the variables affecting the quality of life of these patients. Quality of life was determined by World Health Organisation Quality of life scale questionnaire comprised of 26 items which measures four domains: physical, psychological, social and environmental domain. A total of 81 patients were selected and divided into test and control group and the test group patients received counselling regarding their disease, use of medications, importance of adherence and the complications experienced during and after dialysis. The quality of life data was collected at the interval of 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months and the patients were counselled at each interval. The demographic profiles revealed that majority of the patients were in the age group of 31-50 and there exists a male predominance. About the socioeconomic status, upper middle class people were mostly affected. Assessment of impact of patient counselling in the quality of life of haemodialysis indicated a significant improvement in each domain after counselling. And also found that the psychological domain showed a significant increase in the score compared to others. Patient counselling helped to gain benefits in terms of improvement in quality of life and delayed progression of renal failure. Early recognition and prevention is necessary to improve the quality of life of chronic renal failure patients. Patient counselling should be made mandatory by incorporating clinical pharmacist in the nephrology team to make the patient understand his illness and modifications in lifestyle also create a positive environment and

  12. Comparative study of quality of life and psychosocial characteristics in patients with psoriasis and leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Christodoulou, Christos; Efstathiou, Vasiliki; Tsatovidou, Revekka; Torlidi-Kordera, Evangelia; Zouridaki, Eftychia; Kontochristopoulos, George

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis and leg ulcers have a marked impact on the patient's quality of life and represent a life-long burden for affected patients. The aim of this study is to compare the quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, and loneliness in patients with psoriasis and leg-ulcer patients. Eighty patients with leg ulcers, eighty patients with psoriasis, and eighty healthy controls were included in this study. The quality of life, depression and anxiety, loneliness of the patient, and self-esteem were assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the UCLA loneliness Scale (UCLA-Version 3), and the Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. The DLQI score among patients with psoriasis was 12.74 ± 4.89 and leg ulcer patients was 13.28 ± 2.57. The patients with psoriasis presented statistically significant higher anxiety (9.87 ± 4.56) than both leg ulcer patients (8.26 ± 2.82) and controls (6.45 ± 1.89), while leg ulcer patients also presented higher anxiety than controls. Regarding self-esteem, although there were no significant differences between the patients with psoriasis (15.25 ± 3.20) and the ones with leg ulcers (15.89 ± 2.93), they both presented statistically significant lower self-esteem scores than control group (18.53 ± 3.04). The patients with psoriasis presented statistically significant higher levels of loneliness and social isolation (46.18 ± 6.63) compared to leg ulcer patients (43.73 ± 5.68) than controls (42.49 ± 3.41). Psoriasis and leg ulcers are long-term skin diseases associated with significant impairment of the patient's quality of life, anxiety, and self-esteem, which are frequently under-recognized. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  13. Quality of life in asthma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Noronha Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a study whose main aim is the measurement of the Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL of patients with asthma and the presentation of a first draft of normative values as measured by the SF-6D for asthma patients. In addition, we investigate how far non-disease-specific HRQoL measures can distinguish groups in terms of sociodemographic characteristics.The Portuguese versions of the EQ-5D, SF-6D, AQLQ(S and ACQ were administered using personal interviews to a representative sample of the Portuguese population with asthma.Most of the individuals did not report significant problems in the dimensions used, with the exception of the physical functioning, where individuals reported moderate limitations. The mean utility value was 0.86. Male gender, young, single, individuals with high educational attainment level, employed, individuals with high income and those residing in urban areas reported higher utility levels. As expected, those who were in a severe stadium of the disease reported lower mean utility levels than those who were in a less severe stadium of the disease. Normative values for the SF-6D were computed for patients with asthma by gender, age, marital status, educational attainment level, employment status, area of residence and average monthly net income.The preference-based measures used in this study distinguish patient groups with asthma in terms of socio-demographic groups. The normative values can be used in economic evaluation and clinical studies as they incorporate patients’ preferences and translate the value attributed to patients’ health state. Resumo: Neste artigo é descrito um estudo, cujo objectivo é a medição da qualidade de vida relacionada com a saúde (QdVRS de doentes com asma e a apresentação de uma primeira aproximação aos valores normativos, com base no SF-6D, para aquele tipo de doentes. Pretende-se ainda averiguar a capacidade de medidas gen

  14. Relationship between life satisfaction and quality of life in Turkish nursing school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Yasemin; Kilic, Serap Parlar; Akyol, Asiye Durmaz

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between life satisfaction and quality of life of nursing students. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted with a research population of 396 nursing students who received education at a school of nursing. The research data were collected between May and June of the 2007-2008 academic year. The data collection tools included "Student Description Form," Life Satisfaction Scale, and WHOQOL-BREF (TR) Quality of Life (QOL) Scale. The mean score of life satisfaction was 22.90 ± 5.74. Participants' QOL mean scores were 67.16 ± 15.29 in the physical domain, 64.33 ± 14.72 in the psychological domain, 62.81 ± 19.12 in the social relationships domain, and 60.59 ± 12.59 in the environmental domain. There was a significant correlation between life satisfaction and the four main domains of quality of life scores (P life satisfaction and quality of life among nursing students. In addition, it was determined that being a nursing student had a positive effect on students' life satisfaction and quality of life. Therefore, the education system is recommended to be redesigned in such a way as to make students more active and to improve their life satisfaction and quality of life. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Quality of work life: experiences of Iranian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed Abolfazl; Vanaki, Zohreh; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of Iranian nurses concerning their quality of work life. A purposive sample of nurses (n = 14) was recruited from two university hospitals. The data were collected through unstructured interviews and were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis. The results indicated that the participants discerned their quality of work life by assessing how favorable were their working conditions, the level of fulfilment of their personal needs, and the impact of their working conditions on their private life and their social life. Three main themes were identified: quality of work life, as experienced from a personal perspective; quality of work life, as experienced from a sociocultural perspective; and quality of work life, as experienced from an organizational-professional perspective. The results of the present study will help Iranian nurse administrators to adopt effective strategies in order to improve nurses' quality of work life. Future research can broaden the scope of the current results and offer a more comprehensive understanding of nurses' quality of work life. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Working conditions, work life and quality of life of the temporary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Working conditions, work life and quality of life of the temporary support staff ... and expectations of the temporary support staff with regard to their working ... conditions mainly as unpleasant, but that they adapted because of the team spirit.

  17. Illness perceptions and quality of life among tuberculosis patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The illness perceptions of the TB patients might influence their adherence to treatment. The poor quality of life of the TB patients in the different areas of quality of life such as daily activities and work, calls for programmes to strengthen TB information, education and counselling. Key words: Tuberculosis, patients, ...

  18. Quality of life questionnaires in otorhinolaryngology; a systematic overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenraads, Simone P C; Aarts, Mark C J; vd Veen, EL; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance of quality of life (QOL) as an endpoint and the use of validated QOL questionnaires has increased over time. OBJECTIVE OF OVERVIEW: To evaluate health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) measurement instruments used in patients in otorhinolaryngology (ORL). We aim to

  19. Assessment of quality of life among children with bronchial asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The global disease burden associated with bronchial asthma has continued to increase particularly among children. Asthma-related quality of life is a health related assessment of disease impact on patient and care givers. Aim: To determine the perceived quality of life (QOL) among children with bronchial ...

  20. The Empty Nest Syndrome: Ways to Enhance Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dianbing; Yang, Xinxiao; Aagard, Steve Dale

    2012-01-01

    Empty nest syndrome occurs as a result of urbanization and loosened relationships among family members. It may threaten the life quality of older adults and stability of society as a whole. This survey was designed to investigate the situation and factors that influence the life quality of a sample of older adults in a western state. Thirty-five…

  1. Sociodemographic determinants of quality of life among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosis of depression as well as severity of depression were assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire and Hamilton Rating Scale for depression respectively. Quality of life measures was assessed with the World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief Version (WHOQOLBREF).

  2. Quality of Life of Older Malaysians Living Alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Nurizan; Abdullah, Siti Suhailah; Momtaz, Yadollah Abolfathi; Hamid, Tengku Aizan

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2000 census report, about 7% of the 1.4 million people 60 years and over in Malaysia live alone. This study investigated socioeconomic factors affecting the quality of life of this vulnerable population. Data from a subsample of the study on Mental Health and Quality of Life of Older Malaysians were used in this paper. About 10%…

  3. Measuring quality of life in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, I; Friis, Svein; Haahr, U

    2005-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) measures are increasingly recognized as necessary parts of outcome assessments in psychosis. The present paper is a comprehensive study of patients with first-episode psychosis where QoL is measured by the commonly used Lehman Quality of Life Interview (L-QoLI). The aim...

  4. Conceptual Principles of Quality of Life: An Empirical Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramston, P.; Chipuer, H.; Pretty, G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quality of life is a popular measure of outcomes and its widespread use has led to recent calls for a better understanding of the construct, emphasizing the need to build a substantial body of knowledge around what determines perceptions of life quality. Three widely reported and used conceptual principles are examined in this study.…

  5. Perceived psychosocial needs, social support and quality of life in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects with late-stage HIV infection reported a lower social adjustment to the disease, a lower quality of life and more severe lifestyle changes. Satisfaction with social support correlated significantly with quality of life and social adjustment. It is therefore concluded that the higher the level of satisfaction with social support, ...

  6. Power transformation for enhancing responsiveness of quality of life questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, YanYan Ange

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effect of power transformation of raw scores on the responsiveness of quality of life survey. The procedure maximizes the paired t-test value on the power transformed data to obtain an optimal power range. The parallel between the Box-Cox transformation is also investigated for the quality of life data.

  7. Quality of life outcomes in patients with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilou Paraskevi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life is now considered an important endpoint in cancer clinical trials. It has been shown that assessing quality of life in cancer patients could contribute to improved treatment and could even serve as a prognostic factor along with medical parameters. This paper presents a review of quality of life outcomes in patients with breast cancer according to previous descriptive findings. This is a bibliographic review of the literature covering publications that appeared in English language biomedical journals between 1987 and 2008. The search strategy included a combination of the key words quality of life and breast cancer in the titles of published articles. The major findings are summarized and presented under different headings: evaluation of health-related quality of life i at the time of diagnosis, ii during treatment, and iii after the completion of treatment. Breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy might experience several side-effects and symptoms that have a negative effect on their quality of life. Also adjuvant hormonal therapies were found to have a similar negative impact on quality of life. Psychological distress-anxiety and depression were found to be common among breast cancer patients. Symptoms-pain, fatigue, and insomnia were among the most common symptoms reported. There was quite an extensive body of literature on quality of life in breast cancer patients. These papers have made a considerable contribution to improving breast cancer care.

  8. Quality of life in ostomy patients: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aazam Dabirian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aazam Dabirian, Farideh Yaghmaei, Maryam Rassouli, Mansoureh Zagheri TafreshiNursing and Midwifery School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranPurpose: Therapeutic procedures may not only treat disease but also affect patient quality of life. Therefore, quality of life should be measured in order to assess the impact of disease and therapeutic procedures. To identify clients' problems, it is necessary to assess several dimensions of quality of life, including physical, spiritual, economic, and social aspects. In this regard, we conducted a qualitative study to explore quality of life and its dimensions in ostomy patients referred to the Iranian Ostomy Association.Methods: Fourteen patients were interviewed about their quality of life dimensions by purposeful sampling. Data were gathered by semistructured interviews and analyzed using the content analysis method.Results: Nine main themes emerged using this approach, including physical problems related to colostomy, impact of colostomy on psychological functioning, social and family relationships, travel, nutrition, physical activity, and sexual function, as well as religious and economic issues.Conclusion: The findings of the study identified a number of challenges in quality of life for patients with ostomy. The results can be used by health care providers to create a supportive environment that promotes better quality of life for their ostomy patients.Keywords: ostomy, colostomy, qualitative study, quality of life

  9. The influence of nocturia on the quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, D.G.; Dijk, L. van; Schellevis, F.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Previous studies identified an effect of nocturia (two or more micturitions per night) on quality of life. We hypothesize that nocturia indeed affect quality of life but that effect is mediated via sleep. Nocturia and sleep disturbances are clearly associated. To go to the toilet one has

  10. Quality of life of nurses in the operating room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Murano Alfaia dos Santos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the quality of life of operating room nurses and collect their opinions as to the influence their professional activity exerts on their quality of life. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out on a sample of 24 nurses that work in the operating room of a large private hospital in the city of São Paulo. Two questionnaires were applied; one was designed by the authors of this research project, and the other was the Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF. Rresults: As to quality of life, the environment domain obtained the highest score, while the psychological domain obtained the lowest. When asked if their professional activity in the operating room influenced their quality of life, most responded affirmatively. Regarding the justifications offered by the nurses for the influence of their professional activity on their quality of life, 50% mentioned environment-related stress, responsibilities, duties, risk situations, relationships with the multiprofessional team, and the type of work carried out in the operating room. Cconclusions: The psychological domain obtained the lowest score in the nurse quality of life evaluation, pointing out the need to facilitate and/or encourage nurses to seek psychological support. As to the influence of their professional activity on their quality of life, the nurses mentioned stress related to their work environment and professional activities in the operating room. This highlights the importance of managers in this area, paying greater attention to the individual and collective needs of their employees.

  11. Professional Quality of Life and Clinical Competencies among Korean Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghee Kim, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that it is possible to directly examine the relationship between professional quality of life level and clinical competence among nurses. Thus, interventions to increase nurses' compassion satisfaction and relieve compassion fatigue are needed, as professional quality of life may affect clinical competence.

  12. A study of psoriasis and quality of life in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Kottayam, Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V D Manjula

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease which has an impact on health-related quality of life (QoL. The psoriasis disability index (PDI is a simple 15-item questionnaire which is used to assess overall psoriasis disability. Objectives: (1 To assess the health-related QoL among patients with psoriasis, attending dermatology OPD of Medical College Hospital, Kottayam. (2 To find out the association of QoL with age and gender. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive case series study conducted in Dermatology OPD of Medical College Hospital, Kottayam, Kerala. Psoriasis patients attending the Dermatology OPD of Medical College Hospital for 2 months were assessed. Results: Out of the total 32 patients, 56.2% were males, whose mean age was 45; 72% were married, 47% had education above plus two and were employed. Also, 34% had income above Rs. 3000 per month. Among the PDI subsets, daily activities were affected the most (90.6%, followed by work (84.4%, leisure activities (71.9%, problems with treatment (68.7% and the least affected was personal relations (62.5%. Overall PDI score (median 14.5, interquartile range 4.5-22 showed that the QoL was affected in 75% of which 9.4% were mild (score 18. There was no association between the total PDI score and age or gender. Conclusion: QoL was affected in 75% of psoriasis patients. There was no association between QoL and age or gender.

  13. Quality of life after total knee arthroplasty: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Robson Rocha; Santos, Ayrton André Melo; de Sampaio Carvalho Júnior, José; Matos, Marcos Almeida

    2014-01-01

    To review the literature on quality of life among patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and assess the impact of various associated factors. this was a systematic review of the literature in the Medline, Embase, Lilacs and SciELO databases, using the terms: TKA (total knee arthroplasty); TKR (total knee replacement); quality of life; and outcomes. There were no restrictions regarding study design. 31 articles addressing this topic using various quality-of-life evaluation protocols were selected. SF-36/SF-12, WOMAC and Oxford were the ones most frequently used. The studies made it possible to define that TKA is capable of making an overall improvement in patients' quality of life. Pain and function are among the most important predictors of improvement in quality of life, even when function remains inferior to that of healthy patients. The factors associated negatively were obesity, advanced age, comorbidities, persistence of pain after the procedure and a lengthy wait for surgery.

  14. QUALITY OF LIFE IN CHILDREN WITH VISION DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Nefedovskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this trial was to evaluate the peculiarities of quality of life (QL of blind and purblind children, educated in specialized schools. 64 schoolchildren from specialized correction school and 78 schoolchildren from boarding school of Tatarstan Republic in age 8-12 and 13-18 years old took part in this trial. Instrument of this trial was Russian version of general questionnaire Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory – PedsQL4.0. Results of study showed, that quality of life of blind and purblind children was lower then in their healthy coevals, according to opinion of children, their parents and teachers. On the other hand, quality of life of children with vision disorders, educated in different types of correction schools, did not differ.Key words: quality of life, blind and purblind children.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(1:10-12

  15. Evaluation of the educational climate for specialty trainees in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, J M R; Passi, V

    2016-06-01

    Dermatology specialty trainees (STs) in the United Kingdom (UK) are few in number and will join a thinly spread national consultant body. It is of paramount importance to deliver training programmes of the highest quality for these doctors, central to which is the establishment and maintenance of an educational climate conducive to learning. To conduct a pilot study to evaluate the educational climate for dermatology STs in one UK deanery (West Midlands). Secondary analysis of published data was performed, from the UK's General Medical Council (GMC) national training survey, and the Job Evaluation Survey Tool (JEST) administered by the West Midlands deanery. A modified online version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) was circulated among dermatology STs. The GMC's survey data show that UK dermatology STs rated their training highly in comparison with undifferentiated UK postgraduate trainees. West Midlands dermatology STs (n = 22) scored very similarly to UK dermatology STs. The JEST gave broadly encouraging results, with 21/22 (95%) happy to recommend their posts to colleagues. The modified PHEEM yielded a global mean score of 96.5/152, attracting the descriptor 'more positive than negative but room for improvement'. Despite inherent methodological limitations, the GMC, JEST and modified PHEEM surveys have revealed useful comparative triangulated data which allows the conclusion that West Midlands dermatology STs seem to be training in a favourable educational climate. This represents an important facet of the quality assurance process for medical education, and allows insight into areas which may require improvement. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. Quality of life in patients with allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyk, Deana L; McCarter, Kevin; Achen, Fritz; Belsito, Donald V

    2003-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), a common dermatological disorder, often results in ongoing disease and disability. However, relatively little has been published quantifying the quality of life (QoL) of patients with ACD. This study was conducted to investigate the impact of ACD on QoL and explore prognostic factors that influence outcomes. A total of 428 subjects with ACD were, at varying times after diagnosis, mailed a QoL questionnaire modified from Skindex-16 to include an additional 5 items pertaining to occupational impact. The QoL scores were correlated with subject demographics, disease characteristics, and management techniques to ascertain factors that impact QoL in subjects with ACD. The response rate was 35%, with 149 subjects returning the postal survey. Responders reported being bothered most by itching, skin irritation, and persistence of the condition. Of the four scales included in the QoL questionnaire, the emotions scale had the worst composite QoL score, followed by symptoms, functioning, and occupational impact. Patients with ACD of the face were significantly more bothered by the appearance of their skin. Hand involvement and occupationally related ACD were associated with worse QoL scores within the occupational impact and functioning scales. Subjects that had changed jobs because of ACD had more severe QoL impairment than any other group analyzed, with significantly worse scores on 17 of the 21 QoL items. A history of atopic eczema seemed to impart improved outcomes on patients with ACD, and these subjects were less worried about being fired from their jobs. Subjects diagnosed by patch testing more than 36 months after disease onset seemed to have worse QoL scores than those diagnosed earlier in the natural history of the disease. Patients diagnosed by patch testing within the last 6 months had the worst QoL scores, while the best outcomes were reported in subjects patch tested 6 to 12 months ago. A slight decline in QoL was observed 12

  17. Life sciences flight experiments program, life sciences project division, procurement quality provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, G.

    1980-01-01

    Methods are defined for implementing quality assurance policy and requirements for life sciences laboratory equipment, experimental hardware, integration and test support equipment, and integrated payloads.

  18. Quality of life in blind and partially sighted people

    OpenAIRE

    Vuletić, Gorka; Šarlija, Tea; Benjak, Tomislav

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the subjective quality of life in blind and partially sighted people in relation to the type of impairment, duration of impairment and participation in psychosocial rehabilitation. The study used a sociodemographic and health questionnaire, and the Personal Wellbeing Index for adults to examine participant satisfaction with different life domains. The results have shown that subjective quality of life in blind and partially sighted people is within the ...

  19. Consistent data recording across a health system and web-enablement allow service quality comparisons: online data for commissioning dermatology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, Olga; Michalakidis, Georgios; Mason, Aaron; Jones, Simon; Chan, Tom; de Lusignan, Simon

    2012-01-01

    A new distributed model of health care management is being introduced in England. Family practitioners have new responsibilities for the management of health care budgets and commissioning of services. There are national datasets available about health care providers and the geographical areas they serve. These data could be better used to assist the family practitioner turned health service commissioners. Unfortunately these data are not in a form that is readily usable by these fledgling family commissioning groups. We therefore Web enabled all the national hospital dermatology treatment data in England combining it with locality data to provide a smart commissioning tool for local communities. We used open-source software including the Ruby on Rails Web framework and MySQL. The system has a Web front-end, which uses hypertext markup language cascading style sheets (HTML/CSS) and JavaScript to deliver and present data provided by the database. A combination of advanced caching and schema structures allows for faster data retrieval on every execution. The system provides an intuitive environment for data analysis and processing across a large health system dataset. Web-enablement has enabled data about in patients, day cases and outpatients to be readily grouped, viewed, and linked to other data. The combination of web-enablement, consistent data collection from all providers; readily available locality data; and a registration based primary system enables the creation of data, which can be used to commission dermatology services in small areas. Standardized datasets collected across large health enterprises when web enabled can readily benchmark local services and inform commissioning decisions.

  20. Does glycemic variability impact mood and quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penckofer, Sue; Quinn, Lauretta; Byrn, Mary; Ferrans, Carol; Miller, Michael; Strange, Poul

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic condition that significantly impacts quality of life. Poor glycemic control is associated with more diabetes complications, depression, and worse quality of life. The impact of glycemic variability on mood and quality of life has not been studied. A descriptive exploratory design was used. Twenty-three women with type 2 diabetes wore a continuous glucose monitoring system for 72 h and completed a series of questionnaires. Measurements included (1) glycemic control shown by glycated hemoglobin and 24-h mean glucose, (2) glycemic variability shown by 24-h SD of the glucose readings, continuous overall net glycemic action (CONGA), and Fourier statistical models to generate smoothed curves to assess rate of change defined as "energy," and (3) mood (depression, anxiety, anger) and quality of life by questionnaires. Women with diabetes and co-morbid depression had higher anxiety, more anger, and lower quality of life than those without depression. Certain glycemic variability measures were associated with mood and quality of life. The 24-h SD of the glucose readings and the CONGA measures were significantly associated with health-related quality of life after adjusting for age and weight. Fourier models indicated that certain energy components were significantly associated with depression, trait anxiety, and overall quality of life. Finally, subjects with higher trait anxiety tended to have steeper glucose excursions. Data suggest that greater glycemic variability may be associated with lower quality of life and negative moods. Implications include replication of the study in a larger sample for the assessment of blood glucose fluctuations as they impact mood and quality of life.

  1. Quality estimation methods used in product life cycle

    OpenAIRE

    M. Dudek-Burlikowska; D. Szewieczek

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: A new approach to quality control in production company with usage of quality research methods has been presented.Design/methodology/approach: The possibility of usage of quality research methods are connected with continuous quality improvement of pre-production, production and after-production spheres of organization. Interdependence of the quality research methods and product life cycle has been taken into account.Findings: At the present time the enterprises should integrate qua...

  2. THE IMPACT OF LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS ON QUALITY OF LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Sudhakar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lateral epicondylitis is a work related disorder which is considered to be due to over-use or over-stress of the wrist extensors of the forearm. The patient suffers from pain and decreased function which affects the basic activities in daily life. This reduction in function leading to disability may affect the quality of life as it includes items related to self care, usual activities, emotional problems, pain etc. The present study was conducted to study the impact of Lateral epicondylitis on quality of life. Methods: 52 subjects diagnosed with Lateral epicondylitis were included in the study according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Outcome measures were: pain using Visual analog scale, functional disability using Patient rated tennis elbow evaluation and health-related quality of life using Short Form 36. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between pain and functional disability (p<.001. A significant negative correlation between pain and physical (p=.014 and mental (p=.052 component summary scores of quality of life was found. A significant negative correlation was found between functional disability and physical (p=.002 and mental (p=.015 component summary scores of quality of life. Also a significant correlation was found between physical and mental component summary scores of quality of life (p<.001. Conclusions: Significant correlation was seen between pain, functional disability and quality of life. This suggests that with an increase in severity of pain there is increase in functional disability with lower QOL both physically and mentally.

  3. Differences in quality-of-life dimensions of Adult Strabismus Quality of Life and Amblyopia & Strabismus Questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.S. van de Graaf (Elizabeth); G.J.J.M. Borsboom (Gerard); G.W. van der Sterre (Geertje); J. Felius (Joost); H.J. Simonsz (Huib); H. Kelderman (Henk)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The Adult Strabismus Quality of Life Questionnaire (AS-20) and the Amblyopia & Strabismus Questionnaire (A&SQ) both measure health-related quality of life in strabismus patients. We evaluated to what extent these instruments cover similar domains by identifying the underlying

  4. Quality of life in schizophrenia measured by the MOS SF-36 and the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile: a comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, C. J.; Schene, A. H.; Koeter, M. W. J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare two Quality of Life (QoL) instruments on reliability, feasibility and conceptual overlap in a group of schizophrenic out-patients. Method: The Lancashire Quality of Life Profile (LQoLP) and the MOS SF-36 were used to assess the QoL of 143 schizophrenic out-patients. Results:

  5. Quality of life and philosophy of life determines physical and mental health: status over research findings from the Quality of Life Research Center, Copenhagen, 1991-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2007-10-22

    Quality of life (QOL) has over the past decade become an important part of health science and also increased public awareness. It has become increasingly apparent that illness is closely related to the individual perception of a good life, and therefore the exploration of indicators related to quality of life appears to be of broad importance for the prevention and treatment of diseases. Identifying, which factors constitute a good life may reveal an understanding about what areas in life should be encouraged, in order to enhance the global quality of life, health, and ability. In this paper we present results from studies initiated in 1989 to examine quality of life in relation to disease. The purpose of this presentation was to assemble the results from the study carried out in the years between 1993 and 1997, examining a total of 11,500 Danes, to show the association between quality of life and a wide series of social indicators.

  6. Quality of Life Among Dental Students: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Amanda; Pierre, Gaelle C; McAndrew, Maureen

    2017-10-01

    Quality of life is a complex construct that affects the overall life satisfaction, emotional well-being, and functioning of individuals. The aim of our study was to assess the quality of life of dental students at one U.S. dental school, using the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF, a multi-dimensional, cross-cultural, validated, and reliable survey instrument. Of the 1,437 students invited to participate, 401 students responded, but 17 were excluded because of missing data. The final sample consisted of 384 students for an overall response rate of 27%: response rates by year were first year 32.6%, second year 16.9%, third year 26.6%, and fourth year 24.0%. The results showed that the responding students rated their overall quality of life as good. The Physical Health domain had the highest mean score, while the Psychological domain had the lowest. Females reported higher quality of life than males in the Social Relationships domain. Single students were found to have a lower perceived quality of life than married students. Older students were found to have lower perceived quality of life in the Physical Health and Environment domains. Physical Health domain scores were significantly higher for fourth-year than first-year respondents, while Psychological domain scores were significantly lower for third-year than first-year respondents. Further research is needed to explore the effect of dental school on the quality of life of dental students. Targeted programs to impact students' quality of life at various points in the curriculum may be beneficial.

  7. Why is the center of evidence - based dermatology relevant to Indian dermatology ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Hywel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based dermatology is the application of high-quality evidence to the care of individual patients with skin diseases. The Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology in the UK promotes activities in this field through its three interlinking cogs, composed of the international Cochrane Skin Group, the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UKDCTN, and the UK national electronic library for skin disorders. The Cochrane Skin Group summarises what is already known about health care interventions by supporting systematic reviews of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs. The UKDCTN then addresses the key research gaps identified in systematic reviews by coordinating and carrying out well-designed RCTs. The Skin Disorders specialist library then plays a key role in disseminating new knowledge from systematic reviews and RCTs to a community of clinical users. The electronic resources at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology are all freely available to Indian Dermatologists who can use the resources in a way that could benefit their patients. Such new knoweldge only has value if it is shared and used.

  8. High altitude dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G K Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists. Acute mountain sickness, HA pulmonary edema, HA cerebral edema, and thromboembolic conditions are known to occur in HA. However, enough knowledge has not been shared on dermatoses peculiar to this region. Xerosis, UV-related skin disorders (tanning, photomelanosis, acute and chronic sunburn, polymorphic light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, actinic cheilitis, etc., cold injuries (frostbite, chilblains, acrocyanosis, erythrocyanosis, etc. nail changes (koilonychias, airborne contact dermatitis, insect bite reaction, and skin carcinoma (basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and also rarely malignant melanoma are the dermatoses seen in HAAs. Early diagnosis and knowledge of HA dermatoses may prevent serious consequences of disease and improve the quality of life for the visitors as well as for native of the place.

  9. New Described Dermatological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müzeyyen Gönül

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are “circumferential skin creases Kunze type” and “unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome”; autoinflammatory diseases include “chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE syndrome,” “pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH syndrome,” and “pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH syndrome”; tumors include “acquired reactive digital fibroma,” “onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma,” “infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma,” and “acral histiocytic nodules”; unclassified disorders include “saurian papulosis,” “symmetrical acrokeratoderma,” “confetti-like macular atrophy,” and “skin spicules,” “erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans.”

  10. Topical immunomodulators in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandpur Sujay

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Topical immunomodulators are agents that regulate the local immune response of the skin. They are now emerging as the therapy of choice for several immune-mediated dermatoses such as atopic dermatitis, contact allergic dermatitis, alopecia areata, psoriasis, vitiligo, connective tissue disorders such as morphea and lupus erythematosus, disorders of keratinization and several benign and malignant skin tumours, because of their comparable efficacy, ease of application and greater safety than their systemic counterparts. They can be used on a domiciliary basis for longer periods without aggressive monitoring. In this article, we have discussed the mechanism of action, common indications and side-effects of the commonly used topical immunomodulators, excluding topical steroids. Moreover, newer agents, which are still in the experimental stages, have also been described. A MEDLINE search was undertaken using the key words "topical immunomodulators, dermatology" and related articles were also searched. In addition, a manual search for many Indian articles, which are not indexed, was also carried out. Wherever possible, the full article was reviewed. If the full article could not be traced, the abstract was used.

  11. Patient perspectives on medical photography in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Marie C; Wu, Timothy; Haimovic, Adele; Kaplan, Rachel; Sanchez, Miguel; Cohen, David; Leger, Elizabeth A; Stein, Jennifer A

    2014-09-01

    Clinical photography enhances medical care, research, and teaching. Empirical data are needed to guide best practices regarding dermatologic photography. To investigate patient opinion about clinical photography and identify demographic factors that influence these opinions. Four hundred patients representing a broad range of ages, self-identified ethnic/racial groups, and socioeconomic levels were recruited from 4 dermatology settings in New York City. Patients were administered a survey about perceptions of photography, willingness to allow photographs to be used in a variety of settings, preferences for photographer and photographic equipment, and methods of consent. Eighty-eight percent of patients agreed that photography enhanced their quality of care. Most patients would allow their photographs to be used for medical, teaching, and research purposes with significantly more acceptance when patients were not identifiable. Patients preferred photographs taken by a physician rather than a nurse or student, photographers of the same gender, clinic-owned cameras to personal cameras or cell phones, and written consent to verbal consent. There were significant racial/ethnicity and age-related variations in responses, with white and older patients being more permissive than other groups. We use the results of this study to recommend best practices for photography in dermatology.

  12. Some Themes in the Discussion of the Quality of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    1999-01-01

    Abstract This paper is motivated by the need to discuss the quality of life as a part of the background for devising environmental strategies. When environmental strategies are devised, it is often more or less tacitly assumed that we should try to avoid measures that imply a decrease in the level....... The critical perspective is developed by dealing with welfare or the quality of life: what does it mean to have a good life? On the basis of this discussion, the relationship between consumption and welfare can then be assessed. The approach to the discussion of the quality of life in this paper is first...... with the different themes in the discussion of the quality of life. The point of departure is taken in some critical considerations related to the traditional conceptualization of welfare. After that, some inspiration from the debate on basic needs is outlined and supplemented with some reflections on the dual...

  13. Social acceptance and quality of life of leprosy patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyanoer, P. C.

    2018-03-01

    Some of the leprosy patients facing problems in many aspects such as social, economic, cultural and national security. Both the debilitating effects and disfigurements of leprosy, the society tends to stigmatize negatively those suffering from leprosy. The impact of negative stigma on society causes depression and problems in workplace cause difficulty in patient’s daily life. Neuropathic pain disturbs the quality of life of leprosy patients which could become so severe and significant. The neuropathic pain will lower their productivity which later caused difficulties in finding a job. This study was an analytical observational study to identify the correlation between neuropathic pain and quality of life in Leprosy Hospital of Scanning in Medan Belawan. The result showed that there is a correlation between neuropathic pain and disruption of quality of life (p=0.017). In conclusion, the milder the neuropathic pain experienced by persons with leprosy, the less the quality of life will be disturbed.

  14. [Interventions to improve quality of life in oncological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Steinger, Brunhilde; Koller, Michael; Lindberg, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    The assessment of quality of life is a central aspect in the current debate in support groups, certified cancer centres, benefit assessment, and also in palliative care. Accordingly, quality of life has become an essential part of clinical trials for more than two decades. But most of the time results are presented in a descriptive manner without any concrete therapeutic consequences for the improvement of quality of life. Likewise, there are no uniform recommendations for considering quality of life data in the decision-making process. Therefore, a guide with recommendations for the assessment of quality of life in trials has been developed. Its implementation is illustrated by a complex intervention for a targeted diagnosis and therapy of quality of life in patients with breast cancer or colorectal cancer. The basis is a standardised quality of life assessment and the presentation of results in an intelligible fashion as well as the close collaboration of all healthcare providers to create regional network structures for the targeted support of patients in both the inpatient and outpatient sector. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Predictors of quality of life among Chinese people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Qin; Petrini, Marcia A; Morisky, Donald E

    2017-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the association of quality of life, perceived stigma, and medication adherence among Chinese patients with schizophrenia, and to ascertain the predictors of quality of life. A cross-sectional correlation study was conducted with 146 participants. All participants completed self-report scales: the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale, Link's Stigma Scale, and the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Pearson parametric correlations and stepwise multiple regressions were performed. The total quality of life score and psychosocial subscale was significantly positively correlated with perceived stigma, coping orientation of withdrawal, and feelings of stigma, and negatively correlated with age and medication adherence. The means of all subscale scores except perceived devaluation-discrimination and different/guilty feelings were significantly higher than the midpoint of 2.5. The best predictors of quality of life and psychosocial domains were stigma-related feelings: feeling misunderstood, feeling different/shame, and age. Our findings suggest that an individual's negative emotional response may strengthen internalized stigma and decrease quality of life. As the best predictor, age indicated that adaptation to mental illness may relieve perceived stigma and achieve favorable quality of life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. What affects the quality of life in autoimmune Addison's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G; Hackemann, A; Penna-Martinez, M; Badenhoop, K

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have shown a reduced quality of life in patients with Addison's disease, but little is known about the potential influences. We determined the quality of life in 200 patients with Addison's disease using an Addison's disease-specific quality-of-life questionnaire. Data about first symptoms, time to diagnosis and current medication were collected by questionnaires. With increasing latency between first symptoms and diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency, the quality of life decreased in highly significant manner (pdisease (p=0.05), atrophic gastritis (p=0.01) and primary ovarian failure (p=0.01) were highly correlated with reduced scores. Quality of life was significantly lower in female patients and in those with manifestation at older ages. With more autoimmune comorbidities, the quality of life scores dropped. The most important factor, however, was latency between first symptoms and diagnosis that affected patients' quality of life even years after manifestation of the disease. These results confirm and extend previous observations and emphasize the importance of a timely diagnosis. Therefore, medical awareness for this rare but easily treatable disorder needs to be sharpened. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. [Association between mothers' quality of life and infants' nutritional status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijó, Fernanda de Matos; Carraro, Deborah Filippini; Cuervo, Maria Rita Macedo; Hagen, Martine Elisabeth Kienzle; Spiandorello, Wilson Paloschi; Pizzato, Alessandra Campani

    2011-12-01

    Determine associations between the quality of life of mothers and the nutritional status of children. case-control study involving 152 mothers of children aged zero to five years, living in the coverage area of a basic health unit in the city of Porto Alegre. The calculation of sample size was estimated as 152 mothers - 76 mothers with children at nutritional risk/malnutrition (cases) and 76 mothers with eutrophic children (controls). Information was collected regarding the quality of life of mothers, measured by the instrument of the World Health Organization, and the association between maternal quality of life and nutritional status of children was examined. In relation to the psychiatric realm, for each eutrophic child whose mother has lower quality of life there is a chance of 5.4 children at nutritional risk/malnutrition with mothers in the same condition. In the environmental field, for each eutrophic child whose mother has lower quality of life there is a chance of 2.9 children at nutritional risk/malnutrition with mothers in the same condition. Regarding educational level, for each eutrophic child whose mother has lower quality of life there is a chance of 4.2 children at nutritional risk/malnutrition with mothers in the same condition. Mothers' low quality of life was associated with an infant in nutritional risk/malnutrition and may be a risk factor for the nutritional status of children.

  18. Quality of life of patients with epilepsy in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Salina; Gill, Jesjeet Singh; Tan, Chong Tin

    2014-03-01

    To determine the quality of life of patients with epilepsy and its relationship with depression, and the clinical and sociodemographic variables. This was a cross-sectional study in which a total of 120 epilepsy patients were recruited from a neurology outpatient clinic. Sociodemographic and clinical variables were recorded. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) were used to screen and diagnose for depression, respectively. Quality of Life Inventory of Epilepsy (QOLIE-31) was used to assess quality of life. Patients with epilepsy with major depression had poorer quality life (36.4 ± 1.8) compared to those without depression (41.7 ± 3.8, P Depression, having one seizure or more per month and having seizures within one month of interview were correlated with poorer quality of life, P depression and recent seizures predicted having poorer quality of life in patients with epilepsy. Depression and poor seizure control were predictors for poor quality of life in patients with epilepsy. Therefore, epilepsy patients should be regularly screened for depression and treatment for epilepsy must be optimized to minimize the negative impact of having epilepsy for these patients. Copyright © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Quality of life in ostomy patients: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabirian, Aazam; Yaghmaei, Farideh; Rassouli, Maryam; Tafreshi, Mansoureh Zagheri

    2010-12-21

    Therapeutic procedures may not only treat disease but also affect patient quality of life. Therefore, quality of life should be measured in order to assess the impact of disease and therapeutic procedures. To identify clients' problems, it is necessary to assess several dimensions of quality of life, including physical, spiritual, economic, and social aspects. In this regard, we conducted a qualitative study to explore quality of life and its dimensions in ostomy patients referred to the Iranian Ostomy Association. Fourteen patients were interviewed about their quality of life dimensions by purposeful sampling. Data were gathered by semistructured interviews and analyzed using the content analysis method. Nine main themes emerged using this approach, including physical problems related to colostomy, impact of colostomy on psychological functioning, social and family relationships, travel, nutrition, physical activity, and sexual function, as well as religious and economic issues. The findings of the study identified a number of challenges in quality of life for patients with ostomy. The results can be used by health care providers to create a supportive environment that promotes better quality of life for their ostomy patients.

  20. Information system quality in work-life balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmini Gopinathan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to look for the role information systems quality may play in work-life balance among Malaysian ICT employees. The results of this study will be useful in the development of new tools and technologies that are focused on ISQ dimensions primarily information system quality which can be helpful to devise suggestions to the ICT sector on matters pertaining to sustainable development/policy formulation with reference to achieving a good work-life balance. A total of 79 respondents’ views were analyzed using Partial Least Square (PLS to obtain the final results. The results showed that information quality and system quality has strong effect on work-life balance as compared to service quality which showed no relation to work-life balance.

  1. Optimizing education on the inpatient dermatology consultative service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ladan; Shinkai, Kanade

    2017-03-01

    A consultative dermatology service plays an important role in patient care and education in the hospital setting. Optimizing education in balance with high-quality dermatology consultative services is both a challenge and an opportunity for dermatology consultation teams. There is an emergence of new information about how dermatology can best be taught in the hospital, much of which relies on principles of workplace learning as well as the science of how learning and teaching best happen in work settings. These best practices are summarized in this narrative review with integrated discussion of concepts from outpatient dermatology education and lessons learned from other inpatient teaching models. In addition, consultative dermatology curricula should utilize a blended curriculum model comprised of patient care and active learning and self-study modalities. Specific educational methods will discuss 2 strategies: (1) direct patient-care activities (ie, bedside teaching rounds) and (2) nonpatient care activities (ie, case presentations, didactic sessions, online modules, and reading lists). ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  2. Measurement of Quality of Life I. A Methodological Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread acceptance of quality of life (QOL as the ideal guideline in healthcare and clinical research, serious conceptual and methodological problems continue to plague this area. In an attempt to remedy this situation, we propose seven criteria that a quality-of-life concept must meet to provide a sound basis for investigation by questionnaire. The seven criteria or desiderata are: (1 an explicit definition of quality of life; (2 a coherent philosophy of human life from which the definition is derived; (3 a theory that operationalizes the philosophy by specifying unambiguous, nonoverlapping, and jointly exhaustive questionnaire items; (4 response alternatives that permit a fraction-scale interpretation; (5 technical checks of reproducibility; (6 meaningfulness to investigators, respondents, and users; and (7 an overall aesthetic appeal of the questionnaire. These criteria have guided the design of a validated 5-item generic, global quality-of-life questionnaire (QOL5, and a validated 317-item generic, global quality-of-life questionnaire (SEQOL, administered to a well-documented birth cohort of 7,400 Danes born in 1959�1961, as well as to a reference sample of 2,500 Danes. Presented in outline, the underlying integrative quality-of-life (IQOL theory is a meta-theory. To illustrate the seven criteria at work, we show the extent to which they are satisfied by one of the eight component theories. Next, two sample results of our investigation are presented: satisfaction with one's sex life has the expected covariation with one's quality of life, and so does mother's smoking during pregnancy, albeit to a much smaller extent. It is concluded that the methodological framework presented has proved helpful in designing a questionnaire that is capable of yielding acceptably valid and reliable measurements of global and generic quality of life.

  3. Good Job, Good Life? Working Conditions and Quality of Life in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnic, Sonja; Beham, Barbara; Prag, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Cross-national comparisons generally show large differences in life satisfaction of individuals within and between European countries. This paper addresses the question of whether and how job quality and working conditions contribute to the quality of life of employed populations in nine strategically selected EU countries: Finland, Sweden, the…

  4. Good Job, Good Life? Working Conditions and Quality of Life in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drobnic, Sonja; Beham, Barbara; Prag, Patrick; Drobnič, S.; Prag, Patrick

    Cross-national comparisons generally show large differences in life satisfaction of individuals within and between European countries. This paper addresses the question of whether and how job quality and working conditions contribute to the quality of life of employed populations in nine

  5. Quality of life assessment of children with thalassemia

    OpenAIRE

    Masyitah Sri Wahyuni; Muhammad Ali; Nelly Rosdiana; Bidasari Lubis

    2011-01-01

    Background Thalassemia is a chronic disease that is becoming a major health problem in the world, including the Mediterranean, as well as Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia. This condition clearly affects the patient's quality of life, because of the condition itself and the effects of treatment. Assessment is needed to detennine actions to be taken to improve the quality of life in thalassemic children. Objective To assess the differences in quality of life of thalassemic children comp...

  6. Measuring service life and evaluating the quality of solid tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charoenyut Dechwayukul

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to propose procedures for measuring service life and evaluating the quality of locallymade and used solid tires in Thailand. The solid tires were stressed and rotated until blowout on a drum-like test apparatuswhich is designed, constructed by the authors and equipped with laboratory instrumentation. Solid tires from five differentmanufacturers were selected for testing. We measured service life, length of time to tire failure, at three different loadingamplitudes and three different speeds on the testing drum. The service life of all specimens was studied and compared todetermine the possibility of using service life to evaluate the quality of a solid tire.

  7. Contact sensitisation in hand eczema patients-relation to subdiagnosis, severity and quality of life: a multi-centre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, Tove; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Brandao, Francisco M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contact sensitisation has been identified as a factor associated with poor prognosis for patients with hand eczema. OBJECTIVES: To study implications of contact sensitisation with respect to severity, quality of life (QoL) and subdiagnosis of hand eczema. METHODS: The study was perfor......BACKGROUND: Contact sensitisation has been identified as a factor associated with poor prognosis for patients with hand eczema. OBJECTIVES: To study implications of contact sensitisation with respect to severity, quality of life (QoL) and subdiagnosis of hand eczema. METHODS: The study...... eczema and presence of contact sensitisation were independent risk factors for increased severity as measured by Hand Eczema Severity Index. Furthermore, the severity of hand eczema increased by the number of contact sensitisations detected (P = 0.023). High age and personal history of atopic eczema were...... independent risk factors for low QoL, as measured by Dermatology Life Quality Index, and atopic eczema as well as allergic contact dermatitis as subdiagnosis was associated with increased sick leave. CONCLUSION: Diagnostic subgroups were not found to be related to specific allergens. Contact sensitisation...

  8. Hyperhidrosis Substantially Reduces Quality of Life in Children: A Retrospective Study Describing Symptoms, Consequences and Treatment with Botulinum Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Eriksson Mirkovic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies on children with hyperhidrosis are sparse. This retrospective study presents clinical data and quality of life, along with treatment effect and safety of botulinum toxin (BTX. Case reports from 366 children were included to capture the medical history of hyperhidrosis. The total median score of the Dermatology Life Quality Index before treatment was 11 for children aged 16–17 years and 12 for children younger than 16 years. The children described physical, psychosocial and consequence-related symptoms. More than 70% had multifocal hyperhidrosis. BTX-A and/or BTX-B were given to 323 children, 193 of whom received repeated treatments. The highest score in a 5-grade scale concerning treatment effect was reported by 176/193 children, i.e. their “sweating disappeared completely”. No severe adverse events occurred. Focal and multifocal hyperhidrosis in children reduces quality of life considerably. Treatment with BTX-A and/or BTX-B has been performed with success.

  9. Treatment Satisfaction, Product Perception, and Quality of Life in Plaque Psoriasis Patients Using Betamethasone Dipropionate Spray 0.05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joseph F; Del Rosso, James Q; Pakunlu, Refika I; Sidgiddi, Srinivas

    2017-11-01

    Objective: To assess patient-reported satisfaction, efficacy, and tolerability associated with the use of betamethasone dipropionate spray 0.05% when applied twice daily in subjects with moderate plaque psoriasis. Design: This was an open-label, multicenter study involving 45 patients with moderate plaque psoriasis, with the aim of evaluating patient-reported outcomes with betamethasone dipropionate spray 0.05%. Patients treated all affected areas twice daily with betamethasone dipropionate (BD) spray 0.05% for 28 days per label instructions. Measurements: Outcome measures included the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM), Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Investigators Global Assessment (IGA), and Total Sign Score (TSS). In addition, the lesions were photographed at baseline (Day 1) and on Day 8, Day 14, and Day 29. Results: The results indicated that BD spray 0.05% treatment is associated with improved quality of life. BD spray 0.05% also led to improved IGA and TSS values and a reduction in the percentage of body surface area affected. Conclusion: In subjects with moderate plaque psoriasis, BD spray 0.05% demonstrated good levels of patient satisfaction and quality of life measures, in combination with improvements in the global assessment of disease and the level of itching experienced by subjects.

  10. Sleep quality and quality of life in female shift-working nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ming-Fen; Chou, Yu-Ching; Yeh, Mei-Yu; Tzeng, Wen-Chii

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the factors that influence sleep quality and quality of life among shift-working nurses and the relationship between their sleep quality and quality of life. Although shift-working nurses strive to adapt their life schedules to shift rotations, they tend to suffer from severe sleep disturbances and increased rates of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, digestive disease and irregular menstrual cycles. Poor sleep is also associated with medical errors and occupational injuries. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 with a convenience sample of 435 female nurses from five regional hospitals in Taiwan. Data were collected on sleep quality and quality of life using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument-BREF Taiwan version respectively. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, independent t-tests, analysis of variance and Pearson correlations. The majority of female shift workers (57%) had global sleep-quality scores > or = 5, indicating poor sleep and all mean scores in four domains of the quality-of-life measure were statistically significantly lower than those of females in Taiwan's general population. Scores for poor sleep quality and quality of life were related to premenstrual dysphoria, occupational injury, illness and medication use. In addition, the associations between scores on the sleep-quality and quality-of-life scales were statistically significantly inversely correlated. Advice should be included in both undergraduate programmes and continuing education to help nurses to recognize and improve their own sleep quality and life quality managers should create a supportive environment to encourage shift-working nurses to engage in healthy behaviours.

  11. Quality of Sleep and its Relationship to Quality of Life in Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvan, Kobra; lakdizaji, Sima; Roshangar, Fariborz; Mostofi, Mahtab

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Despite many advances in the treatment of chronic renal failure, the quality of sleep in patients who suffer from this disease is at the risk. The high prevalence of sleep disorders in hemodialysis patients, which is concomitant with physical, behavioral, and psychological problems, has always affected these patients' quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to determine the relationship between quality of sleep and quality of life in hemodialysis patients. Methods: By using a descriptive and correlational design, this study was conducted on 245 hemodialysis patients in 2012. Patients were selected by convenience sampling from the hemodialysis ward of four training hospitals of Tabriz and Maragheh. Quality of sleep was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the quality of life for patients was measured by the Kidney Disease Quality Of Life questionnaire (KDQOL-SF). Results: 83.3% of hemodialysis patients had poor quality of sleep. Poor quality of life was significantly associated with poor quality of sleep. There was a significant negative correlation between global PSQI and important aspects of quality of life including physical health, symptoms and problems, the impact of kidney disease on daily life, burden of kidney disease, mental health, social support, and sexual function. Conclusion: The low quality of sleep in hemodialysis patients has an effect on the deterioration of their quality of life. Therefore, training, counseling, and advocacy programs should be developed to improve the patients' quality of sleep and quality of life, especially those with lower education level and income, and older people. PMID:25276738

  12. Contents of life review and quality of life of advanced cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Michiyo; Ishiwara, Tatsuhiko; Kimura, Hideyuki; Tsuchida, Yoko

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated the utility of life review for advanced cancer patients. In the investigation, we examined the contents of life review of advanced cancer patients, and the relation between specific contents and Quality of Life (QoL) issues.

  13. Interdependence of life insurance service quality and premium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Benazić

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Insurance companies in Croatia feel the need to find new sources of competitive advantage on the Croatian life insurance market amid increasing competition and a poorly profiled offer of life insurance services. Lately, both marketing literature and practice seem to point to the shaping of a relationship between service quality and price as a possible solution to improving the position of insurance companies on the Croatian market. In providing life insurance services, the insurance companies should focus on the quality elements that offer certain benefits a client is willing to pay for. Changes in individual quality features have been evaluated differently by clients. Such differences in their evaluation of changes in the individual elements of service quality also reflect the willingness of clients to pay a suitable increase on their insurance premium. Improvements in the service quality features that are subjectively evaluated as important should lead to the client’s acceptance of a higher life insurance premium. The paper considers the interdependence between the quality of life insurance services and the premium from the aspect of the client’s willingness to pay a higher life insurance premium for a higher service quality.

  14. The Quality of Life in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chong-Min

    2009-01-01

    The AsiaBarometer survey of 1,023 respondents shows Life in Korea is highly modernized and digitalized without being much globalized. Despite the modernization and digitalization of their lifestyles, ordinary citizens still prioritize materialistic values more than post-materialistic values, and they remain least satisfied in the material life…

  15. Effects of early life factors on the health and quality of life of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Fikriye; N Tekin, Rukiye

    2018-01-01

    Few studies on the effects of early life factors on the health and quality of life of adults have been conducted in Turkey. We aimed to investigate the effects of early life factors on the health and quality of life of older adults. We administered a questionnaire to 350 adults, aged 50-89 years, living in Cankaya, Ankara. The questionnaire covered sociodemographic characteristics, early life characteristics, health status, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Ageing scale. Data were analyzed using χ 2 tests, independent samples t-tests, one-way anova, and binary logistic regression analysis. The analyses showed that the most important risk factors for chronic disease were being ≥65 years (odds ratio (OR) = 2.34), having a chronic health problem before 18 years of age (OR = 2.48), experiencing prolonged hospitalization or bed rest before 18 years of age (OR = 2.65), and experiencing parental unconcern during early life (OR = 2.13) (P quality of life (P life factors are among the important determinants of the health and quality of life of older adults in Turkey. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  16. Quality of life in the contemporary politics of healthcare: … but what is a life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Catherine R

    2018-03-01

    'Quality of life' (QoL) is a ubiquitous phrase in medicine. There is considerable literature on the meaning of 'quality' in 'quality of life', but little on the meaning of 'life'. And yet, rooted in measurements of QoL, is a conceptualization of 'a life' used to judge 'quality'. In this article I focus on 'life' within institutional healthcare, arguing that for patients who are considered elderly, their life is defined against functionality. I use an autoethnographic method to enter this conversation, underlining the disjuncture between patients' understanding of 'a life', and that of healthcare professionals. I draw on the writings of the Italian philosopher Georgio Agamben to interrogate 'life', shifting the conversation of QoL from one of measurement and administration to one of political order. I discuss both the formal, evidence-based tools and the nature of their application. I conclude by arguing that QoL tools and their application, produce a particular kind of life, and that what is at stake in the invocation of 'quality of life' in health care is our very experience of aging and our embodiment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. HIV, self-transcendence, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellors, M P; Riley, T A; Erlen, J A

    1997-01-01

    Self-transcendence is a developmental characteristic that expands one's boundaries of the self to take on broader life perspectives, activities, and purposes that help one discover or make meaning of one's life. However, no quantitative studies were found in the research literature that focused on self-transcendence or on the relationship between self-transcendence and quality of life in people infected with HIV. To examine these variables in this population, 46 HIV-positive subjects completed Reed's Self-Transcendence Scale and Ferrans and Powers' Quality of Life Index. The results demonstrated that overall self-transcendence for this sample was relatively high; quality of life was higher than that reported in previous research; and there were some significant group differences among the three HIV clinical categories.

  18. Harmonization of gender roles as a basis for life quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešić Ana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities that determine the quality of life are related to environmental factors, economic factors, social and personal factors that largely determine the relationships among people and, especially, relations between genders. Particularly important for the quality of life is work, development and work results. Career is now perceived as a development of our own competencies, understanding of the meaning of work through the integration of psychological, sociological, educational, physical and economic factors, which together form the individual's career in life. Women's career developments are often different from men's, due to the phenomenon of the glass ceiling, which represents an invisible barrier to the advancement of women, and which often influences their behaviour. Harmonization of gender roles in business and private life of women is imperative to improve the quality of life all citizens.

  19. Caregivers' quality of life and quality of services for children with cancer: a review from iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Homeira; Vameghi, Meroe; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Khodaeiardekani, Mohammadreza

    2013-03-04

    Caregivers of cancer patients are exposed to different types of psychosocial stress which influence their quality of life. The purposes of this study were to assess quality of life in caregivers of children with cancer and to investigate the relationship between the caregivers' quality of life and quality of services in the social work section. 125 caregivers were recruited. Quality of life was measured by the Iranian version of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire and data concerning service quality were obtained from the Iranian version of the SERVQUAL questionnaire. Scores in physical health, psychological status and environmental conditions for caregivers of children with cancer were significantly lower than the general population. There was a negative correlation between the tangible domain of SERVQUAL and the psychological status and environmental conditions of quality of life. The tangible dimension was the only aspect of service quality to predict caregivers' quality of life regarding psychological status and environmental conditions. Caregivers of children with a disease are care consumers and, like all consumers, they expect good service. Delivering high quality services consistently is difficult but profitable for a service organization. In other words, trying to deliver more appropriate services than patients expect to receive from their social work care is one of the most reliable ways to promote caregivers' satisfaction and quality of life.

  20. Caregivers’ Quality of Life and Quality of Services for Children with Cancer: A Review from Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Homeira; Vameghi, Meroe; Ghazinour, Mehdi; KhodaeiArdakani, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Caregivers of cancer patients are exposed to different types of psychosocial stress which influence their quality of life. The purposes of this study were to assess quality of life in caregivers of children with cancer and to investigate the relationship between the caregivers’ quality of life and quality of services in the social work section. Method: 125 caregivers were recruited. Quality of life was measured by the Iranian version of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire and data concerning service quality were obtained from the Iranian version of the SERVQUAL questionnaire. Findings: Scores in physical health, psychological status and environmental conditions for caregivers of children with cancer were significantly lower than the general population. There was a negative correlation between the tangible domain of SERVQUAL and the psychological status and environmental conditions of quality of life. The tangible dimension was the only aspect of service quality to predict caregivers’ quality of life regarding psychological status and environmental conditions. Conclusion: Caregivers of children with a disease are care consumers and, like all consumers, they expect good service. Delivering high quality services consistently is difficult but profitable for a service organization. In other words, trying to deliver more appropriate services than patients expect to receive from their social work care is one of the most reliable ways to promote caregivers’ satisfaction and quality of life. PMID:23618487

  1. Economic Growth - Quality of Life Nexus in Ethiopia: Time Series ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optiplex 7010 Pro

    This study investigates the nexus between economic growth and quality of life ..... competitiveness of political participation, the openness and competitiveness ..... women contributes to minimal food expenditure in the urban areas in the LR.

  2. Quality of life issues relating to endocrine treatment options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P

    1999-01-01

    Recent interest has focused on the use of hormone therapy in prostate cancer for both the management of patients with non-metastatic disease and as a neoadjuvant or adjuvant to curative therapies. This has resulted in patients with fewer symptoms being treated for longer periods of time. Endocrine...... treatments for prostate cancer, such as castration, combined androgen blockade and non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy, have shown similar results in terms of time to progression and survival. The main difference between these treatments is their impact on patients' quality of life. Instruments...... for measuring health-related quality of life should assess both overall and disease-specific quality of life. Data from two large studies of bicalutamide monotherapy show that this non-steroidal antiandrogen is associated with significant health-related quality of life advantages in the treatment of patients...

  3. Assessment of quality of life among children with bronchial asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-23

    Feb 23, 2016 ... dren 5 years and younger, the clinical symptoms of asthma are variable and ... naires alone or composite scores of asthma control. Quality of life measures ... tory, examination finding, laboratory investigation and treatment ...

  4. The Quality of Life Scale (QOLS: Reliability, Validity, and Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Kathryn L

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Quality of Life Scale (QOLS, created originally by American psychologist John Flanagan in the 1970's, has been adapted for use in chronic illness groups. This paper reviews the development and psychometric testing of the QOLS. A descriptive review of the published literature was undertaken and findings summarized in the frequently asked questions format. Reliability, content and construct validity testing has been performed on the QOLS and a number of translations have been made. The QOLS has low to moderate correlations with physical health status and disease measures. However, content validity analysis indicates that the instrument measures domains that diverse patient groups with chronic illness define as quality of life. The QOLS is a valid instrument for measuring quality of life across patient groups and cultures and is conceptually distinct from health status or other causal indicators of quality of life.

  5. The estimation of labor life quality in regions of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Leonidovna Andreyeva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of labor life quality estimation based on research of the social and labor sphere of Russia regions over the last 10 years is described in the article. The most significant components of the labor life quality, allowing to estimate the central problem places of the social and labor sphere (employment and unemployment, salary and income, qualification and labor productivity, safety and work organization, business and investment activity are allocated and proved. On the basis of an author’s calculation method of an integrated index of labor life quality of the population in regions of Russia are calculated and analyzed in dynamics. Regularities of formation of an integrated index of labor life quality in regions of Russia are revealed, ways of an assessment of efficiency of realized state programs in the social and labor sphere are planned.

  6. Quality of life : assessment for transportation performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is a commonly used term. Defining QOL, however, is an ongoing challenge that experts : often take on with minimal input from citizens. This groundbreaking research sought citizen input on what : comprised QOL and what role trans...

  7. Quality of life among dots (directly observed treatment short course ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality of life among dots (directly observed treatment short course) cured patients: ... which is a specific instrument and covers four domains of health i.e. physical, ... thereby necessitating measures for the improvement of the overall health of ...

  8. functional outcome and quality of life after surgical management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the functional outcome and quality of life of acetabular ... Outcome measures: Modified Merle d'Aubigne scale and “Squat and Smile” test for functional outcome. ..... limited number of implants, few surgical instruments.

  9. ed quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... measures can capture the non-respiratory effects of. Chronic ... Key words: Peak expiratory flow, quality of life, spi- ... device. For spirometry, a minimum of three and a maximum of eight spirometry maneuvers were done.

  10. [Functional impairment and quality of life after rectal cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Laura; Zarate, Alba; Serra-Aracil, Xavier; Pallisera, Anna; Serra, Sheila; Navarro-Soto, Salvador

    2018-01-01

    This study determines the quality of life and the anorectal function of these patients. Observational study of two cohorts comparing patients undergoing rectal tumor surgery using TaETM or conventional ETM after a minimum of six months of intestinal transit reconstruction. EORTC-30, EORTC-29 quality of life questionnaires and the anorectal function assessment questionnaire (LARS score) are applied. General variables are also collected. 31 patients between 2011 and 2014: 15 ETM group and 16 TaETM. We do not find statistically significant differences in quality of life questionnaires or in anorectal function. Statistically significant general variables: longer surgical time in the TaETM group. Nosocomial infection and minor suture failure in the TaETM group. The performance of TaETM achieves the same results in terms of quality of life and anorectal function as conventional ETM. Copyright: © 2018 Permanyer.

  11. Hot Flashes and Quality of Life among Breast Cancer Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobs, Linda A

    2005-01-01

    This ongoing longitudinal study examines hot flashes and Quality of Life (QoL) in breast cancer (BC) patients undergoing initial treatment, and develops a taxonomy of the medical and Complementary and Alternative Medicine...

  12. Quality of life from a transcultural nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, M

    1994-01-01

    The author presents research findings derived from Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality bearing upon quality of life. She holds that since quality of life is culturally constituted and patterned, it needs to be studied and understood from a transcultural nursing perspective in order to advance nursing as a discipline and profession. Five major cultures are presented to illustrate culturally constituted dominant care patterns related to quality of life. These comparative data reflect more diversity than universality among the cultures. The author encourages nurse researchers to move beyond present-day overemphasis on individualism and to discover dominant transcultural care values and patterns of emic and etic knowledge focused on quality of life, health, and well-being.

  13. Age decreases quality of life in adolescents with intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prastiya Indra Gunawan

    2015-12-01

    Intractable epileptic adolescents have higher scores for physical functioning and health perception, but lower scores for social stigmatization. Social support has extremely low scores. Increasing age decreases quality of life in adolescents with intractable epilepsy.

  14. Quality of Life Revolution: Labor and Leisure, Joint Contributors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twardzik, Louis F.

    1976-01-01

    If the characteristics generally ascribed to recreation--pleasure, enjoyment, and fulfillment--can be made available during the work experience, the quality of all life experiences will be improved. (JD)

  15. Depression and quality of life in first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Renwick, Laoise

    2012-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has gained recognition as a valid measure of outcome in first-episode psychosis (FEP). This study aimed to determine the influence of specific groups of depressive symptoms on separate domains of subjectively appraised QOL.

  16. Quality of Life of Nigerian Stroke Survivors and Its Determinants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biomedical Research ... The disability caused by stroke could lead to significant decline in the level of functioning and deterioration of quality of life ... The physical, social and emotional domains of QoL were all affected.

  17. Quality of life in survivors of oropharyngeal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høxbroe Michaelsen, Sanne; Grønhøj, Christian; Høxbroe Michaelsen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    and meta-analysis investigates how treatment affects quality of life (QoL) in survivors of oropharyngeal cancer. PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched for all studies reporting patient-assessed QoL at least 1 year after treatment for OPC. In a meta-analysis, weighted average...... for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core-30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) was answered by 704 patients, 644 patients answered the EORTC QLQ Head and Neck-35 (H&N-35), 474 patients answered the University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire, and 381 patients answered the M. D. Anderson...... Dysphagia Inventory. Moderate to large clinically important deteriorations in QoL were found in the domains dry mouth and sticky saliva for the EORTC QLQ-H&N35, saliva, chewing, swallowing, speech, taste, appearance and shoulder for the University of Washington Quality of Life Questionnaire, and the global...

  18. Health and quality of life vs. occupational activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kowalska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The level of quality of life and health status of the population largely depends on the determinants related to occupational activity. The results of reviewed bibliography indicate a significant and growing importance of employment conditions on the quality of life and population health status in most countries of the world, especially in those with market economy. Of the evaluated determinants the following factors should be listed in particular: sources and the amount of income, stability of the income and employment, the nature of work and the degree of job satisfaction, as well as autonomy and career prospects. Moreover, they proved that the situation of persisting and long-term unemployment and precarious employment leads to a significant deterioration in the quality of life and health, especially among young people. In conclusion, the study of quality of life and population health status should take into consideration factors related to occupational activity. Med Pr 2016;67(5:663–671

  19. Quality of life of patients treated with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna Rożniecka-Hełmińska

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Radiotherapy is one of the most commonly used anticancer treatments. Despite continuous technological development it may cause adverse symptoms, and as a result reduce the quality of life in patients undergoing radiation therapy. Objective of the work: Analysis of the quality of life of patients treated with radiation therapy and the effect determination of selected factors and their clinical complications on the quality of life of oncological patients. Material and methods: The study included 100 patients diagnosed with cancer, including 47 (47% women and 53 (53% men, with an average age of 62.1 (± 9.47 years. The study used a standardized questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30, in assessing the quality of life of cancer patients and a questionnaire of our own design containing sociodemographic and clinical data. The collected empirical data were analyzed statistically. The level of significance was p <0.05. Results: In the group of patients tested the average rate the overall quality of life was 50.5 (± 16.28 with a median of 50. The highest quality of life in the test reported in the field of cognitive functioning, and the lowest in the area of social functioning. In 72% of patients experienced complications of radiotherapy. During the analysis, it was found that the overall quality of life and functioning in all domains is lower comparing to the results of patients with no side effects of treatment. The analysis also found that in patients with head and neck cancer, which are irradiated at the same area, the level of cognitive functioning is significantly lower than the level of functioning in the same domain patients irradiated in the chest area (p <0.008 and in the area of reproductive organs (p <0.007. Conclusions: There is a diversity of quality of life of patients with and without complications of treatment with ionizing radiation, which have a significant impact on the quality of life of cancer patients. Location area irradiated

  20. The estimation of labor life quality in regions of Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Yelena Leonidovna Andreyeva; Tatyana Vladimirovna Polkova

    2013-01-01

    The methodology of labor life quality estimation based on research of the social and labor sphere of Russia regions over the last 10 years is described in the article. The most significant components of the labor life quality, allowing to estimate the central problem places of the social and labor sphere (employment and unemployment, salary and income, qualification and labor productivity, safety and work organization, business and investment activity) are allocated and proved. On...

  1. Quality of life of patients with a stoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jánská, Pavla

    2012-01-01

    Thesis "Quality of life of patients with a stoma 'is about what all includes the patient's life with a stoma. The theoretical part acquaint with issues related to each stoma. Describe the anatomy of the digestive and urinary tract, history and basic division stoma. Shortly in my work, I also described diseases that can be dealt with stoma. Describe preoperative and postoperative care, devoted to the care and stoma aids. I mention also stoma complications and deal with the patient's quality of...

  2. Mathematical Methods in Survival Analysis, Reliability and Quality of Life

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Catherine; Mesbah, Mounir

    2008-01-01

    Reliability and survival analysis are important applications of stochastic mathematics (probability, statistics and stochastic processes) that are usually covered separately in spite of the similarity of the involved mathematical theory. This title aims to redress this situation: it includes 21 chapters divided into four parts: Survival analysis, Reliability, Quality of life, and Related topics. Many of these chapters were presented at the European Seminar on Mathematical Methods for Survival Analysis, Reliability and Quality of Life in 2006.

  3. Information system quality in work-life balance

    OpenAIRE

    Sharmini Gopinathan; Murali Raman

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to look for the role information systems quality may play in work-life balance among Malaysian ICT employees. The results of this study will be useful in the development of new tools and technologies that are focused on ISQ dimensions primarily information system quality which can be helpful to devise suggestions to the ICT sector on matters pertaining to sustainable development/policy formulation with reference to achieving a good work-life balance. A total of 79 respondents’...

  4. Proxy-rated quality of life in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Bhattacharya, Suvosree; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the change in proxy rated quality of life (QoL) of a large cohort of home living patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) over a period of 36 months.......The study investigated the change in proxy rated quality of life (QoL) of a large cohort of home living patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) over a period of 36 months....

  5. QUALITY OF LIFE, COUNSELLING AND HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nena Kopčavar Guček

    2008-12-01

    Quality of life in menopause is a result of many factors and therefore it is very individual.Hormone replacement therapy is one of the possibilities of improvement. Therefore, it isessential that a woman is adequately informed about all the advantages and risks of thehormonal replacement therapy. Only an informed patient can be a partner in shareddecision making about the improvement of quality of life

  6. Quality of life in urinary bladder and prostate cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Stefanie, 1979-

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of this thesis was to describe the evolution of Health-Related Quality of Life in Spanish patients with urologic tumours; and to the examine clinical and treatment-related factors associated with changes in Health-Related Quality of Life during the first year of treatment. The EMPARO project is an observational, multicenter, prospective study on patients diagnosed with bladder cancer (n=326) and prostate cancer (n=472). Consecutive patients were enrolled in 7 Spanish hos...

  7. Health-related quality of life in adult dermatitis patients stratified by filaggrin genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heede, Nina G; Thyssen, Jacob P; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan; Szecsi, Pal B; Stender, Steen; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-03-01

    Information concerning health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and comorbidities of adult dermatitis patients stratified by loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) is limited. To investigate HRQoL, skin symptoms and comorbidities in adult FLG mutation carriers. This cross-sectional study included patients diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and/or hand eczema (n = 520). Patients completed questionnaires about dermatitis, skin symptoms, HRQoL, and comorbidities, including actinic keratosis, and atopic and mental disorders. FLG mutations (R501X, 2282del4, and R2447X) were identified in 16.9% of patients, and were significantly associated not only with atopic dermatitis, but also independently with skin fissures on the fingers and heels, and self-reported actinic keratosis. Although FLG mutations were significantly associated with reduced HRQoL, as measured by use of the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), no association with self-reported anxiety or depression was identified. Notably, the highest median DLQI score, reflecting greater impairment, was reported by patients with both FLG mutations and atopic dermatitis. Overall, 19.7% of patients with both atopic dermatitis and FLG mutations reported a 'large or extremely large' impact on their lives; this represents twice the prevalence seen in patients with atopic dermatitis and wild-type FLG (9.6%). Patients with both atopic dermatitis and common FLG mutations are more frequently affected by reduced HRQoL. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The impact of PASI 75 and PASI 90 on quality of life in moderate to severe psoriasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrouk, Michael; Nakamura, M; Zhu, T H; Farahnik, B; Koo, J; Bhutani, T

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that psoriasis significantly impacts patients' quality of life (QoL). With the introduction of improved treatment modalities with biologic agents, more patients with moderate to severe psoriasis are able to achieve better results as measured by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). PASI 75 indicates a 75% or greater reduction in PASI scores from baseline and is indicative of excellent disease improvement. With newer biologic agents such as secukinumab, ixekizumab and brodalumab, patients are now capable of achieving PASI 90, introducing additional clinical decisions for physicians when considering treatment options. However, little is known regarding how the difference between achieving PASI-75 versus PASI-90 impacts patients' QoL. The purpose of this study was to compare how achieving PASI 75 versus PASI 90 impacts QoL for patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis by using validated psychometric instruments that have been widely used in both dermatologic and non-dermatologic settings. Two separate open-label clinical trials were conducted to specifically assess QoL in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis on adalimumab or ustekinumab over 24 weeks. In addition to clinical assessments of psoriasis, patients completed two surveys: The Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB) Index and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Changes in total PGWB score and DLQI score at weeks 12 and 24 compared to baseline were compared between groups achieving PASI 75 and PASI 90. There was no statistically significant difference in PGWB scores between patients achieving PASI 75 and patients achieving PASI 90 in the adalimumab treatment group (week 12 p = .21, but there was at week 24 p = .05). There was a statistically significant difference in DLQI between the patients achieving PASI 75 and the patients achieving PASI 90 in the adalimumab treatment group at week 24 (p = .01), but not week 12 (p = .11). There was no

  9. Quality of life in women with urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Senra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary The aim of this study is to examine the relationship among psychological, clinical and sociodemographic variables, and quality of life in women with urinary incontinence. The sample consisted of 80 women diagnosed with urinary incontinence (UI followed in a Northern Central Hospital in Portugal. Participants answered the Incontinence Quality of Life (I-QOL; Satisfaction with Sexual Relationship Questionnaire (SSRQ; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS and the Brief Cope. The results revealed that women with higher quality of life considered their symptoms of urine loss as mild or moderated compared to those with severe urine loss. The less severe urine loss was associated with greater sexual satisfaction and less use of religion and self-blame as coping strategies. In terms of coping, women who considered the loss of urine as severe expressed more feelings regarding UI. Stress urinary incontinence, high sexual satisfaction, and less use of denial, distraction, and religion as coping strategies, predicted higher quality of life. According to the results, UI has an impact on women’s sexual satisfaction and quality of life. Therefore, intervention programs should target these women, including their partners, helping them to adjust to their condition and teaching effective coping strategies in order to improve their sexual satisfaction and quality of life.

  10. [Association of occupational stress with quality of working life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Lan, Ya-Jia; Chen, Hong-Mei

    2011-07-01

    To assess occupational stress and quality of working life (QWL) and their association in workers with different jobs. The Occupational Stress Inventory Revised Edition (OSI-R) and Quality of Working Life Scale (QWL7-32) were administered to 194 workers in the Liaohe Oilfield. The association between occupational stress and quality of working life was analysed by controlling job types and other confounding variables. Office workers had significantly lower scores in occupational role questionnaire (ORQ) and personal strain questionnaire (PSQ) and higher scores in personal resources questionnaire (PRQ) and QWL than physical laborers (P<0.05). The PSQ scores were positively correlated with the ORQ scores and negatively correlated with the PRQ scores. The QWL scores were negatively correlated with the ORQ and PSQ scores, and positively correlated with the PRQ scores (P<0.001). The QWL scores changed with job types. The QWL scores declined with the increase of stress levels (P<0.01). ORQ, role boundary (RB), role insufficiency (RI), physical environment (PE), PSQ, vocational strain (VS), interpersonal strain (IS) and PRQ had a significant impact on quality of working life (P<0.01). Occupational stress is associated with quality of working life. Quality of working life can be improved through control of occupational stress.

  11. Colon irrigation and quality of life in patients with colostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Barbero Juárez

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems that a patient with a colostomy has to face after surgery is the intestinal continence. This lead these patients to experience not only a series of physical changes but also hygienic, dietetic, social, etc. As nurses, we must learn how to detect the needs of these patients in order to offer them an appropriate attention to improve their quality of life. Our aim is to assess if the irrigation technique (IT as a method for intestinal continence improves the quality of life in these patients. Methodology: A Pretest-postest study without control group was carried out in order to evaluate the usefulness of IT to improve the quality of life in patients with colostomy. Following a normalized protocol, the technique was taught to patients whose quality of life was evaluated before and after the application of IT. Results: Quality of life rate before intervention was 54,2% and reached 77,3% (statistically significant once the patient has used IT for two months. Conclusions: IT is associated with a remarkable improvement in the quality of life of patientes with colostomy. This improvement is reflected in the eight dimensions analysed: psychological welfare, physical welfare, body image, pain, sexual activity, nutrition, social preoccupations and device handling.

  12. Gingivitis, Psychological Factors and Quality of Life in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Priscila de Lima; Barbosa, Taís de Souza; Amato, Juliana Neide; Montes, Ana Bheatriz Marangoni; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the associations between gingivitis, emotional status and quality of life in children. Sixty-four Brazilian students (11 to 12 years old) were examined for clinical and self-reported gingivitis. The participants were divided into two groups: those with gingivitis (n = 21) and controls (n = 43). Quality of life, anxiety and depression were measured using self-administered questionnaires. Saliva was collected 30 min after waking and at bedtime to measure the diurnal decline in salivary cortisol. The results were analysed using bivariate and multivariate analyses. There were significantly more female participants in the control group. Approximately 90% of the children with gingivitis had good oral hygiene and 10.5% had satisfactory oral hygiene. There was a significant positive correlation between anxiety and depression in both clinical groups. Anxiety was negatively correlated with quality of life in the control group. Depression was negatively correlated with quality of life and cortisol concentrations in the group with gingivitis, and with quality of life in the control group. Children with gingivitis were more likely to be older and males. Older children are more likely to experience gingival bleeding. The presence of gingivitis in children may be associated with worse psychological well-being, possibly compromising the quality of life.

  13. Quality of life of people with diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Martins Lima Neto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: evaluate the quality of life of people with diabetic foot and its association with age and gender. Methods: cross-sectional study conducted with people with diabetic foot seen in the vascular clinic of a municipal hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, lifestyle and evaluation of quality of life SF-36 questionnaires were used. Results: sample was consisted of 48 people. The majority was elderly (58.4%, female (56.3%, non-smoker (93.7%, non-alcoholic (83.4%, with recurrence of ulcers (50.0%, with present secretion (54.2% and absent fetid odor (81.3%. Regarding quality of life, the best result was in the domain vitality and the worse, in the domain physical aspects. All domains, except the vitality, had a score below 50 in the measurement of quality of life. There was no significant difference in the comparison of quality of life between age groups and gender. Conclusion: participants presented domains of quality of life that tend to a poorer health status.

  14. Quality of life of parents with Down syndrome children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Loureiro Buzatto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the social and demographic features and quality of life of parents that have children with Down syndrome, and to verify the influence that the care of these children has on the quality of life of their parents. Methods: This was an investigative and descriptive study that included a sample of 30 parents that have children with Down syndrome who were registered in the APAE Sao Paulo and APAE Barueri. A questionnaire elaborated by the authors and the Quality of Life Scale (WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire were applied. Rresults: In the sample of 30 parents of children with Down syndrome, 80% were female. The age ranged from 28 to 49 years, mean of 37 years. The quality of life was described as “good” by 60% of the sample. The following WOHQOL-BREF scores were found: social (80.72; physical (73.36; environmental (69.74; and psychological (60.28. There were 12 responses about the influence of the care of Down syndrome children on quality of life, of which 58.3% reported major involvement with the education and care of the children, which resulted in satisfaction. Cconclusion: The psychological domain had the lowest score in the quality of life evaluation, suggesting that parents need to be offered psychological support.

  15. Performance and Quality of Working Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.D. Pruijt (Hans)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAn examination of the deep structure of the discourse on the organization of work shows that the most successful texts share a common structure: they construct an ideal model in which performance and quality go hand in hand. They provide explanations for the self-constructed gap between

  16. Quality of life as an outcome measure in surgical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenhoff, B S; Krabbe, P F; Wobbes, T; Ruers, T J

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest in assessing the impact of a disease and the effect of a treatment on a patient's life, expressed as health-related quality of life (HRQoL). HRQoL assessment can provide essential outcome information for cancer surgery. METHODS: The core of this review is

  17. The Quality of Life of Retired Reengaged Academics in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejechi, Eucharia Onyema

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life (QL) of retired academics reengaged in some Nigerian Universities was studied using physical health, subjective happiness, life satisfaction and psychological well-being domains and a measure based on control, autonomy, self-realization and pleasure (CASP) as indicators. Satisfactory QL was indicated all respondents (greater…

  18. Measurement of quality of life I. A methodological framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Hilden, Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2003-01-01

    meet to provide a sound basis for investigation by questionnaire. The seven criteria or desiderata are: (1) an explicit definition of quality of life; (2) a coherent philosophy of human life from which the definition is derived; (3) a theory that operationalizes the philosophy by specifying unambiguous...

  19. Antihypertensives in dermatology Part I - Uses of antihypertensives in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. S. Ranugha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a global health problem. Antihypertensives are the mainstay of treatment for hypertension. Some of them were accidentally found to be useful in alopecias and infantile hemangiomas and have now become standard treatment for these conditions as well. Antihypertensives are also being studied for other dermatological indications, where they have shown promising efficacy. This review focuses on the dermatological indications for antihypertensives, discussing the drugs that have been tried, as well as their efficacy, dosage, duration of therapy, and adverse effects.

  20. Work-related quality of life of Ugandan healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opollo, J G; Gray, J; Spies, L A

    2014-03-01

    To describe perceived work-related quality of life of Ugandan healthcare workers. A secondary aim was to seek participant input on ways to improve work environments. Poor patient outcomes, decreased employee motivation and decisions to leave the organization have been linked to poor work conditions. Interventions to correct healthcare worker shortage in developing countries require information about work quality of life. Descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in health and educational settings in Uganda in July 2011. Participants completed the Biographical Information Scale demographic questionnaire and the validated 24-item Work-Related Quality of Life scale. Sample included 146 healthcare workers employed in various settings. Participants reported poorer quality of work life on the work conditions, control at work and home-work interface subscales. Participants perceived stress at work to be low and experienced higher job career satisfaction. There was a significant relationship between work-related quality of life, gender and hours worked. Participants' suggestions to improve work life ranged from simple no-cost suggestions to more complex system level interventions. Work-related quality of life was low in this convenience sample. Perceived stress at work was lower than expected, but may have been due to nurses' expectations of a normal work assignment. Predominantly women, the participants had significant caregiving responsibilities. Nurses must acquire a seat at the table where crucial decisions about nursing and its future are made. By advancing leadership skills, nurses can effectively advocate for organizational changes that address broad factors related to increasing job satisfaction, and retaining and attracting nurses. Nurses can influence work quality of life individually and collectively by identifying workplace concerns, demanding safe work environments, fostering teamwork and enhancing professional growth. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  1. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke; Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Stender, Ida Marie; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst; Vestergaard, Tine; Thormann, Henrik; Hædersdal, Merete; Dam, Tomas Norman; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables in the NMSC database. Information on recurrence, cosmetic results, and complications are registered at two follow-up visits at 3 months (between 0 and 6 months) and 12 months (between 6 and 15 months) after treatment. In 2014, 11,522 patients with 17,575 tumors were registered in the database. Of tumors with a histological diagnosis, 13,571 were BCCs, 840 squamous cell carcinomas, 504 Bowen's disease, and 173 keratoakanthomas. The NMSC database encompasses detailed information on the type of tumor, a variety of prognostic factors, treatment modalities, and outcomes after treatment. The database has revealed that overall, the quality of care of NMSC in Danish dermatological clinics is high, and the database provides the necessary data for continuous quality assurance.

  2. Understanding the life experience of people on hemodialysis: adherence to treatment and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Guerrerro, Verónica; Plazas, Maria del Pilar Camargo; Cameron, Brenda L; Salas, Anna Valeria Santos; González, Carmen Gloria Cofre

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic-phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of patients on hemodialysis in regard to the adherence to treatment and quality of life. Fifteen patients were interviewed, including six women and nine men from three dialysis centers in Chile. Two main themes derived from the analysis: 1) embracing the disease and dialysis, and 2) preventing progression of the disease through treatment management. The findings suggest that patients recognize adherence to treatment and quality of life as conditions that derive from self-care and environmental conditions, which the healthcare provider must constantly assess for care planning to improve the adherence and quality of life in this population.

  3. Ginseng in Dermatology: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouri-Rad, Sarvenaz; Sabouri-Rad, Sara; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra

    2017-01-01

    Ginseng has gained fame as one of the most popular herbs originating from Eastern countries. Among different species which are known as ginseng, Panax ginseng C. A. Mey. (Korean or Asian ginseng) is the most frequently used one. Ginsenosides have been proposed to account for most of the biological activities of ginseng. The widely appreciated health-promoting effect of ginseng pertains to the beneficial effects of this plant against immune, cardiovascular and sexual diseases and cancer. In addition, there are some new aspects of the pharmacological activity of this plant which justify its use in dermatologic diseases. In dermatology, ginseng has been investigated mechanistically for its therapeutic effects in photoaging, wound and injury, skin cancer, dermatitis, hair loss, alopecia and cold hypersensitivity. Here, we reviewed experimental and clinical studies exploring the therapeutic efficacy of ginseng and ginsenosides in the field of dermatology. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. [What's new in instrumental dermatology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, J-M

    2014-12-01

    This "What's new in instrumental dermatology" focuses on cutaneous oncologic surgery, base on a review of the 2012-2014 literature. First, the ability of dermatologists to make a good "oncologic reading of tumors" is the key of radical surgical treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the biopsy are discussed. Then, the second message is the management of anticoagulants, that should not be interrupted for skin surgery. Despite recommendations, this practice is not followed in 40% of cases; this point is critical because bleeding complications are minor compared to potential morbidity of thrombotic events when stopping these medications. Regarding infection, nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is identified as a risk factor for wound infection. A preoperative shower with chlorhexidine and mupirocin topical decolonization of nostril reduces this risk. Surgical techniques are trying to reach minimalism, by reducing undermining and scarring. On the trunk, using deep slow resorbable sutures improve scarring. In addition using adhesive sutures (strip) reduce the wideness of scar. On the face, the lower third of the nose is the most challenging because of the free edges, which are deformable. In this location bilobed or trilobed transposition flap offer the advantage of remaining in the nasal aesthetic unit and not disturbing the free edges of the nasal orifices. Regarding scarring, early hypertrophic scar is now well defined and linked with transposition flaps of the nasal region. An early treatment with intralesional corticosteroid injection appears to be effective. Finally, the biological mechanism of the effectiveness of compression in the prevention and treatment of dystrophic scar is now clear. The mechanotransduction explain how a mechanical stress of the skin activates biological cell pathways, which regulate the quality of collagen synthesis and the arrangement of skin fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Life course socio-economic position and quality of life in adulthood: a systematic review of life course models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background A relationship between current socio-economic position and subjective quality of life has been demonstrated, using wellbeing, life and needs satisfaction approaches. Less is known regarding the influence of different life course socio-economic trajectories on later quality of life. Several conceptual models have been proposed to help explain potential life course effects on health, including accumulation, latent, pathway and social mobility models. This systematic review aimed to assess whether evidence supported an overall relationship between life course socio-economic position and quality of life during adulthood and if so, whether there was support for one or more life course models. Methods A review protocol was developed detailing explicit inclusion and exclusion criteria, search terms, data extraction items and quality appraisal procedures. Literature searches were performed in 12 electronic databases during January 2012 and the references and citations of included articles were checked for additional relevant articles. Narrative synthesis was used to analyze extracted data and studies were categorized based on the life course model analyzed. Results Twelve studies met the eligibility criteria and used data from 10 datasets and five countries. Study quality varied and heterogeneity between studies was high. Seven studies assessed social mobility models, five assessed the latent model, two assessed the pathway model and three tested the accumulation model. Evidence indicated an overall relationship, but mixed results were found for each life course model. Some evidence was found to support the latent model among women, but not men. Social mobility models were supported in some studies, but overall evidence suggested little to no effect. Few studies addressed accumulation and pathway effects and study heterogeneity limited synthesis. Conclusions To improve potential for synthesis in this area, future research should aim to increase study

  6. Quality of services and quality of life from service providers' perspectives: analysis with focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenaro, C; Vega, V; Flores, N; Cruz, M

    2013-06-01

    Concepts such as support, quality of life and quality of services are customary in services for people with intellectual disabilities. The identification of the different ways of conceiving, prioritising and implementing these concepts by service providers can help to drive changes to achieve better personal outcomes for this population. The current study aims to identify service providers' perceptions regarding the quality of life of their clients and the quality of services they provide. It also aims to identify similarities and differences of appraisals among professionals, and to identify associations between supports, quality of life and quality of services. Data were collected from 22 service providers who attended three focus groups (professionals, direct support staff, and managers) from whom 424 comments were analysed. Service providers were asked about the required support for users, the meaning of quality of life for those users, and about features that should characterise quality services. Thematic analysis was employed and transcripts of the sessions were coded according to the dimensions of models on supports, quality of life and quality of services. Chi-squared tests were utilised to test for potential differences among groups. Each professional group has its own priorities concerning required supports. Among the organisation different and potentially conflicting perceptions regarding the meaning of experiencing quality of life coexist. Concerning quality of services, only managers mentioned personal outcomes. Finally, institutionalisation has a negative impact on supports, quality of life and quality of services. It is necessary to move beyond a shared awareness of the negative impact of institutionalisation towards the transformation of services in search of personal quality outcomes. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  7. Quality of life in post-menopausal osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortolani Sergio

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of osteoporosis on the patients' quality of life, particularly in the absence of fractures. Methods 100 post-menopausal women (age 50-85 - 62 with uncomplicated primary osteoporosis and 38 with primary osteoporosis complicated by vertebral fractures; all already treated - were studied using two validated questionnaires: Qualeffo-41 for quality of life in osteoporosis, and Zung for depression. Data were compared to those of 35 controls of comparable age, affected by a different chronic disease (hypothyroidism. Results Family history of osteoporosis and T-score of spine were similar in the two subgroups of osteoporotic women. Body mass index, age at menopause and education level were similar in the two subgroups of osteoporotic women and in the control group. The patients affected by osteoporosis perceived it as a disease affecting their personal life with undesirable consequences: chronic pain (66% of women with fractures and 40% of women without fractures, impaired physical ability, reduced social activity, poor well-being (21% of women without fractures and depressed mood (42% of women irrespective of fractures. Overall, 41% of the women showed a reduced quality of life. On the contrary, in the control group only 11% reported a reduced quality of life. Conclusion The quality of life of osteoporotic patients should be investigated even before fractures, in order to develop appropriate counselling, support and care interventions to help patients develop efficient strategies for accepting the disease and coping with it.

  8. The usefulness of Quality of Life Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire in evaluating the quality of life of children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talarska, D

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of quality of life has become a frequently used method in treatment effects supervision. Quality of Life Childhood Epilepsy (QOLCE) questionnaire, which is completed by patients' parents, has been prepared for children with epilepsy. It enables to determine the quality of life in children aged 4-18 years. The aim of the study was to show the usefulness of QOLCE questionnaire in evaluating the quality of life of children with epilepsy. 160 epileptic children, aged 8-18 years and their parents were examined in the Chair and Department of Developmental Neurology, K. Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences in Poznań. QOLCE questionnaire was completed by parents and "Young people and epilepsy" questionnaire was designed for children. Reliability index of the complete questionnaire in own research and in the original amounted to 0.93 Cronbach alpha coefficient. Epileptic, drug-resistant children constituted 28% of the examined group. Parents of children with controlled seizures evaluated children's functioning in analyzed areas of quality of life higher. 1. QOLCE questionnaire is a suitable tool to evaluate the quality of children's and adolescents' life. 2. The most significant differences in functioning of epileptic, drug-resistant patients and those with controlled seizures were observed in areas of cognitive processes and social activity.

  9. Treatment of facial lipoatrophy with polymethylmethacrylate among patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS): impact on the quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintas, Rodrigo C S; de França, Emmanuel R; de Petribú, Kátia C L; Ximenes, Ricardo A A; Quintas, Lóren F F M; Cavalcanti, Ernando L F; Kitamura, Marco A P; Magalhães, Kássia A A; Paiva, Késsia C F; Filho, Demócrito B Miranda

    2014-04-01

    The lipodystrophy syndrome is characterized by selective loss of subcutaneous fat on the face and extremities (lipoatrophy) and/or accumulation of fat around the neck, abdomen, and thorax (lipohypertrophy). The aim of this study has been to assess the impact of polymethylmethacrylate facial treatment on quality of life, self-perceived facial image, and the severity of depressive symptoms in patients living with HIV/AIDS. A non-randomized before and after interventional study was developed. Fifty-one patients underwent facial filling. The self-perceived quality of life, facial image, and degree of depressive symptoms were measured by the Short-Form 36 and HIV/AIDS--Targeted quality of life questionnaires, by a visual analogue scale and by the Beck depression inventory, respectively, before and three months after treatment. Six of the eight domains of Short-Form 36 and eight of the nine dimensions of the HIV/AIDS--Targeted quality of life questionnaires, together with the visual analogue scale and by the Beck depression inventory scores, revealed a statistically significant improvement. The only adverse effects registered were edema and ecchymosis. The treatment of facial lipoatrophy improved the self-perceived quality of life and facial image as well as any depressive symptoms among patients with HIV/AIDS. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. Subjective Quality of Life in the Psychology of Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapoval I.A.,

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a theoretical introduction to the discussion of the subjective quality of life for carriers of psychology of poverty. We revealed the socio-cultural determinants of subjective quality of life, systematize its psychological components and factors of its high level. We describe a set of characteristics of psychology of poverty, including the sense of displacement from normal life, hopelessness, fatalism, deprivation, social envy, metapathology of personality, lack of subjectivity, responsibility, an outsider position, survivor guilt complex, and so on. On the criterion of the relationship to own life we revealed types of carriers of psychology of poverty: a passive-contemplative, passive-aggressive, pseudocompensatory-devalued, infantile, anomic. We analyzed the specificity of reflection and benchmarking of carriers of psychology of poverty as a cognitive and affective strategies to assess the quality of own lives, focused on the maintenance of self-esteem

  11. Effect of a family history of psoriasis and age on comorbidities and quality of life in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: Results from the ARIZONA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Estebaranz, Jose Luis; Sánchez-Carazo, Jose Luis; Sulleiro, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease whose clinical characteristics vary from patient to patient. We aimed to analyze how comorbidities and quality of life (QoL, as per the Dermatology Life Quality Index [DLQI]) may be affected by a family history of psoriasis and by age. The ARIZONA study was a multicenter, cross-sectional study in 1022 adult patients diagnosed with moderate to severe psoriasis at least 6 months prior to inclusion. The severity of psoriasis and the proportion of patients with comorbidities were not affected by the presence of a family history. The regression analysis revealed that the presence of a family history of psoriasis was associated with the effect on the patient's QoL (P = 0.002), regardless of disease severity. The mean DLQI total score varied significantly across age groups (5.1 ± 5.3 for the 18-30-year group, 5.7 ± 6.5 for the 31-60-year group and 3.8 ± 5.1 for the >60-year group; P = 0.001). In conclusion, the presence of a family history of psoriasis appears to disrupt QoL in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis, but it hardly affected the prevalence of comorbid conditions. The effect of age on QoL was particularly noticeable in younger patients, highlighting its negative impact. As expected, older patients appeared to be burdened with a higher number of comorbidities than their younger counterparts. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  12. Positive impact of omalizumab on angioedema and quality of life in patients with refractory chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria: analyses according to the presence or absence of angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, M; Sofen, H; Ortiz, B; Kianifard, F; Gabriel, S; Bernstein, J A

    2017-06-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with chronic idiopathic/spontaneous urticaria (CIU/CSU) report hives and angioedema; some experience hives/angioedema only. Assess omalizumab's effect on angioedema and quality of life (QoL) in subgroups with refractory CIU/CSU: those with and without angioedema. Patients received omalizumab (75, 150 or 300 mg) or placebo every 4 weeks for 12/24 weeks. Angioedema and QoL were assessed [Urticaria Patient Daily Diary and Dermatology Quality of Life Index (DLQI)]. Subgroups were based on the presence/absence of baseline angioedema 7 days prior to randomization. Patients with baseline angioedema randomized to omalizumab 300 mg had a greater reduction in mean weekly incidence of angioedema and mean number of days/week with angioedema vs. placebo at 12 and 24 weeks. A 3.3- to 4.5-point greater mean reduction in DLQI score was achieved with omalizumab 300 mg treatment vs. placebo, above the minimal clinically important difference threshold. Results with lower doses vs. placebo were variable. Compared with placebo, omalizumab 300 mg treatment over 12-24 weeks resulted in marked reduction in incidence and number of days/week with angioedema accompanied by clinically relevant improvement in QoL. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  13. Cancer Communication and Family Caregiver Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Wittenberg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Family caregivers have enormous communication responsibilities tied to caregiving, such as sharing the patient’s medical history with providers, relaying diagnosis and prognosis to other family members, and making decisions about care with the patient. While caregiver stress and burden has been widely documented in the caregiving literature, little is known about how communication burden, real or perceived communication challenges, impacts caregiver quality of life. In family caregiving, the City of Hope (COH Quality of Life model proposes that the caregiving experience is reciprocal to the patient experience, impacting physical, social, psychological, and spiritual quality of life. We used data from a pilot study testing a communication coaching call intervention with family caregivers of lung cancer patients to analyze caregiver reported communication burden and quality of life. We found variances in each quality of life domain, suggesting that caregiver interventions should range from self-care skill building for physical care to psycho-educational interventions that support caregiver coping and communication skill building. These findings demonstrate the importance of caregiver assessment and attention to communication burden in quality cancer care.

  14. Quality of life philosophy II: what is a human being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Kromann, Maximilian; Merrick, Joav

    2003-12-01

    The human being is a complex matter and many believe that just trying to understand life and what it means to be human is a futile undertaking. We believe that we have to try to understand life and get a grip on the many faces of life, because it can be of great value to us to learn to recognize the fundamental principles of how life is lived to the fullest. Learning to recognize the good and evil forces of life helps us to make use of the good ones. To be human is to balance between hundreds of extremes. Sometimes we have to avoid these extremes, but at other times it seems we should pursue them, to better understand life. With our roots in medicine, we believe in the importance of love for better health. The secret of the heart is when reason and feelings meet and we become whole. Where reason is balanced perfectly by feelings and where mind and body come together in perfect unity, a whole new quality emerges, a quality that is neither feeling nor reason, but something deeper and more complete. In this paper, we outline only enough biology to clarify what the fundamental inner conflicts are about. The insight into these conflicts gives us the key to a great deal of the problems of life. To imagine pleasures greater than sensual pleasures seems impossible to most people. What could such a joy possibly be? But somewhere deep in life exists the finest sweetness, the greatest quality in life, the pure joy of being alive that emerges when we are fully present and life is in balance. This deep joy of life is what we call experiencing the meaning of life.

  15. Quality of Life Philosophy II: What is a Human Being?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The human being is a complex matter and many believe that just trying to understand life and what it means to be human is a futile undertaking. We believe that we have to try to understand life and get a grip on the many faces of life, because it can be of great value to us to learn to recognize the fundamental principles of how life is lived to the fullest. Learning to recognize the good and evil forces of life helps us to make use of the good ones.To be human is to balance between hundreds of extremes. Sometimes we have to avoid these extremes, but at other times it seems we should pursue them, to better understand life. With our roots in medicine, we believe in the importance of love for better health. The secret of the heart is when reason and feelings meet and we become whole. Where reason is balanced perfectly by feelings and where mind and body come together in perfect unity, a whole new quality emerges, a quality that is neither feeling nor reason, but something deeper and more complete.In this paper, we outline only enough biology to clarify what the fundamental inner conflicts are about. The insight into these conflicts gives us the key to a great deal of the problems of life. To imagine pleasures greater than sensual pleasures seems impossible to most people. What could such a joy possibly be? But somewhere deep in life exists the finest sweetness, the greatest quality in life, the pure joy of being alive that emerges when we are fully present and life is in balance. This deep joy of life is what we call experiencing the meaning of life.

  16. Novelty detection in dermatological images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maletti, Gabriela Mariel

    2003-01-01

    The problem of novelty detection is considered for at set of dermatological image data. Different points of view are analyzed in detail. First, novelty detection is treated as a contextual classification problem. Different learning phases can be detected when the sample size is increased. The det......The problem of novelty detection is considered for at set of dermatological image data. Different points of view are analyzed in detail. First, novelty detection is treated as a contextual classification problem. Different learning phases can be detected when the sample size is increased...

  17. Nose: Applied aspects in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dammaningala Venkataramaiah Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents.

  18. Probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Yim, Elizabeth; Keri, Jonette E

    2014-10-01

    The rapid increase in the medical use of probiotics and prebiotics in recent years has confirmed their excellent safety profile. As immune modulators, they have been used in inflammatory skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. We review the literature regarding the use of probiotics and prebiotics in dermatology. Probiotics and prebiotics appear to be effective in reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants, but their role in atopic dermatitis treatment is controversial. Their role in acne, wound healing, and photoprotection is promising, but larger trials are needed before a final recommendation can be made. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of perception of quality of life of disabled athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Bolach

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the perception of quality of life for athletes - disabled, participating in individual and team Paralympic sports. Material: The study involved 32 athletes sports club "Start" in Wroclaw in 2013, engaged in individual sports: swimming, weightlifting, powerlifting (powerlifting and command: wheelchair basketball and volleyball in a sitting position. Results: Studies have proven that sports people with physical disabilities have a positive effect on the quality of their lives. Conclusions: 1. Study aspects of perception of quality of life is a complex issue, but deserves proper attention and appropriate force to study it. 2. Athletes - Disabled involved both individual and team sports, the perception of quality of life is average.

  20. INDIGENOUS HOUSEHOLDS, REMITTANCES AND LIFE QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio César Cruz Islas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mexican migration to other countries, primarily United States, is a phenomenon that has been studied from different approaches. It is an important flow of people who, for decades, has left Mexico in search of employment opportunities and higher income. This is due to the weakness of opportunities structure present in Mexico, predominantly in rural areas, as well as budget constraints that prevent households to improve their living conditions. Remittances from other countries, in turn, are an alternative for families to address the lack of employment opportunities and income in their homeland, as well as life-deficit conditions. To see how remittances impact on living conditions of indigenous population, in this paper we analyze living conditions of indigenous households.

  1. Quality-of-life assessment in advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, S

    2000-07-01

    In the past 5 years, quality-of-life (QOL) assessment measures such as the McGill, McMaster, Global Visual Analogue Scale, Assessment of QOL at the End of Life, Life Evaluation Questionnaire, and Hospice QOL Index have been devised specifically for patients with advanced cancer. The developers of these instruments have tried to respond to the changing needs of this specific population, taking into account characteristics including poor performance status, difficulty with longitudinal study, rapidly deteriorating physical condition, and change in relevant issues. Emphasis has been placed on patient report, ease and speed of completion, and the existential domain or meaning of life. Novel techniques in QOL measurement have also been adapted for palliative care, such as judgment analysis in the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life. It is generally agreed that a single tool will not cover all QOL assessment needs.

  2. Quality of life after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joly, F.; Degrendel, A.C.; Guizard, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of localized prostate cancer radiotherapy is to cure patients. The decision-making must integrate the survival but also the quality of life of patients. Some French validated self-reported questionnaires are available to evaluate quality of life. Whatever the treatments (radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, external beam radiation, with or without hormono-therapy), even if patients report more sequelae, their long-term quality of life is similar to that of the general population, except for patients treated with hormono-therapy who complain more decline of physical quality of life. In comparison with prostatectomy, patients treated with external beam radiation report less long-lasting urinary symptoms, but more bowel side effects, with no difference in global quality of life. Sexual disorders are initially less important with external beam radiation but increase over time. Brachytherapy shows no sexual function preservation benefit relative to radiation and may be less favourable with more urinary sequelae. The association of hormono-therapy and external beam radiation decreases the quality of life of the patients, with a negative impact on vitality, sexuality and increase urinary disorders. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) seems to better preserve the long-term digestive quality of life in comparison with conformal radiation therapy. Post-prostatectomy could induce more digestive toxicity, such as rectal irritation. The adjunction of hormono-therapy to radiation, the previous medical history of abdominal surgery, the field of radiation and the acute reactions to radiation are the main predictive factors to late toxicity and should be considered in the choice of initial treatment and for the follow-up. (authors)

  3. Relationship Between Resilience and Quality of Life in Diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, A.; Malik, J. A.; Batool, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between resilience and quality of life of diabetes patients controlling the effect of personal level (i.e., gender, age, and income) and disease-specific (i.e., duration of disease, and current glucose level) demographics. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Outpatient Departments of various hospitals in Islamabad and Rawalpindi, from October to November 2012. Methodology: Patients diagnosed with diabetes taking treatment in an outdoor patients facility were included. Patients with a major diabetes complications causing or coexistent with a physical disability, medical condition or psychiatric comorbidity were excluded. Informed consent was taken from patients before administration of questionnaires. The patients were asked to respond to a demographic sheet, State-Trait resilience inventory, and WHO-Quality of Life BREF. Statistical testing was conducting using bivariate correlation, Mann-Whitney U-test, and multiple linear regression analysis for moderation testing. Results: There were 242 patients including (n=108, 44% females; and n=134, 56% males) aged 17 - 85 years with mean of 44.56 +- 16.56 years. Trait resilience predicted all aspects of quality of life of diabetic patients (b range = 0.30 to 0.42, p < .01) and explained 17% variance in physical functioning, 29% in psychological functioning, 17% in environmental functioning, 30% in social dimension, and 29% in overall quality of life. Duration of diabetes moderated effect of state resilience on all aspects of quality of life (b interaction range = 0.20 to 0.26, p < .05) and explained an additional 4% variance in physical functioning, 5% in psychological functioning, 3% in environmental functioning, 5% in social dimension, and 4% in overall quality of life of diabetics. Conclusion: Trait resilience has unconditional positive effect on all aspect of quality of life. Long standing diabetics may benefit from intervention addressing state

  4. Quality of life, postnatal depression and baby gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tychey, Claude; Briançon, Serge; Lighezzolo, Joëlle; Spitz, Elisabeth; Kabuth, Bernard; de Luigi, Valerie; Messembourg, Catherine; Girvan, Françoise; Rosati, Aurore; Thockler, Audrey; Vincent, Stephanie

    2008-02-01

    To study the impact of postnatal depression on the quality of life of young French mothers and to evaluate if the gender of their child influences this. Postnatal depression (PND) constitutes a major public health problem considering its high prevalence and consequences upon quality of life and parental skills. This research is a cross-sectional study during the postnatal period. This study was carried out during a two-month period. Data were collected by interview and questionnaires. The authors compared the prevalence rate of PND and life quality in a cohort of 181 women and measured the short-term impact of the child's birth. Postnatal depression strongly negatively influences all dimensions of life quality explored through the SF36, e.g. physical functioning (PF), physical Role (RP), bodily pain (BP), mental health (MH), emotional role (RE), social functioning (SF), vitality (VT), general health (GH), standardized physical component (PCS) and standardized mental component (MCS). The baby's gender (having a boy) also significantly reduces quality of life, irrespective of depressive state. There is a relationship between baby gender and PND. This research is the first to show that the birth of a boy reduces several dimensions of the mothers' quality of life. The importance of the impairment of quality of life in case of PND, as well as its effects on mother-child interaction, could justify prevention programs and early psychotherapeutic care. Further research needs to explore the effectiveness of programmes targeting the construction of parenting skills as a preventative measure against PND, especially for parents of boys.

  5. Use of laser in dermatology | Eldin | Sudanese Journal of Dermatology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New clinical indications are continually being proposed, some of which have been confirmed and others still in trial stage. In dermatology lasers are used in removal of benign skin lesion (moles, warts), scar resurfacing, treatment of vascular lesions and pigmented lesions (tattoos, freckles) and hair removal. In this paper we ...

  6. Tourette syndrome, co-morbidities and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Snedden, Corina; Črnčec, Rudi; Pick, Anna; Sachdev, Perminder

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is often associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder and other co-morbidities, the presence of which can reduce health-related quality of life. The relationship between the number and type of co-morbidities and tic severity upon health-related quality of life has been insufficiently examined in Tourette syndrome populations and not at all in the Australian context. We hypothesised that an increased number of co-morbid diagnoses would be inversely related to health-related quality of life and that the presence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder in particular would negatively impact health-related quality of life. In all, 83 people with a previously established diagnosis of Tourette syndrome, who responded to a letter of invitation sent to the Tourette Syndrome Association of Australia past-member database, formed the study sample. Participants completed the Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome-Quality of Life Scale and a short form of the National Hospital Interview Schedule to assess tics and related behaviours. Participants with pure-Tourette syndrome had significantly better health-related quality of life than those with Tourette syndrome and three or more co-morbid diagnoses. Few differences were observed between the pure-Tourette syndrome and Tourette syndrome and one or two co-morbid diagnoses groups. Analysis of the impact of individual co-morbid disorders and Tourette syndrome symptoms on health-related quality of life indicated that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder exerted a significant negative effect, as did the presence of complex tics, especially coprolalia and copropraxia. When these variables were examined in multiple regression analysis, number of co-morbidities and the presence of coprophenomena emerged as significant predictors of health-related quality of life. While tics are the defining feature of Tourette syndrome, it appears to be the

  7. Style and quality of life of waste collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Mendes da Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the style and quality of life of waste collectors and, to compare its respective domains. A cross-sectional and analytical study, conducted with 43 waste collectors of an inner city in Minas Gerais state. We used a form containing socio-economical and demographic data, WHOQOL-Bref and the Estilo de Vida Fantástico – EVF (FANTASTIC Lifestyle Assessment - Brazilian version. The results showed that there was a significant association between the results from the WHOQOL-Bref and EVF (p<0.05, indicating that higher quality of life scores are associated with better lifestyles. Despite the adverse conditions inherent from work executed by the collectors and its external causes, like the weather, odor, weight, physical effort, and low salaries, there was a satisfactory assessment for questions composing quality of life and lifestyle. From the exposed, it was evident that the work, health, quality of life and lifestyle are related and determine the worker’s profile in their subjective life, as well as, in their work life.

  8. Disease activity in and quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans: the Nordic PAM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, U; Gudbjornsson, B; Iversen, L; Laasonen, L; Ejstrup, L; Ternowitz, T; Ståhle, M

    2017-11-01

    To describe the social status and health-related quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries. Patients with at least one mutilated joint confirmed by radiology were studied. Disease activity involving joints and skin, physician-assessed disease activity, and patient's education and work status were recorded. Data from the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, Health Assessment Questionnaire and Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire were gathered and correlated with disease duration, pain, and general well-being (visual analogue scale). The controls were 58 Swedish patients with long-standing psoriatic arthritis sine PAM. Sixty-seven patients were included. Patients with PAM had a protracted disease history (33 ± 14 years) and disease onset at a relatively early age (30 ± 12 years). Overall inflammatory activity at inclusion was mild to moderate. The mean number of mutilated joints was 8.2 and gross deformity was found in 16% of patients. Forty per cent were treated with biological and 32% with conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Forty-two per cent had retired early or were on sick leave. Impaired functional capacity with little or no ability to perform self-care or everyday tasks was reported by 21% of the patients. Patients between 45 and 60 years of age reported the most impaired quality of life in comparison to the control group. PAM seriously affects social functioning. Whether early recognition of PAM and new forms of therapy can improve disease outcome and quality of life remains to be studied.

  9. Professionalism and professional quality of life for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Insil; Kim, Yuna; Kim, Kyunghee

    2016-10-01

    To identify the relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life among oncology nurses working at tertiary hospitals in Korea. Oncology nurses are combined with core competencies and qualities required in cancer patient care. Professionalism that means compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue is a main concept in problem-solving strategies as motivation. Their satisfaction is representative of professionalism and professional quality of life. However, little research has focused on professionalism and professional quality of life. A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires. A total of 285 nurses from two tertiary hospitals were included. Data collection was undertaken using Korean version of professionalism scale derived from the Hall Professional Inventory Scale and professional quality of life. Data were analysed by spss 21.0 for Windows Program using t-test, anova, and multiple regression. The mean score of professionalism in oncology nurses was 77·98 ± 7·31. The mean professional quality of life score for compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress was 33·84 ± 5·62, 28·38 ± 5·36 and 28·33 ± 5·48. Compassion satisfaction was affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 49·2%. Burnout and secondary traumatic stress were affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 39·3% and 4·8%. The higher the professionalism leads to the higher the compassion satisfaction, the lower the compassion fatigue. The relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life for a health work environment requires further investigation. Our study supports the idea that enhancing professionalism can increase professional quality of life. It is necessary to develop professionalism by recognised qualifications and applied rewards in advanced nursing organisational culture. Furthermore, compassion satisfaction is increased by

  10. Quality of Life and Gait in Elderly Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taguchi, Carlos Kazuo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The process of aging could lead to seniors being more prone to falls, which affects their quality of life. Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between quality of life and gait in the elderly. Methods We used World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief (WHOQOL-Brief Brazilian version and the Dynamic Gait Index to assess fifty-six volunteers from the northeast of Brazil. Ages ranged from 60 to 85 years. Results The Dynamic Gait Index, which indicates the probability of falls, resulted in 36.3% of the sample presenting abnormal results. There was correlation between domain 2 (psychological and domain 4 (environment with domain 1(Physical and domain 3 (Social; a negative correlation between age and Domain 2; correlation between Question 1 (How would you rate your quality of life? and domains 1, 2, and 4 and no correlation between questions 1 and 2 (How satisfied are you with your health?. Question 2 was correlated with all of the domains. There was negative association between question 1 and falls, and a slight correlation between the Dynamic Gait Index scores and Question 1. Conclusion The self-perception of the study group about their quality of life was either good or very good, even though a considerable percentage of individuals had suffered falls or reported gait disturbances.

  11. Quality of life and sexuality issues in aging women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhäuser, M H

    2009-01-01

    Quality of life may decrease after menopause. Hormone replacement therapy remains the first-line and most effective treatment for menopausal symptoms and improvement of low quality of life due to estrogen deficiency. The decrease of health-related quality of life in women suffering from cardiovascular disease may be superimposed on the decrease of quality of life induced by menopause itself. Postmenopausal women with acute cardiovascular disease have a significantly higher probability of death than men of the same age. Quality of life predicts long-term mortality. A myocardial infarction does not automatically interdict sexual activity. The Princeton guidelines classify patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases in three categories. Most patients belong to the low-risk category. In general, these patients can be safely encouraged to initiate or resume sexual activity or to receive treatment for sexual dysfunction. Patients at intermediate (or indeterminate) levels of risk should further receive cardiologic evaluation to be classified into either the low- or high-risk group. Patients in the high-risk category have to be stabilized by specific treatment for their cardiac condition before resumption of sexual activity, or initiation of treatment for sexual dysfunction.

  12. Metabolic syndrome and quality of life: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Pozas Saboya

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to present currently available evidence to verify the association between metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Method: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Medline and LILACS databases were studied for all studies investigating the association with metabolic syndrome and quality of life. Two blinded reviewers extracted data and one more was chosen in case of doubt. Results: a total of 30 studies were included, considering inclusion and exclusion criteria, which involved 62.063 patients. Almost all studies suggested that metabolic syndrome is significantly associated with impaired quality of life. Some, however, found association only in women, or only if associated with depression or Body Mass Index. Merely one study did not find association after adjusted for confounding factors. Conclusion: although there are a few studies available about the relationship between metabolic syndrome and quality of life, a growing body of evidence has shown significant association between metabolic syndrome and the worsening of quality of life. However, it is necessary to carry out further longitudinal studies to confirm this association and verify whether this relationship is linear, or only an association factor.

  13. Swallowing Quality of Life After Zona Incerta Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstedt, Stina; Nordh, Erik; Linder, Jan; Hedström, Johanna; Finizia, Caterina; Olofsson, Katarina

    2017-02-01

    The management of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been improved, but management of signs like swallowing problems is still challenging. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) alleviates the cardinal motor symptoms and improves quality of life, but its effect on swallowing is not fully explored. The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported swallowing-specific quality of life before and after caudal zona incerta DBS (cZI DBS) in comparison with a control group. Nine PD patients (2 women and 7 men) completed the self-report Swallowing Quality of Life questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) before and 12 months after cZI DBS surgery. The postoperative data were compared to 9 controls. Median ages were 53 years (range, 40-70 years) for patients and 54 years (range, 42-72 years) for controls. No significant differences were found between the pre- or postoperative scores. The SWAL-QOL total scores did not differ significantly between PD patients and controls. The PD patients reported significantly lower scores in the burden subscale and the symptom scale. Patients with PD selected for cZI DBS showed good self-reported swallowing-specific quality of life, in many aspects equal to controls. The cZI DBS did not negatively affect swallowing-specific quality of life in this study.

  14. Quality of life and deglutition after total laryngectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernambuco, Leandro de Araújo; Oliveira, Jabson Herber Profiro de; Régis, Renata Milena Freitas Lima; Lima, Leilane Maria de; Araújo, Ana Maria Bezerra de; Balata, Patrícia Maria Mendes; Cunha, Daniele Andrade da; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Total laryngectomy creates deglutition disorders and causes a decrease in quality of life Aim: To describe the impact of swallowing and quality of life of patients after total laryngectomy. Method: A case series study. Patients completed a Swallowing and Quality of Life questionnaire composed of 44 questions assessing 11 domains related to quality of life (burden, eating duration, eating desire, frequency of symptoms, food selection, communication, fear, mental health, social functioning, sleep, and fatigue). The analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, including measures of central tendency and variability. Results: The sample comprised 15 patients who underwent total laryngectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Of these, 66.7% classified their health as good and 73% reported no restrictions on food consistency. The domains “communication” and “fear” represented severe impact and “eating duration” represented moderate impact on quality of life. The items with lower scores were: longer time to eat than others (domain “eating duration”), cough and cough to remove the liquid or food of the mouth when they are stopped (domain “symptom frequency”), difficulties in understanding (domain “communication”) and fear of choking and having pneumonia (domain “fear”). Conclusion: After total laryngectomy, patients report that swallowing issues have moderate to severe impact in “communication,” “fear,” and “eating duration” domains. PMID:25991974

  15. Premenstrual syndrome and life quality in Turkish health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşik, Hatice; Ergöl, Şule; Aynioğlu, Öner; Şahbaz, Ahmet; Kuzu, Ayşe; Uzun, Müge

    2016-04-19

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the incidence of PMS, risk factors affecting PMS symptoms, and life quality in health science students. A total of 608 volunteer female students studying at the health campus of a state university in Turkey were included in the study. The participants were asked to fill out questionnaires on sociodemographic data, PMS symptoms, and SF-36 life quality tests. The overall frequency of PMS among participants was 84.5%. The average PMS and general health SF scores were 118.34 ± 37.3 and 20.03 ± 3.72, respectively. Students who had irregular breakfast, drank ≥2 cups of coffee/day, and consumed alcohol or fast food had higher PMS scores. Irregular menstruation and family history increased PMS scores and decreased life quality (P life quality of the students significantly decreased as the severity of PMS increased (P life quality, students should be informed about the symptoms, risk factors, and management options of PMS.

  16. Diabetes and Quality of Life: A Ugandan Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Nyanzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life of diabetic patients is not a new concept in literature. The contentious issue however is whether factors associated in literature with quality of life apply to diabetic patients in Uganda. A sample of 219 outpatients attending Mulago diabetic clinic—a national referral hospital in Uganda—is used to provide an understanding of this issue. Quality of life is assessed in the dimensions of role limitation due to physical health, emotional health, treatment satisfaction, physical endurance, and diet satisfaction based on a five-point Likert scale. The analysis is made by patients’ characteristics, medical conditions, lifestyle factors, and type of medication using frequency distributions, summary statistics, and a Poisson regression. In the results, we confirm a consensus regarding the influence of age and education level on the quality of life in the dimensions of role limitation and physical endurance P<0.05. A similar conclusion is reached with regards to impact of diabetic foot ulcers in the dimension of physical endurance. Thus, the factors associated with quality of life are not entirely unique to diabetic patients in the country.

  17. Quality of Life in Iranian Chemical Warfare Veteran's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abbas; Moradian, Tayeb; Mollahadi, Mohsen; Saeed, Yaser; Refahi, Ali Akbar

    2014-05-01

    Mustard gas has different effects on different body systems such as respiratory tract, blood, gastrointestinal, skin, eye, endocrine and peripheral nervous system. The purpose of this study was to determine the quality of life in chemical warfare veterans due to sulfur mustard exposure. In a cross-sectional and analytic study, 242 patients who had a chemical injury during the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1983) and their lung damage was proven were investigated in our study. The quality of life was measured in these patients using an extensively validated Iranian version of SF-36. The mean age of veterans was 44.12 ± 4.9 ranging from 22 to 62 years. Our results showed that chemical warfare had a decreased quality of life in all subscales of the SF-36. The lowest scores in SF-36 subscales were related to role physical and general health. The data also showed a significant relationship between the number of organs involved and the quality of life in these patients (P chemical warfare survivors suffering from late complications have a low health related quality of life.

  18. Quality of Life in Elderly Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavdaniti, Maria; Zyga, Sofia; Vlachou, Eugenia; Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina

    2017-01-01

    As life expectancy increases, it is expected that 60% of all cases of cancer will be detected in elderly patients in the next two decades. Cancer treatment for older persons is complicated by a number of factors, thus negatively affecting patients' quality of life. The purpose of this study is to investigate quality of life in elderly cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. This study was descriptive and non-experimental. It was conducted in one large hospital in a major city of Northern Greece. The sample was convenience comprising 53 elderly cancer patients undergoing cycle 3 chemotherapy. The data was collected using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale and included questions related to demographic and clinical characteristics. The majority of participants were men (n = 27, 50.9%) who were married (n = 32, 79.5%). Their mean age was 70.07 ± 3.60. Almost half of the sample (n = 30, 56.6%) had colon cancer. There was a statistical significant difference between men and women pertaining to physical wellbeing (p = 0.004) and overall quality of life (p family wellbeing (p = 0.029), functional wellbeing (p = 0.09) and overall quality of life (p family wellbeing (p = 0.029). These findings call attention to quality of life and its related factors in elderly cancer patients. It is highly recommended to envisage measures for improving quality of life in this group of cancer patients.

  19. Dimensions of hospital nurses' quality of working life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Yi; Kernohan, George

    2006-04-01

    This paper is a report of a study describing the quality of working life of nurses in Taiwan. The purpose of the study was to gather data on which to base a questionnaire to be used in further research. Nurses often complain of overwork and underpay. Problems persist with nurses' job satisfaction, stress, organizational commitment and intent to leave. 'Quality of working life' is a system of analysing how people experience work: it relates to job satisfaction, intent to leave, turnover rate, personality and work stress. However, reliable information on hospital nurses' quality of working life is limited. A descriptive study was carried out with a convenience sample. A total of 16 focus groups in one medical centre and five regional hospitals informed a quality of working life framework. Each group had three to five participants who were Registered Nurses in medical or surgical wards with at least 2 years' nursing experience, and who held a position below assistant nurse manager. The data were collected in 2000. A total of 56 nurses' quality of working life categories were identified and fitted into six dimensions: socio-economic relevance, demography, organizational aspects, work aspects, human relation aspects and self-actualization. In this paper, we focus on issues emphasized by focus group participants. These were managing shift work within the demands of family life; accommodation; support resources; and nurses' clinical ladder system and salary system. Further research is needed with other groups of nurses in a wider variety of settings in order to examine strengths and weaknesses in the total healthcare work environment and to develop appropriate strategies for nurses' quality of working life.

  20. Materialism and Satisfaction with Over-All Quality of Life and Eight Life Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James A.; Clement, Aimee

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has shown that materialism relates negatively to satisfaction with many life domains. The present study broadens this body of research by examining the relationship between three dimensions of materialism and eight quality of life (QOL) domains in a large, diverse sample of U.S. respondents. Two hypotheses were tested: First,…

  1. Working conditions, work life and quality of life of the temporary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five major categories resulted: experiences of the organisational structure; work life; interpersonal relationships; occupational development and quality of life while working at TLS. Conclusions were that staff experienced working conditions mainly as unpleasant, but that they adapted because of the team spirit.

  2. Work Life Balance Among Nurse Educators Towards Quality Life: A Mixed Method Study

    OpenAIRE

    Eddieson Astodello Pasay-an; Petelyne Pacio Pangket; Juanita Yudong Nialla; Lynn B Laban

    2014-01-01

    Work-Life balance is completely an imminent problem that needs to be addressed across all organizations. The nursing field, especially nurses in the Academe is not excused due to multiple roles they are facing. This study was intended to determine and explore the work life balance among nurse educators towards quality life. The respondents of the study were the nurse educators of the Schools of Nursing in the city Baguio and the province of Benguet, Philippines. The research utilized Mixed Me...

  3. Quality of life assessment in cosmetics: specificity and interest of the international BeautyQol instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresniak, Ariel; Auray, Jean-Paul; Duru, Gérard; Aractingi, Selim; Krueger, Gerald G; Talarico, Sergio; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Dupont, Danielle; de Linares, Yolaine

    2015-09-01

    The wide use of cosmetics and their perceived benefits upon well-being imply objective descriptions of their effects upon the different dimensions contributing to the quality of life (QoL). Such a goal pleas for using relevant and validated scientific instruments with robust measurement methods. This paper discusses the interest of the new validated questionnaire BeautyQoL specifically designed to assess the effect of cosmetic products on physical appearance and QoL. After conducting a review of skin appearance and QoL, three phases of the international codevelopment have been carried out in the following sequence: semi-directed interviews (Phase 1), acceptability study (Phase 2), and validation study (Phase 3). Data collection and validation process have been carried out in 16 languages. This review confirms that QoL instruments developed in dermatology are not suitable to assess cosmetic products, mainly because of their lack of sensitivity. General acceptability of BeautyQol was very good. Forty-two questions have been structured in five dimensions that explained 76.7% of the total variance: Social Life, Self-confidence, Mood, Vitality, and Attractiveness. Cronbach's alpha coefficients are between 0.932 and 0.978, confirming the good internal consistency of the results. The BeautyQol questionnaire is the first international instrument specific to cosmetic products and physical appearance that has been validated in 16 languages and could be used in a number of clinical trials and descriptive studies to demonstrate the added value of these products on the QoL. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Health-related quality of life, optimism, and coping strategies in persons suffering from localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szramka-Pawlak, B; Dańczak-Pazdrowska, A; Rzepa, T; Szewczyk, A; Sadowska-Przytocka, A; Żaba, R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical course of localized scleroderma may consist of bodily deformations, and bodily functions may also be affected. Additionally, the secondary lesions, such as discoloration, contractures, and atrophy, are unlikely to regress. The aforementioned symptoms and functional disturbances may decrease one's quality of life (QoL). Although much has been mentioned in the medical literature regarding QoL in persons suffering from dermatologic diseases, no data specifically describing patients with localized scleroderma exist. The aim of the study was to explore QoL in localized scleroderma patients and to examine their coping strategies in regard to optimism and QoL. The study included 41 patients with localized scleroderma. QoL was evaluated using the SKINDEX questionnaire, and levels of dispositional optimism were assessed using the Life Orientation Test-Revised. In addition, individual coping strategy was determined using the Mini-MAC scale and physical condition was assessed using the Localized Scleroderma Severity Index. The mean QoL score amounted to 51.10 points, with mean scores for individual components as follows: symptoms = 13.49 points, emotions = 21.29 points, and functioning = 16.32 points. A relationship was detected between QoL and the level of dispositional optimism as well as with coping strategies known as anxious preoccupation and helplessness-hopelessness. Higher levels of optimism predicted a higher general QoL. In turn, greater intensity of anxious preoccupied and helpless-hopeless behaviors predicted a lower QoL. Based on these results, it may be stated that localized scleroderma patients have a relatively high QoL, which is accompanied by optimism as well as a lower frequency of behaviors typical of emotion-focused coping strategies.

  5. Sudanese Journal of Dermatology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    photographs. Make sure that each table is cited in the text. Avoid too many tables. Identify statistical measures such as standard deviation, standard error of the mean and data statistical significance, if possible. 3. Manuscripts to Sudanese Journal of Dermatology should not be under simultaneous consideration by another ...

  6. Dermatology on YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyers, Lindsay N; Quest, Tyler; Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-06-15

    YouTube, reaches upwards of six billion users on a monthly basis and is a unique source of information distribution and communication. Although the influence of YouTube on personal health decision-making is well established, this study assessed the type of content and viewership on a broad scope of dermatology related content on YouTube. Select terms (i.e. dermatology, sun protection, skin cancer, skin cancer awareness, and skin conditions) were searched on YouTube. Overall, the results included 100 videos with over 47 million viewers. Advocacy was the most prevalent content type at 24% of the total search results. These 100 videos were "shared" a total of 101,173 times and have driven 6,325 subscriptions to distinct YouTube user pages. Of the total videos, 35% were uploaded by or featured an MD/DO/PhD in dermatology or other specialty/field, 2% FNP/PA, 1% RN, and 62% other. As one of the most trafficked global sites on the Internet, YouTube is a valuable resource for dermatologists, physicians in other specialties, and the general public to share their dermatology-related content and gain subscribers. However, challenges of accessing and determining evidence-based data remain an issue.

  7. Refining the Eye: Dermatology and Visual Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Corinne; Huang, Jennifer T.; Buzney, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and Harvard Medical School began a partnership focused on building visual literacy skills for dermatology residents in the Harvard Combined Dermatology Residency Program. "Refining the Eye: Art and Dermatology", a four session workshop, took place in the museum's galleries and utilized the Visual…

  8. Quality of life in patients with Behcet's disease and Recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Tuğrul Ayanoğlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Behçet’s disease (BD is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is a condition affecting oral health-related quality of life (QoL. In this study, we aimed to evaluate QoL of BD patients by using the Behçet’s disease quality of life instrument (BDQLI and to compare the QoL of patients with BD with that of patients with RAS and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with BD and 40 patients with RAS and 40 healthy subjects with similar sociodemographic characteristics were included in the study. We used the BDQLI to evaluate QoL of patients with BD and the Dermatology-specific quality of life instrument for comparison of QqL between patients with BD and RAS. 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and clinical data form were applied in all participants. The results were analyzed statistically. The power of the study was 99%. Results: QoL of patients with BD were lower than that of healthy controls. It was observed that patients with BD had decreased physical functions, impaired perception of pain and poor general health (p0.05. Female gender, relapse periods and mucocutaneous symptoms negatively affected QoL of patients with BD. Female gender and duration of the disease were found to be the main factors affecting QoL of patients with RAS. Conclusion: Unlike the results obtained with other instruments, with BDQLI, QoL, particularly in patients with active period and female gender was found to be decreased. In this study, there was a dominance of active mucocutaneous symptoms. This may explain the effect of mucocutaneous symptoms on QoL and the fact that there was no difference in QoL between BD and RAS patients. Further studies comparing QoL of patients with BD in whom visceral involvement is also observed with those with other diseases. QoL of BD patients may be improved by paying attention on symptoms that patients have trouble and by evaluating QoL with

  9. Regression estimators for generic health-related quality of life and quality-adjusted life years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Manca, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    To develop regression models for outcomes with truncated supports, such as health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data, and account for features typical of such data such as a skewed distribution, spikes at 1 or 0, and heteroskedasticity. Regression estimators based on features of the Beta distribution. First, both a single equation and a 2-part model are presented, along with estimation algorithms based on maximum-likelihood, quasi-likelihood, and Bayesian Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods. A novel Bayesian quasi-likelihood estimator is proposed. Second, a simulation exercise is presented to assess the performance of the proposed estimators against ordinary least squares (OLS) regression for a variety of HRQoL distributions that are encountered in practice. Finally, the performance of the proposed estimators is assessed by using them to quantify the treatment effect on QALYs in the EVALUATE hysterectomy trial. Overall model fit is studied using several goodness-of-fit tests such as Pearson's correlation test, link and reset tests, and a modified Hosmer-Lemeshow test. The simulation results indicate that the proposed methods are more robust in estimating covariate effects than OLS, especially when the effects are large or the HRQoL distribution has a large spike at 1. Quasi-likelihood techniques are more robust than maximum likelihood estimators. When applied to the EVALUATE trial, all but the maximum likelihood estimators produce unbiased estimates of the treatment effect. One and 2-part Beta regression models provide flexible approaches to regress the outcomes with truncated supports, such as HRQoL, on covariates, after accounting for many idiosyncratic features of the outcomes distribution. This work will provide applied researchers with a practical set of tools to model outcomes in cost-effectiveness analysis.

  10. Investigating nurses' quality of life and work-life balance statuses in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawkul, Y; Yap, S F; Makabe, S; Chan, S; Takagai, J; Tam, W W S; Nurumal, M S

    2018-04-06

    To investigate the key determinants of nurses' quality of life and work-life balance statuses in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. Nurses' quality of life can directly and indirectly impact patients' safety and quality of care. Therefore, identifying key factors that influence nurses' quality of life is essential in the healthcare delivery system. A descriptive quantitative study design was adopted, and validated questionnaires were used. Data were collected in a period of 3 months (March to May 2014) at a 600-bed tertiary hospital in Singapore. One thousand and forty nurses participated in the study. Social support and sense of coherence were found to be significant predictors for high quality of life in all domains. Most nurses in this study spent more time on work than their private lives. However, there was no significant difference in job satisfaction among the four groups of nurses' proportions of percentages of actual time spent on work and private life. Cultivating social support from family, friends/colleagues and supervisors can help an individual cope with stress and enhance a nurse's quality of life. Even though nurses who spent more time at work were still satisfied with their job, they might need to be aware of their physical health and work environment. Nursing policy related to nurses' physical health and environment should be established. Health promotion programmes such as physical exercise and mindfulness interventions should be conducted to promote nurses' well-being and healthy workplace environments to enhance nurses' quality of life. © 2018 International Council of Nurses.

  11. [Quality of life and vertigo after bilateral cochlear implantation : Questionnaires as tools for quality assurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, T; Haerterich, M; Ernst, B P; Stöver, T; Strieth, S

    2018-03-01

    Persistent dizziness symptoms after cochlear implantation have an impact on quality of life. In this study, the effects of bilateral cochlear implants (CI) on quality of life as well as on subjective dizziness complaints are analyzed using questionnaires, some of which have never been applied before in these patient collectives. In this article, questionnaires for the assessment of dizziness symptoms and quality of life are introduced in order to realize quality assurance. A total of 32 patients with bilateral CI were questioned regarding dizziness symptoms and quality of life. The Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire (NCIQ) was used. In the case of reported regular dizziness, the Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire (VHQ) and the Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS) were also assessed. Persistent dizziness symptoms were shown in 8 of 32 patients. Quality of life was measured with the NCIQ and was improved significantly (p < 0.001) by 23.7% after the second CI. The dizziness symptoms changed slightly (VHQ -11.2%; VSS +16.4%) after the second implantation. The results show that the questionnaires are valid instruments for documenting quality of life and dizziness symptoms for quality assurance. These questionnaires may be applied as a complement or an alternative to device-based measurements of peripheral vestibular dysfunction.

  12. Diabetic patients treated with dialysis: complications and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, V R; Mathiesen, E R; Watt, T

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of complications, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the influence of beliefs about control over health in diabetic dialysis patients. METHODS: Of 53 eligible diabetic patients on chronic dialysis during January 2004...... in our clinic, 38 (76%) completed a kidney-specific (Kidney Disease Quality of Life) and a generic (SF-36) questionnaire and were characterised in terms of cardiovascular diseases and diabetic complications. Matched groups of non-diabetic dialysis patients (n = 40) and diabetic patients with a long...... population (47 +/- 19). The diabetic dialysis patients had similar levels of kidney-specific quality of life and mental health compared with the control groups. Reduced physical health was predicted by the presence of end-stage renal disease, diabetes and short time spent in education. Among the diabetic...

  13. [The meanings of quality of life for women with AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Júlia Trevisan; Garanhani, Mara Lúcia; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz; dos Santos, Wilson Correa

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study conducted among women with AIDS, was to identify the knowledge about how they acquired the disease, as well as the meaning AIDS has in their Quality of Life. This is a qualitative, exploratory descriptive study encompassing twelve women. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews from October 2006 to January 2007. After the analysis, two categories were identified. The first one related to how AIDS was acquired, and the other to the meanings of Quality of Life (QL) for these women. The results revealed that the interviewees know how the HIV infection was acquired. The meanings, as far as Quality of Life, had to do with keeping healthy, family and work relationships, and acceptance of current situation, all of which points out to the need of providing wholesome care for these women.

  14. Quality of life in unaffected twins discordant for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Bech, Per; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2007-01-01

    -Risk twins) and without (the control group/Low-Risk twins) a co-twin history of affective disorder were identified through nationwide registers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that a genetic liability to affective disorder is associated with a lower perception of quality......BACKGROUND: The disability and hardship associated with affective disorder is shared by the family members of affective patients and might affect the family member's quality of life. METHOD: In a cross-sectional, high-risk, case-control study, monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins with (High...... of life. RESULTS: Univariate analyses showed that quality of life in all domains was impaired for the 121 High-Risk twins compared to the 84 Low-Risk twins. In multiple regression analyses, the differences remained significant after adjustment for sex, age, marital status and years of education. Adjusted...

  15. ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY OF LIFE: PRESENT AND FUTURE METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Benítez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing importance of quality of life in diverse domains, such as health, school performance and social participation, has led to the development of new conceptualisations and assessments of the construct. This diversity of perspectives brings about many benefits, but it also creates an obstacle for the formulation of a single unifying definition of the construct and, therefore, an agreed instrument or assessment framework. The aim of this study is to discuss the current methodological challenges in the measurement of quality of life. Firstly, we provide a brief description of the construct as defined in various areas, then we examine the new methodological developments and different applications. We also present an overview of the different possibilities for future developments in defining and measuring quality of life in national and international studies.

  16. [Quality of life in Latin American immigrant caregivers in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Andreu; Taltavull, Joana Maria; Gastaldo, Denise; Luengo, Raquel; Izquierdo, María Dolores; Juando-Prats, Clara; Sáenz de Ormijana, Amaia; Robledo, Juana

    2015-01-01

    To describe perceived quality of life in Latin American caregivers working in Spain and how it varies in relation to certain variables shared by this group. We used the SF-36 to measure perceived quality of life in 517 women residing in five Spanish regions: the Balearic Islands, Catalonia, the Basque Country, the Canary Islands, and Madrid. Several variables related to the socio-demographic profile and migration process were studied using Student's t test, ANOVA and linear regression models. The participants scored very low on the dimensions of physical and emotional roles. The factors associated with lower quality of life scores within the group were working as a live-in caregiver, lack of contract, multitasking, irregular status, and younger age. The vulnerability of these women can be explained by poor working conditions and other factors related to the migratory process. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. [Individual medical relevance of headaches. Comorbidities and quality of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, G

    2014-08-01

    In a multitude of cases, very frequent primary headaches lead to a clear deterioration in quality of life. Particularly in patients with chronic migraine, chronic tension headache, and cluster headache, quality of life is limited. This contradicts the preconception still encountered today that headaches are not a serious illness. Comorbidities with somatic and above all mental disorders are also very frequently observed in headache patients. In the foreground are the cardiovascular diseases of arterial hypertension, stroke, and coronary heart disease, as well as the mental disorders of depression, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorders, and sleep disorders. When such comorbidities are present, the quality of life of the sufferers is significantly reduced. Therefore, headache disorders should be taken seriously and sufferers should be provided with a consistent therapy. In cases of severe types of headache and in the presence of comorbidities, it is imperative that therapy is also prophylactic and multimodal in nature.

  18. Infusing culture into oncology research on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashing-Giwa, Kimlin; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie

    2006-01-01

    To review the literature relevant to understanding culturally informed oncology research, particularly as it relates to health-related quality of life. Published articles and books. A cultural perspective to the prevailing theory and research methods used in oncology research with respect to quality of life is imperative. A multidimensional and practical framework can be applied to increase cultural competence in research by addressing the purpose of the research, theoretical framework, and methodologic approaches. Culturally competent, multicultural research will help the scientific community better comprehend disparities that exist in health-related quality of life so that benefits can be experienced by all patients. Nursing practice and research must continue its leadership role to infuse cultural competence and reduce disparities in the healthcare system.

  19. Quality of life and compliance in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kalugin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Older adults usually have more than one chronic disease. In most cases, each condition requires constant pharmacotherapy. On average, the clinical examination of patients aged 60 and older reveals at least four or five different chronic pathological states in various phases and stages. Disease interference changes the classical clinical picture, increases the number of complications and their severity, affects the quality of life and prognosis, as a result - complicated medical diagnostic process and reduced compliance. The presence in the elderly both mental and physical illness significantly affects the quality of life. Psychological interventions aimed at a patient's awareness of the disease and methods of its treatment, the creation of therapeutic alliance and the prevention of self-medication, according to our hypothesis, contributes to compliance and quality of life improvement in polymorbid elderly patients suffering from mental disorders. Methods. In the study took part 325 patients who underwent inpatient treatment at the gerontopsychiatric department and signed provided informed consent. The study had a design of a randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients were randomized to experimental and control groups in a ratio of 3 to 1 based on age and gender. The study group of 238 people received standard treatment and psychological interventions. A comparison group of 87 people had only standard treatment. Patients were evaluated for quality of life with SF-36 scale and compliance with Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Results. We have seen significant intergroup differences on the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale in the baseline period. Consequently, its results were not be taken into account in the final analysis. Before treatment patients’ quality of life between the study groups did not differ statistically (p = 0.317. After the treatment, a statistically significant difference in life quality between experimental

  20. Emotional style, health and perceived quality of life in pregnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Guarino

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to determine the possible relationship among emotional style (rumination and emotional inhibition and the perceived health and quality of life of pregnant women. To do so, a sample of 94 Venezuelan women on their first trimester of pregnancy completed questionnaires measuring the studied variables: Rumination, Emotional Inhibition, Global Health and perceived Quality of Life. Results support previous findings regarding the positive association between negative emotional style and the deterioration of the health status, while brings new evidence of the inverse relationship between these individual difference and the quality of life in this particular group, who has been poorly studied in its psychosocial dimension.