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Sample records for depression inventory bdi

  1. Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients: DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

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    Peter Knaster; Ann-Mari Estlander; Hasse Karlsson; Jaakko Kaprio; Eija Kalso

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional ...

  2. Psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) among community-dwelling older adults.

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    Segal, Daniel L; Coolidge, Frederick L; Cahill, Brian S; O'Riley, Alisa A

    2008-01-01

    The psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) as a self-administered screening tool for depressive symptoms were examined in a sample of community-dwelling older and younger adults. Participants completed the BDI-II, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, the Coolidge Axis II Inventory, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Short Psychological Well-Being Scale. Internal reliability of the BDI-II was found to be good among older and younger adults. The average BDI-II depression score did not differ between younger and older adults. Solid evidence for convergent and discriminant validity was demonstrated by correlations between the BDI-II with the other measures. The BDI-II appears to have strong psychometric support as a screening measure for depression among older adults in the general population. Implications for using the BDI-II as an assessment instrument in behaviorally based psychotherapy are discussed.

  3. A comparison of the major depression inventory (MDI) and the beck depression inventory (BDI) in severely depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konstantinidis, Anastasios; Martiny, Klaus; Bech, Per

    2011-01-01

    We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression.......We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression....

  4. Psychometric properties of a Persian-language version of the Beck Depression Inventory--Second edition: BDI-II-PERSIAN.

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    Ghassemzadeh, Habibollah; Mojtabai, Ramin; Karamghadiri, Narges; Ebrahimkhani, Narges

    2005-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is perhaps the most commonly used screening instrument for depression in the general population. We examined the psychometric properties of a Persian-language version of the second edition of this instrument (BDI-II) [Beck et al., 1996] in an Iranian college-student sample. In a sample of 125 student volunteers from two Iranian universities, we compared mean item scores on the BDI-II-Persian with those on the English-language version administered to North American college students, and assessed internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the BDI-II-Persian and its concurrent validity against a measure of negative automatic thoughts in depression, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire [Hollon and Kendall, 1980]. We also examined the factor structure of the BDI-II-Persian through comparing the fit of various proposed models to the data using confirmatory factor analysis. The BDI-II-Persian had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.87) and acceptable test-retest reliability (r=0.74). The instrument correlated strongly with the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire. In factor analysis, models with strongly correlated affective-cognitive and somatic-vegetative factors provided a better fit than models with one global factor. These data support the reliability and concurrent validity of the BDI-II-Persian as a measure of depressive symptoms in nonclinical samples. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) with Puerto Rican elderly.

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    Rodríguez-Gómez, José R; Dávila-Martínez, Mariel G; Collazo-Rodríguez, Luis C

    2006-06-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; (1) is one of the most useful measures for depressive symptomatology in many countries (2). The psychometric properties of this inventory, however, have not been reported with Puerto Rican elderly. This paper reports, exploratory psychometric results with a sample of 410 elderly Puerto Rican (65 years and older; men=94, women=316). The assessment of the construct validity of the BDI-II yielded four factors accounting for 52% of total variance and an internal reliability coefficient (alpha Cronbach) of .89. A factor analysis with the 21 items of the BDI-II was performed using principal component analysis as the extraction method and Varimax rotation. This analysis revealed that the BDI-II was a good measure of the dimensions of depressive symptomatology in the present sample, which resembled prior findings reported with the general Puerto Rican Population (3). This study also reports further data supporting the reliability, validity, and practical utility of the BDI-II for the Puerto Rican population including elders. Implications for potential research with minorities and clinical uses of the BDI-II are also discussed.

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Scale for Depression (Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II)--A Study on a Sample of Students in the State of Kuwait Universities

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    Dahem, Ahmed Mohammed Faleh

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) the Arabized version by Gharib (2000); the study sample consisted of 500 male and female students from the Kuwaiti universities by 250 males and 250 females on whom the BDI-II scale was applied twice; the psychometric characteristics such as the…

  7. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in Dutch advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmenhoven, Franca; van Rijswijk, Eric; Engels, Yvonne; Kan, Cornelis; Prins, Judith; van Weel, Chris; Vissers, Kris

    2012-02-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in advanced cancer patients, but the diagnosis of depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer is difficult. Screening instruments could facilitate diagnosing depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. Patients with advanced metastatic disease, visiting the outpatient palliative care department, were asked to fill out a self-questionnaire containing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question "Are you feeling depressed?" The mood section of the PRIME-MD was used as a gold standard. Sixty-one patients with advanced metastatic disease were eligible to be included in the study. Complete data were obtained from 46 patients. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics analysis of the BDI-II was 0.82. The optimal cut-off point of the BDI-II was 16 with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 69%. The single screening question showed a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94%. The BDI-II seems an adequate screening tool for a depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. The sensitivity of a single screening question is poor.

  8. 50 YEARS OF THE BECK DEPRESSION INVENTORY: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR USING THE SPANISH ADAPTATION OF THE BDI-II IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

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    Jesús Sanz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The first Spanish adaptation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-I was published in 2011, which happened to be the 50th anniversary of the publication of its first edition. In this time, the BDI has become the most widely-used self-report questionnaire in Spain and in the world for evaluating the severity of depression. In this study, the basic characteristics of the BDI-II are presented and compared with its earlier versions (BDI-I and BDI-IA, the process of its adaptation to the Spanish population is described, the psychometric properties of this adaptation are summarized and its use in clinical practice is discussed. Concerning this use, guidelines and cut-off scores are proposed for measuring the severity of depression, evaluating the clinical significance of therapeutic change, screening for depression and assisting in the differential diagnosis of depressive disorders.

  9. Inventário de Depressão de Beck - BDI: validação fatorial para mulheres com câncer Beck Depression Inventory - BDI: factorial analysis for women with cancer

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    Rita de Cássia Gandini

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo validar fatorialmente o Inventário de Depressão de Beck - BDI para uma amostra de 208 mulheres com câncer. A validação fatorial do BDI foi realizada por meio da análise fatorial, método de extração dos componentes principais e rotação oblimin, tendo sido identificadas duas soluções fatoriais, uma bifatorial - sendo F1 composto por 8 itens (a = 0,82 denominado "visão negativa de si mesmo", explicando 32,4% da variância e F2 com 5 itens (a = 0,77 denominado "função física", explicando 8% da variância - e outra unifatorial com 13 itens, com fidedignidade altamente satisfatória (a = 0,86 denominada "depressão", explicando 38% da variância total.This study refers to the factor analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory - BDI in a population composed by 208 women with cancer. The extraction method was principal components and the rotation procedure was oblimin. The BDI factorial analysis was done through the oblimin rotation, finding two solutions possibilities. One with two factors solution - the first one with 8 items (a = 0,82, called "negative view of self", explaining 32,4% of the variance and the second factor with 5 items (a = 0,77, called "physical function", explaining 8% of the variance - and other with one factor solution with 13 items, with really satisfactory reliability of 0,86, called "depression" and explaining 38% of the total variance.

  10. Substance Use and Depression Symptomatology: Measurement Invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) among Non-Users and Frequent-Users of Alcohol, Nicotine and Cannabis.

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    Moore, Ashlee A; Neale, Michael C; Silberg, Judy L; Verhulst, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a highly heterogeneous condition, and identifying how symptoms present in various groups may greatly increase our understanding of its etiology. Importantly, Major Depressive Disorder is strongly linked with Substance Use Disorders, which may ameliorate or exacerbate specific depression symptoms. It is therefore quite plausible that depression may present with different symptom profiles depending on an individual's substance use status. Given these observations, it is important to examine the underlying construct of depression in groups of substance users compared to non-users. In this study we use a non-clinical sample to examine the measurement structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) in non-users and frequent-users of various substances. Specifically, measurement invariance was examined across those who do vs. do not use alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Results indicate strict factorial invariance across non-users and frequent-users of alcohol and cannabis, and metric invariance across non-users and frequent-users of nicotine. This implies that the factor structure of the BDI-II is similar across all substance use groups.

  11. Substance Use and Depression Symptomatology: Measurement Invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II among Non-Users and Frequent-Users of Alcohol, Nicotine and Cannabis.

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    Ashlee A Moore

    Full Text Available Depression is a highly heterogeneous condition, and identifying how symptoms present in various groups may greatly increase our understanding of its etiology. Importantly, Major Depressive Disorder is strongly linked with Substance Use Disorders, which may ameliorate or exacerbate specific depression symptoms. It is therefore quite plausible that depression may present with different symptom profiles depending on an individual's substance use status. Given these observations, it is important to examine the underlying construct of depression in groups of substance users compared to non-users. In this study we use a non-clinical sample to examine the measurement structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in non-users and frequent-users of various substances. Specifically, measurement invariance was examined across those who do vs. do not use alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Results indicate strict factorial invariance across non-users and frequent-users of alcohol and cannabis, and metric invariance across non-users and frequent-users of nicotine. This implies that the factor structure of the BDI-II is similar across all substance use groups.

  12. Measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) across gender, race, and ethnicity in college students.

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    Whisman, Mark A; Judd, Charles M; Whiteford, Natalie T; Gelhorn, Heather L

    2013-08-01

    Measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II) across gender, race, and ethnic groups was evaluated in a large sample of college students, using pooled data from 11 universities from diverse geographical regions in the United States (N = 7,369). Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the fit of several possible factor structures, and the results from these analyses indicated that the BDI-II was most adequately represented by a hierarchical four-factor structure, composed of three first-order factors and one second-order factor. Results based on analyses of covariance structures indicated there was factorial invariance for this hierarchical four-factor structure across groups, suggesting that the BDI-II provides an assessment of severity of depressive symptoms that is equivalent across gender, race, and ethnicity in college students.

  13. Development of the Perinatal Depression Inventory (PDI)-14 using item response theory: a comparison of the BDI-II, EPDS, PDI, and PHQ-9.

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    Brodey, Benjamin B; Goodman, Sherryl H; Baldasaro, Ruth E; Brooks-DeWeese, Amy; Wilson, Melanie Elliott; Brodey, Inger S B; Doyle, Nora M

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a simple, brief, self-report perinatal depression inventory that accurately measures severity in a number of populations. Our team developed 159 Likert-scale perinatal depression items using simple sentences with a fifth-grade reading level. Based on iterative cognitive interviewing (CI), an expert panel improved and winnowed the item pool based on pre-determined criteria. The resulting 67 items were administered to a sample of 628 pregnant and 251 postpartum women with different levels of depression at private and public sector obstetrics clinics, together with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Edinburg Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), as well as Module A of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Diagnoses (SCID). Responses were evaluated using Item Response Theory (IRT). The Perinatal Depression Inventory (PDI)-14 items are highly informative regarding depression severity and function similarly and informatively across pregnant/postpartum, white/non-white, and private-clinic/public-clinic populations. PDI-14 scores correlate well with the PHQ-9, EPDS, and BDI-II, but the PDI-14 provides a more precise measure of severity using far fewer words. The PDI-14 is a brief depression assessment that excels at accurately measuring depression severity across a wide range of severity and perinatal populations.

  14. The Children Depression Inventory (CDI and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI: Their validity as screening measures for major depression in a group of Puerto Rican adolescents

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    Carmen L. Rivera

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio cuasi-experimental evalúa la eficiencia del Inventario de Depresión en Niños (CDI y el Inventario de Depresión de Beck (BDI, en sus versiones en español, como medidas de cernimiento para el trastorno de depresión mayor (TDM en una muestra clínica de adolescentes puertorriqueños. La muestra incluía 130 adolescentes con edades entre 13 y 18 años. Los resultados obtenidos demostraron que el mejor punto de corte para identificar TDM fue una puntuación de 20 con un índice de sensibilidad de 0,69, especificidad de 0,43, un valor predictivo positivo de 0,64 y un valor predictivo negativo de 0,49. El mejor punto de corte para el BDI fue una puntuación de 12 con un índice de sensibilidad de 0,65, especificidad de 0,50, un valor predictivo positivo de 0,67 y un valor predictivo negativo de 0,47. Se puede concluir que el CDI y el BDI pueden ser útiles como instrumentos de cernimiento para identificar TDM en muestras clínicas de adolescentes puertorriqueños. Los resultados obtenidos difieren de los puntos de corte e índices de sensitividad y especificidad obtenidos por Kovacs para el CDI. Los resultados evidencian que la sensibilidad y especificidad para identificar un trastorno pueden diferir de una población a otra por lo cual no se puede asumir equivalencia psicométrica.

  15. The relation of hopelessness/helplessness versus beck depression inventory (BDI) in healthy individuals and in patients with benign breast disease and breast cancer: a prospective case-control study in Finland.

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    Eskelinen, Matti; Korhonen, Riika; Selander, Tuomas; Ollonen, Paula

    2015-02-01

    The relation between hopelessness/helplessness versus the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in healthy study subjects (HSS) and in patients with benign breast disease (BBD) and breast cancer (BC) has not been compared in a prospective study before. We, therefore, investigated hopelessness and helplessness versus the BDI in 115 patients. In the Kuopio Breast Cancer Study, 115 women with breast symptoms were evaluated for hopelessness and helplessness versus the BDI before any diagnostic procedures were carried out. In the self-rating score (SRS), the hopelessness and the helplessness versus the BDI were highly significantly positively correlated in the HSS, BBD and BC groups. In the SRS, the weighted kappa values for hopelessness and helplessness versus the BDI in the HSS, BBD and BC groups were also statistically significant. There was also a significant positive correlation in the examiner-rating score (ERS) in the hopelessness versus the BDI in the BBD and BC groups and in the ERS in helplessness versus the BDI in the HSS and BBD groups. The unweighted kappa values in the ERS for hopelessness versus the BDI in the HSS and BBD groups were statistically highly significant and the unweighted kappa values in the ERS for helplessness versus the BDI in the BBD and BC groups were statistically significant. The results of this study support a powerful link between hopelessness and helplessness versus BDI in the self-rating and examiner-rating. This finding is of clinical importance since, in the breast cancer diagnostic unit, the patients with hopelessness/helplessness characteristics and high BDI score might be associated with a difficulty and delay in reaching BC diagnosis. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Evidências de validade entre a Escala de Depressão (EDEP, o BDI e o Inventário de Percepção de Suporte Familiar (IPSF Validity evidences between the Depression Scale (EDEP, the BDI and the Perception of Family Support Inventory (IPSF

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    Makilim Nunes Baptista

    2008-12-01

    's family support, understood as manifestation of attention, care, dialog, freedom, affective proximity, autonomy and independence between family members. The present research aimed to search for validity evidences to Depression Scale (EDEP based on the relation to other variables assessing the same construct, depression, being also assessed by Beck Depression Inventory - BDI, and assessing related constructs, family support, measured by Perception of Family Support Inventory - IPSF. 157 undergraduates from a private university located in south state of Minas Gerais, 75,5% from female gender and 24,5% from male gender, aging from 18 to 51 years old (M=23,2; DP=6,4 took part in this study. At the results, high, significant and positive correlations were found between EDEP and BDI, as expected, indicating that the higher the scores on both scales, higher the depressive symptoms. As for the correlations between EDEP and IPSF dimensions, significant and negative correlations were found, suggesting that the higher depressive symptoms lower the perception of family support on individuals. Only marginally significant differences were found between genders, as to depressive symptoms (EDEP and BDI, indicating that women would score more at the depression scales.

  17. Severity of symptoms of depression among burned patients one week after injury, using Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II).

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    Ahrari, Farideh; Salehi, Seyyed Hamid; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Soltani, Madjid; Taghavi, Shahrzad; Samimi, Roghayeh

    2013-03-01

    This study was done to determine the severity of symptoms of depression in burned patients and to assess the effect of burn related factors on depression. This is a descriptive cross-sectional survey, performed in Burn center, Motahhari hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The population of the study included 300 hospitalized patients from April 2010 to May 2011 who were assessed for symptoms of depression one week after burn injury by Beck Depression Inventory-II. Three hundred subjects (50% female and 50% male) participated in the study. Age ranged from 13 to 75 with the mean of 35.06±12.79 years. 184 (61.3%) had symptoms of depression, 58 (19.3%) of them mild, 52 (17.3%) moderate and 74 (24.7%) severe depression symptoms. There was a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and age, gender, educational level, TBSA%, number of burn sites and amputation (p valueburned patients suggests that depression should be screened in such patients and treat if indicated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Depressive symptoms in people with and without alcohol abuse: factor structure and measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II across groups.

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    Cecilie Skule

    Full Text Available This study explored differences in the factor structure of depressive symptoms in patients with and without alcohol abuse, and differences in the severity of depressive symptoms between the two groups. In a sample of 358 patients without alcohol problems and 167 patients with comorbid alcohol problems, confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the same factor structures, Beck et al.'s two-factor Somatic Affective-Cognitive (SA-C model, and Buckley et al.'s three-factor Cognitive-Affective- Somatic (C-A-S model, demonstrated the best fit to the data in both groups. The SA-C model was preferred due to its more parsimonious nature. Evidence for strict measurement invariance across the two groups for the SA-C model was found. MIMIC (multiple-indicator-multiple-cause modeling showed that the level of depressive symptoms was found to be highest on both factors in the group with comorbid alcohol problems. The magnitude of the differences in latent mean scores suggested a moderate difference in the level of depressive symptoms between the two groups. It is argued that patients with comorbid depression and alcohol abuse should be offered parallel and adequate treatment for both conditions.

  19. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Depression Inventories When Used with an Elderly Population.

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    Watkins, Arleen J.; Kligman, Evan

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is a self-reported inventory tapping current feelings only. A short form was published in 1972 consisting of 13 items from the original BDI, called the BDI-SF. In 1978 the original version was modified to eliminate double negative statements and alternative ways of asking the same question and then referred to…

  20. Assessment of depression in a geriatric inpatient cohort: A comparison of the BDI and GDS

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    Bret G. Bentz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de esta investigación fue comparar la habilidad para evaluar y clasificar la depresión del Beck Depression Inventory (BDI y de la Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS en pacientes geriátricos. Se realizó una revisión retrospectiva de los registros médicos de 158 pacientes consecutivamente admitidos en una unidad geriátrica. Los datos recabados incluyeron diagnósticos, información demográfica, puntuaciones del BDI y del GDS, y puntuaciones de varios tests neuropsicológicos. Los ítems de ambos cuestionarios fueron sometidos a análisis factorial para obtener constructos ortogonales. Además, los ítems de ambos cuestionarios fueron tratados mediante análisis discriminante con objeto de investigar su habilidad para diagnosticar la depresión. Finalmente, las puntuaciones de cada factor y las totales de cada cuestionario fueron correlacionadas con medidas de funcionamiento neuropsicológico. Los resultados indicaron que tanto el BDI como el GDS tienen estructuras multifactoriales y su utilidad para diagnosticar la depresión es cuestionable. Además, se obtuvo que el factor de Síntomas Vegetativos del BDI correlacionaba significativamente con varias medidas de funcionamiento neuropsicológico. Los resultados se discutieron en términos de la utilidad clínica relativa de estas dos medidas de auto-informe para la depresión.

  1. The Latent Symptom Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Outpatients with Major Depression

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    Quilty, Lena C.; Zhang, K. Anne; Bagby, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a self-report instrument frequently used in clinical and research settings to assess depression severity. Although investigators have examined the factor structure of the BDI-II, a clear consensus on the best fitting model has not yet emerged, resulting in different recommendations regarding how to best…

  2. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

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    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  3. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

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    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  4. Activation as an overlooked factor in the BDI-II: a factor model based on core symptoms and qualitative aspects of depression.

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    Bühler, Joël; Keller, Ferdinand; Läge, Damian

    2014-09-01

    An adequate assessment of depression has been of concern to many researchers over the last half-century. These efforts have brought forth a manifold of depression rating scales, of which the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is 1 of the most commonly used self-assessment scales. Since its revision, the item structure of the BDI-II has been examined in many factor analytic studies, yet it has not been possible to achieve a consensus about the underlying factor structure. Recent findings from a nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analysis (Bühler, Keller, & Läge, 2012) of the German norming sample of the BDI-II emphasized a structure with different qualitative aspects of depression, which suggested that the existing factor models do not adequately represent the data. The NMDS results were reviewed, and on the basis of these findings, a different factor model is proposed. In contrast to the common factor models in the literature, the presented model includes an additional factor, which is associated with the activation level of the BDI-II symptoms. The model was evaluated with a 2nd sample of patients diagnosed with a primary affective disorder (N = 569) and obtained good fit indices that even exceeded the fit of the most reliable factor model (Ward, 2006) described in the literature so far. Furthermore, emphasis is placed on the methodological question of how factor models may be derived from the results of NMDS analyses. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. A Factor Analytic Study of the Beck Depression Inventory for Female College Students.

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    Hedl, John J., Jr.

    Previous factor studies of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) have not analyzed the item data as a function of sex, or reported more than one factor solution. To further study the factor structure of the BDI, items were factor analyzed and multiple solutions were examined for simple structure, parsimony, and psychological meaningfulness. A sample…

  6. Autism spectrum disorder severity as a predictor of Battelle Developmental Inventory - second edition (BDI-2) scores in toddlers.

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    Goldin, Rachel L; Matson, Johnny L; Beighley, Jennifer S; Jang, Jina

    2014-02-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the severity of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomology and scores on the Battelle Developmental Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-2) in toddlers (n = 325). Total scores on the BDI-2 and individual domain scores were examined to explore the relationship between severity of ASD and developmental quotient, impairment in personal-social skills, adaptive functioning, cognition, and communication. Regression analyses controlled for the impact of age and IQ on results, indicating that higher autism severity scores were associated with overall greater impairment and in the total scores and the individual domains of the BDI-2. The domains were found to be differentially affected by severity of ASD. These findings suggest severity of ASD may influence symptom presentation. Clinical implications of study findings are discussed.

  7. Correlations between the BDI and CES-D in a Sample of Adolescent Mothers.

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    Wilcox, Holly; Field, Tiffany; Prodromidis, Margarita; Scafidi, Frank

    1998-01-01

    The adequacy of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) as screening instruments for adolescent depression is examined. Both are correlated with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, a clinical measure. BDI correlates more highly with Major Depression subscale, CES-D to Dysthymia…

  8. The use of the Battelle Developmental Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-2) as an early screener for autism spectrum disorders.

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    Sipes, Megan; Matson, Johnny L; Turygin, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The purpose was to develop cut-off scores for a measure of developmental level (Battelle Developmental Inventory-Second Edition; BDI-2) which could be used as a screening tool to differentiate young children with possible autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Infants and toddlers with ASD (n = 604) and atypically-developing infants and toddlers (n = 1064) were administered the BDI-2. Cut-off scores were determined based on standard deviations from the mean of the ASD group. Using 1.5 standard deviations from the mean of the ASD group, a cut-off score of 96 was determined which had a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 0.31. With high sensitivity, these cut-off scores can be used to identify children who require further assessment. In addition, the measure can be used to determine treatment targets.

  9. Prevalence of depression and validation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Children's Depression Inventory-Short amongst HIV-positive adolescents in Malawi

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    Maria H Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a remarkable dearth of evidence on mental illness in adolescents living with HIV/AIDS, particularly in the African setting. Furthermore, there are few studies in sub-Saharan Africa validating the psychometric properties of diagnostic and screening tools for depression amongst adolescents. The primary aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of depression amongst a sample of HIV-positive adolescents in Malawi. The secondary aim was to develop culturally adapted Chichewa versions of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and Children's Depression Inventory-II-Short (CDI-II-S and conduct a psychometric evaluation of these measures by evaluating their performance against a structured depression assessment using the Children's Rating Scale, Revised (CDRS-R. Study design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: We enrolled 562 adolescents, 12–18 years of age from two large public HIV clinics in central and southern Malawi. Participants completed two self-reports, the BDI-II and CDI-II-S, followed by administration of the CDRS-R by trained clinicians. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values for various BDI-II and CDI-II-S cut-off scores were calculated with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The area under the curve (AUC was also calculated. Internal consistency was measured by standardized Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and correlation between self-reports and CDRS-R by Spearman's correlation. Results: Prevalence of depression as measured by the CDRS-R was 18.9%. Suicidal ideation was expressed by 7.1% (40 using the BDI-II. The AUC for the BDI-II was 0.82 (95% CI 0.78–0.89 and for the CDI-II-S was 0.75 (95% CI 0.70–0.80. A score of ≥13 in BDI-II achieved sensitivity of >80%, and a score of ≥17 had a specificity of >80%. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.80 (BDI-II and 0.66 (CDI-II-S. The correlation between the BDI-II and CDRS-R was 0.42 (p<0.001 and between the CDI

  10. Adaptation and latent structure of the Swahili version of beck depression inventory-II in a low literacy population in the context of HIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abubakar, Amina; Kalu, Raphael Birya; Katana, Khamis; Kabunda, Beatrice; Hassan, Amin S.; Newton, Charles R.; Van De Vijver, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Objective We set out to adapt the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II in Kenya and examine its factorial structure. Methods In the first phase we carried out in-depth interviews involving 29 adult members of the community to elicit their understanding of depression and identify aspects of the BDI-II

  11. Longitudinal Stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II: A Latent Trait-State-Occasion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    In a six-wave longitudinal study with two cohorts (660 adolescents and 630 young adults), this study investigated the longitudinal stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) using the Trait-State-Occasion (TSO) model. The results revealed that the full TSO model was the best fitting representation of the depression measured by the…

  12. Reliability and validity of the short form Beck Depression Inventory with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, F; Beutler, L; Corbishley, A; Hamblin, D

    1988-11-01

    This study investigated the reliability and validity of the short form Beck Depression Inventory with older adults. Sixty-one clinically depressed older outpatients and 57 non-patient older volunteers comprised the sample. The patient group completed the BDI prior to and at completion of depression treatment. Estimates of internal reliability suggest that the short form BDI possesses adequate Spearman-Brown and alpha coefficients. Congruent validity estimates were less satisfactory, as the correlation between the BDI and the HRSD was statistically significant, but low. Criterion group validity, diagnostic sensitivity, and sensitivity to change estimates were all acceptable. Thus, the short form BDI is adequately reliable to suggest its use as a research and clinical tool with older adults, although further study of the instrument's validity is needed.

  13. The Beck depression inventory as a measure of subjective well-being : A cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, D.A.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Poortinga, Y.H.

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the question whether the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which is one of the most widely used instruments to assess depression, can be used to measure differences in subjective well-being at national level. In order to establish the meaning of depression scores at country

  14. The Beck depression inventory as a measure of subjective well-being : A cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, D.A.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Poortinga, Y.H.

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the question whether the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which is one of the most widely used instruments to assess depression, can be used to measure differences in subjective well-being at national level. In order to establish the meaning of depression scores at country

  15. An examination of racial bias in the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashidharan, Tracy; Pawlow, Laura A; Pettibone, Jonathan C

    2012-04-01

    Historically, many psychological measures were developed and standardized based on a primarily Caucasian population. These tests are subsequently applied to minorities and may be inappropriate and possibly even pathologizing. The widely used Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was initially standardized on a sample of Caucasian university students and its use with minorities has only recently been investigated. This study examined the possibility of racial bias in the BDI-II by comparing Caucasian and African American Midwestern university students. A hierarchical multiple regression compared the scores of the BDI-II with a similar measure of depression that is standardized for use with African Americans. There was no evidence of racial bias discovered in the BDI-II in this sample. Implications and future directions of research are discussed.

  16. Validating the Beck Depression Inventory-II for Hong Kong Community Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Barbara M.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Lee, Peter W. H.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to test for the validity of a Chinese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (C-BDI-II) for use with Hong Kong community (i.e., nonclinical) adolescents. Based on a randomized triadic split of the data (N = 1460), we conducted exploratory factor analysis on Group1 (n = 486) and confirmatory factor…

  17. The Beck Depression Inventory: Testing for Invariant Measurement and Structure across Gender for Nonclinical Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Barbara M.; And Others

    Extending the earlier work of B. M. Byrne and P. Baron (1990), the factorial invariance of the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was tested using 351 non-clinical adolescent males and 334 non-clinical adolescent females. All subjects were in grades 9 through 12 and attended the same secondary school in a large metropolitan area in central…

  18. Cross-cultural examination of measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Jessica; Watters, Carolyn A; Yu, Stephanie Chee-Min; Bagby, R Michael; Ryder, Andrew G; Harkness, Kate L

    2015-03-01

    Given substantial rates of major depressive disorder among college and university students, as well as the growing cultural diversity on many campuses, establishing the cross-cultural validity of relevant assessment tools is important. In the current investigation, we examined the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) among Chinese-heritage (n = 933) and European-heritage (n = 933) undergraduates in North America. The investigation integrated 3 distinct lines of inquiry: (a) the literature on cultural variation in depressive symptom reporting between people of Chinese and Western heritage; (b) recent developments regarding the factor structure of the BDI-II; and (c) the application of advanced statistical techniques to the issue of cross-cultural measurement invariance. A bifactor model was found to represent the optimal factor structure of the BDI-II. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed that the BDI-II had strong measurement invariance across both culture and gender. In group comparisons with latent and observed variables, Chinese-heritage students scored higher than European-heritage students on cognitive symptoms of depression. This finding deviates from the commonly held view that those of Chinese heritage somatize depression. These findings hold implications for the study and use of the BDI-II, highlight the value of advanced statistical techniques such as multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, and offer methodological lessons for cross-cultural psychopathology research more broadly.

  19. Validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Oliveira, Marcio Henrique; Gorenstein, Clarice; Lotufo Neto, Francisco; Andrade, Laura Helena; Wang, Yuan Pang

    2012-12-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is used worldwide for detecting depressive symptoms. This questionnaire has been revised (1996) to match the DSM-IV criteria for a major depressive episode. We assessed the reliability and the validity of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the BDI-II for non-clinical adults. The questionnaire was applied to 60 college students on two occasions. Afterwards, 182 community-dwelling adults completed the BDI-II, the Self-Report Questionnaire, and the K10 Scale. Trained psychiatrists performed face-to-face interviews with the respondents using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-I), the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale, and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Descriptive analysis, signal detection analysis (Receiver Operating Characteristics), correlation analysis, and discriminant function analysis were performed to investigate the psychometric properties of the BDI-II. The intraclass correlation coefficient of the BDI-II was 0.89, and the Cronbach's alpha coefficient of internal consistency was 0.93. Taking the SCID as the gold standard, the cut-off point of 10/11 was the best threshold for detecting depression, yielding a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 87%. The concurrent validity (a correlation of 0.63-0.93 with scales applied simultaneously) and the predictive ability of the severity level (over 65% correct classification) were acceptable. The BDI-II is reliable and valid for measuring depressive symptomatology among Portuguese-speaking Brazilian non-clinical populations.

  20. Adaptation and Latent Structure of the Swahili Version of Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Low Literacy Population in the Context of HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Amina Abubakar; Raphael Birya Kalu; Khamis Katana; Beatrice Kabunda; Hassan, Amin S; Newton, Charles R; Fons Van de Vijver

    2016-01-01

    Objective We set out to adapt the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II in Kenya and examine its factorial structure. Methods In the first phase we carried out in-depth interviews involving 29 adult members of the community to elicit their understanding of depression and identify aspects of the BDI-II that required adaptation. In the second phase, a modified version of BDI-II was administered to 221 adults randomly selected from the community to allow for the evaluation of its psychometric prope...

  1. Cross-Cultural Validation of the Beck Depression Inventory-II across U.S. and Turkish Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canel-Cinarbas, Deniz; Cui, Ying; Lauridsen, Erica

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) for factorial invariance across Turkish and U.S. college student samples. The results indicated that (a) a two-factor model has an adequate fit for both samples, thus providing evidence of configural invariance, and (b) there is a metric invariance but "no" sufficient…

  2. Poor Sleep in Multiple Sclerosis Correlates with Beck Depression Inventory Values, but Not with Polysomnographic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Veauthier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI values correlate with depression, but studies investigating the relationship between PSQI values and polysomnographic (PSG data showed inconsistent findings. Methods. Sixty-five consecutive patients with multiple sclerosis (MS were retrospectively classified as “good sleepers” (GS (PSQI ≤ 5 and “poor sleepers” (PS (PSQI > 5. The PSG data and the values of the Visual Analog Scale (VAS of fatigue, Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS, Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were compared. Results. No significant differences were found either for PSG data or for ESS, MFIS, and FSS values; but PS showed significantly increased BDI and VAS values. Conclusions. Poor sleep is associated with increased depression and fatigue scale values.

  3. Validity of the BPRS, the BDI and the BAI in dual diagnosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, M.; Austin, S.F.; Oestrich, I.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The psychometric properties of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were tested in a sample of 134 patients with a substance use disorder and a non-substance related psychiatric disorder in a special inpatient dual diag...

  4. Factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagee, Ashraf; Nel, Adriaan; Saal, Wylene

    2014-02-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that mood disturbance is common among patients living with HIV and may be an important barrier to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) adherence. Thus the assessment of depressed mood is an important and necessary aspect of the experience of persons living with HIV as it may impact the health status of individuals directly and indirectly. We sought to determine the factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) among a sample of 185 South Africans living with HIV and receiving ART. The mean BDI score was 16.5 (SD 12.15) with a range from 0-50 (out of a possible 63), indicating on average moderate levels of depression. Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was 0.90. Although the four factors had eigenvalues that were technically above 1.0, only three factors could logically be extracted, the combination of which accounted for 47.29% of the variance. These three factors were Cognitive, Affective and Somatic. The results indicate that the BDI-II is a reliable measure of symptoms of depression among persons living with HIV. The factor structure among South Africans receiving ART is similar to that of other samples, although surprisingly, the item assessing appetite disturbance did not load on any factor. The results of the study suggest that the BDI-II is a useful measure among South Africans living with HIV. In the context of the need to rapidly identify depressed mood among persons receiving ART in public health clinics, the BDI may be a useful instrument. We end the paper with certain cautions associated with routine screening.

  5. A Psychometric Evaluation of the STAI-Y, BDI-II, and PAI Using Single and Multifactorial Models in Young Adults Seeking Psychoeducational Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Benjamin D.; Musso, Mandi; Jones, Glenn N.; Pella, Russell D.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2013-01-01

    A psychometric evaluation on the measurement of self-report anxiety and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), State Trait Anxiety Inventory, Form-Y (STAI-Y), and the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) was performed using a sample of 534 generally young adults seeking psychoeducational evaluation at a university-based clinic.…

  6. Psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory applied to college students: factor analysis and relation to the Beck Depression Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, L; Gorenstein, C; Vieira Filho, A H; Tung, T C; Artes, R

    2001-03-01

    The psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the trait form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) and its relation to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were evaluated in a large Brazilian college student sample containing 845 women and 235 men. STAI-T scores tended to be higher for women, singles, those who work, and subjects under 30 years. Factor analysis of the STAI-T for total sample and by gender yielded two factors: the first representing a mood dimension and the second being related to worrying or cognitive aspects of anxiety. In order to study the relation between anxiety and depression measures, factor analysis of the combination of the 21 BDI items and the 20 STAI-T items was also carried out. The analysis resulted in two factors that were analyzed according to the tripartite model of anxiety and depression. Most of the BDI items (measuring positive affectivity and nonspecific symptoms of depression) were loaded on the first factor and four STAI-T items that measure positive affectivity. The remaining STAI-T items, all of them measuring negative affect, remained in the second factor. Thus, factor 1 represents a depression dimension and factor 2 measures a mood-worrying dimension. The findings of this study suggest that, although widely used as an anxiety scale, the STAI-T in fact measures mainly a general negative affect.

  7. Psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory applied to college students: factor analysis and relation to the Beck Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade L.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the trait form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T and its relation to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were evaluated in a large Brazilian college student sample containing 845 women and 235 men. STAI-T scores tended to be higher for women, singles, those who work, and subjects under 30 years. Factor analysis of the STAI-T for total sample and by gender yielded two factors: the first representing a mood dimension and the second being related to worrying or cognitive aspects of anxiety. In order to study the relation between anxiety and depression measures, factor analysis of the combination of the 21 BDI items and the 20 STAI-T items was also carried out. The analysis resulted in two factors that were analyzed according to the tripartite model of anxiety and depression. Most of the BDI items (measuring positive affectivity and nonspecific symptoms of depression were loaded on the first factor and four STAI-T items that measure positive affectivity. The remaining STAI-T items, all of them measuring negative affect, remained in the second factor. Thus, factor 1 represents a depression dimension and factor 2 measures a mood-worrying dimension. The findings of this study suggest that, although widely used as an anxiety scale, the STAI-T in fact measures mainly a general negative affect.

  8. Factor structure and clinical utility of the Beck depression inventory in patients with binge eating disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoko; McKee, Sherry A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2015-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is often used to assess depression symptoms, but its factor structure and its clinical utility have not been evaluated in patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and obesity. A total of 882 treatment-seeking obese patients with BED were administered structured interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I Disorders) and completed self-report questionnaires. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a brief 16-item BDI version with a three-factor structure (affective, attitudinal and somatic). Both 21- and 16-item versions showed excellent internal consistency (both α=0.89) and had significant correlation patterns with different aspects of eating disorder psychopathology; three factors showed significant but variable associations with eating disorder psychopathology. Area under the curves (AUC) for both BDI versions were significant in predicting major depressive disorder (MDD; AUC=0.773 [16-item], 73.5% sensitivity/70.2% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 79.5% sensitivity/64.1% specificity) and mood disorders (AUC=0.763 [16-item], 67.1% sensitivity/71.5% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 84.2% sensitivity/55.7% specificity). The 21-item BDI (cutoff score ≥16) showed higher negative predictive values (94.0% vs. 93.0% [MDD]; 92.4% vs. 88.3% [mood disorders]) than the brief 16-item BDI (cutoff score ≥13). Both BDI versions demonstrated moderate performance as a screening instrument for MDD/mood disorders in obese patients with BED. Advantages and disadvantages for both versions are discussed. A three-factor structure has potential to inform the conceptualization of depression features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Use of the Beck Depression Inventory for assessing depression in patients hospitalized with severe burn. Disentangling symptoms of depression from injury and treatment factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Brett D

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) are biased by injury severity among hospitalized survivors of burn (N=262). A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) model was developed with a general depression factor that loaded on all items and somatic and cognitive factors that were orthogonal to the general factor and to each other. The model fit the data well and substantially better than an alternative three-factor model with correlated factors. Percent total body surface area burned (TBSA) was significantly associated with the general depression factor (p=.04), but also with the orthogonal somatic factor (pburn injury. Analysis of item communalities, however, suggested that only approximately 2% of total predicted item variance was associated with bias related to injury severity. It was concluded that, despite a small amount of bias, the BDI is a reasonably accurate clinical tool even in the context of severe burn. Appropriate adjustments for bias, however, should be made in research with the BDI among patients with acute burn.

  10. Adaptation and Latent Structure of the Swahili Version of Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Low Literacy Population in the Context of HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Abubakar

    Full Text Available We set out to adapt the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in Kenya and examine its factorial structure.In the first phase we carried out in-depth interviews involving 29 adult members of the community to elicit their understanding of depression and identify aspects of the BDI-II that required adaptation. In the second phase, a modified version of BDI-II was administered to 221 adults randomly selected from the community to allow for the evaluation of its psychometric properties. In the third phase of the study we evaluated the discriminative validity of BDI-11 by comparing a randomly chosen community sample (n = 29 with caregivers of adolescents affected by HIV (n = 77.A considerable overlap between the BDI symptoms and those generated in the interviews was observed. Relevant idioms and symptoms such as 'thinking too much' and 'Kuchoka moyo (having a tired heart' were identified. The administration of the BDI had to be modified to make it suitable for the low literacy levels of our participants. Fit indices for several models (one factorial, two-factor model and a three factor model were all within acceptable range. Evidence indicated that while multidimensional models could be fitted, the strong correlations between the factors implied that a single factor model may be the best suited solution (alpha [0.89], and a significant correlation with locally identified items [r = 0.51] confirmed the good psychometric properties of the adapted BDI-II. No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that somatization was more prevalent. Lastly, caregivers of HIV affected adolescents had significantly higher scores compared to adults randomly selected from the community F(1, 121 = 23.31, p < .001 indicating the discriminative validity of the adapted BDI = II.With an adapted administration procedure, the BDI-II provides an adequate measure of depressive symptoms which can be used alongside other measures for proper diagnosis in a low literacy population.

  11. Concurrent Validity of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory Depression Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joel O.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Compared two new measures of depression (Millon Multiaxial Inventory Dysthymia and Major Depression subscales) with two established instruments: Beck Depression Inventory, a self-report measure which emphasizes the cognitive-affective aspects of depression, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, an interview measure that emphasizes somatic…

  12. Dimensional and hierarchical models of depression using the Beck Depression Inventory-II in an Arab college student sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohaeri Jude U

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An understanding of depressive symptomatology from the perspective of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA could facilitate valid and interpretable comparisons across cultures. The objectives of the study were: (i using the responses of a sample of Arab college students to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in CFA, to compare the "goodness of fit" indices of the original dimensional three-and two-factor first-order models, and their modifications, with the corresponding hierarchical models (i.e., higher - order and bifactor models; (ii to assess the psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II, including convergent/discriminant validity with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25. Method Participants (N = 624 were Kuwaiti national college students, who completed the questionnaires in class. CFA was done by AMOS, version 16. Eleven models were compared using eight "fit" indices. Results In CFA, all the models met most "fit" criteria. While the higher-order model did not provide improved fit over the dimensional first - order factor models, the bifactor model (BFM had the best fit indices (CMNI/DF = 1.73; GFI = 0.96; RMSEA = 0.034. All regression weights of the dimensional models were significantly different from zero (P Conclusion The broadly adequate fit of the various models indicates that they have some merit and implies that the relationship between the domains of depression probably contains hierarchical and dimensional elements. The bifactor model is emerging as the best way to account for the clinical heterogeneity of depression. The psychometric characteristics of the BDI-II lend support to our CFA results.

  13. Inventário de Depressão de Beck (BDI e Escala de Avaliação de Depressão de Hamilton (HAM-D em pacientes com epilepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Nogueira M. de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar os pontos de melhor sensibilidade e especificidade do Inventário de Depressão de Beck (BDI e da Escala de Avaliação de Depressão de Hamilton (HAM-D no diagnóstico de depressão associada à epilepsia. MÉTODOS: Setenta e três pacientes de um centro de referência no tratamento da epilepsia foram submetidos à avaliação neuropsiquiátrica. Foram colhidos dados clínicos e sociodemográficos, sendo utilizados os seguintes instrumentos: entrevista clínica estruturada (MINI-PLUS para diagnóstico psiquiátrico conforme o DSM-IV, HAM-D e BDI. RESULTADOS: No momento da entrevista, 27,4% dos pacientes estavam deprimidos e 37% preenchiam critérios para diagnóstico de depressão maior ao longo da vida. A análise da curva ROC indicou que o ponto de corte em 16 (> 16 para o BDI (sensibilidade de 94,4%, especificidade de 90,6% e em 16 (> 16 para a HAM-D (sensibilidade de 95%, especificidade de 75,5% representou dicotomização ótima entre deprimidos e não deprimidos. Ambos os instrumentos apresentaram um valor preditivo negativo superior a 95%. CONCLUSÃO: A frequência de depressão maior é elevada em pacientes com epilepsia. BDI e a HAM-D podem auxiliar o clínico na identificação da depressão associada à epilepsia, diminuindo seu subdiagnóstico.

  14. Changes in depression in a cohort of Danish HIV-positive individuals: time for routine screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, Lotte; Laursen, Tinne; Christensen, Nils B

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to follow a cohort of HIV-positive individuals for 3 years in order to assess changes in depression, adherence, unsafe sex and emotional strains from living with HIV. Methods: Participants were assessed for depression, adherence, emotional strain and unsafe sex...... via a questionnaire. The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI) was used to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI score of 20 or above (moderate to major depression) were offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Results: In 2005, 205 HIV......-positive individuals participated in the study. Symptoms of depression (BDI >14) were observed in 77 (38%) and major depression (BDI ≥20) in 53 (26%) individuals. In 2008, 148 participants were retested (72% of original sample). Depression (BDI >14) was observed in 38 (26%) and symptoms of major depression (BDI ≥20...

  15. Sensitivity and specificity of the Major Depression Inventory in outpatients

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    Noteboom Annemieke

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a new, brief, self-report measure for depression based on the DSM-system, which allows clinicians to assess the presence of a depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV, but also to assess the severity of the depressive symptoms. Methods We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and psychometric qualities of the MDI in a consecutive sample of 258 psychiatric outpatients. Of these patients, 120 had a mood disorder (70 major depression, 49 dysthymia. A total of 139 subjects had a comorbid axis-I diagnosis, and 91 subjects had a comorbid personality disorder. Results Crohnbach's alpha of the MDI was a satisfactory 0.89, and the correlation between the MDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90 was 0.79 (p Conclusion The MDI is an attractive, brief depression inventory, which seems to be a reliable tool for assessing depression in psychiatric outpatients.

  16. AUV fuzzy neural BDI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The typical BDI (belief desire intention) model of agent is not efficiently computable and the strict logic expression is not easily applicable to the AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle) domain with uncertainties. In this paper, an AUV fuzzy neural BDI model is proposed. The model is a fuzzy neural network composed of five layers: input ( beliefs and desires) , fuzzification, commitment, fuzzy intention, and defuzzification layer. In the model, the fuzzy commitment rules and neural network are combined to form intentions from beliefs and desires. The model is demonstrated by solving PEG (pursuit-evasion game), and the simulation result is satisfactory.

  17. Somatic and Depressive Symptoms in Female Japanese and American Students: A Preliminary Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Arnault, Denise Saint; Sakamoto, Shinji; Moriwaki, Aiko

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between common somatic symptoms and depression in samples of Japanese and American college students. Fifty Japanese and 44 American women completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and rated 56 somatic-distress items for 7 days. Japanese had higher levels of somatic distress than Americans. ANOVA of somatic distress by BDI-level revealed that the High BDI Japanese group reported 26 somatic symptoms (including stomach ache, dizziness, and shoulder...

  18. Prevalence of depression and its associated factors using Beck Depression Inventory among students of School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz, Iran in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Safiri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a debilitating disease which is caused by social and environmental factors in additionto genetic factors. University students are among the young and vulnerable population to depression and theirpopulation is increasing with increase in universities and higher education institutions. Therefore, any disturbance instudent's mental and physical health is a serious threat for the next generation. In this study, we aimed to estimate theprevalence of depression and its related factors in students of School of Health and Nutrition at Tabriz University ofMedical Sciences, Iran. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey on 175 students selected by stratified random sampling, educating indifferent fields at School of Health and Nutrition in 2009. The data collection tool was the short form of the standardBeck Depression Inventory (BDI which is used for screening depression. The collected data were analyzed by softwareStata Statistical Software, Release 10.0 (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA. RESULTS: The results showed that 62.7% of the students had depression and from these 10.9% suffered from severedepression. Significantly higher depression rates were seen in students with worrisome about the future. Marriedstudents, those interested in their field of study, those performing prayers and regularly reading the Quran hadsignificantly lower rates of depression. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the high prevalence of depression, screening strategies should be implemented to identifydepressed students. Counseling services should be available and accessible to students at risk.

  19. Detecting Depression in Elderly Medical Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Stephen R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Used Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess base rate of detection of depression in 150 elderly medical inpatients by nonpsychiatric physicians, and evaluated psychometric properties of screening instruments to assess depression. Found detection of depression by house staff extremely low (8.7 percent). Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), BDI…

  20. Computerized adaptive measurement of depression: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammen Oommen

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient, accurate instruments for measuring depression are increasingly important in clinical practice. We developed a computerized adaptive version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We examined its efficiency and its usefulness in identifying Major Depressive Episodes (MDE and in measuring depression severity. Methods Subjects were 744 participants in research studies in which each subject completed both the BDI and the SCID. In addition, 285 patients completed the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Results The adaptive BDI had an AUC as an indicator of a SCID diagnosis of MDE of 88%, equivalent to the full BDI. The adaptive BDI asked fewer questions than the full BDI (5.6 versus 21 items. The adaptive latent depression score correlated r = .92 with the BDI total score and the latent depression score correlated more highly with the Hamilton (r = .74 than the BDI total score did (r = .70. Conclusions Adaptive testing for depression may provide greatly increased efficiency without loss of accuracy in identifying MDE or in measuring depression severity.

  1. Prevalence of Depression Among Students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Aghakhani, Nader; Sharif Nia, Hamid; Eghtedar, Samereh; Rahbar, Narges; Jasemi, Madineh; Mesgar Zadeh, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A depressive disorder is an illness that involves the body, mood, thoughts and behaviors. This study was performed to identify the presence of depression among medical students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 700 undergraduate medical and basic sciences students. Beck depression inventory (BDI) used for data gathering. Results: Mean score of BDI was 10.4 ± 0.8 and 52.6% of students scored under the depression th...

  2. Teoria da resposta ao item aplicada ao Inventário de Depressão Beck Item response theory applied to the Beck Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Maris de Jezus Castro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O Inventário de Depressão Beck (BDI, uma escala que mede o traço latente de intensidade de sintomas depressivos, pode ser avaliado através da Teoria da Resposta ao Item (TRI. Este estudo utilizou o modelo TRI de Resposta Gradual na avaliação da intensidade de sintomas depressivos de 4.025 indivíduos que responderam ao BDI, de modo a explorar eficientemente a informação disponível nos diferentes aspectos possibilitados pelo uso desta metodologia. O ajuste foi efetuado no software PARSCALE. Foram identificados 13 itens do BDI nos quais pelo menos uma categoria de resposta não tinha chance maior que as demais de ser escolhida, de modo que estes itens tiveram de ser recategorizados. Os itens com maior capacidade de discriminação são relativos à tristeza, pessimismo, sentimento de fracasso, insatisfação, auto-aversão, indecisão e dificuldade para trabalhar. Os itens mais graves são aqueles relacionados com perda de peso, retraimento social e idéias suicidas. O grupo dos 202 indivíduos com as maiores intensidades de sintomas depressivos foi composto por 74% de mulheres, e praticamente 84% possuíam diagnóstico de algum transtorno psiquiátrico. Os resultados evidenciam alguns dos inúmeros ganhos advindos da utilização da TRI na análise de traços latentes.The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, a scale that measures the latent trait intensity of depression symptoms, can be assessed by the Item Response Theory (IRT. This study used the Graded-Response model (GRM to assess the intensity of depressive symptoms in 4,025 individuals who responded to the BDI, in order to efficiently use the information available on different aspects enabled by the use of this methodology. The fit of this model was done in PARSCALE software. We identified 13 items of the BDI in which at least one response category was not more likely than others to be chosen, so that these items had to be categorized again. The items with greater power of

  3. Screening for depressed mood in an adolescent psychiatric context by brief self-assessment scales -- testing psychometric validity of WHO-5 and BDI-6 indices by latent trait analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Eva Henje; Bech, Per; Högberg, Göran

    2012-01-01

    but they are time-consuming and often not fully implemented in clinical practice. Screening for depressive symptoms in the child psychiatric context using brief, user-friendly and easily managed self-assessment scales may be of clinical value and utility. The aim of the study is to test the psychometric validity.......52 and for the BDI-6 of 0.46. Rasch analysis also accepted unidimensionality when testing males versus females (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The WHO-5 is psychometrically valid in an adolescent psychiatric context including both genders to assess the wellness dimension and applicable as a first step in screening for MDD...

  4. The accuracy of diagnosis of major depression in patients with Parkinson's disease: a comparative study among the UPDRS, the geriatric depression scale and the Beck depression inventory A precisão do diagnóstico de depressão na doença de Parkinson: um estudo comparativo entre a UPDRS, a escala geriátrica de depressão e o inventário de depressão de Beck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Tumas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the accuracy of diagnosis of major depression in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD using the UPDRS, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15 and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHOD: 50 consecutive patients with PD were evaluated. The diagnosis of major depression was made according to the DSM-IV criteria. RESULTS: We found a 24% prevalence of major depression. All depression scales were highly correlated but UPDRS depression item had the lowest diagnostic value. The GDS15 had the more appropriate "receiver operating characteristics" curve. The best cut-off scores for screening depression were 17/18 for BDI and 8/9 for GDS15. We did not find any correlation between the level of depression and intensity of motor symptoms, functional capacity and duration of the disease. CONCLUSION: GDS15 is better than the BDI and the UPDRS for screening depression in PD and depression is not related to the degree of parkinsonian symptoms.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a precisão do diagnóstico de depressão em pacientes com doença de Parkinson avaliados pela UPDRS, pela Escala Geriátrica de Depressão com 15 itens (EGD15 e pelo Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB. MÉTODO: 50 pacientes com DP foram avaliados. O diagnóstico de depressão maior foi feito segundo os critérios do DSM-IV. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de depressão foi 24%. As escalas de depressão tiveram elevada correlação entre si. A UPDRS apresentou a menor sensibilidade para o diagnóstico. A EGD15 mostrou uma curva ROC mais apropriada que o IDB. Os melhores escores-de-corte para diagnóstico de depressão foram 17/18 para o IDB e 8/9 para a EGD15. Não houve correlação entre os níveis de depressão e a intensidade do parkinsonismo, a capacidade funcional ou a duração da doença. CONCLUSÃO: A EGD15 é melhor que o IDB para diagnosticar depressão na DP. A depressão não está relacionada à gravidade dos sintomas parkinsonianos.

  5. Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) Tasting and Reported Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Paul B.

    1986-01-01

    The phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste test was investigated for its potential as a genetically based biological marker for depression. Results indicated PTC tasters reported significantly higher levels of depression on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) than nontasters and they scored higher on 5 of the 21 items. (Author/BL)

  6. 贝克抑郁量表第2版中文版在大一学生中的试用%Application of Chinese Version of Beck Depression Inventory-Ⅱ to Chinese First-year College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨文辉; 吴多进; 彭芳

    2012-01-01

    目的:评估贝克抑郁量表第2版(BDI-Ⅱ)中文版在我国大一学生中的信度和效度.方法:972名大一学生完成BDI-Ⅱ中文版和流调中心用抑郁量表(CES-D)的测试,并随机抽取65名大学生1周后完成BDI-Ⅱ的重测.结果:BDI-Ⅱ中文版的Cronbach α系数为0.85,各条目间的相关系数在0.08~0.39之间,各条目与BDI-Ⅱ总分的相关系数在0.34~0.57之间,重测相关系数为0.73(Ps<0.05);BDI-Ⅱ总分与CES-D总分呈正相关(r=0.70,P<0.01).认知-情感和躯体症状2因子结构模型的验证性因素分析各指标为IFI=0.967 、CFI=0.967、x2/df=3.820、RMSEA=0.054.结论:贝克抑郁量表第2版中文版在大一学生中具有良好的信度和效度,能够作为我国大一学生抑郁症状筛查的自评工具.%Objective: To examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of Beck Depression Inventory-Ⅱ (BDI-Ⅱ) of Chinese first-year college students. Methods: A convenient sample of 972 college students in their first year completed the Chinese version of BDI-Ⅱ and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and 65 students received the retest of the BDI-Ⅱ after 1 week. Results: The Cronb-ch alpha coefficient of BDI-Ⅱ was 0.85. The intercorrelations of 21 items ranged from 0.08 to 0.39, and item-total correlations ranged from 0.34 to 0.57 (Ps<0.05). The test-retest coefficient was 0.73 (P<0.01). BDI-Ⅱ total score was related with the CES-D total score (r=0.70, P<0.01). The goodness-of-fit indices of confirmatory factor analysis were found (IFI=0.967, CFI=0.967, x2/df=3.820, RMSEA=0.054) for the two-factor structure model of cognitive-affective and somatic depressive symptoms. Conclusion: The Chinese version of Beck Depression Inventory-Ⅱ shows good reliability and validity, and could be reliably used as a self-administer inven-tory to assess depressive symptoms for Chinese first-year college students.

  7. Factors associated with risk of depression and relevant predictors of screening for depression in clinical practice: a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Maria; Sodemann, Morten; Gabel, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors associated with risk of depression. RESULTS: Symptoms of depression (BDI-II score ≥ 14) were observed in 75 patients (35%), and symptoms of moderate to major depression (BDI-II score ≥ 20......OBJECTIVES: Depression and psychiatric disorders are frequent among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression and describe the psychiatric history of HIV-infected individuals in an out-patient clinic in Denmark and to identify factors of clinical...... importance that may be used to identify patients at risk of depression. METHODS: In 2013, 212 HIV-infected patients were included in a questionnaire study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI-II score ≥ 20 were...

  8. Evaluation of Anxiety and Depressive Levels in Tinnitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Chang Gun; Chi, Jun Hyuk; Song, Jae-Jun; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Bo Hae

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the relationship between tinnitus and the level of anxiety and depression experienced by subjective tinnitus patients, and to determine the effect of the level of anxiety and depression to the results of tinnitus treatment. Subjects and Methods A total of 104 patients were included in this study. All the patients conducted Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State Trait Anxiety Inventory 1, 2 (ST...

  9. Assessment of depression in medical patients: A systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Pang Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To perform a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory for detecting depression in medical settings, this article focuses on the revised version of the scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, which was reformulated according to the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. We examined relevant investigations with the Beck Depression Inventory-II for measuring depression in medical settings to provide guidelines for practicing clinicians. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria seventy articles were retained. Validation studies of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, in both primary care and hospital settings, were found for clinics of cardiology, neurology, obstetrics, brain injury, nephrology, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, oncology, and infectious disease. The Beck Depression Inventory-II showed high reliability and good correlation with measures of depression and anxiety. Its threshold for detecting depression varied according to the type of patients, suggesting the need for adjusted cut-off points. The somatic and cognitive-affective dimension described the latent structure of the instrument. The Beck Depression Inventory-II can be easily adapted in most clinical conditions for detecting major depression and recommending an appropriate intervention. Although this scale represents a sound path for detecting depression in patients with medical conditions, the clinician should seek evidence for how to interpret the score before using the Beck Depression Inventory-II to make clinical decisions.

  10. The construct validity of the Major Depression Inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Germund; Ørnbøl, Eva; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the measurement properties of the ten-item Major Depression Inventory when used on clinical suspicion in general practice by performing a Rasch analysis. METHODS: General practitioners asked consecutive persons to respond to the web-based Major Depression Inventory...... and scalability. RESULTS: Our Rasch analysis showed misfit concerning the sleep and appetite items (items 9 and 10). The response categories were disordered for eight items. After modifying the original six-point to a four-point scoring system for all items, we achieved ordered response categories for all ten...... items. The person separation reliability was acceptable (0.82) for the initial model. Dimensionality testing did not support combining the ten items to create a total score. The scale appeared to be well targeted to this clinical sample. No significant differential item functioning was observed...

  11. A Study of the Predictive Validity of the Children's Depression Inventory for Major Depression Disorder in Puerto Rican Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Medina, Carmen L.; Bernal, Guillermo; Rossello, Jeannette; Cumba-Aviles, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the predictive validity of the Children's Depression Inventory items for major depression disorder (MDD) in an outpatient clinic sample of Puerto Rican adolescents. The sample consisted of 130 adolescents, 13 to 18 years old. The five most frequent symptoms of the Children's Depression Inventory that best predict the…

  12. Cognitive-behavioural therapy v. usual care in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Conradi; P. de Jonge; J. Ormel

    2008-01-01

    We examined in a primary care sample whether acute-phase cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) would be more effective than usual care for patients with multiple prior episodes of depression. Depression outcome was based on a 3-monthly administered Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) during a 2-year follo

  13. Markers of oxidative/nitrative damage of plasma proteins correlated with EDSS and BDI scores in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Agnieszka; Bijak, Michał; Niwald, Marta; Miller, Elżbieta; Saluk, Joanna

    2017-05-19

    Objectives The objective of the present study was to evaluate oxidative/nitrative stress in the plasma of 50 patients suffering from the secondary progressive course of multiple sclerosis (MS), and to verify its correlation with physical and mental disability as assessed by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Methods Oxidative and nitrative damage to proteins was determined by the level of carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine using ELISA test. Based on the reaction with Ellman's reagent, we estimated the concentration of oxidized thiol groups. Additionally, we measured the level of lipid peroxidation. Results In plasma drawn from MS patients, we observed a significantly higher level of 3-NT (92%; P EDSS and BDI. Negative correlations were observed between concentration of -SH groups and EDSS and BDI. Conclusion Our results indicate that impaired red-ox balance can significantly promote neurodegeneration in secondary progressive MS.

  14. Anhedonia and Pessimism in Hospitalized Depressed Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinoviy Gutkovich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal study investigates whether anhedonia and pessimistic attributional style represent a clinical state or a trait in hospitalized depressed adolescents. 81 consecutive adolescent inpatients were screened with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the clinician-rated Major Depressive Disorder (MDD criteria sheet. 51 patients with BDI score ≥10 and/or ≥4 symptoms on MDD criteria sheet were assessed at Time 1 upon admission, with 39 patients (78% assessed at discharge (Time 2 with the Pleasure Scale for Children and Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire—Revised. Anhedonia and pessimism at admission were associated with BDI scores at admission and discharge as well as number of depressive symptoms and depression severity. MDD diagnosis was associated with anhedonia, but not with pessimism. Pessimism—but not anhedonia—improved significantly by discharge. Results suggest that while some adolescents exhibit enduring anhedonia, pessimistic attributional style appears to be a concomitant feature of an acute depressive state.

  15. The Sensitivity and Specificity of Depression Screening Tools among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailey, Sarah H.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the validity and the sensitivity and specificity of depression screening tools among adults with intellectual and disabilities (ID). Subjects (N = 75) were interviewed with the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the Glasgow Depression Scale for People with a Learning Disability (GDS-LD) and also completed a clinical…

  16. Depression and major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Shin; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-01-15

    The prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) varies greatly. In this study, we investigated major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive symptoms without MDD in patients with PD. The psychopathological characteristics of depressive symptoms were assessed by a psychiatric interview. A total of 105 Japanese patients with PD without dementia were included. The Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with a cutoff score of 13/14 was used to screen for depression. Using a structured interview, a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation of patients with BDI-II scores >13 (high BDI patients) was completed using the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR. Forty patients (38%) had a BDI-II >13, but 29 did not show any depressed mood. Five cases met the criteria for MDD (three current, two past) and one patient was diagnosed with minor depressive disorder. A slight depressed mood that was associated with worrying about PD was seen in 6 of 34 patients without any depressive disorder and fluctuated with aggravation of PD symptoms in two of these patients. For the diagnosis of MDD, the number of positive items from the DSM-IV-TR definition of MDD is most important and useful for differentiating MDD and non-MDD. The low-prevalence rate of MDD in our patient population suggests that PD may be a psychological stressor for MDD, but does not necessarily induce MDD.

  17. Prevalence of depression and its associated factors using Beck Depression Inventory among students of a medical college in Karnataka

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ganesh S; Jain, Animesh; Hegde, Supriya

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: Depression among medical students is an area of increasing concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of depression and its associated factors among medical students. Materials and Methods: A stratified random sample of 400 students was assessed using Beck Depression Inventory by investigators. Associations between depression and class of studying, social factors like alcohol use, drug addiction, family problems, family history of depression, and st...

  18. Negative correlation between cerebrospinal fluid FGF21 levels and BDI scores in male Chinese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanlong; Wang, Meiling; Tan, Xiaohua; Wang, Xiaofang; Yang, Xiaoyu; Xiao, Jian; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Fan

    2017-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an important metabolic regulator of glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Recently, FGF21 has been shown to play a robust neuroprotective role and act as a mediator of the effects of mood stabilizers. In the present study, we measured the concentration of FGF21 in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and investigated the relationship of FGF21 levels with depression and anxiety emotions. Sixty-seven Chinese volunteers were recruited from Beijing Jishuitan Hospital. A significant negative association was found between CSF FGF21 levels and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores in male subjects. Our findings provide evidence of the role of FGF21 in mood regulation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Screening for depression while patients dialyse: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcot, Joseph; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2008-08-01

    The lack of routine depression screening among the haemodialysis (HD) population may contribute to depression being under-recognised. While screening patients could be beneficial, the optimum screening procedure remains unclear. One method would be to screen HD patients while they receive their treatment. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI) could be administered while patients dialysed. Forty HD patients completed the BDI while dialysing and again at a time when off-dialysis. Level of agreement analysis (Bland and Altman) was undertaken to determine if the assessment condition influenced BDI scoring. The off-dialysis assessment also involved a short clinical interview that was compared with the BDI assessment. There was a high level of agreement between the on- and off-dialysis assessments, but differences in response to the somatic items on the BDI scale were apparent between the conditions. The clinical interview revealed that 22% of the sample met the DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. The optimal cut-off value for the BDI as determined by receiver operating characteristic curves was >or=16, with 88.9% sensitivity and 87.1% specificity. The results indicate that the procedure of on-dialysis assessment using the BDI is a viable screening procedure. The practicality of employing this screening procedure may facilitate improved detection of depression in the dialysis population.

  20. Correlates of Depression in First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatte, Aude; Marcotte, Diane; Potvin, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and rank the personal, family-related, social, and academic correlates of depressive symptoms in first-year college students. A questionnaire that included the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was administered to 389 first-year college students (mean age = 18.9; SD = 3.38; 59.4% female). Eight variables…

  1. The Depression Inventory Development Workgroup: A Collaborative, Empirically Driven Initiative to Develop a New Assessment Tool for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Anthony L; Evans, Kenneth R; Kalali, Amir H; Kennedy, Sidney H; Engelhardt, Nina; Frey, Benicio N; Greist, John H; Kobak, Kenneth A; Lam, Raymond W; MacQueen, Glenda; Milev, Roumen; Placenza, Franca M; Ravindran, Arun V; Sheehan, David V; Sills, Terrence; Williams, Janet B W

    2016-01-01

    The Depression Inventory Development project is an initiative of the International Society for CNS Drug Development whose goal is to develop a comprehensive and psychometrically sound measurement tool to be utilized as a primary endpoint in clinical trials for major depressive disorder. Using an iterative process between field testing and psychometric analysis and drawing upon expertise of international researchers in depression, the Depression Inventory Development team has established an empirically driven and collaborative protocol for the creation of items to assess symptoms in major depressive disorder. Depression-relevant symptom clusters were identified based on expert clinical and patient input. In addition, as an aid for symptom identification and item construction, the psychometric properties of existing clinical scales (assessing depression and related indications) were evaluated using blinded datasets from pharmaceutical antidepressant drug trials. A series of field tests in patients with major depressive disorder provided the team with data to inform the iterative process of scale development. We report here an overview of the Depression Inventory Development initiative, including results of the third iteration of items assessing symptoms related to anhedonia, cognition, fatigue, general malaise, motivation, anxiety, negative thinking, pain and appetite. The strategies adopted from the Depression Inventory Development program, as an empirically driven and collaborative process for scale development, have provided the foundation to develop and validate measurement tools in other therapeutic areas as well.

  2. Depressive symptoms and associated factors in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karol, David E; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa G; Lin, Min; Clowse, Megan E B

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms affect anywhere from 11% to 71% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which may be related to SLE disease activity, other clinical variables, or sociodemographic factors. We aimed to measure the rate of depressive symptoms in our cohort of patients with SLE and to identify modifiable factors associated with depressive symptoms. Patients in our university-based SLE registry completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), pain scores, and demographic information. Disease activity was measured using the physician's global assessment (PGA) and Selena-SLE disease activity index (Selena-systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI)). Patients were identified as having moderate or severe depressive symptoms (BDI-II ≥ 18) or not (BDI-II lupus arthritis (P lupus arthritis, may result in alleviation of depressive symptoms in patients with SLE. Copyright © 2013 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Depression Subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale applied preoperatively in spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of the Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D in spine surgery, comparing it to Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, the HADS-D and the BDI were applied to patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar (n=139 or cervical spondylosis (n=17. Spearman correlation tests for HADS-D and BDI were applied. The internal consistency of HADS-D was estimated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. RESULTS: According to the BDI, the prevalence of depression was of 28.8% (n=45. The Spearman r coefficient between HADS-D and BDI was 0.714 (p10, there was a sensitivity of 71.1%, specificity of 95.4%, and positive likelihood-ratio of 15.78. CONCLUSIONS: HADS-D showed a strong correlation with BDI and good reliability. HADS-D is a good alternative for screening depression and assessing its severity.

  4. A test of the cognitive content specificity hypothesis in depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberton, Anna; Oei, Tian P S

    2008-03-01

    The present study tested the cognitive content specificity hypothesis (CCSH) to assess whether anxiety and depression can be differentiated on the basis of cognitive disturbance. One hundred and thirty five depressed participants were administered the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI), the automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ) and the anxious self-statements questionnaire (ASSQ). It was hypothesised that depressive cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, depressive (but not anxiety) symptoms in a depressed sample. Conversely, it was predicted that anxiety cognitions would be specifically related to, and predictive of, anxiety (but not depressive) symptoms in a depressed sample. Results revealed that the ATQ was the sole predictor of the BDI and similarly, the ASSQ was the sole predictor of the BAI. These findings support the CCSH in depression and provide an integrative framework for a greater understanding of the relationship between anxiety and depression.

  5. Evidence of Higher Oxidative Status in Depression and Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Grases

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a simple method for evaluating antioxidative status, by measuring the redox potential of urine, and correlate the findings with measures of anxiety and depression. We include 63 individuals (28 males and 35 females aged between 20 and 65 years. The validated anxiety State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and the validated BDI (Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire were used to evaluate anxiety and depression. Antioxidative status was determined by measuring the redox potential of urine collected in standard conditions. Correlation of the antioxidant capacity of urines evaluated using the ferric ion/specific dye method or through redox potential using the platinum electrode demonstrated the suitability of this last procedure. We found that normal anxiety state values corresponded to low urine redox potentials, whereas higher anxiety states were associated with high urinary redox potential. We also found that individuals with normal BDI values had significantly lower urine redox potentials than individuals with higher BDI values.

  6. An Evaluation of Depressed Mood in Two Classes of Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Ruth E.; Litwins, Stephanie D.; Frye, Ann W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess depression rates in contemporary medical students. Method: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered anonymously to two medical school classes at matriculation, the end of first year, and the end of second year. Results: Median scores for both classes were low at all points. The proportion of students scoring in the…

  7. Can depression be diagnosed by response to mother's face? A personalized attachment-based paradigm for diagnostic fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Objective measurement of depression remains elusive. Depression has been associated with insecure attachment, and both have been associated with changes in brain reactivity in response to viewing standard emotional and neutral faces. In this study, we developed a method to calculate predicted scores for the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II using personalized stimuli: fMRI imaging of subjects viewing pictures of their own mothers. METHODS: 28 female subjects ages 18-30 (14 healthy controls and 14 unipolar depressed diagnosed by MINI psychiatric interview were scored on the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II and the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI coherence of mind scale of global attachment security. Subjects viewed pictures of Mother (M, Friend (F and Stranger (S, during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Using a principal component regression method (PCR, a predicted Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II score was obtained from activity patterns in the paracingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 32 and compared to clinical diagnosis and the measured BDI-II score. The same procedure was performed for AAI coherence of mind scores. RESULTS: Activity patterns in BA-32 identified depressed subjects. The categorical agreement between the derived BDI-II score (using the standard clinical cut-score of 14 on the BDI-II and depression diagnosis by MINI psychiatric interview was 89%, with sensitivity 85.7% and specificity 92.8%. Predicted and measured BDI-II scores had a correlation of 0.55. Prediction of attachment security was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Brain activity in response to viewing one's mother may be diagnostic of depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging using personalized paradigms has the potential to provide objective assessments, even when behavioral measures are not informative. Further, fMRI based diagnostic algorithms may enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms of depression by

  8. PROSPECTIVE ASSOCIATIONS OF DEPRESSIVE RUMINATION AND SOCIAL PROBLEM SOLVING WITH DEPRESSION: A 6-MONTH LONGITUDINAL STUDY(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Hattori, Yosuke; Nishimura, Haruki; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2015-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine whether depressive rumination and social problem solving are prospectively associated with depressive symptoms. Nonclinical university students (N = 161, 64 men, 97 women; M age = 19.7 yr., SD = 3.6, range = 18-61) recruited from three universities in Japan completed the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II), the Ruminative Responses Scale, Social Problem-Solving Inventory-Revised Short Version (SPSI-R:S), and the Means-Ends Problem-Solving Procedure at baseline, and the BDI-II again at 6 mo. later. A stepwise multiple regression analysis with the BDI-II and all subscales of the rumination and social problem solving measures as independent variables indicated that only the BDI-II scores and the Impulsivity/carelessness style subscale of the SPSI-R:S at Time 1 were significantly associated with BDI-II scores at Time 2 (β = 0.73, 0.12, respectively; independent variables accounted for 58.8% of the variance). These findings suggest that in Japan an impulsive and careless problem-solving style was prospectively associated with depressive symptomatology 6 mo. later, as contrasted with previous findings of a cycle of rumination and avoidance problem-solving style.

  9. Hopelessness depression as a distinct dimension of depressive symptoms among clinical and non-clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, T E; Steer, R A; Abramson, L Y; Alloy, L B; Metalsky, G I; Schmidt, N B

    2001-05-01

    Subtyping depression has been an interest of theorists and clinicians for at least four centuries. In this paper, we examined the validity of the symptom cluster component of the hopelessness theory of depression. We used structural equation modeling analyses on large samples of psychiatric outpatients (N=1604, 844, and 680) and Air Force cadets (N=1404) who completed the items of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Findings were supportive of the hopelessness depression cluster as a distinct depressive syndrome. Implications for the nosology of depression and for depression theory were discussed.

  10. Apathy and depression in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguru, Miyako; Tachibana, Hisao; Toda, Kazuo; Okuda, Bungo; Oka, Nobuyuki

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical correlates of apathy and depression in Parkinson disease (PD), and to clarify whether apathy can be dissociated from depression. One hundred fifty patients with PD completed the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II), Starkstein's Apathy Scale (AS), and a quality of life (QOL) battery. Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were performed on the same day. Apathy (AS score > or = 16) was diagnosed in 60% of patients and depression (BDI-II score > or = 14) in 56%. Apathy coexisted with depression in 43% of patients, compared with depression without apathy in 13% and apathy without depression in 17%. Apathy scale score was significantly correlated with UPDRS scores, HY stage, and age, whereas BDI-II score was correlated only with UPDRS scores. Both AS and BDI-II scores were negatively correlated with QOL. However, multiple regression analysis revealed that depression was strongly and negatively associated with emotional well-being and communication, whereas apathy was mainly associated with cognition and stigma. These findings suggest that apathy and depression may be separable in PD, although both are common in patients with PD and are associated with QOL.

  11. Meta-Analysis of the English Version of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erford, Bradley T.; Johnson, Erin; Bardoshi, Gerta

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed 144 studies from 1996 to 2013 using the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition. Internal consistency was 0.89 and test-retest reliability 0.75. Convergent comparisons were robust across 43 depression instruments. Structural validity supported both one- and two-factor solutions and diagnostic accuracy varied according…

  12. Eating and Psychological Profiles of Women with Higher Depressive Symptoms Who Are Trying to Lose Weight

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    C. Bégin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine whether women with higher depressive symptoms differed from women with lower depressive symptoms on early weight-loss, eating behaviors and psychological profiles. Among a sample of 45 overweight/obese women who had undertaken a self-initiated weight-loss attempt, two groups were formed based on scores from the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, one with lower depressive symptoms (BDI-II < 10; n=21 and one with higher depressive symptoms (BDI ≥ 10; n=24. Even if some women in the higher depressive symptom group did not reach the clinical cut-off for depression (BDI = 14, this group tended to lose less weight in the first two months of their weight-loss attempt and to show a more disturbed eating and psychological profile compared to the group with lower depressive symptoms. In addition, among women with higher depressive symptoms, eating and psychological variables were systematically related to one another whereas these variables were not related among the other group. Results highlight the relevance of considering the presence of depressive symptoms as a marker of clinical severity among the overweight/obese population, and suggest that the BDI-II could be an interesting screening instrument to identify this particular subgroup.

  13. Pattern classification of brain activation during emotional processing in subclinical depression : psychosis proneness as potential confounding factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modinos, Gemma; Mechelli, Andrea; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Allen, Paul; McGuire, Philip; Aleman, Andre

    2013-01-01

    We used Support Vector Machine (SVM) to perform multivariate pattern classification based on brain activation during emotional processing in healthy participants with subclinical depressive symptoms. Six-hundred undergraduate students completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). Two groups w

  14. Pattern classification of brain activation during emotional processing in subclinical depression : psychosis proneness as potential confounding factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modinos, Gemma; Mechelli, Andrea; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Allen, Paul; McGuire, Philip; Aleman, Andre

    2013-01-01

    We used Support Vector Machine (SVM) to perform multivariate pattern classification based on brain activation during emotional processing in healthy participants with subclinical depressive symptoms. Six-hundred undergraduate students completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). Two groups

  15. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Symptoms of Depression among Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

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    Lorraine Frazier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence of self-reported depressive symptoms and the self reported somatic depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II among patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and explored the impact of gender on both. A convenience sample of 789 adults (248 women and 541 men was recruited for the study during hospital admission for ACS and participants were screened for self-reported depressive symptoms. BDI-II scores of ≥14 indicate a moderate level of depressive symptoms and this cut-off score was used to categorize patients into depressed and non-depressed groups. Pearson chi-square tests for independence (categorical variables and t tests for independent samples (continuous variables were used for gender comparisons. Results showed that depressive symptoms during ACS episodes were different between women and men. Women reported greater overall depressive symptoms (BDI-II mean = 11.89, S.D. = 9.68 than men (BDI-II mean = 9.00, S.D. = 7.93 (P<0.000. Significantly more women (7.66% were identified positive for somatic depressive symptoms (sleep and appetite disturbances and fatigue than men (2.22% (P=0.0003. Findings support that there are gender differences in depressive symptoms experienced by patients hospitalized for ACS. Somatic symptoms of depression may be important indicators of depression especially among female ACS patients.

  16. Validation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a community sample Validação da versão brasileira em português do Inventário de Depressão de Beck-II numa amostra da comunidade

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    Marcio Henrique Gomes-Oliveira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI is used worldwide for detecting depressive symptoms. This questionnaire has been revised (1996 to match the DSM-IV criteria for a major depressive episode. We assessed the reliability and the validity of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the BDI-II for non-clinical adults. METHODS: The questionnaire was applied to 60 college students on two occasions. Afterwards, 182 community-dwelling adults completed the BDI-II, the Self-Report Questionnaire, and the K10 Scale. Trained psychiatrists performed face-to-face interviews with the respondents using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-I, the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale, and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale. Descriptive analysis, signal detection analysis (Receiver Operating Characteristics, correlation analysis, and discriminant function analysis were performed to investigate the psychometric properties of the BDI-II. RESULTS: The intraclass correlation coefficient of the BDI-II was 0.89, and the Cronbach's alpha coefficient of internal consistency was 0.93. Taking the SCID as the gold standard, the cut-off point of 10/11 was the best threshold for detecting depression, yielding a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 87%. The concurrent validity (a correlation of 0.63-0.93 with scales applied simultaneously and the predictive ability of the severity level (over 65% correct classification were acceptable. CONCLUSION: The BDI-II is reliable and valid for measuring depressive symptomatology among Portuguese-speaking Brazilian non-clinical populations.OBJETIVOS: O Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB é utilizado mundialmente para detectar sintomas depressivos. Este questionário foi revisado (1996 para se adequar aos critérios do DSM-IV para episódio depressivo maior. Avaliamos a confiabilidade e validade da versão I em português-brasileiro do IDB-I em uma amostra não clínica de adultos. MÉTODOS: O questionário foi aplicado em duas

  17. Interferon-induced depression in patients with hepatitis C: an epidemiologic study

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    Lucas Pereira Jorge de Medeiros

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the incidence rate and severity of depressive symptoms in different time points (12, 24 and 48 weeks in Brazilian patients with HCV treated with PEG IFN plus ribavirin. Methods We conducted an observational prospective study using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D. Results Fifty patients were included. The assessments with either scale showed the highest score of depressive symptoms in the 24th week of treatment; the mean BDI score before treatment was 6.5 ± 5.3 and the mean CES-D was 10.9 ± 7.8. After 24 weeks, the mean BDI was 16.1 ± 10.2 and mean CES-D was 18.6 ± 13.0; 46% were diagnosed with depression according to combined BDI and CES-D scores. The somatic/psychomotor subscales were highly correlated with overall scale scores . Subjects with history of substance and alcohol abuse had higher risk for IFN-induced depression. Conclusion Treatment with PEG IFN was associated with a high incidence rate of depressive symptoms in this sample of Brazilian patients, as measured by CES-D and BDI. Alcohol and substance abuse increase the risk of PEG IFN-induced depression.

  18. Further validation of the Psychological Maltreatment Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, E E; Gayton, W F

    1996-05-01

    This study attempted to provide further validation of the Psychological Maltreatment Inventory (PMI). The PMI was found to be correlated with scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for females but not males. Four separate ANOVAs were run with parent gender and respondent gender as independent variables and the total PMI score along with three factor subscale scores as separate dependent variables to determine the effects of both parent and respondent gender on PMI scores. Fathers were found to have significantly higher PMI scores than mothers, and post hoc tests indicated that male respondents view their fathers as more hostile rejecting than their mothers.

  19. The Correlation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory with Depression and Anxiety in Veterans with Tinnitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jinwei Hu; Jane Xu; Matthew Streelman; Helen Xu; O’neil Guthrie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The mechanisms of tinnitus are known to alter neuronal circuits in the brainstem and cortex, which are common to several comorbid conditions. This study examines the relationship between tinnitus and anxiety/depression. Subjects and Methods. Ninety-one male veterans with subjective tinnitus were enrolled in a Veterans Affairs Tinnitus Clinic. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) was used to assess tinnitus severity. ICD-9 codes for anxiety/depression were used to determine their p...

  20. Internet Addiction and Beck Depression Inventory in the University Students at a Student Hostel

    OpenAIRE

    Atilla Senih Mayda 1; Muammer Yılmaz 1; Filiz Bolu; et. al.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between internet addiction and depression in students at a student hostel. Methods: The data of this descriptive study was collected with questionnaires applied to 698 of 1000 university students by face to face interview. Data was collected with Beck Depression Inventory and with the interview form that includes 15 questions about sociodemographic characteristics and 7 questions they were prepared using Goldberg’s diagnostic criteria. Results: A...

  1. Do depressive symptoms correlate with oxidative stress in a sample of healthy college students?

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    Masateru Matsushita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Major depression and sub-threshold depressive symptoms are associated with health crisis. Oxidative stress may be a mechanism for major depression. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the degree of depressive symptoms and oxidative status using a reliable and inexpensive method that evaluates endogenous hydroperoxides. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 54 non-smoking college students and measured serum reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs and the biological antioxidant potential (BAP as an index of oxidative status. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: The concentrations of ROMs did not differ between the lower BDI group (BDI 14 (282.7 - 59.84 U.CARR vs 307.7 - 67.51 U.CARR, z = -1.19, P = 0.239. We did find a significant relationship between ROM concentration values and higher BDI scores (rho = 0.30, P = 0.042. BAP levels in the hig-her BDI group were not significantly greater than those in the lower BDI group (z = -0.108, P = 0.287. There was no significant correlation between BAP and depressive symptoms (rho = 0.22, P = 0.140. Moreover, we conducted a multiple regression analysis to control for gender difference and difference in sleep perception of the previous night between the two BDI groups. However, depressive symptoms were not significantly predicted by ROM concentrations (beta = 0.28, P = 0.076. Conclusions: While results of the present study demonstrated a slight correlation between depressive symptoms and oxidative stress, this linkage could not be confirmed after controlling for significant confounding factors. This result should be verified in a larger sample.

  2. Do depressive symptoms correlate with oxidative stress in a sample of healthy college students?

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    Masateru Matsushita

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Major depression and sub-threshold depressive symptoms are associated with health crisis. Oxidative stress may be a mechanism for major depression. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the degree of depressive symptoms and oxidative status using a reliable and inexpensive method that evaluates endogenous hydroperoxides. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 54 non-smoking college students and measured serum reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs and the biological antioxidant potential (BAP as an index of oxidative status. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: The concentrations of ROMs did not differ between the lower BDI group (BDI 14 (282.7 - 59.84 U.CARR vs 307.7 - 67.51 U.CARR, z = -1.19, P = 0.239. We did find a significant relationship between ROM concentration values and higher BDI scores (rho = 0.30, P = 0.042. BAP levels in the hig-her BDI group were not significantly greater than those in the lower BDI group (z = -0.108, P = 0.287. There was no significant correlation between BAP and depressive symptoms (rho = 0.22, P = 0.140. Moreover, we conducted a multiple regression analysis to control for gender difference and difference in sleep perception of the previous night between the two BDI groups. However, depressive symptoms were not significantly predicted by ROM concentrations (beta = 0.28, P = 0.076. Conclusions: While results of the present study demonstrated a slight correlation between depressive symptoms and oxidative stress, this linkage could not be confirmed after controlling for significant confounding factors. This result should be verified in a larger sample.

  3. The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology - the self-report Romanian version

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    Hackl, E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical depression is a debilitating disorder affecting a significant percentage of population. In this context, having reliable screening instruments for depression represents a major advantage. A widely used screening tool is the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology – Self-Report version (QIDS-SR. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychometric proprieties of the Romanian version of QIDS-SR as a diagnostic measure for depression. The data were collected from Romanian adult participants (N = 148 who expressed interest in an online therapeutic program for depression. Our sample included both normal (N = 48 and clinically depressed (N = 100 participants. Diagnostic assessments were conducted using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. The Romanian QIDS-SR demonstrated high convergent validity with Beck Depression Inventory - II (r=.83 and good internal consistency (α=.74. Receiver operating characteristics analysis demonstrated satisfactory diagnostic validity for the QIDS-SR. The optimal ratio between sensitivity and specificity was set at 15 for the QIDS-SR. It was concluded that QIDS-SR represents an adequate, useful and cost-effective screening instrument for clinical depression in Romania.

  4. Development and validation of the geriatric depression inventory in Chinese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhijuan; Lv, Xiaozhen; Hu, Yongdong; Ma, Wanxin; Xie, Hengge; Lin, Kai; Yu, Xin; Wang, Huali

    2015-09-01

    Depression among older adults is under-recognized either in the community or in general hospitals in Chinese culture. This study aimed to develop a culturally appropriate screening instrument for late-life depression in the non-psychiatric settings and to test its reliability and validity for a diagnosis of depression. Using a Delphi method, we developed a geriatric depression inventory (GDI), consisting of 12 core symptoms of depressive disorder in old age. We investigated its reliability and validity on 89 patients with late-life depression and 249 non-depression controls. Both self-report (GDI-SR) and physician-interview (GDI-RI) versions were assessed. Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.843 for GDI-SR and 0.880 for GDI-RI. Both GDI-SR and GDI-RI showed good concurrent validity with the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15) (GDI-SR: r = 0.750, p depression versus non-depression. Using a cut-off of three items endorsed, sensitivity and specificity were 92.1% and 81.9% for GDI-SR, and 93.3% and 87.1% for GDI-RI. The GDI, either based on self-report or rater interview, is a reliable and valid instrument for the detection of depression among older adults in non-psychiatric medical settings in Chinese culture.

  5. Casuist BDI-Agent: A New Extended BDI Architecture with the Capability of Ethical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Ali Reza; Ghasem-Aghaee, Nasser

    Since the intelligent agent is developed to be cleverer, more complex, and yet uncontrollable, a number of problems have been recognized. The capability of agents to make moral decisions has become an important question, when intelligent agents have developed more autonomous and human-like. We propose Casuist BDI-Agent architecture which extends the power of BDI architecture. Casuist BDI-Agent architecture combines CBR method in AI and bottom up casuist approach in ethics in order to add capability of ethical reasoning to BDI-Agent.

  6. Patterns of self-reported depressive symptoms in relation to morningness-eveningness in inpatients with a depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias Johannes; Olschinski, Christiane; Kundermann, Bernd; Cabanel, Nicole

    2016-05-30

    The stable and persisting preference for activities in the late evening (i.e. eveningness) is associated with a higher risk for depression, suicidality, and non-remission in major depression. The present study investigated symptom patterns in hospitalized patients with depressive syndromes in relation to morningness-eveningness (chronotypes). Depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI-II]) and chronotype (German version of the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire [D-MEQ]) were assessed after admission and before discharge in inpatients with mainly major depression. Group differences of BDI-II single items and three BDI-II factors (cognitive, affective, somatic) between patients divided at the D-MEQ sample median into "morning preference" (MP) and "evening preference" (EP) were calculated. Data from 64 consecutively admitted patients (31MP/33EP) were analyzed. Both groups (MP/EP) were comparable regarding age, sex, diagnosis, length of stay, and subjective sleep quality, BDI-II scores were significantly higher in EP than in MP at admission. At admission and discharge, cognitive symptoms were significantly more pronounced in EP vs. MP; non-significant differences between EP and MP were found for affective and somatic symptoms. The results underline the importance of the trait-like chronotype for severity and symptomatology in patients with depressive disorders. The patients' chronotype should be taken into account in diagnostics and treatment of depressive disorders.

  7. Validation of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) in Cocaine Dependent Inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suris, Alina; Kashner, T. Michael; Gillaspy, James A., Jr.; Biggs, Melanie; Rush, A. John

    2001-01-01

    While the reliability and validity of Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) scores have been established with outpatient adults being treated in community psychiatric clinics, it has not been used in special or dually diagnosed populations. Establishes internal consistency, concurrent validity, and construct validity for both the clinical…

  8. Testing the Hierarchical Structure of the Children's Depression Inventory: A Multigroup Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Luis F.; Aluja, Anton; del Barrio, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, the aims were (a) to obtain, describe, and compare different solutions of three, five, and six first-order factors raised in the previous literature about the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI); (b) analyze the number and nature of the second-order factors; (c) test which model best reproduces…

  9. Assessing Measurement Invariance of the Children's Depression Inventory in Chinese and Italian Primary School Student Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenfeng; Lu, Yongbiao; Tan, Furong; Yao, Shuqiao; Steca, Patrizia; Abela, John R. Z.; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the measurement invariance of Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and compared its factorial variance/covariance and latent means among Chinese and Italian children. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis of the original five factors identified by Kovacs revealed that full measurement invariance did not hold. Further analysis…

  10. Which increases depressive symptoms in obese patients, hypertension or diabetes?

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    Sakir Özgür Keskek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression and obesity are common disorders. Obesity is also predictive of several chronic diseases like hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare depression frequency of obese patients with hypertension or diabetes. Methods: Weight, height and body mass index (BMI were measured. The definition of obesity was a body mass index (weight (kg/height (m2 ≥30 kg/m2. Obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were documented. All participants had a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI evaluation. Results: A total of 389 subjects were included, of whom 100, 101, 92, 96 participants were healthy, obese, obese with hypertension, obese with diabetes, respectively. Beck Depression Inventory scores of obese patients, obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were higher compared to the control group. BDI scores of obese patients with diabetes were higher compared to obese and obese with hypertension subjects.

  11. Relationship between plasma glutamate levels and post-stroke depression in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱方媛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the association between the plasma glutamate levels during acute ischemic stroke andpost-stroke depression(PSD)initially.Methods Seventy-four ischemic stroke patients admitted to the hospital within the first day of stroke onset were evaluated at a follow-up of 2 weeks.The Beck Depression Inventory(BDI,21-item)and DSM-Ⅳcriteria was used to diagnose post-stroke depression(PSD)at 2 weeks after stroke.

  12. Detailed course of depressive symptoms and risk for developing depression in late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinnin, Ran; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Takagaki, Koki; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Yamamura, Takanao; Okamoto, Yuri; Miyake, Yoshie; Takebayashi, Yoshitake; Tanaka, Keisuke; Sugiura, Yoshinori; Shimoda, Haruki; Kawakami, Norito; Furukawa, Toshi A; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Despite its clinical importance, adolescent subthreshold depression remains a largely neglected topic. The aims of this study were to accurately identify the natural course of depressive symptoms and the risk for developing major depressive episode (MDE) in late adolescents with subthreshold depression over 1 year. Patients and methods One hundred and seventy-two participants <20 years of age (mean age: 18.32 years, standard deviation: 0.50), who did not meet the full criteria for an MDE, were selected from 2,494 screened freshmen based on the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II). We conducted a cohort study of three groups (low-, middle-, and high-symptom groups) divided based on BDI-II scores, over a 1 year period with the use of bimonthly assessments. Temporal changes of depressive symptoms were analyzed using linear mixed modeling and growth mixture modeling. Results First, we found that late adolescents with subthreshold depression (high depressive symptoms) were split between the increasing and decreasing depressive symptoms groups, whereas the majority of the less-symptoms group remained stable during 1 year. Second, in comparison with late adolescents with less depressive symptoms, those with subthreshold depression had an elevated risk of later depression. Conclusion Some late adolescents with subthreshold depression had increased depressive symptoms and developed an MDE during 1 year. Therefore, it is necessary for us to rigorously assess the changes in subthreshold depressive symptoms over time in late adolescents. PMID:28053534

  13. The Effect of Psychological Resilience in Postpartum Depressing Symptomatology

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    Markella Salioni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The postpartum period requires from the new mother high Psychological Resilience, particularly when is expressed postpartum depressing symptomatology. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between psychological resilience and postpartum depression. Material – Method: 104 participants completed the Panas-X scale, the CD-RISK (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and the BDI (Beck Depression Inventory. Results: Results showed that 42% of the participants were prone to experience postpartum depression according to the BDI. Moreover it was shown that psychological resilience remains unaffected during pregnancy, while it relates to low postpartum depression levels. Finally the study provides support that partner and environment support as well as positive affectivity affect psychological resilience levels. Conclusion: The Psychological Resilience and the support from companion and family can protect new mothers from depressing symptoms.

  14. Determining a diagnostic cut-off on the Teate Depression Inventory

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    Balsamo M

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Michela Balsamo, Aristide SagginoDepartment of Psychological Sciences, Humanities and Territory, G. d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, ItalyAbstract: A small but growing body of literature suggests that the Teate Depression ­Inventory (TDI may be an “objective” measure of depression compared with other commonly used scales. Furthermore, the TDI has strong psychometric properties in both clinical and nonclinical samples. The present study aimed to extend the use of TDI by identifying cut-off scores that could differentiate varying levels of depression severity in a group of clinically diagnosed depression disorder patients (N=125. Three receiver operating characteristic curve analyses indicated cut-off scores of 21 (sensitivity =0.86, specificity =0.94, and classification accuracy =0.90; 36 (sensitivity =0.84, specificity =0.96, and classification accuracy =0.92; and 50 (sensitivity =0.81, specificity =0.93, and classification accuracy =0.90, for minimal, mild, moderate, and severe depression, respectively. Results suggest that the TDI measures depression severity across a broad range with high test accuracy and may be appropriately used to screen for depression.Keywords: major depression, ROC curve, self-report scales, Rasch analysis, depression screening

  15. Norms and Screening Utility of the Dutch Version of the Children's Depression Inventory in Clinical and Nonclinical Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Jeffrey; Braet, Caroline; Rood, Lea; Timbremont, Benedikte; van Vlierberghe, Leen; Goossens, Lien; van Breukelen, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to (a) assess relationships between the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and "DSM"-oriented depression and anxiety scales of the Youth Self Report, (b) develop reliable norms for the CDI, and (c) determine CDI cutoff scores for selecting youngsters at risk for depression and anxiety. A total of 3,073 nonclinical and…

  16. Building a new Rasch-based self-report inventory of depression

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    Balsamo M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Michela Balsamo,1 Giuseppe Giampaglia,2 Aristide Saggino11DiSPUTer, Department of Psychological Sciences, Humanities and Territory, “G d'Annunzio” University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy; 2Department of Economics and Statistics, “Federico-II” University, Naples, ItalyAbstract: This paper illustrates a sequential item development process to create a new self-report instrument of depression refined with Rasch analysis from a larger pool of potential diagnostic items elicited through a consensus approach by clinical experts according to the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria for major depression. A 51-item pool was administered to a sample of 529 subjects (300 healthy community-dwelling adults and 229 psychiatric outpatients. Item selection resulted in a 21-item set, named the Teate Depression Inventory, with an excellent Person Separation Index and no evidence of bias due to an item–trait interaction (χ2=147.71; df =168; P=0.48. Additional support for the unidimensionality, local independence, appropriateness of the response format, and discrimination ability between clinical and nonclinical subjects was provided. No substantial differential item functioning by sex was observed. The Teate Depression Inventory shows considerable promise as a unidimensional tool for the screening of depression. Finally, advantages and disadvantages of this methodology will be discussed in terms of subsequent possible mathematical analyses, statistical tests, and implications for clinical investigations.Keywords: depression, scale development, self-report scales, Rasch analysis

  17. The Correlation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory with Depression and Anxiety in Veterans with Tinnitus

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    Jinwei Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The mechanisms of tinnitus are known to alter neuronal circuits in the brainstem and cortex, which are common to several comorbid conditions. This study examines the relationship between tinnitus and anxiety/depression. Subjects and Methods. Ninety-one male veterans with subjective tinnitus were enrolled in a Veterans Affairs Tinnitus Clinic. The Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI was used to assess tinnitus severity. ICD-9 codes for anxiety/depression were used to determine their prevalence. Pure tone averages (PTA were used to assess hearing status. Results. Descriptive analyses revealed that 79.1% of the 91 tinnitus sufferers had a diagnosis of anxiety, 59.3% had depression, and 58.2% suffered from both anxiety/depression. Patients with anxiety had elevated total THI scores as compared to patients without anxiety (p<0.05. Patients with anxiety or depression had significantly increased Functional and Emotional THI scores, but not Catastrophic THI score. Significant positive correlations were illustrated between the degree of tinnitus and anxiety/depression (p<0.05. There were no differences in PTA among groups. Conclusions. A majority of patients with tinnitus exhibited anxiety and depression. These patients suffered more severe tinnitus than did patients without anxiety and depression. The data support the need for multidisciplinary intervention of veterans with tinnitus.

  18. The Role of Family Environment in Depressive Symptoms among University Students: A Large Sample Survey in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yunmiao Yu; Xiuxian Yang; Yanjie Yang; Lu Chen; Xiaohui Qiu; Zhengxue Qiao; Jiawei Zhou; Hui Pan; Bo Ban; Xiongzhao Zhu; Jincai He; Yongqing Ding; Bing Bai

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between family environment and depressive symptoms and to evaluate the influence of hard and soft family environmental factors on depression levels in a large sample of university students in China. Methods A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select 6,000 participants. The response rate was 88.8%, with 5,329 students completing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Family Environment Scale Chinese Version (FES-CV), which was adap...

  19. Sintomas depressivos no câncer de mama: Inventário de Depressão de Beck - Short Form Depressive symptoms in breast cancer: Beck Depression Inventory - Short Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Oliveira Cangussu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Verificar a prevalência de sintomas depressivos em mulheres com câncer de mama e identificar os fatores de risco associados à sua ocorrência. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo transversal, em que foram entrevistadas 71 mulheres com câncer de mama. Foram empregados dois instrumentos: um questionário para verificar os dados sociodemográficos e clínicos e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck - Short Form (BDI-SF, para avaliação dos sintomas depressivos. Para análise dos dados, utilizaram-se medidas descritivas e o teste de qui-quadrado, que avaliou a associação entre variáveis sociodemográficas e clínicas e os sintomas depressivos. O nível de significância considerado foi de 5%. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de sintomas depressivos foi de 29,6%. Os fatores associados à presença desses sintomas foram o tratamento quimioterápico (p = 0,021, presença de dor (p = 0,018 e limitação do movimento do membro superior (p = 0,010 e pior percepção da saúde (p = 0,018. CONCLUSÃO: Sintomas depressivos são frequentes no câncer de mama, assim a saúde mental das mulheres com esse tipo de câncer deve ser investigada e tratada quando necessário, reduzindo o impacto desses sintomas na vida da mulher.OBJECTIVES: To verify the prevalence of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer and identify risk factors associated to its occurrence. METHODS: It was a transversal study where 71 women with breast cancer were interviewed. Two instruments were applied, being one questionnaire used to verify sociodemographic and clinical data, and the Beck Depression Inventory - Short Form to evaluate depressive symptoms. Descriptive methods and chi-square test were utilized to analyze data, evaluating association between depressive symptoms, sociodemographic and clinical data. Significance level was considered of 5%. RESULTS: Depressive symptoms prevalence was 29,6%. Factors associated to the presence of this kind of symptoms were

  20. Depression in Coronary Artery Disease

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    Nasser Safaie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is one of the Common psychological disorders. From the cognitive point of view, the unhealthy attitudes increase the severity of the depression. The aim of this study was to investigate depression and unhealthy attitudes in coronary patients hospitalized at Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center. Methods: One hundred twenty eight hospitalized patients having myocardial Infarctions were studied regarding unhealthy attitudes, severity of depression and demographic data. Results: The study showed a significant relation between unhealthy attitudes, BDI (Beck Depression Inventory and severe depression. Moreover, a significant relation existed between gender and depression (P=0.0001. In addition, the level of education increased the intensity of unhealthy attitudes (P=0.0001. Several researches in both outside and inside Iran support the idea. Conclusion: Based on present study and more other investigations, it can be suggested to provide the necessary elements and parameters such as antidepressant medication, psychologists, complementary treatment for coping with negative mood and its unwanted consequences.

  1. Depression in chronic migraine: severity and clinical features Depressão em migrânea crônica: aspectos clínicos e gravidade

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    Juliane Prieto Peres Mercante

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic migraine (CM is a common medical condition affecting 2.4% of the general population. Depression is one of the most frequent comorbid disorders in CM. METHOD: Seventy patients diagnosed with chronic migraine were studied. All patients evaluated filled out the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Depression severity was divided into none or minimal depression, mild, moderate, and severe. RESULTS: BDI ranged from 4 to 55, mean 21 ± 10.7. Moderate or severe depression, were present in 58.7% of the patients . Some degree of depression appeared in 85.8% of patients. The BDI scores correlated with pain intensity (p = 0.02. Severe depression was more frequent in patients with comorbid fibromyalgia and in patients reporting fatigue. CONCLUSION: The BDI is an easy tool to access depression in CM patients. Suicide risk assessment is needed in CM patients. Patients with fibromyalgia and fatigue are at even higher risk for severe depression.INTRODUÇÃO: A migrânea crônica (MC é uma doença comum, que afeta 2,4% da população geral. A depressão é uma das comorbidades mais frequentes em enxaqueca. MÉTODO: Setenta pacientes diagnosticados com migrânea crônica foram estudados. Todos os pacientes preencheram o Inventário de Depressão Beck.(BDI. A gravidade da depressão foi dividida em nenhuma ou leve, mínima, moderada, e grave. RESULTADOS: O BDI variou de 4 a 55, média 21 ± 10,7. A depressão moderada ou grave esteve presente em 58,7% dos pacientes. Algum grau de depressão foi observado em 85,8% dos pacientes. Os escores de depressão correlacionaram-se com a intensidade da dor. A depressão grave foi mais freqüente em paciente com comorbidade com fibromialgia e fadiga. CONCLUSÃO: O BDI é um instrumento de fácil avaliação da depressão em MC. A identificação do risco de suicídio é necessária nestes pacientes. Fibromialgia e fadiga são fatores de risco para depressão grave.

  2. Therapeutic horticulture in clinical depression: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil W; Kirkevold, Marit

    2009-01-01

    Clinically depressed persons suffer from impaired mood and distortion of cognition. This study assessed changes in depression severity and perceived attentional capacity of clinically depressed adults (N=18) during a 12-week therapeutic horticulture program. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Attentional Function Index (AFI) were administered at baseline, twice during (4 and 8 weeks), and immediately after the intervention (12 weeks), and at a 3-month follow-up. Experiences of being away and fascination related to the intervention were measured at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The mean BDI score declined 9.7 points from pretest (27.3) to posttest (p or =6) for 72% of the cases. The mean AFI score increased 10.2 points from pretest (68.8) to posttest (p = .06). The greatest change in BDI and AFI scores occurred in the initial weeks of the intervention. The reduction in BDI scores remained significant and clinically relevant at the 3-month follow-up (N=16). The decline in depression severity during the intervention correlated strongly with the degree to which the participants found that it captured their attention. Therapeutic horticulture may decrease depression severity and improve perceived attentional capacity by engaging effortless attention and interrupting rumination.

  3. Psychometric evaluation of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) as depression severity scale using the LEAD (Longitudinal Expert Assessment of All Data) as index of validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Timmerby, N; Martiny, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) was developed to cover the universe of depressive symptoms in DSM-IV major depression as well as in ICD-10 mild, moderate, and severe depression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the standardization of the MDI as a depression severity......-IV major depression. The conventional VAS scores for no, mild, moderate, and severe depression were used for the standardization of the MDI. RESULTS: The inter-correlation for the MDI with the clinician ratings (VAS, MES, HAM-D17 and HAM-D6) increased over the rating weeks in terms of Pearson coefficients....... After nine weeks of therapy the coefficient ranged from 0.74 to 0.83. Using the clinician-rated VAS depression severity scale, the conventional MDI cut-off scores for no or doubtful depression, and for mild, moderate and severe depression were confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: Using the VAS as index of external...

  4. Adolescent Depression: Children's Depression Inventory Norms, Suicidal Ideation, and (Weak) Gender Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, George M.; Lassen, Maureen K.

    1994-01-01

    Surveys of nonreferred students in grades 7 through 12 found that girls endorsed more depressive symptomatology than did boys, but the magnitude of the effect was trivial. Over one-third of the sample reported suicidal ideation. It is suggested that effect-size analyses may advance understanding of normative research on depression. (RJM)

  5. Screening for Depression after Cardiac Events Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Geriatric Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Gail D.; Hubley, Anita M.

    2007-01-01

    Despite findings that depression is a risk factor for heart disease and for death following cardiac events and that depressed cardiac patients experience significantly reduced quality of life and are less likely to follow treatment regimens, depression is neither adequately identified nor treated in cardiac patients. Recent calls in the literature…

  6. Hopelessness, suicide ideation, and depression in chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis or transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Sibela Vasconcelos; Sesso, Ricardo; Diniz, Denise Helena de Madureira Pará

    2015-01-01

    Hopelessness, suicide ideation and depression symptoms affect life quality and expectancy of chronic kidney disease patients. To verify whether there are differences in hopelessness, suicide ideation and depression symptoms between chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis or transplant recipients. We also analyzed the influence of sociodemographic factors in these symptoms. Cross-sectional study in which 50 clinically stable chronic hemodialysis patients and 50 renal transplant patients matched by gender and age. Instruments-Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). BHS: 2% of each group scoring > 8 (p = 1.00). BSI: 4% in hemodialysis and 6% of the transplant patients scoring > 1 (p = 1.000). BDI: 20% in hemodialysis and 12% of transplant patients scoring > 14 (p = 0.275). Patients who did not have a labor activity presented more depressive symptoms (average BDI score: 10.5 vs. 7.3, p = 0.027). Transplant patients from deceased donor presented more depressive symptoms compared with those with transplant from living donors (average BDI score: 11.0 vs. 6.7, p = 0.042). There was no difference in the intensity of hopelessness, suicide ideation and depression symptoms between stable hemodialysis and transplant patients. Not performing a labor activity and receiving the transplant from deceased donor lead to more depressive symptoms. The high prevalence of depressive symptoms and the finding of suicide ideation in both modalities of renal replacement therapy point to the need to monitor and care for those patients.

  7. Qualitative Characteristics of Depression in Parkinson's Patients and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritzinger, Cleo; Vollstedt, Eva-Juliane; Hückelheim, Katja; Lorwin, Anne; Graf, Julia; Tunc, Sinem; Klein, Christine; Kasten, Meike

    2015-01-01

    Depression is common in Parkinson's disease (PD); in light of typical PD pathology it may differ phenomenologically from depression in the general population. To assess depressive symptoms in PD patients and control groups and compare symptom profiles. After postal screening of 10,000 citizens of Lübeck, 642 participants were examined and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was sufficiently answered by 477 subjects. Based on motor examinations, we distinguished PD patients, Healthy Controls (HC, no motor impairment), and Disease Controls (DC, motor impairment other than PD). The sample comprised 331 men and 311 women, aged 65 ± 8 years. Out of the overall sample, 198 (41.5%) had a BDI score ≥9. BDI results above 9 points occurred in 34.5% of HC, 50.3% of DC, and 42.4% of PD patients. Compared to the control groups (HC, DC) the PD patients endorsed more "dissatisfaction" and "loss of appetite" but less "feelings of guilt," "self-hate," and "loss of libido." Depressive symptoms are more frequent in PD patients compared to HC but not DC. Interestingly, the distribution of individual symptoms of the BDI differs between groups with an emphasis on loss of pleasure/enjoyment in the PD group, a symptom typically considered to be dopaminergically transmitted.

  8. Low openness on the revised NEO personality inventory as a risk factor for treatment-resistant depression.

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    Michio Takahashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, we reported that low reward dependence, and to a lesser extent, low cooperativeness in the Temperature and Character Inventory (TCI may be risk factors for treatment-resistant depression. Here, we analyzed additional psychological traits in these patients. METHODS: We administered Costa and McCrae's five-factor model personality inventory, NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R, to antidepressant-treatment resistant depressed patients (n=35, remitted depressed patients (n=27, and healthy controls (n=66. We also evaluated the relationships between scores on NEO and TCI, using the same cohort of patients with treatment-resistant depression, as our previous study. RESULTS: Patients with treatment-resistant depression showed high scores for neuroticism, low scores for extraversion, openness and conscientiousness, without changes in agreeableness, on the NEO. However, patients in remitted depression showed no significant scores on NEO. Patients with treatment-resistant depression and low openness on NEO showed positive relationships with reward dependence and cooperativeness on the TCI. CONCLUSIONS: Many studies have reported that depressed patients show high neuroticism, low extraversion and low conscientiousness on the NEO. Our study highlights low openness on the NEO, as a risk mediator in treatment-resistant depression. This newly identified trait should be included as a risk factor in treatment-resistant depression.

  9. The Effects of Powdered Fertilized Eggs on Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Ester

    2011-01-01

    This 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of fertilized egg powder (Young Tissue Extract; YTE®) intake on outcome measures for depression. Fifty-five patients with depression were randomly assigned to receive YTE, YTE plus Melissa officinalis, or placebo for 12 weeks. At baseline, there were no significant differences in scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) or Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) among the 3 groups. At 12 weeks, the HAM-D...

  10. Pain, depression and sleep disorders in patients with diabetic and nondiabetic carpal tunnel syndrome: a vicious cycle

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    Nermin Tanik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a condition involving nerve entrapment that often leads to chronic neuropathic pain. We aimed to evaluate sleep quality and related parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic CTS patients. Method This study included a total of 366 patients with chronic CTS. These patients’ sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. The severity of neuropathic pain was evaluated using the Douleur Neuropathique-4 (DN4 questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS. Results In the non-diabetic patient group, the total PSQI score was found to affect BDI and VAS, while in the diabetic patient group, the duration of symptoms affected VAS, BDI and fasting glucose levels. Conclusion For diabetic patients, hyperglycemia depression and chronification of neuropathic pain may lead to deterioration of sleep quality. Therefore, consideration of these parameters in the treatment may break a vicious cycle.

  11. Relationship of Internet addiction with self-esteem and depression in university students

    OpenAIRE

    BAHRAINIAN, SA.; HAJI ALIZADEH, K.; RAEISOON, MR.; HASHEMI GORJI, O.; KHAZAEE, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of self-esteem and depression with Internet addiction in university students. Methods. The present descriptive-analytic correlation study involved 408 students (150 female and 258 male) who had been selected by means of a cluster sampling method from among all the students studying in Birjand Islamic Azad University. Students were evaluated through the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Cooper Smith Self-Esteem Invento...

  12. Self-statements, self-esteem, and locus of control in discriminating college students' scores on the Beck Depression Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, S; Philpot, V D

    1996-04-01

    To study the use of the ratio of positive to negative self-statements, locus of control, and self-esteem in discriminating between scores on the Beck Depression Inventory 145 undergraduate college students were administered the Beck Depression Inventory, Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire-Revised, Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory-Adult Form, and the Rotter Locus of Control scale in their classrooms. A stepwise discriminant analysis indicated that five variables combined to yield a statistically significant discrimination among low, middle, and high scores on the Beck Depression Inventory. The classification analysis indicated that 77.1% (n = 111) of the undergraduate students were correctly classified; 93.2% (82 of 88) were correctly classified as low scorers and 73.3% (18 of 46) were correctly classified as high scorers.

  13. [Study of symptoms and structure of depressive mood in puberty using Kovacs' Child Depression Inventory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobert, W

    1990-01-01

    This study is based on the German Language version "GCDI" of the "CDI" according to Maria KOVACS used in investigations on random selection of normal school population between the 7th and 9th grades (n = 130). The pupils ages ranged between 13 and 15 years. A second group was also used, made up of children of approximately the same age (n = 145) from a clinic. Among this second group, 58 suffered from clinical depression. The comparison provided a clear separation between the depressive patients and the normal random participants--and the GCDI/CDI total value = 20 was decided to the optimal separation value. Comparisons with the Canadian group of school pupils (n = 850) agreed well with the above. Follow-up examinations on the randomly selection of normal school population resulted in the detection of a lasting condition of depressive mood for 7 per cent of the participants. It is apparent, that for the clarification for the structure of depressive mood not only are the simple total scores necessary--but also a factor analysis of the 27 items. Four factors were detected: 1) primarily affective disturbance, 2) motivation and cognition disturbances, 3) contact disturbances, 4) disturbances in school performances and behavior. Under consideration of the Fürntratt criterium, 25 of the 27 items in the GCDI could classified into the four factors and achieve a significant correlation. GCDI is useful for international comparative investigations. Clinical use is possible too.

  14. Narcolepsy and depression Narcolepsia e depressão

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    Carla Adda

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy main symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Its chronic course is accompanied by psychosocial impairment added to the difficulties and side effects of stimulants and tricyclics long term use. Depressive complaints are occasionally reported. The aim of this paper was to evaluate objectively the possibility of depression in a sample of 12 narcoleptics (7F;5 M, with mean age of 53 years (12 years SD, using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D. The results showed absence of depressive disorder in 75.0% of the cases according to BDI (or 58.3% according to HAM-D. The remaining patients had mild depression (only one patient presented major depression. The findings showed no correlation between narcolepsy and major depression.Narcolepsia é um distúrbio do sono caracterizado por sonolência diurna excessiva e ataques de cataplexia. Sendo crônico, traz uma série de dificuldades psicossociais às quais se aliam aquelas geradas pelos efeitos colaterais dos estimulantes e tricíclicos utilizados. Queixas depressivas são encontradas ocasionalmente. Esta pesquisa buscou verificar objetivamente a ocorrência de depressão em narcolépticos. Foi avaliado um grupo de 12 pacientes narcolépticos (7F; 5M com média de idade de 53 anos (DP 12 usando-se como instrumentos o Inventário de Beck para Depressão (BDI e a Escala Hamilton de Depressão (HAM-D. Os resultados demonstraram ausência de distúrbio depressivo em 75.0% dos pacientes avaliados pelo BDI e em 58.3% pela HAM-D. Os demais escores evidenciaram depressão leve ou disforia; depressão maior foi encontrada em apenas um caso. Tais achados não sugerem correlação entre narcolepsia e depressão.

  15. Job stress, burnout, depression symptoms, and physical health among Chinese university teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jie; You, Jianing; Gan, Yiqun; Zhang, Yiwen; Lu, Changqin; Wang, Hongbo

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships among job stress, burnout, depression, and health among university teachers in China. Using a stratified random sampling method, a sample of 300 university teachers completed the Occupational Stress Indicator-2 (OSI-2), Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Path analysis showed that burnout was a mediator among job stress, the occurrence and exacerbation of depressive symptoms, and poor physical health.

  16. Depression Is Associated With Muscle Mass And Strength In Patients With End Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Rim Song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is the most common psychiatric complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Sarcopenia, defined as loss of muscle mass and strength, is expected to be associated with depression, because both are closely linked to physical inactivity and functional impairment. We investigated the association of sarcopenia with depression in patients with ESRD. A total of 115 patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD were included in this study. Muscle mass was assessed by lean tissue index (LTI using portable whole body bioimpedance spectroscopy, and muscle strength was measured with handgrip strength (HGS. Depression was defined as Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II score ≥16. About 60% of prevalent HD patients had depression. Compared to subjects without depression, depressed patients had a higher prevalence of sarcopenia (45.5 vs. 8.2%, p<0.001 and significantly increased serum IL-6 and hs-CRP level. However, (prealbumin and body mass index (BMI failed to correlate with BDI-II. HGS and LTI had a consistent negative effect on BDI-II even after adjusting other parameters including inflammation. In multivariate analysis, lower , increased IL-6 and β2-microglobulin,and sarcopenia were significant predictors for depression; sarcopenia was most powerful [odds ratio 9.01, 95% CI 3.60-12.22, p=0.001]. In conclusion, the prevalence of sarcopenia and depression was considerably high and and the presence of sarcopenia was an important predictor for depression.

  17. [Depression and stress management in medical students. A comparative study between freshman and advanced medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat, H B; Richter, L; Cramer, M; Vetter, A; Bedau, S; Leweke, F; Milch, W

    2011-05-01

    International studies have indicated a high prevalence of depression and a lack of coping with stress in medical students. Freshman and advanced medical students were investigated using a specific questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) with a response rate of 100%. Of the subjects studied 81.1% did not have any depression, 13.1% slight and 5.8% clinically relevant symptoms of depression. The severity of symptoms was highly associated with subjective appraisal of stressors. Coping skills of first year students significantly influenced the depression symptoms calling for preventative measures even in freshman medical students.

  18. Depressive symptoms in medical students: prevalence and related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bomi; Roh, Hyerin

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to estimate the prevalence of depression and the factors that influence it in Korean medical students. We evaluated depression in 122 first- and second-year medical students in December 2011 using the Korean Beck Depression Inventory (K-BDI). Sixteen potential factors were considered: gender, class year, grade point average, breakfast habits, residence type, leisure activity, sleep satisfaction, relationship status, a close friend or a significant other, finances, present health status, history of mood disorders, family history of mood disorders, religion, and self-esteem. The average BDI score was 8.9. There were 80 (65.6%), 16 (13.1%), 15 (12.3%), and 11 (9.0%) students with minimal, mild, moderate, and severe depression, respectively. The group with depressive symptoms comprised males with a total BDI score > or =24 and females with total BDI > or =25 and constituted 9.0% of students. Students in the depressive symptom group had lower self-esteem and lower grade point averages and were more frequently ill, less likely to be in a relationship, and more likely to have a history of mood disorders (pself-esteem score was an independent factor. The BDI scores in our study were similar to those that have been reported in other countries but slightly higher than in other Korean medical and university students. Self-esteem, grade point average, health status, history of mood disorders, family history of mood disorders, and presence of a significant other correlated significantly with depression in medical students.

  19. [Evidence-based management of perinatal depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Yueh; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2008-04-01

    Perinatal depression, which may occur from pregnancy to one year after childbirth, is recognized by the World Health Organization as a significant health issue affecting women. Depression during the perinatal period can have enormous consequences, not only affecting the health of the woman herself but also influencing her interaction with her children and other family members. This article introduces several depression screening tools and evidence-based nonpharmacological managements of perinatal depression. There are some fairly valid and feasible screening methods, among which routinely screening perinatal women with EPDS (Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale) or BDI (Beck Depression Inventory) in the primary care setting is practicable. A survey of the limited literature available reveals that interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive behavior therapy and listening to music provide quantifiable depression amelioration effects for perinatal women. More scientific research moderated by women's life experiences and preferences should be conducted, however, and applied to improve women's health.

  20. Children's Depression Inventory: A unidimensional factor structure for American Indian and Alaskan native youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Walter D; Clapp, Joshua; Mileviciute, Inga; Mousseau, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Given that American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) youth are at increased risk for a variety of depression-related outcomes and may experience depression uniquely, the fact that the factor structure of the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 1992) is unknown for these populations represents a significant obstacle. In Study 1 with an AI youth sample, we conducted confirmatory factor analyses and failed to find support for either of the 2 predominant CDI multifactor models (Craighead, Smucker, Craighead, & Ilardi, 1998; Kovacs, 1992). In subsequent exploratory structural equation modeling, we found the most support for a unidimensional factor structure. In Study 2, using confirmatory modeling with independent AI/AN youth samples, we found further support for this unidimensional model. Finally, in Study 3, we found support across AI/AN groups varying in gender and age for measurement invariance with respect to both factor structure and factor loadings. Overall, for these AI/AN youth populations, our findings support the practice of calculating total CDI scores, and they suggest a unique construction of the depression experience.

  1. Depression, anxiety, hostility and hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewalds-Kvist, S Béatrice M; Hirvonen, Toivo; Kvist, Mårten; Lertola, Kaarlo; Niemelä, Pirkko

    2005-09-01

    Sixty-five women (aged 32 - 54 yrs) were assessed at 2 months before to 8 months after total abdominal hysterectomy on four separate occasions. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), Measurement of Masculinity-Femininity (MF), Likert scales and semantic differentials for psychological, somatic and sexual factors varied as assessment tools. High-dysphoric and low-dysphoric women were compared with regard to hysterectomy outcomes. Married nulliparae suffered from enhanced depression post-surgery. Pre-surgery anxiety, back pain and lack of dyspareunia contributed to post-surgery anxiety. Pre-surgery anxiety was related to life crises. Pre- and post-surgery hostility occurred in conjunction with poor sexual gratification. Post-hysterectomy health improved, but quality of sexual relationship was impaired. Partner support and knowledge counteracted hysterectomy aftermath. Post-hysterectomy symptoms constituted a continuum to pre-surgery signs of depression, anxiety or hostility.

  2. Selective neurocognitive deficits and poor life functioning are associated with significant depressive symptoms in alcoholism-HIV infection comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Stephanie A; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Fama, Rosemary; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2012-09-30

    Alcoholism, HIV, and depressive symptoms frequently co-occur and are associated with impairment in cognition and life function. We administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), measures of life function, and neurocognitive tests to 67 alcoholics, 56 HIV+ patients, 63 HIV+ alcoholics, and 64 controls to examine whether current depressive symptom level (significant, BDI-II>14 vs. minimal, BDI-IIalcoholism-HIV comorbidity. Participants with significant depressive symptoms demonstrated slower manual motor speed and poorer visuospatial memory than those with minimal depressive symptoms. HIV patients with depressive symptoms showed impaired manual motor speed. Alcoholics with depressive symptoms showed impaired visuospatial memory. HIV+ alcoholics with depressive symptoms reported the poorest quality of life; alcoholics with depressive symptoms, irrespective of HIV status, had poorest life functioning. Thus, significant depressive symptoms were associated with poorer selective cognitive and life functioning in alcoholism and in HIV infection, even though depressive symptoms had neither synergistic nor additive effects on cognition in alcoholism-HIV comorbidity. The results suggest the relevance of assessing and treating current depressive symptoms to reduce cognitive compromise and functional disability in HIV infection, alcoholism, and their comorbidity.

  3. Reliability, validity and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the Major Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiptsios I

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a brief self-rating scale for the assessment of depression. It is reported to be valid because it is based on the universe of symptoms of DSM-IV and ICD-10 depression. The aim of the current preliminary study was to assess the reliability, validity and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the MDI. Methods 30 depressed patients of mean age 23.41 (± 5.77 years, and 68 controls patients of mean age 25.08 (± 11.42 years, entered the study. In 18 of them, the instrument was re-applied 1–2 days later and the Translation and Back Translation made. Clinical diagnosis was reached with the use of the SCAN v.2.0 and the International Personality Disorders Examination (IPDE. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D and the Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS were applied for cross-validation purposes. Statistical analysis included ANOVA, the Spearman Product Moment Correlation Coefficient, Principal Components Analysis and the calculation of Cronbach's α. Results Sensitivity and specificity were 0.86 and 0.94, respectively, at 26/27. Cronbach's α for the total scale was equal to 0.89. The Spearman's rho between MDI and CES-D was 0.86 and between MDI and ZDRS was 0.76. The factor analysis revealed two factors but the first accounted for 54% of variance while the second only for 9%. The test-retest reliability was excellent (Spearman's rho between 0.53 and 0.96 for individual items and 0.89 for total score. Conclusion The current study provided preliminary evidence concerning the reliability and validity of the Greek translation of the MDI. Its properties are similar to those reported in the international literature, but further research is necessary.

  4. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Modified for Inpatients with Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Andrew C.; Hooke, Geoff R.

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness among inpatients with depression of a modified cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program was examined. A group of 300 inpatient admissions with a primary diagnosis of depression attending a private psychiatric clinic were assessed at the beginning and end of a two-week CBT program. The effectiveness of the treatment was demonstrated by improvements on the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the health of the nation outcome scales, locus of control of behaviour scale, and the global assessment of function. The changes on the BDI for patients with depression were benchmarked against estimates generated from published studies. The degree of change in a two-week period for inpatients with depression was similar to that observed in efficacy studies of CBT that typically run over a more extended time. Implications for integrating CBT with inpatient services are discussed. PMID:23738192

  5. Depression in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1: clinical and neuronal correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuelsson Lena

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of depression in Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1. Methods Thirty-one patients with DM1 and 47 subjects in a clinical contrast group, consisting of other neuromuscular disorders, including Spinal muscular atrophy, Limb girdle muscle atrophy and Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We aimed to establish whether different factors associated with DM1 correlated with ratings in the BDI. Results Signs of a clinical depression were prevalent in 32% of the patients with DM1, which was comparable with ratings in the clinical contrast group. The depressive condition was mild to moderate in both groups. In DM1, a longer duration of clinical symptoms was associated with lower scores on the BDI and higher educational levels were correlated with higher scores on depression. We also found a negative association with brain white matter lesions. Conclusions Findings indicate significantly more DM1 patients than normative collectives showing signs of a clinical depression. The depressive condition is however mild to moderate and data indicate that the need for intervention is at hand preferentially early during the disease process.

  6. Childhood depressive symptoms predict psychiatric problems in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronen, E T; Soininen, M

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of childhood depressive symptoms for psychiatric symptoms, adaptive functioning, and self-performance in young adults. The study sample consisted of 111 young adults born during 1975-1976 in the Helsinki region. The young adults were assessed in childhood (10 to 11 years of age) using the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and at the age of 20 to 21 years using Achenbach's Young Adult Self Report (YASR), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Wallston Self-Performance Survey. Self-reported depressive symptoms in childhood predicted psychiatric symptoms (especially aggression), poor adaptive functioning, and low self-esteem in young adulthood. Depressive symptoms in children should be addressed to prevent later psychiatric problems. The CDI may be a measure of nonspecific psychopathology rather than of pure depression--thus, it may be a good screening tool for child populations.

  7. The effects of the gender-culture interaction on self-reports of depressive symptoms: cross-cultural study among Egyptians and Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Research in depression has revealed differences in the way depressed individuals across cultures report their symptoms. This literature also points to possible differences in symptom reporting patterns between men and women. Using data from a larger dataset (Beshai et al. 2016, the current study examined whether non-depressed and depressed Egyptian and Canadian men and women differed in their self-report of the various domains of the Beck Depression Inventory –II (BDI-II. Method We recruited a total of 131 depressed and non-depressed participants from both Egypt (n = 29 depressed; n = 29 non-depressed and Canada (n = 35 depressed; n = 38 non-depressed. Depression status was ascertained using a structured interview. All participants were asked to complete the BDI-II along with other self-report measures of depression. BDI-II items were divided into two subscales in accordance with Dozois, Dobson & Ahnberg (1998 factor analysis: cognitive-affective and somatic-vegetative subscales. Results We found a significant three-way interaction effect on the cognitive-affective (F(1,121 = 9.51, p = .003 and main effect of depression status on somatic-vegetative subscales (F(1,121 = 42.80, p < .001. Post hoc analyses revealed that depressed Egyptian men reported lower scores on the cognitive-affective subscale of the BDI-II compared to their depressed Canadian male counterparts. Conclusions These results suggest that males across cultures may differentially report cognitive symptoms of depression. These results also suggest that clinicians and clinical scientists need to further examine the interaction effect of culture and gender when investigating self-reported symptoms of depression.

  8. Depression in Nursing Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

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    F Rafati

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: University students are important parts of all educational systems. They are susceptible to different psychiatric disturbances, which in turn may cause considerable problems with their course programs. Depression is among the most important indices for investigation on human mental health status. This research was planed to study the prevalence and characteristics of depression and its consequences (suicidality, hopelessness, etc. in nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All undergraduate nursing students at Fatemeh College of Nursing and Midwifery were tested with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: This research revealed that 60% of students were depressed, 34% of them had mild depression, 18.4% moderate, 6% relatively severe and 1.6% severe depression. Mean score of BDI was not significantly different between female and male subjects (13.8 ± 9 in females vs. 15.2 ± 10 in males; total 14.1 ± 11 Conclusions: This research shows that there is still a high proportion of University students having depression, which necessitates considerable attention to their problems. Keywords: Nursing Students, Beck Depression Inventory, Depression.

  9. Insufficient treatment of severe depression in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarro, Velina S.; Mealy, Maureen A.; Simpson, Alexandra; Lacheta, Anna; Pache, Florence; Ruprecht, Klemens; Gold, Stefan M.; Brandt, Alexander Ulrich; Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate depression frequency, severity, current treatment, and interactions with somatic symptoms among patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Methods: In this dual-center observational study, we included 71 patients diagnosed with NMOSD according to the International Panel for NMO Diagnosis 2015 criteria. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was classified into severe, moderate, or minimal/no depressive state category. We used the Fatigue Severity Scale to evaluate fatigue. Scores from the Brief Pain Inventory and the PainDETECT Questionnaire were normalized to estimate neuropathic pain. Psychotropic, pain, and immunosuppressant medications were tabulated by established classes. Results: Twenty-eight percent of patients with NMOSD (n = 20) had BDI scores indicative of moderate or severe depression; 48% of patients (n = 34) endorsed significant levels of neuropathic pain. Severity of depression was moderately associated with neuropathic pain (r = 0.341, p < 0.004) but this relationship was confounded by levels of fatigue. Furthermore, only 40% of patients with moderate or severe depressive symptoms received antidepressant medical treatment. Fifty percent of those treated reported persistent moderate to severe depressive symptoms under treatment. Conclusions: Moderate and severe depression in patients with NMOSD is associated with neuropathic pain and fatigue and is insufficiently treated. These results are consistent across 2 research centers and continents. Future research needs to address how depression can be effectively managed and treated in NMOSD. PMID:27800532

  10. Association between depression and survival in Chinese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qianqian; Zheng, Zhenzhen; Guo, Xiaoyan; Ou, Ruwei; Chen, Xueping; Huang, Rui; Yang, Jing; Shang, Huifang

    2016-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of depression, to identify correlated factors for depression, and to explore the impact on the progression or survival of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by depression in a Chinese population. A total of 166 ALS patients were recruited. Diagnosis of depression disorders and the severity of depression were established by using the fourth diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-24 items (HDRS-24) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Major depression was found in 15 patients (9.6 %). The multiple regression analysis showed that a lower ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) score was correlated with increasing HDRS scores and BDI scores (P = 0.018 and P = 0.012). No significant difference in the median survival time between ALS patients with and without depression was revealed by Kaplan-Meier analysis (log-rank P = 0.282). Cox hazard model showed that the presence of depression in ALS was unrelated to the survival, while the severity of depression in ALS was correlated with the survival. The presence and severity of depression in ALS did not correlate with the progression of ALS. Major depression in ALS is uncommon. Depression evaluation should be given to ALS patients, especially those with lower ALSFRS-R score. The severity of depression may be associated with the survival; however, depression does not worse the progression of ALS.

  11. Burn-Out and Depressive Symptoms in the Workforce of the Ational Institute of Eurology and Eurosurgery

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    Contreras, Guadalupe A.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available There are stressors arising in the workplace that influence emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and lack of personal fulfillment of workers; the most vulnerable populations are those who have contact with the public. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms and burnout syndrome in staff of the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery. The Burnout Inventory (MBI-HS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were applied. Secretarial staff presented the higher rate of depressive symptoms. Concerning the MBI-HS differences were found regarding the lack of personal accomplishment and feelings towards patients according to the different categories of workers.

  12. Geriatric depression and its relation with cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Carol; Tartaglini, María Florencia; Stefani, Dorina; Salgado, Pablo; Taragano, Fernando E; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2014-01-01

    Different subtypes of depressive syndromes exist in late life; many of them have cognitive impairment and sometimes it is difficult to differentiate them from dementia. This research aimed to investigate subtypes of geriatric depression associated with cognitive impairment, searched for differential variables and tried to propose a study model. A hundred and eighteen depressive patients and forty normal subjects matched by age and educational level were evaluated with an extensive neuropsychological battery, scales to evaluate neuropsychiatric symptoms and daily life activities (DLA). Depressive patients were classified in groups by SCAN 2.1: Major Depression Disorder (MDD) (n: 31), Dysthymia Disorder (DD) (n: 31), Subsyndromal Depression Disorder (SSD) (n: 29), Depression due to Dementia (n: 27) (DdD). Neuropsychological significant differences (pdepressive groups, demonstrating distinctive cognitive profiles. Moreover, significant differences (pdepression. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) were significant variables that helped to differentiate depressive groups. Significant correlations between BDI and Neuropsychological tests were found in MDD and DD groups. Depressive symptoms and its relation with neuropsychological variables, MMSE, cognitive profiles, DLA and age of onset of depression should be taken into consideration for the study of subtypes of geriatric depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hybrid BDI-POMDP Framework for Multiagent Teaming

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, R; 10.1613/jair.1549

    2011-01-01

    Many current large-scale multiagent team implementations can be characterized as following the belief-desire-intention (BDI) paradigm, with explicit representation of team plans. Despite their promise, current BDI team approaches lack tools for quantitative performance analysis under uncertainty. Distributed partially observable Markov decision problems (POMDPs) are well suited for such analysis, but the complexity of finding optimal policies in such models is highly intractable. The key contribution of this article is a hybrid BDI-POMDP approach, where BDI team plans are exploited to improve POMDP tractability and POMDP analysis improves BDI team plan performance. Concretely, we focus on role allocation, a fundamental problem in BDI teams: which agents to allocate to the different roles in the team. The article provides three key contributions. First, we describe a role allocation technique that takes into account future uncertainties in the domain; prior work in multiagent role allocation has failed to addr...

  14. Effect of estrogen replacement therapy on symptoms of depression and anxiety in non-depressive menopausal women: a randomized double-blind, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrio, Frederico Navas; Rennó, Joel; Gianfaldoni, Arlete; Gonçalves, Marcelo; Halbe, Hans Wolfgang; Filho, Antônio Hélio Guerra V; Gorenstein, Clarice

    2011-12-01

    The efficacy of estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) for mood disturbances associated with menopause has yet to be firmly established. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of ERT for improving mood and anxiety of non-depressive postmenopausal women. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study involved two treatment groups: one receiving conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs; 0.625 mg/day) and the other placebo, for six cycles of 28 days each. Subjects were hysterectomized, healthy, non-depressive (according to Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Life Time Version [SADS-L]) women. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), respectively. The Profile of Mood States (POMS) and other scales were used to characterize symptoms. In both groups, BDI scores were significantly lower at cycles 1, 2, 3, and 6, compared with baseline assessments (pwomen.

  15. Qualitative Characteristics of Depression in Parkinson’s Patients and Controls

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    Cleo Kritzinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Depression is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD; in light of typical PD pathology it may differ phenomenologically from depression in the general population. Objective. To assess depressive symptoms in PD patients and control groups and compare symptom profiles. Methods. After postal screening of 10,000 citizens of Lübeck, 642 participants were examined and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was sufficiently answered by 477 subjects. Based on motor examinations, we distinguished PD patients, Healthy Controls (HC, no motor impairment, and Disease Controls (DC, motor impairment other than PD. Results. The sample comprised 331 men and 311 women, aged 65 ± 8 years. Out of the overall sample, 198 (41.5% had a BDI score ≥9. BDI results above 9 points occurred in 34.5% of HC, 50.3% of DC, and 42.4% of PD patients. Compared to the control groups (HC, DC the PD patients endorsed more “dissatisfaction” and “loss of appetite” but less “feelings of guilt,” “self-hate,” and “loss of libido.” Conclusion. Depressive symptoms are more frequent in PD patients compared to HC but not DC. Interestingly, the distribution of individual symptoms of the BDI differs between groups with an emphasis on loss of pleasure/enjoyment in the PD group, a symptom typically considered to be dopaminergically transmitted.

  16. Are variations in whole blood BDNF level associated with the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in patients with first episode depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann; Bennike, Bente;

    2013-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seems to play an important role in the pathophysiology of affective disorders. The current study investigated whether blood level BDNF is correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms and recent (six months prior to onset of depression) experience......). Symptomatology was rated using Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and Becks Depression Inventory (BDI 21). No differences in whole blood BDNF was seen in relation to the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and no significant correlations between whole blood BDNF and HAMD-17 or BDI 21 scores were found....... No significant associations between the experiences of SLE before onset of depression and BDNF level were observed. Finally, peripheral BDNF differentiated between patients and healthy control persons. In the current sample of first episode depressed patients, the Val66Met polymorphism was not associated...

  17. Divergent Outcomes in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Pharmacotherapy for Adult Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R; Jarrett, Robin B; Weitz, Erica; Hollon, Steven D; Twisk, Jos; Cristea, Ioana; David, Daniel; DeRubeis, Robert J; Dimidjian, Sona; Dunlop, Boadie W; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Hegerl, Ulrich; Kennedy, Sidney H; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Mergl, Roland; Miranda, Jeanne; Mohr, David C; Rush, A John; Segal, Zindel V; Siddique, Juned; Simons, Anne D; Cuijpers, Pim

    2016-05-01

    Although the average depressed patient benefits moderately from cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or pharmacotherapy, some experience divergent outcomes. The authors tested frequencies, predictors, and moderators of negative and unusually positive outcomes. Sixteen randomized clinical trials comparing CBT and pharmacotherapy for unipolar depression in 1,700 patients provided individual pre- and posttreatment scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and/or Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The authors examined demographic and clinical predictors and treatment moderators of any deterioration (increase ≥1 HAM-D or BDI point), reliable deterioration (increase ≥8 HAM-D or ≥9 BDI points), extreme nonresponse (posttreatment HAM-D score ≥21 or BDI score ≥31), superior improvement (HAM-D or BDI decrease ≥95%), and superior response (posttreatment HAM-D or BDI score of 0) using multilevel models. About 5%-7% of patients showed any deterioration, 1% reliable deterioration, 4%-5% extreme nonresponse, 6%-10% superior improvement, and 4%-5% superior response. Superior improvement on the HAM-D only (odds ratio=1.67) and attrition (odds ratio=1.67) were more frequent in pharmacotherapy than in CBT. Patients with deterioration or superior response had lower pretreatment symptom levels, whereas patients with extreme nonresponse or superior improvement had higher levels. Deterioration and extreme nonresponse and, similarly, superior improvement and superior response, both occur infrequently in randomized clinical trials comparing CBT and pharmacotherapy for depression. Pretreatment symptom levels help forecast negative and unusually positive outcomes but do not guide selection of CBT versus pharmacotherapy. Pharmacotherapy may produce clinician-rated superior improvement and attrition more frequently than does CBT.

  18. [Factor models of the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Validation with coronary patients and a critique of Ward's model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pino Pérez, Antonio; Ibáñez Fernández, Ignacio; Bosa Ojeda, Francisco; Dorta González, Ruth; Gaos Miezoso, María Teresa

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to validate in a sample of 205 coronary patients a factor model for the BDI-II, especially a model that would allow for modeling of depressive symptoms after explicitly removing bias related to somatic symptoms of depression that would overlap those of heart disease. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses for ordinal data were conducted. A one-factor model, six correlated two-factor models and, derivatives thereof, seven models with a single General Depression factor and two uncorrelated factors, were analyzed. Exploratory analysis extracted two factors, Somatic-affective and Cognitive. Confirmatory factor analyses showed the worst fit for the one-factor model. Two-factor models were surpassed in goodness of fit by the models of general-factor and group factors. Among these, the General, Somatic-affective and Cognitive (G-Sa-C) model of Beck with students is noteworthy. The reduced General, Somatic and Cognitive (G-S-C) model of Ward showed the worst goodness of fit. Our model surpasses the cutoff criteria of all fit indexes. We conclude that the inclusion of a general-factor and group factors in all the models surpasses the results of G-S-C model and, therefore, questions it. The G-Sa-C model is strengthened.

  19. The effect of isotretinoin (roaccutane therapy on depression and quality of life of patients with severe acne.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Fakour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acne is the most common skin disease and isotretinoin is the most powerful drug among the various drugs used for its treatment, but it has some adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of isotretinoin on depression and quality of life of a group of patients undergoing isotretinoin therapy before and after the treatment course.In this prospective study, 98 patients with severe acne were enrolled consecutively and underwent isotretinoin therapy receiving 0.5 mg/kg/d of isotretinoin for 16 weeks. Isotretinoin effects on quality of life and depression were evaluated using Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI questionnaires, respectively.In this study, 98 patients suffering from severe acne (38 males and 60 females were enrolled. Treatment of acne was associated with improvement of quality of life scores in both male and female patients (p = 0.001. Considering the cutoff value of 13 for mild depressive mood in the BDI score, in total, 48 (49% of the enrolled patients (21 males and 33 females had a mild depressive mood before the commencement of the treatment in this study. The analysis of before and after treatment BDI scores showed that the number of patients and also the mean score of BDI were increased in both male and female patients after the treatment (p<0.05.Isotretinoin therapy improved the quality of life of patients suffering from acne, but depression was accentuated in the patients to some extent.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of group psychotherapy on cognitive function in patients with multiple sclerosis with cognitive dysfunction and depression

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    Emine Bilgi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study will evaluate how decreasing depression severity via group psychotherapy affects the cognitive function of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS who are also diagnosed with depression and cognitive dysfunction. Method MS patients completed the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. The group members diagnosed with depression and cognitive dysfunction underwent group psychotherapy for 3 months. Upon completion of psychotherapy, both tests were readministered. Results Depression and cognitive dysfunction were comorbid in 15 (13.9% of patients. Although improvement was detected at the end of the 3-month group psychotherapy intervention, it was limited to the BDI and the Paced Auditory Test. Conclusion Group psychotherapy might decrease cognitive impairment in MS patients.

  1. Does the Association between Depressive Symptomatology and Physical Activity Depend on Body Image Perception? A Survey of Students from Seven Universities in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoling Hu; Sherrill Snelgrove; Hamed Adetunji; Pat Deeny; Jill John; Shan Davies; Sian Parke; Mary Stoate; Andi Mabhala; Ceri Phillips; Christiane Stock; Walid El Ansari

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the association between depression and PA in university students of both genders and the role of body image perception as a potential effect modifier. Undergraduate students (N = 3706) from seven universities in the UK completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed sociodemographic information; a range of health, health behaviour and health awareness related factors; the modified version of Beck’s Depression Inventory (M-BDI); educational achieve...

  2. Women and vulnerability to depression: some personality and clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Jesús M; Rojo, Nieves; Staats, Arthur W

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the role of sex differences and personality in vulnerability to depression. Sex differences in personality and some clinical variables are described. We also assess the value of the variables that revealed significant sex differences as predictors of vulnerability to depression. In a group of adult participants (N = 112), 50% males and 50% females (mean age = 41.30; SD = 15.09; range 17-67), we studied sex differences in the three-factor personality model, using the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, Form A (EPQ-A; Eysenck & Eysenck, 1975), and in the Five-Factor Personality Model, with the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI; Costa & McCrae, 1985). The following clinical scales were used: the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979), the Schizotypy Questionnaire (STQ; Claridge & Broks, 1984; Spanish version, Carrillo & Rojo, 1999), the THARL Scales (Dua, 1989, 1990; Spanish version, Dua & Carrillo, 1994) and the Adjustment Inventory (Bell, 1937; Spanish version, Cerdá, 1980). Subsequently, simple linear regression analysis, with BDI scores as criterion, were performed to estimate the value of the variables as predictors of vulnerability to depression. The results indicate that a series of personality variables cause women to be more vulnerable to depression than men and that these variables could be explained by a negative emotion main factor. Results are discussed within the framework of the psychological behaviorism theory of depression.

  3. Prevalence and psychopathological characteristics of depression in consecutive otorhinolaryngologic inpatients

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    Westhofen Martin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High prevalence of depression has been reported in otorhinolaryngologic patients (ORL. However, studies using a semi-structured interview to determine the prevalence of depression in ORL are lacking. Therefore the present study sought to determine the depression prevalence in ORL applying a semi-structured diagnostic interview and to further characterize the pathopsychological and demographic characteristics of depression in these patients. Methods One-hundred inpatients of the otorhinolaryngologic department of a German university hospital participated voluntarily (age M = 38.8 years, SD = 13.9; 38.0% female. Depression was assessed using a clinical interview in which the International Diagnostic Checklist for depression (IDCL was applied. Patients completed the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI which constitutes three composite scores and nine symptom scales and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Multivariate analyses of variance, correlations and effect sizes were conducted. Results A prevalence of depression of 21.0% was determined, 38.0% of the depressed patients were female. Depressed patients showed higher scores on the BSI-scales "interpersonal sensitivity", "depression", "anxiety", "phobic anxiety" and "psychoticism" with medium effect sizes. Conclusions High prevalence of depression was found which is in accordance with results of prior studies. Depressed patients showed higher psychological distress as compared to non-depressed patients. The results call for carrying on in engaging in depression research and routine depression screening in ORL.

  4. Vitamin D Deficiency and Depressive Symptomatology in Psychiatric Patients Hospitalized with a Current Depressive Episode: A Factor Analytic Study.

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    Roland von Känel

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels have been associated with depressive symptoms in population-based studies and non-clinical samples as well as with clinical depression. This study aimed to examine the association of vitamin D levels with the severity and dimensions of depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression taking into account confounding variables.We investigated 380 patients (mean age 47 ± 12 years, 70% women who were consecutively hospitalized with a main diagnosis of an ICD-10 depressive episode. All patients self-rated depressive symptom severity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and the Brief Symptom Inventory. A principal component analysis was performed with all 34 items of these questionnaires and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D were measured.Vitamin D deficiency ( 75 nmol/l were present in 55.5%, 31.8% and 12.6%, respectively, of patients. Patients with vitamin D deficiency scored higher on the HADS-D scale and on an anhedonia symptom factor than those with insufficient (p-values ≤ 0.023 or sufficient (p-values ≤ 0.008 vitamin D. Vitamin D deficient patients also scored higher on the BDI-II scale than those with sufficient vitamin D (p = 0.007; BDI-II cognitive/affective symptoms, but not somatic/affective symptoms, were higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.005 and insufficiency (p = 0.041 relative to those with sufficient vitamin D. Effect sizes suggested clinically relevant findings.Low vitamin D levels are frequent in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression. Especially 25-OH D levels < 50 nmol/l were associated with cognitive/affective depressive symptoms, and anhedonia symptoms in particular.

  5. Vitamin D Deficiency and Depressive Symptomatology in Psychiatric Patients Hospitalized with a Current Depressive Episode: A Factor Analytic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Känel, Roland; Fardad, Nasser; Steurer, Nadine; Horak, Nicole; Hindermann, Esther; Fischer, Franz; Gessler, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Low vitamin D levels have been associated with depressive symptoms in population-based studies and non-clinical samples as well as with clinical depression. This study aimed to examine the association of vitamin D levels with the severity and dimensions of depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression taking into account confounding variables. We investigated 380 patients (mean age 47 ± 12 years, 70% women) who were consecutively hospitalized with a main diagnosis of an ICD-10 depressive episode. All patients self-rated depressive symptom severity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and the Brief Symptom Inventory. A principal component analysis was performed with all 34 items of these questionnaires and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D) were measured. Vitamin D deficiency ( 75 nmol/l) were present in 55.5%, 31.8% and 12.6%, respectively, of patients. Patients with vitamin D deficiency scored higher on the HADS-D scale and on an anhedonia symptom factor than those with insufficient (p-values ≤ 0.023) or sufficient (p-values ≤ 0.008) vitamin D. Vitamin D deficient patients also scored higher on the BDI-II scale than those with sufficient vitamin D (p = 0.007); BDI-II cognitive/affective symptoms, but not somatic/affective symptoms, were higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.005) and insufficiency (p = 0.041) relative to those with sufficient vitamin D. Effect sizes suggested clinically relevant findings. Low vitamin D levels are frequent in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression. Especially 25-OH D levels < 50 nmol/l were associated with cognitive/affective depressive symptoms, and anhedonia symptoms in particular.

  6. Depression, family and cellular immunity: Influence of family relationships and cellular immunity on the severity of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdanowicz, Nicolas; Reynaert, Christine; Jacques, Denis; Tordeurs, David; Lepiece, Brice; Maury, Julien

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to stress activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis through the release of catecholamines, which modify humoral and cellular immunity. On the one hand, this psycho-immunological theory makes it possible to forge links between immunity and depression. On the other hand, we know that family determinants are an important variable in the model of vulnerability to depression. Our study weighs the influence of cellular immunity and family relations on the severity of depression. 498 inpatients with major depressive disorder were enrolled in an open-label trial. In addition to a socio-demographic questionnaire, they completed Olsen's FACES III and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Flow cytometry was used to assess lymphocyte subsets. In terms of immunity, there are correlations between the BDI and percentages of CD3 (p=0.015; r=-0.112), CD4 (pfamily relationships, there is a correlation between the BDI and family of origin, both for cohesion (p=0.007; r=-0.169) and adaptability (p=0.035; r=-0.133) measures. With respect to the relationship between family dynamics and immunity, there are correlations between adaptability in the family of origin and CD3 (p=0.04; r=0.094) and CD4 (p=0.044; r=0.093). A logistic regression model for family variables explained 11.4% of the BDI, compared to 12.7% for immune variables, while a model including the two explained 16%. While both the family and immunity can explain the BDI, it is surprising they have a greater effect in combination than individually. This suggests that the psycho-immunological theory should look at the relation between immunity and family life, notably in relation to the family of origin.

  7. Evaluation of the SHIFT-Depression® Inventory With a Sample of Australian Women, Demonstrating the Centrality of Gendered Role Expectations to Their Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C. Vidler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To address the double fold incidence and prevalence rates of depression in women compared to men needs more than symptom management. In primary health care where time does not normally allow for thorough assessments of what causes or maintains depression, using a brief questionnaire is warranted. A means must be found to address system level barriers to care and the poor quality of life so many women experience. Using an online survey and mixed method design, initial evaluation of a measure developed to identify individual and contextual issues connected to depression in women, examined underlying factor structure. 266 depressed women aged 18 to 85yrs also completed the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CESD and provided written commentary about any further issues. The SHIFT-Depression® Inventory analysis revealed five reliable underlying factors explaining 59% of the variance. The factors identified were; 'diminished self/feels powerless/focused on other's care'; 'financial problems, lacks access to healthcare, healthy food, housing, exercise’; 'relationship difficulties, loss/betrayal/abuse’; ‘women’s problems’ and 'lack of social support/feels isolated'. Analysis of participant’s comments found four groupings similar to the identified factors. This initial evaluation of the SHIFT-Depression® Inventory showed evidence of the multiple issues impacting on depressed women spanning the physical, intrapsychic, relational, social and contextual areas. The inventory provides preliminary assessment which can identify when more extensive questioning and referrals to various services may be appropriate. It could be used in primary health care settings when consultation times are brief, or as an adjunct to assessment in the mental health setting.

  8. Which tinnitus-related characteristics affect current health-related quality of life and depression? A cross-sectional cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidt, Steffi; Delsignore, Aba; Meyer, Martin; Rufer, Michael; Peter, Nicole; Drabe, Natalie; Kleinjung, Tobias

    2016-03-30

    Tinnitus is sometimes associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and depressive symptoms. However, only limited evidence exists identifying which tinnitus characteristics are responsible for these associations. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess associations between tinnitus, HRQoL, depressive symptoms, subjective tinnitus loudness and audiometrically assessed tinnitus characteristics (e.g., hearing threshold). Two hundred and eight outpatients reporting tinnitus completed questionnaires on tinnitus (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, THI), HRQoL (World-Health-Organisation Quality of Life Short Form Survey, WHOQOL-BREF), and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI), and underwent audiometry. Patients with higher THI scores exhibited significantly lower HRQoL, and higher depression scores. THI total-score, THI subscales, and subjective tinnitus loudness explained significant variance of WHOQOL-BREF and BDI. Audiometrically measured features were not associated with WHOQOL-BREF or BDI. Overall, we confirmed findings that different features of tinnitus are associated with HRQoL and depressive symptoms but not with audiometrically assessed tinnitus characteristics. Consequently, physicians should evaluate THI total score, its sub-scores, and subjective tinnitus loudness to reliably and quickly identify patients who potentially suffer from depressive symptoms or significantly lower HRQoL. Supporting these patients early might help to prevent the development of reactive depressive symptoms and impairment of HRQoL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of the harm avoidance personality in depression and anxiety during the medical internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Yen; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan; Li, Peng; Huang, Wei-Lieh; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether physicians with harm avoidance (HA) personality traits were more prone to developing increased anxiety and depression during the medical internship. A prospective longitudinal study of 74 medical interns was carried out using repeated measures of symptoms of anxiety and depression with the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories (BAI and BDI) before, at the 3rd, 6th, and 12th months during the internship, and 2 weeks after the internship was completed. Baseline personality was assessed by the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire with 3 dimensions: novelty-seeking, HA, and reward dependence (RD). Levels of both depression and anxiety increased (6.4 and 3.4 on scores for BDI and BAI, respectively) during the internship and returned to baseline 2 weeks after it ended. HA scores were significantly correlated with depression and anxiety (0.3 scores on both the BDI and the BAI) and the scores for RD were significantly correlated with anxiety but not with depression. The interaction of HA and point in internship showed no significant differences. Internship plays a major role in the increase in depression and anxiety. A HA personality was also associated with the development of both depression and anxiety.

  10. Study of prevalence of depression and impact of depression in patients following acute myocardial infarction

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    Bobby Hmar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression has been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases in various studies done in different parts of the world. Whether depression really develops after an attack of acute myocardial infarction (AMI in hospitalised patients was not evaluated in this region of our country prior to the current work. Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of depression and impact of depression in AMI patients during the period of hospitalisation. Materials and method: Patients were recruited for the study after fulfilling the selection criteria and who had documented AMI within four to five days of hospitalisation. Informed consent of the patient and ethical committee clearance was obtained. To collect data semi-structured interview schedule was used. Assamese versions of 21 self-report items Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and observer-rated 17 items Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D were administered to 50 AMI patients. Data were analysed with chi-square test, Pearson coefficient of correlation, and student t test wherever applicable. p-value<0.05 was considered test of significance in this study. Result: Fifty cases of AMI were evaluated from August 2007 to July 2008. Thirty six per cent of AMI patients and 34% of AMI patients were found to have depression as per BDI and HAM-D scales respectively. Depression has an impact on duration of hospital stay significantly (p<0.019 but not on gender difference (p=0.089. Correlation of mean scores of both HAM-D and BDI scales was done by Pearson coefficient of correlation and was found to be significant at .01 level. Conclusion: Depression was found to be high in AMI patients during the period of hospitalisation in both the depression rating scales and it has an impact on prognosis of the patients.

  11. Correlation and characteristics of self-rating and clinical rating of depression among alcoholics in the course of early abstinence

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    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Depression is an alcoholism relapse risk factor, but frequently stays underdiagnosed among treated alcoholics. The correlation and characteristics of self-reported and clinically assessed depression in the course of early alcohol abstinence were explored. Methods. A total of 100 inpatient, primary male alcoholics (20-60 years diagnosed according to Classificaton of Mental and Behavioural Disorders (ICD-10 and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV were recruited consecutively. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were scored on admission (T1, after 4 weeks (T2 and after 8 weeks (T3. Student's t-test, repeated measures ANOVA and Pearson's correlation between the scores were done (p < 0.05. Factor analyses of symptoms were performed. Results: On HDRS T1, T2, T3 90,7%, 39.5%, 17.4% alcoholics were depressive, respectively. The mean HDRS vs BDI scores on T1, T2 and T3 were 15.16 ± 6.34, 7.35 ± 4.18, 4.23 ± 2.93 vs 14.20 ± 9.56, 8.14 ± 7.35, 5.30 ± 4.94, respectively. Depression severity significantly lowered in the course of abstinence (ANOVA. The HRDS and BDI correlations on T1, T2 and T3 were significant (r1 = 0.763, r2 = 0.684, r3 = 0.613 respectively. Dysphoric mood, anxious, vegetative and cognitive HDRS subscales on T1, T2 and T3 were detected, but not BDI factors, thus BDI symptoms were analysed. Conclusions. The majority of alcoholics had depression on admission. A predominant mild-degree with a significant lowering of depression severity and positive significant correlations between HRDS and BDI scores in the course of abstinence were detected. The dysphoric mood on the HDRS sub-scale, and self-blame, anhedonia and guilt BDI symptoms were most prominent and persisted. The BDI could be a useful tool not only for routine screening and reassessment of depression, but also for exploring emotional content during early abstinence and planning tailored

  12. Depression in Osteoporotic and Osteopenic Patients and the Relation with Lifstyle

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    Evren Kul Panza

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to investigate the frequency of depression in osteoporotic and osteopenic women and to determine the relationship between depression and lifestyle, level of education and some risk factors of osteoporosis. Sixty-one osteopenic or osteoporotic postmenopausal women were included in this retrospective study. Patients’ lifestyle, risk factors, pain and depression levels were evaluated by means of lifestyle questionnaire, Visual Analog Scale (VAS and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, respectively. The women were divided into two groups as osteopenic and osteoporotic according to WHO criteria. The mean age and menopause duration of the subjects were 61.7±5.2 and 18.9±9.7 years, respectively. Fourty-six percent of women were found to be osteoporotic and the remainig were osteopenic according to the bone density measurement. As the results of lifestyle questionnaire, 73.8% of the patients were housewife, 45.9% graduated from primary school, and 14.8% were exercising regularly. The mean VAS and BDI scores were 5.4±2.01 cm and 17.2±9.8, respectively. According to BDI scores, 30.8% of women had moderate, and 7.7% had severe depression. There were negative correlations between BDI score and education level (r= -0.300, p= 0.031, as well as BDI and history of exercise (r=-0.285, p=0.041. However, positive correlations were found between exercise and level of education (r=0.340 p=0.007, and Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT (r=0.430 p=0.001. In conclusion, depression being commonly seen in osteoporotic and osteopenic patients should be taken into account in the treatment and follow-up of patients. In these patients it should be taken into consideration that lifestyle properties like education, dressing, HRT usage, and exercise could have a relation with depression and with each other.

  13. Persistent Depressive Symptoms are Independent Predictors of Low-Grade Inflammation Onset Among Healthy Individuals

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    Fábio Gazelato de Mello Franco

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Depressive symptoms are independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD among individuals with non-diagnosed CVD. The mechanisms underlying this association, however, remain unclear. Inflammation has been indicated as a possible mechanistic link between depression and CVD. Objectives: This study evaluated the association between persistent depressive symptoms and the onset of low-grade inflammation. Methods: From a database of 1,508 young (mean age: 41 years individuals with no CVD diagnosis who underwent at least two routine health evaluations, 134 had persistent depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory - BDI ≥ 10, BDI+ and 1,374 had negative symptoms at both time points (BDI-. All participants had been submitted to repeated clinical and laboratory evaluations at a regular follow-up with an average of 26 months from baseline. Low-grade inflammation was defined as plasma high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (CRP concentrations > 3 mg/L. The outcome was the incidence of low-grade inflammation evaluated by the time of the second clinical evaluation. Results: The incidence of low-grade inflammation was more frequently observed in the BDI+ group compared to the BDI- group (20.9% vs. 11.4%; p = 0.001. After adjusting for sex, age, waist circumference, body mass index, levels of physical activity, smoking, and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, persistent depressive symptoms remained an independent predictor of low-grade inflammation onset (OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.03-3.02; p = 0.04. Conclusions: Persistent depressive symptoms were independently associated with low-grade inflammation onset among healthy individuals.

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Computerized Interactive Media-Based Problem Solving Treatment for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis R; Buckey, Jay C; Ainslie, Ricardo; Tombari, Martin; Stone, William; Hegel, Mark T

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of an interactive media-based, computer-delivered depression treatment program (imbPST) compared to a no-treatment control condition (NTC) in a parallel-group, randomized, controlled trial conducted in an outpatient psychiatric research clinic. 45 adult participants with major depressive disorder or dysthymia were randomized to receive either 6 weekly sessions of imbPST or no treatment (No Treatment Control; NTC). The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). There was a significant Group x Time interaction effect [F (1.73, 43)= 58.78; p<.001; η2=.58, Cohens d=1.94], such that the patients receiving imbPST had a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms compared to the patients in the NTC condition. Participants in the imbPST group improved their depression symptoms significantly from moderate (BDI-II=21.9±4.20) to mild levels of depression (BDI-II=17.9±4.0) after receiving 3 weekly sessions of imbPST (p<0.001), and progressed to still milder levels of depression after six weekly sessions (BDI-II=14.5±3.7, p<0.001). NTC participants showed no significant reduction in BDI-II scores (BDI-II=21.8±4.2 pre, BDI-II=21.5±5.2 post, N.S.). Additionally, 40% of the imbPST group showed a clinically significant and reliable change in depression levels while none of the NTC group met this criterion. imbPST participants rated the program highly usable on the system usability scale (SUS) after the first session (SUS Session 1=74.6±7.2) and usability scores increased significantly by the last session (SUS Session 6=85.4±5.6). We conclude that imbPST is an effective, engaging, and easily used depression treatment program that warrants further evaluation with heterogeneous depressed populations in a stand-alone, self-administered fashion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Comparison of pre-procedural anxiety and depression scores for patients undergoing chorion villus sampling and amniocentesis: An alternative perspective on prenatal invasive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhal, Cem Yasar; Mendilcioglu, Inanc; Ozekinci, Murat; Simsek, Mehmet; Bozkurt, Selen

    2015-01-01

    To compare the pre-procedural anxiety and depression levels of patients undergoing chorion villus sampling (CVS) and amniocentesis (AC). Patients referred to our department for fetal karyotype analysis with a positive first or second trimester screening test for aneuploidy between January 2013 to June 2015 were included. CVS and AC procedures were performed in patients with gestation periods of between 11-14 and 16-20 weeks, respectively. Anxiety was evaluated using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and depression was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). A total of 1,400 patients were included. Compared to first trimester controls, patients undergoing CVS had significantly higher STAI-state and BDI-II results. Likewise, patients undergoing AC had higher STAI-state and BDI-II scores than controls in the second trimester. In terms of STAI-trait results, no difference was found between the groups. Our results also showed that, compared to AC group, patients undergoing CVS had similar STAI-state, STAI-trait and but higher BDI-II scores. We conclude that evaluating the stress and depression levels of these patients should be one of the routine procedures in pregnancy follow-up.

  16. Pain intensity influences the relationship between anger management style and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estlander, Ann-Mari; Knaster, Peter; Karlsson, Hasse; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kalso, Eija

    2008-11-30

    There is an abundance of studies concerning depression and pain, while the mechanisms and the relationships of anger expression and pain are less well known. The validity of commonly used depression questionnaires as measures of depression in pain patients has been questioned, as they include items which can be related to the pain problem as well as to signs of depression. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between pain severity, various signs of depression, and anger management style. Subjects were 100 consecutive patients referred to the Helsinki University Pain Clinic. Demographic data and pain intensity (VAS) were collected by a questionnaire. Two subscales (negative view and physical function) from the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Anger Expression Scales (Anger-in and Anger-out) from the Spielberg State Trait Anger Expression Inventory 2 were used to assess depression and anger expression, respectively. The results showed that pain severity modulates the relationship between anger expression and physical signs of depression. In patients with more severe pain, the relationships between anger management style, specifically, inhibition of anger and depression were strong, while no such relationships were found in the group of patients with less severe pain. No correlations were found between pain intensity and depression as measured by the sum score of the BDI. However, analysing separately the two subscales of the BDI, negative view and physical function, significant positive relationships between pain intensity and both subscales appeared.

  17. Contribution to the validation of the Kutcher Adolescent Depression Scale (KADS-6 in a Portuguese population

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    Sónia Quintão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The KADS-6 is a self-report assessment instrument known for its ease application in assessing depression in young people. This study aimed to contribute to the validation of the Portuguese version of this tool and analyze its psychometric characteristics in comparison with other self-report instruments for depression in adolescents, in Portugal. Two samples were collected, a non-clinical group of in school youth (n=773; 52.4% male and a clinical sample (n=134 youth; 44% male. Comparisons also used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI. Results: The factor analysis revealed the unidimensionality of the measure. The KADS-6 demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha in both clinical (.74 and school (.80 samples. Its convergent validity with the BDI-II and CDI was r=.44; r=.61, respectively in the clinical sample and r=.60; r=.57 in the school sample. The KADS-6, a short and time efficient instrument, showed good psychometric characteristics in terms of internal consistency and convergent validity in comparison with the BDI-II and the CDI. Given its ease of use and scoring, the KADS-6 could be considered for use in both school and clinical settings when addressing adolescent depression.

  18. Depressive symptoms and concussions in aging retired NFL players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didehbani, Nyaz; Munro Cullum, C; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Hart, John

    2013-08-01

    We examined the relationship between a remote history of concussions with current symptoms of depression in retired professional athletes. Thirty retired National Football League (NFL) athletes with a history of concussion and 29 age- and IQ-matched controls without a history of concussion were recruited. We found a significant correlation between the number of lifetime concussions and depressive symptom severity using the Beck Depression Inventory II. Upon investigating a three-factor model of depressive symptoms (affective, cognitive, and somatic; Buckley et al., 2001) from the BDI-II, the cognitive factor was the only factor that was significantly related to concussions. In general, NFL players endorsed more symptoms of depression on all three Buckley factors compared with matched controls. Findings suggest that the number of self-reported concussions may be related to later depressive symptomology (particularly cognitive symptoms of depression).

  19. Depressive Symptoms and Concussions in Aging Retired NFL Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didehbani, Nyaz; Munro Cullum, C.; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Hart, John

    2013-01-01

    We examined the relationship between a remote history of concussions with current symptoms of depression in retired professional athletes. Thirty retired National Football League (NFL) athletes with a history of concussion and 29 age- and IQ-matched controls without a history of concussion were recruited. We found a significant correlation between the number of lifetime concussions and depressive symptom severity using the Beck Depression Inventory II. Upon investigating a three-factor model of depressive symptoms (affective, cognitive, and somatic; Buckley et al., 2001) from the BDI-II, the cognitive factor was the only factor that was significantly related to concussions. In general, NFL players endorsed more symptoms of depression on all three Buckley factors compared with matched controls. Findings suggest that the number of self-reported concussions may be related to later depressive symptomology (particularly cognitive symptoms of depression). PMID:23644673

  20. Psychometric properties of the Spanish-language child depression inventory with Hispanic children who are secondary victims of domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Carmen Soto; Gómez, José Rodriguez; Pastrana, Maria C Vélez

    2009-01-01

    The Child Depression Inventory (CDI), a self-report instrument that measures depressive symptomatology in children, has been shown to have adequate construct validity (Kovacs, 1983, 1992). However, limited research has been conducted with minority children and adolescents. In the present study, the construct validity of the Spanish-language version of the Child Depression Inventory (CDI-S) ages 8-12 years (N = 100). The CDI was developed by Maria Kovacs (1992) and has been a widely used instrument for screening depression in children. Fifty of the children had witnessed domestic violence (secondary victims of domestic violence) and received psychological services for victims of domestic violence, and fifty had not witnessed domestic violence. To identify the group of non-victims of domestic violence, their mothers completed the Conflict Tactic Scale (CIS). The CDI is a self-report instrument used to measure symptoms of depression. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed including the 27 items that make up the instrument, using principal component analysis as the extraction method and Varimax rotations. This analysis revealed that the CDI measures five dimensions of depression in the child. However, differences were found in the factor structure of the Spanish CDI when compared with the original version. Additionally, its internal consistency was documented.

  1. Combined detection of depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients using the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy and the World Health Organization well-being index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Pilebæk; Amiri, Moshgan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the Danish version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E), and compare it with the World Health Organization index for psychological well-being (WHO-5) as screening tests for depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients. METHODS: Epilepsy...... there are 17% false positives. CONCLUSION: NDDI-E in Danish is valid and slightly better than WHO-5 in the detection of depression in epilepsy patients. WHO-5 is valid for the detection of anxiety disorders. Combined use of NDDI-E and WHO-5 is recommended, since 95% of all epilepsy patients with depression and....../or anxiety disorder are identified with only a modest number of false positives....

  2. Factorial Structure of Depressive Symptoms in Anglophone Caribbean University Students: Psychometric Properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

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    Michael H. Campbell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio buscó establecer propiedades psicométricas del Inventario de Depresión de Beck-Segunda Edición (BDI-II con estudiantes de una universidad del Caribe (n=400, 76% mujeres, edad media=25.2. Además, administramos la Escala de Elasticidad de Ego-89, La Escala de Tensión Percibida, La Escala de Ansiedad Estado-Rasgo (Versión de Rasgo y La Escala de Depresión de Zung. El análisis factorial confirmativo comparó la estructura observada con las estructuras oblicuas propuestas en los modelos de dos factores. Las estimaciones factoriales y los índices de calidad de ajuste sugirieron adecuado ajuste para modelos de dos factores. La consistencia interna (=.86 y la fiabilidad test-retest (n=57, r=.78 eran fuertes. Las correlaciones de validez eran significativas en las direcciones teóricamente esperadas. Los resultados apoyan el uso del BDI-II con estudiantes del Caribe.

  3. Perception of quality of life and social adjustment of patients with recurrent depression

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    Stanković Žana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is the most commonly present psychiatric entity in clinical practice, accompanied by significant impairment of both social and professional functioning. In addition, depression frequently develops as complication of other psychiatric disorders and various somatic diseases. Objective: To investigate subjective perception of quality of life and social adjustment, severity of depressive symptoms as well as level of correlation of severity of depressive symptoms and quality of life and social adjustment of patients with recurrent depression in comparison to the group of patients with diabetes and healthy subjects. Method: The study included 45 subjects of both sexes, ranging from 18 to 60 years of age, divided in three groups of 15 subjects each. The experimental group comprised the patients diagnosed with recurrent depression in remission (DSM-IV, one control group was consisted of patients diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and another one comprised healthy subjects. The instruments of assessment were: The Beck Depression Inventory- BDI, The Social Adaptation Self -evaluation scale - SASS, The Psychological General Well-Being Scale - WBQ. Results: Significant difference of both BDI and WBQ scales was found between the experimental and the control group of healthy subjects (ANOVA, Mann Whitney; p≤0.01, as well as between two control groups (p≤0.02. The level of inverse correlation of mean score values of BDI and SASS scales was significant in the control group of patients with diabetes while such levels of BDI and WBQ scales (Spearman correlation coefficient, p<0.01 were found in all groups of our study. Conclusion: In the group of patients with recurrent depression, significant decline of quality of life and significantly higher severity of depressive symptoms were present in comparison to the group of healthy subjects as well as significant level of inverse correlation of severity of depressive symptoms and

  4. The relationship between personality, social functioning, and depression: a structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Wai S; Rochelle, Tina L; Cheung, Jacky C K

    2011-06-01

    The relationship between personality, social functioning, and depression remains unclear. The present study employs structural equation modeling to examine the mediating role of social functioning between harm avoidance (HA), self-directedness (SD), and depression. A sample of 902 individuals completed a self-report questionnaire consisting of the following scales: HA and SD subscales of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Social Adaptation Self-Evaluation Scale (SASS). Structural equation modeling via analysis of moment structure was used to estimate the fit of nine related models. Results indicated that social functioning is a mediator between harm avoidance or self-directness and depression. Self-directedness was also shown to have direct effects on depression. The results support the social reinforcement theory of depression and provide a theoretical account of how the variables are related based on correlation methods. Suggestions are offered for future experimental and longitudinal research.

  5. Personality features, dissociation, self-stigma, hope, and the complex treatment of depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasko, Jan; Ociskova, Marie; Grambal, Ales; Sigmundova, Zuzana; Kasalova, Petra; Marackova, Marketa; Holubova, Michaela; Vrbova, Kristyna; Latalova, Klara; Slepecky, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identifying the predictors of response to psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments may be useful for increasing treatment efficacy in pharmacoresistant depressive patients. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of dissociation, hope, personality trait, and selected demographic factors in treatment response of this group of patients. Methods Pharmacoresistant depressive inpatients were enrolled in the study. All patients completed Clinical Global Impression – both objective and subjective form (CGI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) at baseline and after 6 weeks of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (group cognitive-behavioral or group psychodynamic) treatment as an outcome measures. The Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI), Dissociative Experience Scale (DES), Adult Dispositional Hope Scale (ADHS), and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-R) were completed at the start of the treatment with the intention to find the predictors of treatment efficacy. Results The study included 72 patients who were hospitalized for the pharmacoresistant major depression; 63 of them completed the study. The mean scores of BDI-II, BAI, subjCGI, and objCGI significantly decreased during the treatment. BDI-II relative change statistically significantly correlated with the total ISMI score, Discrimination Experience (ISMI subscale), and Harm Avoidance (TCI-R personality trait). According to stepwise regression, the strongest factors connected to BDI-II relative change were the duration of the disorder and Discrimination Experience (domain of ISMI). ObjCGI relative change significantly correlated with the level of dissociation (DES), the total ISMI score, hope in ADHS total score, and Self-Directedness (TCI-R). According to stepwise regression, the strongest factor connected to objCGI relative change was Discrimination Experience (domain of ISMI). The existence of comorbid personality disorder did not

  6. Personality features, dissociation, self-stigma, hope, and the complex treatment of depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasko, Jan; Ociskova, Marie; Grambal, Ales; Sigmundova, Zuzana; Kasalova, Petra; Marackova, Marketa; Holubova, Michaela; Vrbova, Kristyna; Latalova, Klara; Slepecky, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the predictors of response to psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments may be useful for increasing treatment efficacy in pharmacoresistant depressive patients. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of dissociation, hope, personality trait, and selected demographic factors in treatment response of this group of patients. Pharmacoresistant depressive inpatients were enrolled in the study. All patients completed Clinical Global Impression - both objective and subjective form (CGI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) at baseline and after 6 weeks of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (group cognitive-behavioral or group psychodynamic) treatment as an outcome measures. The Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI), Dissociative Experience Scale (DES), Adult Dispositional Hope Scale (ADHS), and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-R) were completed at the start of the treatment with the intention to find the predictors of treatment efficacy. The study included 72 patients who were hospitalized for the pharmacoresistant major depression; 63 of them completed the study. The mean scores of BDI-II, BAI, subjCGI, and objCGI significantly decreased during the treatment. BDI-II relative change statistically significantly correlated with the total ISMI score, Discrimination Experience (ISMI subscale), and Harm Avoidance (TCI-R personality trait). According to stepwise regression, the strongest factors connected to BDI-II relative change were the duration of the disorder and Discrimination Experience (domain of ISMI). ObjCGI relative change significantly correlated with the level of dissociation (DES), the total ISMI score, hope in ADHS total score, and Self-Directedness (TCI-R). According to stepwise regression, the strongest factor connected to objCGI relative change was Discrimination Experience (domain of ISMI). The existence of comorbid personality disorder did not influence the treatment

  7. Stability of maternal depressive symptoms among urban, low-income, African American adolescent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Marcuse, Fatima; Oberlander, Sarah E; Papas, Mia A; McNary, Scot W; Hurley, Kristen M; Black, Maureen M

    2010-04-01

    Maternal depressive symptomatology is an important public health issue with negative consequences for both mothers and infants. This study examined prevalence and patterns of depressive symptoms among 181 urban, low-income, first-time, African American adolescent mothers recruited from urban hospitals following delivery. Follow-up evaluations were conducted at 6 (N=148; 82%) and 24 (N=147; 81%) month home visits. Depressive symptoms were measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Half of mothers (49%) had BDI scores >9 at baseline, with significant correlations between BDI scores across all visits (r=0.28-0.50). Depressive symptom trajectories analyzed using group-based trajectory modeling revealed three trajectories of depressive symptoms: Low (41%), Medium (45%), and High (14%). The high depressive symptom group reported lower self-esteem, more negative life events, and lower parenting satisfaction than the low and moderate depressive symptoms groups. Depressive symptoms were self-reported and not verified with a clinical interview. Findings are limited to urban, low-income, African American adolescent mothers and may not be generalizable to other populations. The high prevalence and relative stability of depressive symptoms through 2years of parenting suggest the need for early identification and treatment of maternal depressive symptoms. Brief screening for maternal depressive symptoms conducted during pediatric well-child visits is a feasible and effective method for identifying mothers with depressive symptoms, however, screening measures can not differentiate between high and low levels of depressive symptoms. Brief intervention may be an effective treatment for mothers with mild symptoms of depression; mothers with moderate to severe symptoms may require more intensive intervention. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assogna, Francesca; Fagioli, Sabrina; Cravello, Luca; Meco, Giuseppe; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Stefani, Alessandro; Imperiale, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Pontieri, Francesco E; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with neurological and non-neurological medical illnesses very often complain of depressive symptoms that are associated with cognitive and functional impairments. We compared the profile of depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with that of control subjects (CS) suffering from non-neurological medical illnesses. Methods One-hundred PD patients and 100 CS were submitted to a structured clinical interview for identification of major depressive disorder (MDD) and minor depressive disorder (MIND), according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR), criteria. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were also administered to measure depression severity. Results When considering the whole groups, there were no differences in depressive symptom frequency between PD and CS apart from worthlessness/guilt, and changes in appetite reduced rates in PD. Further, total scores and psychic and somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI did not differ between PD and CS. After we separated PD and CS in those with MDD, MIND, and no depression (NODEP), comparing total scores and psychic/somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI, we found increased total depression severity in NODEP PD and reduced severity of the psychic symptoms of depression in MDD PD, with no differences in MIND. However, the severity of individual symptom frequency of depression was not different between PD and CS in MDD, MIND, and NODEP groups. Conclusion Although MDD and MIND phenomenology in PD may be very similar to that of CS with non-neurological medical illnesses, neurological symptoms of PD may worsen (or confound) depression severity in patients with no formal/structured DSM-IV-TR, diagnosis of depressive mood disorders. Thus, a thorough assessment of depression in PD should take into consideration the different impacts of neurological manifestations on MDD, MIND, and NODEP. PMID

  9. The validity of dysthymia to predict clinical depressive symptoms as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale at the 5-year follow-up of patients with first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In long-term follow-up studies on depression, the Eysenck Neuroticism Scale (ENS) at the score level of dysthymia has been found to be valid at predicting poor outcome. AIMS: The ENS dysthymia level was compared with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) level to predict the prevalence......, and HAM-D from 2005-2007. At 5-year follow-up from 2011-2013, the participants were re-assessed by HAM-D. The HAM-D was used to measure depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. The Mokken analysis was used to indicate scalability of the BDI and ENS. RESULTS: A total of 185 participants were available...... as measured by the two self-rating scales ENS and BDI can be considered part of a 'double depression' in patients with first episode depression, implying an existence of depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Evaluation of dysthymia or neuroticism is important to perform, even...

  10. Assessing Depression in Cardiac Patients: What Measures Should Be Considered?

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    M. Ceccarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is highly recommended to promptly assess depression in heart disease patients as it represents a crucial risk factor which may result in premature deaths following acute cardiac events and a more severe psychopathology, even in cases of subsequent nonfatal cardiac events. Patients and professionals often underestimate or misjudge depressive symptomatology as cardiac symptoms; hence, quick, reliable, and early mood changes assessments are warranted. Failing to detect depressive signals may have detrimental effects on these patients’ wellbeing and full recovery. Choosing gold-standard depression investigations in cardiac patients that fit a hospitalised cardiac setting well is fundamental. This paper will examine eight well established tools following Italian and international guidelines on mood disorders diagnosis in cardiac patients: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, the Cognitive Behavioural Assessment Hospital Form (CBA-H, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the two and nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2, PHQ-9, the Depression Interview and Structured Hamilton (DISH, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D/HRSD, and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. Though their strengths and weaknesses may appear to be homogeneous, the BDI-II and the PHQ are more efficient towards an early depression assessment within cardiac hospitalised patients.

  11. Validating the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Indonesia’s general population and coronary heart disease patients

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    Henndy Ginting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio evalúa la validez y determina los puntos de corte del Inventario de Depresión de Beck -II (BDI-II en Indonesia. La versión indonesia del BDI-II (BDI-II Indo se administró a 720 personas sanas de la población general, a 215 pacientes con Enfermedad Coronaria (EC y a 102 pacientes con depresión. El análisis factorial confirmatorio mostró similitud factorial de las tres muestras. Las correlaciones entre el Indo BDI-II y otras medidas de auto-percepción relacionadas con la depresión fueron significativas, mostrando la validez de constructo del Indo BDI-II. Además, la diferencia de puntuación del Indo BDI-II entre los participantes deprimidos y no deprimidos fue altamente significativa. La consistencia interna y la fiabilidad re- test fueron suficientemente altas. La curva ROC (receiver operating characteristic indicó que el punto de corte de la BDI-II para el nivel de gravedad leve de depresión la población de Indonesia es igual a 17. En conclusión, el Indo BDI-II es una medida válida de depresión, tanto para la población general indonesia como en pacientes con EC.

  12. Sense of identity and depression in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Başaran; Kaynak-Demir, Hadiye; Sönmez, Emel Irmak

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sense of identity and depression in a group of adolescents. Thirty-one depressed adolescents and 31 control subjects were included in the study. They were evaluated using the Sense of Identity Assessment Form (SIAF), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Depressed adolescents were reevaluated during the eighth week of antidepressant treatment. Higher baseline SIAF scores were detected in depressed adolescents as compared with non-depressed subjects. After antidepressant treatment, there was a significant decrease in SIAF scores in the depression group. Correlation analysis indicated that there are significant, positive relationships between SIAF, depression, and anxiety scores. The regression analysis results suggested that the change in SIAF scores can accurately predict 91.6% of the remitters and 42.8% of the non-remitters. Collectively, these findings indicate that there is a close association between depression symptoms and identity confusion-related distress in adolescents.

  13. Scores on Adjective Check List, Eysenck Personality Inventory, and Depression Adjective Chck List for a male prison pupulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, B; Horned, C M; Knapp, R R

    1977-10-01

    Normative data are presented for a male prison population on the Adjective Check List (Gough & Heilbrun, 1965), Form A of the Eysenck Personality Inventory (Eysenck & Eysenck, 1975) and Form C of Depression Adjective Check List (Lubin, 1967). The intercorrelations among the instruments also are presented. In the sample were 60 recently admitted male inmates of a maximum security correctional institution randomly drawn from a large sample of 205 consecutive admissions. Subjects described themselves as markedly depressed, high on neuroticism, low in personal adjustment, low in self-confidence, and low in self-control.

  14. The effect of optimism on depression: the mediating and moderating role of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk Yan Sing; Wong, Wing S

    2011-11-01

    This article aims to clarify if insomnia exerts a mediating or moderating effect on the optimism-depression association in Chinese college students. 529 Chinese college students completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R) and the Multidimensional Scale of Social Support (MSPSS). The results failed to show any moderating effect but after adjustment for age, gender and social support, a mediating effect was observed. In conclusion, insomnia qualifies as a mediator, suggesting considerable variance in depressive symptoms of college students could be due to change in their sleep status.

  15. Psychological distress, anxiety and depression among nursing students in Greece

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    Sapountzi-Krepia D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is usually observed that nursing students undergo tremendous stress during various stages oftheir course but the knowledge about the stress process and depressive symptoms in this population is limited. TheAim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of psychological distress, anxiety and depression amongnursing students in Greece. For that purpose 170 nursing students (34 males, 136 females of the Department of Nursingof the Technological Educational Institute of Thessaloniki completed 3 self-report questionnaires, the General HealthQuestionnaire (GHQ, the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. The mean agewas 21.5 years. No difference in stress and depression on the basis of gender was observed. Our results showed that thescores on the GHQ, BDI and STAI tend to increase in the year 2 and 3. The majority of students reported relatively highscores on the GHQ suggesting increased psychiatric morbidity. 52.4% of students experienced depressive symptoms(34.7% mild, 12.9% moderate and 4.7% severe. The scores on the state scale were higher in the years 2 and 3, whilethe majority of students who had no or mild stress was observed in the first and the last year. Low stress personalitytraits were also observed in the first and the last year. However, no significant differences between the four years wereobserved. Our results suggest that nursing students experience different levels of stress and depression and that thesefactors are positively correlated.

  16. Psychosocial stressors and depression at a Swedish primary health care centre. A gender perspective study

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    Strömberg Ranja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychosocial stress may account for the higher prevalence of depression in women and in individuals with a low educational background. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between depression and socio-demographic data, psychosocial stressors and lifestyle circumstances from a gender perspective in a relatively affluent primary care setting. Methods Patients, aged 18- 75 years, visiting a drop-in clinic at a primary care health centre were screened with Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI. The physicians used also targeted screening with BDI. A questionnaire on socio-demographic data, psychosocial stressors and use of alcohol and tobacco was distributed. Among patients, who scored BDI ≥10, DSM-IV-criteria were used to diagnose depression. Of the 404 participants, 48 men and 76 women were diagnosed with depression. The reference group consisted of patients with BDI score Results The same three psychosocial stressors: feeling very stressed, perceived poor physical health and being dissatisfied with one's family situation were associated with depression equally in men and women. The negative predictive values of the main effect models in men and women were 90.7% and 76.5%, respectively. Being dissatisfied with one's work situation had high ORs in both men and women. Unemployment and smoking were associated with depression in men only. Conclusions Three questions, frequently asked by physicians, which involve patient's family and working situation as well as perceived stress and physical health, could be used as depression indicators in early detection of depression in men and women in primary health care.

  17. Depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Akmal; Sultan, Sayed Mohammad; Nazli, Rubina; Akhtar, Tasleem; Khan, Mudasar Ahmad; Sher, Nabila; Aslam, Hina

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency of depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus in Peshawar at Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar, from March to September 2010. Depression was assessed by using Beck Depressive Inventory-II (BDI-II). Out of 140 patients with type-II diabetes, 85 (61%) were women and 55 (39%) were men. Mean age was 45±7.45 years. Eighty four (60%) patients presented with severe depression. Depression was higher in females than males and widows. Depression was high in diabetic patients, especially in females and widows. It is of essence that psychiatric attention may be necessary to be incorporated in diabetes care both for prevention and treatment.

  18. The manifestation of depression in the context of urban poverty: a factor analysis of the Children's Depression Inventory in low-income urban youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeremy J; Grant, Kathryn E; Amrhein, Kelly; Carter, Jocelyn Smith; Farahmand, Farahnaz; Harrison, Aubrey; Thomas, Kina J; Carleton, Russell A; Lugo-Hernandez, Eduardo; Katz, Brian N

    2014-12-01

    The current study used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to compare the fit of 2 factor structures for the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) in an urban community sample of low-income youth. Results suggest that the 6-factor model developed by Craighead and colleagues (1998) was a strong fit to the pattern of symptoms reported by low-income urban youth and was a superior fit with these data than the original 5-factor model of the CDI (Kovacs, 1992). Additionally, results indicated that all 6 factors from the Craighead model contributed to the measurement of depression, including School Problems and Externalizing Problems especially for older adolescents. This pattern of findings may reflect distinct contextual influences of urban poverty on the manifestation and measurement of depression in youth.

  19. Sleep quality, depression, and quality of life in elderly hemodialysis patients

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    Turkmen K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kultigin Turkmen,1 Fatih Mehmet Erdur,1 Ibrahim Guney,2 Abduzhappar Gaipov,1 Faruk Turgut,3 Lutfullah Altintepe,2 Mustafa Saglam,1 Halil Zeki Tonbul,1 Emaad M Abdel-Rahman41Division of Nephrology, Meram School of Medicine, Necmettin Erbakan University, Meram, Konya, Turkey; 2Division of Nephrology, Meram Research and Training Hospital, Meram, Konya, Turkey; 3Division of Nephrology, Iskenderun State Hospital, Iskenderun, Hatay, Turkey; 4Division of Nephrology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USAObjective: Both the incidence and the prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in elderly patients are increasing worldwide. Elderly ESRD patients have been found to be more prone to depression than the general population. There are many studies that have addressed the relationship between sleep quality (SQ, depression, and health related quality of life (HRQoL in ESRD patients, but previous studies have not confirmed the association in elderly hemodialysis (HD patients. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to demonstrate this relationship in elderly HD patients.Patients and methods: Sixty-three elderly HD patients (32 females and 31 males aged between 65 and 89 years were included in this cross-sectional study. A modified Post-Sleep Inventory (PSI, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form health survey, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were applied.Results: The prevalence of poor sleepers (those with a PSI total sleep score [PSI-4 score] of 4 or higher was 71% (45/63, and the prevalence of depression was 25% (16/63. Of the 45 poor sleepers, 15 had depression, defined as a BDI score of 17 or higher. Poor sleepers had a significantly higher rate of diabetes mellitus (P = 0.03, significantly higher total BDI scores, and lower Physical Component Scale scores (ie, lower HRQoL than good sleepers. The PSI-4 score correlated negatively with Physical Component Scale (r = −0.500, P < 0.001 and Mental Component Scale

  20. Association between primary headaches and depression in young adults in southern Brazil

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    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the association between depression and headache in young adults, as well as to identify the features of headache associated with depression and the influence of this mood disorder on headache-related disability. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires about headache and depression was conducted at the Universidade de Caxias do Sul. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS were used to evaluate depressive symptoms and headache-related disability, respectively. Depression was considered if BDI > 15. RESULTS: A thousand and thirteen young adults were included in the study. A clear relationship was observed between headache and depression among the participants. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that nausea or vomiting related to headache and higher headacherelated disability scores were independent factors associated with depression. Migraine was more associated with depression than the other types of headache. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate an association between headache and depression. Depressive symptoms are more likely to be found in young adults with more disabling headaches.

  1. Network analysis of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology: Reanalysis of the STAR*D clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhoo, Manisha; Levine, Stephen Z

    2016-11-01

    Network analysis is yet to be used to examine patient-reported symptom severity and change during citalopram treatment for major depressive disorder. We aimed to identify: (I) network systems; (II) central symptoms; and (III) network differences, in patient-reported depression for baseline, endpoint and change scores. STAR*D data during citalopram treatment were reanalyzed to examine depression based on the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR). Network analyses were computed from the QIDS-SR item-level severity scores at baseline and endpoint, and from estimated change scores based on mixed models, adjusted for confounding by dose and baseline severity. Centrality indices for each symptom were computed. Networks were contrasted for connectivity with permutation tests. Network analyses grouped symptoms consistently as: Sleep disturbances, cognitive and physical avolition, Affect and Appetite. Symptom centrality was highest for Energy at baseline, Mood at endpoint, and Mood and Concentration on change scores. Generally, permutation tests showed that the networks all significantly (p<.05) differed. Results demonstrated: (I) a replicable network group of the symptoms of depression that modestly mapped onto well-known mechanisms for depression; (II) symptoms with high centrality that may be future treatment targets (e.g., mood); and (III) that the form of the networks differed across treatment time-points, thereby contributing centrality as a possible mechanism to the initial severity debate. These findings highlight the utility of focusing on symptoms rather than total scores to understand how treatment unfolds, and tentative mechanisms.

  2. Depression and quality of sleep in maintenance hemodialysis patients

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    Trbojević-Stanković Jasna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sleep disorders and psychological disturbances are common in end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. However, despite their frequency and importance, such conditions often go unnoticed, since all patients do not clearly manifest fully expressed symptoms. Objective. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression and poor sleep quality and to examine the association between these disorders and demographic, clinical and treatment-related characteristics of ESRD patients on hemodialysis (HD. Methods. The study included 222 patients (132 men and 90 women, mean age 57.3±11.9 years, from 3 HD centers in Central Serbia, which provided us with biochemical parameters and demographic data. Sleep quality and depression were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, respectively. Results. The average BDI was 16.1±11.3. Depressed patients were significantly older (p=0.041, had a significantly lower dialysis adequacy (p=0.027 and a significantly worse quality of sleep (p<0.001, while they did not show significant difference as regarding sex, employment, marital status, comorbidities, dialysis type, dialysis vintage, shift and laboratory parameters. The average PSQI was 7.8±4.5 and 64.2% of patients were poor sleepers. Poor sleepers were significantly older (p=0.002, they were more often females (p=0.027 and had a significantly higher BDI (p<0.001, while other investigated variables were not correlated with sleep quality. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between BDI and PSQI (r=0.604; p<0.001. Conclusion. Depression and poor sleep quality are frequent and interrelated among HD patients.

  3. Depression and anxiety are not related to nummular headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Peñacoba-Puente, Cecilia; López-López, Almudena; Valle, Begoña; Cuadrado, María Luz; Barriga, Francisco J; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-12-01

    Nummular headache (NH) is a clinical picture characterized by head pain that is exclusively felt in a round, elliptical, or oval area of the head. Although there is evidence supporting an organic origin for NH, some authors question this origin, hypothesizing a potential role for psychological factors. Our aims were to investigate the differences in anxiety and depression between NH patients and healthy controls, and to analyse if these conditions were related to pain parameters in NH patients. The Beck depression inventory (BDI-II) and the trait anxiety scale from state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) were administered to 26 patients with NH and 34 comparable matched controls. No significant interactions between group (NH patients, controls) in either depression (U = 391; p = 0.443) or anxiety levels (U = 336; p = 0.113) were found. Both groups showed similar scores in the BDI-II (patients: 3.9 +/- 2.9; controls: 3.46 +/- 3.15) and STAI (patients: 17.23 +/- 10.3; controls: 13.5 +/- 7.9). Moreover, neither depression nor anxiety showed association with mean pain intensity, pain intensity in exacerbations, size of pain area, or pain frequency. Our study demonstrated that self-reported depression and anxiety were not related to the presence of NH. Further, longitudinal studies are still needed to elucidate the role of mood state in the course of NH.

  4. Test Review: Kovacs, M. "Children's Depression Inventory 2 (CDI 2)" (2nd ed.). North Tonawanda, NY: Multi-Health Systems Inc, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yunhee

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a review of the Children's Depression Inventory 2 (CDI 2), published by Multi-Health Systems (MHS) to assess depressive symptoms in 7- to 17-year-old children and adolescents. Given the importance of early diagnosis and treatment (Kovacs & Devlin, 1998), the CDI 2 can assist professionals to pinpoint critical depressive…

  5. Early Maladaptive Schemas in Depressed Women and Its Relationship with Depression

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    Hacer Bolat KONUKÇU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective: Schemas are deep enduring cognitive structures that are the source of dysfunctional cognitions, emotions and behaviors, activate after critical incidents in depression. A subset of schemas called Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMS which are hyphotised to arise from early traumatic and adverse life events are also claimed to be related with not only personality disorders but also mood disorders. In this study we aimed to investigate the relationship between early maladaptive schemas and depression and relationship between schema scores and depression severity in depressed women and compare it with non-depressed controls.Methods: 40 women attending to an outpatient psychiatry clinic and 30 healthy controls participated. All participants were assessed with SCID-1. Data were obtained by using a Sociodemographic Questionnaires, Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form 3 (YSQ and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI.Results: All except one (enmeshment/undeveloped self maladaptive schema scores of depressed women were higher than controls. BDI was correlated to some schema and schema domain scores in both depressed and control groups but the correlations were stronger in control group. Mean emotional deprivation, negativism, abandonment and instability, failure EMS scores showed the highest difference between two groups. The schema domains most related to depression symptom severity were disconnection and rejection, impaired autonomy and performance.Conclusions: Almost all early maladaptive schemas are related to depression, and some schemas are related to depression symptom severity but these correlations are weaker in control group. This may mean that EMS are stable and mood independent structures. Although other schemas are related to depression, mostly related EMS in women might be emotional deprivation schema. These schemas may also overlap with Beck’s unlovability core belief or sociotropy dimension

  6. Insula and striatum activity in effort-related monetary reward processing in gambling disorder: The role of depressive symptomatology

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    Mira Fauth-Bühler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurobiological underpinnings of effort-related monetary reward processing of gambling disorder have not been previously studied. To date neuroimaging studies lack in large sample sizes and as a consequence less attention has been given to brain reward processing that could potentially be attributed to comorbid conditions such as depressive mood state. We assessed monetary reward processing using an effort-dependent task during 3 tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging. We investigated a large sample of male, right-handed, slot-machine-playing disordered gamblers (DGs; N = 80 as well as age- and smoking-matched male healthy controls (HCs; N = 89. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. DGs and HCs were divided into subgroups (“high” and “low” based on their BDI scores. Effort-related monetary reward processing did not differ between the complete groups of HCs and DGs. Brain activation during receipt of monetary reward though revealed a significant Group × BDI interaction: DGs with higher BDI scores compared to DGs with lower BDI scores showed greater brain activity in the right insula cortex and dorsal striatum while no differences were observed for HCs with higher versus lower BDI scores. Our results suggest that effort-related aspects of monetary motivation, i.e. when monetary output is tied to performance, are not altered in DG. Additionally, our findings strengthen the need for subgroup comparisons in future investigations of the disorder as part of a personalized medicine approach.

  7. Study of Association of Psychological Stress and Depression among Undergraduate Medical Students in Pondicherry

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    Devi Kittu, Rohan Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical education across the globe is perceived as being inherently stressful. Studies on psychological problems such as stress, depression and anxiety among medical students have found that these disorders are under diagnosed and under treated. In this background the present study was undertaken with the objectives to assess the magni-tude of depression and its association with stress among medical students. Methods: A Cross sectional study was undertaken among 235 medical students in a private medical college, Pondicherry. Tools similar to General Health Questionaire (GHQ-12 and Beck depression Inventory (BDI was used to screen psychological stress and depression respectively. Results: The prevalence of depression was 71% among medical students. Psychological stress was associated with depression. Conclusion: Emphasize should be laid on the importance of screening for depression of medical students on a regular basis for early detection and rendering appropriate intervention like group counseling, stress management training etc. to protect the future professionals.

  8. The relationship of neuroticism and extraversion to symptoms of anxiety and depression in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jylhä, Pekka; Isometsä, Erkki

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the relationship of the personality dimensions of neuroticism and extraversion to the symptoms of depression and anxiety in the general population. A random general population sample (ages 20-70 years), from two Finnish cities was surveyed with the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). In addition, questions regarding diagnosed lifetime mental disorders, health care use for psychiatric reasons in the past 12 months, and history of mental disorders in first-degree relatives were posed. Among the 441 subjects who participated, neuroticism correlated strongly with symptoms of depression (r(s)=.71, Ppersonality dimensions to both self-reported lifetime mental disorders and use of health services for psychiatric reasons strengthens the clinical validity of these personality dimensions.

  9. Depressive symptoms and white matter dysfunction in retired NFL players with concussion history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Jeremy; Didehbani, Nyaz; Cullum, C Munro; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Conover, Heather; Kraut, Michael A; Hart, John; Womack, Kyle B

    2013-07-02

    To determine whether correlates of white matter integrity can provide general as well as specific insight into the chronic effects of head injury coupled with depression symptom expression in professional football players. We studied 26 retired National Football League (NFL) athletes who underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scanning. Depressive symptom severity was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) including affective, cognitive, and somatic subfactor scores (Buckley 3-factor model). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were processed using tract-based spatial statistics from FSL. Correlations between FA and BDI-II scores were assessed using both voxel-wise and region of interest (ROI) techniques, with ROIs that corresponded to white matter tracts. Tracts demonstrating significant correlations were further evaluated using a receiver operating characteristic curve that utilized the mean FA to distinguish depressed from nondepressed subjects. Voxel-wise analysis identified widely distributed voxels that negatively correlated with total BDI-II and cognitive and somatic subfactors, with voxels correlating with the affective component (p NFL athletes correlate negatively with FA using either an unbiased voxel-wise or an ROI-based, tract-wise approach. DTI is a promising biomarker for depression in this population.

  10. “Female Preponderance” of Depression in Non-clinical Populations: A Meta-Analytic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Lu, Han; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Neumann, David L.; Shum, David H. K.; Chan, Raymond C. K.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical observations and research suggest a female preponderance in major depressive disorder. However, it is unclear whether a similar gender difference is found for the reporting of depressive symptoms in non-clinical populations. The present meta-analysis was conducted to address this issue. We searched for published papers targeting non-clinical populations in which the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used. Eighty-four papers (91 studies) published between 1977 and 2014 were included in the final meta-analysis, which comprised 23,579 males and 29,470 females. Females in the general population reported higher level of depressive symptoms than males (d = -0.187, corresponding to 1.159 points in the 21-item BDI). This pattern was not found to influence by years of publication, socioeconomic status, or version of the BDI used. Using age group as a moderator, studies with adolescents and young adults were found to show a smaller effect size than studies with older participants. Our results appear to confirm the “female preponderance” in the level of self-report depressive symptoms in the general population, and support the social gender role theory in explaining gender difference over biological susceptibility theory and evolutionary theory. PMID:27695433

  11. Fatigue and depression in multiple sclerosis: Correlation with quality of life

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    Miletić Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to examine the relationship between fatigue and depression, common features of multiple sclerosis (MS, and the quality of life (QOL. The study was comprised of 120 patients with clinical manifestations of definite MS. Relapsing-remitting MS was present in 76.7% patients and secondary progressive MS was present in 23.3% patients. Mean disease duration was 8.1 ± 5.6 years and the mean Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS was 3.5 ± 1.8 (range 1-8. Fatigue was measured with the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS, depression was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and QOL was assessed using the health-related quality of life questionnaire SF-36. We observed that the global FSS score was 4.6 ± 1.8 (range 1-7 and BDI was 10.7 ± 10.3 (range 0-39. The FSS significantly and positively correlated with the BDI scores (r = 0.572; p = 0.000. The severity of fatigue had a significant impact on the quality of life (r = -0.743; p = 0.000, in particular on mental health (r = -0.749; p = 0.000. We observed a significant correlation between the severity of depression and impaired quality of life (r = -0.684; p = 0.000. This study shows that fatigue and depression are associated with impaired QOL in MS.

  12. Relation between exercise, depression and body mass index

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    J. Vasconcelos-Raposo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between physical exercise, depression, and body mass index (BMI. The sample of the study consisted of 175 participants (43 male and 132 female with ages between the 18 and 27 years. The used instruments were: an adapted and validated Portuguese version of the Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI and an adaptation of the physical exercise scale developed by Prochaska, Sallis and Long (2001. The results suggested a negative correlation between the physical exercise and depression, with statistical significance. The group that does not reach the recommended level of physical exercise presents higher scores of depression in comparison with the group that reaches. This study corroborates previous studies that suggested positive effects of physical exercise on depression.

  13. Relation between exercise, depression and body mass index

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    José Vasconcelos-Raposo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between physical exercise, depression, and body mass index (BMI. The sample of the study consisted of 175 participants (43 male and 132 female with ages between the 18 and 27 years. The used instruments were: an adapted and validated Portuguese version of the Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI and an adaptation of the physical exercise scale developed by Prochaska, Sallis and Long (2001. The results suggested a negative correlation between the physical exercise and depression, with statistical significance. The group that does not reach the recommended level of physical exercise presents higher scores of depression in comparison with the group that reaches. This study corroborates previous studies that suggested positive effects of physical exercise on depression.

  14. Mental Health and Depression after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

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    Hassan Farrashbandi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental health of those with ischemic heart disease (IHD has been a focus of attention of researchers since it has always been considered as a psychosomatic disorder. The present study was designed to investigate mental health status of a group of patients before and after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Materials and Methods: In this longitudinal descriptive study 63 candidates for CABG, referred by cardiologist and cardiac surgeon in a 6 month period were asked to take part in the study if they didn't have any exclusion criteria. The patients were the out-patients of cardiac clinics in Shiraz, Iran. The patients were assessed by general health questionnaire (GHQ-28 and beck depression inventory (BDI at 3 phases, before surgery, 1 month after surgery and three months after surgery. Results: The analysis did not show significant statistical change in GHQ-28 and BDI measures before and after CABG. There were statistically significant differences in the mentioned measures between male and female participants in initial assessment, i.e., women scores were higher than men in distress scores measured by GHQ-28 and BDI. Conclusion: In our study, we observed no statistically significant differences between pre and post operation in general health and depression scales. However women showed higher degrees of depressed mood at any step of assessment.

  15. Sleep quality and depression among patients with migraine.

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    Khosro Sadeghniiat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the sleep quality and level of depression among Iranian migraineurs. Among 380 cases that were selected by simple random selection from those who attended Outpatient Neurology Clinic of Imam Khomeini Hospital, 332 patients participated in this cross-sectional study. After an inclusive examination by a neurologist, the participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian versions of Pittsburg Sleep Questionnaire (PSQI and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. They also requested to score headache severity by means of a visual analogue scale graded from 1-10. According to frequency of attacks, patients were divided into three groups: with 1-4 migraine days per month, 5-7 migraine days in a month and more than 7 migraine days per month. Mean age of participants was 36.3±10.1 years and mean headache severity score was 6.0±1.9. The PSQI total score and headache severity score were highest among patients with frequent attacks. Mean BDI, PSQI and headache severity scores significantly differ between male and female participants. There was significant positive correlation between BDI and PSQI scores (r=0.5, P<0.001 also there was a positive correlation between headache severity score and PSQI score (r=0.6, P<0.001. Decreased sleep quality with other co-morbidities such as depression in migraineurs cases should be considered.

  16. Depression. Does it affect the comprehension of receptive skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtchi, Mojgan; Zokaee, Zahra; Ghaffarinejad, Ali R; Sadeghi, Mohammad M

    2012-07-01

    To compare the comprehension of depressed and non-depressed male and female Iranian learners of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in receptive skills, and to investigate whether inefficiency in learning English could be due to depression. We selected 126 boys and 96 girls aged between 15 and 18 by simple random sampling from 2 high schools in Kerman, Iran to examine whether there was any significant relationship between depression and comprehension of receptive skills in males and females. We undertook this descriptive, correlational study between January and May 2011 in Kerman, Iran. After administration of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), we found that 93 students were non-depressed, 65 had minimal depression, 48 mild depression, and 16 suffered from severe depression. The correlation between participants` scores on listening and reading test with depression level indicated a significant relationship between depression and comprehension of both listening, and reading. Males had higher scores in both reading and listening. In listening, there was no significant difference among the levels of depression and males and females. Regarding the reading skill, there was no significant difference among levels of depression; however, the reading comprehension of males and females differed significantly. Learners who show a deficiency in receptive skills should be examined for the possibility of suffering from some degree of depression.

  17. Concurrent Validity of the Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test.

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    McLean, Mary; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The study compared the results of the Battelle Developmental Inventory (BDI) Screening Test with the Denver Developmental Screening Test-Revised and with the full-scale BDI for 30 handicapped and 35 nonhandicapped children, all aged six months to six years. Major differences were found between the tests and populations identified for follow-up.…

  18. Mechanical prosthetic valve disease is related with an increase in depression and anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turker, Yasemin; Ongel, Kurtulus; Ozaydin, Mehmet; Turker, Yasin; Yildirim Bas, Funda; Akkaya, Mehmet

    2015-02-01

    Patients with organic disease can present with psychiatric symptoms. We hypothesized that since patients with prosthetic heart valve require frequent hospital followup and are at higher risk for complications, the incidence of depression and anxiety is higher in these patients. This cross-sectional study prospectively studied 98 consecutive patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valve. All patients fulfilled prosthetic heart valve evaluation form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS). Complete blood count, basic metabolic panel and echocardiogram results were collected for all the patients. Using the BDI, there were 26 patients (27%) with no depression, 20 (20%) with mild depression, 38 (39%) with moderate, 4 (4%) with severe and 10 (10%) patients with very severe depression. Avarege score was 18.3±11.4 on BDI and 19.1±11.1 on HAS. The depression level was positively associated with prothrombin time (p les than 0.001) and international normalized ratio (INR) level (p les than 0.001). Hamilton Anxiety Scale was significantly correlated with comorbidities (r: 0.344; p=0.002), blood transfusion (r: 0.370; p les than 0.001), obesity (r: 0.319; p=0.007) and Beck Depression Scale was correlated with comorbidities (r: 0.328; p=0.002), in patients with prosthetic heart valve disease. Patients with prosthetic heart valve have higher prevalence of depression and higher scores of anxiety and depression. Early recognition and appropriate treatment of depression and anxiety may decrease the morbidity in prosthetic heart valve disease. Besides, use of new oral anticoagulant agents that do not need INR check, could decrease anxiety and depression in the future.

  19. Association of different levels of depressive symptoms with symptomatology, overall disease severity, and quality of life in women with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Amris, Kirstine; Ortega, Francisco B

    2015-01-01

    .4-23.7), as well as poorer sleep quality (3.2-units; 95 % CI 1.7-4.7) and mental component of HRQoL (-17.0-units; 95 % CI -21.0 to -12.9) than participants with minimal signs of depression. There was no association of signs of depression with pain sensitivity, exercise capacity, or the physical component of HRQo......PURPOSE: This study examined the associations of different levels of depression with pain, sleep quality, fatigue, functional exercise capacity, overall fibromyalgia (FM) severity, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in women with FM. METHODS: A total of 451 women with FM participated...... in this cross-sectional study. Depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory; BDI-II), pain intensity (numerical rating scale; NRS), pain sensitivity (algometry), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory), functional exercise capacity (6-min walk test), FM...

  20. Chronotype and Improved Sleep Efficiency Independently Predict Depressive Symptom Reduction after Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Ong, Jason C; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Manber, Rachel

    2015-09-15

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to improve both sleep and depressive symptoms, but predictors of depression outcome following CBT-I have not been well examined. This study investigated how chronotype (i.e., morningness-eveningness trait) and changes in sleep efficiency (SE) were related to changes in depressive symptoms among recipients of CBT-I. Included were 419 adult insomnia outpatients from a sleep disorders clinic (43.20% males, age mean ± standard deviation = 48.14 ± 14.02). All participants completed the Composite Scale of Morningness and attended at least 4 sessions of a 6-session group CBT-I. SE was extracted from sleep diary; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) prior to (Baseline), and at the end (End) of intervention. Multilevel structural equation modeling revealed that from Baseline to End, SE increased and BDI decreased significantly. Controlling for age, sex, BDI, and SE at Baseline, stronger evening chronotype and less improvement in SE significantly and uniquely predicted less reduction in BDI from Baseline to End. Chronotype did not predict improvement in SE. In an insomnia outpatient sample, SE and depressive symptoms improved significantly after a CBT-I group intervention. All chronotypes benefited from sleep improvement, but those with greater eveningness and/or less sleep improvement experienced less reduction in depressive symptom severity. This suggests that evening preference and insomnia symptoms may have distinct relationships with mood, raising the possibility that the effect of CBT-I on depressive symptoms could be enhanced by assessing and addressing circadian factors. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  1. Affect and eating behavior in obese adults with and without elevated depression symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B.; Crosby, Ross D.; Engel, Scott G.; Crow, Scott J.; Cao, Li; Peterson, Carol B.; Durkin, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although there is a modest relation between obesity and depression, mechanisms that contribute to this co-occurrence are unclear. This study examined mood and eating behavior among obese adults with and without elevated depression symptoms. Method Obese adults (N=50) were subtyped according to a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) cutoff of 14, indicating “probable depression.” Participants with (BDI≥14; n=15) and without elevated depression symptoms (BDI<14; n=35) were compared on affect- and eating-related variables measured via questionnaire and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) using ANCOVA and mixed model regression. Results After adjusting for group differences in body mass index (BMI; p=.03), participants with elevated depression symptoms reported greater emotional eating via self-report questionnaire [F(1,50)=4.3; p=.04], as well as more frequent binge eating (Wald chi-square=13.8; p<.001) and higher daily negative affect (Wald chi-square=7.7; p=.005) on EMA recordings. Emotional eating mediated the relationship between depression status and BMI (indirect effect estimate=3.79; 95% CI=1.02–7.46). Discussion Emotional eating and binge eating were more commonly reported by obese adults with elevated depression symptoms compared to those without, and may occur against a general backdrop of overall low mood. Intervention and prevention programs for obesity and/or depression should address disordered eating to prevent or minimize adverse health consequences. PMID:24014067

  2. Initial investigation of behavioral activation therapy for co-morbid major depressive disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry; Bodenlos, Jamie S; Schneider, Kristin L; Olendzki, Barbara; Spates, C Richard; Ma, Yunsheng

    2008-09-01

    More than one-third of treatment-seeking obese patients are clinically depressed. No evidence-based treatments exist for individuals with comorbid depression and obesity. Behavioral activation (BA), an effective treatment for depression, might also facilitate weight loss. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of BA plus nutrition counseling for weight loss among individuals with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) and obesity. The BA intervention targeted both weight reduction and depression in 14 obese patients (79% female; 86% Caucasian) who met criteria for MDD. At baseline, mean Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) score was 26.71, and mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score was 16.00. Significant reductions at 12-weeks in both BDI-II and HDRS were observed with 10 participants reaching full remission at post treatment. Reductions in body weight, daily caloric intake, and physical activity were observed. BA with nutrition counseling appears to have potential as a weight loss treatment in the context of depression. Results support the need for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of BA for both weight loss and depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Inpatients with major depressive disorder: Psychometric properties of the new Multidimensional Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darharaj, Mohammad; Habibi, Mojtaba; Power, Michael J; Farzadian, Farzaneh; Rahimi, Maesoumeh; Kholghi, Habibeh; Kazemitabar, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The New Multi-dimensional Depression Scale (NMDS) is one of the most comprehensive scales that measures depression symptoms in four domains, including emotional, cognitive, somatic, and interpersonal. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the NMDS in a group of Iranian inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). At first, the scale was translated into Persian and used as part of a battery consisting of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The battery was administered to 271 inpatients with MDD (90 men and 181 women) aged from 18 to 60 who had been referred to psychiatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Persian version of the NMDS upheld its original four-factor structure. Moreover, the results showed its good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranging from 0.70 for the emotional subscale to 0.83 for the interpersonal subscale). In addition, the NMDS scores were correlated with other constructs in empirically and theoretically expected ways, which provides evidence for the convergent (positive significant relationships with anxiety and cognitive and somatic-affective symptoms of depression) and divergent (negative significant relationships with happiness and mental health and physical health) validity of the scale. These findings supported the Persian version of the NMDS as a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of depression symptoms in patients with MDD.

  4. Exercise impact on depressed patients’ self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi-Nezhad, Mahdi

    The overall aim of the present thesis is to investigate the effects of aerobic, anaerobic and relaxation forms of exercise on physical self-perception and self-esteem of Danish epressed patients. This study was designed as part of a larger project called DEMO which was a parallel-group, randomised...... of the Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP) in Danish depressed patients. We also tested the ability of the PSPP for discriminant validity when depression groups were compared with normal adults. The mediating role of self-esteem in physical self-perceptions and negative affect relationship were examined....... A sample of 96 Danish psychiatric patients completed the PSPP, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA). The Danish version of the PSPP showed high internal consistency and Applying the exploratory and confirmatory factor...

  5. Sensitivity to changes during antidepressant treatment: a comparison of unidimensional subscales of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Isabella; Wagner, Stefanie; Mergl, Roland; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Hautzinger, Martin; Henkel, Verena; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tadić, André

    2012-06-01

    In the efficacy evaluation of antidepressant treatments, the total score of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) is still regarded as the 'gold standard'. We previously had shown that the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) was more sensitive to detect depressive symptom changes than the HAMD17 (Helmreich et al. 2011). Furthermore, studies suggest that the unidimensional subscales of the HAMD, which capture the core depressive symptoms, outperform the full HAMD regarding the detection of antidepressant treatment effects. The aim of the present study was to compare several unidimensional subscales of the HAMD and the IDS regarding their sensitivity to changes in depression symptoms in a sample of patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression (MIND). Biweekly IDS-C28 and HAMD17 data from 287 patients of a 10-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of sertraline and cognitive-behavioural group therapy in patients with MIND were converted to subscale scores and analysed during the antidepressant treatment course. We investigated sensitivity to depressive change for all scales from assessment-to-assessment, in relation to depression severity level and placebo-verum differences. The subscales performed similarly during the treatment course, with slight advantages for some subscales in detecting treatment effects depending on the treatment modality and on the items included. Most changes in depressive symptomatology were detected by the IDS short scale, but regarding the effect sizes, it performed worse than most subscales. Unidimensional subscales are a time- and cost-saving option in judging drug therapy outcomes, especially in antidepressant treatment efficacy studies. However, subscales do not cover all facets of depression (e.g. atypical symptoms, sleep disturbances), which might be important for comprehensively understanding the nature of the disease depression. Therefore, the cost-to-benefit ratio must be

  6. Mother-Infant Attachment Style as a Predictor of Depression among Female Students

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    Rozita Amani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: There are an increasing number of studies showing an association of adult attachment styles to psychopathology. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation between attachment style and depression among students of Bu-Ali Sina University in Iran. Methods: This descriptive correlational study was conducted on 157 girl students who were randomly selected. They were evaluated by demographic questionnaire, Adult Attachment Inventory (AAI (Hazan and Shaver, and theBeck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. The data was analysis by using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis in SPSS 16 statistical package. Results: Findings indicated that secure attachment style had no significant correlation with depression and insecure attachment styles had a significant positive correlation with depression (p

  7. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS: validation in a Greek general hospital sample

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    Patapis Paulos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS has been used in several languages to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients with good results. Methods The HADS was administered to 521 participants (275 controls and 246 inpatients and outpatients of the Internal Medicine and Surgical Departments in 'Attikon' General Hospital in Athens. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used as 'gold standards' for depression and anxiety respectively. Results The HADS presented high internal consistency; Cronbach's α cofficient was 0.884 (0.829 for anxiety and 0.840 for depression and stability (test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient 0.944. Factor analysis showed a two-factor structure. The HADS showed high concurrent validity; the correlations of the scale and its subscales with the BDI and the STAI were high (0.722 – 0.749. Conclusion The Greek version of HADS showed good psychometric properties and could serve as a useful tool for clinicians to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients.

  8. Anxiety and Depressed Mood Decline Following Smoking Abstinence in Adult Smokers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Lirio S; Hu, Mei-Chen; Winhusen, Theresa; Lima, Jennifer; Berlin, Ivan; Nunes, Edward

    2015-12-01

    A preponderance of relevant research has indicated reduction in anxiety and depressive symptoms following smoking abstinence. This secondary analysis investigated whether the phenomenon extends to smokers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study setting was an 11-Week double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial of osmotic release oral system methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) as a cessation aid when added to nicotine patch and counseling. Participants were 255 adult smokers with ADHD. The study outcomes are: anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI)) and depressed mood (Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI)) measured one Week and six Weeks after a target quit day (TQD). The main predictor is point-prevalence abstinence measured at Weeks 1 and 6 after TQD. Covariates are treatment (OROS-MPH vs placebo), past major depression, past anxiety disorder, number of cigarettes smoked daily, demographics (age, gender, education, marital status) and baseline scores on the BAI, BDI, and the DSM-IV ADHD Rating Scale. Abstinence was significantly associated with lower anxiety ratings throughout the post-quit period (panxiety (pAnxiety and depression ratings at baseline predicted increased ratings of corresponding measures during the post-quit period. Stopping smoking yielded reductions in anxiety and depressed mood in smokers with ADHD treated with nicotine patch and counseling. Treatment with OROS-MPH yielded mood reductions in delayed manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determinants of depression in 111 italian patients with systemic sclerosis

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    R. Scorza

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: A high prevalence of depressive symptoms has been described in systemic sclerosis (SSc, but no clear association with organ involvement or objective indices of disease severity has been depicted. To date, no effort has been made to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Italian patients with SSc or to clarify their cause. Methods: One-hundred-eleven SSc patients were asked to fill in the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI questionnaire, the scleroderma Health Assessment Questionnaire (sHAQ and two additional questions assessing the patient’s familiar support and the social consequences of the patient’s change in physical appearnace. Results: Thirty-seven subjects (33.4% presented mild to severe depressive symptoms (BDI ³17. On univariate analysis the diffuse cutaneous form of the disease (p=0.019, higher pulmonary systolic pressures on echocardiogram (p=0.016, lower FVC percentage of predicted values (p=0.022, higher sHAQ values (p<0.001 or higher VAS values for pain (p=0.007, lung involvement (p=0.02, Raynaud’s phenomenon severity (p=0.002, ulcers severity (p=0.006 or disease severity (p<0.001, were associated with the presence of pathologic depressive symptoms. On multivariate analysis only the VAS for disease severity relevant to BDI scores (p=0.016. Social behaviour changes due to SSc-related physical involvement were reported in 14 patients (38% with depressive symptoms (p=0,006 and were more likely to be observed in younger patients (p=0.001 with a more severe Raynauds’s phenomenon (p=0.013. Conclusions: Mild to severe depressive symptoms are common in SSc patients especially in those with a worse perception of disease severity, these patients should be carefully monitored and a psychological assistance counselled whenever necessary.

  10. A case-control study assessing depression in patients with periodontitis

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    Shiyamali Sundararajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the tooth. One of the important non-oral risk factors for periodontitis is psychosocial stress and depression. Depression affects oral health by affecting the immune system through its effects on hypothalamic pituitary axis system. Periodontal inflammatory surface area (PISA is a system used to assess inflammatory burden in the periodontal tissue. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between PISA and depression. Settings and Design: The design of the study is case-control study. Materials and Methods: The study design is a case-control study with forty patients each in case and control groups. The periodontal inflammatory level was assessed by PISA system and the levels of depression was assessed by using Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI. Statistical Analysis: Student's t-test was used to compare PISA and BDI scores. The BDI score (mean ± standard deviation [SD] for controls was 12.75 ± 6.82 compared to 22.73 ± 4.40 for the cases. The comparison (t = 7.78 was statistically significant at P < 0.0001. The PISA score (mean ± SD for controls was 210.47 ± 76.80 compared to the PISA score of 1069.50 ± 204.21 for cases which was statistically significant (t = 24.90; P < 0.0001. Results: Significantly higher BDI scores were observed in patients with chronic periodontitis than healthy controls. Conclusion: This study clearly reveals a significant association between the severity of depression and inflammatory burden.

  11. Longitudinal characterization of depression and mood states beginning in primary HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jessica A; Grill, Marie; Peterson, Julia; Pilcher, Christopher; Lee, Evelyn; Hecht, Frederick M; Fuchs, Dietmar; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T; Price, Richard W; Robertson, Kevin; Spudich, Serena

    2014-06-01

    Though depression is known to frequently afflict those with chronic HIV, mood during the early course of HIV is not well characterized. In a prospective study we assessed mood during primary HIV infection [primary HIV infection (PHI), ART). The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Profile of Mood States (POMS) subscales were longitudinally administered prior to and after ART in PHI subjects. This evaluation of mood was done concurrently with blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuropsychological [total z and global deficit score (GDS)] evaluation at each visit. Analysis employed Spearman's rho, logistic regression, and linear mixed models. 47.7 % of the 65 men recruited at a median 3.5 months HIV duration met BDI criteria for clinical depression at baseline, classified as 'mild' (n = 11), 'moderate' (n = 11), or 'severe' (n = 9). Drug, alcohol, and depression history did not associate with BDI score. Proportional somatic-performance scores were worse than cognitive-affective scores (p = .0045). Vigor subscore of POMS was reduced compared to norms and correlated with total z (r = 0.33, p = 0.013) and GDS (r = -0.32, p = 0.016). BDI and POMS correlated with one another (r = 0.85, p ART. Depression was prevalent during PHI in our subjects, associated with abnormal somatic-performance and vigor scores. Neither neuropsychological performance nor disease biomarkers correlated with depressed mood. Mood indices did not improve over time in the presence of ART.

  12. Screening for depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants living in Western countries: The use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoping; Haralambous, Betty; Pachana, Nancy A; Bryant, Christina; LoGiudice, Dina; Goh, Anita; Dow, Briony

    2016-03-01

    Depression and anxiety are two common mental health problems among older people. There is evidence that using well-validated screening tools can improve detection of depression and anxiety among this group. The review explored the use of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and the Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI) for screening depression and anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, one of the largest and fastest growing groups of older immigrants in Western society. It focused on the GDS and GAI because both are designed specifically for older people. Online literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. A narrative approach was used to review included papers. A total of 21 articles were included. There were limited data on anxiety among older Chinese immigrants, with only one unpublished report identified. There were 13 studies (20 articles) using the GDS with this group. Results of these studies indicated that the GDS is a reliable tool in this population; however, there was limited validity data. Two versions of the GDS-15 have been used with older Chinese immigrants, including the standard GDS-15 and Mui's GDS-15. Prevalence of depression ranged between 20% and 30% in most reviewed studies. Results of this review have practical implications for clinicians in their use of these tools with older Chinese immigrants in Western countries, such as the different GDS versions. It also suggests a number of directions for future research, such as the inclusion of clinical samples and consideration of the diversity within this group. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression among adults in Japanese clinical settings: a single-group study

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    Kikuchi Toshiaki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for treating Japanese patients with major depression is lacking, therefore, a feasibility study of CBT for depression in Japanese clinical settings is urgently required. Findings A culturally adapted, 16-week manualized individual CBT program for Japanese patients with major depressive disorder was developed. A total of 27 patients with major depression were enrolled in a single-group study with the purpose of testing the feasibility of the program. Twenty six patients (96% completed the study. The mean total score on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II for all patients (Intention-to-treat sample improved from 32.6 to 11.7, with a mean change of 20.8 (95% confidence interval: 17.0 to 24.8. Within-group effect size at the endpoint assessment was 2.64 (Cohen's d. Twenty-one patients (77.7% showed treatment response and 17 patients (63.0% achieved remission at the end of the program. Significant improvement was observed in measurement of subjective and objective depression severity (assessed by BDI-II, Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Rated, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, dysfunctional attitude (assessed by Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, global functioning (assessed by Global Assessment of Functioning of DSM-IV and subjective well-being (assessed by WHO Subjective Well-being Inventory (all p values Conclusions Our manualized treatment comprised of a 16-week individual CBT program for major depression appears feasible and may achieve favorable treatment outcomes among Japanese patients with major depression. Further research involving a larger sample in a randomized, controlled trial design is warranted. Trial registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000002542.

  14. Treating major depression with yoga: A prospective, randomized, controlled pilot trial

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    Rivera, Renee; Cochran, Ashly; Tungol, Jose Gabriel; Fayazmanesh, Nima; Weinmann, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Background Conventional pharmacotherapies and psychotherapies for major depression are associated with limited adherence to care and relatively low remission rates. Yoga may offer an alternative treatment option, but rigorous studies are few. This randomized controlled trial with blinded outcome assessors examined an 8-week hatha yoga intervention as mono-therapy for mild-to-moderate major depression. Methods Investigators recruited 38 adults in San Francisco meeting criteria for major depression of mild-to-moderate severity, per structured psychiatric interview and scores of 14–28 on Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI). At screening, individuals engaged in psychotherapy, antidepressant pharmacotherapy, herbal or nutraceutical mood therapies, or mind-body practices were excluded. Participants were 68% female, with mean age 43.4 years (SD = 14.8, range = 22–72), and mean BDI score 22.4 (SD = 4.5). Twenty participants were randomized to 90-minute hatha yoga practice groups twice weekly for 8 weeks. Eighteen participants were randomized to 90-minute attention control education groups twice weekly for 8 weeks. Certified yoga instructors delivered both interventions at a university clinic. Primary outcome was depression severity, measured by BDI scores every 2 weeks from baseline to 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes were self-efficacy and self-esteem, measured by scores on the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) at baseline and at 8 weeks. Results In intent-to-treat analysis, yoga participants exhibited significantly greater 8-week decline in BDI scores than controls (p-value = 0.034). In sub-analyses of participants completing final 8-week measures, yoga participants were more likely to achieve remission, defined per final BDI score ≤ 9 (p-value = 0.018). Effect size of yoga in reducing BDI scores was large, per Cohen’s d = -0.96 [95%CI, -1.81 to -0.12]. Intervention groups did not differ significantly in 8-week change scores for

  15. Validez Convergente de la Version Espanola Preliminar del Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depresion y Aduste Marital (Convergent Validity of the Preliminary Spanish Version of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depression and Marital Adjustment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruabarrena, M. Ignacia; de Paul, Joaquin

    1992-01-01

    "Convergent validity" of preliminary Spanish version of Child Abuse Potential (CAP) Inventory was studied. CAP uses ecological-systemic model of child maltreatment to evaluate individual, family, and social factors facilitating physical child abuse. Depression and marital adjustment were measured in three groups of mothers. Results found…

  16. Validez Convergente de la Version Espanola Preliminar del Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depresion y Aduste Marital (Convergent Validity of the Preliminary Spanish Version of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depression and Marital Adjustment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruabarrena, M. Ignacia; de Paul, Joaquin

    1992-01-01

    "Convergent validity" of preliminary Spanish version of Child Abuse Potential (CAP) Inventory was studied. CAP uses ecological-systemic model of child maltreatment to evaluate individual, family, and social factors facilitating physical child abuse. Depression and marital adjustment were measured in three groups of mothers. Results found…

  17. The influence of comorbid personality disorder on the effects of behavioural activation vs. antidepressant medication for major depressive disorder: results from a randomized trial in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradveisi, Latif; Huibers, Marcus J H; Renner, Fritz; Arasteh, Modabber; Arntz, Arnoud

    2013-08-01

    There is a disagreement about the impact of personality disorder (PD) on treatment outcome for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). 100 out-patients with MDD were randomized to 16 sessions of behavioural activation (BA) (n = 50) or antidepressant medication (ADM) (n = 50) in Iran. Main outcome was depression severity, measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), and assessed at 0, 4, 13 and 49 weeks. Participants with comorbid PDs had higher scores on BDI and HRSD at baseline and throughout the study than participants without comorbid PD. Patients with and without comorbid personality pathology responded equally to treatment on the short-and the long-term. Overall, BA was better in reducing symptoms in patients but this effect was not influenced by comorbid PD. Similar effects were found for a dimensional PD-measure. Only cluster-C PD-traits turned out to be associated with overall depression severity. Cluster-A PD-traits predicted poorer long-term treatment response to ADM and BA, but only on the BDI, not on the HRSD. No effects of cluster-B PD-traits were found. However, PD was associated with higher dropout. The general conclusion is that comorbid PD pathology, especially from cluster-C, is associated with higher depression severity, but not with less response to treatment. Comorbid PD did predict increased chance of dropout.

  18. The problems during choice of profession and comparison of these problems with anxiety and depression in final year of high school students

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    Veysel Kars

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to investigate the relationship between prevalence of anxiety, depressive disorder symptoms and some sociodemographic variables in the final year of high-school students, secondly to determine the socio-economic and cultural factors which affect choosing professions among the high school senior students in the province of Van. Methods: In this context, the study was performed in the provincial center of Van in the second semester of 2011. Unpaired t test and one way Anova test were used for statistical analysis. Socio-demographic Information Form, Awareness of Career Choice Form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI were applied to a total of 412 students. Results: In this study BAI and BDI scores were 15.4±13.3 and 15.3±12.8 respectively. BAI scores of the students in Anatolian high school were found higher than the normal high school. Both the anxiety and depressive levels of female students were higher than the males. The mean age was 16,8 years, 73.8% of whom were male. In 58% of the students’ BAI point, in 66% BDI point were higher than 41; and in 37% BDI point were higher than 17. Female students had higher BAI points. There was a positive correlation between BAI and BDI points. Conclusion: It was noticed in our study that the great amount of anxiety discovered in last grade high school students affect. The student’s job choice negatively. We think that providing last grade high school students with guidance service about job selection will be useful.

  19. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

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    Milgrom Jeannette

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Methods Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26–32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161 also completed questionnaires at 10–12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1. Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2. Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3. Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator

  20. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-04-16

    Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26-32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161) also completed questionnaires at 10-12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1). Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2). Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3). Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator for other risk factors. Risk factor profiles for

  1. Depression and intimate relationships of adolescents from divorced families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadžikapetanović, Halima; Babić, Tajib; Bjelošević, Edin

    2017-02-01

    Aim To determine an impact of parental divorce to depression and intimate relationships of young people during adolescence, and prevalence of symptoms of depression and the level of intimacy in relations to adolescents living in intact families and those from divorced families. Methods This prospective descriptive research was conducted on a sample of 168 examinees of which 64 (38.1%) were students of the University Zenica, and 104 (61.9%) high students schools from Zenica and Maglaj cities during May and June 2011. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) II, Miller Social Intimacy Scale and sociodemographic questionnaire were used. Results Adolescents from divorced families had statistically significantly higher level of depression (pintimate relationships, with a legislative introduction of premarital and marriage counseling for parents in the conflict. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  2. Variation in the recall of socially rewarding information and depressive symptom severity: a prospective cohort study.

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    Lewis, G; Kounali, D-Z; Button, K S; Duffy, L; Wiles, N J; Munafò, M R; Harmer, C J; Lewis, G

    2017-05-01

    To test the association between recall for socially rewarding (positive) and/or socially critical (negative) information and depressive symptoms. Cohort study of people who had visited UK primary care in the past year reporting depressive symptoms (N = 558, 69% female). Positive and negative recall was assessed at three time-points, 2 weeks apart, using a computerised task. Depressive symptoms were assessed at four time-points using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Analyses were conducted using multilevel models. Concurrently we found evidence that, for every increase in two positive words recalled, depressive symptoms reduced by 0.6 (95% CI -1.0 to -0.2) BDI points. This association was not affected by adjustment for confounders. There was no evidence of an association between negative recall and depressive symptoms (-0.1, 95% CI -0.5 to 0.3). Longitudinally, we found more evidence that positive recall was associated with reduced depressive symptoms than vice versa. People with more severe depressive symptoms recall less positive information, even if their recall of negative information is unaltered. Clinicians could put more emphasis on encouraging patients to recall positive, socially rewarding information, rather than trying to change negative interpretations of events that have already occurred. © 2017 The Authors. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Childhood adversities, adulthood life events and depression.

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    Korkeila, Jyrki; Vahtera, Jussi; Nabi, Hermann; Kivimäki, Mika; Korkeila, Katariina; Sumanen, Markku; Koskenvuo, Karoliina; Koskenvuo, Markku

    2010-12-01

    The role of childhood adversities in predicting adulthood depression has been suggested to be complex and in need of additional comprehensive studies. This investigation set out to examine whether increased exposure to life events (LEs) in adulthood mediates the association between childhood adversities and adulthood depression. This study is based on a random health survey sample from the Finnish working-aged population (n=16,877) with a follow-up of up to 7 years. Depression was identified by Beck Depression Inventory, records of antidepressant prescriptions and hospitalization due to depression obtained from national health registers. Childhood adversities were associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing a high number of LEs in adulthood and their perceived burdensomeness. The mean number of new LEs correlated significantly (Pchildhood adversities. Reporting childhood adversities was associated with a 1.28-2.70-fold increase in the odds of depression as indicated by BDI score, a 1.29-1.94-fold increase in the rate of antidepressant prescriptions and a 1.17-4.04-fold increase in the risk of hospitalization due to depression. Adjustment for new LE attenuated these associations by 21-24%, but did not render them insignificant. Increased exposure to adult negative life events proximal to adult depression may partially explain the association between childhood adversities and adult depression. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Somatic symptom overlap in Beck Depression Inventory-II scores following myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Pilote, Louise; Dozois, David J. A.; Beck, Aaron T.; Dobson, Keith S.; Fuss, Samantha; de Jonge, Peter; Grace, Sherry L.; Stewart, Donne E.; Ormel, Johan; Abbey, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Depression measures that include somatic symptoms may inflate severity estimates among medically ill patients, including those with cardiovascular disease. Aims To evaluate whether people receiving in-patient treatment following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) had higher somatic symptom

  5. Detailed course of depressive symptoms and risk for developing depression in late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a cohort study

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    Jinnin R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ran Jinnin,1 Yasumasa Okamoto,1 Koki Takagaki,1 Yoshiko Nishiyama,1 Takanao Yamamura,1 Yuri Okamoto,2 Yoshie Miyake,2 Yoshitake Takebayashi,3 Keisuke Tanaka,4 Yoshinori Sugiura,5 Haruki Shimoda,6 Norito Kawakami,6 Toshi A Furukawa,7 Shigeto Yamawaki1 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, 2Health Service Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 3Risk Analysis Research Center, The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo, Japan; 4Graduated School of Education, Joetsu University of Education, Niigata, Japan; 5Graduated School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 6Department of Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 7Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Purpose: Despite its clinical importance, adolescent subthreshold depression remains a largely neglected topic. The aims of this study were to accurately identify the natural course of depressive symptoms and the risk for developing major depressive episode (MDE in late adolescents with subthreshold depression over 1 year.Patients and methods: One hundred and seventy-two participants <20 years of age (mean age: 18.32 years, standard deviation: 0.50, who did not meet the full criteria for an MDE, were selected from 2,494 screened freshmen based on the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II. We conducted a cohort study of three groups (low-, middle-, and high-symptom groups divided based on BDI-II scores, over a 1 year period with the use of bimonthly assessments. Temporal changes of depressive symptoms were analyzed using linear mixed modeling and growth mixture modeling.Results: First, we found that late adolescents with subthreshold depression (high depressive symptoms were split between the increasing and decreasing depressive symptoms groups, whereas the majority of the less-symptoms group remained

  6. Changes in the Temperament and Character Inventory dimensions after paroxetine treatment in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Tetsu; Kaneda, Ayako; Nakagami, Taku; Kaneko, Sunao; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have reported changes in the dimensions of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) after patients with major depressive disorder are treated. We aimed to investigate the changes in the TCI dimensions after paroxetine treatment in patients with major depressive disorder. Forty-eight patients were enrolled in this study and were treated with 10-40 mg/day of paroxetine for 6 weeks. The TCI was completed twice, at weeks 0 and 6. We used the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) to evaluate patients. The participants were divided into three groups (responders, non-responders, and early responders) based on treatment response. The scores of each dimension of the TCI were compared before and after treatment using repeated-measures two-way analyses of variance. In the responders group (n = 24), no TCI dimension scores changed significantly during treatment, but the interaction between sex and MADRS score change was significantly associated with the results. In the non-responders group (n = 15), the self-directedness score increased significantly during the treatment period (p = 0.000), and the change in MADRS score significantly affected the results. In the early responders group (n = 9), no TCI dimension scores changed significantly during treatment. The results of the present study may reveal a possible correlation between paroxetine treatment and changes in personality traits. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Depressive Symptoms among Fourth Form Students in St. Kitts and Nevis High Schools

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    Gillian A. Lowe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been limited research on depressive symptoms among high school students in St. Kitts and Nevis. This project examines levels of depressive symptoms among fourth form (grade 10 students attending all high schools in St. Kitts and Nevis. Students enrolled in the fourth form during the 2006/2007 academic year in all high schools were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. A near census of the students was conducted (n = 744 students; 50.4% females, 47.6% males, and 2% no gender reported; age 13–19 years, mean = 15.5 ± 0.8 years. Six in every ten students (62.1% reported some symptoms of depression, with 14.8% reporting moderate to severe and 9.7% reporting severe symptoms of depression. Females reported significantly higher BDI-II scores (t(727 = 7.11, p < 0.01 with 70% of females reporting some level of depressive symptoms compared with 52% of their male counterparts (X2(1 = 24.6, p < 0.05. Additionally, 34% of females were in the moderate to severe or severe range of depressive symptoms, while 15% of males were in the same range. Students who were older than expected for their grade (i.e., 17 years or older reported significantly higher BDI-II scores (F(2,740 = 2.88, p < 0.05 than students who were younger or at the expected age (i.e., 14–16 years. Students whose mothers had a high school or postsecondary education reported significantly lower levels of depressive symptoms than students whose mothers had less than a high school education (F(3, 637, = 4.23, p < 0.05. Symptoms of depression among fourth form students in St. Kitts and Nevis are a prevalent problem that is influenced by students’ age, gender, and social class as indicated by maternal education.

  8. Uncontrollable and unpredictable stress interacts with subclinical depression and anxiety scores in determining anxiety response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havranek, Michael M; Bolliger, Bianca; Roos, Sophie; Pryce, Christopher R; Quednow, Boris B; Seifritz, Erich

    2016-01-01

    According to learned helplessness theory, uncontrollable stress is assumed to be a critical etiological factor in the pathogenesis of depression. In contrast, unpredictability of stressors is assumed to facilitate the development of sustained anxiety. Despite the frequent co-morbidity of depression and anxiety disorders, these two factors have rarely been studied simultaneously in humans. Therefore, we investigated whether there are interaction effects of uncontrollability and unpredictability on anxiety response in healthy participants. Seventy-nine healthy participants performed a visual dot probe task with emotional faces, while receiving mild electrical shocks in four different conditions (2 × 2 factorial design). In (un)controllable conditions, participants were (not) able to attenuate shock intensity. In (un)predictable conditions, participants were (not) able to anticipate shock occurrence. Before the experiment, participants' subclinical depression and anxiety scores were measured using the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories (BDI/BAI). During the experiment, continuous skin conductance and self-reported state anxiety were assessed and attentional biases towards angry faces were calculated. As expected, participants showed greater anxiety in uncontrollable compared to controllable and in unpredictable compared to predictable conditions. Additionally, anxiety decreased within the test sessions in participants with low BDI/BAI scores but not in participants with higher BDI/BAI scores. Most importantly, controllability and predictability interacted with each other and with BDI/BAI scores with regard to anxiety. Our results provide evidence that uncontrollability and unpredictability of stressors not only have separate but also interaction effects on several anxiety measures in susceptible individuals and may provide insights into the psychological mechanisms underlying a depressive/anxiety co-morbidity.

  9. Depression, pain, exposure to stressful life events, and long-term outcomes in temporomandibular disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, S M; Laskin, D M; Frantsve, L M; Orr, T

    2001-06-01

    This study investigated the role of psychological factors in temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Orofacial pain patients' pretreatment levels of depression, disability caused by pain, and exposure to stressful life events were measured, and differences on these variables between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease patients and patients whose pain was of muscular origin (MPD) were evaluated. The use of these variables and patient diagnostic status in predicting response to treatment in a subsample of these patients was also evaluated. Before undergoing treatment, 258 patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Pain Disability Index (PDI), and the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS). Follow-up data on pain disability, current level of pain, depression, and satisfaction with treatment were obtained on 48 of these patients who were contacted at varying intervals after completing treatment. BDI scores obtained at the outset of treatment were significantly elevated and were positively correlated with SRRS and PDI scores. MPD patients had higher SRRS, BDI depression, and PDI pain disability scores than TMJ patients, and differences between the 2 groups in pain disability were greatest in areas that are often sources of interpersonal stress. Among follow-up patients, PDI scores declined after treatment, with MPD patients showing greater decreases than TMJ patients. Independent of patients' diagnostic status, their pretreatment PDI scores were predictive of their pain level at follow-up and were inversely related to their degree of satisfaction with treatment at follow-up; their pretreatment BDI scores were predictive of their depression level at follow-up. The findings are consistent with previous research indicating a link between emotional dysfunction and TMD and are largely supportive of the conclusion that psychological factors play a more pronounced role when pain is of muscular origin. Promising behavioral interventions are available for

  10. 急性冠脉综合征患者焦虑抑郁情绪的随访%Follow-up of anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢南姿; 马文林; 刘光辉; 沈玉芹; 陈罗蔓; 周璐

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察急性冠脉综合征(acute coronary syndrome,ACS)患者焦虑抑郁情绪的变化.方法 对782例ACS患者的焦虑抑郁情绪进行平均(8.0±5.8)m的随访测评,应用综合性医院情绪测量表(hospital anxiety and depression scales,HADS)、贝克焦虑量表(Beck Anxiety Inventory,BAI)和贝克抑郁量表(Beck Depression Inventory,BDI),分析ACS患者焦虑抑郁情绪的变化.结果 与基线期相比,ACS患者的抑郁评分下降具有统计学意义[(7.07±5.37) vs(6.28±5.51),P<0.05],焦虑评分下降无统计学意义(P>0.05),焦虑、抑郁的构成比例无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 ACS后抑郁程度虽然呈现自然下降趋势,但构成比例降低却无统计学意义,故仍需早发现,早治愈.关于ACS后的焦虑有待进一步深入研究.%Objective To observe changes in anxiety and depression symptoms in acute coronary syndrome patients. Methods A prospective cohort study of 782 patients with ACS were followed up anxiety and depression symptoms were assessed and collected, application of hospital anxiety and depression scales (HADS)、beck anxiety inventory (BAI) and beck depression inventory (BDI). Results The follow-up Beck depression inventory (BDI) score decreased significantly compared with the baseline BDI score [(7.07±5.37) vs (6.28±5.51, P 0.05). Conclusion Among ACS population, though the depression level was decline spontaneously 7 months later, the proportions of anxiety and depression were still as high as the baseline, So as for the improvement of clinic outcome of ACS population, post-ACS depression should be assessed and treated effectively as early as possible. In the case of post-ACS anxiety, large sample and long term investigations were needed to make it clear.

  11. PSDRS, BDI, MoCA and MMSE as screening tools for the evaluation of mood and cognitive functions in patients at the early stage of cerebral stroke.

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    Dorota Anita Przewoźnik

    2015-06-01

    The PSDRS and MoCA scales proved to be more effective tools of the evaluation of depressive and cognitive disorders in patients at an early stage after cerebral stroke, than it was observed in the case of conventionally applied MMSE and BDI scales. The examination results additionally prove a significant dependence between mood and the efficiency of cognitive functions in this group of patients. With the weakening of cognitive functioning, also the patients’ mood became depressed.

  12. Correlation between low back pain and depression of nurses%护理人员腰背疼痛与抑郁情绪的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李向芝; 易春燕; 严凌燕; 王若婧; 凌莉

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between low back pain and depression of nurses. Methods 502 nurses were randomly divided into two groups: one group with pains and the other without, both investigated by questionnaire involving general condition, numerical rating scale (NRS) and Beck depression inventory (BDI). Chi-square test, rank sum test and rank correlation analysis were employed to analyze the relationship between low back pain and depression. Results BDI index of the group with low back pain was higher than that in the group without low back pain. Both incidence and degree of low back pain had the positive correlation with BDI. Conclusions The incidence and the degree of low back pain are both correlated with degree of depression. Double interferences in somatic and psychological symptoms may lower the incidence of low back pains in nurses.%目的 探讨护理人员腰背疼痛(low back pain,LBP)与抑郁情绪之间的相关关系.方法 采用一般情况、数字疼痛量表(numerical rating scale,NRS)及Beck抑郁问卷(Beck depression inventory,BDI)对502名临床在职护理人员进行调查.按有无LBP分为LBP组和无LBP组.采用x2检验、秩和检验及等级相关分析法分析LBP与抑郁情绪间的相关关系.结果 与无LBP组比较,LBP组BDI指数明显升高.LBP发生率及疼痛程度与抑郁程度呈正相关.结论 做好躯体症状和心理症状双重干预可降低护理人员LBP的发生.

  13. Una teoria della razionalità: il modello BDI

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    Costanza Larese

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In quest’articolo propongo un’analisi di una teoria della razionalità, il modello Belief-Desire-Intention (BDI, con l’obiettivo di stabilirne la fecondità teoretica. Interpreto il modello come il risultato dell’indebolimento di alcuni principi cardine della teoria della scelta razionale: se questa è di natura normativa e considera agenti altamente idealizzati, il modello BDI è invece motivato dallo scopo di dare una caratterizzazione cognitivamente plausibile delle azioni degli individui e inserisce nella definizione di razionalità aspetti non normativi. Per questa ragione, la teoria BDI introduce il concetto di intenzione e complica la propria ontologia: le intenzioni pongono dei vincoli di consistenza sulla componente motivazionale dell’individuo e fungono da filtro di ammissibilità sulla selezione di altre intenzioni (Bratman, 1987. Presento ed analizzo di seguito due formalizzazioni, sviluppatesi in due diverse aree di ricerca (logica e intelligenza artificiale, dei principi filosofici della teoria: il sistema BDICTL*-W3 (Georgeff e Rao, 1998 ed un esempio di Agent Control Loop (Wooldridge, 2000. La discussione vuole rilevare le peculiarità dei vari approcci alla teoria in oggetto, individuare i nodi concettuali comuni ma anche le specificità di ciascun apporto. Concludo quindi con alcune osservazioni di carattere epistemologico sui vantaggi di un approccio plurale.

  14. The Anxiety Depression Distress Inventory-27 (ADDI-27): a short version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Augustine; Freedenthal, Stacey; Gutierrez, Peter M; Wong, Jane L; Emmerich, Ashley; Lozano, Gregorio

    2011-06-01

    The authors conducted three studies to construct and examine the psychometric properties of a 27-item version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire-90 (MASQ-90; Watson & Clark, 1991a). The Anxiety Depression Distress Inventory-27 (ADDI-27) contains three empirically derived scales: Positive Affect, Somatic Anxiety, and General Distress, which are relevant dimensions of the tripartite model of affect. Each scale is composed of nine items, and the estimate of scale reliability for each scale score was ≥ .80 across the three studies. Results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses provided adequate support for a 3-factor model. Additional estimates of concurrent validity documented the ADDI-27 scales' convergent and discriminant validity. We also identified three construct relevant correlates for each scale score. Overall, the ADDI-27 appears to be a content valid, reliable, and multidimensional measure of the tripartite model of affect.

  15. Neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in depressive disorder Correlation between 1H-MRS and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Xia; Minjie Yang; Yi Lei; Yicheng Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)and functional MRI to study depression have primarily focused on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-MRS)appearance in various areas of the brain and volume measurements in the limbic system.However,results have not been consistent.To the best of our knowledge,very little is known about the relationship between 1H-MRS appearance and depression inventory.In the present study,the relationship between 1H-MRS appearance in depressive patients and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 scale was analyzed.MRI and 1H-MRS exhibited widened sulci and cisterns,as well as an absence of abnormal signals in depressive patients.In addition,N-acetyl aspartate/total creatine ratios in bilateral hippocampi and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly less in depressive patients than in control subjects(P < 0.01).In contrast,choline-containing compounds/total creatine ratios in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly greater in depressive patients than in control subjects(P < 0.01).These ratios significantly and positively correlated with patient total depression scores as assessed using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 scale(r=0.934 7,0.878 7,P < 0.01).These results suggested that 1H-MRS could be used to reveal a reduced number of neurons in the hippocampus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex,as well as altered membrane phospholipid metabolism in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex,in patients with depressive disorder.Abnormal mechanisms partially reflected severity of depressive disorder.

  16. The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy as an anti-depressive treatment is falling: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Tom J; Friborg, Oddgeir

    2015-07-01

    A meta-analysis examining temporal changes (time trends) in the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as a treatment for unipolar depression was conducted. A comprehensive search of psychotherapy trials yielded 70 eligible studies from 1977 to 2014. Effect sizes (ES) were quantified as Hedge's g based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Rates of remission were also registered. The publication year of each study was examined as a linear metaregression predictor of ES, and as part of a 2-way interaction with other moderators (Year × Moderator). The average ES of the BDI was 1.58 (95% CI [1.43, 1.74]), and 1.69 for the HRSD (95% CI [1.48, 1.89]). Subgroup analyses revealed that women profited more from therapy than did men (p effects of CBT have declined linearly and steadily since its introduction, as measured by patients' self-reports (the BDI, p depressive symptoms as compared with the seminal trials. Potential causes and possible implications for future studies are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. A Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Study Evaluating UP165 and S-Adenosyl-l-Methionine on Depression, Anxiety and Psychological Well-Being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S. Kalman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this pilot clinical trial was to evaluate the effects of UP165 (derived from Zea mays L., commonly known as corn over time. The secondary objective was the comparison for outcomes versus S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM-e. Subjects with mild depression or anxiety were given the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and the Schwartz Outcome Scale (SOS-10. Forty-two subjects (21–65 years old were randomized to eight-weeks of supplementation with UP165 or SAM-e with questionnaires being administered at randomization, week four and eight. Those receiving UP165 achieved significant reduction from baseline at weeks four and eight, respectively for the BDI-II, as well as a trend for reduction in BAI at week four and significance at week eight. There was a trend for improvement on the SOS at week four and significance at week eight. SAM-e demonstrated a trend for improvement on the BDI-II by week eight over the UP165 with no differences between the two for the BAI or the SOS. Overall, this study indicates that there may be benefit to UP165 for mood enhancement in those with mild depression or anxiety. Randomized placebo comparator trials appear warranted.

  18. Effectiveness of meta-cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapy in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Ahmad; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Rasoulian, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of metacognitive therapy (MCT) and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) in treating Iranian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Thirty three outpatients meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD without any other axis I and II disorders were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions, i.e. MCT, CBT and pharmacotherapy. The Beck Depression Inventory-II-Second Edition (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) were administered for pre-treatment, post-treatment and follow-up. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Based on repeated measures ANOVA, all the participants demonstrated improvement in depression, anxiety, dysfunctional attitude and ruminative response. Based on percentage results, all the patients in MCT and CBT groups showed significant improvement at post-treatment phase. MCT and CBT were more effective than pharmacotherapy alone In treatment of MDD. None.

  19. Fatigue, Depression and Sleep Disturbances in Iranian Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouzbeh Fateh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is one of the most frequent symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS and it is difficult to clarify the nature of this symptom and manage it. This study was aimed to evaluate the frequency of fatigue, depression and sleep disturbances in Iranian patients with MS. 100 patients from the outpatient MS clinic of Sina hospital were asked to complete Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Sleep Disorder Questionnaire (SDQ, Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS questionnaires. Student's t-test, ANOVA, Spearman correlation and Stepwise multiple linear regressions by SPSS version 15.0 were used for data analysis. From participants, 64 had fatigue complaint during day time and 36 did not feel fatigued. BDI, PSQI, MFIS and SDQ scores were significantly higher in fatigued patients than non-fatigued group but there were no statistically significant differences in ESS, EDSS and duration of disease between fatigued and non-fatigued cases. There were significant correlations between MFIS and BDI scores (r=0.49, P=0.01, MFIS and PSQI scores (r=0.399, P=0.01 and MFIS and ESS (r=0.25, P=0.01. This study demonstrates that depression is not the only cause of fatigue in patients with MS and it is also associated with sleep disorders, so this complaint should be carefully evaluated and managed in these patients.

  20. Fatigue, depression and sleep disturbances in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Fateh, Rouzbeh; Daneshmand, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most frequent symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and it is difficult to clarify the nature of this symptom and manage it. This study was aimed to evaluate the frequency of fatigue, depression and sleep disturbances in Iranian patients with MS. 100 patients from the outpatient MS clinic of Sina hospital were asked to complete Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Sleep Disorder Questionnaire (SDQ), Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) questionnaires. Student's t-test, ANOVA, Spearman correlation and Stepwise multiple linear regressions by SPSS version 15.0 were used for data analysis. From participants, 64 had fatigue complaint during day time and 36 did not feel fatigued. BDI, PSQI, MFIS and SDQ scores were significantly higher in fatigued patients than non-fatigued group but there were no statistically significant differences in ESS, EDSS and duration of disease between fatigued and non-fatigued cases. There were significant correlations between MFIS and BDI scores (r=0.49, P=0.01), MFIS and PSQI scores (r=0.399, P=0.01) and MFIS and ESS (r=0.25, P=0.01). This study demonstrates that depression is not the only cause of fatigue in patients with MS and it is also associated with sleep disorders, so this complaint should be carefully evaluated and managed in these patients.

  1. Sociodemographic correlates of unipolar and bipolar depression in North-East India: A cross-sectional study

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    Kamal Narayan Kalita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early diagnosis and management of depression is important for better therapeutic outcome. Strategies for distinguishing between unipolar and bipolar depression are yet to be defined, resulting improper management. This study aims at comparing the socio-demographic and other variables between patients with unipolar and bipolar depression, along with assessment of severity of depression. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care psychiatry hospital in North-East India. The study included total of 330 subjects selected through purposive sampling technique from outpatient department after obtaining due informed consent. Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I. version 6.0 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were applied. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 16.0 was applied for analysis. Results: Bipolar group had onset of illness at significantly younger age with more chronicity (32.85 ± 11.084. Mean BDI score was significantly higher in the unipolar depressive group. Conclusion: Careful approach in eliciting symptom severity and associated socio demographic profiles in depressed patients may be helpful in early diagnosis of bipolar depression.

  2. Sociodemographic Correlates of Unipolar and Bipolar Depression in North-East India: A Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Kamal Narayan; Hazarika, Jyoti; Sharma, Mohan; Saikia, Shilpi; Patangia, Priyanka; Hazarika, Pranabjyoti; Sarmah, Anil Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Early diagnosis and management of depression is important for better therapeutic outcome. Strategies for distinguishing between unipolar and bipolar depression are yet to be defined, resulting improper management. This study aims at comparing the socio-demographic and other variables between patients with unipolar and bipolar depression, along with assessment of severity of depression. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care psychiatry hospital in North-East India. The study included total of 330 subjects selected through purposive sampling technique from outpatient department after obtaining due informed consent. Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) version 6.0 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were applied. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0 was applied for analysis. Results: Bipolar group had onset of illness at significantly younger age with more chronicity (32.85 ± 11.084). Mean BDI score was significantly higher in the unipolar depressive group. Conclusion: Careful approach in eliciting symptom severity and associated socio demographic profiles in depressed patients may be helpful in early diagnosis of bipolar depression. PMID:28250558

  3. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  4. Coping with obesity stigma affects depressed mood in African-American and white candidates for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettich, Karla C; Chen, Eunice Y

    2012-05-01

    Depressed mood in severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking candidates is influenced by obesity stigma, yet the strategies for coping with this stigma are less well understood. This study hypothesized that coping strategies are significantly associated with depressed mood above and beyond demographic factors and frequency of weight-related stigma, with specific coping strategies differing between racial groups. Severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking adults (N = 234; 91 African Americans) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Stigmatizing Situations Inventory (SSI). Two hierarchical linear regressions were conducted separately for African Americans and whites. For both racial groups, age, sex, BMI, years overweight, annual income, and education level did not account for a significant portion of the variance in BDI scores. The frequency of stigmatizing situations and coping strategies significantly explained 16.4% and 33.2%, respectively, of the variance for whites, and 25.9% and 25%, respectively, for African Americans (P self-statements, and less self-love and more crying; while in African Americans greater depressed mood was associated only with ignoring the situation (P < 0.05). The study found that regardless of race, depressed mood in severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking clients is related to the frequency of stigmatizing experiences and associated coping strategies. This suggests that efforts to reduce the deleterious effects of weight-related stigma need to focus both on reducing the frequency of stigmatization and on teaching effective coping strategies. These efforts also need to take into account the client's racial background.

  5. Depression, suicidality and alcohol abuse among medical and business students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curran, T A

    2012-02-01

    We determined the prevalence and correlates of depression, alcohol abuse and suicidal ideation among medical and business students in Trinity College, Dublin and University College, Dublin. We rated depression and suicidal ideation in the past month with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and alcohol abuse with the CAGE. Of 539 students registered, 338 (62.7%) responded. 47 (13.9%) students were depressed, scoring > or = 10 on the BDI. 83 (24.6%) students had an alcohol use disorder (CAGE > or = 2). Alcohol abuse was more common among business students than medical students (AOR = 2.9; 95% C.I. = 1.7-5.1); there were no other inter-faculty differences. 20 (5.9%) students reported suicidal ideation in the last month. Suicidal ideation correlated positively with stressful life events (AOR = 1.4; 95% C.I.= 1.1-1.7), and negatively with social support (AOR = 0.6; 95\\/ C.I. =0.5-0.7). These findings suggest that students are a vulnerable group, and underscore the need for mental health education and psychosocial support services in universities.

  6. Estresse pós-traumático, ansiedade e depressão em vítimas de queimaduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Galery Medeiros

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in the investigation of the emotional consequences related to burns. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of posttraumatic stress (PTSD, depression, and anxiety symptoms among burnt inpatients in the Hospital Municipal de Pronto Socorro de Porto Alegre (RS, Brazil. In patients’ symptomatology was assessed with the Screen for Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms (SPTSS, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI. It was found that burn-victims patients showed high levels of psychopathology, including clinically-relevant PTSD (21.7% of participants, and moderate-to-severe anxiety (25% and depression (30% symptoms. Overall, burn extension and degree weren’t associated to the level of symptomatology. Taken together, the findings suggest that victims of burn should receive additional care regarding their mental health status, including interventions tailored to prevent PTSD and depression.

  7. Adolescent pregnancy and depression: is there an association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalak, Z; Köşüş, N; Köşüş, A; Hizli, D; Akçal, B; Kafali, H; Canbal, M; Isaoğlu, Ü

    2016-01-01

    The impact of being an adolescent and socio-demographic parameters on depression development during pregnancy were evaluated in this study. Between September 2010 and September 2011, 105 consecutive adolescent women ≤ 17 years of age were defined as the study group and 105 consecutive pregnant women over 18 years of age and matched for gestational age, were defined as the control group. Groups were compared according to depression development. The predictors of depression were analyzed by regression analysis. Median Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) scores in adolescent and control groups were 16 and 6, respectively. The difference was statistically significant. In the adolescent group, 39.0% of patients had mild depression, 37.1% moderate, and 10.5% had severe depression. Only 4.8% of patients in the control group had mild depression while none of the control cases had moderate or severe depression. Multivariate analysis showed that most important factor that was associated with depression development during pregnancy was being an adolescent. Depression risk was increased 18.2-fold in adolescent patients with pregnancy. Therefore psychiatric evaluation should be considered for these patients.

  8. Effectiveness of Compassionate Mind Training on Depression, Anxiety, and Self-Criticism in a Group of Iranian Depressed Patients

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    Fatemeh Noorbala

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of compassionate mind training (CMT on symptoms of depression and anxiety in Iranian depressed sufferers .Method:Nineteen depressed patients aged 20 to 40 (Beck Depression Inventory value≥20 were randomly assigned into two groups. The experimental group participated in 12 sessions of group therapy based on Paul Gilbert’s manual of CMT. The control group was given no intervention. The participants were assessed by Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Anxiety Scale (AS, and Levels of Self-Criticism (LSCS questionnaires at the beginning and immediately after the intervention. To follow-up the therapeutic effect of CMT, the three questionnaires were answered again by participants two months after the end of the intervention. Data were analyzed by independent samples ttest. Results:The results revealed that CMT significantly decreases depression (P<0.05 and anxiety score (P<0.05 in the follow-up study, but not immediately after the intervention. Although CMT decreased selfcriticism, this effect was marginally insignificant.Conclusion:The findings indicated that CMT could alleviatedepression and anxiety in a group of Iranian depressed patients.

  9. [The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR): validation of the depression scale in a clinical sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Wolfram Alexis; Loew, Thomas; von Heymann, Friedrich; Stadtmüller, Godehard; Georgi, Alexander; Tischinger, Michael; Strom, Frederik; Mutschler, Friederike; Tritt, Karin

    2015-06-01

    The ICD-10 Symptom Rating (ISR) 1 measures the severity of psychiatric disorders with 29 items on 5 subscales as comprehensively as possible. The following syndromes are measured: Depressive syndrome, anxiety syndrome, obsessive-compulsive syndrome, Somatoform syndrome, eating disorder syndrome as well as additional items that cover various mental syndromes, and an overall score. The study reports findings on the validity and sensitivity to change of the depression subscale (ISR-D). In a clinical sample of N=949 inpatients with depression spectrum disorders the convergent validity was determined by correlation with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) 3 and the subscale "depression" of the Symptom-Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) 4. The high correlation between the different instruments confirms the validity of the ISR-Depression Scale. The sensitivity to change of the ISR seems higher than that of the BDI and the SCL-90. Because of its economy and the good psychometric properties the ISR is recommended for use in clinical samples.

  10. The effect of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate on postnatal depression: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singata-Madliki, Mandisa; Hofmeyr, G Justus; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2016-07-01

    Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is the most commonly used hormonal contraceptive method in South Africa. It is frequently administered in the immediate postnatal period, yet it is unclear whether it affects the risk of postnatal depression (PND). To determine whether DMPA increases the risk of PND compared with the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) when administered after delivery. A single-blind randomised controlled trial conducted at two teaching hospitals in East London, South Africa. Eligible, consenting women (N=242) requiring postnatal contraception were randomised to receive DMPA or an IUD within 48 hours of childbirth and interviewed at 1 and 3 months postpartum. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Resumption of sexual intercourse, menstrual symptoms and breastfeeding rates were also assessed. One-month EPDS depression scores were statistically significantly higher in the DMPA arm compared with IUD arm (p=0.04). Three-month BDI-II scores were significantly higher in the DMPA arm than in the IUD arm (p=0.002) and, according to the BDI-II but not the EPDS, more women in the DMPA arm had major depression at this time-point (8 vs 2; p=0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in other outcome measures except that fewer women had resumed sexual activity by 1 month postpartum in the DMPA arm (13% vs 26%; p=0.02). The possibility that immediate postnatal DMPA use is associated with depression cannot be excluded. These findings justify further research with longer follow-up. PACTR201209000419241. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. The effect of acupuncture on mood and working memory in patients with depression and schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peggy Bosch; Maurits van den Noort; Sujung Yeo; Sabina Lim; Anton Coenen; Gilles van Luijtelaar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with depression, as wel as in patients with schizophrenia, both mood and working memory performance are often impaired. Both issues can only be addressed and improved with medication to some extent. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the mood and the working memory performance in patients with depression or schizophrenia and whether acupuncture can improve these. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: A pragmatic clinical trial design was used. The study was conducted in a psychiatric clinic. Fifty patients with depression and 50 with schizophrenia were randomly divided into an experimental and a waiting-list group. Additional y, 25 healthy control participants were included. Twelve weeks of individualized acupuncture treatment was used as the clinical intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Al patients were tested before (T1) and after (T2) acupuncture treatment on a mood scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI-II), a simple working memory task (digit span), and a complex working memory task (letter-number sequencing); the healthy controls were tested at T1 only. RESULTS: Patients with depression scored worse than the others on the BDI-II, and patients with schizophrenia scored worse than the healthy controls. On the digit span, patients with schizophrenia did not differ from healthy controls whereas they scored worse of al on the letter-number sequencing. With respect to the acupuncture findings, first, the present study showed that the use of acupuncture to treat patients with schizophrenia was both practical and safe. Moreover, acupuncture had a positive effect on the BDI-II for the depression group, but acupuncture had no effect on the digit span and on the letter-number sequencing performance for the two clinical groups. CONCLUSION: The clinical improvement in patients with depression after acupuncture treatment was not accompanied by any significant change in a simple working memory task or in a more complex working memory

  12. Personality features, dissociation, self-stigma, hope, and the complex treatment of depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasko J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jan Prasko,1 Marie Ociskova,1 Ales Grambal,1 Zuzana Sigmundova,1 Petra Kasalova,1 Marketa Marackova,1 Michaela Holubova,1,2 Kristyna Vrbova,1 Klara Latalova,1 Milos Slepecky3 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic; 3Department of Psychology Sciences, Faculty of Social Science and Health Care, Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Nitra, Slovak Republic Objective: Identifying the predictors of response to psychiatric and psychotherapeutic treatments may be useful for increasing treatment efficacy in pharmacoresistant depressive patients. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of dissociation, hope, personality trait, and selected demographic factors in treatment response of this group of patients.Methods: Pharmacoresistant depressive inpatients were enrolled in the study. All patients completed Clinical Global Impression – both objective and subjective form (CGI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI at baseline and after 6 weeks of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy (group cognitive-behavioral or group psychodynamic treatment as an outcome measures. The Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMI, Dissociative Experience Scale (DES, Adult Dispositional Hope Scale (ADHS, and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI-R were completed at the start of the treatment with the intention to find the predictors of treatment efficacy.Results: The study included 72 patients who were hospitalized for the pharmacoresistant major depression; 63 of them completed the study. The mean scores of BDI-II, BAI, subjCGI, and objCGI significantly decreased during the treatment. BDI-II relative change statistically significantly correlated with the total ISMI score, Discrimination Experience (ISMI subscale, and Harm Avoidance (TCI-R personality trait

  13. Does the association between depressive symptomatology and physical activity depend on body image perception? A survey of students from seven universities in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ansari, Walid; Stock, Christiane; Phillips, Ceri; Mabhala, Andi; Stoate, Mary; Adetunji, Hamed; Deeny, Pat; John, Jill; Davies, Shan; Parke, Sian; Hu, Xiaoling; Snelgrove, Sherrill

    2011-02-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the association between depression and PA in university students of both genders and the role of body image perception as a potential effect modifier. Undergraduate students (N = 3706) from seven universities in the UK completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed sociodemographic information; a range of health, health behaviour and health awareness related factors; the modified version of Beck's Depression Inventory (M-BDI); educational achievement, and different levels of physical activity (PA), such as moderate PA (at least 5 days per week moderate exercise of at least 30 minutes), and vigorous PA (at least 3 days per week vigorous exercise of at least 20 minutes). Only 12.4% of the sample achieved the international recommended level for moderate PA, and 33.1% achieved the recommendations for vigorous PA. Both moderate and vigorous PA were inversely related to the M-BDI score. Physically active students, regardless of the type of PA, were significantly more likely to perceive their health as good, to have higher health awareness, to perform strengthening exercises, and to be males. The stratified analyses indicated that the association between depression and PA differed by body image. In students perceiving their body image as 'just right', moderate (>4th percentile) and high (>5th percentile) M-BDI scores were inversely related to vigorous PA. However, in students who perceived their body image as 'overweight', the inverse association was only significant in those with high M-BDI scores. We conclude that the positive effect of PA on depression could be down modulated by the negative impact of a 'distorted' body image on depression. The practical implications of these findings are that PA programmes targeting persons with depressive symptoms should include effective components to enhance body image perception.

  14. Treatment response in relation to subthreshold bipolarity in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant monotherapy: a post hoc data analysis (KOMDD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park YM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Young-Min Park,1 Bun-Hee Lee2 1Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, 2Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Eunpyeong Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: The aim of this observational study was to determine whether subthreshold bipolarity affects treatment response and remission in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant (AD monotherapy over a 6-month follow-up period. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with major depressive disorder were stratified into two subgroups according to the presence of subthreshold bipolarity, identified using the Korean version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (K-MDQ, which classifies patients as positive for a screening of bipolarity based on the cutoff for the total K-MDQ score (ie, 7 points. They received AD monotherapy such as escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, or tianeptine for 6 months. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD, Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation were applied at baseline, 1 week, 3 weeks, 2 months, 3 months, and 6 months. Results: The mean HAMD, BDI, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation scores were higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 3 weeks. The mean BDI score was also higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 6 months. Evaluation of the ratio of improvement for each scale revealed different patterns of percentage changes between the two groups over the 6-month follow-up period. Furthermore, the response and remission rates (as assessed using BDI and HAMD scores were higher in the nonbipolarity group than in the bipolarity group, with the exception of HAMD scores at the 3-week follow-up time point. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that depressed patients with bipolarity had a worse response to AD monotherapy than did those without bipolarity. Keywords: subthreshold bipolarity

  15. Does the Association between Depressive Symptomatology and Physical Activity Depend on Body Image Perception? A Survey of Students from Seven Universities in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study assessed the association between depression and PA in university students of both genders and the role of body image perception as a potential effect modifier. Undergraduate students (N = 3706 from seven universities in the UK completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed sociodemographic information; a range of health, health behaviour and health awareness related factors; the modified version of Beck’s Depression Inventory (M-BDI; educational achievement, and different levels of physical activity (PA, such as moderate PA (at least 5 days per week moderate exercise of at least 30 minutes, and vigorous PA (at least 3 days per week vigorous exercise of at least 20 minutes. Only 12.4% of the sample achieved the international recommended level for moderate PA, and 33.1% achieved the recommendations for vigorous PA. Both moderate and vigorous PA were inversely related to the M-BDI score. Physically active students, regardless of the type of PA, were significantly more likely to perceive their health as good, to have higher health awareness, to perform strengthening exercises, and to be males. The stratified analyses indicated that the association between depression and PA differed by body image. In students perceiving their body image as ‘just right’, moderate (>4th percentile and high (>5th percentile M-BDI scores were inversely related to vigorous PA. However, in students who perceived their body image as ‘overweight’, the inverse association was only significant in those with high M-BDI scores. We conclude that the positive effect of PA on depression could be down modulated by the negative impact of a ‘distorted’ body image on depression. The practical implications of these findings are that PA programmes targeting persons with depressive symptoms should include effective components to enhance body image perception.

  16. Baseline Depression Severity as Moderator of Depression Outcomes Between Cognitive Behavioral Therapy vs Pharmacotherapy: An Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Erica S; Hollon, Steven D; Twisk, Jos; van Straten, Annemieke; Huibers, Marcus J H; David, Daniel; DeRubeis, Robert J; Dimidjian, Sona; Dunlop, Boadie W; Cristea, Ioana A; Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Hegerl, Ulrich; Jarrett, Robin B; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Kennedy, Sidney H; Mergl, Roland; Miranda, Jeanne; Mohr, David C; Rush, A John; Segal, Zindel V; Siddique, Juned; Simons, Anne D; Vittengl, Jeffrey R; Cuijpers, Pim

    2015-11-01

    Current guidelines recommend treating severe depression with pharmacotherapy. Randomized clinical trials as well as traditional meta-analyses have considerable limitations in testing for moderators of treatment outcomes. To conduct a systematic literature search, collect primary data from trials, and analyze baseline depression severity as a moderator of treatment outcomes between cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and antidepressant medication (ADM). A total of 14 902 abstracts were examined from a comprehensive literature search in PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and Cochrane Registry of Controlled Trials from 1966 to January 1, 2014. Randomized clinical trials in which CBT and ADM were compared in patients with a DSM-defined depressive disorder were included. Study authors were asked to provide primary data from their trial. Primary data from 16 of 24 identified trials (67%), with 1700 outpatients (794 from the CBT condition and 906 from the ADM condition), were included. Missing data were imputed with multiple imputation methods. Mixed-effects models adjusting for study-level differences were used to examine baseline depression severity as a moderator of treatment outcomes. Seventeen-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). There was a main effect of ADM over CBT on the HAM-D (β = -0.88; P = .03) and a nonsignificant trend on the BDI (β = -1.14; P = .08, statistical test for trend), but no significant differences in response (odds ratio [OR], 1.24; P = .12) or remission (OR, 1.18; P = .22). Mixed-effects models using the HAM-D indicated that baseline depression severity does not moderate reductions in depressive symptoms between CBT and ADM at outcome (β = 0.00; P = .96). Similar results were seen using the BDI. Baseline depression severity also did not moderate the likelihood of response (OR, 0.99; P = .77) or remission (OR, 1.00; P = .93) between CBT and ADM. Baseline

  17. Evaluation of the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition, Screening Test for Use in States' Child Outcomes Measurement Systems under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaum, Batya; Gattamorta, Karina A.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition, Screening Test (BDI-2 ST) for use in states' child outcomes accountability systems under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Complete Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition (BDI-2), assessment data were obtained for 142 children, ages 2 to 62 months, who…

  18. Depressive symptoms and other risk factors predicting suicide in middle-aged men: a prospective cohort study among Korean Vietnam War veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Yi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few studies have prospectively examined whether depressive symptoms and other risk factors are associated with a higher risk of suicide death in individuals other than high-risk populations such as psychiatric patients and individuals with self-harm histories. The purpose of the study is to prospectively examine whether depressive symptoms assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI are associated with greater risk of suicide death and whether depressive symptoms and other risk factors are independent predictors of suicide in general-risk populations. Another aim is to evaluate the sensitivity of the BDI for predicting suicide death.Methods. 10,238 Korean Vietnam War veterans (mean age: 56.3 years who participated in two surveys in 2001 were followed up for suicide mortality over 7.5 years.Results. 41 men died by suicide. Severely depressed participants had a higher adjusted hazard ratio (aHR = 3.4; 95% CI [1.5–7.7] of suicide than non-to-moderately depressed ones. Higher suicide risk was associated with more severe depressive symptoms (p for trend = 0.009. After adjustment for depressive symptoms and other factors, very poor health, low education, and past drinking were associated with higher suicide risk, while good health, body mass index, and marital status were not associated with suicide. The sensitivity at the cut-off score of 31 for detecting suicide was higher during the earlier 3.5 years of the follow-up (75%; 95% CI [50–90] than during the latter 4 years (60%; 95% CI [41–76].Conclusions. Depressive symptoms are a strong independent predictor and very poor health, low education, and drinking status may be independent predictors of future suicide. The BDI may have acceptable diagnostic properties as a risk assessment tool for identifying people with depression and suicidal potential among middle-aged men.

  19. Pretreatment depression as a prognostic indicator of survival and nutritional status in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Ae; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Lee, Sang-Ah; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Sung-Bae; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The emotional status of cancer patients is associated with disease course and treatment outcomes. In this study, the authors evaluated associations between the presence of pretreatment depression and pretreatment quality of life (QOL), nutritional status, and survival outcomes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). For this prospective study, 241 patients with previously untreated HNSCC who underwent curative treatments were enrolled. Patients completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 30-item Core QOL Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), and the EORTC QLQ Head and Neck Cancer module (QLQ-H&N35). EORTC QLQ scores were compared between depressive and nondepressive patients, as determined according to pretreatment BDI-II scores ≥ 14 and nutritional status and laboratory data. Pretreatment depression was present in 60 patients (24.9%). In depressive and nondepressive patients, the 3-year overall survival rates were 70.8% and 82.7%, respectively (P = .045), and the 3-year DFS rates were 63.5% and 79.1%, respectively (P = .015). After controlling for clinical factors, the presence of depression was predictive of 3-year DFS (P = .032). EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-HN35 scores on all items except feeding tube, nutritional supplement, and problem with mouth opening differed between depressive and nondepressive patients (P nutritional status, and survival outcomes in patients with HNSCC. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  20. Incorporating BDI Agents into Human-Agent Decision Making Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphorst, Bart; van Wissen, Arlette; Dignum, Virginia

    Artificial agents, people, institutes and societies all have the ability to make decisions. Decision making as a research area therefore involves a broad spectrum of sciences, ranging from Artificial Intelligence to economics to psychology. The Colored Trails (CT) framework is designed to aid researchers in all fields in examining decision making processes. It is developed both to study interaction between multiple actors (humans or software agents) in a dynamic environment, and to study and model the decision making of these actors. However, agents in the current implementation of CT lack the explanatory power to help understand the reasoning processes involved in decision making. The BDI paradigm that has been proposed in the agent research area to describe rational agents, enables the specification of agents that reason in abstract concepts such as beliefs, goals, plans and events. In this paper, we present CTAPL: an extension to CT that allows BDI software agents that are written in the practical agent programming language 2APL to reason about and interact with a CT environment.

  1. Test Reviews: Newborg, J. (2005). "Battelle Developmental Inventory--Second Edition." Itasca, IL: Riverside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Stacy L.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-2), a criterion-referenced, individually administered, standardized assessment used to measure the developmental skills in children aged birth through 7 years, 11 months. The BDI-2 is composed of 450 items grouped into five domains (Adaptive,…

  2. The Use of the Battelle Developmental Inventory in the Prediction of Later Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Diane D.; Akers, James F.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a larger longitudinal study, scores of 239 children (ages 1 to 4) with disabilities on the Battelle Developmental Inventory (BDI) were compared with scores on the Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement (Revised) 1 to 3 years later. The BDI scores from children at or above age 2 predicted later achievement scores (mean correlation .74).…

  3. A comparison of self-report and caregiver assessment of depression, apathy, and irritability in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anjan; Anderson, Karen E; Moskowitz, Carol B; Hauser, Willard A; Marder, Karen S

    2005-01-01

    The natural history of psychiatric syndromes associated with Huntington's disease (HD) remains unclear, and longitudinal studies of symptoms such as depression, apathy, and irritability are required to better understand the progression and role of these syndromes and their effect on disability. Self-administered scales such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) may be useful to document changes in symptoms over time, but the validity of self-report may be questionable with the inevitable progression of cognitive deficits. An alternative to the patient's self-report would be assessments by the caregiver. The authors assessed interrater agreement between patient self-assessment and caregiver assessment of patients status for the presence of depressed mood using the BDI and apathy and irritability using an apathy and irritability scale. Agreement between these scales across strata of cognitive status was also examined. Interrater agreement varied from moderate to good for the BDI, depending on patient cognitive status. Agreement for the apathy scores was low for patients with poor cognition and fair in patients with better cognition. Irritability scale agreement was fair at best and was the worst in patients with the most intact cognition. Caregiver assessment of patients' moods and apathy may be an acceptable alternative to patient self-report as patients' cognitive status worsens.

  4. Recognizing depression in patients with Parkinson’s disease: accuracy and specificity of two depression rating scale Reconhecimento de depressão em pacientes com doença de Parkinson: acurácia e especificidade de duas escalas de avaliação de depressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Débora Silberman

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to find cut-off scores for the Montgomery-Asberg rating scale (MADRS and the Beck depression inventory (BDI that can relate to specific clinical diagnoses of depression in Parkinson´s disease (PD. Mild and moderate PD patients (n=46 were evaluated for depression according to the DSM IV criteria. All patients were assessed with the MADRS and the BDI. A "receiver operating characteristics" (ROC curve was obtained and the sensibility, specificity, positive and the negative predictive values were calculated for different cut-off scores of the MADRS and the BDI. The Kappa statistic was calculated for different cut-off scores to assess the agreement between the clinical judgment and both scales. Depression was present in 18 patients. MADRS cut-off scores of 6 and 10 showed Kappa 0.5 and 0.56, respectively. Specificity of cut-off score of 6 was 78.6% and of cut-off score of 10 was 96.4%. Kappa agreement of BDI cut-off scores of 10 and 18 were 0.36 and 0.62, respectively. Specificity was 60.7% for 10 and 92.9% for 18. Both rating scales show similar accuracy within the ROC curves (84.3% for MADRS and 79.7% for BDI. The MADRS and the BDI show a good accuracy and correlation to the clinical diagnosis when a cut-off score of 10 is used to MADRS and a cut-off score of 18 is used to BDI to recognize depression in mild to moderate PD patients. This may help clinicians to recognize depression in PD.Este estudo objetivou encontrar pontos de corte da escala de depressão de Montgomery-Asberg (MADRS e inventário de depressão de Beck (IDB que possam estar relacionados ao diagnóstico clínico específico de depressão na doença de Parkinson (DP. Os pacientes com DP leve e moderada (n= 46 foram avaliados para depressão de acordo com os critérios diagnósticos da DSM-IV. MADRS e IDB foram aplicadas em todos os pacientes. Uma curva "receiver operating characteristics" (ROC foi obtida calculando-se sensibilidade, especificidade, valores

  5. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses

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    Assogna F

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Assogna,1 Sabrina Fagioli,1 Luca Cravello,1 Giuseppe Meco,2 Mariangela Pierantozzi,3 Alessandro Stefani,3 Francesca Imperiale,2 Carlo Caltagirone,1,3 Francesco E Pontieri,4 Gianfranco Spalletta11I.R.C.C.S. Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry (Parkinson’s Centre and Research Centre of Social Diseases (CIMS, University “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Neuroscience, University “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Neuroscience, Mental Health and Sensory Systems, University “Sapienza”, Movement Disorder Unit, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome, ItalyBackground: Patients with neurological and non-neurological medical illnesses very often complain of depressive symptoms that are associated with cognitive and functional impairments. We compared the profile of depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients with that of control subjects (CS suffering from non-neurological medical illnesses.Methods: One-hundred PD patients and 100 CS were submitted to a structured clinical interview for identification of major depressive disorder (MDD and minor depressive disorder (MIND, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR, criteria. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were also administered to measure depression severity.Results: When considering the whole groups, there were no differences in depressive symptom frequency between PD and CS apart from worthlessness/guilt, and changes in appetite reduced rates in PD. Further, total scores and psychic and somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI did not differ between PD and CS. After we separated PD and CS in those with MDD, MIND, and no depression (NODEP, comparing total scores and psychic/somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI, we found increased total depression severity in NODEP PD and reduced severity of the psychic symptoms of

  6. Cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for early-onset chronic depression: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Elisabeth; Zobel, Ingo; Dykierek, Petra; Kech, Sabine; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Külz, Anne; Berger, Mathias

    2011-03-01

    The only psychotherapy specifically designed and evaluated for the treatment of chronic depression, the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), has never been directly compared to another depression-specific psychological method. Thirty patients with early-onset chronic depression were randomized to 22 sessions of CBASP or Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) provided in 16 weeks. Primary outcome was the score on the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) assessed posttreatment by an independent blinded evaluator. Secondary endpoints were, among others, remission (HRSD≤8) rates and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The study included a prospective naturalistic 12-month follow-up. Intent-to-treat analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) revealed that there was no significant difference in posttreatment HRSD scores between the CBASP and the IPT condition, but in self-rated BDI scores. We found significantly higher remission rates in the CBASP (57%) as compared to the IPT (20%) group. One year posttreatment, no significant differences were found in the self-reported symptom level (BDI) using ANCOVA. The study used only a small sample size and no placebo control. The generalizability of the results may be limited to patients with a preference for psychological treatment. While the primary outcome was not significant, secondary measures showed relevant benefits of CBASP over IPT. We found preliminary evidence that in early-onset chronic depression, an approach specifically designed for this patient population was superior to a method originally developed for the treatment of acute depressive episodes. Long-term results suggest that chronically depressed patients may need extended treatment courses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A longitudinal study of the association of adiponectin gene rs1501299 with depression in Chinese Han adolescents after Wenchuan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Zhu, Xing Chun; Liu, Hui; Ran, Mao Sheng; Fang, Ding Zhi

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed inconsistent results of the association between plasma adiponectin and depression. The aim of this study is to longitudinally investigate the association of adiponectin rs1501299 with depression in Chinese Han adolescents who experienced the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Variants of adiponectin rs1501299 were identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Depressive symptoms were assessed by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) among 746 high school students at 6, 12 and 18 months after the earthquake. The female T allele carriers of adiponectin rs1501299 had lower prevalence of depression (p=0.008) and BDI scores (p=0.024) than the female GG homozygotes at 18 months, but not at 6 or 12 months after the earthquake, which were significantly reduced (p=0.022 for the prevalence and pearthquake when compared with those at 12 months. In addition, the major predictors of depression for the GG homozygotes were gender and age at 6, 12 and 18 months after earthquake. On the other hand, the major predictor for the T allele carriers was gender at 6, 12 and 18 months after earthquake. There were some limitations in the present study. First, adiponectin expressions including serum adiponectin and mRNA in adipose tissues were not measured. Second, the effect of body mass index was not evaluated. The adiponectin T allele is associated with reduced prevalence of depression and lower BDI scores of female adolescents in the later stage of rehabilitation of depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Depression in HIV-positive women is associated with changes in antiretroviral treatment regimens

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    Claus Philippe Küpper-Tetzel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is a co-morbidity of clinical significance in HIV-positive patients with an estimated prevalence of more than 20%. Sex and gender-related differences in depression are well described in HIV-negative populations, demonstrating that more women are being affected. So far little is known about frequency and characteristics of depression in HIV-positive men and women. Materials and Methods: Primary objective of our prospective epidemiological study was the evaluation of the Beck score for depression in male and female patients of the Frankfurt HIV Cohort. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II is a self-report symptom inventory made up of 21 questions, each with 4 possible answers, correlating with a certain point value. Interpretation: score 14–19: mild depression; score 20–28: moderate depression; score ≥29: severe depression. Secondary objectives of the analysis were factors that might possibly influence the disposition for depression in HIV-positive patients, e.g. age, antiretroviral treatment history, co-morbidities and socioeconomic status. Results: Between January and October 2013, 348 patients were enrolled in the study, 161 women and 187 men of the Frankfurt HIV Cohort, who had a routine appointment at the HIV-Center of the University Clinic Frankfurt. The mean age of all study participants was 45 years (range 22–80. The majority of patients were on antiretroviral therapy (91% at study entrance. The median BDI-II score in all patients was 8 (0–49; in female patients 10 (0–42, in male patients 6 (0–49, respectively (Table 1. Significant more women than men showed a score for moderate depression (p=0.006. Factors associated with a BDI-II score ≥20 in women were older age (>45 years, living alone, unemployment and the number of prior changes in antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions: Depression in people living with HIV shows sex and gender-related differences that might also influence antiretroviral

  9. Association between cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms among military medical students in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güleç, Mahir; Bakir, Bilal; Ozer, Mustafa; Uçar, Muharrem; Kiliç, Selim; Hasde, Metin

    2005-04-30

    An association has been documented between two important health concerns, smoking and depression. A cross-sectional study was carried out to explore whether this relationship exists in a sample of Turkish military medical undergraduates. Of a total of 779 military medical undergraduates, 690 agreed to participate in the study. The students completed a self-administered questionnaire including the Turkish adaptation of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and gave a smoking history. It was determined that the smokers among medical students were 2.2 times more likely to have depressive symptoms than nonsmokers. This result extends the significant association between smoking and depressive symptoms in the literature to a sample of Turkish military medical undergraduates.

  10. A Comparative Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Group Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

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    Shima Tamannaeifar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT is a new method of psychotherapy for major depressive disorder (MDD. The aim of this experimental study is evaluating the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 19 depressive out-patients were randomly divided into 2 groups (acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Twelve therapeutic sessions administered in consulting center of Tehran University twice a week. All the subjects were tested by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS before and after the treatments. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Results: The results show no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the variables of depression and rumination. Conclusion: Overall, the results suggest that ACT is an effective treatment, the effectiveness of which appears equivalent to that of CT.

  11. Objective Methods for Reliable Detection of Concealed Depression

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    Cynthia eSolomon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that it is possible to automatically detect clinical depression from audio-visual recordings. Before considering integration in a clinical pathway, a key question that must be asked is whether such systems can be easily fooled. This work explores the potential of acoustic features to detect clinical depression in adults both when acting normally and when asked to conceal their depression. Nine adults diagnosed with mild to moderate depression as per the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 were asked a series of questions and to read a excerpt from a novel aloud under two different experimental conditions. In one, participants were asked to act naturally and in the other, to suppress anything that they felt would be indicative of their depression. Acoustic features were then extracted from this data and analysed using paired t-tests to determine any statistically significant differences between healthy and depressed participants. Most features that were found to be significantly different during normal behaviour remained so during concealed behaviour. In leave-one-subject-out automatic classification studies of the 9 depressed subjects and 8 matched healthy controls, an 88% classification accuracy and 89% sensitivity was achieved. Results remained relatively robust during concealed behaviour, with classifiers trained on only non-concealed data achieving 81% detection accuracy and 75% sensitivity when tested on concealed data. These results indicate there is good potential to build deception-proof automatic depression monitoring systems.

  12. Multiagent Systems and Applications Volume 2 Development Using the GORITE BDI Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, Dennis; Ronnquist, Ralph; Jain, Lakhmi C

    2013-01-01

    Since its conception almost 30 years ago, the BDI (Belief Desire Intention) model of agency has become established, along with Soar, as the approach of choice for practitioners in the development of knowledge intensive agent applications. However, in developing BDI agent applications for over 15 years, the authors of this book have observed a disconnect between what the BDI model provides and what is actually required of an agent model in order to build practical systems. The GORITE BDI framework was  developed to address this gap and this book is written for students, researchers and practitioners who wish to gain a practical understanding of how GORITE is used to develop BDI agent applications. In this regard, a feature of the book is the use of complete, annotated examples. As GORITE is a Java framework,  a familiarity with Java (or a similar language) is assumed, but no prior knowledge of the BDI model is required.

  13. Prevalence of depressive disorders in Rasht, Iran: A community based study

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    Shirazi Maryam

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Depression is a well known health problem worldwide. Prevalence of depressive disorders varies in different societies. Aim to determine the prevalence of depressive disorders and some associated factors in Rasht City (Northern part of Iran. Materials and methods 4020 subjects were selected among 394925 residents of Rasht aged between 18–70 during 2003 – 2004. In the first phase, subjects were screened by Beck's Depression Inventory. In the second phase, those who scored more than 15 were assessed through semi-structured psychiatric interview (DSMIV-TR. Socio-demographic characteristics including age, gender, marital status, educational level, and socio-economic class were recorded as well. Results 9.5% of samples (63% female and 37% male were diagnosed by depressive disorders. The prevalence of minor depressive disorder, dysthymia and major depressive disorder was 5%, 2/5%, and 1% respectively. Socio-economic class was significantly associated with both depressive symptoms based on BDI score (p Conclusion Comparing to other studies, this study revealed that prevalence of dysthymic and minor depressive disorder were more than major depressive disorder, and low socio-economic class was the most significant risk factor associated with depression. Regarding our study limitations, researchers and policy makers should not consider our findings as conclusive results. Findings of this study could be applied by researchers using analytical methodology to assess relationship between depressive disorders and associated factors.

  14. Child behavior checklist profiles in adolescents with bipolar and depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Kukju; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Kee Jeong; Joo, Yeonho; Kim, Hyo-Won

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) profiles in youths with bipolar and depressive disorders. Seventy-four subjects with a mean age of 14.9±1.6years (36 boys) with mood disorders and their parents were recruited from September 2011 to June 2013 in the Department of Psychiatry, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosis of mood disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorder was confirmed by child psychiatrists using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children - Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL). The parents of the subjects completed the Parent General Behavior Inventory-10-item Mania Scale (P-GBI-10M), Parent-version of Mood Disorder Questionnaire (P-MDQ), ADHD rating scale (ARS) and CBCL. The adolescents completed the 76-item Adolescent General Behavior Inventory (A-GBI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Adolescent-version of Mood Disorder Questionnaire (A-MDQ). When adjusted for gender and the comorbidity with ADHD, the Withdrawn and Anxious/Depressed subscale scores of the CBCL were higher in subjects with bipolar disorder than in those with depressive disorder. Higher scores of A-GBI Depressive subscale, A-MDQ and BDI were shown in subjects with bipolar disorder than in those with depressive disorder. There was no significant difference on CBCL-DP, P-GBI-10M, P-MDQ, A-GBI Hypomanic/Biphasic subscale and ARS between two groups. All eight subscales of the CBCL positively correlated with the P-GBI-10M and P-MDQ scores, and seven of all eight subscales of the CBCL positively correlated with A-GBI Depressive and Hypomanic/Biphasic subscales. The BDI score was positively associated with the Withdrawn, Somatic Complaints, Anxious/Depressed, and Social Problems subscale scores. CBCL-DP score was strongly correlated with manic/hypomanic symptoms measured by P-GBI-10M and P-MDQ (r=0.771 and 0.826). This study suggests that the CBCL could be used for measuring mood symptoms and combined psychopathology

  15. BDI Agent action planning mechanism based on reinforcement learning%基于加强学习的BDI Agent动作规划机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈梅; 胡晓辉

    2011-01-01

    To enable BDI agents making rational decisions about an appreciate course of action to pursue goals in dynamic and complex environments, the intention decision structure is described with the and/or graph which integrates goals with their opposite plans. Then,three different types of action planning decision strategies are developed based on the reinforcement learning according to the intention decision structure, respectively, single-step planning of the short-sighted BDI agents, multi-steps planning of the far-sighted BDl agents and the optimal-planning of the ideal BDI agents. Compared with traditional BDI agents systems, this new intention decision scheme overcomes the limitation of abstract high-level plans and easily to be implemented.%为了确保BDI Agent在动态,复杂的环境中实现基于某目标的动作序列决策任务,使用与/或图描述了意图决策结构,此结构将目标与实现这些目标的计划联系起来.根据意图决策结构,提出了3种不同的基于加强学习的动作规划策略,分别是短视性BDI Agent的单步规划、具有远见的BDI Agent的多步规划和追求完美的BDI Agent的最优规划.与传统的BDI Agent系统相比,这种新的意图决策模式克服了计划抽象的不足,并且易于编程实现.

  16. Depression, hopelessness, and sleep in cancer patients' desire for death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Pathiaki, Maria; Galanos, Antonis; Vlahos, Lambros

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of clinical characteristics and risk factors for hastened death in advanced cancer patients. Patients completed the Greek version of Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death (G-SAHD), a sleep quality measure, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a Greek version of a depression inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), a hopelessness scale, the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for the assessment of pain. The final sample consisted of 102 terminally ill cancer patients attending a Palliative Care Unit. Statistically significant associations were found between G-SAHD and patients performance status (ECOG) (chi2 = 8.62, p = 0.003). Strongest associations were observed between desire for death, depression, and hopelessness (r = 0.468, p hopelessness" (p depression" (p Depression, hopelessness, and sleep quality appeared to have a statistically significant relationship with desire for hastened death. Health care professionals finding desire for death in advanced cancer patients should not only consider depression and hopelessness, but also other factors such as poor sleep quality in their diagnostic formulations in order to provide the appropriate treatment.

  17. Validation of Standardized Questionnaires Evaluating Symptoms of Depression in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Approaches to Screening for a Frequent Yet Underrated Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englbrecht, Matthias; Alten, Rieke; Aringer, Martin; Baerwald, Christoph G; Burkhardt, Harald; Eby, Nancy; Fliedner, Gerhard; Gauger, Bettina; Henkemeier, Ulf; Hofmann, Michael W; Kleinert, Stefan; Kneitz, Christian; Krueger, Klaus; Pohl, Christoph; Roske, Anne-Eve; Schett, Georg; Schmalzing, Marc; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Peter Tony, Hans; Wendler, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    To validate standard self-report questionnaires for depression screening in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and compare these measures to one another and to the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), a standardized structured interview. In 9 clinical centers across Germany, depressive symptomatology was assessed in 262 adult RA patients at baseline (T0) and at 12 ± 2 weeks followup (T1) using the World Health Organization 5-Item Well-Being Index (WHO-5), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). The construct validity of these depression questionnaires (using convergent and discriminant validity) was evaluated using Spearman's correlations at both time points. The test-retest reliability of the questionnaires was evaluated in RA patients who had not undergone a psychotherapeutic intervention or received antidepressants between T0 and T1. The sensitivity and the specificity of the questionnaires were calculated using the results of the MADRS, a structured interview, as the gold standard. According to Spearman's correlation coefficients, all questionnaires met convergent validity criteria (ρ > |0.50|), with the BDI-II performing best, while correlations with age and disease activity for all questionnaires met the criteria for discriminant validity (ρ questionnaire to meet the predefined retest reliability criterion (ρ ≥ 0.70) was the BDI-II (rs  = 0.77), which also achieved the best results for both sensitivity and specificity (>80%) when using the MADRS as the gold standard. The BDI-II best met the predefined criteria, and the PHQ-9 met most of the validity criteria, with lower sensitivity and specificity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Depression during pregnancy: Prevalence and obstetric risk factors among pregnant women attending a tertiary care hospital in Navi Mumbai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaunak Ajinkya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Depression affects about 20% of women during their lifetime, with pregnancy being a period of high vulnerability. Prevalence of depression during pregnancy ranges from 4% to 20%. Several risk factors predispose to depression during pregnancy including obstetric factors. Depression during pregnancy is not only the strongest risk factor for post-natal depression but also leads to adverse obstetric outcomes. Aims: To study the prevalence of depression during pregnancy and its associated obstetric risk factors among pregnant women attending routine antenatal checkup. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational survey done at the outpatient department (OPD of the department of obstetrics of a tertiary care hospital in Navi Mumbai. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eighty-five pregnant women were randomly administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI for detecting depression. Additional socio-demographic and obstetric history was recorded and analyzed. Results: Prevalence of depression during pregnancy was found to be 9.18% based upon BDI, and it was significantly associated with several obstetric risk factors like gravidity (P = 0.0092, unplanned pregnancy (P = 0.001, history of abortions (P = 0.0001, and a history of obstetric complications, both present (P = 0.0001 and past (P = 0.0001. Conclusions: Depression during pregnancy is prevalent among pregnant women in Navi-Mumbai, and several obstetric risk factors were associated to depression during pregnancy. Future research in this area is needed, which will clearly elucidate the potential long-term impact of depression during pregnancy and associated obstetric risk factors so as to help health professionals identify vulnerable groups for early detection, diagnosis, and providing effective interventions for depression during pregnancy.

  19. Cognitive Support using BDI Agent and Adaptive User Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Shabbir

    2012-01-01

    -known framework to measure the individual health status and functioning level. The third goal is to develop an approach for supporting for users with irrational behaviour due to cognitive impairment. To deal with this challenge, a Belief, Desire and Intention (BDI) agent based approach is proposed due to its...... conducted using the developed system shows potentials in terms of providing freedom of mobility for the user with cognitive impairment.......The need of constant support and care for the elderly people with special needs is gradually increasing. It is becoming the primary challenge for most of the western countries and research society to innovate new eective approaches and develop novel technologies to address the demographics...

  20. Cognitive Support using BDI Agent and Adaptive User Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Shabbir

    2012-01-01

    a set of goals for attaining the objective of this thesis. The initial goal is to recognize the activities of the users to assess the need of support for the user during the activity. However, one of the challenges of the recognition process is the adaptability for variant user behaviour due to physical...... for higher accuracy and reliability. The second goal focus on the selection process of the type support required for user based on the aptitude of performing the activities. The capability model has been extracted from International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), a well...... Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP) in the BDI agent is proposed in this thesis to handle the irrational behaviour of the user. The fourth goal represents the implementation of the research approaches and performs validation of the system through experiments. The empirical results of the experiments...

  1. Depression as a predictor of weight regain among successful weight losers in the diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, David W; Ma, Yong; Rubin, Richard R; Perreault, Leigh; Bray, George A; Marrero, David; Knowler, William C; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Lacoursiere, D Yvette

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether depression symptoms or antidepressant medication use predicts weight regain in overweight individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) who are successful with initial weight loss. A total of 1,442 participants who successfully lost at least 3% of their baseline body weight after 12 months of participation in the randomized controlled Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) continued in their assigned treatment group (metformin, intensive lifestyle, or placebo) and were followed into the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcome Study (DPPOS). Weight regain was defined as a return to baseline DPP body weight. Participant weight and antidepressant medication use were assessed every 6 months. Depression symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] score ≥11) were assessed every 12 months. Only 2.7% of the overall cohort had moderate to severe depression symptoms at baseline; most of the participants with BDI score ≥11 had only mild symptoms during the period of observation. In unadjusted analyses, both depression symptoms (hazard ratio 1.31 [95% CI 1.03-1.67], P = 0.03) and antidepressant medication use at either the previous visit (1.72 [1.37-2.15], P weight regain. After adjustment for multiple covariates, antidepressant use remained a significant predictor of weight regain (P weight, antidepressant use may increase the risk of weight regain.

  2. Impact of Depression, Fatigue, and Global Measure of Cortical Volume on Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

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    Domenica Nunnari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the influence of demographic and clinical variables, such as depression, fatigue, and quantitative MRI marker on cognitive performances in a sample of patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS. Methods. 60 MS patients (52 relapsing remitting and 8 primary progressive underwent neuropsychological assessments using Rao’s Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Tests (BRB-N, the Beck Depression Inventory-second edition (BDI-II, and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. We performed magnetic resonance imaging to all subjects using a 3 T scanner and obtained tissue-specific volumes (normalized brain volume and cortical brain volume. We used Student’s t-test to compare depressed and nondepressed MS patients. Finally, we performed a multivariate regression analysis in order to assess possible predictors of patients’ cognitive outcome among demographic and clinical variables. Results. 27.12% of the sample (16/59 was cognitively impaired, especially in tasks requiring attention and information processing speed. From between group comparison, we find that depressed patients had worse performances on BRB-N score, greater disability and disease duration, and brain volume decrease. According to multiple regression analysis, the BDI-II score was a significant predictor for most of the neuropsychological tests. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the presence of depressive symptoms is an important determinant of cognitive performance in MS patients.

  3. Telephone cognitive-behavioral therapy for subthreshold depression and presenteeism in workplace: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Furukawa, Toshi A; Horikoshi, Masaru; Kawakami, Norito; Kadota, Masayo; Sasaki, Megumi; Sekiya, Yuki; Hosogoshi, Hiroki; Kashimura, Masami; Asano, Kenichi; Terashima, Hitomi; Iwasa, Kazunori; Nagasaku, Minoru; Grothaus, Louis C

    2012-01-01

    Subthreshold depression is highly prevalent in the general population and causes great loss to society especially in the form of reduced productivity while at work (presenteeism). We developed a highly-structured manualized eight-session cognitive-behavioral program with a focus on subthreshold depression in the workplace and to be administered via telephone by trained psychotherapists (tCBT). We conducted a parallel-group, non-blinded randomized controlled trial of tCBT in addition to the pre-existing Employee Assistance Program (EAP) versus EAP alone among workers with subthreshold depression at a large manufacturing company in Japan. The primary outcomes were depression severity as measured with Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and presenteeism as measured with World Health Organization Health and Work Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ). In the course of the trial the follow-up period was shortened in order to increase acceptability of the study. The planned sample size was 108 per arm but the trial was stopped early due to low accrual. Altogether 118 subjects were randomized to tCBT+EAP (n = 58) and to EAP alone (n = 60). The BDI-II scores fell from the mean of 17.3 at baseline to 11.0 in the intervention group and to 15.7 in the control group after 4 months (pdepression. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach in longer terms. The study was funded by Sekisui Chemicals Co. Ltd. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00885014.

  4. Modelos de apego, homossexualidade masculina, e depressão: um relato de experiência Models of attachment, homosexuality and depression: an intervention report

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    Dilcio Dantas Guedes

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Relatam-se casos clínicos de dois rapazes, que buscaram psicoterapia a partir de demandas afetivas e amorosas. Enfatizam-se a análise de seus modelos de apego e a queixa de depressão em relação a suas experiências homoafetivas. Partiu-se das suposições de que: (1 os modelos comportamentais de apego com os pais repetir-se-iam com os parceiros; e (2 o nível de segurança das relações amorosas mediaria inversamente o nível da depressão. Articularam-se dados da mensuração dos níveis de depressão pelo Inventário de Depressão Beck (BDI e da Attachment Security and Secondary Strategies Interview (ASSSI. Os resultados indicaram que os modelos de apego aos pais parecem ter influenciado as representações de apego e experiências amorosas, que pareceram mediar os níveis da depressão.Case studies of two young men are reported. Their reason for seeking psychotherapy lies in their affection and romantic love problems, what led us to an effort to understand their models of attachment and depression complaints in regard to their homo-affective experiences. Authors assumed that: (1 attachment models experienced with their parents would be repeated with love partners, and (2 the level of steadiness in the romantic relationship would inversely mediate the level of depression. Depression data obtained by means of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were related to equivalent information generated by Attachment Security and Secondary Strategies Interview (ASSSI. Results showed that models of attachment to the parents seemed to have influenced the attachment representations' and love relationships, which seemed to have mediated the levels of depression.

  5. Depression, C-reactive protein and length of post-operative hospital stay in coronary artery bypass graft surgery patients.

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    Poole, Lydia; Kidd, Tara; Leigh, Elizabeth; Ronaldson, Amy; Jahangiri, Marjan; Steptoe, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in mediating the association between greater pre-operative depression symptoms and longer post-operative length of stay in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. We used a sample of 145 elective CABG patients and measured depression symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) prior to surgery and collected baseline measures of CRP. Participants were followed up during their in-hospital stay to measure early (1-3 days post-surgery) and persistent (4-8 days post-surgery) CRP responses to surgery. We found that compared with participants with low depression symptoms, those with elevated depression symptoms (BDI>10) prior to CABG were at increased odds of a hospital stay of greater than one week (OR 3.51, 95% CI 1.415-8.693, p=0.007) and that greater persistent CRP responses mediated this association. Further work is needed to explore the exact physiological pathways through which depression and CRP interact to affect recovery in CABG patients.

  6. Depression and hopelessness in patients with acute leukemia: the psychological impact of an acute and life-threatening disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheihman, Galina; Zimmermann, Camilla; Deckert, Amy; Fitzgerald, Peter; Mischitelle, Ashley; Rydall, Anne; Schimmer, Aaron; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Chris; Rodin, Gary

    2016-08-01

    Acute leukemia (AL) is a life-threatening cancer associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly in older adults. Given that there has been little research on the psychological impact of such malignancies with acute onset, we assessed the prevalence and correlates of depression and hopelessness in patients with AL. Three hundred forty-one participants were recruited within 1 month of diagnosis or relapse and completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and other psychosocial measures. Multivariate regression analyses identified correlates of depression and hopelessness. 17.8% reported clinically significant depressive symptoms (BDI-II ≥ 15), 40.4% of which were in the moderate-severe range (BDI-II ≥ 20). 8.5% reported significant symptoms of hopelessness (BHS ≥ 8). Depression was associated with greater physical symptom burden (adjusted R(2)  = 48.4%), while hopelessness was associated with older age and lower self-esteem (adjusted R(2)  = 45.4%). Both were associated with poorer spiritual well-being. Clinically significant depressive symptoms were common early in the course of AL and related to physical symptom burden. Hopelessness was less common and associated with older age and lower self-esteem. The results suggest that whereas depression in AL may be related to disease burden, the preservation of hope may be linked to individual resilience, life stage, and realistic prognosis.Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Relationship between premature ejaculation and depression in Korean males.

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    Son, Hwancheol; Song, Sang Hoon; Lee, Jun-Young; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2011-07-01

    The psychological impacts of premature ejaculation (PE), which include guilt, anxiety, and distress, have been well established in Western countries. However, in Asia, although a substantial number of epidemiological studies have surveyed the prevalence of PE, researchers have not thoroughly investigated the relationship between PE and depression, or have defined PE properly. We studied the association between PE and depression and other psychological disturbances, in a Korean cohort by applying an appropriate definition for PE and validated outcome measures of depression. METHODS.  A total of 956 males (≥20 years) were initially approached via an Internet survey company. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire requesting detailed medical and sexual histories, which included questions from the Erectile Function Domain score in the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EF) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The prevalence of PE was evaluated using two different definitions-self-assessed PE and presumed PE. Presumed PE was defined as a short ejaculation time (an estimated intravaginal ejaculatory latency time ≤5 minutes), an inability to control ejaculation, and the presence of distress resulting from PE. Ejaculation-related questionnaire, the IIEF-EF, and BDI. A total of 334 men were evaluated. The prevalence of PE was 10.5% according to the Presumed PE definition, whereas by self-assessment, it was 25.4%. Self-assessed PE patients suffered from various psychological problems, such as depression, low self-esteem, bother, and low sexual satisfaction. Even after excluding erectile dysfunction (ED) subjects, a significant relationship was found between self-assessed PE and depression. Moreover, after further classification of the Self-assessed PE group, we found that subjects included in this group, but not in the Presumed PE group, suffered more from psychological burden than any other members of the cohort. Korean men with subjective

  8. Depression and Anxiety in Iranian Mothers of Children with Epilepsy

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    Atefeh SOLTANIFAR

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available bjectiveEpilepsy is a common neurological disorder in children. Parents with epileptic children have many psychosocial care needs. So the main goal of this study was to evaluate depression and anxiety in Iranian mothers with epileptic children.Materials & MethodsWe identified 30 mothers of children with epilepsy and 30 mothers of children without epilepsy with children aged between 8 and 12 years who met the study criteria. In all children with epilepsy, the mothers were the main caregivers and all these children lived in two-parent families. Children in the control group were in the same age. Ninety-eight percent of children in the control group lived in two-parent families with the mother as the main caregiver. All mothers fulfilled the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.ResultsAccording to these data, BDI scores were significantly higher in the mothers of epileptic children (mean of Beck score=16.5 compared to the control group (mean of Beck score=9.8. The total, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scores for mothers of children with epilepsy were 100.3, 51.7 and 48.6. However, these scores in the control group were 86.9, 45.1 and 41.8. These differences were statistically significant.In a second analysis, using the demographic data, we did not find any statistically significant relation between anxiety or depression and the mothers’ job, children’s medication and other demographic variables.ConclusionNeurologists and psychiatrists need to develop better programs for adequate management of psychiatric disorders in mothers with epileptic children.

  9. Death by suicide long after electroconvulsive therapy. Is the sense of coherence test of Antonovsky a predictor of mortality from depression?

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    John Erik Berg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of increased risk of suicide is difficult. We had the opportunity to follow up 20 patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT because of severe depression. They filled in the Antonovsky sense of coherence test (SOC and Beck depression inventory (BDI before and after a series of ECT treatments. Seventeen surviving patients had a mean observation time of 20.6 months, whereas the three deceased patients had 11.3 months. There was a lower mean age at onset of illness and a longer mean duration of disease in the deceased. Other clinical parameters did not differ. The surviving patients had a significant decrease on the BDI from 35 to 18 (P less than 0.001 and an increase on the SOC test after ECT from 2.45 to 3.19 (P less than 0.001, indicating both less depression and better functioning in life. The deceased had a larger change on the BDI from 32 to 13, not attaining significance because of the low number of deceased. The SOC test, however, did not increase to a purported normal level; that is, from 2.43 to 2.87. Although the SOC scale has been shown to predict mortality in substance abusers, the SOC test has not been part of earlier reviews of predictive power. Tentatively, a low pathological score on the SOC test may indicate low sense of coherence in life that might increase the propensity for suicide. These preliminary results need replication in larger studies.

  10. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of cognitive therapy, rational emotive behavioral therapy, and fluoxetine (Prozac) in treating depression: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Florin A; Yates, Brian T; Lupu, Viorel; Szentagotai, Aurora; David, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of cognitive therapy (CT), rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), and fluoxetine (Prozac) for major depressive disorder (MDD) were compared in a randomized clinical trial with a Romanian sample of 170 clients. Each intervention was offered for 14 weeks, plus three booster sessions. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores were obtained prior to intervention, 7 and 14 weeks following the start of intervention, and 6 months following completion of intervention. CT, REBT, and fluoxetine did not differ significantly in changes in the BDI, depression-free days (DFDs), or Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs). Average BDI scores decreased from 31.1 before treatment to 9.7 six months following completion of treatment. Due to lower costs, both psychotherapies were more cost-effective, and had better cost-utility, than pharmacotherapy: median $26.44/DFD gained/month for CT and $23.77/DFD gained/month for REBT versus $34.93/DFD gained/month for pharmacotherapy, median $/QALYs=$1,638, $1,734, and $2,287 for CT, REBT, and fluoxetine (Prozac), respectively.

  11. Effectiveness of Emotional Schema Therapy on Severity of Depression and Rumination in People with Major Depressive Disorder

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    M rezaee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The emotional schema model emphasises on mind rumination and other emotional schemas in depression. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of Emotional Schema Therapy (EST on severity of depression and rumination in people with major depression disorder. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial study using pre-test and post-test-follow up with the control group. Among all patients with major depressive disorder visited in Imam Hossein hospital and Rahyar clinic of Tehran, 32 patients were selected through inclusion or exclusion criteria and convenience sampling then they were randomly assigned into two equal groups; experimental (16 persons and control (16 persons. Experimental group experienced 14 weeks of emotional schema therapy, while the control grouprecieved no treatment intervention. Revised Beck depression inventory (BDI-II and ruminative response scale (RRS were used in base lines, post-test and follow up as the assessment instruments. Data were analyzed by mixed analysis of variance via SPSS19 software. Results: The results of this research showed that the means of depression and rumination in the experimental group were reduced significantly in comparison with the control group in post-test and follow up (P<0.05. Conclusion: The study findings proposed that Emotional Schema Therapy can be used as an effective intervention in order to reduce the depression and mind rumination in people with major depressive disorder.

  12. Depression and migraine Depressão e migrânea

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    José Carlos Busto Galego

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate both the presence and intensity of depressive symptoms in patients with episodic migraine (EM and transformed migraine (TM or chronic migraine, comparing them with a control group. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was used for this purpose. The median of BDI score of the control group was significantly lower than the EM and TM groups (pO objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a presença e a intensidade de sintomas depressivos entre pacientes com migrânea episódica (ME e migrânea transformada (MT ou migrânea crônica, comparando-os com um grupo controle. O Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB foi aplicado para esta finalidade. A mediana das pontuações do IDB do grupo controle foi significantemente menor que a dos grupos ME e MT (p< 0,0005. Os grupos ME e MT não apresentaram diferenças significantes em suas medianas das pontuações (p=0,12. Quando avaliados de forma qualitativa, pela análise de dependência, o grupo MT apresentou freqüência maior de depressão severa. Sintomatologia depressiva mais severa do ponto de vista qualitativo poderia reforçar possível co-morbidade entre depressão e migrânea transformada. Esta associação poderia ser considerada mais como um fator de perpetuação da MT do que um fator de risco de transformação da ME para a MT.

  13. Glucocorticoid mediated regulation of inflammation in human monocytes is associated with depressive mood and obesity.

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    Cheng, Tiefu; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Pruitt, Christopher; Hong, Suzi

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is observed in various conditions, including depression and obesity, which are also often related. Glucocorticoid (GC) resistance and desensitization of peripheral GC receptors (GRs) are often the case in HPA dysregulation seen in depression, and GC plays a critical role in regulation of inflammation. Given the growing evidence that inflammation is a central feature of some depression cases and obesity, we aimed to investigate the immune-regulatory role of GC-GR in relation to depressive mood and obesity in 35 healthy men and women. Depressive mood and level of obesity were assessed, using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-Ia) and body mass index (BMI), respectively. We measured plasma cortisol levels via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated intracellular tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production by monocytes, using flow cytometry. Cortisol sensitivity was determined by the difference in monocytic TNF production between the conditions of 1 and 0 μM cortisol incubation ("cortisol-mediated inflammation regulation, CoMIR"). GR vs. mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism for CoMIR was examined by using mifepristone and spironolactone. A series of multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate independent contribution of depressive mood vs. obesity after controlling for age, gender, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and plasma cortisol in predicting CoMIR. CoMIR was explained by somatic subcomponents of depressive mood (BDI-S: β=-0.499, p=0.001), or BMI (β=-0.466, pobesity and somatic depressive symptoms were associated with smaller efficacy of the blockers, which warrants further investigation. Our findings, although in a preclinical sample, signify the shared pathophysiology of immune dysregulation in depression and obesity and warrant further mechanistic investigation.

  14. Prevalence and Clinical Correlators of Undiagnosed Significant Depressive Symptoms Among Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes In A Mediterranean Population.

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    Nicolau, J; Simó, R; Sanchís, P; Ayala, L; Fortuny, R; Rivera, R; Masmiquel, L

    2016-11-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and clinical parameters, of clinically significant depressive symptoms among a type 2 diabetes (T2DM) sample from a Mediterranean area without an established diagnosis of depressive disorder (DD). Methods: 320 subjects with T2DM were recruited randomly from Primary-Care settings and the Endocrine Department from a tertiary center in Mallorca (Spain). 91 healthy individuals matched by age, gender and BMI were used as controls. All participating patients graded by the presence of DD by using the "Beck Depression Inventory" (BDI), considering pathological a cut-off score equal or greater than 16. Results: 27.2% T2DM subjects had significant symptoms of DD compared with 12.1% in the control group (pdepressive symptoms are more prevalent among Mediterranean T2DM subjects than in general population. Main clinical correlators of significant depressive symptoms are gender, marital status and BMI.

  15. Religion, coping and outcome in out-patients with depression or diabetes mellitus.

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    Amadi, K U; Uwakwe, R; Odinka, P C; Ndukuba, A C; Muomah, C R; Ohaeri, J U

    2016-06-01

    The study assesses the association between religiosity and coping style with the outcome of depression and diabetes. Using a simple random sampling, we recruited 112 participants with diabetes and an equal number with depression consecutively, matching for gender. Religiosity was determined using Religious Orientation Scale (revised) (ROS-R), coping styles with Brief Religious Coping (Brief RCOPE) scale and Mental Adjustment to Cancer (MAC) scale (adapted). Primary and secondary outcomes were evaluated using Sheehan's Disability Scale (SDS) and Becks Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) respectively. Among participants with diabetes, BDI-II total scores correlated negatively with ROS-R Extrinsic Social (r = -0.2, P < 0.05) and Fighting Spirit (r = -0.3, P < 0.05) but correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.3, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.4, P < 0.05). SDS global scores correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.3, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.4, P < 0.05). Among participants with depression, BDI-II total scores correlated negatively with Intrinsic religiosity (r = -0.2, P < 0.05) and Fighting Spirit (r = -0.4, P < 0.05) but correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.6, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.7, P < 0.05). SDS global scores correlated negatively with Intrinsic religiosity (r = -0.2, P < 0.05) and Fighting Spirit (r = -0.3, P < 0.05) but correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.5, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.4, P < 0.05). High intrinsic and extrinsic religiosities are likely to be associated with positive coping skills and better treatment outcome in patients with depression or diabetes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Collaborative care for depression in general practice: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

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    Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Curth, Nadja Kehler; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Mikkelsen, John Hagel; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Lundsteen, Merete; Csillag, Claudio; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-07-21

    Depression is a common illness with great human costs and a significant burden on the public economy. Previous studies have indicated that collaborative care (CC) has a positive effect on symptoms when provided to people with depression, but CC has not yet been applied in a Danish context. We therefore developed a model for CC (the Collabri model) to treat people with depression in general practice in Denmark. Since systematic identification of patients is an "active ingredient" in CC and some literature suggests case finding as the best alternative to standard detection, the two detection methods are examined as part of the study. The aim is to investigate if treatment according to the Collabri model has an effect on depression symptoms when provided to people with depression in general practice in Denmark, and to examine if case finding is a better method to detect depression in general practice than standard detection. The trial is a cluster-randomised, clinical superiority trial investigating the effect of treatment according to the Collabri model for CC, compared to treatment as usual for 480 participants diagnosed with depression in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is depression symptoms (Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II)) after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include depression symptoms (BDI-II) after 15 months, anxiety symptoms (Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI)), level of functioning (Global Assessment of Function (GAF)) and psychological stress (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R)). In addition, case finding (with the recommended screening tool Major Depression Inventory (MDI)) and standard detection of depression is examined in a cluster-randomized controlled design. Here, the primary outcome is the positive predictive value of referral diagnosis. If the Collabri model is shown to be superior to treatment as usual, the study will contribute with important knowledge on how to improve treatment of depression in

  17. Predictive Validity of the Battelle Developmental Inventory as a Measure of Social-Behavioral Development for Young Children with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Kenneth W.; Mauk, Gary W.

    1993-01-01

    The Battelle Developmental Inventory (BDI) was administered to 121 young children, and parents rated them with the Social Skills Rating System 2-3 years after entry into the study. Correlations between the two measures revealed very weak to modest relationships, providing limited support for the BDI as a predictive measure of future…

  18. Parental quality of life and depressive mood following methylphenidate treatment of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeni; Kim, Bongseog; Chang, Jae-Seung; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Cho, Soo-Churl; Hwang, Jun-Won

    2014-07-01

    This naturalistic study investigated the associations between quality of life and depressive mood in parents and symptom changes in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children. At baseline and at weeks 4 and 8, the parents evaluated their children, who were receiving treatment with osmotic-release oral system methylphenidate (mean dosage 36.3 ± 15.5 mg/day), using the Swanson, Nolan, and Pelham - Fourth Edition (SNAP-IV-18) scale. The parents evaluated themselves using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment, Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF). A significant reduction in SNAP-IV-18 scores and improvements in parental BDI scores and parental WHOQOL-BREF scores were observed. The decrease in BDI scores from baseline to 8 weeks was significantly associated with increases in WHOQOL-BREF sub-domain scores from baseline to 8 weeks, with a greater decrease at 4 weeks and after. The decrease in the SNAP-IV-18 hyperactivity-impulsivity score was significantly associated with increases in WHOQOL social sub-domain scores from baseline to 8 weeks. For those patients who showed a 25% or greater decrease in the SNAP-IV-18 total scores from baseline to 8 weeks, the decreases in the SNAP-IV-18 total score and in the inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity scores were significantly associated with a decrease in BDI scores from baseline to 8 weeks. Methylphenidate treatment for ADHD was associated with both symptom alleviation in children with ADHD and improvement in parental depressive mood and quality of life, suggesting that the effects of treatment could go beyond symptom improvement in ADHD. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Depressive Symptoms, and Cognitive Performance in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazereeuw, Graham; Herrmann, Nathan; Oh, Paul I.; Ma, David W.L.; Wang, Cheng Tao; Kiss, Alexander; Lanctôt, Krista L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This trial investigated the efficacy of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) treatment for improving depressive symptoms and cognitive performance in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) participating in cardiac rehabilitation. Patients with CAD aged 45 to 80 years were randomized to receive either 1.9-g/d n-3 PUFA treatment or placebo for 12 weeks. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D, primary outcome) and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria were used to identify a depressive episode at baseline. Cognitive performance was measured using a standardized battery for vascular cognitive impairment. In 92 patients (age, 61.7 ± 8.7 y; 76% male, 40% depressed; HAM-D, 6.9 ± 5.9; BDI-II, 12.3 ± 10.9; n = 45 n-3 PUFA, n = 47 placebo), depression decreased (HAM-D, F3,91 = 2.71 and P = 0.049; BDI-II, F3,91 = 6.24 and P < 0.01), and cognitive performance improved (attention/processing speed, F1,91 = 5.57, P = 0.02; executive function, F1,91 = 14.64, P < 0.01; visuospatial memory, F1,91 = 4.01, P = 0.04) over cardiac rehabilitation. Omega-3 PUFA treatment increased plasma eicosapentaenoic acid (F1,29 = 33.29, P < 0.01) and docosahexaenoic acid (F1,29 = 15.29, P < 0.01) concentrations but did not reduce HAM-D (F3,91 = 1.59, P = 0.20) or BDI-II (F3,91 = 0.46, P = 0.50) scores compared with placebo. Treatment did not improve cognitive performance; however, n-3 PUFAs significantly increased verbal memory compared with placebo in a subgroup of nondepressed patients (F1,54 = 4.16, P = 0.04). This trial suggests that n-3 PUFAs do not improve depressive and associated cognitive symptoms in those with CAD. The possible benefits of n-3 PUFAs for verbal memory may warrant investigation in well-powered studies. PMID:27529771

  20. Randomized Trial of Group Music Therapy With Chinese Prisoners: Impact on Anxiety, Depression, and Self-Esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi-Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Gold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of group music therapy on improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in Chinese prisoners. Two-hundred male prisoners were randomly assigned to music therapy (n = 100) or standard care (n = 100). The music therapy had 20 sessions of group therapy compared with standard care. Anxiety (State and Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI]), depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]), and self-esteem (Texas Social Behavior Inventory [TSBI], Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory [RSI]) were measured by standardized scales at baseline, mid-program, and post-program. Data were analyzed based on the intention to treat principle. Compared with standard care, anxiety and depression in the music therapy condition decreased significantly at mid-test and post-test; self-esteem improved significantly at mid-test (TSBI) and at post-test (TSBI, RSI). Improvements were greater in younger participants (STAI-Trait, RSI) and/or in those with a lower level of education (STAI-State, STAI-Trait). Group music therapy seems to be effective in improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem and was shown to be most beneficial for prisoners of younger age or with lower education level.

  1. Pain, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Cervical Miyofascial Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Dundar

    2014-03-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of depression, pain and disability in patients with chronic cervical miyofascial pain syndrome (MPS and to determine their association with quality of life. Material and Method: Forty patients with Cervical MPS and 40 age and sex-matched healthy controls enrolled in this study. The social and demographic characteristics of the patients and controls were examined. All patients and controls were evaluated with respect to pain (at night, rest and movement and assessed by visual analog scale (VAS. Neck disability index (NDI was used to calculate functional disability. Quality of life was evaluated with the the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36. Also all of the patients and controls underwent Beck depression inventory (BDI. Results: There was no statistical difference between the patients and control cases according to demographical data. The SF-36 scores of the study patients were lower than controls. NDI, BDI and VAS scores were higher in the patients with chronic cervical MPS compared to controls. BDI scores of the patients with chronic cervical MPS  were negatively and closely associated with subparameters of the SF-36 (physical function (r:-0,599, p<0.001, role limitations due to physical functioning (r:-0,558, p<0.001, bodily pain (r:-0.540, p<0.001, general health (r:- 0,708 p<0.001, vitality (r:-0,692, p<0.001, social functioning (r:-0,559, p<0.001, role limitations due to emotional problems (r:-0,537, p<0.001 and mental health (r: -0,787, p<0.001. Discussion: BDI scores are higher in patients with chronic cervical MPS than healthy controls and negatively affect their quality of life. Psychiatric evaluation of the patients with chronic cervical MPS may improve their quality of life and treatments outcome.

  2. Increased frequency of anxiety, depression, quality of life and sexual life in young hypogonadotropic hypogonadal males and impacts of testosterone replacement therapy on these conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Umit; Aydogdu, Aydogan; Akbulut, Halil; Sonmez, Alper; Yuksel, Servet; Basaran, Yalcin; Uzun, Ozcan; Bolu, Erol; Saglam, Kenan

    2012-01-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is defined as the failure in production of gonadal hormones, thus resulting in lower amounts of testosterone. Depression, anxiety and decreased quality of life are the most common psychopathological conditions in young hypogonadal men. The aim of the present study was to assess the still debated relationship with testosterone levels and psychological symptoms in young male patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). Thirty-nine young male patients with CHH and 40 age-matched healthy males were enrolled in the present study. The impact of testosterone replacement treatment (TRT) on the patients' anxiety and depression levels, sexual function and quality of life were assessed before and after 6 months of treatment using valid and reliable scales, including the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Arizona Sexual Experiences (ASEX). Patients with CHH had significantly higher scores for BDI, BAI, and ASEX than the control subjects at baseline (p=0.011, p=0.036, pstatistically significant (p=0.135). When compared to the control group, treatment naïve hypogonadal patients had more severe symptoms of sexual dysfunction, anxiety, depression, and worse quality of life. After 6 months of TRT, we observed improvements in the above parameters, suggesting that low endogenous levels of testosterone might be related to the increased incidence of psychological symptoms.

  3. Identity confusion and depression in groups of adolescents having psychiatric and physical symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuhadaroğlu, F

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the identity status of adolescents having psychiatric and physical symptoms and the relation of depression with identity problems in adolescence. Three groups of university students were given a sociodemographic questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Sense of Identity Assessment Form (SIAF). The first group consisted of 31 students who were seen by the consultant psychiatrist at the Student Health Center of a university in Ankara. The second group included 37 students who applied to the same center with various physical complaints but did not need to be consulted by the psychiatrist. The third group was a group of 50 healthy students at the same university. The analysis revealed that only those with psychiatric complaints had identity confusion and that for the males in this group depressive symptoms are significant predictors of identity confusion.

  4. Decreased Total Antioxidant Activity in Major Depressive Disorder Patients Non-Responsive to Antidepressant Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Song-Eun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rho, Dae-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity (TAA) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the effect of antidepressants on TAA using a novel potentiometric method. Methods Twenty-eight patients with MDD and thirty-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The control group comprised 31 healthy individuals matched for gender, drinking and smoking status. We assessed symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We measured TAA using potentiometry. All measurements were made at baseline and four and eight weeks later. Results There was a significant negative correlation between BDI scores and TAA. TAA was significantly lower in the MDD group than in controls. When the MDD group was subdivided into those who showed clinical response to antidepressant therapy (response group) and those who did not (non-response group), only the non-response group showed lower TAA, while the response group showed no significant difference to controls at baseline. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, TAA in both the response and non-response groups was similar, and there was no significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the response to antidepressant treatment in MDD patients might be predicted by measuring TAA. PMID:27081384

  5. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  6. Body-Related Social Comparison and Disordered Eating among Adolescent Females with an Eating Disorder, Depressive Disorder, and Healthy Controls

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    Daniel Le Grange

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between body-related social comparison (BRSC and eating disorders (EDs by: (a comparing the degree of BRSC in adolescents with an ED, depressive disorder (DD, and no psychiatric history; and (b investigating whether BRSC is associated with ED symptoms after controlling for symptoms of depression and self-esteem. Participants were 75 girls, aged 12–18 (25 per diagnostic group. To assess BRSC, participants reported on a 5-point Likert scale how often they compare their body to others’. Participants also completed a diagnostic interview, Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE. Compared to adolescents with a DD and healthy adolescents, adolescents with an ED engaged in significantly more BRSC (p ≤ 0.001. Collapsing across groups, BRSC was significantly positively correlated with ED symptoms (p ≤ 0.01, and these associations remained even after controlling for two robust predictors of both ED symptoms and social comparison, namely BDI-II and RSE. In conclusion, BRSC seems to be strongly related to EDs. Treatment for adolescents with an ED may focus on reducing BRSC.

  7. Relation Between Emotional Intelligence, Socio-Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Depressive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Sayeda Ahmed; Hussien, El-Sayed Saleh; Hamed, Warda Elshahat; Zoromba, Mohamed Ali

    2017-02-01

    The present study aims to assess the emotional intelligence in relation to socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with depressive disorders. A descriptive correlational study was utilized with a sample of (106) depressed patients who were diagnosed by a psychiatrist with depressive disorders at psychiatric outpatient clinics in Mansoura University Hospital. Data were collected through assessing socio demographic and clinical characteristics, assessing level of depression using Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II, and assessing emotional intelligence using Barchard emotional intelligence scales. Results revealed that emotional intelligence not related significantly to socio demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with depressive disorders, there is a highly significant relationship between emotional intelligence in relation to level of depression and other practices used to alleviate depression. Therefore, it is recommended to conduct a periodical workshops and training programs for adolescents and young in the universities, schools, social clubs, camps and youth organizations to enhance their emotional intelligence in order to prevent depression. In addition, assessing the effect of emotional intelligence programs on preventing and managing depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Depressive symptoms and drug abuse among incarcerated women in cadeia pública feminina de Votorantim/SP

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    Danilo de Assis Pereira

    2014-06-01

    This is a qualitative study grounded in Social Representations Theory (SRT, with descriptive approach. Objectives: the research aimed to identify the life trajectories of women incarcerated in the Public Jail Women's Votorantim, its prospects and the meanings attributed to prison. The specific objectives were: (1 identify the socio-demographic and clinical data, (2 the prevalence of depressive symptoms and (3 the use, abuse or dependence symptoms in women prisoners. Methods: we interviewed 25 women, trapped interim Chain Public Women's Votorantim. The arrested after signing the Instrument of Consent, responding to a data sheet Sociodemographic and Clinical Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We use the Collective Subject Discourse to present the result of discursive question. For the rest of the specs of sociodemographic and clinical data and the Beck Depression Questionnaire, we chose the descriptive approach. Results: most of the interviewees was arrested for drug trafficking, has fragmented family history, present history of physical abuse and/or sexual abuse, have significant mental health problems, physical and substance abuse; 80% of women who responded to the BDI were identified as having moderate to severe depression, and the items that scored more this index were: loss of libido, sadness, punishment, insomnia. Conclusion: it is vital to ensure the rights of the imprisoned health access. We suggest that every convict follow a process of initial assessment, to be diagnosed soon: substance dependence and depression.

  9. Advising depression patients to reduce alcohol and drug use: factors associated with provider intervention in outpatient psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satre, Derek D; Leibowitz, Amy S; Mertens, Jennifer R; Weisner, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Mental health clinicians have an important opportunity to help depression patients reduce co-occurring alcohol and drug use. This study examined demographic and clinical patient characteristics and service factors associated with receiving a recommendation to reduce alcohol and drug use from providers in a university-based outpatient psychiatry clinic. The sample consisted of 97 participants ages 18 and older who reported hazardous drinking (≥3 drinks/occasion), illegal drug use (primarily cannabis) or misuse of prescription drugs, and who scored ≥15 on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Participants were interviewed at intake and 6 months. At 6-month telephone interview, 30% of participants reported that a clinic provider had recommended that they reduce alcohol or drug use. In logistic regression, factors associated with receiving advice to reduce use included greater number of drinks consumed in the 30 days prior to intake (p = .035); and greater depression severity on the BDI-II (p = .096) and hazardous drinking at 6 months (p = .05). While participants with greater alcohol intake and depression symptom severity were more likely to receive advice to reduce use, the low overall rate of recommendation to reduce use highlights the need to improve alcohol and drug use intervention among depression patients, and potentially to address alcohol and drug training and treatment implementation issues among mental health providers. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  10. The relationship between depression, anxiety and medication adherence among patients receiving antiretroviral treatment in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Adriaan; Kagee, Ashraf

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, a small but growing body of literature on the associations between common mental disorders and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has emerged. The present study builds on the growing body of research by investigating associations between symptoms of depression, symptoms of anxiety and adherence to ART. We studied a convenience sample of 101 South African ART users to determine the severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety and their association with self-reported adherence to ART. Based on the standardised cut-off scores recorded using the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition (BDI II), 40.4% of participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of depression. Moreover, results from the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) indicated that 28.7% of the study participants demonstrated moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety. Biserial correlations and logistic regression analysis demonstrated a significant relationship between symptoms of depression and adherence. The results indicate that patients reporting non-perfect adherence were approximately three times more likely (OR=2.73; CI=1.09-6.82) to have moderate to severe symptoms of depression than those reporting perfect adherence. The present findings are in keeping with those of previous studies, suggesting that depression may act as a barrier to ART adherence.

  11. [Influence between early maladaptive schemas and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, A; Jourda, B; Laros, C; Walburg, V; Callahan, S

    2011-09-01

    Early maladaptive schemas developed during childhood are relatively stable. Once activated, these early maladaptive schemas could influence reality perceptions and create cognitive distortions. Previous studies showed that early maladaptive schemas are linked to depression: early maladaptive schemas could be a risk factor for depression (Young, 2001) and a vulnerability marker for depression (Dozoïs, 2007). The main objective of the present study was to explore the influence of early maladaptive schemas on depression severity among a French adult population. One hundred and sixty-two participants (mean age 29 years; SD=13.86) were enrolled, 66 men (mean age 29 years; SD=13.65) and 106 women (mean age 30; SD=14.07). Participants were invited to complete the Young Schema Questionnaire, short version (YSQ-S1-Young 1994) and the Beck depression Inventory, 2nd version (BDI-II-Beck 1994). Fifty-six participants were randomly selected to complete a paper version of the scales, and 95 participants completed an online electronic version. Fifty-two percent of the participants were not depressed, 15% slightly depressed, 17% moderately depressed and 16% met criteria of severe depression. All 15 schemas scores were positively correlated to depression scores. Comparing schema scores and depression severity it can be noted that for severely depressed participants all schema scores were significantly higher, and six of 15 schemas were significantly higher in the case of moderate depression. In addition, three schemas (imperfection, vulnerability, fusional relation) are significantly and positively linked to depression scores, whereas one schema (everything is owed to me) appears to be a significantly negative predictor of associated depression. This study confirms results of previous research concerning the link between early maladaptive schemas and depression. What is more, the results show that the importance of these schemas increases with depression severity. The most

  12. The association of academic tracking to depressive symptoms among adolescents in three Caribbean countries

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    Clarke Nelson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Students who are tracked into low performing schools or classrooms that limit their life chances may report increased depressive symptoms. Limited research has been conducted on academic tracking and its association with depressive symptoms among high school students in the Caribbean. This project examines levels of depressive symptoms among tenth grade students tracked within and between high schools in Jamaica, St. Vincent and St. Kitts and Nevis. Methods Students enrolled in grade ten of the 2006/2007 academic year in Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Vincent were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. In Jamaica and St. Vincent, academic tracking was operationalized using data provided by the local Ministries of Education. These Ministries ranked ordered schools according to students' performance on Caribbean school leaving examinations. In St. Kitts and Nevis tracking was operationalized by classroom assignments within schools whereby students were grouped into classrooms according to their levels of academic achievement. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between academic tracking and BDI-II depression scores. Results A wide cross-section of 4th form students in each nation was sampled (n = 1738; 278 from Jamaica, 737 St. Kitts and Nevis, 716 from St. Vincent; 52% females, 46.2% males and 1.8% no gender reported; age 12 to 19 years, mean = 15.4 yrs, sd = .9 yr. Roughly half (53% of the students reported some symptoms of depression with 19.2% reporting moderate and 10.7% reporting severe symptoms of depression. Students in Jamaica reported significantly higher depression scores than those in either St. Kitts and Nevis or St. Vincent (p Conclusions There appears to be an association between academic tracking and depressive symptoms that is differentially manifested across the islands of Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Vincent.

  13. Loneliness and Depression among Wives of Pakistani Expatriate Husbands

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    Najam-us-SAHAR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to assess loneliness and depression among wives of expatriated husbands with focus on the role of family. The sample comprised of 50 married women divided in two groups (29 living in joint family & 21 living in nuclear family setup whose husbands are living abroad for last one year or more. Differential Loneliness Scale (DLS & Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were administered. Statistical analysis revealed that n=16(32% of the participants experience severe depression. Furthermore a significant positive relation was found between loneliness & depression especially in intimate relations domain(r=.66**. Another significant finding is difference in loneliness & depression based on family system. Women living in joint family system experienced more loneliness (M+SD= 29.1+11.9, t=2.1* and severe depression (35% as compared to those living in nuclear family system (M+SD= 21.8+12.5 for loneliness, 29% for severe depression. This study will be helpful in analyzing the psychological impact of husband’s expatriation on their wives mental health and it will also serve as a representative and expressive effort to open new avenues for further researchers to consider social variables including family dynamics.

  14. First validation of a Spanish-translated version of the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS) for use in pregnant women. A Chilean study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Rubén; Jadresic, Enrique; Guajardo, Viviana; Rojas, Graciela

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Edinburg Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to detect depression during pregnancy in Chile. The EPDS was applied to a sample of 111 pregnant women, who were attending an antenatal appointment in primary care centers. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-I) was used to assess the convergent validity, and the Depressive Episode module of the MINI was used to identify cases. The factor analysis showed that there was a good fit, with a factor model that explains 57.6 % of the total variance. There was a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.914) and good convergent validity with the BDI-I (rho = 0.850, p < 0.001). The EPDS was capable of differentiating cases of depression from non-cases. The best cutoff point was between 12 and 13, corresponding to an overall accuracy of 87.4 %. The questionnaire has good psychometric properties and can be useful for detecting cases of depression during pregnancy.

  15. Impact of a switch to fingolimod on depressive symptoms in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis: An analysis from the EPOC (Evaluate Patient OutComes) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Samuel F; Agius, Mark; Miller, Deborah M; Cutter, Gary; Barbato, Luigi; McCague, Kevin; Meng, Xiangyi; Agashivala, Neetu; Chin, Peter; Hollander, Eric

    2016-06-15

    Depression is common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), may confound evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness and may be impacted by MS-specific treatments. First, to assess the impact on depressive symptoms of a switch to fingolimod versus remaining on an injectable disease-modifying therapy (iDMT) in a post-hoc analysis of prospectively collected data from the EPOC study. Secondly, to investigate the underlying Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) factor structure in patients with MS, and estimate treatment differences using the resulting subscales. EPOC was a 6-month, open-label study assessing patient-reported outcomes after switch from iDMT to oral fingolimod 0.5mg versus remaining on iDMT in 1053 patients with relapsing-remitting MS. At end of study (EOS), a greater proportion of patients on fingolimod versus iDMT no longer had BDI-II scores indicating depression (p<0.001). Fewer mildly and moderately symptomatic patients developed severe depressive symptoms, and fewer severely symptomatic patients continued to have scores indicating severe depression at EOS on fingolimod versus iDMT (p=0.027, p=0.038, p=0.030, respectively). Two BDI-II subscales were identified and labelled Somatic and Affective; fingolimod demonstrated more reduction on both subscales at EOS versus iDMTs (p<0.0001 and p=0.0001, respectively). A switch to fingolimod versus remaining on/switching to another iDMT was associated with an improvement in depressive symptoms in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-P

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    Mir Mohammad Jalali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tinnitus can have a significant effect on an individual’s quality of life, and is very difficult quantify. One of the most popular questionnaires used in this area is the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of a Persian translation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-P.   Materials and Methods: This prospective clinical study was performed in the Otolaryngology Department of Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. A total of 102 patients aged 23–80 years with tinnitus completed the (THI-P. The patients were instructed to complete the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Audiometry was performed. Eight-five patients were asked to complete the THI-P for a second time 7–10 days after the initial interview. We assessed test–retest reliability and internal reliability of the THI-P. Validity was assessed by analyzing the THI-P of patients according to their age, tinnitus duration and psychological distress (BDI and STAI. A factor analysis was computed to verify if three subscales (functional, emotional, and catastrophic represented three distinct variables.   Results: Test–retest correlation coefficient scores were highly significant. The THI-P and its subscales showed good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.80 to 0.96. High-to-moderate correlations were observed between THI-P and psychological distress and tinnitus symptom ratings. A confirmatory factor analysis failed to validate the three subscales of THI, and high inter-correlations found between the subscales question whether they represent three distinct factors. Conclusion:  The results suggest that the THI-P is a reliable and valid tool which can be used in a clinical setting to quantify the impact of tinnitus on the quality of life of Iranian patients.

  17. The working alliance in a randomized controlled trial comparing online with face-to-face cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression

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    Preschl Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although numerous efficacy studies in recent years have found internet-based interventions for depression to be effective, there has been scant consideration of therapeutic process factors in the online setting. In face-to face therapy, the quality of the working alliance explains variance in treatment outcome. However, little is yet known about the impact of the working alliance in internet-based interventions, particularly as compared with face-to-face therapy. Methods This study explored the working alliance between client and therapist in the middle and at the end of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for depression. The participants were randomized to an internet-based treatment group (n = 25 or face-to-face group (n = 28. Both groups received the same cognitive behavioral therapy over an 8-week timeframe. Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI post-treatment and the Working Alliance Inventory at mid- and post- treatment. Therapists completed the therapist version of the Working Alliance Inventory at post-treatment. Results With the exception of therapists' ratings of the tasks subscale, which were significantly higher in the online group, the two groups' ratings of the working alliance did not differ significantly. Further, significant correlations were found between clients' ratings of the working alliance and therapy outcome at post-treatment in the online group and at both mid- and post-treatment in the face-to-face group. Correlation analysis revealed that the working alliance ratings did not significantly predict the BDI residual gain score in either group. Conclusions Contrary to what might have been expected, the working alliance in the online group was comparable to that in the face-to-face group. However, the results showed no significant relations between the BDI residual gain score and the working alliance ratings in either group. Trial registration ACTRN12611000563965

  18. The working alliance in a randomized controlled trial comparing online with face-to-face cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preschl, Barbara; Maercker, Andreas; Wagner, Birgit

    2011-12-06

    Although numerous efficacy studies in recent years have found internet-based interventions for depression to be effective, there has been scant consideration of therapeutic process factors in the online setting. In face-to face therapy, the quality of the working alliance explains variance in treatment outcome. However, little is yet known about the impact of the working alliance in internet-based interventions, particularly as compared with face-to-face therapy. This study explored the working alliance between client and therapist in the middle and at the end of a cognitive-behavioral intervention for depression. The participants were randomized to an internet-based treatment group (n = 25) or face-to-face group (n = 28). Both groups received the same cognitive behavioral therapy over an 8-week timeframe. Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) post-treatment and the Working Alliance Inventory at mid- and post- treatment. Therapists completed the therapist version of the Working Alliance Inventory at post-treatment. With the exception of therapists' ratings of the tasks subscale, which were significantly higher in the online group, the two groups' ratings of the working alliance did not differ significantly. Further, significant correlations were found between clients' ratings of the working alliance and therapy outcome at post-treatment in the online group and at both mid- and post-treatment in the face-to-face group. Correlation analysis revealed that the working alliance ratings did not significantly predict the BDI residual gain score in either group. Contrary to what might have been expected, the working alliance in the online group was comparable to that in the face-to-face group. However, the results showed no significant relations between the BDI residual gain score and the working alliance ratings in either group. ACTRN12611000563965. © 2011 Preschl et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Depression and anxiety in epilepsy: the association with demographic and seizure-related variables

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    Pseftogianni Dimitra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression and anxiety are common psychiatric symptoms in patients with epilepsy, exerting a profound negative effect on health-related quality of life. Several issues, however, pertaining to their association with psychosocial, seizure-related and medication factors, remain controversial. Accordingly, the present study was designed to investigate the association of interictal mood disorders with various demographic and seizure-related variables in patients with newly-diagnosed and chronic epilepsy. Methods We investigated 201 patients with epilepsy (51.2% males, mean age 33.2 ± 10.0 years, range 16–60 with a mean disease duration of 13.9 ± 9.5 years. Depression and anxiety were assessed in the interictal state with the Beck Depression Inventory, 21-item version (BDI-21 and the state and trait subscales of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S and STAI-T, respectively. The association of mood disorders with various variables was investigated with simple and multiple linear regression analyses. Results High seizure frequency and symptomatic focal epilepsy (SFE were independent determinants of depression, together accounting for 12.4% of the variation of the BDI-21. The STAI-S index was significantly associated with the type of epilepsy syndrome (SFE. Finally, high seizure frequency, SFE and female gender were independent determinants of trait anxiety accounting for 14.7% of the variation of the STAI-T. Conclusion Our results confirm the prevailing view that depression and anxiety are common psychological disorders in epileptics. It is additionally concluded that female gender, high seizure frequency and a symptomatic epilepsy syndrome are independent risk factors for the development of anxiety and/or depression.

  20. Assessing Latina/o Undergraduates' Depressive Symptomatology: Comparisons of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the Self-Report Depression Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Rico, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of depression scales as screening tools at university and college centers is increasing and thus, the question of whether scales are culturally valid for different student groups is increasingly more relevant with increased severity of depression for students and changing student demographics. As such, this study examined the reliability…

  1. Spanish Adaptation of the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI: psychometric properties of the patient and therapist forms (WAI-P and WAI-T

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    Nelson Andrade-González

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The working alliance is one of the most widely studied constructs in psychotherapy process research. The purpose of our study was to adapt the patient and therapist forms of the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI-P and WAI-T into Spanish. Both measurement instruments were translated into Spanish through a systematic translation process. The psychometric properties of the instruments were evaluated in both a pilot study and a clinical study involving Spanish outpatients with depressive disorders and their therapists. In the clinical study, patients completed the Spanish-language Beck Depression Inventory (BDI prior to initiating therapy and after the third and tenth psychotherapy sessions. High average scores were obtained with the Spanish-language WAI-P and WAI-T. A large number of individual items correlated satisfactorily with the overall score for the corresponding subscale. Both measures demonstrated excellent reliability (internal consistency and convergent validity. There were some limitations in the discriminant validity of the measures vs. measures of empathy. Regarding predictive validity, the overall WAI-P and the Task subscale of the WAI-T separately explained a moderate percentage of the variance in patient change in the BDI after the tenth psychotherapy session. These results were satisfactory and consistent with those obtained in studies using the English-language WAI.

  2. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  3. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  4. Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy for depressive symptoms with minimal support: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Päivi; Langrial, Sitwat; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Tolvanen, Asko; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2015-11-01

    Low-intensity interventions for people suffering from depressive symptoms are highly desirable. The aim of the present study was to investigate the outcomes of a web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT)-based intervention without face-to-face contact for people suffering from depressive symptoms. Participants (N = 39) with depressive symptoms were randomly assigned to an Internet-delivered acceptance and commitment therapy (iACT) intervention or a waiting list control condition (WLC). Participants were evaluated with standardized self-reporting measures (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI-II], Symptom Checklist-90 [SCL-90], Acceptance and Action Questionnaire [AAQ-2], Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire [FFMQ], Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire [ATQ], and White Bear Suppression Inventory [WBSI]) at pre- and post-measurement. Long-term effects in the iACT group were examined using a 12-month follow-up. The iACT program comprised home assignments, online feedback given by master's-level students of psychology over a 7-week intervention period, and automated email-based reminders. Significant effects were observed in favor of the iACT group on depression symptomatology (between effect sizes [ESs] at post-treatment, iACT/WLC, g = .83), psychological and physiological symptoms (g = .60), psychological flexibility (g = .67), mindfulness skills (g = .53), and frequency of automatic thoughts (g = .57) as well as thought suppression (g = .53). The treatment effects in the iACT group were maintained over the 12-month follow-up period (within-iACT ES: BDI-II, g = 1.33; SCL-90, g = 1.04; ATQF/B [Frequency/Believability], FFMQ, WBSI, AAQ-II, g = .74-1.08). The iACT participants stated that they would be happy to recommend the same intervention to others with depressive symptoms. We conclude that an ACT-based guided Internet-delivered treatment with minimal contact can be effective for people with depressive symptoms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Childhood trauma in the lives of substance-dependent patients: The relationship between depression, anxiety and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Suat; Kandemir, Hasan

    2015-05-01

    High levels of childhood traumatic experiences have been observed among substance abusers. There has been insufficient study of the effects of childhood trauma in adulthood. The aim of this study is to research the relationship between childhood trauma, self-esteem, and levels of depression and anxiety in substance-dependent (SD) people. This study took place between March 2012 and April 2013, at Balıklı Rum Hospital (Istanbul) substance dependency clinic. It included 50 patients diagnosed as substance dependent according to the criteria of DSM-IV as compared with 45 healthy controls. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Diagnosis (SCID-I) was used to identify Axis I disorders. All other data was collected using a semi-structured socio-demographic questionnaire, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The total scores of the SD group on the CTQ and on its Emotional Abuse/Emotional Neglect (EA/EN), Physical Abuse (PA) and Sexual Abuse (SA) subscales were statistically significant. In relation to the healthy controls, the SD group scored higher on the RSES, BDI and BAI. A correlation was observed between the total scores of SD individuals on the CTQ and their scores on the RSES, BDI and BAI. This study showed high levels of childhood traumatic experiences for SD people and indicates that there may be a relationship between these experiences and their levels of self-esteem, depression and anxiety.

  6. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  7. Are Depression and Anxiety Common in Hemodialyzed Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop-Jordanova Nada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers confirmed that depression and anxiety are two common comorbid disorders in chronic kidney patients. The aim of our study was to screen the level of depression and anxiety in a group of end-stage kidney diseases treated with hemodialysis. The evaluated sample comprised 230 participants; 110 females (mean age 55.5±13.5 years, and 120 males (mean age 54.5±14.3 years. The mean duration of maintenance dialysis was 8.3±5.8 years (from 0.5 to 24 years. Patients were selected randomly from three dialysis centers in R. Macedonia. As psychometric instruments Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and scores from Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-201 were used. Our study confirmed that majority of evaluated dialyzed patients are depressed and anxious in different level, but unfortunately the mental problems are frequently unrecognized. We suggested some response measures for management of these conditions in order to avoid risks for complications as well of suicide.

  8. Detecting Postpartum Depression in Referents to Medical and Health Centers in Hamadan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shobeiri

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Pregnancy and childbirth are significant developmental excitable for most women. Physical, intrapersonal and relational adaptations are needed to adjust successfully to pregnancy and delivery. Postpartum depression is a serious psychiatric disorder and the adverse impact on infants has been noted. The purpose of this study was to detect postpartum depression in referents to medical and health centers in Hamadan city.Materials & Methods: A descriptive and cross-sectional study involving 400 women completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI within 2-8 weeks of delivery was conducted in urban health centers in Hamadan city, Iran. Data were collected through interviews with women in the clinics in the health centers. Data processing and statistical analysis were performed using SPSS 10.0.Results: The results revealed that majority of women (68.0% were considered normal. Depression was detected in 32.0% of women. Out of these 19.0, 4.0 and 9.0% were mild, moderate and severe depression, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between postpartum depression and age, number of delivery, education, job and husband's job (P=0.000.Conclusion: Nearly 32.0% of selected women had depression. Therefore, it is important for medical personnel to be well versed in the course and treatment of postpartum depression. Post partum depression should be screened and treated as early as possible for several reasons. It can cause significant suffering for the woman who experiences it, and it can have deleterious consequences for the newborn.

  9. Chronic and Recurrent Depression in Primary Care: Socio-Demographic Features, Morbidity, and Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M. McMahon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major depression is often chronic or recurrent and is usually treated within primary care. Little is known about the associated morbidity and costs. Objectives. To determine socio-demographic characteristics of people with chronic or recurrent depression in primary care and associated morbidity, service use, and costs. Method. 558 participants were recruited from 42 GP practices in the UK. All participants had a history of chronic major depression, recurrent major depression, or dysthymia. Participants completed questionnaires including the BDI-II, Work and Social Adjustment Scale, Euroquol, and Client Service Receipt Inventory documenting use of primary care, mental health, and other services. Results. The sample was characterised by high levels of depression, functional impairment, and high service use and costs. The majority (74% had been treated with an anti-depressant, while few had seen a counsellor (15% or a psychologist (3% in the preceding three months. The group with chronic major depression was most depressed and impaired with highest service use, whilst those with dysthymia were least depressed, impaired, and costly to support but still had high morbidity and associated costs. Conclusion. This is a patient group with very significant morbidity and high costs. Effective interventions to reduce both are required.

  10. Depressive symptoms are associated with analgesic use in people with Alzheimer's disease: Kuopio ALSOVA study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Fiona-Maree Gilmartin

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD such as depression may be associated with pain, which according to the literature may be inadequately recognized and managed in this population. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with analgesic use in persons with AD; in particular, how AD severity, functional status, neuropsychiatric symptoms of AD, co-morbidities and somatic symptoms are associated with analgesic use. 236 community-dwelling persons with very mild or mild AD at baseline, and their caregivers, were interviewed over five years as part of the prospective ALSOVA study. Generalized Estimating Equations (GEEs were used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs for the factors associated with analgesic use over a five year follow-up. The proportion of persons with AD using any analgesic was low (13.6% at baseline and remained relatively constant during the follow-up (15.3% at Year 5. Over time, the most prevalent analgesic changed from non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (8.1% of persons with AD at Year 1 to acetaminophen (11.1% at Year 5. Depressive symptoms (measured by the Beck Depression Inventory, BDI were independently associated with analgesic use, after effects of age, gender, education, AD severity, comorbidities and somatic symptoms were taken into account. For every one unit increase in BDI, the odds of analgesic use increased by 4% (OR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval CI = 1.02-1.07. Caregiver depressive symptoms were not statistically significantly associated with analgesic use of the person with AD. Depressive symptoms were significantly associated with analgesic use during the five year follow-up period. Possible explanations warranting investigation are that persons with AD may express depressive symptoms as painful somatic complaints, or untreated pain may cause depressive symptoms. Greater awareness of the association between depressive symptoms and analgesic use may lead to safer and more

  11. Application of the Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory in clinical patients Aplicação do inventário de expressão de raiva estado-traço de Spielberger em pacientes clínicos

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    Flávia Barros de Azevedo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the factor structure of the Portuguese version of State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI in clinical patients. METHOD: 400 subjects from an internal medicine outpatient unit and 200 from a medical ward were recruited. Patients answered questions about clinical data, the STAXI, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Raw score of the STAXI was submitted to reliability assessment and factor analysis. RESULTS: Internal consistency using the Cronbach's alpha coefficient was of 0.84. The STAXI significantly correlated with BDI at r=0.352 (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar o construto e as propriedades psicométricas da versão em português do Inventário de Expressão de Raiva Estado-Traço (STAXI em pacientes clínicos. MÉTODO: 400 indivíduos de uma unidade ambulatorial e 200 de uma enfermaria de clínica médica foram recrutados. Foram coletadas informações sobre aspectos clínicos, o STAXI e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck (BDI. Os escores brutos do STAXI foram submetidos à análise de confiabilidade e análise fatorial. RESULTADOS: A consistência interna pelo coeficiente alfa de Cronbach foi de 0,84. O STAXI se correlacionou significativamente com BDI (r=0,352; p<0,01. A análise de Componentes Principais identificou cinco fatores significativos: Raiva-traço, Raiva-estado, Controle-de-raiva, Raiva-para-fora e Raiva-para-dentro. Esse modelo estrutural é similar ao apresentado originalmente por Spielberger. CONCLUSÃO: A versão em português do STAXI apresenta uma estrutura fatorial adequada que permite a avaliação das dimensões da raiva em pacientes clínicos.

  12. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  13. Parental bonding and depression: personality as a mediating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagianou, Penelope-Alexia; Zafiropoulou, Maria

    2008-01-01

    According to Bowlby's theory of attachment, the role of early experience and parenting is of crucial importance to child development and mental health. In addition, several research findings suggest that parental bonding and different types of attachment play a crucial role in personality development. The present study examines the association between parental bonding experiences (lack of parental care, overprotection or both) and depression during adulthood. The objective of the present study was to evaluate different personality dimensions as possible mediators of the relation between perceptions of parental bonding and depressive symptoms in adult life. 181 participants (15- 49-years-old) completed the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF). The results show that lack of parental care and overprotection is linked with depressive symptoms and a number of personality characteristics, such as low self-esteem, introversion, distress and emotional instability. In contrast, high care and low protection (optimal bonding) is linked with increased self-confidence, less distress and less depressive symptoms. The results presented here are in line with Bowlby's theory of attachment and show that parental bonding is linked with problematic personality development and psychopathology. The present study provided evidence that personality factors may mediate the observed relationship between parental rearing style and depression. The potential causal mechanisms warrant longitudinal evaluation.

  14. A hybrid POMDP-BDI agent architecture with online stochastic planning and plan caching

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, D

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an agent architecture for controlling an autonomous agent in stochastic, noisy environments. The architecture combines the partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP) model with the belief-desire-intention (BDI...

  15. An investigation into the experience of self-conscious emotions in individuals with bipolar disorder, unipolar depression and non-psychiatric controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, Julie; Markham, Dominic; Skinner, Martin; Neal, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    There has been little research into the association of shame and other self-conscious emotions in bipolar disorder, although there is evidence linking shame to various psychopathologies. This research investigates the levels of shame in individuals with bipolar disorder. A cross-sectional design was used to compare 24 individuals with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder to a clinical control group of 18 individuals with unipolar depression, and 23 age-matched non-psychiatric controls on measures of mood (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] and Self Report Manic Inventory [SRMI]) and of self-conscious emotions (Internalized Shame Scale and Test of Self-Conscious Affect). Higher levels of trait shame and lower guilt-proneness were found in the bipolar group. Higher levels of shame-proneness were found in the unipolar group in comparison to the bipolar and control groups. BDI scores positively correlated with trait shame and shame-proneness, and accounted for a large proportion of the variance in these scores. SRMI scores positively correlated with trait (internalized) shame and negatively correlated with guilt-proneness. There was evidence for the presence of shame within bipolar disorder, but this differed to the evidence for shame in individuals with unipolar depression. Clinical implications are discussed.  © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Predictive factors of depression symptoms among adolescents in the 18-month follow-up after Wenchuan earthquake in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Cheryl H K; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Li, Rong-Hui; Fan, Mei; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Yuan-Hao; Ou, Guo Jing; Jiang, Zhe; Tong, Yu-Zhen; Fang, Ding-Zhi

    2017-02-01

    It is unclear about the change and risk factors of depression among adolescent survivors after earthquake. This study aimed to explore the change of depression, and identify the predictive factors of depression among adolescent survivors after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China. The depression among high school students at 6, 12 and 18 months after the Wenchuan earthquake were investigated. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used in this study to assess the severity of depression. Subjects included 548 student survivors in an affected high school. The rates of depression among the adolescent survivors at 6-, 12- and 18-month after the earthquake were 27.3%, 42.9% and 33.3%, respectively, for males, and 42.9%, 61.9% and 53.4%, respectively, for females. Depression symptoms, trauma-related self-injury, suicidal ideation and PTSD symptoms at the 6-month follow-up were significant predictive factors for depression at the 18-month time interval following the earthquake. This study highlights the need for considering disaster-related psychological sequela and risk factors of depression symptoms in the planning and implementation of mental health services. Long-term mental and psychological supports for victims of natural disasters are imperative.

  17. [State and trait anxiety level and increase of depression among mothers of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder. pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolafnczyk, Tomasz; Wolafnczyk, Tomasz; Kolakowski, Artur; Pisula, Agnieszka; Liwska, Monika; Zlotkowska, Malgorzata; Srebnicki, Tomasz; Bryliska, Anita

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate anxiety level (as a trait and as a state) and the intensity of depressive symptoms in mothers of children with hyperkinetic disorder (HD) and with and without comorbid conduct disorder (CD); to determine the relationship between the intensity of anxiety and depression and intensity of symptoms of HD. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and STAI questionnaire to measure state-trait anxiety were filled by 24 mothers of children with HD and 26 mothers of children without HD. Mothers of children with HD were also asked to complete the Conners Questionnaire for Parents and Teachers (IOWA). Teachers were asked to complete the Conners Questionnaire for Teachers (RCTS). 75% of HD subjects had a comorbid CD, in comparison with 19.2 % in the control group. No significant differences were found between the mothers of children with HD and the control group in the results of BDI scale and STAI questionnaire in anxiety state and anxiety trait subscales. The difference was found between mothers of children with CD and without CD in anxiety-state subscale in STAI questionnaire. No correlations were found between the number of depressive symptoms, anxiety as a state and as a trait and the results of Conners IOWA and RCTS. The presence of HD in children does not correlate with the level of depression and anxiety in their mothers. There is a relationship between the presence of CD in children and elevated levels of state anxiety in their mothers.

  18. One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients’ Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jo Chiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD. The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ. Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks, posttest (after 12 therapy sessions, and short- (3 months, medium- (6 months, and long-term (12 months follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P<0.001. Similar effects were seen on the HRSD. ATQ significantly decreased at the 12th session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P<0.001. We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

  19. One-Year Follow-Up of the Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Patients' Depression: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kai-Jo; Chen, Tsai-Hui; Hsieh, Hsiu-Tsu; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Ou, Keng-Liang; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term (one year) effectiveness of a 12-session weekly cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT) on patients with depression. This was a single-blind randomized controlled study with a 2-arm parallel group design. Eighty-one subjects were randomly assigned to 12 sessions intervention group (CBGT) or control group (usual outpatient psychiatric care group) and 62 completed the study. The primary outcome was depression measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). The secondary outcomes were automatic thoughts measured by automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ). Both groups were evaluated at the pretest (before 2 weeks), posttest (after 12 therapy sessions), and short- (3 months), medium- (6 months), and long-term (12 months) follow-up. After receiving CBGT, the experimental group had a statistically significant reduction in the BDI-II from 40.30 at baseline to 17.82 points at session eight and to 10.17 points at postintervention (P session, 6 months after sessions, and 1 year after the sessions ended (P < 0.001). We concluded that CBGT is effective for reducing depression and continued to be effective at 1 year of follow-up.

  20. Third trimester of pregnancy: Carpal tunnel syndrome, anxiety and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tupković Emir

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study measured the frequency of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and the levels of anxiety and depression in the third trimester of healthy pregnant women having regular prenatal visits. The study was performed at the Department of Neurophysiology Health Centre Tuzla in the period of January through April 2006. The group consisted of 40 pregnant women in the third trimester of pregnancy, age range of 25.6 ± 4.9 years. The control group consisted of healthy women, ages 31.1 ± 4.4 years. The electrophysiological parameters n. medians, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI were measured. The diagnosis of CTS is neurophysiologically confirmed in 12 pregnant women (30% and 75% showed clinical signs and symptoms of disease. Pain was measured by subjective pain scale ranked from 0 (absence of pain to 10 (severe pain. The mean value of BAI in control group was 8.6 ± 6.5, while in the group of pregnant women was 12.9 ± 6.9, which was significantly higher (p = 0.011. The mean value of BDI in control group was 4.2 ±4.4 and in the group of pregnant women was 8.7 ±5.9. which was significantly higher (p = 0.0008, The mean value of BAI in the group of women with CTS was 12.25 ± 6.7 which was not significantly higher than the compared to the control group (p = 0.113. The mean value of BDI in the group of pregnant women with CTS was 7.9 ± 6.4,which was significantly higher when compared to the control group (p = 0.037. The subjective assessment of pain in the group of women with CTS was 2.4 ±2.1. There was a slight correlation between pain intensity and degree of BAI (r = 0.289 and a negative correlation with the level of depression (r = - 0.297. The conclusion is that pregnant women with normal risk should make an extra effort in the treatment of unpleasant conditions such as CTS, anxiety and depression, which may impair the quality of life and have physical and psychological side effects on the future mother.

  1. An Investigation of the Validity and Reliability of the Battelle Developmental Inventory with a Population of Children Younger than 30 Months with Identified Handicapping Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Mary; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The study evaluated the Batelle Developmental Inventory (BDI) with 40 disabled children under 30 months of age. Subjects were also given the Bayley Scales and Vine Scales of Adaptive Behavior. Results indicated high concurrent validity, interrater reliability, and internal consistency for the BDI. (Author/DB)

  2. Judgment of emotional information expressed by prosody and semantics in patients with unipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlipf, Sarah; Batra, Anil; Walter, Gudrun; Zeep, Christina; Wildgruber, Dirk; Fallgatter, Andreas; Ethofer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate the impact of major depressive disorder (MDD) on judgment of emotions expressed at the verbal (semantic content) and non-verbal (prosody) level and to assess whether evaluation of verbal content correlate with self-ratings of depression-related symptoms as assessed by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We presented positive, neutral, and negative words spoken in happy, neutral, and angry prosody to 23 MDD patients and 22 healthy controls (HC) matched for age, sex, and education. Participants rated the valence of semantic content or prosody on a 9-point scale. MDD patients attributed significantly less intense ratings to positive words and happy prosody than HC. For judgment of words, this difference correlated significantly with BDI scores. No such correlation was found for prosody perception. MDD patients exhibited attenuated processing of positive information which generalized across verbal and non-verbal channels. These findings indicate that MDD is characterized by impairments of positive rather than negative emotional processing, a finding which could influence future psychotherapeutic strategies as well as provide straightforward hypotheses for neuroimaging studies investigating the neurobiological correlates of impaired emotional perception in MDD.

  3. Judgment of emotional information expressed by prosody and semantics in patients with unipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eSchlipf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It was the aim of this study to investigate the impact of major depressive disorder (MDD on judgment of emotions expressed at the verbal (semantic content and non-verbal (prosody level and to assess whether evaluation of verbal content correlate with self-ratings of depression-related symptoms as assessed by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We presented positive, neutral, and negative words spoken in happy, neutral, and angry prosody to 23 MDD patients and 22 healthy controls (HC matched for age, sex, and education. Participants rated the valence of semantic content or prosody on a 9-point scale. MDD patients attributed significantly less intense ratings to positive words and happy prosody than HC. For judgment of words, this difference correlated significantly with BDI scores. No such correlation was found for prosody perception. MDD patients exhibited attenuated processing of positive information which generalized across verbal and non-verbal channels. These findings indicate that MDD is characterized by impairments of positive rather than negative emotional processing, a finding which could influence future psychotherapeutic strategies as well as provide straightforward hypotheses for neuroimaging studies investigating the neurobiological correlates of impaired emotional perception in MDD.

  4. A parallel group randomised open blinded evaluation of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for depression after psychosis: Pilot trial outcomes (ADAPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumley, Andrew; White, Ross; Briggs, Andy; Ford, Ian; Barry, Sarah; Stewart, Corinna; Beedie, Sara; McTaggart, Jacqueline; Clarke, Caoimhe; MacLeod, Rachel; Lidstone, Emma; Riveros, Bruno Salgado; Young, Robin; McLeod, Hamish

    2017-05-01

    Depression is one of the major contributors to poorer quality of life amongst individuals with psychosis and schizophrenia. The study was designed as a Pilot Trial to determine the parameters of a larger, definitive pragmatic multi-centre randomised controlled trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for depression after psychosis (ACTdp) for individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who also meet diagnostic criteria for major depression. Participants were required to meet criteria for schizophrenia and major depression. Blinded follow-ups were undertaken at 5-months (end of treatment) and at 10-months (5-months posttreatment). Primary outcomes were depression as measured by the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A total of 29 participants were randomised to ACTdp + Standard Care (SC) (n=15) or SC alone (n=14). We did not observe significant differences between groups on the CDSS total score at 5-months (Coeff=-1.43, 95%CI -5.17, 2.32, p=0.45) or at 10-months (Coeff=1.8, 95%CI -2.10, 5.69, p=0.36). In terms of BDI, we noted a statistically significant effect in favour of ACTdp+SC at 5-months (Coeff=-8.38, 95%CI -15.49, -1.27, p=0.02) but not at 10-months (Coeff=-4.85, 95%CI -12.10, 2.39, p=0.18). We also observed significant effects on psychological flexibility at 5-months (Coeff=-8.83, 95%CI -14.94, -2.71, ptherapy with depression as the primary outcome, ACT is a promising intervention for depression in the context of psychosis. A further large-scale definitive randomised controlled trial is required to determine effectiveness. ISRCTN: 33306437. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Escitalopram treatment for depressive disorder following acute coronary syndrome: a 24-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Min; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Stewart, Robert; Jung, Bo-Ok; Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Ju Han; Shin, Hee-Young; Kang, Gaeun; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Jong-Keun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Depression is common after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and has adverse effects on prognosis. There are few evidence-based interventions for treating depression in ACS. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of escitalopram in treating depressive disorders identified 2-14 weeks after a confirmed ACS episode. A total of 217 patients with DSM-IV depressive disorders (121 major and 96 minor) and ACS were randomly assigned to receive escitalopram in flexible doses of 5-20 mg/d (n = 108) or placebo (n = 109) for 24 weeks. The study was conducted from 2007 to 2013. The primary outcome measure was the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Secondary outcome measures included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness scale (CGI-S), Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS), and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule-12. Cardiovascular safety outcomes included echocardiography, electrocardiography, laboratory test, body weight, and blood pressure results. Escitalopram was superior to placebo in reducing HDRS scores (mean difference = 2.3, P = .016, effect size = 0.38). Escitalopram was also superior to placebo in decreasing depressive symptoms evaluated by the MADRS, BDI, and CGI-S and in improving SOFAS functioning level. Escitalopram was not associated with any harmful changes in cardiovascular safety measures. Dizziness was significantly more frequently reported in the escitalopram group (P = .018), but there were no significant differences in any other adverse events. These results indicate that escitalopram has clinically meaningful antidepressant effects with no evidence of reduced cardiovascular safety in depressive disorder following ACS. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00419471. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  6. Sexual Compulsivity Comorbidity With Depression, Anxiety, and Substance Use in Students From Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzanan Berberovic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to examine relationships between sexual compulsivity, depression (including level of self-esteem anxiety, and the use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs in a sample of 1,711 students from Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Sexual compulsivity, depression, and anxiety were measured with standardized scales and inventories (the Sexual Compulsivity Scale – SCS, the Beck Depression InventoryBDI, and the Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait, STAI-T, respectively, whereas specific questions about tobacco, alcohol, and drug use were modified for the purpose of this study. Results indicated positive, significant but low correlations between sexual compulsivity and depression; sexual compulsivity and anxiety; and sexual compulsivity and substance use; whereas a low, negative but significant correlation was obtained between sexual compulsivity and self-esteem. The strongest predictor of sexual compulsivity was drug use; two other significant predictors were alcohol and depression. Limitations of the study are discussed in the end.

  7. Low frequency (1-Hz), right prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) compared with venlafaxine ER in the treatment of resistant depression: a double-blind, single-centre, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Martin; Kopecek, Miloslav; Novak, Tomas; Stopkova, Pavla; Sos, Peter; Kozeny, Jiri; Brunovsky, Martin; Höschl, Cyril

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have shown effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of depression. This double-blind study compared efficacy of l Hz rTMS over the right prefrontal dorsolateral cortex with venlafaxine ER in the treatment of resistant depression. A total of 60 inpatients with depressive disorder (DSM-IV criteria), who previously did not respond to at least one antidepressant treatment, were randomly assigned to 1 Hz rTMS with placebo and venlafaxine ER with sham rTMS for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was score change in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). We also used Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and Beck Depressive. Inventory-Short Form (BDI-SF). The response was defined as a >or=50% reduction of MADRS score. There were no significant differences between treatment groups in MADRS (p=0.38), BDI-SF (p=0.56) and CGI (p=0.17) scores from baseline to endpoint. Response rates for rTMS (33%) and venlafaxine (39%) as well as remission (MADRS scoreBDI-SF scores in both groups. Small sample size. No placebo arm was included for ethical reasons, because both treatments have previously been reported to be more effective than placebo. Relatively short duration of antidepressant treatment. The findings of this study suggest that, at least in the acute treatment, the right sided rTMS produces clinically relevant reduction of depressive symptomatology in patients with resistant depression comparable to venlafaxine ER. Larger sample sizes are required to confirm these results.

  8. The effects of 3 weeks of rTMS treatment on P200 amplitude in patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung Mook; Jang, Kyoung-Mi; Jang, Kuk In; Um, Yoo Hyun; Kim, Myung-Sun; Kim, Do-Won; Shin, Dongkyoo; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2014-08-08

    Previous studies have reported that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) induces neuronal plasticity in the brain. Although event-related potential (ERP) is an exploration tool, the rTMS effects on ERPs in patients with major depression have not been fully explored. We demonstrated that rTMS treatment induces changes in brain function in patients with medication-resistant major depression using the ERP. Eighteen patients with medication-resistant major depression (five males and 13 females) participated in this study. The patients received rTMS treatment for 3 weeks. All patients completed clinical scales, including the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (SAI, TAI), Ruminative Response Scale, Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, and Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ), as well as the ERP auditory oddball task, at their first visit (baseline) and at the 3-week visit (3-weeks). The HAM-D, HAM-A, BDI, SAI, and "blaming others" scale of the CERQ decreased significantly after rTMS treatment. In ERP auditory oddball task, when FP1, FP2, FZ, FCZ, CZ, and PZ channels were analyzed, P200 amplitudes showed a main effect for time of measurement and increased after 3 weeks of rTMS treatment. Standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography showed significant activation in the left middle frontal gyrus by 3 weeks of rTMS treatment. The results suggest that relatively longer rTMS treatment induces changes in brain function in patients with medication-resistant major depression, which can be identified using ERP.

  9. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  10. Associations of race with depression and symptoms in patients on maintenance haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Fried, Linda F; Unruh, Mark L; Kimmel, Paul L; Switzer, Galen E; Fine, Michael J; Arnold, Robert M

    2007-01-01

    Although studies have shown that African American haemodialysis patients report better overall quality of life than Whites, racial differences in depression and symptom burden remain less well characterized. The aim of this study was to compare these domains between African American and White patients on chronic haemodialysis. We surveyed African American and White maintenance haemodialysis patients. Depression was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Cognitive Depression Index (CDI). Symptoms were evaluated using the Dialysis Symptom Index (DSI). Among the 82 Whites and 78 African Americans enrolled, there were no racial differences in the prevalence of depression (27% in African Americans vs 27% in Whites, P = 1.0), BDI Scores (11.2 vs 10.9, P = 0.6) or CDI scores (6.0 vs 6.0, P = 0.9). Symptom burden was substantial in both African Americans and Whites (median number of symptoms 8.5 and 9.0, respectively) with no racial differences in the overall burden or severity of symptoms. However, based on a single item, African Americans were more likely to describe their religious/spiritual beliefs as "very important". Adjustment for demographic and treatment characteristics had no impact on the associations of race with depression or symptoms. Depression and symptoms are highly prevalent in both African American and White haemodialysis patients, without racial differences in these health-related domains. In exploratory analyses, spiritual/religious beliefs appear to be of greater importance to African Americans. The relevance of these observations to the advantages in quality of life and survival among African Americans on haemodialysis warrants further investigation.

  11. Dissociative symptoms reflect levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha in patients with unipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizik G

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gustav Bizik,1 Petr Bob,1 Jiri Raboch,1 Josef Pavlat,1 Jana Uhrova,2 Hana Benakova,2 Tomas Zima2 1Center for Neuropsychiatric Research of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry and UHSL, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Recent evidence indicates that the nature of interactions between the nervous system and immune system is important in the pathogenesis of depression. Specifically, alterations in pro-inflammatory cytokines have been related to the development of several psychological and neurobiological manifestations of depressive disorder, as well as to stress exposure. A number of findings point to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α as one of the central factors in these processes. Accordingly, in the present study, we test the hypothesis that specific influences of chronic stressors related to traumatic stress and dissociation are related to alterations in TNF-α levels. We performed psychometric measurement of depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]-II, traumatic stress symptoms (Trauma Symptom Checklist [TSC]-40, and psychological and somatoform dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale [DES] and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire [SDQ]-20, respectively, and immunochemical measure of serum TNF-α in 66 inpatients with unipolar depression (mean age 43.1 ± 7.3 years. The results show that TNF-α is significantly related to DES (Spearman R=−0.42, P<0.01, SDQ-20 (Spearman R=−0.38, P<0.01, and TSC-40 (Spearman R=−0.41, P<0.01, but not to BDI-II. Results of the present study suggest that TNF-α levels are related to dissociative symptoms and stress exposure in depressed patients. Keywords: depression, dissociation, TNF-alpha, traumatic stress

  12. Symptoms of depression among adults in rural areas of western Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Łojko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [b]Objective[/b]. To measure the intensity of depressive symptoms in the populations residing in rural areas of western Poland, and to delineate the putative association between the intensity of depression and selected socio-demographic and clinical factors. [b]Materials and method.[/b] The study covered 445 adults recruited from one family physician practice in the rural area of Wielkopolska region. The following tools were applied: Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the WHO WHOQoL-Bref quality of life assessment scale, and a socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire elaborated by the authors. [b]Results.[/b] Depressive symptoms were observed in approx. 30% of the patients. The intensity of symptoms correlated with age, female gender, and inversely correlated with the quality of life. There was no association between depressive symptoms and level of education (counted as years of education, number of somatic illnesses, and family burden of psychiatric disorders. [b]Conclusion[/b]. Symptoms of depression were noted in approx. 30% of patients who consulted their family physician. The Beck questionnaire is a simple tool whose application could decidedly improve the recognition of depression. It is worth taking note of factors that may be connected with the intensity of depressive symptoms – gender, the number of diagnosed somatic illnesses, and the quantity of drugs administered.

  13. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) and Its Relationship to Hopelessness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Caroline L.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Numerous existing measures assess attitudes toward suicide yet fail to account for contextual factors. The Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) is presented as an alternative, with implications for the development of prevention programs. Having previously reported exploratory analysis of the TIPS; confirmatory factor analysis and…

  14. DEPRESSION, ANXIETY AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF CANCER SURVIVORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koijam Shantibala

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cancer of any type is a serious and life-threatening illness, not uncommon in the general population. Cancer survivor can mean any person diagnosed with cancer from the time of initial diagnosis until his or her death. It includes people who are dying from untreatable cancer. Cancer survivor also includes those patients who are receiving or have received treatment with no active disease process and those who are not in the terminal stage of the illness. Cancer survivors tend to develop anxiety, depression and change in their quality of life as they have to make adjustment to many psychological and physical changes as well as financial constraint. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty (50 cancer survival patients visiting Department of Radiotherapy, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS, Imphal, during February 2015 to December 2015 were enrolled in this study. The study forms including the questions regarding the patient’s demographic characteristics, Becks Depression Inventory (BDI, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI and WHOQOL BREF were completed during face-to-face interviews for the determination of the psychological status of the patients. And the data were analysed using SPSS version 20.0. RESULTS All the dimensions of the Quality of Life (QoL except D3= Domain 3 (Social Relationship are negatively correlated with both the sub-types of STAI (State and Trait Anxiety. The state anxiety score is negatively correlated with D1=Domain 1 (Physical health; p=.001, D2= Domain 2 (Psychological; p=.001, D4= Domain 4 (Environment; p=.000. Also, the trait anxiety scores of the patients are negatively correlated with D1=Domain 1 (Physical health; p=.001, D2= Domain 2 (Psychological; p=.000, D4= Domain 4 (Environment; p=.000. However, there is no significant difference in terms of D3= Domain 3 (Social Relationship; state anxiety p=.142 and trait anxiety p=.220 and STAI scores. On the other hand, there is positive correlation between Becks

  15. A genetic variant in 12q13, a possible risk factor for bipolar disorder, is associated with depressive state, accounting for stressful life events.

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    Ayu Shimasaki

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified a number of susceptibility genes for schizophrenia (SCZ and bipolar disorder (BD. However, the identification of risk genes for major depressive disorder (MDD has been unsuccessful because the etiology of MDD is more influenced by environmental factors; thus, gene-environment (G × E interactions are important, such as interplay with stressful life events (SLEs. We assessed the G×E interactions and main effects of genes targeting depressive symptoms. Using a case-control design, 922 hospital staff members were evaluated for depressive symptoms according to Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI; "depression" and "control" groups were classified by scores of 10 in the BDI test, SLEs, and personality. A total of sixty-three genetic variants were selected on the basis of previous GWASs of MDD, SCZ, and BD as well as candidate-gene (SLC6A4, BDNF, DBH, and FKBP5 studies. Logistic regression analysis revealed a marginally significant interaction (genetic variant × SLE at rs4523957 (P uncorrected = 0.0034 with depression and a significant association of single nucleotide polymorphism identified from evidence of BD GWAS (rs7296288, downstream of DHH at 12q13.1 with depression as the main effect (P uncorrected = 9.4 × 10(-4, P corrected = 0.0424. We also found that SLEs had a larger impact on depression (odds ratio ∼ 3, as reported previously. These results suggest that DHH plays a possible role in depression etiology; however, variants from MDD or SCZ GWAS evidence or candidate genes showed no significant associations or minimal effects of interactions with SLEs on depression.

  16. Specific Killing Effects of Immunotoxin BDI-1-PEA against Human Bladder Cancer Cells%抗膀胱癌免疫毒素BDI-1-PEA特异杀伤肿瘤细胞的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温儒民; 薛松; 孙晓青; 陈家存; 顾骧; 陈仁富; 郑骏年

    2004-01-01

    目的:探讨免疫毒素BDI-1-PEA特异杀伤膀胱癌细胞的体外及体内研究.方法:应用MTT法检测不同浓度的BDI-1-PEA,BDI-1和PEA的混合物(BDI-1+PEA),PEA对体外癌细胞的杀伤能力.接种于裸鼠背部皮下的癌细胞长至0.3cm大小实体瘤时,于尾静脉隔日分别注入BDI-1-PEA、BDI-I、正常小鼠IgG共6次,观察不同的药物对癌的抑制作用.结果:免疫毒素BDI-1-PEA在体外抗膀胱癌细胞系E-J的作用明显优于PEA及BDI-1与PEA的混合物,在荷瘤裸鼠体内明显优于BDI-1及IgG,与对非靶细胞的细胞毒性作用相比较差异非常显著.结论:免疫毒素BDI-1-PEA是一种很有潜力的抗癌药物,为进一步临床研究奠定基础.

  17. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  18. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  19. Prevalence of depressive symptoms among college students and the influence of sport activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglesić, Boran; Lasić, Davor; Zuljan-Cvitanović, Marija; Buković, Damir; Karelović, Deni; Delić-Brkljacić, Diana; Buković, Nevia; Radan, Mirjana

    2014-03-01

    The present study asses the prevalence of depressive symptoms among college students in Split, Croatia, and positive influence of sport activity on decreasing the depression symptoms. Authors screened all 664 college students of the first year of study. All of them were over the 18 years and the mean age was 19.4 +/- 1.2 years. There were 466 females (70.2%) and 178 (26.8%) males. They answered The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and questionnaire about their sport activity (no sport activity, recreational and active in sports). For the purpose of the analysis depressive symptoms were defined as a score of > 11. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney test were used for data analysis. 9.4% of the students had significant depression symptoms (score > 11). No one student had score > 26 (symptoms of major depression). Statistically significant lower score on BDI have students who are active in sports (score median = 3) compared to group of recreational (score median = 4) and in correlation to group who are not active in sports (score median = 5) (Kruskal-Wallis: p sports (N = 254) there are only 5.5% with depressions symptoms, while in the group of non active in sports (N = 60) are 18 depressive (chi2-test: p = 0,005). Females are statistically more depressed than males (chi2-test: p = 0.01). In the female group 49 (10.5%) are depressed, and in the male group are 9 (5%). Compared to gender in separate analysis we did not find correlation of decreasing depression symptoms and sport activity among males (chi2-test: p = 0.47), while in females we find that sport activity has significant effect (chi2-test: p = 0.026). Our results shoved moderate values of depression symptoms among college population in Split, Croatia. More females than males experienced depressive symptoms. While sport activity did not have significant influence on the depression in male population, it has significant influence in reducing the depression symptoms among females.

  20. "The Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy as an Anti-Depressive Treatment is Falling: A Meta-Analysis": Correction to Johnsen and Friborg (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Reports an error in "The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy as an anti-depressive treatment is falling: A meta-analysis" by Tom J. Johnsen and Oddgeir Friborg (Psychological Bulletin, 2015[Jul], Vol 141[4], 747-768). There are several numerical errors in the flowchart summarizing the selection and exclusion of studies as contained in Figure 1. The correct number of titles not further investigated should be 27,381; abstracts rejected should be 1,181; Excluded, different treatment form should be (94). The errors do not affect the results or conclusions of the study as the final number of meta-analysable studies are the same as originally reported. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-20361-001.) A meta-analysis examining temporal changes (time trends) in the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as a treatment for unipolar depression was conducted. A comprehensive search of psychotherapy trials yielded 70 eligible studies from 1977 to 2014. Effect sizes (ES) were quantified as Hedge's g based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Rates of remission were also registered. The publication year of each study was examined as a linear metaregression predictor of ES, and as part of a 2-way interaction with other moderators (Year × Moderator). The average ES of the BDI was 1.58 (95% CI [1.43, 1.74]), and 1.69 for the HRSD (95% CI [1.48, 1.89]). Subgroup analyses revealed that women profited more from therapy than did men (p effects of CBT have declined linearly and steadily since its introduction, as measured by patients' self-reports (the BDI, p depressive symptoms as compared with the seminal trials. Potential causes and possible implications for future studies are discussed.

  1. Can the concepts of depression and quality of life be integrated using a time perspective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Hannah

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is understood about the conceptual relationship of depression and quality of life (QoL. Judgments concerning both, implicitly or explicitly, involve a time perspective. The aim of this study was to test de Leval's theoretical model linking depression and QoL with a time perspective. The model predicts that changes in cognitions about one's past, present and future QoL, will be associated with changes in depressive symptomatology. Methods Eighteen psychiatric in-patients with a clinically confirmed diagnosis of depression were assessed on commencing treatment and 12 weeks later. QoL was assessed by the Schedule for Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life (SEIQoL, depression by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and hopelessness by the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS. Time perspective was incorporated by asking QoL questions about the past, present and future. Results Depression and hopelessness were associated with a poorer present QoL. Depression lowered present QoL but did not alter future QoL, as these remained consistently high whether participants were depressed or recovering. However, depressed individuals had a larger gap between their actual present QoL and future (aspired to QoL. Changes in QoL were influenced by depression and hopelessness. Contrary to the model, perception of "past" QoL was not affected by depression or hopelessness. Conclusions de Leval's model was largely confirmed. Thus depression and hopelessness influence a person's present and future QoL. The analysis of a temporal horizon was helpful in understanding the link between depression and QoL.

  2. Depression Dimensions: Integrating Clinical Signs and Symptoms from the Perspectives of Clinicians and Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Arrua Vares

    Full Text Available Several studies have recognized that depression is a multidimensional construct, although the scales that are currently available have been shown to be limited in terms of the ability to investigate the multidimensionality of depression. The objective of this study is to integrate information from instruments that measure depression from different perspectives-a self-report symptomatic scale, a clinician-rated scale, and a clinician-rated scale of depressive signs-in order to investigate the multiple dimensions underlying the depressive construct.A sample of 399 patients from a mood disorders outpatient unit was investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS, and the Core Assessment of Psychomotor Change (CORE. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA were used to investigate underlying dimensions of depression, including item level analysis with factor loadings and item thresholds.A solution of six depression dimensions has shown good-fit to the data, with no cross-loading items, and good interpretability. Item-level analysis revealed that the multidimensional depressive construct might be organized into a continuum of severity in the following ascending order: sexual, cognitive, insomnia, appetite, non-interactiveness/motor retardation, and agitation.An integration of both signs and symptoms, as well as the perspectives of clinicians and patients, might be a good clinical and research alternative for the investigation of multidimensional issues within the depressive syndrome. As predicted by theoretical models of depression, the melancholic aspects of depression (non-interactiveness/motor retardation and agitation lie at the severe end of the depressive continuum.

  3. Avaliação da depressão e de testes neuropsicológicos em pacientes com desordens temporomandibulares Depression and neuropsychological testing in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Selaimen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A fim de determinar se existem diferenças neuropsicológicas entre os grupos, o Teste de Aprendizado Verbal da Califórnia (CVLT e o Teste do Trigrama de Consoantes de Brown-Peterson (CCC foram usados. A depressão foi avaliada pelo Inventário de Depressão de Beck (BDI. Os testes neuropsicológicos usados não mostraram diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre os três grupos estudados, o que pode ser devido à baixa proporção de pacientes com educação pós-secundária (25%. Entretanto, o grupo experimental (Grupos I e II mostrou índices de depressão mais elevados (pA cross-sectional retrospective study was undertaken, with the primary objective of discovering if there were any neuropsychological differences among and within groups. The California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT and the Brown-Peterson Consonant Trigram Auditory Memory Test (CCC were used. Depression was assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI - Portuguese Version.The neuropsychological tests used did not present any statistically significant differences among the three groups studied, which might be due to the low proportion of patients with post high school education (20%. However, the experimental group (Groups I plus II showed higher scores on depression (p<0.05 than Group III. In addition, Group II showed higher levels of depression (p<0.01 than Group I, and no statistical differences were found between Group I and III. Taken together, these results suggest that memory tests are highly dependent on the education levels of the participants and cannot be widely used. Additionally, depression plays a role not only in the etiology, but also in the perpetuation of TMD.

  4. Prevalence of Sleep Deprivation and Relation with Depressive Symptoms among Medical Residents in King Fahd University Hospital, Saudi Arabia

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    Esraa M. Al-Maddah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common among medical residents of all specialties. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of sleep deprivation and depressive symptoms among medical residents in King Fahd University Hospital (KFUH in Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, the association between sleep deprivation, sleepiness and depressive symptoms was examined. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between February and April 2012 and involved 171 KFUH medical residents of different specialties. Data were collected using a specifically designed questionnaire eliciting demographic information, working hours and number of hours of sleep. In addition, validated Arabic versions of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory-2 (BDI-2 were used. Results: The prevalence of acute sleep deprivation and chronic sleep deprivation among residents in KFUH was 85.9% and 63.2%, respectively. The prevalence of overall sleepiness was 52%; 43.3% reported being excessively sleepy in certain situations while 8.8% reported being excessively sleepy regardless of the situation. Based on the BDI-2, the prevalence of mild, moderate and severe depressive symptoms was 43.3%, 15.2% and 4.7%, respectively. Significant associations were found between sleep deprivation and depressive symptoms; depressive symptoms and sleepiness, and depressive symptoms and being a female resident. Conclusion: The vast majority of medical residents had acute sleep deprivation, with more than half suffering from chronic sleep deprivation. The number of hours and quality of sleep among the residents were strongly associated with depressive symptoms. New regulations are recommended regarding the number of working hours and night duties for medical residents. Further studies should assess these new regulations on a regular basis.

  5. Effectiveness of Mindfulness Techniques in Decreasing Anxiety and Depression in Women Victims of Spouse Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanoo Ghahari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety are outputs of domestic violence and victims should be treated using medical and nonmedical treatment. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in reducing anxiety and depression of women victims of domestic violence in Tehran. The study is an empirical research in kind of pretest-posttest plan with a control group. Statistical population consists of women victims of domestic violence in Tehran referred to several psychiatric clinics in Tehran for treatment by 2015. The statistical sample consists of 30 women selected randomly, who were placed into two groups, each group with 15 members. The experimental group was under the intervention of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for 8 sessions and control group was in waiting list. Both groups, fulfilled Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI and Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI in final step and end of treatment. Obtained data was analyzed using ANOVA and using SPSS22 software. The obtained results from the study show that there is a significant difference between two experimental and control groups in terms of depression and anxiety after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy intervention (p<001. The obtained results from the study show that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy can affect the reduction of anxiety and depression of women victims of domestic violence.

  6. Stress, depression, quality of life and salivary cortisol levels in community health agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Berenice Scaletzky; Cocco, Rafaela Abreu; Radtke, Vinicius Augusto; Medeiros, João Ricardo Carvalho; Oses, Jean Pierre; Wiener, Carolina David; Jansen, Karen

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of and factors associated with depression and stress with perceived quality of life and the salivary cortisol levels in Community Health Agent (CHA). Materials and Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study of CHAs in Pelotas-RS, Brazil. Data collection, including sociodemographic information and factors related to work and health. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) II was used to assess depressive symptoms, Inventory of Stress Symptoms Lipp (ISSL) was used for the analysis of stress and the WHOQOL-BREF was used to investigate quality of life. Salivary cortisol was quantified via ELISA test. The assessments showed that 71.0% are in a state of stress resistance, 30.5% were in the alert state of stress and 32.8% were in the stress state of exhaustion. Depressive episodes (BDI≥12) were observed in 28.2%. The environmental domain had the lowest score for quality of life. We observed significantly higher salivary cortisol levels in CHAs with less than 1 year of service and with the lowest quality of life scores in the environmental subsection. A high prevalence of stress and depression was observed in this sample of CHAs. In addition, the worst levels of quality of life were identified in the environmental subsection. Cortisol levels corroborate these findings regarding quality of life within the environmental domain and began working less than a year previously.

  7. Effect of 'Exercise Without Movement' yoga method on mindfulness, anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbaños Roche, Laura; Miró Barrachina, María Teresa; Ibáñez Fernández, Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    To analyze the effect of the 'Exercise Without Movement' (E.W.M) yoga method on mindfulness and on the improvement of anxiety and depression symptoms. A quasi-experimental study examined the effect of one month E.W.M. intervention among 38 participants who were enrolled voluntarily to both groups, study (n = 16) and control (n = 22). Five participants dropped out during the study. The State Mindfulness Scale (SMS) was used to measure mindfulness. The Anxiety Inventory Beck (BAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) were used to measure the anxiety and depression symptoms, respectively, before and after the intervention. Study group showed both a statistically significant increase in mindfulness and decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms, compared with the control group. The E.W.M. has been useful in the development of mindfulness and in the treatment of anxiety and depression symptoms and may represent a new method in the mindfulness-based therapeutic application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anxiety, depression, and quality of life in mothers of children with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Raj Gogoi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intellectual disability (ID in children can trigger a range of psychological responses in parents. The present study was an attempt to investigate psychological conditions of mothers of children with ID and to determine whether these problems were more prominent in mothers of children with ID than mothers with healthy children. Aim and objectives were to investigate psychological impact (i.e. anxiety, depression, and quality of life [QOL] on mothers of children with ID. Materials and methods comprised of two groups of subjects, i.e. mothers of sixty children with ID and mothers of sixty healthy children. The study was conducted at the Outpatient Department of Lokopriya Gopinath Bordoloi Regional Institute of Mental Health (LGBRIMH, Tezpur, Assam. Both groups were assessed with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II; State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and World Health Organization QOL-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF. Data was analysed by descriptive statistics, correlation, and t test. Result: The results of the study conclusively found out that the mothers of children with ID were having higher anxiety and depression than mothers with healthy children. The anxiety and depression had negative correlation with QOL of mothers of children with ID. Conclusion: This study shows that anxiety and depression affected QOL in mothers of children with ID.

  9. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea severity and sleep, depression and anxiety symptoms in newly-diagnosed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, Paul M; Woo, Mary A; Kumar, Rajesh; Cross, Rebecca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2010-04-16

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in at least 10% of the population, and leads to higher morbidity and mortality; however, relationships between OSA severity and sleep or psychological symptoms are unclear. Existing studies include samples with wide-ranging comorbidities, so we assessed relationships between severity of OSA and common sleep and psychological disturbances in recently diagnosed OSA patients with minimal co-morbidities. We studied 49 newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients without major co-morbidities such as mental illness, cardiovascular disease, or stroke; subjects were not using psychoactive medications or tobacco (mean +/- std age: 46.8+/-9.1 years; apnea/hyponea index [AHI]: 32.1+/-20.5 events/hour; female/male: 12/37; weight sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index; PSQI), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II; BDI), and anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI), as well as sex and body mass index (BMI). AHI was similar in females and males. Mean levels of all symptoms were above normal thresholds, but AHI was not correlated with age, ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI; only BMI was correlated with OSA severity. No differences in mean AHI appeared when subjects were grouped by normal versus elevated values of ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI. Consistent with other studies, a strong link between OSA severity and psychological symptoms did not appear in these newly diagnosed patients, suggesting that mechanisms additional to the number and frequency of hypoxic events and arousals occurring with apneas contribute to adverse health effects in OSA. OSA patients presenting with mild or moderate severity, and no major co-morbidities will not necessarily have low levels of sleep or psychological disturbances.

  10. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea severity and sleep, depression and anxiety symptoms in newly-diagnosed patients.

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    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA occurs in at least 10% of the population, and leads to higher morbidity and mortality; however, relationships between OSA severity and sleep or psychological symptoms are unclear. Existing studies include samples with wide-ranging comorbidities, so we assessed relationships between severity of OSA and common sleep and psychological disturbances in recently diagnosed OSA patients with minimal co-morbidities. We studied 49 newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients without major co-morbidities such as mental illness, cardiovascular disease, or stroke; subjects were not using psychoactive medications or tobacco (mean +/- std age: 46.8+/-9.1 years; apnea/hyponea index [AHI]: 32.1+/-20.5 events/hour; female/male: 12/37; weight <125 kg. We evaluated relationships between the AHI and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale; ESS, sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index; PSQI, depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II; BDI, and anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI, as well as sex and body mass index (BMI. AHI was similar in females and males. Mean levels of all symptoms were above normal thresholds, but AHI was not correlated with age, ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI; only BMI was correlated with OSA severity. No differences in mean AHI appeared when subjects were grouped by normal versus elevated values of ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI. Consistent with other studies, a strong link between OSA severity and psychological symptoms did not appear in these newly diagnosed patients, suggesting that mechanisms additional to the number and frequency of hypoxic events and arousals occurring with apneas contribute to adverse health effects in OSA. OSA patients presenting with mild or moderate severity, and no major co-morbidities will not necessarily have low levels of sleep or psychological disturbances.

  11. The Effects of Powdered Fertilized Eggs on Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of fertilized egg powder (Young Tissue Extract; YTE®) intake on outcome measures for depression. Fifty-five patients with depression were randomly assigned to receive YTE, YTE plus Melissa officinalis, or placebo for 12 weeks. At baseline, there were no significant differences in scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) or Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) among the 3 groups. At 12 weeks, the HAM-D scores in groups treated with YTE or YTE with M. officinalis were both significantly lower than those in the placebo group. In addition, both treatment groups showed a significant improvement in depression as measured by the change in HAM-D scores from baseline to 12 weeks, whereas the placebo group showed no significant change. There were no significant differences between the 2 treatment groups. The study indicates that the fertilized egg powder has an antidepressive effect and may be an alternative or adjunct to antidepressive medication for some patients, but further research is necessary. PMID:21631360

  12. Administration of ketamine for unipolar and bipolar depression.

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    Kraus, Christoph; Rabl, Ulrich; Vanicek, Thomas; Carlberg, Laura; Popovic, Ana; Spies, Marie; Bartova, Lucie; Gryglewski, Gregor; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Willeit, Matthäus; Winkler, Dietmar; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Kasper, Siegfried

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials demonstrated that ketamine exhibits rapid antidepressant efficacy when administered in subanaesthetic dosages. We reviewed currently available literature investigating efficacy, response rates and safety profile. Twelve studies investigating unipolar, seven on bipolar depression were included after search in medline, scopus and web of science. Randomized, placebo-controlled or open-label trials reported antidepressant response rates after 24 h on primary outcome measures at 61%. The average reduction of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) was 10.9 points, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) 15.7 points and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) 20.8 points. Ketamine was always superior to placebo. Most common side effects were dizziness, blurred vision, restlessness, nausea/vomiting and headache, which were all reversible. Relapse rates ranged between 60% and 92%. To provide best practice-based information to patients, a consent-form for application and modification in local language is included. Ketamine constitutes a novel, rapid and efficacious treatment option for patients suffering from treatment resistant depression and exhibits rapid and significant anti-suicidal effects. New administration routes might serve as alternative to intravenous regimes for potential usage in outpatient settings. However, long-term side effects are not known and short duration of antidepressant response need ways to prolong ketamine's efficacy.

  13. Hair cortisol as a marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Axis activity in female patients with major depressive disorder.

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    Pochigaeva, Ksenia; Druzhkova, Tatiana; Yakovlev, Alexander; Onufriev, Mikhail; Grishkina, Maria; Chepelev, Aleksey; Guekht, Alla; Gulyaeva, Natalia

    2017-04-01

    Hair cortisol is regarded as a promising marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) activity alterations due to stress, somatic and mental health conditions. Hair cortisol was previously reported to be elevated in patients with depression, however the data related to remission and recurrent depressive episodes are different. In this study, levels of hair cortisol were assessed in female patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the validity of hair cortisol as a marker of HPAA activity in this condition was evaluated. Hair cortisol was measured in 1 cm hair segments of 21 female patients with MDD and 22 female age-matched controls using enzyme-immunoassay analysis. Concurrently, serum cortisol was assessed and psychological status was evaluated using 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Spielberger state trait anxiety inventory (STAI). The levels of hair cortisol were significantly lower in the MDD group, while serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in patients, as compared with controls. A significant negative correlation was found between HAMD-17 scores and hair cortisol. Decreased hair cortisol found in female patients with MDD as compared to controls suggests downregulation of HPAA activity during the preceding month. Further studies are needed to investigate the profiles of hair cortisol at different stages of depressive disorder to establish this parameter as a handy clinical tool.

  14. Quality of Life, Depression, Anxiety and Coping Strategies after Heart Transplantation

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    Fulvio Bergamo Trevizan

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Heart transplantation is the therapeutic procedure indicated to increase the survival of patients with refractory heart failure. Improvement in overall functioning and quality of life are expected factors in the postoperative period. Objective: To identify and evaluate mental disorders and symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, quality of life and coping strategies in the post-surgical situation of heart transplantation. Methods: A cross-sectional, quantitative study with patients who have undergone heart transplantation. Participants answered to the Sociodemographic Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Escala Modos de Enfrentamento de Problemas (Ways of Coping Scale (EMEP and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF. For data analysis, the significance level was considered P≤0.05. Results: A total of 33 patients participated in the study. The BDI-II results indicated that 91% (n=30 of the patients presented a minimal level. In BAI, 94% (n=31 of the patients demonstrated minimal level of anxiety symptoms. WHOQOL-BREF showed a perception of quality of life considered good in all domains. The EMEP data have registered a problem-focused coping strategy. According to MINI, a single case of major depressive episode, current and recurrent was recorded. Conclusion: Although most participants in the sample had symptoms of depression and anxiety, only one patient was identified with moderate symptoms in both domains. The most used strategy was coping focused on the problem. Patients have classified the perceptions of quality of life as 'good', pointing out satisfaction with their health.

  15. Impact of personality and depression on quality of life in patients with severe haemophilia in Korea.

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    Kim, S-Y; Kim, S-W; Kim, J-M; Shin, I-S; Baek, H-J; Lee, H-S; Hwang, T-J; Yoon, J-S

    2013-09-01

    Among reports on the psychological variables that influence quality of life (QoL), none has addressed the impact of personality on QoL in patients with haemophilia. We investigated the impact of psychosocial variables including depression and personality on QoL in patients with severe haemophilia. A cross-sectional survey examining psychosocial and clinical characteristics was administered to Korean patients with severe haemophilia. Personality traits were ascertained using the 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory, which quantifies five personality dimensions including extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness. Patient QoL and depression were measured by the World Health Organization Quality of Life-abbreviated version and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) respectively. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used for each domain to determine the impact of psychological variables on QoL. Of the 53 subjects who consented to participate, 46 cases were finally analysed. Multivariate linear regression analyses demonstrated that agreeableness was significantly and positively associated with the physical health domain of QoL. Openness was independently and positively associated with the psychological and social relationship domains of QoL. BDI scores were significantly and negatively associated with all four domains of the QoL. Persistent pain and joint impairment showed strong associations with all domains in a univariate analysis, but the impact was attenuated after adjusting for psychosocial variables. Personality and depression had strong impacts on QoL independent of physical status in patients with severe haemophilia. Providing psychological screening and intervention are recommended for enhancing QoL in patients with severe haemophilia.

  16. Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeblad, Annika; Falkenström, Fredrik; Andersson, Gerhard; Vestberg, Robert; Holmqvist, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate. Ninety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin. IPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score depressed psychiatric patients in a community-based outpatient clinic. CBT had significantly more dropouts than IPT, indicating that CBT may be experienced as too demanding. Since about half the patients did not recover, there is a need for further treatment development for these patients. The study should be considered an effectiveness trial, with strong external validity but some limitations in internal validity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy vs. psycho-education for patients with major depression who did not achieve remission following antidepressant treatment.

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    Chiesa, Alberto; Castagner, Vittoria; Andrisano, Costanza; Serretti, Alessandro; Mandelli, Laura; Porcelli, Stefano; Giommi, Fabio

    2015-04-30

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) showed efficacy for currently depressed patients. However, most of the available studies suffer from important methodological shortcomings, including the lack of adequate control groups. The present study aims to compare MBCT with a psycho-educational control group designed to be structurally equivalent to the MBCT program but excluding the main putative "active ingredient" of MBCT (i.e., mindfulness meditation practice) for the treatment of patients with major depression (MD) who did not achieve remission following at least 8 weeks of antidepressant treatment. Out of 106 screened subjects, 43 were randomized to receive MBCT or psycho-education and were prospectively followed for 26 weeks. MD severity was assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Measures of anxiety, mindfulness, and quality of life were also included. All assessments were performed at baseline, 4, 8, 17 and 26-weeks. Both HAM-D and BDI scores, as well as quality of life and mindfulness scores, showed higher improvements, which were particularly evident over the long-term period, in the MBCT group than in the psycho-education group. Although limited by a small sample size, the results of this study suggest the superiority of MBCT over psycho-education for non-remitted MD subjects.

  18. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Different people have different symptoms. Some symptoms of depression include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness ...

  19. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  20. Did depressive symptoms affect recognition of emotional prosody in Parkinson’s disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Vélez Feijó

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Vélez Feijó1, Carlos RM Rieder3, Márcia LF Chaves21Medical Sciences Post-Graduate Course; 2Internal Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; 3Movement Disorders Clinic Coordinator, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, BrazilObjective: Evaluate the influence of depressive symptoms on the recognition of emotional prosody in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients, and identify types of emotion on spoken sentences.Methods: Thirty-five PD patients and 65 normal participants were studied. Dementia was checked with the Mini Mental State Examination, Clinical Dementia Rating scale, and DSM IV. Recognition of emotional prosody was tested by asking subjects to listen to 12 recorded statements with neutral affective content that were read with a strong affective expression. Subjects had to recognize the correct emotion by one of four descriptors (angry, sad, cheerful, and neutral. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was employed to rate depressive symptoms with the cutoff 14.Results: Total ratings of emotions correctly recognized by participants below and above the BDI cutoff were similar among PD patients and normal individuals. PD patients who correctly identified neutral and anger inflections presented higher rates of depressive symptoms (p = 0.011 and 0.044, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the normal group.Conclusions: Depression may modify some modalities of emotional prosody perception in PD, by increasing the perception of non-pleasant emotions or lack of affection, such as anger or indifference.Keywords: emotional prosody, Parkinson’s disease, depression, emotion

  1. Post-traumatic stress, depression, and community integration a long time after whiplash injury

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    Britt-Marie Stålnacke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychological factors such as post-traumatic stress and depression may play an important role in the recovery after whiplash injuries. Difficulties in psychosocial functioning with limitations in everyday life may dominate for some time after the injury. Our study therefore investigates the relationships between pain, post-traumatic stress, depression, and community integration. A set of questionnaires was answered by 191 persons (88 men, 103 women five years after a whiplash injury to assess pain intensity (visual analogue scale, VAS, whiplash-related symptoms, post-traumatic stress (impact of event scale, IES, depression (Beck depression inventory, BDI-II, community integration (community integration questionnaire, CIQ, life satisfaction (LiSat-11. One or more depressive symptoms were reported by 74% of persons; 22% reported scores that were classified as mild to severe depression. The presence of at least one post-traumatic symptom was reported by 70% of persons, and 38% reported mild to severe stress. Total scores of community integration for women were statistically significantly higher than for men. The total VAS score was correl-ated positively to the IES (r=0.456, P less than 0.456, the BDI (r=0.646, P less than 0.001, and negatively to the CIQ (r=-0.300, P less than 0.001. These results highlight the view that a significant proportion of people experience both pain and psycho- logical difficulties for a long time after a whiplash injury. These findings should be taken into consideration in the management of subjects with chronic whiplash symptoms and may support a multi-professional rehabilitation model that integrates physical, psychological, and psychosocial factors.

  2. Peripheral chemokine levels in women with recurrent major depression with suicidal ideation Níveis periféricos de quimiocina em mulheres com depressão maior com ideação suicida

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    Rodrigo Grassi-Oliveira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare serum levels of MCP-1/CCL2, RANTES/CCL5, and Eotaxin/CCL11 between female patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD and healthy controls, verifying if there is a difference in the levels of these mediators between those with or without current suicidal ideation. METHODS: Thirty female outpatients with recurrent MDD were divided in two groups accordingly the presence or absence of suicidal ideation. These groups were compared with 16 healthy controls. Serum levels of MCP-1/CCL2, RANTES/CCL5, and Eotaxin/CCL11 were determined. Depression severity was evaluated by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Suicidal ideation was assessed by SCID-I and BDI. RESULTS: Patients with recurrent MDD and healthy controls did not differ in age, socioeconomic status, and education. All patients reported high scores of BDI (mean, SD, n; 29.75, 10.55, 28. Multivariable analysis of covariance adjusted for age and BMI showed that MDD patients with suicidal ideation presented lower levels of MCP-1/ CCL2 and RANTES/CCL5 (p OBJETIVO: Comparar os níveis séricos de MCP-1/CCL2, RANTES/CCL5 e Eotaxin/CCL11 entre pacientes do sexo feminino com transtorno depressivo maior (TDM recorrente e controles saudáveis, verificando se há diferença nos níveis desses mediadores entre os indivíduos com ou sem ideação suicida. MÉTODOS: Trinta pacientes do sexo feminino com TDM recorrente foram divididas em dois grupos de acordo com a presença ou ausência de ideação suicida. Esses grupos foram comparados com 16 controles saudáveis. Os níveis séricos de MCP-1/CCL2, RANTES/CCL5 e Eotaxin/CCL11 foram determinados. A gravidade da depressão foi avaliada usando o Beck Depression Inventory (BDI e a ideação suicida foi avaliada usando o SCID-I e o BDI. RESULTADOS: As pacientes com TDM recorrente e os controles saudáveis não diferiram em idade, status socioeconômico e educação. Todas as pacientes relataram altas pontuações no BDI (média, SD, n

  3. Relationship of depression in participants with nonspecific acute or subacute low back pain and no-pain by age distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Lobo, Cesar; Vilar Fernández, Juan Manuel; Becerro-de-Bengoa-Vallejo, Ricardo; Losa-Iglesias, Marta Elena; Rodríguez-Sanz, David; Palomo López, Patricia; López López, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Nonspecific low back pain (LBP) is the most prevalent musculoskeletal condition in various age ranges and is associated with depression. The aim of this study was to determine the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores in participants with nonspecific LBP and no-pain by age distribution. Methods A case–control study was carried out following the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology criteria. A sample of 332 participants, divided into the following age categories: 19–24 (n=11), 25–39 (n=66), 40–64 (n=90), 65–79 (n=124), and ≥80 (n=41) years was recruited from domiciliary visits and an outpatient clinic. The BDI scores were self-reported in participants with nonspecific acute or subacute (≤3 months) LBP (n=166) and no-pain (n=166). Results The BDI scores, mean ± standard deviation, showed statistically significant differences (p<0.001) between participants with nonspecific acute or subacute LBP (9.590±6.370) and no-pain (5.825±5.113). Significantly higher BDI scores were obtained from participants with nonspecific acute and subacute LBP in those aged 40–64 years (p<0.001; 9.140±6.074 vs 4.700±3.777) and 65–79 years (p<0.001; 10.672±6.126 vs 6.210±5.052). Differences were not significant in younger patients aged 19–24 (p=0.494; 5.000±2.646 vs 8.250±7.498), 25–39 (p=0.138; 5.440±5.245 vs 3.634±4.397), and in those aged ≥80 years (p=0.094; 13.625±6.1331 vs 10.440±5.591). Conclusion Participants with nonspecific acute and subacute LBP present higher BDI depression scores, influenced by age distribution. Specifically, patients in the age range from 40 to 80 years with LBP could require more psychological care in addition to any medical or physical therapy. Nevertheless, physical factors, different outcomes, and larger sample size should be considered in future studies. PMID:28138263

  4. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample

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    Kogevinas Manolis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Methods 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. Results 8 (6.7% of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7% with moderate and 38 (31.7% with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68

  5. Work-family conflict as a mediator in the association between work stress and depressive symptoms: cross-sectional evidence from the German lidA-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Peter, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The demographic change leads to a shrinking German work force. Depressive symptoms cause many days absent at work, loss of productivity and early retirement. Therefore, pathways for prevention of depressive symptoms are important for the maintenance of global competitiveness. We investigated the role of work-family conflict (WFC) in the well-known association between work stress and depressive symptoms. A total of 6,339 employees subject to social insurance, born in 1959 or 1965 and randomly drawn from 222 sample points in Germany participated in the first wave of the leben in der Arbeit-study. In the analysis, 5,906 study subjects working in full-time or part-time positions were included. Work stress was measured by effort-reward imbalance ratio, depressive symptoms by the applied Becks depression inventory (BDI-V) and WFC by items of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ)-scale. Multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for age, education, negative affectivity (PANAS), overcommitment and number of children was performed. Mediation was defined according to the criteria of Baron and Kenny. Work stress was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (BDI-V) in all full-time [ß1female = 6.61 (95 % CI 3.95-9.27); ß1male = 8.02 (95 % CI 5.94-10.09)] and female part-time employees [ß2female = 4.87 (95 % CI 2.16-7.59)]. When controlling for WFC effect, estimates became smaller in men and were even halved in women. WFC was also significantly associated with work stress and depressive symptoms: All criteria for partial mediation between work stress and depressiveness were fulfilled. Prevention of WFC may help to reduce days absent at work and early retirement due to work stress-related depressive symptoms in middle-aged women and men.

  6. A study on construction, validation and determination of normalization of adolescents depression scale

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    Khadijeh Babakhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to construct, to validate and to determine normalization factors associated with adolescents depression scale. The study is performed among 750 randomly selected guided and high school students, 364 male and 386 female, who live in city of Zanjan, Iran. Validity of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Validity of Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS and divergence validity of the Coopersmith self- esteem coefficients are 0.72, 0.37 and -0.71, respectively. Result suggests that adolescents’ depression test is a reliable and valid tool for assessing depression, with utility in both research and clinical settings, counseling centers. In addition, the results of correlation test indicate there are some meaningful differences between depression levels of female and male students. In fact, our survey indicates that female students have more depression than male students do (F-value = 33.06, Sig. = 0.000. In addition, there are some meaningful differences between depression levels in various educational levels (F-value = 8.59, Sig. = 0.000. However, the study does not find sufficient evidence to believe there is any meaningful correlation between educational backgrounds and gender.

  7. Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation of stroke patients on depression and quality of life

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    An, Tae-Gyu; Kim, Soo-Han; Kim, Ko-Un

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on depression and quality of life (QOL) in patients with stroke, by conducting conventional occupational therapy with and without tDCS on 20 patients each. [Subjects and Methods] The experimental group (N=20) received both tDCS and conventional occupational therapy, while the control group (N=20) received false tDCS and conventional occupational therapy. The treatment was conducted 20 times over a four-week period; each session was 30 minutes long. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered to score the depression levels in patients before and after the intervention, while the stroke-specific quality of life (SS-QOL) was measured to compare the QOL. [Result] Following the intervention, the patients in the experimental group showed a significant decrease in depression and an increase in the QOL. In contrast, the control group showed no significant changes in depression or QOL. Our findings indicate that tDCS decreased depression while increasing QOL in patients with stroke. [Conclusion] In other words, our study confirmed that the application of tDCS during stroke rehabilitation improves the depression symptoms and QOL in patients.

  8. HOW AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL MEMORY DEFICITS AFFECT PROBLEM-SOLVING IN DEPRESSED PATIENTS

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    H. Kaviani

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, there have been several studies showing autobiographical memory retrieval and problem‑solving deficits in depressed population. The present study aimed to first to examine the roles of autobiographical memory specificity and problemsolving effectiveness in Iranian depressed people with or without suicide ideation and secondly, to test the correlations between autobiographical memory and problem-solving components. A group of depressed patients with suicide ideation (n=20, aged 18-45 and a matched control group (depressed without suicide ideation were tested by a autobiographical memory test, a means-ends problem-solving task, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS. Both groups met DSM-IV criteria for major depression disorder without psychotic features. In line with hypotheses, the suicide ideators scored significantly higher on the hopelessness scale than the control group. The suicide ideators also provided significantly less effective problem-solving strategies and more over-general memories than the control group. A significant correlation was found between low effectiveness of problem-solving strategies and over-general memory retrieval. The present results suggest that access to non-specific memories in depressed people can lead probably to ineffective problem solutions and subsequently hopelessness and suicide.

  9. The impact of childhood traumas, depressive and anxiety symptoms on the relationship between borderline personality features and symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbudak, Ercan; Evren, Cuneyt

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies reported that there is a significant association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood and borderline personality disorder (BPD) in adulthood. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship of borderline personality features (BPF) and ADHD symptoms while controlling the effect of childhood traumas, symptoms of depression and anxiety in adulthood on this relationship in Turkish university students. A total of 271 Turkish university students participated in this study. The students were assessed through the Turkish version of the Borderline Personality Inventory (BPI), the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Correlation analyses have revealed that severity of BPF is related with adult ADHD symptoms, emotional, physical abuse and depression scores. Hierarchical regression analysis has indicated that depressive symptoms, emotional and physical abuse and the severity of ADHD symptoms are the predictors for severity of BPF. Findings of the present study suggests that clinicians must carefully evaluate these variables and the relationship between them to understand BPF and ADHD symptoms in university students better. Together with depressive symptoms, emotional and physical abuse may play a mediator role on this relationship. Further studies are needed to evaluate causal relationship between these variables in both clinical and non-clinical populations.

  10. The severity of Internet addiction risk and its relationship with the severity of borderline personality features, childhood traumas, dissociative experiences, depression and anxiety symptoms among Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbudak, Ercan; Evren, Cuneyt; Aldemir, Secil; Evren, Bilge

    2014-11-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of Internet addiction (IA) risk with the severity of borderline personality features, childhood traumas, dissociative experiences, depression and anxiety symptoms among Turkish university students. A total of 271 Turkish university students participated in this study. The students were assessed through the Internet Addiction Scale (IAS), the Borderline Personality Inventory (BPI), the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The rates of students were 19.9% (n=54) in the high IA risk group, 38.7% (n=105) in the mild IA risk group and 41.3% (n=112) in the group without IA risk. Correlation analyses revealed that the severity of IA risk was related with BPI, DES, emotional abuse, CTQ-28, depression and anxiety scores. Univariate covariance analysis (ANCOVA) indicated that the severity of borderline personality features, emotional abuse, depression and anxiety symptoms were the predictors of IAS score, while gender had no effect on IAS score. Among childhood trauma types, emotional abuse seems to be the main predictor of IA risk severity. Borderline personality features predicted the severity of IA risk together with emotional abuse, depression and anxiety symptoms among Turkish university students.

  11. Treating postnatal depressive symptoms in primary care: a randomised controlled trial of GP management, with and without adjunctive counselling

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    Leigh Bronwyn

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal depression (PND is under-diagnosed and most women do not access effective help. We aimed to evaluate comparative management of (PND following screening with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, using three best-practice care pathways by comparing management by general practitioners (GPs alone compared to adjunctive counselling, based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT, delivered by postnatal nurses or psychologists. Methods This was a parallel, three-group randomised controlled trial conducted in a primary care setting (general practices and maternal & child health centres and a psychology clinic. A total of 3,531 postnatal women were screened for symptoms of depression; 333 scored above cut-off on the screening tool and 169 were referred to the study. Sixty-eight of these women were randomised between the three treatment groups. Results Mean scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II at entry were in the moderate-to-severe range. There was significant variation in the post-study frequency of scores exceeding the threshold indicative of mild-to-severe depressive symptoms, such that more women receiving only GP management remained above the cut-off score after treatment (p = .028. However, all three treatment conditions were accompanied by significant reductions in depressive symptoms and mean post-study BDI-II scores were similar between groups. Compliance was high in all three groups. Women rated the treatments as highly effective. Rates of both referral to the study (51%, and subsequent treatment uptake (40% were low. Conclusions Data from this small study suggest that GP management of PND when augmented by a CBT-counselling package may be successful in reducing depressive symptoms in more patients compared to GP management alone. The relatively low rates of referral and treatment uptake, suggest that help-seeking remains an issue for many women with PND, consistent with previous research. Trial

  12. Evaluation of a computer-adaptive test for the assessment of depression (D-CAT) in clinical application.

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    Fliege, Herbert; Becker, Janine; Walter, Otto B; Rose, Matthias; Bjorner, Jakob B; Klapp, Burghard F

    2009-01-01

    In the past, a German Computerized Adaptive Test, based on Item Response Theory (IRT), was developed for purposes of assessing the construct depression [Computer-adaptive test for depression (D-CAT)]. This study aims at testing the feasibility and validity of the real computer-adaptive application.The D-CAT, supplied by a bank of 64 items, was administered on personal digital assistants (PDAs) to 423 consecutive patients suffering from psychosomatic and other medical conditions (78 with depression). Items were adaptively administered until a predetermined reliability (r > or = 0.90) was attained. For validation purposes, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered. Another sample of 114 patients was evaluated using standardized diagnostic interviews [Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI)].The D-CAT was quickly completed (mean 74 seconds), well accepted by the patients and reliable after an average administration of only six items. In 95% of the cases, 10 items or less were needed for a reliable score estimate. Correlations between the D-CAT and the HADS, CES-D, and BDI ranged between r = 0.68 and r = 0.77. The D-CAT distinguished between diagnostic groups as well as established questionnaires do.The D-CAT proved an efficient, well accepted and reliable tool. Discriminative power was comparable to other depression measures, whereby the CAT is shorter and more precise. Item usage raises questions of balancing the item selection for content in the future.

  13. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: influence of slight-to-moderate depressive symptom severity and worrying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoen, Astrid B H; Redlich, Else M; de Weerd, Al W

    2014-08-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a well-known, effective treatment for primary insomnia. However, the majority of sleeping problems occur in the presence of another medical or psychiatric disorder. Depression and general anxiety disorder (with a main feature of excessive generalized worrying) are disorders that frequently co-occur with insomnia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether depressive symptom severity or worrying influences the subjective effectiveness of CBT-I. Patients with a complaint of insomnia received CBT-I. At the beginning of the therapy, patients completed a sleep evaluation list, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II-NL, N = 92), and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ, N = 119). Based on the BDI and the PSWQ, the sample was divided into different groups: patients with low versus high depression scores, low worriers versus high worriers, and patients without depressive symptoms who were also classified as low worriers and patients with depressive symptoms who were also classified as high worriers. The sleep evaluation list was completed directly after the treatment and 6 months later. Sleep evaluation scores, subjective total sleep time, subjective sleep onset latency, and subjective wake after sleep onset all changed in a positive way after CBT-I and remained that way over the next 6 months for all patients. These positive effects of CBT-I did not differ between the subgroups. Results suggest that CBT-I improves subjective sleep experiences, regardless of depressive symptom severity or worrying. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The Effect of Back Pain on Quality of Life, Sleep Quality and Depression in Patients with Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

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    Sema Haliloğlu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to assess the effects of back pain on the quality of sleep, quality of life and depression in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. We also evaluated the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD and these parameters. Materials and Methods: One hundred and five patients diagnosed with postmenopausal osteoporosis were included in this study. The patients were evaluated on the Quality of Life Questionnaire of the European Foundation for Osteoporosis (QUALEFFO-41, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. The intensity of back pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS. Results: Patients ranged in age from 46 to 75, with a mean age of 61.16±7.59. As pain scores increased, depression scores increased and sleep quality and quality of life were impaired (p<0.01. There were strong positive correlations among depression, sleep quality and quality of life (p<0.01, but we did not find significant correlations among lumbar spine (L1-L4 T-scores, L1-L4 BMD values, VAS, PSQI total scores, QUALEFFO-41 total scores and BDI scores. Conclusion: High pain scores in postmenopausal patients may be related to low quality of sleep and of life, and depression. Depression, sleep disorder and low quality of life may affect each other. Treating back pain, a frequent symptom in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients, may produce favorable effects on quality of sleep and life and on depression, as well as basic management. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2014;20: 6-9

  15. Dejian Mind-Body Intervention on Depressive Mood of Community-Dwelling Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Agnes S. Chan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a short-term mind-body intervention program on improving the depressive mood of an adult community sample. Forty adult volunteers with various degrees of depressive mood were randomly assigned to the experimental group (Dejian Mind-Body Intervention, DMBI and control group (Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, CBT. For each group, a total of four 90-min weekly sessions were conducted. Treatment-related changes were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, an electroencephalographic indicator of positive affect (i.e., prefrontal activation asymmetry, and self-report ratings on physical health. Results indicated that both the DMBI and the CBT group demonstrated significant reduction in depressive mood. However, among individuals with moderate to severe depressive mood at baseline, only those in the DMBI but not the CBT group showed significant reduction in depressive mood. Besides, only the DMBI group demonstrated a significant increase in prefrontal activation asymmetry, suggesting increase in positive affect. While most psychological therapies for depressive mood normally take several months to show treatment effect, the present findings provided initial data suggesting that the DMBI was effective in improving depressive mood of community adults after 1 month of training.

  16. Prevalence and Intensity of Depression in Mothers of Children with Beta-Thalassemia Major In Talghani Hospital of Gorgan, Iran

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    Nargesbeygom Mirbehbahani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thalassemia is a chronic disease that it leads to psychological and social problems for parents. Mothers are at markedly increased risk of suffering from psychological distress and depression because they usually take on a considerable part of extra care that their children need.This study was designed to determine prevalence and intensity of depression in mothers with a thalassemic child. Material and Methods: In this cross – sectional study, 65 mothers of children with thalassemia major (case group and 65 mothers of children without thalassemia major (control group were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Data were analyzed by using SPSS (v 16.0 for windows. Results: Prevalence of depression was significantly higher in case group than that in control group (84.6%vs. 56.9%, p <0.05. Moderate depression had a highest prevalence in the both groups (33.4% in case group and 30.8% in control group. Prevalence of severe depression in case group was markedly higher than that in control group (29.2% vs. 3.1% p<0.05. There was a significant difference between intensity of depression in mothers of case group that had another child with beta-thalassemia major (p<0.05. Conclusion: Mothers of children with thalassemia major are vulnerable to depression. They need psychosocial support to promote their health.

  17. Internet-delivered therapist-guided physical activity for mild to moderate depression: a randomized controlled trial

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    Morgan Ström

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main hypothesis, and the objective of the study, was to test if the participants allocated to the treatment group would show a larger reduction in depressive symptoms than those in the control group. Methods. This study was a randomized nine week trial of an Internet-administered treatment based on guided physical exercise for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. A total of 48 participants with mild to moderate depression, diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, were randomized either to a treatment intervention or to a waiting-list control group. The main outcome measure for depression was the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and physical activity level was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ. The treatment program consisted of nine text modules, and included therapist guidance on a weekly basis. Results. The results showed significant reductions of depressive symptoms in the treatment group compared to the control group, with a moderate between-group effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.67; 95% confidence interval: 0.09–1.25. No difference was found between the groups with regards to increase of physical activity level. For the treatment group, the reduction in depressive symptoms persisted at six months follow-up. Conclusions. Physical activity as a treatment for depression can be delivered in the form of guided Internet-based self-help. Trial Registration. The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01573130.

  18. Concurrent Validity of the Cognitive Domain of the Battelle Developmental Inventory in Relation to the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test, Fourth Edition for Urban African-American Low SES Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidz, Carol S.; And Others

    The relationship between scores on the cognitive domain of the Battelle Developmental Inventory (BDI) and scores on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test (SBIT), Fourth Edition, was studied for 32 urban, low socioeconomic status (SES), African American children (22 males and 10 females) aged 3 to 5 years. The BDI is a developmental inventory…

  19. The relationship between students’ study habits, happiness and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Susan; Rajaeepour, Saeed; Rizi, Hasan Ashrafi; Zahmatkesh, Monereh; Nematolahi, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the important requirements for cultural, social and even economic development is having a book-loving nation. In order to achieve this, there is a need for purposeful and continuous programming. The purpose of this research was to determine the relationship between students’ study habits, happiness and depression in Isfahan University of Medical Science. METHODS: This research was a kind of descriptive and correlation survey. Statistical population included all MSc and PhD students in the second semester of the Isfahan University of Medical Science (263 students). In this research, stratified and random sampling was used in which a sample of 100 students was selected. Data collection instruments were Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Oxford Happiness Inventory and a researcher-made questionnaire to determine the amount of students’ study. Validity of this questionnaires was determined by structure and content related validity and its reliability was calculated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the first (r = 0.94), second (r = 0.91) and third (r = 0.85) questionnaire. Analysis of research findings was done through descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: Findings showed that 68.8 percent of students study less than 5 hours and only 2.5 percent of students study more than 10 hours. 65 percent of students had high amount of happiness and 35 percent had medium amount of happiness. In 60 percent of students there was no symptom of depression and 7.5 had depression symptoms. Also, there was no significant relationship between happiness and studying but there was a significant and negative relationship between studying and depression and happiness and depression. CONCLUSIONS: The amount of study and tendency for reading are among the most important indices of human growth in terms of potential abilities for achieving a perfect human life and to prevent one-dimensional thinking. Thus, finding ways to encourage students to study is

  20. Design and psychometric analysis of the Hopelessness and Suicide Ideation Inventory “IDIS”

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    Bertha Lucía Avendaño Prieto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to design the Hopeless and Suicide Ideation Inventory, also know as IDIS - Spanish acronym for Inventario de Desesperanza e Ideación Suicida - and to analyze its psychometric properties. A quantitative empirical research was conducted employing a non-experimental design, an instrumental variable and cross-sectional analysis. Three hundred and thirty-nine people participated in the study (67.6% females, 31.6% males, in which 54.6% were students and 34.8% were employees. Participants completed the IDIS, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, the Positive and Negative Suicide Ideation Inventory, and the Beck Hopelessness Scale. The results indicated an inter-rater reliability and a positive convergent validity in both scales. Suicidal ideation revealed an internal consistency of α = .76, and α = .81 for hopelessness; a total variance of 41.77% and 47.52% was obtained correspondingly. Based on the Item Response Theory (IRT, the adjustments for INFIT and OUTFIT fell under the expected range. It was concluded that the IDIS is a reliable and valid measure, however, further evaluations on sensitivity and specificity are encouraged.

  1. Sintomas depressivos e de ansiedade em mães durante internação pediátrica em um hospital universitário Depressive symptoms and of anxiety among mothers of pediatric inpatients at a university hospital

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    Bruno Luiz Guidolin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O período de tratamento e recuperação de uma criança hospitalizada pode ser longo. Durante esse tempo em que precisa estar inserida no ambiente hospitalar, muitas vezes institui-se uma crise na vida da criança e da mãe. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência de sintomas de ansiedade e depressão materna em mulheres que tiveram seus filhos internados na ala pediátrica do hospital universitário da Universidade Luterana do Brasil (ULBRA. MÉTODOS: Este foi um estudo transversal, com aplicação dos Inventários de Ansiedade e Depressão de Beck (Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories, respectivamente BAI e BDI em 140 mulheres que se encontravam entre 31 e 365 dias após o parto. Adotamos o ponto de corte > 20 nas escalas BAI e BDI para definir a presença de ansiedade e depressão. RESULTADOS: Do total, 43 mulheres (30,7% apresentaram escores > 20 no BDI, ou seja, foram consideradas deprimidas; 46 (32,9% apresentaram escores > 20 no BAI, tendo sido consideradas ansiosas; 26 mulheres (18,6% apresentavam-se ansiosas e deprimidas. Mulheres em situação de maior vulnerabilidade social apresentaram depressão e ansiedade com maior frequência, especificamente mulheres mais jovens, com menor escolaridade e menor renda, sem plano privado de saúde e com mais filhos. CONCLUSÕES: A atuação preventiva de equipes multidisciplinares, nos primeiros meses após o parto, é necessária devido à alta frequência de sintomas depressivos e de ansiedade nas mães. Com isso, essas mães que se encontram em um ambiente hospitalar podem ser encaminhadas para profissionais de saúde mental adequados.INTRODUCTION: The treatment and recovery of a pediatric inpatient may take a long time. During the child's stay in the hospital environment, it is not uncommon to observe the development of emotional crises affecting both child and mother. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms among mothers who had their children admitted

  2. Prevalence and Correlates of Depressive Symptoms Among High School Students in Hanover, Jamaica

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    Olaniyi J. Ekundayo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Jamaican adolescents and examine its association with individual and family factors. We used an abbreviated form of the Beck's Depression Inventory II (BDI-II to assess depressive symptoms among 748 students, attending public high schools in the parish of Hanover Jamaica. In the analysis, we classified adolescents with scores in the upper quartile of the depressive symptom score as having depressive symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of depressive symptoms. 14.2% of participants reported depressive symptoms. There was association between engagement in sexual activity [Odds Ratio (OR = 1.61, 95% Confidence Interval (CI = 1.02-2.51], parental monitoring of adolescent activity (OR=2.04, 95%CI=1.33 -3.12, maternal affection and support (OR= 4.07, 95%CI= 2.62-6.33, and paternal affection and support (OR= 1.58, 95%CI= 1.05-2.39 with self reported depressive symptoms at the bivariate level. In the final model, depressive symptoms was associated with perceived lack of maternal affection and support (OR= 4.06, 95%CI= 2.61-6.32 and showed marginal association with being sexually experienced (OR= 1.59, 95%CI= 1.00-2.52. As most homes are female-headed, establishing support systems for the mother to take care of their adolescent children may decrease the odds of depressive symptoms. Sexually experienced adolescents may require screening for depression. Further research is required to fully explore all factors that could predispose Jamaican adolescents to depression.

  3. The association between depression, socio-economic factors and dietary intake in mothers having primary school children living in Rey, south of Tehran, Iran

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    Payab Moloud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the WHO report released in 2000, about 121 million people worldwide suffer from depression. The present study aimed to explore factors influencing depression in mothers from Rey, South of Tehran, Iran; who had elementary school children. Methods The cross-sectional survey was conducted in spring 2010. Four hundred thirty mothers who had elementary school children, were selected through a two stage cluster sampling. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was used to assess depression in the mothers and a 24-hour food recall was used to collect information regarding their dietary intake. General information regarding economic condition and socio-economic status were also gathered using a questionnaire. The data was analyzed using chi-square, one-way analysis of variance and simple regression tests. Results In our study, 51.4% of the mothers suffered from depression. There was an inverse correlation between the educational level of the mothers and the heads of household, their occupational status, their marital status, their socio-economic condition and depression. Conversely, any increase in the family size worsened the depression. The daily intake of different macronutrients, except for fat, was lower in individuals of depressed group. Conclusion The present study emphasized the fact that more attention should be paid to the educational level and economic condition of the family in order to reduce maternal depression. Family size also plays an important role in this regard.

  4. The association between depression, socio-economic factors and dietary intake in mothers having primary school children living in Rey, South of Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background According to the WHO report released in 2000, about 121 million people worldwide suffer from depression. The present study aimed to explore factors influencing depression in mothers from Rey, South of Tehran, Iran; who had elementary school children. Methods The cross-sectional survey was conducted in spring 2010. Four hundred thirty mothers, who had elementary school children, were selected through a two stage cluster sampling. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression in the mothers and a 24-hour food recall was used to collect information regarding their dietary intake. General information regarding economic condition and socio-economic status were also gathered using a questionnaire. The data was analyzed using chi-square, one-way analysis of variance and simple regression tests. Results In our study, 51.4% of the mothers suffered from depression. There was an inverse correlation between the educational level of the mothers and the heads of household, their occupational status, their marital status, their socio-economic condition and depression. Conversely, any increase in the family size worsened the depression. The daily intake of different macronutrients, except for fat, was lower in individuals of depressed group. Conclusion The present study emphasized the fact that more attention should be paid to the educational level and economic condition of the family in order to reduce maternal depression. Family size also plays an important role in this regard. PMID:23497656

  5. The association between depression, socio-economic factors and dietary intake in mothers having primary school children living in Rey, South of Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payab Moloud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the WHO report released in 2000, about 121 million people worldwide suffer from depression. The present study aimed to explore factors influencing depression in mothers from Rey, South of Tehran, Iran; who had elementary school children. Methods The cross-sectional survey was conducted in spring 2010. Four hundred thirty mothers, who had elementary school children, were selected through a two stage cluster sampling. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was used to assess depression in the mothers and a 24-hour food recall was used to collect information regarding their dietary intake. General information regarding economic condition and socio-economic status were also gathered using a questionnaire. The data was analyzed using chi-square, one-way analysis of variance and simple regression tests. Results In our study, 51.4% of the mothers suffered from depression. There was an inverse correlation between the educational level of the mothers and the heads of household, their occupational status, their marital status, their socio-economic condition and depression. Conversely, any increase in the family size worsened the depression. The daily intake of different macronutrients, except for fat, was lower in individuals of depressed group. Conclusion The present study emphasized the fact that more attention should be paid to the educational level and economic condition of the family in order to reduce maternal depression. Family size also plays an important role in this regard.

  6. Abnormal brain glucose metabolism and depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease: SPM analysis of F-18 FDG positron emission tomography

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    Jun, Sung Min; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive mood and pre-dialytic CKD, to localize and quantify depressive mood -related lesions in pre-dialytic CKD patients through statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET), and to examine the usefulness of brain PET for early detection and proper treatment of depressive mood. Twenty one patients with stage 5 CKD and 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed by depressive mood assessment and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of 18F-FDG PET. Depressive mood assessment was done by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The largest clusters were areas including precentral gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulated cortex of left hemisphere. Other clusters were left transverse temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46, 44), right inferior frontal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left angular gyrus. In addition, correlation was found between hypometabolized areas and HDRS scores of CKD patients in right prefrontal cortex (BA 11) and right anterior cingulated gyrus (BA 24). In conclusion, this study demonstrated specific depressive mood-related abnormal metabolic lesion. Interestingly, in CKD patients with severe depressive mood, cerebral metabolism was similar to that of MDD.

  7. The Level of Anxiety and Depression in Dialysis Patients Undertaking Regular Physical Exercise Training - a Preliminary Study

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    Wioletta Dziubek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a six-month physical training undertaken by haemodialysis (HD patients, on the depression and anxiety. Methods: Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD were recruited from the dialysis station at the Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine in Wroclaw. Physical training took place at the beginning of the first 4-hours of dialysis, three times a week for six months. A personal questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used in the study. Results: A total of 28 patients completed the study: 20 were randomised to endurance training and 8 were randomised to resistance training. Statistical analysis of depression and anxiety at the initial (t1 and final examination (t2 indicated a significant reduction in depression and anxiety, particularly anxiety as a trait (X2 in the whole study group. The change in anxiety as a state correlated with the disease duration, duration of dialysis and the initial level of anxiety as a state (t1X1. The change in anxiety as a trait significantly correlated with age and the initial level of anxiety (t1X2. Conclusions: Undertaking physical training during dialysis by patients with ESRD is beneficial in reducing their levels of anxiety and depression. Both resistance and endurance training improves mood, but only endurance training additionally results in anxiety reduction.

  8. The Level of Anxiety and Depression in Dialysis Patients Undertaking Regular Physical Exercise Training--a Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubek, Wioletta; Kowalska, Joanna; Kusztal, Mariusz; Rogowski, Łukasz; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Nikifur, Małgorzata; Szczepańska-Gieracha, Joanna; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Klinger, Marian; Woźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a six-month physical training undertaken by haemodialysis (HD) patients, on the depression and anxiety. Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) were recruited from the dialysis station at the Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine in Wroclaw. Physical training took place at the beginning of the first 4-hours of dialysis, three times a week for six months. A personal questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used in the study. A total of 28 patients completed the study: 20 were randomised to endurance training and 8 were randomised to resistance training. Statistical analysis of depression and anxiety at the initial (t1) and final examination (t2) indicated a significant reduction in depression and anxiety, particularly anxiety as a trait (X2) in the whole study group. The change in anxiety as a state correlated with the disease duration, duration of dialysis and the initial level of anxiety as a state (t1X1). The change in anxiety as a trait significantly correlated with age and the initial level of anxiety (t1X2). Undertaking physical training during dialysis by patients with ESRD is beneficial in reducing their levels of anxiety and depression. Both resistance and endurance training improves mood, but only endurance training additionally results in anxiety reduction. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Comparing telehealth-based and clinic-based group cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depression and anxiety: a pilot study

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    Khatri N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nasreen Khatri, Elsa Marziali, Illia Tchernikov, Nancy ShepherdRotman Research Institute, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: The primary objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate reliable adherence to a group cognitive behavioral (CBT therapy protocol when delivered using on-line video conferencing as compared with face-to-face delivery of group CBT. A secondary aim was to show comparability of changes in subject depression inventory scores between on-line and face-to-face delivery of group CBT.Methods: We screened 31 individuals, 18 of whom met the criteria for a DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition diagnosis of mood and/or anxiety disorder. All qualifying participants had the necessary equipment (computer, webcam, Internet for participation in the study, but could exercise their preference for either the on-line or face-to-face format. Eighteen completed the 13 weekly session intervention program (ten face-to-face; eight video conferencing. We coded adherence to protocol in both intervention formats and generated pre–post changes in scores on the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II for each participant.Results: Application of the CBT protocol coding system showed reliable adherence to the group CBT intervention protocol in both delivery formats. Similarly, qualitative analysis of the themes in group discussion indicated that both groups addressed similar issues. Pre–post intervention scores for the BDI-II were comparable across the two delivery formats, with 60% of participants in each group showing a positive change in BDI-II severity classification (eg, from moderate to low symptoms.Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrates that group CBT could be delivered in a technology-supported environment (on-line video conferencing and can meet the same professional practice standards and outcomes as face-to-face delivery of the intervention program.Keywords: psychotherapy, gerontology, mood

  10. Self-Esteem, Social Phobia and Depression Status in Patients with Epilepsy

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    KUTLU, Ayşe; GÖKÇE, Gökçen; BÜYÜKBURGAZ, Ülkü; SELEKLER, Macit; KOMŞUOğLU, Sezer

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The increased risk for psychiatric disorders in epilepsy can be related to a number of clinical, psychosocial and biological factors. Due to the unpredictability of seizures and the possibility that they may occur at any time and in any place, patients with epilepsy may develop social phobia and may have feelings of worthlessness and stigma. These factors decrease their psychosocial function, self-efficacy, and quality of life and even increase the suicide rate. Considering the above-mentioned scientific data, the present study was designed to investigate phobia, self-esteem and depression status in patients with epilepsy. Methods One hundred thirty-two patients (aged 21–52 years) and age- and gender-matched control group of 61 subjects (aged 25–60 years) were included in this study. All patients in both groups were administered the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (CSEI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results The mean ages of the patient group and the healthy controls were 29.66±11.3 and 32.16±7.99, respectively. There was no statistical significance between the two groups in terms of age and sex (p>0.05). BDI, LSAS and CSEI scores in the patient group were statistically significantly different than in the control group (pself-esteem and depression are important comorbid conditions in epileptic patients. Psychiatric disorders are usually underrecognized and undertreated in patients with epilepsy. Therefore, it is very important to identify and treat the psychiatric comorbid conditions in epilepsy because of their significant burden on patients’ quality of life.

  11. Relationship of Internet addiction with cognitive style, personality, and depression in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senormancı, Omer; Saraçlı, Ozge; Atasoy, Nuray; Senormancı, Güliz; Koktürk, Fürüzan; Atik, Levent

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of dysfunctional attitudes, self-esteem, personality, and depression with Internet addiction in university students. A total of 720 university students participated in the study in Bülent Ecevit University English Preparatory School which offers intensive English courses. Students were evaluated with a sociodemographic data form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale form A (DAS-A), Internet Addiction Scale (IAS), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised/Abbreviated Form (EPQR-A). The results indicated that 52 (7.2%) of the students had Internet addiction. There were 37 (71.2%) men, 15 (28.8%) women in the addicted group. While the addicted groups' BDI, DAS-A perfectionistic attitude, need for approval, RSES, EPQR-A neuroticism, and psychoticism scores were significantly higher, EPQR-A lie scores were significantly lower than those of the non addicted group. According to the multiple binary logistic regression analysis, being male, duration of Internet usage, depression, and perfectionistic attitude have been found as predictors for Internet addiction. It has been found that perfectionistic attitude is a predictor for Internet addiction even when depression, sex, duration of Internet were controlled. To the knowledge of the researchers, this study is the first study to show the dysfunctional attitudes in Internet addiction. It can be important to evaluate dysfunctional attitudes, personality, self-esteem and depression in people with Internet addiction. These variables should be targeted for effective treatment of people with Internet addiction in cognitive behavioral therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Is immediate adjunctive CBT more beneficial than delayed CBT in treating depression?: A Pilot Study.

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    Rizvi, Sakina J; Zaretsky, Ari; Schaffer, Ayal; Levitt, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious first-line therapy for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Due to the limited accessibility of CBT, long wait lists result in delayed treatment, which may affect treatment outcomes. The goal of this pilot study was to obtain preliminary data from a randomized controlled trial to determine whether delayed CBT reduces the effectiveness of the therapy compared to immediate CBT in patients with MDD receiving pharmacotherapy. Patients were randomized to receive immediate CBT (n=18) or to begin CBT after 6 months (n=20) and received 14 weekly sessions, followed by two additional booster sessions. During the active treatment months, patients in the immediate group demonstrated reductions in scores on the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) that were similar to those in the delayed CBT group. However, when the analysis was performed using only data from patients in the delayed group who were still in a depressive episode, there was an overall greater decrease in BDI-II scores in the immediate group vs. the delayed group over the active treatment months, but not specifically at the 6-month endpoint. These findings suggest delays in depression treatment, similar to what occurs with real-world wait list times, may not have a significant impact on the effectiveness of CBT in patients who are already receiving treatment as usual. However, such delays may affect the effectiveness of CBT in those patients who remain depressed during the time delay. A larger trial is necessary to confirm these findings. (Journal of Psychiatric Practice 2015;21:107-113).

  13. Depressive Symptoms and Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

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    Boyle, Stephen; Samad, Zainab; Becker, Richard C.; Williams, Redford; Kuhn, Cynthia; Ortel, Thomas L.; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Prybol, Kevin; Rogers, Joseph; O’Connor, Christopher; Velazquez, Eric J.; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary focus of this study was to examine associations between depressive symptoms and mental stress induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods Adult patients with documented CHD were recruited for baseline mental stress and exercise stress screening testing as a part of the enrollment process of the REMIT trial. Patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). Following a 24-48-hour Beta-blocker withdrawal, consented patients completed three mental stress tests followed by a treadmill exercise test. Ischemia was defined as 1) any development or worsening of any wall motion abnormality (WMA), 2) reduction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥ 8% by transthoracic echocardiography, and/or ischemic ST-segment change by electrocardiography during stress testing. MSIMI was considered present when ischemia occurred in at least one mental test. Data were analyzed using logistic regression adjusting for age, gender, and resting left ventricular ejection fraction. Results One hundred twenty five (44.2 %) of 283 patients were found to have MSIMI and 93 (32.9%) had ESIMI. Unadjusted analysis showed that BDI-II scores were positively associated with the probability of MSIMI (OR = .1.30: 95% CI 1.06 – 1.60, p = .013) and number of MSIMI positive tasks (all p < .005). These associations were still significant after adjustment for covariates (ps ≤ .05). Conclusions In CHD patients, depressive symptoms were associated with a higher probability of MSIMI. These observations may enhance our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the association of depressive symptoms to future cardiovascular events. PMID:24163385

  14. Design and application of a CA-BDI model to determine farmers' land-use behavior.

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    Liang, Xiaoying; Chen, Hai; Wang, Yanni; Song, Shixiong

    2016-01-01

    The belief-desire-intention (BDI) model has been widely used to construct reasoning systems for complex tasks in dynamic environments. We have designed a capabilities and abilities (CA)-BDI farmer decision-making model, which is an extension of the BDI architecture and includes internal representations for farmer household Capabilities and Abilities. This model is used to explore farmer learning mechanisms and to simulate the bounded rational decisions made by farmer households. Our case study focuses on the Gaoqu Commune of Mizhi County, Shaanxi Province, China, where scallion is one of the main cash crops. After comparing the differences between actual land-use changes from 2007 to 2009 and the simulation results, we analyze the validity of the model and discuss the potential and limitations of the farmer land-use decision-making model under three scenarios. Based on the design and implementation of the model, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) the CA-BDI framework is an appropriate model for exploring learning mechanisms and simulating bounded rational decisions; and (2) local governments should encourage scallion planting by assisting scallion farmer cooperatives and farmers to understand the market risk, standardize the rules of their cooperation, and supervise the contracts made between scallion cooperatives and farmers.

  15. ANN based Performance Evaluation of BDI for Condition Monitoring of Induction Motor Bearings

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    Patel, Raj Kumar; Giri, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    One of the critical parts in rotating machines is bearings and most of the failure arises from the defective bearings. Bearing failure leads to failure of a machine and the unpredicted productivity loss in the performance. Therefore, bearing fault detection and prognosis is an integral part of the preventive maintenance procedures. In this paper vibration signal for four conditions of a deep groove ball bearing; normal (N), inner race defect (IRD), ball defect (BD) and outer race defect (ORD) were acquired from a customized bearing test rig, under four different conditions and three different fault sizes. Two approaches have been opted for statistical feature extraction from the vibration signal. In the first approach, raw signal is used for statistical feature extraction and in the second approach statistical features extracted are based on bearing damage index (BDI). The proposed BDI technique uses wavelet packet node energy coefficients analysis method. Both the features are used as inputs to an ANN classifier to evaluate its performance. A comparison of ANN performance is made based on raw vibration data and data chosen by using BDI. The ANN performance has been found to be fairly higher when BDI based signals were used as inputs to the classifier.

  16. The incidence of anxiety, depression, and quality of life in patients with dermatological diseases

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    Andrea Solgajová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aim was to establish the differences in the levels of anxiety, depression, and quality of life in patients with acne and atopic dermatitis, to examine differences related to gender, and to examine the relationship of levels of anxiety, depression, and quality of life to age and personality traits. Design: A cross-sectional study. Methods: The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI were used for data collection, and the Mini International Personality Item Pool (IPIP was used for identification of five personality factors. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between patients with acne and patients with atopic dermatitis regarding levels of anxiety, depression, and quality of life. In terms of age, a difference was found only in the incidence of anxiety in the group of patients with acne; higher anxiety was found in women. There were no statistically significant differences in anxiety, depression, and quality of life related to age in patients with acne and atopic dermatitis. Significant relationships of the variables to personality traits were found in both groups. Conclusion: Knowing the factors influencing the incidence of mental health problems in patients with acne and atopic dermatitis helps in early nursing diagnosis of such problems, which can eliminate the negative impact of mental health problems on patients' quality of life.

  17. Depression in mothers of children with thalassemia or blood malignancies: a study from Iran.

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    Sharghi, Afshan; Karbakhsh, Mojgan; Nabaei, Behrooz; Meysamie, Alipasha; Farrokhi, AliReza

    2006-10-04

    Several studies have found that parents of children with chronic diseases or disabilities have higher depression scores than control parents. Mothers usually take on the considerable part of the extra care and support that these children need and thus are at markedly increased risks of suffering from psychological distress and depression. The main aim of the present study was to investigate if mothers of children with thalassemia or blood malignancies have higher scores of depression compared with a group of control mothers. In this cross - sectional study, 294 mothers were recruited in three groups and assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI): mothers of children with thalassemia, mothers of children with blood malignancies and a control group. SPSS version 11.5 with chi square, ANOVA, linear and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. The only variable bearing a statistically significant relationship with the depression score of mothers was the child's disease: for thalassemia with OR of 2.17 (95% CI = 1.16-4.0, P = 0.015), for blood malignancies with OR of 2.71 (95% CI = 1.48-4.99, P = 0.001). The results of this study can contribute to the development of a screening program for decreasing depression burden and promoting quality of life for mothers of children with thalassemia or blood malignancies.

  18. Overgeneral autobiographical memory predicts higher prospective levels of depressive symptoms and intrusions in borderline patients.

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    Van den Broeck, Kris; Pieters, Guido; Claes, Laurence; Berens, Ann; Raes, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM), the tendency to retrieve categories of events from autobiographical memory instead of single events, is found to be a reliable predictor for future mood disturbances and post-traumatic symptom severity. Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often report co-morbid episodes of major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, we investigated whether OGM would predict depression severity and (post-traumatic) stress symptoms in BPD patients. At admission (N = 54) and at six-month follow-up (N ≥ 31), BPD patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders, the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders, the Autobiographical Memory Test, the Beck Depression Inventory-2nd edition (BDI-II), and the Impact of Event Scale. OGM at baseline predicted (a) higher levels of depressive symptoms at follow-up and (b) more intrusions related to a stressful event over and above baseline levels of borderline symptoms, depressive symptoms, and intrusions, respectively. No association was found between memory specificity and event-related avoidance at follow-up. Despite previous findings suggesting that OGM in BPD is less robust than in MDD and PTSD, our results suggest that memory specificity in BPD patients may have some relevance for the course of depressive and stress symptomatology in BPD.

  19. Metacognitive therapy in recurrent depression: a case replication series in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callesen, Pia; Jensen, Anne Backhausen; Wells, Adrian

    2014-02-01

    Metacognitive therapy (MCT) for depression is derived from the Wells and Matthews (1994) self-regulatory model, in which a Cognitive-Attentional Syndrome (CAS) is the cause of psychological disorders. MCT for depression focuses on identifying patients' CAS and helps them to stop it. The CAS consists of worry, rumination and dysfunctional coping strategies. The focus in MCT is on removing the CAS by challenging positive and negative metacognitive beliefs and eliminating dysfunctional behaviors. In this case series, MCT was delivered to four depressed Danes and treatment was evaluated in 5-11 sessions of up to one hour each. An A-B design with follow-up at 3 and 6 months was conducted and the primary outcome was Beck's Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). We measured CAS processes with the Major depressive Disorder Scale (MDD-S). The results of the case series showed clinically significant improvements in depressive symptoms, rumination and metacognitive beliefs and the effects were still present at follow-up for all patients. The small number of patients and decreasing baselines observed in some cases limits the conclusions. However, the results suggest that this treatment is feasible and was associated with large improvements in symptoms when delivered away from its point of origin and in a Danish help-seeking sample.

  20. The Effectiveness of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS on Reducing Depression Severity and Automatic Thoughts in Depressed Women

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    Saideh Masaf

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is a common disorder that is often associated with other mental and physical disorders. One of the innovative approaches applied in depressed patients is transcranial direct current stimulation. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of transcranial direct electrical stimulations on reducing the severity of depression and negative automatic thoughts. Method: This study is a quasi-experimental study. The population of it all depressed women formed in Tehran in 2015-16. A total of 24 subjects were selected by convenience sampling and randomly assigned into two test (n=12 and control (n=12 groups. The assessment tool used in the clinical interview was Beck Depression Inventory (BDI- Form 21 and automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ respectively. The treatment sessions with a transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS included 15-20 min anodal stimulation of T3 region, and Kathodal stimulation of FD1 with a current of 2 mA. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance and a dependent t-test. Results: Analysis of the data using analysis of covariance showed that there is a significant difference between tDCS and control groups in the rates of depression (p<0.05. There was also a significant difference between tDCS and control groups in terms of belief and the frequency of automatic thoughts (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that transcranial direct current stimulation can reduce the severity of depression. Therefore, psychologists and psychotherapists can use it as a method of intervention used to improve symptoms in patients with depression

  1. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  2. Relationship between Eating Disorders, Stress and Depression in Medical Students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences & Health Services

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    Afarin Ahmadian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Nowadays eating disorders are considered as one of the main psychological disorders. These types of disorder result in physical and mental health problems and affect the individuals’ quality of life. This study has aimed to survey eating disorders and its relation with depression and stress in medical students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. Methodology: In a descriptive study, 340 university students were chosen by the use of simple random sampling and also three questionnaires had been used: 1 Eating attitude questionnaire (EAT-26, revised Beck depression inventory (BDI and Students stressors questionnaire by Pouladi. Collected information was analyzed by the use of SPSS software and statistical tests. Findings: Based on research results 9.41% of students had eating disorder, 12.5% had average depression, 33.4% had severe depression, 12.5% had average stress and 31.3% had high stress. Relative frequency of eating disorder in medical students was the same based on gender, age, living conditions and marital status. Also there was a significant relation between relative frequency of eating disorder, depression severity and stress. Conclusion: Study findings showed that there was a relation between eating disorder, depression severity and stress; thus necessity of paying more attention to some mental symptoms such as depression and stress helps clinicians diagnose and cure eating disorders.

  3. Depression in relation to anxiety, obsessionality and phobia among neurosurgical patients with a primary brain tumor: a 1-year follow-up study.

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    Mainio, Arja; Hakko, Helinä; Niemelä, Asko; Koivukangas, John; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2011-10-01

    Depression is found to be present in up to 44% of brain tumor patients during their illness process. Anxiety as a comorbid psychiatric disorder with depression has formerly been studied, but phobia or obsessive-compulsive symptoms among brain tumor patients have not yet been noticed. By using a clinical prospective database of primary brain tumor patients (n=77) we studied the level of depression, anxiety, obsessionality (traits and symptoms) and phobic anxiety symptoms. Psychiatric symptoms were assessed before tumor operation as well as at three months and at one year after operation. The presence of comorbid anxiety, obsessionality and phobic anxiety symptoms was assessed before operation and at follow-ups in depressed and non-depressed patients, separately. Before tumor operation 16% of the patients had depression according to Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), while 10% had depression at three months and 15% at one year after operation. The depressed patients had statistically significantly higher anxiety scores and phobic scores at all three measurement points compared to corresponding scores among non-depressed brain tumor patients. The mean obsessionality scores among depressed brain tumor patients were significantly higher when measured before operation and at one year after the operation compared to non-depressed patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study so far in which comorbidity of psychiatric symptoms has been shown among depressive brain tumor patients. Concurrent comorbid conditions have been shown to be associated with increased severity, morbidity and chronicity of depression. It is recommended that treatment of depressive patients complicated with comorbid psychiatric disorders be planned by psychiatric units.

  4. Elevated social stress levels and depressive symptoms in primary hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Katharina M; Schote, Andrea B; Schneider, Katja Kerstin; Schulz, André; Meyer, Jobst

    2014-01-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis is defined as excessive sweating of certain body areas without physiological reasons. Hyperhidrotic individuals report a high psychological strain and an impairment of their quality of life. Thus, the aim of the study is to investigate the relation between hyperhidrosis and different psychological as well as physiological aspects of chronic stress as a co-factor for the etiology of depression. In this study, forty hyperhidrotic subjects were compared to forty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. The Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress ('Trierer Inventar zum chronischen Stress': TICS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Screening for Somatoform Disorders (SOMS-2) were used to examine the correlation between primary hyperhidrosis and stress as well as accompanying depressive and somatic symptoms. The cortisol awakening response of each subject was analyzed as a physiological stress correlate. In hyperhidrotics, we found a significant lack of social recognition as well as significantly more depressive symptoms compared to the control subjects. A subgroup of patients with axillary hyperhidrosis had the highest impact on these increased issues of chronic stress, pointing to a higher embarrassment in these subjects. Especially in social situations, hyperhidrotics showed higher stress levels, whereby a vicious circle of stress and sweating is triggered. However, the cortisol awakening response did not significantly differ between hyperhidrotics and controls. Moreover, affected persons suffer from more depressive symptoms, which may be caused by feelings of shame and a lack of self-confidence. This initial study provides an impetus for further investigation to reveal a causative relationship between hyperhidrosis and its psychological concomitants.

  5. Elevated social stress levels and depressive symptoms in primary hyperhidrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina M Gross

    Full Text Available Primary hyperhidrosis is defined as excessive sweating of certain body areas without physiological reasons. Hyperhidrotic individuals report a high psychological strain and an impairment of their quality of life. Thus, the aim of the study is to investigate the relation between hyperhidrosis and different psychological as well as physiological aspects of chronic stress as a co-factor for the etiology of depression. In this study, forty hyperhidrotic subjects were compared to forty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. The Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress ('Trierer Inventar zum chronischen Stress': TICS, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Screening for Somatoform Disorders (SOMS-2 were used to examine the correlation between primary hyperhidrosis and stress as well as accompanying depressive and somatic symptoms. The cortisol awakening response of each subject was analyzed as a physiological stress correlate. In hyperhidrotics, we found a significant lack of social recognition as well as significantly more depressive symptoms compared to the control subjects. A subgroup of patients with axillary hyperhidrosis had the highest impact on these increased issues of chronic stress, pointing to a higher embarrassment in these subjects. Especially in social situations, hyperhidrotics showed higher stress levels, whereby a vicious circle of stress and sweating is triggered. However, the cortisol awakening response did not significantly differ between hyperhidrotics and controls. Moreover, affected persons suffer from more depressive symptoms, which may be caused by feelings of shame and a lack of self-confidence. This initial study provides an impetus for further investigation to reveal a causative relationship between hyperhidrosis and its psychological concomitants.

  6. A Sectional Study: The Relationship between Perceived Social Support and Depression in Turkish Infertile Women

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    Kubra Erdem

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies conducted on infertile women in the literature investigated some features such as depression, anxiety, loneliness, and social support. However, there has been no study examining the relationship between levels of perceived social support and depression in infertile women. Considering this deficiency, the study was conducted to determine the relationship between perceived social support and depression in infertile women. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between perceived social support and depression in infertile women. Materials and Methods: This descriptive and sectional study was conducted between 16 April and 31 October 2012 in in vitro fertilisation (IVF Centre of Fırat University Research Hospital. Sampling formula was used in cases when the number of elements in the population was not known to calculate minimum sample size required to be included in the study. A total of 238 women who applied to the relevant centre between the specified dates constituted the sample group of the study. A Questionnaire Form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS were used to collect the data. A pilot study was carried out on nine infertile women. As a result of the pilot study, we formed the final version of the Questionnaire Form. The data of these nine women were not involved in the research. The data obtained from the study was assessed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA version 15.0. Percentage distribution, mean, t test, one-way analysis of variance (One-Way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation analysis were used to evaluate the data. Results: The women’s total mean score on the BDI was 12.55 ± 8.07. Scores obtained by women on the MSPSS was 15.75 ± 8.53 for the subscale of friend, 21.52 ± 8.20 for the subscale of family, and 15.62 ± 8.45 for the subscale of significant others. The women’s total

  7. A cross-sectional study of depression and self-care in patients with type 2 diabetes with and without foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Camila Ribeiro; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht; Parisi, Maria Cândida Ribeiro

    2014-02-01

    Depression has been recognized as a risk factor for foot ulceration in persons with diabetes mellitus. Using convenience sampling methods, a cross-sectional study was conducted among persons with type 2 diabetes treated in a diabetic foot clinic in Sao Paulo, Brazil between February 2010 and December 2011. One hundred (100) patients (average age 62 years, range 38 to 83 years), 50 with a foot ulcer and 50 at risk for developing a foot ulcer, participated. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), where scores increase with severity; and patients were interviewed about foot self-care behaviors. Average BDI scores among patients with an ulcer were higher (mean 20.37; range 1 to 42) than those of patients that had not developed a foot ulcer (mean 15.70; range 2 to 49) (P = 0.030). Self-care behavior was not significantly different between the two groups. Severe depression (P = 0.049, OR= 6.56 95% CI 1.01-42.58) and male gender (P <0.001, OR=14.87 95% CI 3.83-57.82) were associated with the presence of a foot ulcer. Despite reported adequate self-care behaviors, patients with an ulcer had more symptoms of depression than patients who were at risk for developing a foot ulcer. Studies examining cause-and-effect relationships between these observations and the potential role of depression interventions are needed. The results of this and other studies suggest depression screening is important in patients with diabetes mellitus and foot ulcers.

  8. Influencing factors correlated with depression in somatoform disorders%躯体形式障碍伴发抑郁的影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李武; 翟金国; 杨冬林; 胡春凤

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨躯体形式障碍(SFD)伴发抑郁的影响因素.方法 采用自编的躯体症状报告单、Beck抑郁自评问卷(BDI)、认知情绪调节问卷(CERQ-C)、多伦多述情量表(TAS)对115例SFD患者进行评定.结果 纳入研究的109例SFD中,69例(SFD抑郁组)BDI总分≥14分,40例(SFD非抑郁组)BDI总分≤13分.SFD抑郁组CERQ-C不适应性策略总分[(46.83±7.58)比(41.35±9.32)]、TAS总分[(61.55±7.05)比(55.20±9.84)]均高于非抑郁组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).SFD抑郁组的认知功能、运动系统、疼痛、泌尿生殖系统症状及症状清单总分[(26.38±6.80)比(22.35±6.30)]显著高于非抑郁组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).以是否抑郁为因变量,对有关变量进行Lo-gistic回归分析,CERQ-C不适应性策略总分、性别、受教育年限依次进入方程.结论 SFD伴发抑郁较为常见,SFD抑郁组较非抑郁组存在更为严重的述情障碍与躯体化症状.SFD抑郁的发生与不适应性策略、性别及受教育年限等密切相关.%Objective To investigate the influencing factors correlated with depression in somatoform disorders (SFD). Methods A total of 115 SFD patients were assessed with a self—designed self-rating somatic symptom questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Chinese version of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ—C) and the twenty—item Toronto Scale (TAS). Results In 109 SFD completed the study, 69 patients (the SFD group with depression)had total BDI score over 14,and 40(the SFD group without depression) had total BDI score under 13. Compared with the SFD group without depression, the SFD group with depression showed significant higher total score of CERQ -C maladaptive strategies [(46. 83±7.58)vs ( 41.35 ± 9.32)] and TAS[(61. 55±7. 05)vs (55.20 ± 9. 84)] (P<0. 01). In somatic symptom questionnaire, SFD with depressive mood had significant higher score in cognitive function, locomotor system, pain, urinary and

  9. Branched-Chain Amino Acids as New Biomarkers of Major Depression - A Novel Neurobiology of Mood Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyi, Andreas; Amouzadeh-Ghadikolai, Omid; von Lewinski, Dirk; Rothenhäusler, Hans-Bernd; Theokas, Simon; Robier, Christoph; Mangge, Harald; Reicht, Gerhard; Hlade, Peter; Meinitzer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background The proteinogenic branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) valine, leucine and isoleucine might play an unrecognised crucial role in the development of depression through their activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. The aim of this research project is to evaluate whether BCAAs are altered in patients with major depression and might thus be appropriate biomarkers for major depression. Methods The concentrations of valine, leucine and isoleucine were determined in 71 in-patients with major depression and 48 healthy controls by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Psychiatric and laboratory assessments were obtained at the time of in-patient admittance. Results The BCAAs are significantly decreased in patients with major depression in comparison with healthy subjects (valine: Mann-Whitney-U: 968.0; p <0.0001, leucine: Mann-Whitney-U: 1246.5; p = 0.013, isoleucine: Mann-Whitney-U: 1252.5; p = 0.014). Furthermore, as shown by Spearman's rank correlation coefficients, there is a significant negative correlation between valine, leucine and isoleucine concentrations and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) as well as Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) scores. Conclusions Our study results are strong evidence that in patients with major depression, BCAAs might be appropriate biomarkers for depression. Reduced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) due to a reduction of BCAAs might play a crucial unrecognised factor in the etiology of depression and may evoke depressive symptomatology and lower energy metabolism in patients with major depression. In the future, mTor and its up- and downstream signalling partners might be important targets for the development of novel antidepressants. PMID:27490818

  10. Depression and Anxiety after Acute Myocardial Infarction Treated by Primary PCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, Petr; Hudakova, Nela; Jurajda, Michal; Kasparek, Tomas; Ustohal, Libor; Parenica, Jiri; Sebo, Marek; Holicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main objective of the study was to find out prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms in the population of patients with AMI with ST-segment elevation (STEMI), treated with primary PCI (pPCI). Secondary target indicators included the incidence of sleep disorders and loss of interest in sex. Methods and results The project enrolled 79 consecutive patients with the first AMI, aged <80 years (median 61 years, 21.5% of women) with a follow-up period of 12 months. Symptoms of depression or anxiety were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory II tests (BDI-II, cut-off value ≥14) and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, cut-off ≥ 45) within 24 hours of pPCI, before the discharge, and in 3, 6 and 12 months). Results with the value p<0.05 were considered as statistically significant. The BDI-II positivity was highest within 24 hours after pPCI (21.5%) with a significant decline prior to the discharge (9.2%), but with a gradual increase in 3, 6 and 12 months (10.4%; 15.4%; 13.8% respectively). The incidence of anxiety showed a relatively similar trend: 8.9% after pPCI, and 4.5%, 10.8% and 6.2% in further follow-up. Conclusions Patients with STEMI treated by primary PCI have relatively low overall prevalence of symptoms of depression and anxiety. A significant decrease in mental stress was observed before discharge from the hospital, but in a period of one year after pPCI, prevalence of both symptoms was gradually increasing, which should be given medical attention. PMID:27074002

  11. Variation of plasma cortisol levels in patients with depression after treatment with bilateral electroconvulsive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fortunato Burgese

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: More than 60 years after the introduction of modern psychopharmacology, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT continues to be an essential therapeutic modality in the treatment of mental disorders, but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Hormones play an essential role in the development and expression of a series of behavioral changes. One aspect of the influence of hormones on behavior is their potential contribution to the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders and the mechanism of action of psychotropic drugs and ECT.Objective: We measured blood levels of the hormone cortisol in patients with unipolar depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV and compared results with levels found in healthy adults.Method: Blood cortisol levels were measured before the beginning of treatment with ECT, at the seventh session, and at the last session, at treatment completion. Depression symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI.Results: Cortisol levels remained stable in both men and women between the seventh and the last sessions of ECT; values ranged from 0.686±9.6330 g/dL for women, and there was a mean decrease of 5.825±6.0780 g/dL (p = 0.024. Mean number of ECT sessions was 12. After the seventh and the last ECT sessions, patients with depression and individuals in the control group had similar cortisol levels, whereas BDI scores remained different.Conclusion: Cortisol levels decreased during ECT treatment. ECT seems to act as a regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenal axis.