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Sample records for depression inventory bdi

  1. Enige ervaringen met de Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, TK; Luteijn, F; Albersnagel, FA; van der Ploeg, FAE

    1985-01-01

    Reviews the research outside the Netherlands concerning the reliability and validity of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and conducted an evaluation of the BDI based on responses from 106 heterogeneous psychiatric patients and 156 undergraduates. Results indicate that the BDI is a reliable

  2. Norms for the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) in a Large Dutch Community Sample.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, J.; van Breukelen, G.; de Graaf, L.E.; Beck, A.T.; Arntz, A.; Huibers, M.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) is a widely used instrument that provides information about the presence and severity of depressive symptoms. Although the BDI-II is a psychometrically sound instrument, relatively little is known about norm scores. This study aimed to develop reliable norms

  3. A comparison of the major depression inventory (MDI) and the beck depression inventory (BDI) in severely depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konstantinidis, Anastasios; Martiny, Klaus; Bech, Per

    2011-01-01

    We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression.......We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression....

  4. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in patients with breast disease and breast cancer: a prospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Matti; Ollonen, Paula

    2011-01-01

    In 1972, Beck introduced an inventory (BDI) for rapid screening of depression. The associations between the BDI and the risk of breast cancer (BC) are rarely considered together in prospective studies. In an extension of the Kuopio Breast Cancer Study, 115 women with breast cancer symptoms were semi-structurally interviewed in-depth as well as asked to complete standardised questionnaires (Forsen, Spielberger, MADRS), and all study variables were obtained before any diagnostic procedures were carried out. BDI was used to evaluate the depression of the study participants. The clinical examinations and biopsies showed BC in 34 patients, benign breast disease (BBD) in 53 patients, and 28 individuals were shown to be healthy (HSS). There was a trend for the women with HSS to have less sadness (BDI mean score, 0.27) than those of the BC (BDI mean score, 0.56) and BBD groups (BDI mean score, 0.49). The HSS group tended to be less pessimistic (BDI mean score, 0.15) than the patients in the BC group (BDI mean score, 0.44) and in the BBD group (BDI mean score, 0.42). The HSS group also had less self-accusation (BDI mean score, 0.19) than the patients in the BC group (BDI mean score, 0.50) and the patients in the BBD group (BDI mean score, 0.62). The HSS group also reported less work inhibition and weight loss than the patients in the BC group and in the BBD group. The mean sum of the scores of BDI variables was significantly lower in the HSS group (BDI mean score, 7.1) than in the BC (BDI mean score, 8.4) or BBD groups (BDI mean score, 8.8). The results of this study do not support a specific link between BDI and breast cancer risk. However, the patients with BC and BBD tended to have an increased risk for depressive symptoms.

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Beck Scale for Depression (Beck Depression Inventory BDI-II)--A Study on a Sample of Students in the State of Kuwait Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahem, Ahmed Mohammed Faleh

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the psychometric properties of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) the Arabized version by Gharib (2000); the study sample consisted of 500 male and female students from the Kuwaiti universities by 250 males and 250 females on whom the BDI-II scale was applied twice; the psychometric characteristics such as the…

  6. Comparison of Reliability and Validity of the Breast Cancer depression anxiety stress scales (DASS- 21) with the Beck Depression Inventory-(BDI-II) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)

    OpenAIRE

    Bener A; Alsulaiman R; Doodson LG; El Ayoubi HR

    2016-01-01

    Background: No study has been conducted to determine the reliability and validity of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21), Hospital Anxiety and Depression [HADS] and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) among the Arab Breast Cancer population. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the reliability and validity of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress scale (DASS-21), the Beck Depression Inventory-(BDI-II) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) among Breast Cancer women ...

  7. Prediction of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) Score Using Acoustic Measurements in a Sample of Iium Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikri Zanil, Muhamad; Nur Wahidah Nik Hashim, Nik; Azam, Huda

    2017-11-01

    Psychiatrist currently relies on questionnaires and interviews for psychological assessment. These conservative methods often miss true positives and might lead to death, especially in cases where a patient might be experiencing suicidal predisposition but was only diagnosed as major depressive disorder (MDD). With modern technology, an assessment tool might aid psychiatrist with a more accurate diagnosis and thus hope to reduce casualty. This project will explore on the relationship between speech features of spoken audio signal (reading) in Bahasa Malaysia with the Beck Depression Inventory scores. The speech features used in this project were Power Spectral Density (PSD), Mel-frequency Ceptral Coefficients (MFCC), Transition Parameter, formant and pitch. According to analysis, the optimum combination of speech features to predict BDI-II scores include PSD, MFCC and Transition Parameters. The linear regression approach with sequential forward/backward method was used to predict the BDI-II scores using reading speech. The result showed 0.4096 mean absolute error (MAE) for female reading speech. For male, the BDI-II scores successfully predicted 100% less than 1 scores difference with MAE of 0.098437. A prediction system called Depression Severity Evaluator (DSE) was developed. The DSE managed to predict one out of five subjects. Although the prediction rate was low, the system precisely predict the score within the maximum difference of 4.93 for each person. This demonstrates that the scores are not random numbers.

  8. Substance Use and Depression Symptomatology: Measurement Invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II among Non-Users and Frequent-Users of Alcohol, Nicotine and Cannabis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee A Moore

    Full Text Available Depression is a highly heterogeneous condition, and identifying how symptoms present in various groups may greatly increase our understanding of its etiology. Importantly, Major Depressive Disorder is strongly linked with Substance Use Disorders, which may ameliorate or exacerbate specific depression symptoms. It is therefore quite plausible that depression may present with different symptom profiles depending on an individual's substance use status. Given these observations, it is important to examine the underlying construct of depression in groups of substance users compared to non-users. In this study we use a non-clinical sample to examine the measurement structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II in non-users and frequent-users of various substances. Specifically, measurement invariance was examined across those who do vs. do not use alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Results indicate strict factorial invariance across non-users and frequent-users of alcohol and cannabis, and metric invariance across non-users and frequent-users of nicotine. This implies that the factor structure of the BDI-II is similar across all substance use groups.

  9. Substance Use and Depression Symptomatology: Measurement Invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) among Non-Users and Frequent-Users of Alcohol, Nicotine and Cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ashlee A; Neale, Michael C; Silberg, Judy L; Verhulst, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a highly heterogeneous condition, and identifying how symptoms present in various groups may greatly increase our understanding of its etiology. Importantly, Major Depressive Disorder is strongly linked with Substance Use Disorders, which may ameliorate or exacerbate specific depression symptoms. It is therefore quite plausible that depression may present with different symptom profiles depending on an individual's substance use status. Given these observations, it is important to examine the underlying construct of depression in groups of substance users compared to non-users. In this study we use a non-clinical sample to examine the measurement structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) in non-users and frequent-users of various substances. Specifically, measurement invariance was examined across those who do vs. do not use alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Results indicate strict factorial invariance across non-users and frequent-users of alcohol and cannabis, and metric invariance across non-users and frequent-users of nicotine. This implies that the factor structure of the BDI-II is similar across all substance use groups.

  10. The relation of hopelessness/helplessness versus beck depression inventory (BDI) in healthy individuals and in patients with benign breast disease and breast cancer: a prospective case-control study in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Matti; Korhonen, Riika; Selander, Tuomas; Ollonen, Paula

    2015-02-01

    The relation between hopelessness/helplessness versus the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in healthy study subjects (HSS) and in patients with benign breast disease (BBD) and breast cancer (BC) has not been compared in a prospective study before. We, therefore, investigated hopelessness and helplessness versus the BDI in 115 patients. In the Kuopio Breast Cancer Study, 115 women with breast symptoms were evaluated for hopelessness and helplessness versus the BDI before any diagnostic procedures were carried out. In the self-rating score (SRS), the hopelessness and the helplessness versus the BDI were highly significantly positively correlated in the HSS, BBD and BC groups. In the SRS, the weighted kappa values for hopelessness and helplessness versus the BDI in the HSS, BBD and BC groups were also statistically significant. There was also a significant positive correlation in the examiner-rating score (ERS) in the hopelessness versus the BDI in the BBD and BC groups and in the ERS in helplessness versus the BDI in the HSS and BBD groups. The unweighted kappa values in the ERS for hopelessness versus the BDI in the HSS and BBD groups were statistically highly significant and the unweighted kappa values in the ERS for helplessness versus the BDI in the BBD and BC groups were statistically significant. The results of this study support a powerful link between hopelessness and helplessness versus BDI in the self-rating and examiner-rating. This finding is of clinical importance since, in the breast cancer diagnostic unit, the patients with hopelessness/helplessness characteristics and high BDI score might be associated with a difficulty and delay in reaching BC diagnosis. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Evidências de validade entre a Escala de Depressão (EDEP, o BDI e o Inventário de Percepção de Suporte Familiar (IPSF Validity evidences between the Depression Scale (EDEP, the BDI and the Perception of Family Support Inventory (IPSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makilim Nunes Baptista

    2008-12-01

    's family support, understood as manifestation of attention, care, dialog, freedom, affective proximity, autonomy and independence between family members. The present research aimed to search for validity evidences to Depression Scale (EDEP based on the relation to other variables assessing the same construct, depression, being also assessed by Beck Depression Inventory - BDI, and assessing related constructs, family support, measured by Perception of Family Support Inventory - IPSF. 157 undergraduates from a private university located in south state of Minas Gerais, 75,5% from female gender and 24,5% from male gender, aging from 18 to 51 years old (M=23,2; DP=6,4 took part in this study. At the results, high, significant and positive correlations were found between EDEP and BDI, as expected, indicating that the higher the scores on both scales, higher the depressive symptoms. As for the correlations between EDEP and IPSF dimensions, significant and negative correlations were found, suggesting that the higher depressive symptoms lower the perception of family support on individuals. Only marginally significant differences were found between genders, as to depressive symptoms (EDEP and BDI, indicating that women would score more at the depression scales.

  12. Assessment of depression in a geriatric inpatient cohort: A comparison of the BDI and GDS

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    Bret G. Bentz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de esta investigación fue comparar la habilidad para evaluar y clasificar la depresión del Beck Depression Inventory (BDI y de la Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS en pacientes geriátricos. Se realizó una revisión retrospectiva de los registros médicos de 158 pacientes consecutivamente admitidos en una unidad geriátrica. Los datos recabados incluyeron diagnósticos, información demográfica, puntuaciones del BDI y del GDS, y puntuaciones de varios tests neuropsicológicos. Los ítems de ambos cuestionarios fueron sometidos a análisis factorial para obtener constructos ortogonales. Además, los ítems de ambos cuestionarios fueron tratados mediante análisis discriminante con objeto de investigar su habilidad para diagnosticar la depresión. Finalmente, las puntuaciones de cada factor y las totales de cada cuestionario fueron correlacionadas con medidas de funcionamiento neuropsicológico. Los resultados indicaron que tanto el BDI como el GDS tienen estructuras multifactoriales y su utilidad para diagnosticar la depresión es cuestionable. Además, se obtuvo que el factor de Síntomas Vegetativos del BDI correlacionaba significativamente con varias medidas de funcionamiento neuropsicológico. Los resultados se discutieron en términos de la utilidad clínica relativa de estas dos medidas de auto-informe para la depresión.

  13. The Latent Symptom Structure of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Outpatients with Major Depression

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    Quilty, Lena C.; Zhang, K. Anne; Bagby, R. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a self-report instrument frequently used in clinical and research settings to assess depression severity. Although investigators have examined the factor structure of the BDI-II, a clear consensus on the best fitting model has not yet emerged, resulting in different recommendations regarding how to best…

  14. Validating the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Indonesia's general population and coronary heart disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginting, H.; Näring, G.W.B.; Veld, W.M. van der; Srisayekti, W.; Becker, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the validity and determines the cut-off point for the Beck Depression Inventory-II (the BDI-II) among Indonesians. The Indonesian version of the BDI-II (the Indo BDI-II) was administered to 720 healthy individuals from the general population, 215 Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)

  15. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

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    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  16. Prevalence of depression in patients with β-thalassemia as assessed by the Beck's Depression Inventory.

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    Shafiee, Akbar; Nazari, Shiva; Jorjani, Soudeh; Bahraminia, Emad; Sadeghi-Koupaei, Mohammadtaghi

    2014-01-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is a frequent, chronic hereditary disease, and a plausible cause for psychological disorders. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to identify the rate and severity of depression among Iranian patients with β-thal using the Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). β-Thalassemic patients aged 13-20 years [median age 17.2 years; 27 males (48.2%), 29 females (51.8%)], who presented to the Mofid Children Hospital, Tehran, Iran, for blood transfusions within a 1-year period, were asked to complete the BDI questionnaire. Based on the BDI score, patients were classified as normal or mild-to-severe depression groups, and the collected data were then analyzed according to age and sex. A total of 56 subjects completed the BDI form. Mean score for BDI was 14.27 ± 12.79. Based on the BDI results, 35 (62.5%) had a BDI score below 16 and were therefore not classified as being depressed, while seven (12.5%) patients suffered from severe depression (BDI > 47). Age and gender did not have any significant association with the BDI results (p = 0.52 and p = 0.67, respectively). The total prevalence of various degrees of depression was 30.8% in this study. We concluded that the noticeable rate of depression in thalassemic patients signifies the necessity for improving psychosocial care in this specific group of patients.

  17. Brief Report Reliability of the Beck Depression Inventory and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective — This study aimed to assess the reliability of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale for epidemiological investigations of adolescents' symptoms. Method — Self-report questionnaires were administered on two occasions to 104 students in four private high schools in Cape Town ...

  18. Correlations between the BDI and CES-D in a Sample of Adolescent Mothers.

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    Wilcox, Holly; Field, Tiffany; Prodromidis, Margarita; Scafidi, Frank

    1998-01-01

    The adequacy of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) as screening instruments for adolescent depression is examined. Both are correlated with the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, a clinical measure. BDI correlates more highly with Major Depression subscale, CES-D to Dysthymia…

  19. Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II in a Psychiatric Outpatient Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background To further understand the relationship between anxiety and depression, this study examined the factor structure of the combined items from two validated measures for anxiety and depression. Methods The participants were 406 patients with mixed psychiatric diagnoses including anxiety and depressive disorders from a psychiatric outpatient unit at a university-affiliated medical center. Responses of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II, and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) were analyzed. We conducted an exploratory factor analysis of 42 items from the BAI and BDI-II. Correlational analyses were performed between subscale scores of the SCL-90-R and factors derived from the factor analysis. Scores of individual items of the BAI and BDI-II were also compared between groups of anxiety disorder (n = 185) and depressive disorder (n = 123). Results Exploratory factor analysis revealed the following five factors explaining 56.2% of the total variance: somatic anxiety (factor 1), cognitive depression (factor 2), somatic depression (factor 3), subjective anxiety (factor 4), and autonomic anxiety (factor 5). The depression group had significantly higher scores for 12 items on the BDI while the anxiety group demonstrated higher scores for six items on the BAI. Conclusion Our results suggest that anxiety and depressive symptoms as measured by the BAI and BDI-II can be empirically differentiated and that particularly items of the cognitive domain in depression and those of physical domain in anxiety are noteworthy. PMID:29651821

  20. BDI Logics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, J.J.Ch.; Broersen, J.M.; Herzig, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of so-called BDI logics, logics where the notion of Beliefs, Desires and Intentions play a central role. Starting out from the basic ideas about BDI by Bratman, we consider various formalizations in logic, such as the approach of Cohen and Levesque, slightly

  1. The depressive personality disorder inventory and current depressive symptoms: implications for the assessment of depressive personality.

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    Chamberlain, Jude; Huprich, Steven K

    2011-10-01

    The Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory (DPDI; Huprich, Margrett, Barthelemy, & Fine, 1996; see Appendix) was created to assess Depressive Personality Disorder in clinical and nonclinical samples. Since its creation, the DPDI has been used in multiple studies, and the psychometric properties of the measure have generally supported its reliability, convergent validity, and construct validity; however, evidence for the measure's discriminant validity has been mixed. Specifically, the DPDI tends to correlate highly with measures of current depressive symptoms, which limits its efficacy in differentiating current depressive symptoms from a depressive personality structure. A principal components analysis of 362 individuals who completed both the DPDI and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) found that 49% of the variance was accounted for in two components. Seven items from the DPDI loaded more strongly on the first component composed of many BDI-II items. These items were removed in order to create a measure believed to assess DPD without the confounding influence of current depressive symptomology. Principal components analysis of the revised measure yielded three components, accounting for 46% of the variance. The revised DPDI was used to calculate convergent, discriminant, and construct validity coefficients from measures used in former studies. Virtually no improvement in the validity coefficients was observed. It is concluded that assessing DPD via self-report is limited in its utility.

  2. Reliability and validity of the Beck depression inventory in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Martine; Leentjens, Albert F. G.; Marinus, Johan; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; van Hilten, Jacobus J.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the validity, reliability, and potential responsiveness of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In part 1 of the study, 92 patients with PD underwent a structured clinical interview for DSM major depression and based on this patients were

  3. Screening for depressed mood in an adolescent psychiatric context by brief self-assessment scales -- testing psychometric validity of WHO-5 and BDI-6 indices by latent trait analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Eva Henje; Bech, Per; Högberg, Göran

    2012-01-01

    of two such scales, which may be used in a two-step screening procedure, the WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5) and the six-item version of Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-6). METHOD: 66 adolescent psychiatric patients with a clinical diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), 60 girls and 6 boys......, aged 14--18 years, mean age 16.8 years, completed the WHO-5 scale as well as the BDI-6. Statistical validity was tested by Mokken and Rasch analyses. RESULTS: The correlation between WHO-5 and BDI-6 was -0.49 (p=0.0001). Mokken analyses showed a coefficient of homogeneity for the WHO-5 of 0.......52 and for the BDI-6 of 0.46. Rasch analysis also accepted unidimensionality when testing males versus females (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The WHO-5 is psychometrically valid in an adolescent psychiatric context including both genders to assess the wellness dimension and applicable as a first step in screening for MDD...

  4. The Beck depression inventory as a measure of subjective well-being : A cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, D.A.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.; Poortinga, Y.H.

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the question whether the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which is one of the most widely used instruments to assess depression, can be used to measure differences in subjective well-being at national level. In order to establish the meaning of depression scores at country

  5. High Beck Depression Inventory 21 scores in adolescents without depression are associated with negative self-image and immature defense style.

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    Savilahti, Emma M; Haravuori, Henna; Rytilä-Manninen, Minna; Lindberg, Nina; Kettunen, Kirsi; Marttunen, Mauri

    2018-05-01

    Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is widely used in assessing adolescents' psychological wellbeing, but occasionally the result diverges from diagnostics. Our aim was to identify factors associated with discrepancies between BDI scores and diagnostic assessment in adolescent psychiatric patients and general population. The study comprised 206 inpatients (13-17 years old) and 203 age and gender matched non-referred adolescents. Study subjects filled self-reports on depression symptoms (BDI-21), alcohol use (AUDIT), defense styles (DSQ-40) and self-image (OSIQ-R), and on background information and adverse life events. Diagnostics was based on K-SADS-PL interview, and/or clinical interview and clinical records when available. We compared subjects who scored in BDI-21 either 0-15 points or 16-63 points firstly among subjects without current unipolar depression (n = 284), secondly among those with unipolar depression (n = 105). High BDI-21 scores in subjects without depression diagnosis (n = 48) were associated with female sex, adverse life events, parents' psychiatric problems, higher comorbidity, higher AUDIT scores, worse self-image and more immature defense styles. Low BDI-21 scores among subjects with depression diagnosis (n = 23) were associated with male sex, more positive self-image and less immature defense style. In conclusion, high BDI-21 scores in the absence of depression may reflect a broad range of challenges in an adolescent's psychological development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The structure of negative emotional states: comparison of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) with the Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories.

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    Lovibond, P F; Lovibond, S H

    1995-03-01

    The psychometric properties of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) were evaluated in a normal sample of N = 717 who were also administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The DASS was shown to possess satisfactory psychometric properties, and the factor structure was substantiated both by exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. In comparison to the BDI and BAI, the DASS scales showed greater separation in factor loadings. The DASS Anxiety scale correlated 0.81 with the BAI, and the DASS Depression scale correlated 0.74 with the BDI. Factor analyses suggested that the BDI differs from the DASS Depression scale primarily in that the BDI includes items such as weight loss, insomnia, somatic preoccupation and irritability, which fail to discriminate between depression and other affective states. The factor structure of the combined BDI and BAI items was virtually identical to that reported by Beck for a sample of diagnosed depressed and anxious patients, supporting the view that these clinical states are more severe expressions of the same states that may be discerned in normals. Implications of the results for the conceptualisation of depression, anxiety and tension/stress are considered, and the utility of the DASS scales in discriminating between these constructs is discussed.

  7. Validity of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory for use in end-stage renal disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loosman, W.L.; Siegert, C.E.H.; Korzec, A.; Honig, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To validate the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for use in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to compare the outcome of both screening measures with each other. Design. Cross-sectional and between-subjects design. The

  8. Cross-cultural examination of measurement invariance of the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Jessica; Watters, Carolyn A; Yu, Stephanie Chee-Min; Bagby, R Michael; Ryder, Andrew G; Harkness, Kate L

    2015-03-01

    Given substantial rates of major depressive disorder among college and university students, as well as the growing cultural diversity on many campuses, establishing the cross-cultural validity of relevant assessment tools is important. In the current investigation, we examined the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) among Chinese-heritage (n = 933) and European-heritage (n = 933) undergraduates in North America. The investigation integrated 3 distinct lines of inquiry: (a) the literature on cultural variation in depressive symptom reporting between people of Chinese and Western heritage; (b) recent developments regarding the factor structure of the BDI-II; and (c) the application of advanced statistical techniques to the issue of cross-cultural measurement invariance. A bifactor model was found to represent the optimal factor structure of the BDI-II. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed that the BDI-II had strong measurement invariance across both culture and gender. In group comparisons with latent and observed variables, Chinese-heritage students scored higher than European-heritage students on cognitive symptoms of depression. This finding deviates from the commonly held view that those of Chinese heritage somatize depression. These findings hold implications for the study and use of the BDI-II, highlight the value of advanced statistical techniques such as multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, and offer methodological lessons for cross-cultural psychopathology research more broadly. 2015 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Response pattern of depressive symptoms among college students: What lies behind items of the Beck Depression Inventory-II?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Junior, Antonio Reis; de Andrade, Arthur Guerra; Andrade, Laura Helena; Gorenstein, Clarice; Wang, Yuan-Pang

    2018-07-01

    This study examines the response pattern of depressive symptoms in a nationwide student sample, through item analyses of a rating scale by both classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory (IRT). The 21-item Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was administered to 12,711 college students. First, the psychometric properties of the scale were described. Thereafter, the endorsement probability of depressive symptom in each scale item was analyzed through CTT and IRT. Graphical plots depicted the endorsement probability of scale items and intensity of depression. Three items of different difficulty level were compared through CTT and IRT approach. Four in five students reported the presence of depressive symptoms. The BDI-II items presented good reliability and were distributed along the symptomatic continuum of depression. Similarly, in both CTT and IRT approaches, the item 'changes in sleep' was easily endorsed, 'loss of interest' moderately and 'suicidal thoughts' hardly. Graphical representation of BDI-II of both methods showed much equivalence in terms of item discrimination and item difficulty. The item characteristic curve of the IRT method provided informative evaluation of item performance. The inventory was applied only in college students. Depressive symptoms were frequent psychopathological manifestations among college students. The performance of the BDI-II items indicated convergent results from both methods of analysis. While the CTT was easy to understand and to apply, the IRT was more complex to understand and to implement. Comprehensive assessment of the functioning of each BDI-II item might be helpful in efficient detection of depressive conditions in college students. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Measuring Depression in a Non-Western War-Affected Displaced Population: Measurement Equivalence of the Beck Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuwan Jayawickreme

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Depression is commonly seen in survivors of conflict and disaster across the world. There is a dearth of research on the validity of commonly used measures of depression in these populations. Measurements of depression that are used in multiple contexts need to meet measurement equivalence, i.e., the instrument measures the same construct in the same manner across different groups. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was administered to female trauma survivors in the United States (n = 268 and female survivors of war in Sri Lanka (n = 149. Three metrics of measurement equivalence—structural, metric, and scalar—were examined. Two- and three-factor structures of the BDI that have been identified in other populations did not provide a good fit for our data. However, a bifactor model revealed a similar general distress dimension across populations, but dissimilar secondary dimensions or subfactors. The Sri Lankan subfactor comprised of predominantly somatic symptoms and the United States subfactor comprised of cognitive and somatic symptoms. While intercepts of individual BDI items differed, their differences seem to be offsetting. Total BDI scores across these two populations are roughly comparable, although caution is recommended when interpreting them. Making comparisons on subscales is not recommended.

  11. Evaluation of the Beck Depression Inventory in a nonclinical student sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignjatović-Ristić, D; Hinić, D; Jović, J

    2012-08-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychological disorders in individuals seeking psychiatric treatment, and a frequent psychological disorder among patients who seek primary healthcare. Therefore, it is vitally important to employ reliable and valid diagnostic instruments and norms, both in clinical and research work to investigate this problem. This article is part of a larger study which has been conducted for ten years now with the aim to create a clearer picture about the level of depression which may be expected in the nonclinical population in Serbia, and in that way provide a basis for comparisons when diagnosing the clinical population. The subsidiary aims were to monitor potential changes in level of depressive reactions within the set time and to examine the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale. The sample consisted of 782 students (40% male, 60% female), mean age = 23.10 years, SD = 1.782. Mean score on the BDI-IA scale was 6.69; SD = 6.412. The study showed no significant relationships between the BDI scores and sociodemographic variables such as age, economic status, and educational profile, but showed significant differences within gender (t (780) = 3.222, p = 0.001). There was also a relatively stable level of depressive reactions in this population over the previous ten years. The Cronbach's coefficient of the BDI scale was alpha = 0.860, with the majority of item-total correlations above 0.37. The three-factor structure represents cognitive aspect, affective component of depression, and somatic problems attached to depression. The cognitive factor prevails in the entire sample, which is in accordance with the Beck theory about dysfunctional attitudes, ie cognitive vulnerability is a psychological predisposition to depression.

  12. Depressive symptoms in breast cancer: Beck Depression Inventory - Short Form

    OpenAIRE

    Cangussu, Renata de Oliveira; Soares, Thiago Barbabela de Castro; Barra, Alexandre de Almeida; Nicolato, Rodrigo

    2010-01-01

    Objetivos: Verificar a prevalência de sintomas depressivos em mulheres com câncer de mama e identificar os fatores de risco associados à sua ocorrência. Métodos: Foi realizado um estudo transversal, em que foram entrevistadas 71 mulheres com câncer de mama. Foram empregados dois instrumentos: um questionário para verificar os dados sociodemográficos e clínicos e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck – Short Form (BDI-SF), para avaliação dos sintomas depressivos. Para análise dos da...

  13. Establishing a common metric for depressive symptoms: linking the BDI-II, CES-D, and PHQ-9 to PROMIS depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung W; Schalet, Benjamin; Cook, Karon F; Cella, David

    2014-06-01

    Interest in measuring patient-reported outcomes has increased dramatically in recent decades. This has simultaneously produced numerous assessment options and confusion. In the case of depressive symptoms, there are many commonly used options for measuring the same or a very similar concept. Public and professional reporting of scores can be confused by multiple scale ranges, normative levels, and clinical thresholds. A common reporting metric would have great value and can be achieved when similar instruments are administered to a single sample and then linked to each other to produce cross-walk score tables (e.g., Dorans, 2007; Kolen & Brennan, 2004). Using multiple procedures based on item response theory and equipercentile methods, we produced cross-walk tables linking 3 popular "legacy" depression instruments-the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (Radloff, 1977; N = 747), the Beck Depression Inventory-II (Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996; N = 748), and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (Kroenke, Spitzer, & Williams, 2001; N = 1,120)-to the depression metric of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS; Cella et al., 2010). The PROMIS Depression metric is centered on the U.S. general population, matching the marginal distributions of gender, age, race, and education in the 2000 U.S. census (Liu et al., 2010). The linking relationships were evaluated by resampling small subsets and estimating confidence intervals for the differences between the observed and linked PROMIS scores; in addition, PROMIS cutoff scores for depression severity were estimated to correspond with those commonly used with the legacy measures. Our results allow clinicians and researchers to retrofit existing data of 3 popular depression measures to the PROMIS Depression metric and vice versa.

  14. Factor structure and clinical utility of the Beck depression inventory in patients with binge eating disorder and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoko; McKee, Sherry A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2015-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is often used to assess depression symptoms, but its factor structure and its clinical utility have not been evaluated in patients with binge eating disorder (BED) and obesity. A total of 882 treatment-seeking obese patients with BED were administered structured interviews (Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I Disorders) and completed self-report questionnaires. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a brief 16-item BDI version with a three-factor structure (affective, attitudinal and somatic). Both 21- and 16-item versions showed excellent internal consistency (both α=0.89) and had significant correlation patterns with different aspects of eating disorder psychopathology; three factors showed significant but variable associations with eating disorder psychopathology. Area under the curves (AUC) for both BDI versions were significant in predicting major depressive disorder (MDD; AUC=0.773 [16-item], 73.5% sensitivity/70.2% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 79.5% sensitivity/64.1% specificity) and mood disorders (AUC=0.763 [16-item], 67.1% sensitivity/71.5% specificity, AUC=0.769 [21-item], 84.2% sensitivity/55.7% specificity). The 21-item BDI (cutoff score ≥16) showed higher negative predictive values (94.0% vs. 93.0% [MDD]; 92.4% vs. 88.3% [mood disorders]) than the brief 16-item BDI (cutoff score ≥13). Both BDI versions demonstrated moderate performance as a screening instrument for MDD/mood disorders in obese patients with BED. Advantages and disadvantages for both versions are discussed. A three-factor structure has potential to inform the conceptualization of depression features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Concurrent Validity of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory Depression Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joel O.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Compared two new measures of depression (Millon Multiaxial Inventory Dysthymia and Major Depression subscales) with two established instruments: Beck Depression Inventory, a self-report measure which emphasizes the cognitive-affective aspects of depression, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, an interview measure that emphasizes somatic…

  16. Validity of the BPRS, the BDI and the BAI in dual diagnosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, M.; Austin, S.F.; Oestrich, I.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The psychometric properties of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were tested in a sample of 134 patients with a substance use disorder and a non-substance related psychiatric disorder in a special inpatient dual...... with and without schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses, and the BDI was able to discriminate between patients with and without mood disorders and schizoaffective disorders at intake to treatment, and each instrument was significantly better than the other at discriminating relevant diagnostic groups. Discriminant...... correlations between the BDI and the BAI were high and statistically significant. Moderator regression analyses showed no indication that any of the scales were less stable at higher levels of thought disorder. CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that dual diagnosis patients can be reliably assessed for symptoms...

  17. Factors associated with risk of depression and relevant predictors of screening for depression in clinical practice: a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Maria; Sodemann, Morten; Gabel, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    importance that may be used to identify patients at risk of depression. METHODS: In 2013, 212 HIV-infected patients were included in a questionnaire study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI-II score ≥ 20 were...... offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors associated with risk of depression. RESULTS: Symptoms of depression (BDI-II score ≥ 14) were observed in 75 patients (35%), and symptoms of moderate to major depression (BDI-II score ≥ 20...

  18. The effect of anxiety and depression scores of couples who ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study data was collected by using a semi-structured questionnaire and the Turkish version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The questionnaire, STAI and BDI were applied to couples who initiated ART treatment. Couples' state anxiety scores were re-evaluated after ...

  19. Selective neurocognitive deficits and poor life functioning are associated with significant depressive symptoms in alcoholism-HIV infection comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Sassoon, Stephanie A.; Rosenbloom, Margaret J.; Fama, Rosemary; Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholism, HIV, and depressive symptoms frequently co-occur and are associated with impairment in cognition and life function. We administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), measures of life function, and neurocognitive tests to 67 alcoholics, 56 HIV+ patients, 63 HIV+ alcoholics, and 64 controls to examine whether current depressive symptom level (significant, BDI-II ≥ 14 vs. minimal, BDI-II < 14) was associated with poorer cognitive or psychosocial function in alcoholism-HIV co...

  20. The construct validity of the Major Depression Inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Germund; Ørnbøl, Eva; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the measurement properties of the ten-item Major Depression Inventory when used on clinical suspicion in general practice by performing a Rasch analysis. Methods General practitioners asked consecutive persons to respond to the web-based Major Depression Inventory...... on clinical suspicion of depression. We included 22 practices and 245 persons. Rasch analysis was performed using RUMM2030 software. The Rasch model fit suggests that all items contribute to a single underlying trait (defined as internal construct validity). Mokken analysis was used to test dimensionality...... for gender, age, work status and education. The Rasch and Mokken analyses revealed two dimensions, but the Major Depression Inventory showed fit to one scale if items 9 and 10 were excluded. Conclusion Our study indicated scalability problems in the current version of the Major Depression Inventory...

  1. Sensitivity and specificity of the Major Depression Inventory in outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noteboom Annemieke

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a new, brief, self-report measure for depression based on the DSM-system, which allows clinicians to assess the presence of a depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV, but also to assess the severity of the depressive symptoms. Methods We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and psychometric qualities of the MDI in a consecutive sample of 258 psychiatric outpatients. Of these patients, 120 had a mood disorder (70 major depression, 49 dysthymia. A total of 139 subjects had a comorbid axis-I diagnosis, and 91 subjects had a comorbid personality disorder. Results Crohnbach's alpha of the MDI was a satisfactory 0.89, and the correlation between the MDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90 was 0.79 (p Conclusion The MDI is an attractive, brief depression inventory, which seems to be a reliable tool for assessing depression in psychiatric outpatients.

  2. Prevalence of depression and its associated factors using Beck Depression Inventory among students of School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz, Iran in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Safiri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression is a debilitating disease which is caused by social and environmental factors in additionto genetic factors. University students are among the young and vulnerable population to depression and theirpopulation is increasing with increase in universities and higher education institutions. Therefore, any disturbance instudent's mental and physical health is a serious threat for the next generation. In this study, we aimed to estimate theprevalence of depression and its related factors in students of School of Health and Nutrition at Tabriz University ofMedical Sciences, Iran. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey on 175 students selected by stratified random sampling, educating indifferent fields at School of Health and Nutrition in 2009. The data collection tool was the short form of the standardBeck Depression Inventory (BDI which is used for screening depression. The collected data were analyzed by softwareStata Statistical Software, Release 10.0 (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA. RESULTS: The results showed that 62.7% of the students had depression and from these 10.9% suffered from severedepression. Significantly higher depression rates were seen in students with worrisome about the future. Marriedstudents, those interested in their field of study, those performing prayers and regularly reading the Quran hadsignificantly lower rates of depression. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the high prevalence of depression, screening strategies should be implemented to identifydepressed students. Counseling services should be available and accessible to students at risk.

  3. Sex Differences in the Expression of Depressive Responses on the Beck Depression Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammen, Constance L.; Padesky, Christine A.

    1977-01-01

    Although epidemiological data have documented sex differences in depression, the nature and origins of the differences are unclear. Depression in a large sample of young, unmarried college students was measured and described by the Beck Depression Inventory. Considers the consequences of sex differences in depressive responses, including…

  4. The Depression Coping Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinke, Chris L.

    College students (N=396), chronic pain patients (N=319), and schizophrenic veterans (N=43) completed the Depression Coping Questionnaire (DCQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Factor analysis of the DCQ identified eleven coping responses: social support, problem solving, self-blame/escape, aggression, indulgence, activities, medication,…

  5. Are variations in whole blood BDNF level associated with the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in patients with first episode depression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann; Bennike, Bente

    2013-01-01

    ). Symptomatology was rated using Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and Becks Depression Inventory (BDI 21). No differences in whole blood BDNF was seen in relation to the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and no significant correlations between whole blood BDNF and HAMD-17 or BDI 21 scores were found...

  6. Computerized adaptive measurement of depression: A simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammen Oommen

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient, accurate instruments for measuring depression are increasingly important in clinical practice. We developed a computerized adaptive version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We examined its efficiency and its usefulness in identifying Major Depressive Episodes (MDE and in measuring depression severity. Methods Subjects were 744 participants in research studies in which each subject completed both the BDI and the SCID. In addition, 285 patients completed the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Results The adaptive BDI had an AUC as an indicator of a SCID diagnosis of MDE of 88%, equivalent to the full BDI. The adaptive BDI asked fewer questions than the full BDI (5.6 versus 21 items. The adaptive latent depression score correlated r = .92 with the BDI total score and the latent depression score correlated more highly with the Hamilton (r = .74 than the BDI total score did (r = .70. Conclusions Adaptive testing for depression may provide greatly increased efficiency without loss of accuracy in identifying MDE or in measuring depression severity.

  7. Simple and practical screening approach to identify HIV-infected individuals with depression or at risk of developing depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjær, Lotte Ørneborg; Gabel, Charlotte; Laursen, Tinne

    2016-01-01

    of depression. METHODS: The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) was used to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms among HIV-infected individuals attending two out-patient clinics in Denmark. HIV-infected individuals with a BDI-II score ≥ 20 were offered a clinical evaluation...... by a consultant psychiatrist. The BDI-II score was compared to the outcome of mental health history review, and to results obtained using the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) two-item depression screening tool. RESULTS: A total of 501 HIV-infected individuals were included in the study. Symptoms of moderate....../major depression (BDI-II score ≥ 20) were observed in 111 patients (22%); 65 of these patients consulted a psychiatrist, of whom 71% were diagnosed with a co-existing disorder. The BDI-II score was compared to the outcome of a mental health history review, and to results obtained using the European AIDS Clinical...

  8. Assessment of depression in medical patients: a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Pang; Gorenstein, Clarice

    2013-09-01

    To perform a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory for detecting depression in medical settings, this article focuses on the revised version of the scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II), which was reformulated according to the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. We examined relevant investigations with the Beck Depression Inventory-II for measuring depression in medical settings to provide guidelines for practicing clinicians. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria seventy articles were retained. Validation studies of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, in both primary care and hospital settings, were found for clinics of cardiology, neurology, obstetrics, brain injury, nephrology, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, oncology, and infectious disease. The Beck Depression Inventory-II showed high reliability and good correlation with measures of depression and anxiety. Its threshold for detecting depression varied according to the type of patients, suggesting the need for adjusted cut-off points. The somatic and cognitive-affective dimension described the latent structure of the instrument. The Beck Depression Inventory-II can be easily adapted in most clinical conditions for detecting major depression and recommending an appropriate intervention. Although this scale represents a sound path for detecting depression in patients with medical conditions, the clinician should seek evidence for how to interpret the score before using the Beck Depression Inventory-II to make clinical decisions.

  9. Depression in patients with HIV is under-diagnosed: a cross-sectional study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, L; Laursen, T; Balle, N

    2009-01-01

    and to detect factors of importance for the development of depression. Methods In 2005, a population of 205 HIV-positive patients was included in a questionnaire-based study. The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) was used to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI......Background International studies suggesting that 20-37% of HIV-positive patients have diagnosable depression may underestimate the prevalence of this condition. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression among HIV-positive patients in an out-patient clinic in Denmark...... score of 20 or above were offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Results Symptoms of depression (BDI>14) were observed in 77 (38%) patients and symptoms of major depression (BDI>/=20) in 53 (26%). Eighteen patients subsequently started treatment with anti-depressants. In a reduced...

  10. A Study of the Predictive Validity of the Children's Depression Inventory for Major Depression Disorder in Puerto Rican Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Medina, Carmen L.; Bernal, Guillermo; Rossello, Jeannette; Cumba-Aviles, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the predictive validity of the Children's Depression Inventory items for major depression disorder (MDD) in an outpatient clinic sample of Puerto Rican adolescents. The sample consisted of 130 adolescents, 13 to 18 years old. The five most frequent symptoms of the Children's Depression Inventory that best predict the…

  11. Beck Depression Inventory-II: Factor Analyses with Three Groups of Midlife Women of African Descent in the Midwest, the South, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Faye A; Yarandi, Hossein; Evans, Edris; Still, Carolyn; Mickels, Prince; Hassan, Mona; Campbell, Doris; Conic, Ruzica

    2018-03-01

    This research encompasses a factor analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), which involves three groups of midlife women of African descent who reside in the Midwest, the South, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The purpose of the study was to determine the factor structure of the BDI-II when administered to a sample of women aged 40-65 of African descent who reside in the three distinct geographical regions of the United States. A correlational, descriptive design was used, and 536 women of African descent were invited to participate in face-to-face interviews that transpired in community settings. Results of the factor analysis revealed a two-factor explanation. Factor one included symptoms such as punishment feelings and pessimism (cognitive), and the second factor included symptoms such as tiredness and loss of energy (somatic-affective). The application of the Beck Depression Inventory-II among the three groups of women generated specific information about each group and common findings across the groups. Knowledge gained from the research could help to guide specific intervention programs for the three groups of women, and explicate the common approaches that could be used for the three groups.

  12. Association of Beck Depression Inventory score and Temperament and Character Inventory-125 in patients with eating disorders and severe malnutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshida, Keizo; Katayama, Hiroto; Kohmura, Kunihiro; Kawano, Naoko; Imaeda, Miho; Kato, Saki; Ando, Masahiko; Aleksic, Branko; Nishioka, Kazuo; Ozaki, Norio

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated the association between personality and physical/mental status in malnourished patients with eating disorders. A total of 45 patients with anorexia nervosa, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, and other specified feeding or eating disorders were included and compared with 39 healthy controls. Personality characteristics and severity of depression were assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory-125 and Beck?s Depression Inventory. Depression correlat...

  13. Vitamin D Supplementation Affects the Beck Depression Inventory, Insulin Resistance, and Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrmanesh, Zahra; Kolahdooz, Fariba; Abedi, Fatemeh; Mazroii, Navid; Assarian, Amin; Asemi, Zatollah; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D may decrease depression symptoms through its beneficial effects on neurotransmitters, metabolic profiles, biomarkers of inflammation, and oxidative stress. This study was designed to assess whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce symptoms of depression, metabolic profiles, serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in 40 patients between 18 and 65 y of age with a diagnosis of MDD based on criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either a single capsule of 50 kIU vitamin D/wk (n = 20) or placebo (n = 20) for 8 wk. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and postintervention to quantify relevant variables. The primary [Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which examines depressive symptoms] and secondary (glucose homeostasis variables, lipid profiles, hs-CRP, and biomarkers of oxidative stress) outcomes were assessed. Baseline concentrations of mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D were significantly different between the 2 groups (9.2 ± 6.0 and 13.6 ± 7.9 μg/L in the placebo and control groups, respectively, P = 0.02). After 8 wk of intervention, changes in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were significantly greater in the vitamin D group (+20.4 μg/L) than in the placebo group (-0.9 μg/L, P stress. This trial was registered at www.irct.ir as IRCT201412065623N29. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Prevalence of depression and its associated factors using Beck Depression Inventory among students of a medical college in Karnataka

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ganesh S.; Jain, Animesh; Hegde, Supriya

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: Depression among medical students is an area of increasing concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of depression and its associated factors among medical students. Materials and Methods: A stratified random sample of 400 students was assessed using Beck Depression Inventory by investigators. Associations between depression and class of studying, social factors like alcohol use, drug addiction, family problems, family history of depression, and st...

  15. The Relationship of Depression, Gender, and Sex Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Cutler, Scott V.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between gender and depression as a function of sex roles. Four hundred twenty subjects were recruited from two introductory psychology courses at Utah State University. Subjects completed the Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A difference was found in the rate of depression between females and males that exceeds the generally accepted 2:1 ratio. There was a female to male ratio of approximately 4...

  16. The codes WAV3BDY and WAV4BDY and the variational Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavilla, R.

    1987-01-01

    A description of the codes WAV3BDY and WAV4BDY, which generate the variational ground state wave functions of the A=3 and 4 nuclei, is given, followed by a discussion of the Monte Carlo integration technique, which is used to calculate expectation values and transition amplitudes of operators, and for whose implementation WAV3BDY and WAV4BDY are well suited

  17. The Depression Inventory Development Workgroup: A Collaborative, Empirically Driven Initiative to Develop a New Assessment Tool for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Anthony L; Evans, Kenneth R; Kalali, Amir H; Kennedy, Sidney H; Engelhardt, Nina; Frey, Benicio N; Greist, John H; Kobak, Kenneth A; Lam, Raymond W; MacQueen, Glenda; Milev, Roumen; Placenza, Franca M; Ravindran, Arun V; Sheehan, David V; Sills, Terrence; Williams, Janet B W

    2016-01-01

    The Depression Inventory Development project is an initiative of the International Society for CNS Drug Development whose goal is to develop a comprehensive and psychometrically sound measurement tool to be utilized as a primary endpoint in clinical trials for major depressive disorder. Using an iterative process between field testing and psychometric analysis and drawing upon expertise of international researchers in depression, the Depression Inventory Development team has established an empirically driven and collaborative protocol for the creation of items to assess symptoms in major depressive disorder. Depression-relevant symptom clusters were identified based on expert clinical and patient input. In addition, as an aid for symptom identification and item construction, the psychometric properties of existing clinical scales (assessing depression and related indications) were evaluated using blinded datasets from pharmaceutical antidepressant drug trials. A series of field tests in patients with major depressive disorder provided the team with data to inform the iterative process of scale development. We report here an overview of the Depression Inventory Development initiative, including results of the third iteration of items assessing symptoms related to anhedonia, cognition, fatigue, general malaise, motivation, anxiety, negative thinking, pain and appetite. The strategies adopted from the Depression Inventory Development program, as an empirically driven and collaborative process for scale development, have provided the foundation to develop and validate measurement tools in other therapeutic areas as well.

  18. Depression Subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale applied preoperatively in spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of the Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D in spine surgery, comparing it to Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, the HADS-D and the BDI were applied to patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar (n=139 or cervical spondylosis (n=17. Spearman correlation tests for HADS-D and BDI were applied. The internal consistency of HADS-D was estimated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. RESULTS: According to the BDI, the prevalence of depression was of 28.8% (n=45. The Spearman r coefficient between HADS-D and BDI was 0.714 (p10, there was a sensitivity of 71.1%, specificity of 95.4%, and positive likelihood-ratio of 15.78. CONCLUSIONS: HADS-D showed a strong correlation with BDI and good reliability. HADS-D is a good alternative for screening depression and assessing its severity.

  19. Depression and self-esteem: rapid screening for depression in black, low literacy, hospitalized tuberculosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, M S; Wolmarans, L

    1992-11-01

    One hundred black hospitalized tuberculosis (TB) patients (75 males and 25 females) were interviewed to ascertain levels of depression and self-esteem. The standard of literacy for 65% of the sample was such that they were unable to complete a self-report inventory. Reliability (internal consistency) was good for the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI: r = 0.79), the 13-item shortened BDI (ABDI: r = 0.76) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (RSE: r = 0.78). There was a significant positive relationship between the BDI and the ABDI (r = 0.92, P = 0.0001). The recommended ABDI cut-off scores established no depression for 32 patients, mild depression for 22 patients, moderate depression for 38 patients and severe depression for 8 patients. There were significant negative relationships between the BDI and the RSE (r = -0.54, P = 0.0001), and between the ABDI and the RSE (r = -0.56, P = 0.0001). Self-esteem scores dropped in accordance with category of depression, revealing that low self-esteem is a characteristic feature of depression. It was concluded that the ABDI was a reliable, rapid, initial screening device for depression in black persons with low literacy levels.

  20. Factors in Outcomes of Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy for Chronic vs. Nonchronic Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    LUBORSKY, LESTER; DIGUER, LOUIS; CACCIOLA, JOHN; BARBER, JACQUES P.; MORAS, KARLA; SCHMIDT, KELLY; DERUBEIS, ROBERT J.

    1996-01-01

    The benefits, and variables influencing the benefits, of short-term dynamic psychotherapy for chronic major depression versus nonchronic major depression were examined for 49 patients. The two diagnostic groups started at the same level on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) and benefited similarly. The bases for the benefits were examined by linear models explaining 35% of termination BDI variance and 47% of termination GAF scores. By far the largest contributor to outcome was initial GAF, followed by presence of more than one comorbid Axis I diagnosis. Initial level of depression on the BDI was not a significant predictor of termination BDI. The chronic/ nonchronic distinction accounted for less than 1% of explained variance, and little was added by personality disorder, age, or gender. PMID:22700274

  1. Discrepancies between self and observer ratings of depression. The relationship to demographic, clinical and personality variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enns, M W; Larsen, D K; Cox, B J

    2000-10-01

    The observer-rated Hamilton depression scale (HamD) and the self-report Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) are among the most commonly used rating scales for depression, and both have well demonstrated reliability and validity. However, many depressed subjects have discrepant scores on these two assessment methods. The present study evaluated the ability of demographic, clinical and personality factors to account for the discrepancies observed between BDI and HamD ratings. The study group consisted of 94 SCID-diagnosed outpatients with a current major depressive disorder. Subjects were rated with the 21-item HamD and completed the BDI and the NEO-Five Factor Inventory. Younger age, higher educational attainment, and depressive subtype (atypical, non-melancholic) were predictive of higher BDI scores relative to HamD observer ratings. In addition, high neuroticism, low extraversion and low agreeableness were associated with higher endorsement of depressive symptoms on the BDI relative to the HamD. In general, these predictive variables showed a greater ability to explain discrepancies between self and observer ratings of psychological symptoms of depression compared to somatic symptoms of depression. The study does not determine which aspects of neuroticism and extraversion contribute to the observed BDI/HamD discrepancies. Depression ratings obtained with the BDI and HamD are frequently discordant and a number of patient characteristics robustly predict the discrepancy between these two rating methods. The value of multi-modal assessment in the conduct of research on depressive disorders is re-affirmed.

  2. Can depression be diagnosed by response to mother's face? A personalized attachment-based paradigm for diagnostic fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Objective measurement of depression remains elusive. Depression has been associated with insecure attachment, and both have been associated with changes in brain reactivity in response to viewing standard emotional and neutral faces. In this study, we developed a method to calculate predicted scores for the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II using personalized stimuli: fMRI imaging of subjects viewing pictures of their own mothers. METHODS: 28 female subjects ages 18-30 (14 healthy controls and 14 unipolar depressed diagnosed by MINI psychiatric interview were scored on the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II and the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI coherence of mind scale of global attachment security. Subjects viewed pictures of Mother (M, Friend (F and Stranger (S, during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Using a principal component regression method (PCR, a predicted Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II score was obtained from activity patterns in the paracingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 32 and compared to clinical diagnosis and the measured BDI-II score. The same procedure was performed for AAI coherence of mind scores. RESULTS: Activity patterns in BA-32 identified depressed subjects. The categorical agreement between the derived BDI-II score (using the standard clinical cut-score of 14 on the BDI-II and depression diagnosis by MINI psychiatric interview was 89%, with sensitivity 85.7% and specificity 92.8%. Predicted and measured BDI-II scores had a correlation of 0.55. Prediction of attachment security was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Brain activity in response to viewing one's mother may be diagnostic of depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging using personalized paradigms has the potential to provide objective assessments, even when behavioral measures are not informative. Further, fMRI based diagnostic algorithms may enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms of depression by

  3. Meta-Analysis of the English Version of the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erford, Bradley T.; Johnson, Erin; Bardoshi, Gerta

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed 144 studies from 1996 to 2013 using the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition. Internal consistency was 0.89 and test-retest reliability 0.75. Convergent comparisons were robust across 43 depression instruments. Structural validity supported both one- and two-factor solutions and diagnostic accuracy varied according…

  4. Relationship of Children´Depression Inventory Factor Structure to School Achievement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fráňová, Lenka; Lukavský, Jiří; Preiss, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 4 (2008), s. 383-394 ISSN 0039-3320 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70250504 Keywords : Children’s Depression Inventory * depressive symptoms * school achievement Subject RIV: AN - Psychology Impact factor: 0.258, year: 2008

  5. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on Self-Compassion in Patient with Mixed Anxiety- Depression Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Katayoun Pasdar; Jafar Hasani; Robabeh Noury

    2017-01-01

    Introduction and Aims The aim of the present study was the evaluation of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy efficacy on self-compassion of patients with mixed anxiety-depression disorder.  Materials and Methods Three participants with mixed anxiety-depression disorder were selected by available sampling. Participants evaluated 9 times by Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Neff self-compassion Scale (SCS). For data analysis, we employed procedur...

  6. The relationship between the severity of depression and cognitive coping strategies in patients with depressive episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-feng HU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the relationship between the depressive mood and cognitive emotion regulation strategies.  Methods: A total of 143 major depression patients were assessed with a self-designed questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the Chinese version of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ-C and the twenty-item Toronto Scale (TAS-20, and 95 healthy people were involved as controls. Regression analysis was carried out for the influcing factors to depressive mood. Results: Compared with controls, Patients with Depressive Episode showed significantly higher total scores of inadaptability strategy,TAS and BDI(P<0.01. There were lots of factors, such as domestic stress and maladaptive strategy showed significant correlation with total score of BDI in major depression (P<0.05 or P<0.01. The factors of domestic stress and maladaptive strategy et al entered the regression equation for BDI by turns. Conclusions: Patients with depression suffered from maladaptive strategy. Cognitive coping strategies and stressl were the important influence factors of depression emotion in patients with depression.

  7. Comparing depression screening tools in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Joshua; Santo, Jonathan B; Blair, Mervin; Smolewska, Kathy; Warriner, Erin; Morrow, Sarah A

    2017-02-01

    Depression is more common among persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) than the general population. Depression in MS is associated with reduced quality of life, transition to unemployment, and cognitive impairment. Two proposed screening measures for depression in MS populations are the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Beck Depression Inventory-Fast Screen (BDI-FS). Our objective was to compared the associations of the BDI-FS and the HADS-D scores with history of depressive symptoms, fatigue, and functional outcomes to determine the differential clinical utility of these screening measures among persons with MS. We reviewed charts of 133 persons with MS for demographic information; scores on the HADS, BDI-FS, a fatigue measure, and a processing speed measure; and employment status. Structural equation modeling results indicated the HADS-D predicted employment status, disability status, and processing speed more effectively than did the BDI-FS, whereas both measures predicted fatigue. This study suggests the HADS-D is more effective than the BDI-FS in predicting functional outcomes known to be associated with depression among persons with MS. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Pattern classification of brain activation during emotional processing in subclinical depression : psychosis proneness as potential confounding factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Modinos, Gemma; Mechelli, Andrea; Pettersson-Yeo, William; Allen, Paul; McGuire, Philip; Aleman, Andre

    2013-01-01

    We used Support Vector Machine (SVM) to perform multivariate pattern classification based on brain activation during emotional processing in healthy participants with subclinical depressive symptoms. Six-hundred undergraduate students completed the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). Two groups

  9. Learning context conditions for BDI plan selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, D.; Sardina, S.; Padgham, L.; Airiau, S.; van der Hoek, W.; Kaminka, G.A.; Lespérance, Y.; Luck, M.; Sen, S.

    2010-01-01

    An important drawback to the popular Belief, Desire, and Intentions (BDI) paradigm is that such systems include no element of learning from experience. In particular, the so-called context conditions of plans, on which the whole model relies for plan selection, are restricted to be boolean formulas

  10. Health anxiety and depression in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçar, Mehmet; Sarp, Ümit; Karaaslan, Özgül; Gül, Ali Irfan; Tanik, Nermin; Arik, Hasan Onur

    2015-10-01

    To investigate health anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Patients with FMS and healthy control subjects were recruited. All participants completed the Health Anxiety Inventory Short Form (HAI-SF) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Pain was assessed in patients with FMS using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). This study involved 95 patients with FMS (15 male) and 95 healthy controls (17 male). Mean ± SD HAI-SF and BDI scores were significantly higher in patients with FMS = than in controls=. HAI-SF scores were 23.50 ± 10.78 and 9.38 ± 4.24 respectively; BDI scores were 18.64 ± 10.11 and 6.21 ± 4.05 respectively. There were highly significant correlations between FIQ and HAI-SF, FIQ and BDI, and HAI-SF and BDI. Patients with FMS had significantly higher HAI-SF and BDI scores than healthy controls. Psychiatric support is essential for patients with FMS. Treatment should include biological, psychological and social approaches. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. The validity of dysthymia to predict clinical depressive symptoms as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale at the 5-year follow-up of patients with first episode depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Per; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2016-11-01

    In long-term follow-up studies on depression, the Eysenck Neuroticism Scale (ENS) at the score level of dysthymia has been found to be valid at predicting poor outcome. The ENS dysthymia level was compared with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) level to predict the prevalence of depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up of patients initially diagnosed with first episode depression using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) to express depressive symptoms. A total of 301 in- or outpatients aged 18-70 years with a recent single depressive episode were assessed by ENS, BDI, and HAM-D from 2005-2007. At 5-year follow-up from 2011-2013, the participants were re-assessed by HAM-D. The HAM-D was used to measure depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. The Mokken analysis was used to indicate scalability of the BDI and ENS. A total of 185 participants were available for the psychometric analysis of the ESN and BDI, and the scalability was found acceptable. In total, 99 patients were available for the predictive analysis. Both the ENS and the BDI were significantly associated with depressive symptoms (HAM-D17 ≥ 8) at the 5-year follow-up (p Dysthymia as measured by the two self-rating scales ENS and BDI can be considered part of a 'double depression' in patients with first episode depression, implying an existence of depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. Evaluation of dysthymia or neuroticism is important to perform, even in patients with first episode depression, in order to identify 'double depression'.

  12. The Role of Depression and Attachment Styles in Predicting Students? Addiction to Cell Phones

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasempour, Abdollah; Mahmoodi-Aghdam, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed at investigating the role of depression and attachment styles in predicting cell phone addiction. Methods In this descriptive correlational study, a sample including 100 students of Payame Noor University (PNU), Reyneh Center, Iran, in the academic year of 2013-2014 was selected using volunteer sampling. Participants were asked to complete the adult attachment inventory (AAI), Beck depression inventory-13 (BDI-13) and the cell phone overuse scale (COS). Find...

  13. Interferon-induced depression in patients with hepatitis C: an epidemiologic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Pereira Jorge de Medeiros

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the incidence rate and severity of depressive symptoms in different time points (12, 24 and 48 weeks in Brazilian patients with HCV treated with PEG IFN plus ribavirin. Methods We conducted an observational prospective study using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D. Results Fifty patients were included. The assessments with either scale showed the highest score of depressive symptoms in the 24th week of treatment; the mean BDI score before treatment was 6.5 ± 5.3 and the mean CES-D was 10.9 ± 7.8. After 24 weeks, the mean BDI was 16.1 ± 10.2 and mean CES-D was 18.6 ± 13.0; 46% were diagnosed with depression according to combined BDI and CES-D scores. The somatic/psychomotor subscales were highly correlated with overall scale scores . Subjects with history of substance and alcohol abuse had higher risk for IFN-induced depression. Conclusion Treatment with PEG IFN was associated with a high incidence rate of depressive symptoms in this sample of Brazilian patients, as measured by CES-D and BDI. Alcohol and substance abuse increase the risk of PEG IFN-induced depression.

  14. Breast cancer and body image as a prognostic factor of depression: a case study in México City

    OpenAIRE

    María J. Aguilar Cordero

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Being diagnosed with breast cancer is devastating for women because they face a sense of loss. Since this loss is observed by the women themselves as well as by those around them, this can often lead to depression. Objectives: (1) To verify a possible association between body image and depression; (2) To establish a relation between depression and time since breast cancer diagnosis. Method: The data came from the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Body Image Scale (BIS),...

  15. Assessing Measurement Invariance of the Children's Depression Inventory in Chinese and Italian Primary School Student Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenfeng; Lu, Yongbiao; Tan, Furong; Yao, Shuqiao; Steca, Patrizia; Abela, John R. Z.; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the measurement invariance of Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and compared its factorial variance/covariance and latent means among Chinese and Italian children. Multigroup confirmatory factor analysis of the original five factors identified by Kovacs revealed that full measurement invariance did not hold. Further analysis…

  16. Validation of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) in Cocaine Dependent Inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suris, Alina; Kashner, T. Michael; Gillaspy, James A., Jr.; Biggs, Melanie; Rush, A. John

    2001-01-01

    While the reliability and validity of Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) scores have been established with outpatient adults being treated in community psychiatric clinics, it has not been used in special or dually diagnosed populations. Establishes internal consistency, concurrent validity, and construct validity for both the clinical…

  17. Patterns of self-reported depressive symptoms in relation to morningness-eveningness in inpatients with a depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias Johannes; Olschinski, Christiane; Kundermann, Bernd; Cabanel, Nicole

    2016-05-30

    The stable and persisting preference for activities in the late evening (i.e. eveningness) is associated with a higher risk for depression, suicidality, and non-remission in major depression. The present study investigated symptom patterns in hospitalized patients with depressive syndromes in relation to morningness-eveningness (chronotypes). Depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI-II]) and chronotype (German version of the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire [D-MEQ]) were assessed after admission and before discharge in inpatients with mainly major depression. Group differences of BDI-II single items and three BDI-II factors (cognitive, affective, somatic) between patients divided at the D-MEQ sample median into "morning preference" (MP) and "evening preference" (EP) were calculated. Data from 64 consecutively admitted patients (31MP/33EP) were analyzed. Both groups (MP/EP) were comparable regarding age, sex, diagnosis, length of stay, and subjective sleep quality, BDI-II scores were significantly higher in EP than in MP at admission. At admission and discharge, cognitive symptoms were significantly more pronounced in EP vs. MP; non-significant differences between EP and MP were found for affective and somatic symptoms. The results underline the importance of the trait-like chronotype for severity and symptomatology in patients with depressive disorders. The patients' chronotype should be taken into account in diagnostics and treatment of depressive disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The immediate effects of taping therapy on knee pain and depression in patients with degenerative arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Won; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Park, Chi-Bok

    2018-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to identify the immediate effects of taping therapy on knee pain and depression among patients with degenerative arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] In total, 32 patients with degenerative arthritis were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the experimental group that underwent taping therapy and the control group that underwent regular treatment (16 patients per group). In the experimental group, therapeutic tape was wrapped all around the knee joint. Pain and depression were measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), respectively. [Results] The intra-group comparison showed significant differences in VAS and BDI for the experimental group. The intergroup comparison showed that the differences in VAS and BDI within the experimental group appeared significant relative to the control group. [Conclusion] It was observed that taping therapy showed an immediate effect in decreasing knee pain and depression among patients with degenerative arthritis.

  19. Which increases depressive symptoms in obese patients, hypertension or diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakir Özgür Keskek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression and obesity are common disorders. Obesity is also predictive of several chronic diseases like hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare depression frequency of obese patients with hypertension or diabetes. Methods: Weight, height and body mass index (BMI were measured. The definition of obesity was a body mass index (weight (kg/height (m2 ≥30 kg/m2. Obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were documented. All participants had a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI evaluation. Results: A total of 389 subjects were included, of whom 100, 101, 92, 96 participants were healthy, obese, obese with hypertension, obese with diabetes, respectively. Beck Depression Inventory scores of obese patients, obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were higher compared to the control group. BDI scores of obese patients with diabetes were higher compared to obese and obese with hypertension subjects.

  20. Prevalence of Depression among High School Students and its Relation to Family Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Daryanavard; Abdoulhossain Madani; Mohammad S. Mahmoodi; Shafei Rahimi; Fatemeh Nourooziyan; Mahmood Hosseinpoor

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: Depression is common in adolescents and especially in high school students. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression among high school students and its relation to parental configurations. Approach: A cross-sectional study was conducted during first term of the academic year 2003-2004. Data was collected by Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire (BDI-21 test) and researcher made questionnaire for demographic characteristics, using census procedur...

  1. Relationship between plasma glutamate levels and post-stroke depression in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱方媛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the association between the plasma glutamate levels during acute ischemic stroke andpost-stroke depression(PSD)initially.Methods Seventy-four ischemic stroke patients admitted to the hospital within the first day of stroke onset were evaluated at a follow-up of 2 weeks.The Beck Depression Inventory(BDI,21-item)and DSM-Ⅳcriteria was used to diagnose post-stroke depression(PSD)at 2 weeks after stroke.

  2. HOW DEPRESSION AND SOCIAL MEDIA PREFERENCES AFFECT FINANCIAL INVESTMENT&GAMBLING RISK TAKING BEHAVIOURS

    OpenAIRE

    YALVAC HAMURCU, H. Dilek; HAMURCU, Çağrı

    2017-01-01

    This study mainly examines the relationship between financial investment and gambling risk-taking tendencies and depression. In addition, how financial investment and gambling risk taking attitudes and depression level change with respect to age, gender and social media preferences are also analyzed in this study. DOSPERT Scale with subscales of financial investment and gambling and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) are used for evaluating financial investment&gambling risk-taking tende...

  3. Using the University Student Depression Inventory to Investigate the Effect of Demographic Variables on Students' Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Duncanson, Krystle

    2008-01-01

    Depression is a problem in the student population and may impact students of any age, gender and ethnicity. Previous studies have indicated student demographic characteristics are associated with depression; however, these studies have not utilised scales specifically designed to measure depression in the student population. The aim of the present…

  4. Sintomas depressivos no câncer de mama: Inventário de Depressão de Beck - Short Form Depressive symptoms in breast cancer: Beck Depression Inventory - Short Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Oliveira Cangussu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Verificar a prevalência de sintomas depressivos em mulheres com câncer de mama e identificar os fatores de risco associados à sua ocorrência. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo transversal, em que foram entrevistadas 71 mulheres com câncer de mama. Foram empregados dois instrumentos: um questionário para verificar os dados sociodemográficos e clínicos e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck - Short Form (BDI-SF, para avaliação dos sintomas depressivos. Para análise dos dados, utilizaram-se medidas descritivas e o teste de qui-quadrado, que avaliou a associação entre variáveis sociodemográficas e clínicas e os sintomas depressivos. O nível de significância considerado foi de 5%. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de sintomas depressivos foi de 29,6%. Os fatores associados à presença desses sintomas foram o tratamento quimioterápico (p = 0,021, presença de dor (p = 0,018 e limitação do movimento do membro superior (p = 0,010 e pior percepção da saúde (p = 0,018. CONCLUSÃO: Sintomas depressivos são frequentes no câncer de mama, assim a saúde mental das mulheres com esse tipo de câncer deve ser investigada e tratada quando necessário, reduzindo o impacto desses sintomas na vida da mulher.OBJECTIVES: To verify the prevalence of depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer and identify risk factors associated to its occurrence. METHODS: It was a transversal study where 71 women with breast cancer were interviewed. Two instruments were applied, being one questionnaire used to verify sociodemographic and clinical data, and the Beck Depression Inventory - Short Form to evaluate depressive symptoms. Descriptive methods and chi-square test were utilized to analyze data, evaluating association between depressive symptoms, sociodemographic and clinical data. Significance level was considered of 5%. RESULTS: Depressive symptoms prevalence was 29,6%. Factors associated to the presence of this kind of symptoms were

  5. Therapeutic horticulture in clinical depression: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil W; Kirkevold, Marit

    2009-01-01

    Clinically depressed persons suffer from impaired mood and distortion of cognition. This study assessed changes in depression severity and perceived attentional capacity of clinically depressed adults (N=18) during a 12-week therapeutic horticulture program. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Attentional Function Index (AFI) were administered at baseline, twice during (4 and 8 weeks), and immediately after the intervention (12 weeks), and at a 3-month follow-up. Experiences of being away and fascination related to the intervention were measured at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The mean BDI score declined 9.7 points from pretest (27.3) to posttest (p or =6) for 72% of the cases. The mean AFI score increased 10.2 points from pretest (68.8) to posttest (p = .06). The greatest change in BDI and AFI scores occurred in the initial weeks of the intervention. The reduction in BDI scores remained significant and clinically relevant at the 3-month follow-up (N=16). The decline in depression severity during the intervention correlated strongly with the degree to which the participants found that it captured their attention. Therapeutic horticulture may decrease depression severity and improve perceived attentional capacity by engaging effortless attention and interrupting rumination.

  6. Depression in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Safaie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is one of the Common psychological disorders. From the cognitive point of view, the unhealthy attitudes increase the severity of the depression. The aim of this study was to investigate depression and unhealthy attitudes in coronary patients hospitalized at Tabriz Shahid Madani Heart Center. Methods: One hundred twenty eight hospitalized patients having myocardial Infarctions were studied regarding unhealthy attitudes, severity of depression and demographic data. Results: The study showed a significant relation between unhealthy attitudes, BDI (Beck Depression Inventory and severe depression. Moreover, a significant relation existed between gender and depression (P=0.0001. In addition, the level of education increased the intensity of unhealthy attitudes (P=0.0001. Several researches in both outside and inside Iran support the idea. Conclusion: Based on present study and more other investigations, it can be suggested to provide the necessary elements and parameters such as antidepressant medication, psychologists, complementary treatment for coping with negative mood and its unwanted consequences.

  7. Psychometric evaluation of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) as depression severity scale using the LEAD (Longitudinal Expert Assessment of All Data) as index of validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Timmerby, N; Martiny, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) was developed to cover the universe of depressive symptoms in DSM-IV major depression as well as in ICD-10 mild, moderate, and severe depression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the standardization of the MDI as a depression severity......-IV major depression. The conventional VAS scores for no, mild, moderate, and severe depression were used for the standardization of the MDI. RESULTS: The inter-correlation for the MDI with the clinician ratings (VAS, MES, HAM-D17 and HAM-D6) increased over the rating weeks in terms of Pearson coefficients....... After nine weeks of therapy the coefficient ranged from 0.74 to 0.83. Using the clinician-rated VAS depression severity scale, the conventional MDI cut-off scores for no or doubtful depression, and for mild, moderate and severe depression were confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: Using the VAS as index of external...

  8. The post-stroke depression and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients of a rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaricai, Elena; Poenaru, Dan V

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability and a major public health problem. To determine frequency and degree of post-stroke depression (PSD) and its impact on functioning in young and adult stroke patients in a rehabilitation unit. The study included 72 stroke patients (aged 29-59 years) who were attending rehabilitation. The patients were assessed for depressive symptoms by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and their functioning by using the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) and the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Forty-eight patients had different degrees of depression: borderline clinical depression (13.8%), moderate depression (34.7%), severe depression (15.2%) or extreme depression (2.9%). There were no significant differences of BDI scores in 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years groups. Statistically significant correlations were between BDI score and SIS score, between BDI score and ADL index, and between SIS score and ADL index in men, women and total study patients. More than half of the PSD patients had a moderate degree of depression. Significant correlations were noticed between depressive symptoms and functional status evaluated both by an instrument of assessing stroke impact upon general health and an instrument for assessing the everyday activities.

  9. A meta-analytic comparison of the Beck Depression Inventory and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression as measures of treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B C; Lambert, M J; Moran, P W; McCully, T; Smith, K C; Ellingson, A G

    1984-05-01

    Some clinicians have considered the Beck Depression Inventory, a self-rating scale, too reactive to patient halo effects and, therefore, a liberal measure of treatment outcome. On the other hand, interviewer-rating scales, like the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression have been viewed as more conservative measures of treatment gain. Studies which compared the Beck Depression Inventory to the Hamilton Rating Scale, as dependent measures, were reviewed for the purpose of determining if the scales provided comparable data for assessing treatment effects. The use of meta-analysis techniques resulted in a comparison of effect sizes which indicated that the Beck Depression Inventory was significantly less liberal than the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. The implications of these results for selecting outcome measures and the application of meta-analysis techniques for comparing dependent measures are discussed.

  10. The structure and dimensionality of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self Report (IDS-SR) in patients with depressive disorders and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardenaar, Klaas J.; van Veen, Tineke; Giltay, Erik J.; den Hollander-Gijsman, Margien; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Zitman, Frans G.

    Background: The Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self Report (IDS-SR) is a widely used but heterogeneous measure of depression severity. Insight in its factor structure and dimensionality could help to develop more homogeneous IDS-SR subscales. However previous factoranalytical studies have

  11. The effects of the gender-culture interaction on self-reports of depressive symptoms: cross-cultural study among Egyptians and Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Vivian; Beshai, Shadi; Yu, Mabel

    2016-01-01

    Research in depression has revealed differences in the way depressed individuals across cultures report their symptoms. This literature also points to possible differences in symptom reporting patterns between men and women. Using data from a larger dataset (Beshai et al. 2016), the current study examined whether non-depressed and depressed Egyptian and Canadian men and women differed in their self-report of the various domains of the Beck Depression Inventory -II (BDI-II). We recruited a total of 131 depressed and non-depressed participants from both Egypt ( n = 29 depressed; n = 29 non-depressed) and Canada ( n = 35 depressed; n = 38 non-depressed). Depression status was ascertained using a structured interview. All participants were asked to complete the BDI-II along with other self-report measures of depression. BDI-II items were divided into two subscales in accordance with Dozois, Dobson & Ahnberg (1998) factor analysis: cognitive-affective and somatic-vegetative subscales. We found a significant three-way interaction effect on the cognitive-affective ( F (1,121) = 9.51, p = .003) and main effect of depression status on somatic-vegetative subscales ( F (1,121) = 42.80, p cultures may differentially report cognitive symptoms of depression. These results also suggest that clinicians and clinical scientists need to further examine the interaction effect of culture and gender when investigating self-reported symptoms of depression.

  12. Qualitative Characteristics of Depression in Parkinson's Patients and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritzinger, Cleo; Vollstedt, Eva-Juliane; Hückelheim, Katja; Lorwin, Anne; Graf, Julia; Tunc, Sinem; Klein, Christine; Kasten, Meike

    2015-01-01

    Depression is common in Parkinson's disease (PD); in light of typical PD pathology it may differ phenomenologically from depression in the general population. To assess depressive symptoms in PD patients and control groups and compare symptom profiles. After postal screening of 10,000 citizens of Lübeck, 642 participants were examined and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was sufficiently answered by 477 subjects. Based on motor examinations, we distinguished PD patients, Healthy Controls (HC, no motor impairment), and Disease Controls (DC, motor impairment other than PD). The sample comprised 331 men and 311 women, aged 65 ± 8 years. Out of the overall sample, 198 (41.5%) had a BDI score ≥9. BDI results above 9 points occurred in 34.5% of HC, 50.3% of DC, and 42.4% of PD patients. Compared to the control groups (HC, DC) the PD patients endorsed more "dissatisfaction" and "loss of appetite" but less "feelings of guilt," "self-hate," and "loss of libido." Depressive symptoms are more frequent in PD patients compared to HC but not DC. Interestingly, the distribution of individual symptoms of the BDI differs between groups with an emphasis on loss of pleasure/enjoyment in the PD group, a symptom typically considered to be dopaminergically transmitted.

  13. Pain, depression and sleep disorders in patients with diabetic and nondiabetic carpal tunnel syndrome: a vicious cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Tanik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a condition involving nerve entrapment that often leads to chronic neuropathic pain. We aimed to evaluate sleep quality and related parameters in diabetic and non-diabetic CTS patients. Method This study included a total of 366 patients with chronic CTS. These patients’ sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and depression using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. The severity of neuropathic pain was evaluated using the Douleur Neuropathique-4 (DN4 questionnaire and a visual analogue scale (VAS. Results In the non-diabetic patient group, the total PSQI score was found to affect BDI and VAS, while in the diabetic patient group, the duration of symptoms affected VAS, BDI and fasting glucose levels. Conclusion For diabetic patients, hyperglycemia depression and chronification of neuropathic pain may lead to deterioration of sleep quality. Therefore, consideration of these parameters in the treatment may break a vicious cycle.

  14. Self-statements, self-esteem, and locus of control in discriminating college students' scores on the Beck Depression Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, S; Philpot, V D

    1996-04-01

    To study the use of the ratio of positive to negative self-statements, locus of control, and self-esteem in discriminating between scores on the Beck Depression Inventory 145 undergraduate college students were administered the Beck Depression Inventory, Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire-Revised, Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory-Adult Form, and the Rotter Locus of Control scale in their classrooms. A stepwise discriminant analysis indicated that five variables combined to yield a statistically significant discrimination among low, middle, and high scores on the Beck Depression Inventory. The classification analysis indicated that 77.1% (n = 111) of the undergraduate students were correctly classified; 93.2% (82 of 88) were correctly classified as low scorers and 73.3% (18 of 46) were correctly classified as high scorers.

  15. Effects of Research Setting on Observed Depressive Symptoms in Marijuana Users

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, John J.; Haney, Margaret; Hart, Carl L.; Vosburg, Suzanne K.; Levin, Frances R.

    2009-01-01

    A post hoc analysis examined depressive symptoms in regular marijuana smokers interested in nontreatment, laboratory studies and marijuana-dependent treatment-seekers considering clinical trial participation. Among marijuana-dependent treatment-seeking patients screened for a clinical trial, the mean Beck Depression Inventory Score (BDI) was significantly higher than for marijuana-using volunteers screened for non-treatment laboratory studies. Mean self-reported baseline marijuana use was not...

  16. An evaluation of the quick inventory of depressive symptomatology and the hamilton rating scale for depression: a sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression trial report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, A John; Bernstein, Ira H; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Carmody, Thomas J; Wisniewski, Stephen; Mundt, James C; Shores-Wilson, Kathy; Biggs, Melanie M; Woo, Ada; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Fava, Maurizio

    2006-03-15

    Nine DSM-IV-TR criterion symptom domains are evaluated to diagnose major depressive disorder (MDD). The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) provides an efficient assessment of these domains and is available as a clinician rating (QIDS-C16), a self-report (QIDS-SR16), and in an automated, interactive voice response (IVR) (QIDS-IVR16) telephone system. This report compares the performance of these three versions of the QIDS and the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17). Data were acquired at baseline and exit from the first treatment step (citalopram) in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial. Outpatients with nonpsychotic MDD who completed all four ratings within +/-2 days were identified from the first 1500 STAR*D subjects. Both item response theory and classical test theory analyses were conducted. The three methods for obtaining QIDS data produced consistent findings regarding relationships between the nine symptom domains and overall depression, demonstrating interchangeability among the three methods. The HRSD17, while generally satisfactory, rarely utilized the full range of item scores, and evidence suggested multidimensional measurement properties. In nonpsychotic MDD outpatients without overt cognitive impairment, clinician assessment of depression severity using either the QIDS-C16 or HRSD17 may be successfully replaced by either the self-report or IVR version of the QIDS.

  17. Zinc monotherapy increases serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and decreases depressive symptoms in overweight or obese subjects: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solati, Zahra; Jazayeri, Shima; Tehrani-Doost, Mehdi; Mahmoodianfard, Salma; Gohari, Mahmood Reza

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have shown a positive effect of zinc as an adjunctive therapy on reducing depressive symptoms. However, to our knowledge, no study has examined the effect of zinc monotherapy on mood. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of zinc monotherapy on depressive symptoms and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in overweight or obese subjects. Fifty overweight or obese subjects were randomly assigned into two groups and received either 30 mg zinc or placebo daily for 12 weeks. At baseline and post-intervention, depression severity was assessed using Beck depression inventory II (BDI II), and serum BDNF and zinc levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry, respectively. The trial was completed with 46 subjects. After a 12-week supplementation, serum zinc and BDNF levels increased significantly in the zinc-supplemented group compared with the placebo group. BDI scores declined in both the groups at the end of the study, but reduction in the zinc-supplemented group was significantly higher than the placebo group. More analysis revealed that following supplementation, BDI scores decreased in subgroup of subjects with depressive symptoms (BDI ≥ 10) (n = 30), but did not change in the subgroup of non-depressed subjects (BDI BDNF levels and depression severity in all participants. Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was found between serum BDNF and zinc levels at baseline. Zinc monotherapy improves mood in overweight or obese subjects most likely through increasing BDNF levels.

  18. Narcolepsy and depression Narcolepsia e depressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Adda

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy main symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Its chronic course is accompanied by psychosocial impairment added to the difficulties and side effects of stimulants and tricyclics long term use. Depressive complaints are occasionally reported. The aim of this paper was to evaluate objectively the possibility of depression in a sample of 12 narcoleptics (7F;5 M, with mean age of 53 years (12 years SD, using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D. The results showed absence of depressive disorder in 75.0% of the cases according to BDI (or 58.3% according to HAM-D. The remaining patients had mild depression (only one patient presented major depression. The findings showed no correlation between narcolepsy and major depression.Narcolepsia é um distúrbio do sono caracterizado por sonolência diurna excessiva e ataques de cataplexia. Sendo crônico, traz uma série de dificuldades psicossociais às quais se aliam aquelas geradas pelos efeitos colaterais dos estimulantes e tricíclicos utilizados. Queixas depressivas são encontradas ocasionalmente. Esta pesquisa buscou verificar objetivamente a ocorrência de depressão em narcolépticos. Foi avaliado um grupo de 12 pacientes narcolépticos (7F; 5M com média de idade de 53 anos (DP 12 usando-se como instrumentos o Inventário de Beck para Depressão (BDI e a Escala Hamilton de Depressão (HAM-D. Os resultados demonstraram ausência de distúrbio depressivo em 75.0% dos pacientes avaliados pelo BDI e em 58.3% pela HAM-D. Os demais escores evidenciaram depressão leve ou disforia; depressão maior foi encontrada em apenas um caso. Tais achados não sugerem correlação entre narcolepsia e depressão.

  19. Depression Is Associated With Muscle Mass And Strength In Patients With End Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Rim Song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is the most common psychiatric complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Sarcopenia, defined as loss of muscle mass and strength, is expected to be associated with depression, because both are closely linked to physical inactivity and functional impairment. We investigated the association of sarcopenia with depression in patients with ESRD. A total of 115 patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD were included in this study. Muscle mass was assessed by lean tissue index (LTI using portable whole body bioimpedance spectroscopy, and muscle strength was measured with handgrip strength (HGS. Depression was defined as Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II score ≥16. About 60% of prevalent HD patients had depression. Compared to subjects without depression, depressed patients had a higher prevalence of sarcopenia (45.5 vs. 8.2%, p<0.001 and significantly increased serum IL-6 and hs-CRP level. However, (prealbumin and body mass index (BMI failed to correlate with BDI-II. HGS and LTI had a consistent negative effect on BDI-II even after adjusting other parameters including inflammation. In multivariate analysis, lower , increased IL-6 and β2-microglobulin,and sarcopenia were significant predictors for depression; sarcopenia was most powerful [odds ratio 9.01, 95% CI 3.60-12.22, p=0.001]. In conclusion, the prevalence of sarcopenia and depression was considerably high and and the presence of sarcopenia was an important predictor for depression.

  20. A multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of sildenafil citrate in Canadian men with erectile dysfunction and untreated symptoms of depression, in the absence of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Sidney H; Dugré, Hélène; Defoy, Isabelle

    2011-05-01

    Depression and erectile dysfunction (ED) often co-occur. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are effective in men with ED and untreated depression, or ED secondary to antidepressants. This study evaluated sildenafil treatment in Canadian men with clinically diagnosed ED (Sexual Health Inventory for Men score ≤ 21) and mild-to-moderate untreated depressive symptoms [Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) score 14-28], but excluding major depressive disorder. Pretreatment screening using the Sexual Health Inventory for Men and BDI-II showed that men with ED were more likely to have depression than men without ED, and ED severity was a predictor of depression (P=0.0226). Two hundred and two men were randomized to 6 weeks of double-blind treatment with placebo (n=98) or sildenafil (n=104), initial dose of 50 mg, adjustable to 25 or 100 mg. The men were evaluated on all domains of the International Index of Erectile Function and the Sex Effects Questionnaire, Global Efficacy Questions, and Event-log data. Compared with placebo, patients treated with sildenafil had significantly greater changes from baseline in BDI-II scores (P<0.001). All International Index of Erectile Function domains and the Sex Effects Questionnaire components were also significantly improved in sildenafil group (P<0.01). The most common adverse events included headache, dyspepsia, vasodilatation, and respiratory tract infections and were generally mild in intensity. 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  1. Normative data for female adolescents with eating disorders on the Children's Depression Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hunna J; Egan, Sarah J; Limburg, Karina; Hoiles, Kimberley J

    2014-09-01

    Given the importance of assessing depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in adolescents with eating disorders (EDs), the aim was to provide normative data on the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) for female adolescents presenting for treatment of an ED. The data source was the Helping to Outline Paediatric Eating Disorders (HOPE) Project registry (N = 1000), a prospective, ongoing registry study comprising consecutive pediatric tertiary ED referrals. Females (N = 256; 12-17 years) with DSM-5 EDs completed the CDI at intake. Results on the CDI revealed a pattern of increasing depressive scores with age and higher scores among patients with anorexic spectrum disorders. The prevalence of suicidal ideation was high and had the same pattern as CDI scores. The mean score on the CDI in the sample was higher than community samples and clinical samples of adolescents with post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other clinical disorders. Females adolescents with EDs are at high-risk of depression and suicidal ideation. These data provide information about variation in CDI scores to guide clinicians in interpretation of scores. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Reliability, validity and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the Major Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiptsios I

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a brief self-rating scale for the assessment of depression. It is reported to be valid because it is based on the universe of symptoms of DSM-IV and ICD-10 depression. The aim of the current preliminary study was to assess the reliability, validity and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the MDI. Methods 30 depressed patients of mean age 23.41 (± 5.77 years, and 68 controls patients of mean age 25.08 (± 11.42 years, entered the study. In 18 of them, the instrument was re-applied 1–2 days later and the Translation and Back Translation made. Clinical diagnosis was reached with the use of the SCAN v.2.0 and the International Personality Disorders Examination (IPDE. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D and the Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS were applied for cross-validation purposes. Statistical analysis included ANOVA, the Spearman Product Moment Correlation Coefficient, Principal Components Analysis and the calculation of Cronbach's α. Results Sensitivity and specificity were 0.86 and 0.94, respectively, at 26/27. Cronbach's α for the total scale was equal to 0.89. The Spearman's rho between MDI and CES-D was 0.86 and between MDI and ZDRS was 0.76. The factor analysis revealed two factors but the first accounted for 54% of variance while the second only for 9%. The test-retest reliability was excellent (Spearman's rho between 0.53 and 0.96 for individual items and 0.89 for total score. Conclusion The current study provided preliminary evidence concerning the reliability and validity of the Greek translation of the MDI. Its properties are similar to those reported in the international literature, but further research is necessary.

  3. The criterion validity of the web-based Major Depression Inventory when used on clinical suspicion of depression in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Germund; Ørnbøl, Eva; Bech, Per

    2017-01-01

    the web-based MDI in a primary care setting. The validation was based on the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI) by phone. GPs in the 22 practices in our study included 132 persons suspected of depression. Depression was rated as yes/no according to the MDI and M-CIDI. Sensitivity......BACKGROUND: The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) is widely used in Danish general practice as a screening tool to assess depression in symptomatic patients. Nevertheless, no validation studies of the MDI have been performed. The aim of this study was to validate the web-based version of the MDI...... against a fully structured telephone interview in a population selected on clinical suspicion of depression (ie, presence of two or three core symptoms of depression) in general practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: General practitioners (GPs) invited consecutive persons suspected of depression to complete...

  4. [Two simple questions to diagnose post-stroke depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, C H; Müller-Nordhorn, J; Jungehülsing, G J; Rossnagel, K; Reich, A; Roll, S; Laumeier, I; Beerfelde, D; Willich, S N; Villringer, A

    2006-05-01

    Many patients develop a depression after having suffered a stroke. Such a Post-Stroke Depression (PSD) impairs rehabilitation and quality of life. PSD is underdiagnosed in spite of available treatment. Several questionnaires have been created to diagnose a PSD. But questionnaires have been considered cumbersome and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to find out whether two simple, standardised questions will identify those stroke patients, who have developed a PSD. The two case-finding questions and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were sent to patients of the Berlin Acute Stroke Study (BASS) four years after their stroke. Incomplete questionnaires were complemented via mail or telephone. Severity of depression was assessed by means of BDI. Out of 211 patients, 199 responded to the questionnaire (94 %). 193 questionnaires were complete (97 %). Forty-two patients affirmed both case-finding questions (22 %). Compared to patients, who did not affirm both questions, these patients had a higher BDI score (19 +/- 8 vs. 7 +/- 5; p two questions were 89 % and 90 %, respectively. The positive and negative predictive value were 60 % and 98 % respectively. The number of confirmed questions (0, 1, 2) correlated well with the BDI score (r (2) = 0.67, p Two standardized questions can identify patients with PSD for further diagnostic evaluation and therapy. Diagnosis of PSD might be facilitated by using them as screening instrument.

  5. A study of depression among Alexandria preparatory school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Nazel, M W; Fahmy, S I; Younis, I A; Seif el-Din, A G; Abdel Fatah, M; Mokhtar, S; Ayoub, A I

    1991-01-01

    Using a constructed Arabic version of Children Depression Inventory (CDI), screening of a stratified random sample of 1% (1561) of Alexandria Preparatory school adolescents was carried out. The prevalence of depressive scorers was 10.25% of total sample. A sub-sample of depressed scorers (111 pupils) were compared with controls (non-depressed scorers) matched on age and sex to study a variety of personal, familial, medical and scholastic ecological variables. Pupils neuroticism scorers were most predictive of depressive scorers where they explained 59.79% of the variance. Other ecological factors including peer and sibling relationships, introversive and lie scale scorers and scholastic performance explained an additional 14.87% of the variance. Using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Mother-Father relationship check list, a sub-sample of depressed pupils' mothers were compared with controls of non-depressed pupils' mothers (42 mothers for each). Results indicated a strong positive correlation between pupils, CDI scores and their mothers BDI scores. On the other hand poor mother-father relationship was significantly associated with depressive scores of pupils. Findings, pointed to the need for reconsideration of school mental health program, since the presented medical and social services to depressed pupils were very poor.

  6. Selective neurocognitive deficits and poor life functioning are associated with significant depressive symptoms in alcoholism-HIV infection comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Stephanie A; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Fama, Rosemary; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2012-09-30

    Alcoholism, HIV, and depressive symptoms frequently co-occur and are associated with impairment in cognition and life function. We administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), measures of life function, and neurocognitive tests to 67 alcoholics, 56 HIV+ patients, 63 HIV+ alcoholics, and 64 controls to examine whether current depressive symptom level (significant, BDI-II>14 vs. minimal, BDI-IIalcoholism-HIV comorbidity. Participants with significant depressive symptoms demonstrated slower manual motor speed and poorer visuospatial memory than those with minimal depressive symptoms. HIV patients with depressive symptoms showed impaired manual motor speed. Alcoholics with depressive symptoms showed impaired visuospatial memory. HIV+ alcoholics with depressive symptoms reported the poorest quality of life; alcoholics with depressive symptoms, irrespective of HIV status, had poorest life functioning. Thus, significant depressive symptoms were associated with poorer selective cognitive and life functioning in alcoholism and in HIV infection, even though depressive symptoms had neither synergistic nor additive effects on cognition in alcoholism-HIV comorbidity. The results suggest the relevance of assessing and treating current depressive symptoms to reduce cognitive compromise and functional disability in HIV infection, alcoholism, and their comorbidity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between online social networking and depression in high school students: behavioral physiology viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Igor; Damjanovic, Aleksandar; Todorovic, Jovana; Topalovic, Dubravka; Bojovic-Jovic, Dragana; Ristic, Sinisa; Pantic, Senka

    2012-03-01

    Frequent use of Facebook and other social networks is thought to be associated with certain behavioral changes, and some authors have expressed concerns about its possible detrimental effect on mental health. In this work, we investigated the relationship between social networking and depression indicators in adolescent population. Total of 160 high school students were interviewed using an anonymous, structured questionnaire and Back Depression Inventory - second edition (BDI-II-II). Apart from BDI-II-II, students were asked to provide the data for height and weight, gender, average daily time spent on social networking sites, average time spent watching TV, and sleep duration in a 24-hour period. Average BDI-II-II score was 8.19 (SD=5.86). Average daily time spent on social networking was 1.86 h (SD=2.08 h), and average time spent watching TV was 2.44 h (SD=1.74 h). Average body mass index of participants was 21.84 (SD=3.55) and average sleep duration was 7.37 (SD=1.82). BDI-II-II score indicated minimal depression in 104 students, mild depression in 46 students, and moderate depression in 10 students. Statistically significant positive correlation (psocial networking. Our results indicate that online social networking is related to depression. Additional research is required to determine the possible causal nature of this relationship.

  8. Reduced Anxiety and Depression in Patients With Advanced Heart Failure After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Gardner; Bhat, Geetha; Mahoney, Edward; Tatooles, Antone

    Despite the high prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients with advanced heart failure, the effects of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation on these critically important aspects of mental health are not well understood. We sought to assess changes in depression and anxiety following LVAD implantation. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were administered to 54 patients by a clinical psychologist at a mean of 12 days before LVAD implantation and 251 days after implantation. Patient demographics and clinical data were collected concurrently to psychologic testing. Changes in BDI-II, BAI, and clinical markers of heart failure were assessed using paired t-tests. A p Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy modified for inpatients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Andrew C; Hooke, Geoff R

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness among inpatients with depression of a modified cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program was examined. A group of 300 inpatient admissions with a primary diagnosis of depression attending a private psychiatric clinic were assessed at the beginning and end of a two-week CBT program. The effectiveness of the treatment was demonstrated by improvements on the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the health of the nation outcome scales, locus of control of behaviour scale, and the global assessment of function. The changes on the BDI for patients with depression were benchmarked against estimates generated from published studies. The degree of change in a two-week period for inpatients with depression was similar to that observed in efficacy studies of CBT that typically run over a more extended time. Implications for integrating CBT with inpatient services are discussed.

  10. The Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self Report (IDS-SR: Psychometric properties of the Indonesian version.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retha Arjadi

    Full Text Available Depression screening and examination in Indonesia are highly challenging due to the disproportionately low number of mental health professionals in comparison to the Indonesian population. Self-report questionnaires on depression are cost-effective and time-efficient. The current study investigates the psychometric properties of the Indonesian Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self Report (IDS-SR.The participants were 904 Indonesians (aged 16-61; 50.2% female, recruited via an online survey using Qualtrics. Confirmatory factor analysis of the one-factor, three-factor, and four-factor model were explored. Convergent and divergent validity of the total score of the Indonesian IDS-SR and each factor were examined, as well as the Cronbach's Alpha reliability. In addition, an optimal cut-off score for the Indonesian IDS-SR was established using ROC curve analysis.The three-factor model of "cognitive/mood", "anxiety/arousal", and "sleep disturbance" was the best fit with the Indonesian IDS-SR data. Convergent and divergent validity were good. Cronbach's Alpha reliability was excellent for the total score, good for the factors "cognitive/mood" and "anxiety/arousal", but insufficient for the factor "sleep disturbance". The optimal cut-off score of the Indonesian IDS-SR was 14, with 87% sensitivity and 86% specificity.As a multifactorial instrument to measure depression that has good validity and reliability, the Indonesian IDS-SR can be used to assess depressive symptoms for the purpose of research and clinical practice. The optimal cut-off score of the Indonesian IDS-SR is in accordance with the internationally used cut-off score.

  11. The effects of the gender-culture interaction on self-reports of depressive symptoms: cross-cultural study among Egyptians and Canadians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Research in depression has revealed differences in the way depressed individuals across cultures report their symptoms. This literature also points to possible differences in symptom reporting patterns between men and women. Using data from a larger dataset (Beshai et al. 2016, the current study examined whether non-depressed and depressed Egyptian and Canadian men and women differed in their self-report of the various domains of the Beck Depression Inventory –II (BDI-II. Method We recruited a total of 131 depressed and non-depressed participants from both Egypt (n = 29 depressed; n = 29 non-depressed and Canada (n = 35 depressed; n = 38 non-depressed. Depression status was ascertained using a structured interview. All participants were asked to complete the BDI-II along with other self-report measures of depression. BDI-II items were divided into two subscales in accordance with Dozois, Dobson & Ahnberg (1998 factor analysis: cognitive-affective and somatic-vegetative subscales. Results We found a significant three-way interaction effect on the cognitive-affective (F(1,121 = 9.51, p = .003 and main effect of depression status on somatic-vegetative subscales (F(1,121 = 42.80, p < .001. Post hoc analyses revealed that depressed Egyptian men reported lower scores on the cognitive-affective subscale of the BDI-II compared to their depressed Canadian male counterparts. Conclusions These results suggest that males across cultures may differentially report cognitive symptoms of depression. These results also suggest that clinicians and clinical scientists need to further examine the interaction effect of culture and gender when investigating self-reported symptoms of depression.

  12. The construct validity of the Major Depression Inventory: A Rasch analysis of a self-rating scale in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Marie Germund; Ørnbøl, Eva; Vestergaard, Mogens; Bech, Per; Christensen, Kaj Sparle

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to assess the measurement properties of the ten-item Major Depression Inventory when used on clinical suspicion in general practice by performing a Rasch analysis. General practitioners asked consecutive persons to respond to the web-based Major Depression Inventory on clinical suspicion of depression. We included 22 practices and 245 persons. Rasch analysis was performed using RUMM2030 software. The Rasch model fit suggests that all items contribute to a single underlying trait (defined as internal construct validity). Mokken analysis was used to test dimensionality and scalability. Our Rasch analysis showed misfit concerning the sleep and appetite items (items 9 and 10). The response categories were disordered for eight items. After modifying the original six-point to a four-point scoring system for all items, we achieved ordered response categories for all ten items. The person separation reliability was acceptable (0.82) for the initial model. Dimensionality testing did not support combining the ten items to create a total score. The scale appeared to be well targeted to this clinical sample. No significant differential item functioning was observed for gender, age, work status and education. The Rasch and Mokken analyses revealed two dimensions, but the Major Depression Inventory showed fit to one scale if items 9 and 10 were excluded. Our study indicated scalability problems in the current version of the Major Depression Inventory. The conducted analysis revealed better statistical fit when items 9 and 10 were excluded. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Combined detection of depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients using the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy and the World Health Organization well-being index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Pilebæk; Amiri, Moshgan

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To validate the Danish version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E), and compare it with the World Health Organization index for psychological well-being (WHO-5) as screening tests for depression and anxiety in epilepsy patients. METHODS: Epilepsy...... outpatients filled out NDDI-E and WHO-5. A Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) as gold standard for psychiatric diagnoses was carried out with every patient. RESULTS: We included 124 epilepsy patients. According to MINI, 5% had depression without anxiety, 6% anxiety without depression, and 6...... there are 17% false positives. CONCLUSION: NDDI-E in Danish is valid and slightly better than WHO-5 in the detection of depression in epilepsy patients. WHO-5 is valid for the detection of anxiety disorders. Combined use of NDDI-E and WHO-5 is recommended, since 95% of all epilepsy patients with depression and...

  14. Depression in Nursing Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

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    F Rafati

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: University students are important parts of all educational systems. They are susceptible to different psychiatric disturbances, which in turn may cause considerable problems with their course programs. Depression is among the most important indices for investigation on human mental health status. This research was planed to study the prevalence and characteristics of depression and its consequences (suicidality, hopelessness, etc. in nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All undergraduate nursing students at Fatemeh College of Nursing and Midwifery were tested with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: This research revealed that 60% of students were depressed, 34% of them had mild depression, 18.4% moderate, 6% relatively severe and 1.6% severe depression. Mean score of BDI was not significantly different between female and male subjects (13.8 ± 9 in females vs. 15.2 ± 10 in males; total 14.1 ± 11 Conclusions: This research shows that there is still a high proportion of University students having depression, which necessitates considerable attention to their problems. Keywords: Nursing Students, Beck Depression Inventory, Depression.

  15. Factors associated with risk of depression and relevant predictors of screening for depression in clinical practice: a cross-sectional study among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot, M; Sodemann, M; Gabel, C; Holmskov, J; Laursen, T; Rodkjaer, L

    2015-08-01

    Depression and psychiatric disorders are frequent among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of depression and describe the psychiatric history of HIV-infected individuals in an out-patient clinic in Denmark and to identify factors of clinical importance that may be used to identify patients at risk of depression. In 2013, 212 HIV-infected patients were included in a questionnaire study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) to assess the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms. Patients with a BDI-II score ≥ 20 were offered a clinical evaluation by a consultant psychiatrist. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors associated with risk of depression. Symptoms of depression (BDI-II score ≥ 14) were observed in 75 patients (35%), and symptoms of moderate to major depression (BDI-II score ≥ 20) in 55 patients (26%). There was also a high prevalence of co-occurring mental illness. In a multivariate model, self-reported stress, self-reported perception that HIV infection affects all aspects of life, self-reported poor health, not being satisfied with one's current life situation, previous alcohol abuse, nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy and previously having sought help because of psychological problems were independently associated with risk of depression. Symptoms of depression and co-occurring mental illness are under-diagnosed and under-treated among HIV-infected individuals. We recommend that screening of depression should be conducted regularly to provide a full psychiatric profile to decrease the risk of depression and improve adherence and quality of life in this population. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  16. Geriatric depression and its relation with cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Carol; Tartaglini, María Florencia; Stefani, Dorina; Salgado, Pablo; Taragano, Fernando E; Allegri, Ricardo F

    2014-01-01

    Different subtypes of depressive syndromes exist in late life; many of them have cognitive impairment and sometimes it is difficult to differentiate them from dementia. This research aimed to investigate subtypes of geriatric depression associated with cognitive impairment, searched for differential variables and tried to propose a study model. A hundred and eighteen depressive patients and forty normal subjects matched by age and educational level were evaluated with an extensive neuropsychological battery, scales to evaluate neuropsychiatric symptoms and daily life activities (DLA). Depressive patients were classified in groups by SCAN 2.1: Major Depression Disorder (MDD) (n: 31), Dysthymia Disorder (DD) (n: 31), Subsyndromal Depression Disorder (SSD) (n: 29), Depression due to Dementia (n: 27) (DdD). Neuropsychological significant differences (pdepressive groups, demonstrating distinctive cognitive profiles. Moreover, significant differences (pdepression. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) were significant variables that helped to differentiate depressive groups. Significant correlations between BDI and Neuropsychological tests were found in MDD and DD groups. Depressive symptoms and its relation with neuropsychological variables, MMSE, cognitive profiles, DLA and age of onset of depression should be taken into consideration for the study of subtypes of geriatric depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychometrics of the PHQ-9 as a measure of depressive symptoms in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammash, Muna H; Hall, Lynne A; Lennie, Terry A; Heo, Seongkum; Chung, Misook L; Lee, Kyoung Suk; Moser, Debra K

    2013-10-01

    Depression in patients with heart failure commonly goes undiagnosed and untreated. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) is a simple, valid measure of depressive symptoms that may facilitate clinical assessment. It has not been validated in patients with heart failure. To test the reliability, and concurrent and construct validity of the PHQ-9 in patients with heart failure. A total of 322 heart failure patients (32% female, 61 ± 12 years, 56% New York Heart Association class III/IV) completed the PHQ-9, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and the Control Attitudes Scale (CAS). Cronbach's alpha of .83 supported the internal consistency reliability of the PHQ-9 in this sample. Inter-item correlations (range .22-.66) and item-total correlation (except item 9) supported homogeneity of the PHQ-9. Spearman's rho of .80, (p < .001) between the PHQ-9 and the BDI-II supported the concurrent validity as did the agreement between the PHQ-9 and the BDI-II (Kappa = 0.64, p < .001). At cut-off score of 10, the PHQ-9 was 70% sensitive and 92% specific in identifying depressive symptoms, using the BDI-II scores as the criterion for comparison. Differences in PHQ-9 scores by level of perceived control measured by CAS (t(318) = -5.05, p < .001) supported construct validity. The PHQ-9 is a reliable, valid measure of depressive symptoms in patients with heart failure.

  18. Qualitative Characteristics of Depression in Parkinson’s Patients and Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleo Kritzinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Depression is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD; in light of typical PD pathology it may differ phenomenologically from depression in the general population. Objective. To assess depressive symptoms in PD patients and control groups and compare symptom profiles. Methods. After postal screening of 10,000 citizens of Lübeck, 642 participants were examined and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was sufficiently answered by 477 subjects. Based on motor examinations, we distinguished PD patients, Healthy Controls (HC, no motor impairment, and Disease Controls (DC, motor impairment other than PD. Results. The sample comprised 331 men and 311 women, aged 65 ± 8 years. Out of the overall sample, 198 (41.5% had a BDI score ≥9. BDI results above 9 points occurred in 34.5% of HC, 50.3% of DC, and 42.4% of PD patients. Compared to the control groups (HC, DC the PD patients endorsed more “dissatisfaction” and “loss of appetite” but less “feelings of guilt,” “self-hate,” and “loss of libido.” Conclusion. Depressive symptoms are more frequent in PD patients compared to HC but not DC. Interestingly, the distribution of individual symptoms of the BDI differs between groups with an emphasis on loss of pleasure/enjoyment in the PD group, a symptom typically considered to be dopaminergically transmitted.

  19. The Interaction of Mastalgia with Depression and Quality of Life in Turkish Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Eryilmaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The interaction of mastalgia with the severity of depression and quality of life is examined. Material and Method: This study was performed on 105 women screened for breast cancer having no organic pathology causing mastalgia. The severity of pain, depression, and quality of life were evaluated through Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36. Results: The mean VAS and BDI scores were 5 (1-10 and 17 (2-41, respectively. Of the patients, 49% (n=51 were referred to psychiatry polyclinics. Accordingly, 58% were depressive, 30% were anxious and 4% were depressive and anxious. The patients obtained the highest scores from physical and social functioning domains of SF-36. A moderate negative association was detected between age and physical function (PF (r=-0.235, p=0.01, while there was a mild positive association between age and vitality energy (r=0.198, p=0.04. There was a mild negative association between BDI and PF (r=-0.146, while there were good positive associations between BDI and mental health and mental component summary scores (r=-0.563, r=-0.559. Moderate negative associations were detected between VAS and eight domains and 2 summary scores of SF-36. Discussion: Mastalgia negatively effected the life quality of women, psychological factors should be considered.  

  20. The validity of dysthymia to predict clinical depressive symptoms as measured by the Hamilton Depression Scale at the 5-year follow-up of patients with first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In long-term follow-up studies on depression, the Eysenck Neuroticism Scale (ENS) at the score level of dysthymia has been found to be valid at predicting poor outcome. AIMS: The ENS dysthymia level was compared with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) level to predict the prevalence...... of depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up of patients initially diagnosed with first episode depression using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) to express depressive symptoms. METHODS: A total of 301 in- or outpatients aged 18-70 years with a recent single depressive episode were assessed by ENS, BDI......, and HAM-D from 2005-2007. At 5-year follow-up from 2011-2013, the participants were re-assessed by HAM-D. The HAM-D was used to measure depressive symptoms at the 5-year follow-up. The Mokken analysis was used to indicate scalability of the BDI and ENS. RESULTS: A total of 185 participants were available...

  1. Depression and anxiety among parents of phenylketonuria children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Mehmet; Arslan, Nur; Unal, Ozlem; Cakar, Sevim; Kuyum, Pınar; Bulbul, Selda F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the existence of depression and/or anxiety with underlying risk factors among parents of children with classical phenylketonuria (PKU). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Division of Pediatric Metabolism, Ankara Children’s Hospital, Dokuz Eylul University, Kırıkkale University, and Erzurum Local Research Hospital, Turkey, between January and July 2014. Parents of 61 patients and 36 healthy controls completed the self-report questionnaires. We used Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) to assess the parental depression and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory S-T (STAI S-T) to assess parental anxiety. Results: Depression and anxiety scores were significantly higher in the case group (BDI 12.3±9.1; STAI-S: 38.2±9.6; STAI-T: 43.2±6.9) than controls (BDI: 5.4±4.1 p=0.000; STAI-S: 31.8±7.6 p=0.001; STAI-T: 37.0±7.2 p=0.000). Mothers of the patients had higher scores than the other parental groups (BDI: p=0.000, STAI-S: p=0.001 and STAI-T: p=0.000). Logistic regression analysis showed that low educational level of the parent was the only independent factor for depression (OR 9.96, 95% CI: 1.89-52.35, p=0.007) and state anxiety (OR: 6.99, 95% CI: 1.22-40.48, p=0.030) in the case group. Conclusion: A subset of parents with PKU patients have an anxiety or depressive disorder. Supportive services dealing with the parents of chronically ill children such as PKU are needed in order to reduce the level of anxiety. PMID:26492114

  2. Work and home stress: associations with anxiety and depression symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L-B; Blumenthal, J A; Watkins, L L; Sherwood, A

    2015-03-01

    In the evolving work environment of global competition, the associations between work and home stress and psychological well-being are not well understood. To examine the impact of psychosocial stress at work and at home on anxiety and depression. In medically healthy employed men and women (aged 30-60), serial regression analyses were used to determine the independent association of psychosocial stress at work and at home with depression symptoms, measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and anxiety symptoms, measured using the Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Psychosocial stress at work was measured using the Job Content Questionnaire to assess job psychological demands, job control, job social support and job insecurity. Psychosocial stress at home was assessed by 12 questions including stress at home, personal problems, family demands and feelings about home life. Serial regression analyses in 129 subjects revealed that job insecurity and home stress were most strongly associated with depression and anxiety symptoms. Job insecurity accounted for 9% of the variation both in BDI-II scores and in STAI scores. Home stress accounted for 13 and 17% of the variation in BDI-II scores and STAI scores, respectively. In addition, job social support was significantly and independently associated with STAI scores but not BDI-II scores. Work and home stress were associated with anxiety and depression symptoms in both men and women. Both work and home stress should be considered in studies evaluating anxiety and depression in working populations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. [The prevention of depression in pregnancy and the post-partum: when to intervene?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iapichino, Elena; Quartieri Bollani, Marta; Cauli, Gilla; Gala, Costanzo

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the presence of anxious-depressive symptoms and risk factors and discuss the method of intervention used with women in pregnancy and post-partum. The mood of the woman was assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), personality traits with the Vulnerable Personality Style Questionnaire (VPSQ) and social support through the Social Provisions Scale (PPS). 50 women have completed the evaluation. In line with the international literature, the presence of anxiety-depressive symptoms is accompanied by the presence of multiple risk factors, in particular the familiar seems to be a predisposing factor.

  4. The Applicability of Cognitive Mediational and Moderational Models to Explain Children's Depression Inventory Factor Scores in Urban Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinemann, Dawn H. S.; Teeter Ellison, Phyllis A.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation examined whether cognition serves as a direct factor, mediates, or moderates the relationship between stressful life events and Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 1992) factor scores in urban, ethnic minority youth. Ninety-eight middle school students completed measures of stressful life events, cognition (cognitive…

  5. Evaluation of the SHIFT-Depression® Inventory With a Sample of Australian Women, Demonstrating the Centrality of Gendered Role Expectations to Their Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C. Vidler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To address the double fold incidence and prevalence rates of depression in women compared to men needs more than symptom management. In primary health care where time does not normally allow for thorough assessments of what causes or maintains depression, using a brief questionnaire is warranted. A means must be found to address system level barriers to care and the poor quality of life so many women experience. Using an online survey and mixed method design, initial evaluation of a measure developed to identify individual and contextual issues connected to depression in women, examined underlying factor structure. 266 depressed women aged 18 to 85yrs also completed the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CESD and provided written commentary about any further issues. The SHIFT-Depression® Inventory analysis revealed five reliable underlying factors explaining 59% of the variance. The factors identified were; 'diminished self/feels powerless/focused on other's care'; 'financial problems, lacks access to healthcare, healthy food, housing, exercise’; 'relationship difficulties, loss/betrayal/abuse’; ‘women’s problems’ and 'lack of social support/feels isolated'. Analysis of participant’s comments found four groupings similar to the identified factors. This initial evaluation of the SHIFT-Depression® Inventory showed evidence of the multiple issues impacting on depressed women spanning the physical, intrapsychic, relational, social and contextual areas. The inventory provides preliminary assessment which can identify when more extensive questioning and referrals to various services may be appropriate. It could be used in primary health care settings when consultation times are brief, or as an adjunct to assessment in the mental health setting.

  6. Prefrontal cortex activation is associated with a discrepancy between self- and observer-rated depression severities of major depressive disorder: a multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Hiroyuki; Tsujii, Noa; Mikawa, Wakako; Adachi, Toru; Kirime, Eiji; Shirakawa, Osamu

    2015-03-15

    Studies on major depressive disorder (MDD) show that the degree of correlation between the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) varies widely. We aimed to determine whether this discrepancy reflects specific functional abnormalities in the frontotemporal cortex. Mildly depressed or euthymic patients with MDD (n=52), including 21 patients with MDD with the discrepancy, i.e., those with low HAMD17 scores (≤13) but high BDI-II scores (>28), and 31 patients without the discrepancy, i.e., those with low HAMD17 scores and low BDI-II scores (≤28), participated in the study along with 48 control subjects. Regional changes of oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) levels during a verbal fluency task (VFT) were monitored using a 52-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device. In the frontotemporal regions, mean oxy-Hb changes induced by the VFT were significantly smaller in patients with MDD than in control subjects. In 5 channels within frontal regions, the increase in mean oxy-Hb levels was significantly greater in MDD patients with the BDI-HAMD discrepancy than in those without the discrepancy. In 6 channels within the frontal region of the patients with MDD, significant positive correlations were observed between mean oxy-Hb changes and BDI total scores (ρ=0.38-0.59; Pdepressed patients, particularly those with melancholia. The distinct pattern of activation of the prefrontal cortex suggests that MDD with the BDI-HAMD discrepancy is pathophysiologically different from MDD without the discrepancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cognitive Support using BDI Agent and Adaptive User Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Shabbir

    2012-01-01

    -known framework to measure the individual health status and functioning level. The third goal is to develop an approach for supporting for users with irrational behaviour due to cognitive impairment. To deal with this challenge, a Belief, Desire and Intention (BDI) agent based approach is proposed due to its...... mentalistic characteristics, such as autonomy, adaptivity, extensibility, and human like reasoning capability. Although, BDI is unable to reason about plans, which is important for generating plans based on the current situation to handle the irrational behaviour of the user. An integration of Partially...... Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP) in the BDI agent is proposed in this thesis to handle the irrational behaviour of the user. The fourth goal represents the implementation of the research approaches and performs validation of the system through experiments. The empirical results of the experiments...

  8. Factorial Structure of Depressive Symptoms in Anglophone Caribbean University Students: Psychometric Properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

    OpenAIRE

    Michael H. Campbell; Jonathan W. Roberti; Donna-Maria Maynard; Maisha K. Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Este estudio buscó establecer propiedades psicométricas del Inventario de Depresión de Beck-Segunda Edición (BDI-II) con estudiantes de una universidad del Caribe (n=400, 76% mujeres, edad media=25.2). Además, administramos la Escala de Elasticidad de Ego-89, La Escala de Tensión Percibida, La Escala de Ansiedad Estado-Rasgo (Versión de Rasgo) y La Escala de Depresión de Zung. El análisis factorial confirmativo comparó la estructura observada con las estructuras oblicuas propuestas en los mod...

  9. Correlation and characteristics of self-rating and clinical rating of depression among alcoholics in the course of early abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Depression is an alcoholism relapse risk factor, but frequently stays underdiagnosed among treated alcoholics. The correlation and characteristics of self-reported and clinically assessed depression in the course of early alcohol abstinence were explored. Methods. A total of 100 inpatient, primary male alcoholics (20-60 years diagnosed according to Classificaton of Mental and Behavioural Disorders (ICD-10 and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV were recruited consecutively. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were scored on admission (T1, after 4 weeks (T2 and after 8 weeks (T3. Student's t-test, repeated measures ANOVA and Pearson's correlation between the scores were done (p < 0.05. Factor analyses of symptoms were performed. Results: On HDRS T1, T2, T3 90,7%, 39.5%, 17.4% alcoholics were depressive, respectively. The mean HDRS vs BDI scores on T1, T2 and T3 were 15.16 ± 6.34, 7.35 ± 4.18, 4.23 ± 2.93 vs 14.20 ± 9.56, 8.14 ± 7.35, 5.30 ± 4.94, respectively. Depression severity significantly lowered in the course of abstinence (ANOVA. The HRDS and BDI correlations on T1, T2 and T3 were significant (r1 = 0.763, r2 = 0.684, r3 = 0.613 respectively. Dysphoric mood, anxious, vegetative and cognitive HDRS subscales on T1, T2 and T3 were detected, but not BDI factors, thus BDI symptoms were analysed. Conclusions. The majority of alcoholics had depression on admission. A predominant mild-degree with a significant lowering of depression severity and positive significant correlations between HRDS and BDI scores in the course of abstinence were detected. The dysphoric mood on the HDRS sub-scale, and self-blame, anhedonia and guilt BDI symptoms were most prominent and persisted. The BDI could be a useful tool not only for routine screening and reassessment of depression, but also for exploring emotional content during early abstinence and planning tailored

  10. Persistent Depressive Symptoms are Independent Predictors of Low-Grade Inflammation Onset Among Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Gazelato de Mello Franco

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Depressive symptoms are independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD among individuals with non-diagnosed CVD. The mechanisms underlying this association, however, remain unclear. Inflammation has been indicated as a possible mechanistic link between depression and CVD. Objectives: This study evaluated the association between persistent depressive symptoms and the onset of low-grade inflammation. Methods: From a database of 1,508 young (mean age: 41 years individuals with no CVD diagnosis who underwent at least two routine health evaluations, 134 had persistent depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory - BDI ≥ 10, BDI+ and 1,374 had negative symptoms at both time points (BDI-. All participants had been submitted to repeated clinical and laboratory evaluations at a regular follow-up with an average of 26 months from baseline. Low-grade inflammation was defined as plasma high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (CRP concentrations > 3 mg/L. The outcome was the incidence of low-grade inflammation evaluated by the time of the second clinical evaluation. Results: The incidence of low-grade inflammation was more frequently observed in the BDI+ group compared to the BDI- group (20.9% vs. 11.4%; p = 0.001. After adjusting for sex, age, waist circumference, body mass index, levels of physical activity, smoking, and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, persistent depressive symptoms remained an independent predictor of low-grade inflammation onset (OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.03-3.02; p = 0.04. Conclusions: Persistent depressive symptoms were independently associated with low-grade inflammation onset among healthy individuals.

  11. The Impact of an Early Eclectic Rehabilitative Intervention on Symptoms in First Episode Depression among Employed People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero Raiskila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect of an early vocational-orientated eclectic intervention on beck depression inventory (BDI scores compared to treatment as usual in first ever depressive episode among employed people. Design. A randomized controlled trial comparing the rehabilitative intervention and the conventional treatment. Subjects. The subjects came from occupational health care units. Methods. Employees were sent to a rehabilitation center after being screened for depression using the BDI. They were diagnosed using the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV. The participating subjects (N=283 were randomized into intervention and control groups. The intervention group received eclectic early depression intervention treatment (N=134 and the control group was treated in the conventional way (N=100. They were followed for one year. Results. The mean decrease in BDI scores within the intervention group was from 20.8 to 11.6 and within the control group from 19.3 to 10.8. BDI score decreased by 10 or more points in 64% of the participants in the intervention group and in 53% of the control group (P=0.013. Conclusions. There was some evidence that early eclectic intervention in first ever episode depression may be more effective than conventional treatments among working age people in employment.

  12. Factorial Structure of Depressive Symptoms in Anglophone Caribbean University Students: Psychometric Properties of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Campbell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio buscó establecer propiedades psicométricas del Inventario de Depresión de Beck-Segunda Edición (BDI-II con estudiantes de una universidad del Caribe (n=400, 76% mujeres, edad media=25.2. Además, administramos la Escala de Elasticidad de Ego-89, La Escala de Tensión Percibida, La Escala de Ansiedad Estado-Rasgo (Versión de Rasgo y La Escala de Depresión de Zung. El análisis factorial confirmativo comparó la estructura observada con las estructuras oblicuas propuestas en los modelos de dos factores. Las estimaciones factoriales y los índices de calidad de ajuste sugirieron adecuado ajuste para modelos de dos factores. La consistencia interna (=.86 y la fiabilidad test-retest (n=57, r=.78 eran fuertes. Las correlaciones de validez eran significativas en las direcciones teóricamente esperadas. Los resultados apoyan el uso del BDI-II con estudiantes del Caribe.

  13. Cigarette demand among smokers with elevated depressive symptoms: an experimental comparison with low depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secades-Villa, Roberto; Weidberg, Sara; González-Roz, Alba; Reed, Derek D; Fernández-Hermida, José R

    2018-03-01

    Individuals with depression smoke more than smokers without depression. Research has shown that cigarette demand is a useful tool for quantifying tobacco reinforcement and supposes a clinical predictor of treatment outcomes. Despite previous studies examining the relative reinforcing efficacy of nicotine among different populations of smokers, to date, no study has assessed cigarette demand among individuals with elevated depressive symptoms. The aim of this study was to compare cigarette demand among samples of smokers with low and elevated depressive symptoms. Further, it also sought to examine the relationship between depressive symptomatology and the individual CPT demand indices. Participants (80 non-depressed smokers and 85 depressed smokers) completed the 19-item version of the Cigarette Purchase Task (CPT). Depression symptomatology was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II). Depressed smokers needed to present at least moderate depressive symptoms as indicated by scoring ≥ 20 on the BDI-II. Depressive symptomatology and nicotine dependence were significantly associated with elasticity of demand (R 2  = 0.112; F(2, 155) = 9.756, p = ≤ 0.001). Depressive symptoms, cigarettes per day, and years of regular smoking also predicted breakpoint scores (R 2  = 0.088; F(4, 153) = 3.697, p = 0.007). As smokers with elevated depressive symptoms are less sensitive to increases in cigarette prices than those with low depressive symptomatology, future studies should consider these cigarette demand indices when designing depression-focused smoking cessation treatments. Providing this difficult-to-treat population with interventions that promote both pleasurable and alternative reinforcing activities is highly encouraged.

  14. Preference-based reasoning in BDI Agent Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Simeon; Thangarajah, John; Harland, James; Dignum, F.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    An important feature of BDI agent systems is number of different ways in which an agent can achieve its goals. The choice of means to achieve the goal in made by the system at run time, depending on contextual information that is not available in advance. In this article, we explore ways that the

  15. Major depressive episodes are associated with poor concordance with therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients: the impact on disease outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Marroquín, Ricardo; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Alcocer-Castillejos, Natasha; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate associations between major depressive episodes (MDE), concordance with therapy (CwT) and disease outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Seventy-eight outpatients receiving ≥1 disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug and without significant comorbidity had concomitant rheumatic and psychiatric evaluations. CwT was defined according to a questionnaire. MDE was defined using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the severity of depressive symptoms was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Appropriated statistic was used. IRB approval was obtained. Patients included (73 ♀) had (mean±SD) age of 44±10 years and (median, range) disease duration of 10 years (5.2-15.8). Current MDE were diagnosed in 24 patients (30.8%); 60 patients (76.9%) were CwT. Patient-non-CwT were more frequently diagnosed with MDE and tend to have higher BDI scores. They had significantly more disease activity according to patient-pain VAS and swollen joint counts. Both groups were similar regarding demographic variables, treatment and comorbid conditions. Forty-one patients (53%) had clinically important depressive symptoms (BDI≥10), among them 20 had mild depression, 14 moderate and 7 severe depression. Patient-non-CwT had more frequently moderate depression (according to BDI score) than their counterparts and similar tendency was found regarding severe depression. Patient-CwT who additionally had lower BDI scores had better disease outcomes than concordant patients with higher BDI scores. Similar results were found in non-CwT patients but statistical significance was limited to disease activity. Prevalence of current MDE in RA patients was of 31%; those patients had poorer CwT and worse outcomes than mentally healthy patients.

  16. Depression in hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Barki, H.; Masood, M.

    2008-01-01

    To measure the frequency of depression and its risk factors in patients under going hemodialysis. It is a cross-sectional prospective study conducted at Hemodialysis unit of Shalamar Hospital and Shaikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore from 1/sup st/ January 2006 to 30/sup th/ April 2006. All patients getting regular hemodialysis for more than three months were included. Beck's Depression Inventory- II (BDI-II; adapted in Urdu) was administered on all the patients who were able to read or understand it. Blood sample were drawn at the same time for routine hematological, biochemical parameters and viral markers (Anti HCV and HbsAg). Diagnosis was made as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM IV) for correlation of psychological variables with clinical, hematological and biochemical parameters. Eighty nine patients were enrolled which included fifty two (58.4%) were male and seventy seven (86.5%) were married. Major causes of renal failure were diabetes, hypertension and chronic glomerulonephrotis. Duration of dialysis was from 03 to 49 months with mean of 19.64 +- 11.7 months. Severity of depression was categorized in to mild, moderate and severe on the basis of BDI score. Majority of the patients fifty (56.1%) were moderately to severely depressed and there was no gender difference in the prevalence of depression. Majority of patients undergoing hemodialysis were depressed. Major risk factors for depression were marital status, illiteracy, number of children, socioeconomic factors, gender, hypertension and hypoalbuminemia. Patients with anemia, hyponatremia and hyperkalemia had suicidal tendency. Patients with hepatitis C and disturbed liver function have strong correlation with psychological parameters. (author)

  17. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory: Validity and Comparison of Scoring Methods to Assess Individuals Screening Positive for Anxiety and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriola, Marco; Mosca, Oriana; Trentini, Cristina; Foschi, Renato; Tambelli, Renata; Carleton, R Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    Intolerance of Uncertainty is a fundamental transdiagnostic personality construct hierarchically organized with a core general factor underlying diverse clinical manifestations. The current study evaluated the construct validity of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory, a two-part scale separately assessing a unitary Intolerance of Uncertainty disposition to consider uncertainties to be unacceptable and threatening (Part A) and the consequences of such disposition, regarding experiential avoidance, chronic doubt, overestimation of threat, worrying, control of uncertain situations, and seeking reassurance (Part B). Community members ( N = 1046; Mean age = 36.69 ± 12.31 years; 61% females) completed the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory with the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Part A demonstrated a robust unidimensional structure and an excellent convergent validity with Part B. A bifactor model was the best fitting model for Part B. Based on these results, we compared the hierarchical factor scores with summated ratings clinical proxy groups reporting anxiety and depression symptoms. Summated rating scores were associated with both depression and anxiety and proportionally increased with the co-occurrence of depressive and anxious symptoms. By contrast, hierarchical scores were useful to detect which facets mostly separated between for depression and anxiety groups. In sum, Part A was a reliable and valid transdiagnostic measure of Intolerance of Uncertainty. The Part B was arguably more useful for assessing clinical manifestations of Intolerance of Uncertainty for specific disorders, provided that hierarchical scores are used. Overall, our study suggest that clinical assessments might need to shift toward hierarchical factor scores.

  18. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory: Validity and Comparison of Scoring Methods to Assess Individuals Screening Positive for Anxiety and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lauriola

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Intolerance of Uncertainty is a fundamental transdiagnostic personality construct hierarchically organized with a core general factor underlying diverse clinical manifestations. The current study evaluated the construct validity of the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory, a two-part scale separately assessing a unitary Intolerance of Uncertainty disposition to consider uncertainties to be unacceptable and threatening (Part A and the consequences of such disposition, regarding experiential avoidance, chronic doubt, overestimation of threat, worrying, control of uncertain situations, and seeking reassurance (Part B. Community members (N = 1046; Mean age = 36.69 ± 12.31 years; 61% females completed the Intolerance of Uncertainty Inventory with the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Part A demonstrated a robust unidimensional structure and an excellent convergent validity with Part B. A bifactor model was the best fitting model for Part B. Based on these results, we compared the hierarchical factor scores with summated ratings clinical proxy groups reporting anxiety and depression symptoms. Summated rating scores were associated with both depression and anxiety and proportionally increased with the co-occurrence of depressive and anxious symptoms. By contrast, hierarchical scores were useful to detect which facets mostly separated between for depression and anxiety groups. In sum, Part A was a reliable and valid transdiagnostic measure of Intolerance of Uncertainty. The Part B was arguably more useful for assessing clinical manifestations of Intolerance of Uncertainty for specific disorders, provided that hierarchical scores are used. Overall, our study suggest that clinical assessments might need to shift toward hierarchical factor scores.

  19. Direct and indirect influences of childhood abuse on depression symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Takagaki, Koki; Okada, Go; Toki, Shigeru; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanabe, Hajime; Kobayakawa, Makoto; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2015-10-14

    It is known that the onset, progression, and prognosis of major depressive disorder are affected by interactions between a number of factors. This study investigated how childhood abuse, personality, and stress of life events were associated with symptoms of depression in depressed people. Patients with major depressive disorder (N = 113, 58 women and 55 men) completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the Neuroticism Extroversion Openness Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS), and the Life Experiences Survey (LES), which are self-report scales. Results were analyzed with correlation analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM), by using SPSS AMOS 21.0. Childhood abuse directly predicted the severity of depression and indirectly predicted the severity of depression through the mediation of personality. Negative life change score of the LES was affected by childhood abuse, however it did not predict the severity of depression. This study is the first to report a relationship between childhood abuse, personality, adulthood life stresses and the severity of depression in depressed patients. Childhood abuse directly and indirectly predicted the severity of depression. These results suggest the need for clinicians to be receptive to the possibility of childhood abuse in patients suffering from depression. SEM is a procedure used for hypothesis modeling and not for causal modeling. Therefore, the possibility of developing more appropriate models that include other variables cannot be excluded.

  20. Validating the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Indonesia’s general population and coronary heart disease patients

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    Henndy Ginting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio evalúa la validez y determina los puntos de corte del Inventario de Depresión de Beck -II (BDI-II en Indonesia. La versión indonesia del BDI-II (BDI-II Indo se administró a 720 personas sanas de la población general, a 215 pacientes con Enfermedad Coronaria (EC y a 102 pacientes con depresión. El análisis factorial confirmatorio mostró similitud factorial de las tres muestras. Las correlaciones entre el Indo BDI-II y otras medidas de auto-percepción relacionadas con la depresión fueron significativas, mostrando la validez de constructo del Indo BDI-II. Además, la diferencia de puntuación del Indo BDI-II entre los participantes deprimidos y no deprimidos fue altamente significativa. La consistencia interna y la fiabilidad re- test fueron suficientemente altas. La curva ROC (receiver operating characteristic indicó que el punto de corte de la BDI-II para el nivel de gravedad leve de depresión la población de Indonesia es igual a 17. En conclusión, el Indo BDI-II es una medida válida de depresión, tanto para la población general indonesia como en pacientes con EC.

  1. Evaluation of self-esteem and depression symptoms in depressed and nondepressed subjects treated with onabotulinumtoxinA for glabellar lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexsel, Doris; Brum, Cristiano; Siega, Carolina; Schilling-Souza, Juliana; Dal'Forno, Taciana; Heckmann, Marc; Rodrigues, Ticiana C

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection has become the most popular cosmetic nonsurgical procedure, and it has been suggested that BoNT-A injections may improve emotional states when frown lines are treated. To evaluate symptoms of depression and self-esteem before and after onabotulinumtoxinA (ONA) injections in the glabella in subjects with and without depression. Twenty-five subjects with depression were allocated into one group and 25 subjects without depression were matched to those according to demographic characteristics. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) were used to assess depression symptoms and self-esteem, respectively. Patients were assessed up to 12 weeks after the intervention. Patients with depression had significant improvement in depression symptoms after ONA injections. The maximum effect occurred within the first 8 weeks after treatment. A significant reduction from baseline in BDI score and significant improvement in self-esteem were also observed in patients with depression. This research presents new data regarding BoNT-A as a potential treatment to improve depression symptoms in patients with Major Depressive Disorder. Self-esteem scores alone cannot explain the improvement in depression symptoms. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Perception of quality of life and social adjustment of patients with recurrent depression

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    Stanković Žana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is the most commonly present psychiatric entity in clinical practice, accompanied by significant impairment of both social and professional functioning. In addition, depression frequently develops as complication of other psychiatric disorders and various somatic diseases. Objective: To investigate subjective perception of quality of life and social adjustment, severity of depressive symptoms as well as level of correlation of severity of depressive symptoms and quality of life and social adjustment of patients with recurrent depression in comparison to the group of patients with diabetes and healthy subjects. Method: The study included 45 subjects of both sexes, ranging from 18 to 60 years of age, divided in three groups of 15 subjects each. The experimental group comprised the patients diagnosed with recurrent depression in remission (DSM-IV, one control group was consisted of patients diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and another one comprised healthy subjects. The instruments of assessment were: The Beck Depression Inventory- BDI, The Social Adaptation Self -evaluation scale - SASS, The Psychological General Well-Being Scale - WBQ. Results: Significant difference of both BDI and WBQ scales was found between the experimental and the control group of healthy subjects (ANOVA, Mann Whitney; p≤0.01, as well as between two control groups (p≤0.02. The level of inverse correlation of mean score values of BDI and SASS scales was significant in the control group of patients with diabetes while such levels of BDI and WBQ scales (Spearman correlation coefficient, p<0.01 were found in all groups of our study. Conclusion: In the group of patients with recurrent depression, significant decline of quality of life and significantly higher severity of depressive symptoms were present in comparison to the group of healthy subjects as well as significant level of inverse correlation of severity of depressive symptoms and

  3. Is the Effect of Postpartum Depression on Mother-Infant Bonding Universal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Lina Kurdahi; Ayvazian, Nelly; Lameh, Salma; Charafeddine, Lama

    2018-05-01

    Although the negative consequences of maternal depression on infants has been documented in several Western societies, similar studies have not been conducted in Middle-Eastern countries where cultural norms and traditions may differ. The main objective of this study was to determine the risk factors for postpartum depression (PPD) and its relationship to mother -infant bonding in a Lebanese population. One hundred and fifty participants were administered the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS), and the social support scale at 2-3 days postpartum. At 10-12 weeks mother-infant bonding using the Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire (PBQ) and depression using the Beck Inventory (BDI-II) were assessed during a telephone interview. The prevalence of depression was 19% with an average score of 10.9 ± 6.02 on the EPDS. At 10-12 weeks 2.7% of the whole sample was depressed with an average score of 18.60 ± 16.87 on the BDI-II. Risk factors of PPD on the EPDS were; history of alcohol use, complications during pregnancy, not a good marital relationship, baby admitted to an intensive care unit, history of depression and low social support. Risk factors for impaired bonding were age, history of depression, BDI-II scores above 20 and low social support. The multiple regression analysis found that impaired bonding was associated with older age, history of depression and low social support, which explained 39% of the variance, F = 7.12, p = 0.02. The prevalence of PPD was higher than previously reported at day 2-3 post-delivery, but lower at 10-12 weeks postpartum. Impaired mother- infant bonding was associated older mothers, history of depression, low social support and BDI-II scores above 20 which should alert practitioner to assessing these factors in post-partum mothers. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. HIV-infected individuals with high coping self-efficacy are less likely to report depressive symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodkjaer, L; Chesney, M A; Lomborg, K

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Having effective ways to cope helps HIV-infected individuals maintain good psychological and physical well-being. This study investigated the relationship between coping self-efficacy levels, as determined by the Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE), HIV status disclosure, and depression...... in a Danish cohort. METHODS: In 2008, the CSE was administered to 304 HIV-infected individuals to measure their confidence in their ability to cope with HIV infection. HIV status disclosure was assessed on a three-point scale: living openly with the disease, partly openly, or secretly. The Beck Depression...... Inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression prevalence and severity. RESULTS: The CSE score was significantly related to depression (Spearman's rho = -0.71; the test of H0: BDI and coping, probability >t=0.0001). There was a significant relationship between higher CSE scores and living openly with HIV...

  5. Vulnerable narcissism is associated with severity of depressive symptoms in dysthymic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkoreka, Leire; Navarro, Bárbara

    2017-11-01

    Pathological narcissism involves grandiose and vulnerable presentations. Narcissism, and specifically the vulnerable presentation, has been associated to depression, although empirical research studying this relationship is limited. Dysthymia is characterized by a greater treatment resistance and poorer prognosis than other chronic depressive disorders. The presence of dysfunctional personality traits may explain it. We aim to explore the association between vulnerable narcissistic traits and severity of depressive symptoms in a sample of dysthymic patients. To that end, 80 dysthymic outpatients were evaluated. The treating psychiatrist collected sociodemographic and clinical data and completed the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale. Patients completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hypersensitive Narcissism Scale (HSNS), that respectively assess severity of depressive symptoms and vulnerable narcissism. We tested for potential confounders and conducted a regression analysis to explore whether severity of vulnerable narcissism was associated with greater depressive symptoms. HSNS was found to be the principal predictor of BDI, and along with age, accounted for 23% of the variance in BDI. An assessment of personality functioning is therefore recommended in chronically depressed patients that have been refractory to standard treatments. Psychotherapies that address personality disturbance should be included in the treatment when necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Depression is associated with the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola, Aila J; Thorn, Lena M; Saraheimo, Markku; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2010-10-01

    Both depression and the metabolic syndrome are frequently found among patients with type 1 diabetes, but their potential association has not yet been investigated. In this paper the relationship between depression and the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 1 diabetes was evaluated. A total of 1226 patients participating in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study between 2003 and 2009 were included. Depression was defined as use of antidepressive medication or Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score ≥16. The metabolic syndrome was defined using the criteria established by the International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Epidemiology and Prevention (IDF); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); American Heart Association (AHA); World Heart Federation (WHF); International Atherosclerosis Society (IAS); and International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO). The metabolic syndrome was more frequently observed among depressed patients (57% versus 46%, P = 0.008). Of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome, waist, triglyceride, and HDL components were more frequently fulfilled among patients with depression. The BDI score increased with the number of components of the metabolic syndrome present. The BDI score was independently associated with the waist component (odds ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.05) when adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status, smoking, nephropathy, and HbA(1c). The metabolic syndrome is frequently found among depressed patients with type 1 diabetes. Whether this association influences the development of diabetic complications is not known.

  7. Stability of maternal depressive symptoms among urban, low-income, African American adolescent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Marcuse, Fatima; Oberlander, Sarah E; Papas, Mia A; McNary, Scot W; Hurley, Kristen M; Black, Maureen M

    2010-04-01

    Maternal depressive symptomatology is an important public health issue with negative consequences for both mothers and infants. This study examined prevalence and patterns of depressive symptoms among 181 urban, low-income, first-time, African American adolescent mothers recruited from urban hospitals following delivery. Follow-up evaluations were conducted at 6 (N=148; 82%) and 24 (N=147; 81%) month home visits. Depressive symptoms were measured with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Half of mothers (49%) had BDI scores >9 at baseline, with significant correlations between BDI scores across all visits (r=0.28-0.50). Depressive symptom trajectories analyzed using group-based trajectory modeling revealed three trajectories of depressive symptoms: Low (41%), Medium (45%), and High (14%). The high depressive symptom group reported lower self-esteem, more negative life events, and lower parenting satisfaction than the low and moderate depressive symptoms groups. Depressive symptoms were self-reported and not verified with a clinical interview. Findings are limited to urban, low-income, African American adolescent mothers and may not be generalizable to other populations. The high prevalence and relative stability of depressive symptoms through 2years of parenting suggest the need for early identification and treatment of maternal depressive symptoms. Brief screening for maternal depressive symptoms conducted during pediatric well-child visits is a feasible and effective method for identifying mothers with depressive symptoms, however, screening measures can not differentiate between high and low levels of depressive symptoms. Brief intervention may be an effective treatment for mothers with mild symptoms of depression; mothers with moderate to severe symptoms may require more intensive intervention. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessing Depression in Cardiac Patients: What Measures Should Be Considered?

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    M. Ceccarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is highly recommended to promptly assess depression in heart disease patients as it represents a crucial risk factor which may result in premature deaths following acute cardiac events and a more severe psychopathology, even in cases of subsequent nonfatal cardiac events. Patients and professionals often underestimate or misjudge depressive symptomatology as cardiac symptoms; hence, quick, reliable, and early mood changes assessments are warranted. Failing to detect depressive signals may have detrimental effects on these patients’ wellbeing and full recovery. Choosing gold-standard depression investigations in cardiac patients that fit a hospitalised cardiac setting well is fundamental. This paper will examine eight well established tools following Italian and international guidelines on mood disorders diagnosis in cardiac patients: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, the Cognitive Behavioural Assessment Hospital Form (CBA-H, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the two and nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2, PHQ-9, the Depression Interview and Structured Hamilton (DISH, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D/HRSD, and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. Though their strengths and weaknesses may appear to be homogeneous, the BDI-II and the PHQ are more efficient towards an early depression assessment within cardiac hospitalised patients.

  9. The efficacy of psychoeducation on recurrent depression: A randomised trial with a two-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Foldager, Leslie; Makki, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    and decline in Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI). Methods: Eighty patients were randomized, either to the psychoeducative programme (consisting of eight sessions, each of 2 hours duration) and 2-year outpatient follow-up (42 cases), or only to 2-year outpatient follow-up (38 controls). The patients were...... monitored during 2 years after randomization. Data were collected from interviews including BDI, drug treatment and social measurements, and register data concerning use of psychiatric services. Results: At 2-year follow-up, a significant reduction in the consumption of psychiatric inpatient services...... and in BDI was found; however, it was uniform for case and control patients. Drop-out/non-compliance was significantly more frequent among patients randomized to the control group. Furthermore, during follow-up the case group got a significant stronger attachment to the Labour market than the control group...

  10. Impression management or real change? Reports of depressive symptoms before and after the preoperative psychological evaluation for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricatore, Anthony N; Sarwer, David B; Wadden, Thomas A; Combs, Christopher J; Krasucki, Jennifer L

    2007-09-01

    Many bariatric surgery programs require that candidates undergo a preoperative mental health evaluation. Candidates may be motivated to suppress or exaggerate psychiatric symptoms (i.e., engage in impression management), if they believe doing so will enhance their chances of receiving a recommendation to proceed with surgery. 237 candidates for bariatric surgery completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-ll) as part of their preoperative psychological evaluation (Time 1). They also completed the BDI-II approximately 2-4 weeks later, for research purposes, after they had received the mental health professional's unconditional recommendation to proceed with surgery (Time 2). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean BDI-II scores from Time 1 to Time 2 (11.4 vs 12.7, Ppsychological "clearance" for surgery. Possible explanations for these findings include measurement error, impression management, and true changes in psychiatric status.

  11. Stress and depression in informal caregivers of patients with bipolar affective disorder

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    Ximena Palacios-Espinosa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to establish the stress and depression´s prevalence in informal primary caregivers of patients with bipolar affective disorder of the Clínica de Nuestra Señora de la Paz (Bogotá, Colombia. The sample consisted of 40 informal primary caregivers who were tested by several tools: a survey filter, a sociodemographic record, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Daily Stress Questionnaire. Results indicate that there is much more presence of depression than of daily stress in the sample.

  12. Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Depressive Symptoms among Korean Adolescents: JS High School Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Hyun; Park, Ji Hye; Choi, Dong Phil; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Hyeon Chang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that secondhand smoke exposure (SHSE) may affect not only physical health, but also mental health. Therefore, we evaluated the association between SHSE and depressive symptoms among Korean adolescents. The JS High School Study enrolled 1071 high school freshmen from a rural community of South Korea. The current analysis was limited to 989 adolescents (495 male and 494 female adolescents), after excluding 48 ever-smokers, 3 students with physician-diagnosed depression, and 31 students who did not complete the depression questionnaire. SHSE was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire and was classified into three groups: none, occasional exposure, and regular exposure. Depressive symptoms were assessed according to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score, ranging from 0 to 63, and the presence of depressive symptoms was defined as a BDI score ≥10. Overall, adolescents with SHSE were more likely to have depressive symptoms than those without SHSE (p = 0.042).In a sex-specific analysis treating the BDI score as a continuous variable, regular SHSE was independently associated with higher BDI scores in male adolescents (β = 2.25, p = 0.026), but not in female adolescents (β = 1.11, p = 0.253). Compared to no SHSE, the odds ratio for having depressive symptoms among male adolescents with regular SHSE was 2.17 (95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 4.25) after adjusting for age, body mass index, and study year, and 3.65 (95% confidence interval, 1.52 to 8.73) after adjusting for age, body mass index, study year, exercise, and household income. Regular exposure to secondhand smoke was associated with having depressive symptoms among Korean male adolescents.

  13. Psychosocial stressors and depression at a Swedish primary health care centre. A gender perspective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strömberg Ranja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychosocial stress may account for the higher prevalence of depression in women and in individuals with a low educational background. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between depression and socio-demographic data, psychosocial stressors and lifestyle circumstances from a gender perspective in a relatively affluent primary care setting. Methods Patients, aged 18- 75 years, visiting a drop-in clinic at a primary care health centre were screened with Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI. The physicians used also targeted screening with BDI. A questionnaire on socio-demographic data, psychosocial stressors and use of alcohol and tobacco was distributed. Among patients, who scored BDI ≥10, DSM-IV-criteria were used to diagnose depression. Of the 404 participants, 48 men and 76 women were diagnosed with depression. The reference group consisted of patients with BDI score Results The same three psychosocial stressors: feeling very stressed, perceived poor physical health and being dissatisfied with one's family situation were associated with depression equally in men and women. The negative predictive values of the main effect models in men and women were 90.7% and 76.5%, respectively. Being dissatisfied with one's work situation had high ORs in both men and women. Unemployment and smoking were associated with depression in men only. Conclusions Three questions, frequently asked by physicians, which involve patient's family and working situation as well as perceived stress and physical health, could be used as depression indicators in early detection of depression in men and women in primary health care.

  14. Secondhand Smoke Exposure and Depressive Symptoms among Korean Adolescents: JS High School Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that secondhand smoke exposure (SHSE may affect not only physical health, but also mental health. Therefore, we evaluated the association between SHSE and depressive symptoms among Korean adolescents.The JS High School Study enrolled 1071 high school freshmen from a rural community of South Korea. The current analysis was limited to 989 adolescents (495 male and 494 female adolescents, after excluding 48 ever-smokers, 3 students with physician-diagnosed depression, and 31 students who did not complete the depression questionnaire. SHSE was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire and was classified into three groups: none, occasional exposure, and regular exposure. Depressive symptoms were assessed according to the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score, ranging from 0 to 63, and the presence of depressive symptoms was defined as a BDI score ≥10.Overall, adolescents with SHSE were more likely to have depressive symptoms than those without SHSE (p = 0.042.In a sex-specific analysis treating the BDI score as a continuous variable, regular SHSE was independently associated with higher BDI scores in male adolescents (β = 2.25, p = 0.026, but not in female adolescents (β = 1.11, p = 0.253. Compared to no SHSE, the odds ratio for having depressive symptoms among male adolescents with regular SHSE was 2.17 (95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 4.25 after adjusting for age, body mass index, and study year, and 3.65 (95% confidence interval, 1.52 to 8.73 after adjusting for age, body mass index, study year, exercise, and household income.Regular exposure to secondhand smoke was associated with having depressive symptoms among Korean male adolescents.

  15. Depressive status explains a significant amount of the variance in COPD assessment test (CAT) scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravitlles, Marc; Molina, Jesús; Quintano, José Antonio; Campuzano, Anna; Pérez, Joselín; Roncero, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    COPD assessment test (CAT) is a short, easy-to-complete health status tool that has been incorporated into the multidimensional assessment of COPD in order to guide therapy; therefore, it is important to understand the factors determining CAT scores. This is a post hoc analysis of a cross-sectional, observational study conducted in respiratory medicine departments and primary care centers in Spain with the aim of identifying the factors determining CAT scores, focusing particularly on the cognitive status measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and levels of depression measured by the short Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). A total of 684 COPD patients were analyzed; 84.1% were men, the mean age of patients was 68.7 years, and the mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (%) was 55.1%. Mean CAT score was 21.8. CAT scores correlated with the MMSE score (Pearson's coefficient r =-0.371) and the BDI ( r =0.620), both p CAT scores and explained 45% of the variability. However, a model including only MMSE and BDI scores explained up to 40% and BDI alone explained 38% of the CAT variance. CAT scores are associated with clinical variables of severity of COPD. However, cognitive status and, in particular, the level of depression explain a larger percentage of the variance in the CAT scores than the usual COPD clinical severity variables.

  16. The manifestation of depression in the context of urban poverty: a factor analysis of the Children's Depression Inventory in low-income urban youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeremy J; Grant, Kathryn E; Amrhein, Kelly; Carter, Jocelyn Smith; Farahmand, Farahnaz; Harrison, Aubrey; Thomas, Kina J; Carleton, Russell A; Lugo-Hernandez, Eduardo; Katz, Brian N

    2014-12-01

    The current study used confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to compare the fit of 2 factor structures for the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) in an urban community sample of low-income youth. Results suggest that the 6-factor model developed by Craighead and colleagues (1998) was a strong fit to the pattern of symptoms reported by low-income urban youth and was a superior fit with these data than the original 5-factor model of the CDI (Kovacs, 1992). Additionally, results indicated that all 6 factors from the Craighead model contributed to the measurement of depression, including School Problems and Externalizing Problems especially for older adolescents. This pattern of findings may reflect distinct contextual influences of urban poverty on the manifestation and measurement of depression in youth. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Theory and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Aluminum Coordination Complexes – Al K-Edge Studies of Charge and Bonding in (BDI)Al, (BDI)AlR2, and (BDI)AlX2 Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Alison B; Pemmaraju, C D; Camp, Clément; Arnold, John; Minasian, Stefan G; Prendergast, David; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek

    2015-08-19

    Polarized aluminum K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and first-principles calculations were used to probe electronic structure in a series of (BDI)Al, (BDI)AlX2, and (BDI)AlR2 coordination compounds (X = F, Cl, I; R = H, Me; BDI = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-β-diketiminate). Spectral interpretations were guided by examination of the calculated transition energies and polarization-dependent oscillator strengths, which agreed well with the XANES spectroscopy measurements. Pre-edge features were assigned to transitions associated with the Al 3p orbitals involved in metal-ligand bonding. Qualitative trends in Al 1s core energy and valence orbital occupation were established through a systematic comparison of excited states derived from Al 3p orbitals with similar symmetries in a molecular orbital framework. These trends suggested that the higher transition energies observed for (BDI)AlX2 systems with more electronegative X(1-) ligands could be ascribed to a decrease in electron density around the aluminum atom, which causes an increase in the attractive potential of the Al nucleus and concomitant increase in the binding energy of the Al 1s core orbitals. For (BDI)Al and (BDI)AlH2 the experimental Al K-edge XANES spectra and spectra calculated using the eXcited electron and Core-Hole (XCH) approach had nearly identical energies for transitions to final state orbitals of similar composition and symmetry. These results implied that the charge distributions about the aluminum atoms in (BDI)Al and (BDI)AlH2 are similar relative to the (BDI)AlX2 and (BDI)AlMe2 compounds, despite having different formal oxidation states of +1 and +3, respectively. However, (BDI)Al was unique in that it exhibited a low-energy feature that was attributed to transitions into a low-lying p-orbital of b1 symmetry that is localized on Al and orthogonal to the (BDI)Al plane. The presence of this low-energy unoccupied molecular orbital on electron-rich (BDI)Al distinguishes

  18. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on depression and quality of life in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Gharekhani, Afshin; Khatami, Mohammad-Reza; Miri, Elham-Sadat; Khalili, Hossein; Razeghi, Effat; Hashemi-Nazari, Seyed-Saeed; Mansournia, Mohammad-Ali

    2014-01-01

    Depression and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are closely interrelated among hemodialysis (HD) patients and associated with negative impacts on patients' clinical outcomes. Considering previous reports on clinical benefits of omega-3 fatty acids in major depression and HRQoL in other patient populations, this study examined effects of omega-3 fatty acids on depression and HRQoL in chronic HD patients. In this randomized placebo-controlled trial, 40 adult patients with a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score of ≥16 and HD vintage of at least 3 months were randomized to ingest 6 soft-gel capsules of either omega-3 fatty acids (180 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 120 mg docosahexaenoic acid in each capsule) or corresponding placebo, daily for 4 months. At baseline and after 4 months, 2 questionnaires of BDI and the Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey were completed by each patient. Although baseline BDI score was comparable between the 2 groups, it was significantly lower in the omega-3 group compared with the placebo group at the end of the study (P = 0.008). Except for mental health, social functioning, and general health, other domains of HRQoL showed significant improvement in the omega-3 group compared with the placebo group at month 4 of the study (P acids in HD patients with depressive symptoms seems to be efficacious in improving depressive symptoms and HRQoL.

  19. Personality Profiles Identify Depressive Symptoms over Ten Years? A Population-Based Study

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    Kim Josefsson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the relationship between temperament and character inventory (TCI profiles and depressive symptoms. Personality profiles are useful, because personality traits may have different effects on depressive symptoms when combined with different combinations of other traits. Participants were from the population-based Young Finns study with repeated measurements in 1997, 2001, and 2007 (=1402 to 1902. TCI was administered in 1997 and mild depressive symptoms (modified Beck’s depression inventory, BDI were reported in 1997, 2001, and 2007. BDI-II was also administered in 2007. We found that high harm avoidance and low self-directedness related strongly to depressive symptoms. In addition, sensitive (NHR and fanatical people (ScT were especially vulnerable to depressive symptoms. high novelty seeking and reward dependence increased depressive symptoms when harm avoidance was high. These associations were very similar in cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis. Personality profiles help in understanding the complex associations between depressive symptoms and personality.

  20. Detecting depression among adolescents in Santiago, Chile: sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Ricardo; Montero-Marin, Jesus; Barroilhet, Sergio; Fritsch, Rosemarie; Gaete, Jorge; Montgomery, Alan

    2013-04-23

    Depression among adolescents is common but most cases go undetected. Brief questionnaires offer an opportunity to identify probable cases but properly validated cut-off points are often unavailable, especially in non-western countries. Sex differences in the prevalence of depression become marked in adolescence and this needs to be accounted when establishing cut-off points. This study involved adolescents attending secondary state schools in Santiago, Chile. We compared the self-reported Beck Depression Inventory-II with a psychiatric interview to ascertain diagnosis. General psychometric features were estimated before establishing the criterion validity of the BDI-II. The BDI-II showed good psychometric properties with good internal consistency, a clear unidimensional factorial structure, and good capacity to discriminate between cases and non-cases of depression. Optimal cut-off points to establish caseness for depression were much higher for girls than boys. Sex discrepancies were primarily explained by differences in scores among those with depression rather than among those without depression. It is essential to validate scales with the populations intended to be used with. Sex differences are often ignored when applying cut-off points, leading to substantial misclassification. Early detection of depression is essential if we think that early intervention is a clinically important goal.

  1. Association between primary headaches and depression in young adults in southern Brazil

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    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the association between depression and headache in young adults, as well as to identify the features of headache associated with depression and the influence of this mood disorder on headache-related disability. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires about headache and depression was conducted at the Universidade de Caxias do Sul. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS were used to evaluate depressive symptoms and headache-related disability, respectively. Depression was considered if BDI > 15. RESULTS: A thousand and thirteen young adults were included in the study. A clear relationship was observed between headache and depression among the participants. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that nausea or vomiting related to headache and higher headacherelated disability scores were independent factors associated with depression. Migraine was more associated with depression than the other types of headache. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate an association between headache and depression. Depressive symptoms are more likely to be found in young adults with more disabling headaches.

  2. The Role of Self-Esteem in Depression: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Sven; Goerigk, Stephan; Padberg, Frank; Nadjiri, Annekatrin; Übleis, Aline; Jobst, Andrea; Dewald-Kaufmann, Julia; Falkai, Peter; Bühner, Markus; Naumann, Felix; Sarubin, Nina

    2018-04-25

    Based on the vulnerability model, several studies indicate that low self-esteem seems to contribute to depressive symptoms. The aim of this study was to treat depressive symptoms in a cognitive behavioural group therapy, focusing on the enhancement of self-esteem, and to explore co-variation in depressive symptoms and the level of self-esteem. The Multidimensional Self-esteem Scale (MSWS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered to 147 psychiatric in-patients with current depressive symptoms due to an affective disorder (major depression, bipolar I, dysthymia). Self-esteem was measured pre-treatment (t0) and post-treatment (t4, after 5 weeks of eight group sessions); the BDI was applied weekly. A linear mixed growth analysis was conducted to estimate the change in depressive symptoms including interactions with self-esteem. Within the 5 weeks of group therapy, depressive symptoms showed a linear decline, which was stronger for patients with higher gains in self-esteem between t0 and t4. Self-esteem at t0 was unrelated to the change in depression but predicted self-esteem at t4. Treating depressive symptoms in a cognitive behavioural group therapy in a naturalistic setting might have a positive effect on the process of recovery. Moreover, depressive symptoms and level of self-esteem seemed to co-vary.

  3. Evaluation of the level of depression among medical students from Poland, Portugal and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seweryn, Mariusz; Tyrała, Kinga; Kolarczyk-Haczyk, Aleksandra; Bonk, Magdalena; Bulska, Weronika; Krysta, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Depression is a serious illness affecting health, family and professional life of many people of all sectors of society. It also concerns students, regardless of their geographical location. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is a proper tool to brief check of the level of depression because it has high correlation with depression. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the level of depression among medical students from Poland, Portugal and Germany. Students from different countries were asked to fill in an electronic form containing the BDI. The form was created separately for each country, using official translation of the BDI, approved by the competent psychiatric association. Google Drive software was used for the electronic form, and Stat soft Statistica v10 software for statistical analysis. There were statistically significant differences (p<0.05) in terms of average score of the BDI and of the proportion of the scores more than 10 points of medical and technology students among kinds of studies and countries. The average score of the BDI of medical students: Poland: 13.76±9.99 points; Germany: 8.49±7.64 points; Portugal: 7.37±7.67 points. The average score of the BDI of technology students: Poland: 12.42±9.66 points; Germany: 10.51±8.49 points; Portugal: 9.25±8.97 points. The proportion of the scores more than 10 points of medical students: Poland 56.32% (285/506) Germany 34.92% (154/441) Portugal 26.03% (82/315). The proportion of the scores more than 10 points of technology students: Poland 55.01% (368/669) Germany 43.82% (156/356) Portugal 37.57% (136/362). The highest depression score among medical and technology students according the BDI was found in Poland. A proper monitoring of depression is required, as well as rapid and appropriate help for those who suffer from it.

  4. Beckova škála deprese BDI-II - standardizace a využití v praxi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ptáček, R.; Raboch, J.; Vňuková, M.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Anders, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 6 (2016), s. 270-274 ISSN 1212-0383 Grant - others:1 LF(CZ) PRVOUK Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : BDI-II * depression * standards * validity * reliability Subject RIV: FL - Psychiatry, Sexuology OBOR OECD: Psychiatry http://www.cspsychiatr.cz/detail.php?stat=1121

  5. Relationship of Internet addiction with self-esteem and depression in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrainian, S A; Alizadeh, K Haji; Raeisoon, M R; Gorji, O Hashemi; Khazaee, A

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of self-esteem and depression with Internet addiction in university students. The present descriptive-analytic correlation study involved 408 students (150 female and 258 male) who had been selected by means of a cluster sampling method from among all the students studying in Birjand Islamic Azad University. Students were evaluated through the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Cooper Smith Self-Esteem Inventory (CSEI) and Internet Addiction Test (IAT). The results indicated that 40.7% of the students had Internet addiction. A significant correlation emerged between depression, self-esteem and Internet addiction. Regression analysis indicated that depression and self-esteem were able to predict the variance of Internet addiction to some extent. It may be important to evaluate self-esteem and depression in people with Internet addiction. These variables should be targeted for effective cognitive behavioral therapy in people with Internet addiction.

  6. Depression and quality of sleep in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trbojević-Stanković Jasna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sleep disorders and psychological disturbances are common in end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. However, despite their frequency and importance, such conditions often go unnoticed, since all patients do not clearly manifest fully expressed symptoms. Objective. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression and poor sleep quality and to examine the association between these disorders and demographic, clinical and treatment-related characteristics of ESRD patients on hemodialysis (HD. Methods. The study included 222 patients (132 men and 90 women, mean age 57.3±11.9 years, from 3 HD centers in Central Serbia, which provided us with biochemical parameters and demographic data. Sleep quality and depression were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, respectively. Results. The average BDI was 16.1±11.3. Depressed patients were significantly older (p=0.041, had a significantly lower dialysis adequacy (p=0.027 and a significantly worse quality of sleep (p<0.001, while they did not show significant difference as regarding sex, employment, marital status, comorbidities, dialysis type, dialysis vintage, shift and laboratory parameters. The average PSQI was 7.8±4.5 and 64.2% of patients were poor sleepers. Poor sleepers were significantly older (p=0.002, they were more often females (p=0.027 and had a significantly higher BDI (p<0.001, while other investigated variables were not correlated with sleep quality. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between BDI and PSQI (r=0.604; p<0.001. Conclusion. Depression and poor sleep quality are frequent and interrelated among HD patients.

  7. The NEO Five-Factor Inventory: Latent Structure and Relationships with Dimensions of Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in a Large Clinical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, Anthony J.; Brown, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study evaluated the latent structure of the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO FFI) and relations between the five-factor model (FFM) of personality and dimensions of "DSM-IV" anxiety and depressive disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder [GAD], obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia [SOC], major depressive disorder…

  8. Test Review: Kovacs, M. "Children's Depression Inventory 2 (CDI 2)" (2nd ed.). North Tonawanda, NY: Multi-Health Systems Inc, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yunhee

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a review of the Children's Depression Inventory 2 (CDI 2), published by Multi-Health Systems (MHS) to assess depressive symptoms in 7- to 17-year-old children and adolescents. Given the importance of early diagnosis and treatment (Kovacs & Devlin, 1998), the CDI 2 can assist professionals to pinpoint critical depressive…

  9. A Recursive BDI-Agent Model for Theory of Mind and its Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosse, T.; Memon, Z.A.; Treur, J.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses a formal belief, desire, intention (BDI)-based agent model for theory of mind (ToM). The model uses BDI concepts to describe the reasoning process of an agent that reasons about the reasoning process of another agent, which is also based on BDI concepts. We discuss three

  10. Comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms as predictors of cardiovascular events: results from the NHLBI-sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Thomas; Linke, Sarah E; Krantz, David S; Johnson, B Delia; Bittner, Vera; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Eteiba, Wafia; Pepine, Carl J; Vaccarino, Viola; Francis, Jennifer; Vido, Diane A; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2009-11-01

    To study the independent and interactive effects of depression and anxiety symptoms as predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in a sample of women with suspected myocardial ischemia. Symptoms of depression and anxiety overlap strongly and are independent predictors of CVD events. Although these symptoms commonly co-occur in medical patients, little is known about combined effects of depression and anxiety on CVD risk. A total of 489 women completed a baseline protocol including coronary angiogram, CVD risk factor assessment, and questionnaire-based measures of depression and anxiety symptoms, using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), respectively. Participants were followed for a median 5.9 years to track the prevalence of CVD events (stroke, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and CVD-related mortality). We tested the BDI x STAI interaction effect in addition to the BDI and STAI main effects. Seventy-five women (15.3% of sample) experienced a CVD event, of which 18 were deaths attributed to cardiovascular causes. Results using Cox regression indicated a significant BDI x STAI interaction effect in the prediction of CVD events (p = .02) after covariate adjustment. Simple effect analyses indicated that depression scores were significant predictors of CVD events among women with low anxiety scores (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.3 [in standard deviation units]; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 1.3-3.9; p = .005) but not among women with higher levels of anxiety (HR = 0.99; 95% CI = 0.70-1.4; p = .95). Among women with suspected myocardial ischemia, the value of depression symptoms for predicting CVD events varied by the severity of comorbid anxiety. These results suggest that the clinical utility of depression measures may be improved by using them in combination with measures of anxiety.

  11. Depression and anxiety are not related to nummular headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Peñacoba-Puente, Cecilia; López-López, Almudena; Valle, Begoña; Cuadrado, María Luz; Barriga, Francisco J; Pareja, Juan A

    2009-12-01

    Nummular headache (NH) is a clinical picture characterized by head pain that is exclusively felt in a round, elliptical, or oval area of the head. Although there is evidence supporting an organic origin for NH, some authors question this origin, hypothesizing a potential role for psychological factors. Our aims were to investigate the differences in anxiety and depression between NH patients and healthy controls, and to analyse if these conditions were related to pain parameters in NH patients. The Beck depression inventory (BDI-II) and the trait anxiety scale from state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) were administered to 26 patients with NH and 34 comparable matched controls. No significant interactions between group (NH patients, controls) in either depression (U = 391; p = 0.443) or anxiety levels (U = 336; p = 0.113) were found. Both groups showed similar scores in the BDI-II (patients: 3.9 +/- 2.9; controls: 3.46 +/- 3.15) and STAI (patients: 17.23 +/- 10.3; controls: 13.5 +/- 7.9). Moreover, neither depression nor anxiety showed association with mean pain intensity, pain intensity in exacerbations, size of pain area, or pain frequency. Our study demonstrated that self-reported depression and anxiety were not related to the presence of NH. Further, longitudinal studies are still needed to elucidate the role of mood state in the course of NH.

  12. The role of temperament and character in the outcome of depressive mood in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cano, Teresa; Beato-Fernandez, Luis; Rojo-Moreno, Luis; Vaz-Leal, Francisco J

    2014-07-01

    The aims were to see which temperament and character dimensions were associated with depression, mainly with its outcome at two-year follow up in eating disorders (EDs). Participants (N=151) were 44 Anorexia nervosa (AN), 55 Bulimia nervosa (BN) and 52 Eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) patients. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Rosenberg Self Esteem Questionnaire (RSE), Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2) and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) were administered. Depression at the beginning (t0) was severe in 22% of the cases. Harm Avoidance and Novelty Seeking had an effect on depressed mood at t0, mediated by Ineffectiveness. Responsibility (SD1) was associated with scores on the BDI at two-year follow up (β=-0.37, 95% CI -2.6, -0.6, p<0.01). The evaluation of personality dimension in EDs has therapeutic and prognostic implications: To enhance self-efficacy and self-directness is crucial for good clinical outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The predictive value of mental health for long-term sickness absence: the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and the Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5) compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Rugulies, Reiner; Hjarsbech, Pernille U; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2013-09-17

    Questionnaires are valuable for population surveys of mental health. Different survey instruments may however give different results. The present study compares two mental health instruments, the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and the Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5), in regard to their prediction of long-term sickness absence. Questionnaire data was collected from N = 4153 Danish employees. The questionnaire included the MDI and the MHI-5. The information of long-term sickness absence was obtained from a register. We used Cox regression to calculate covariance adjusted hazard ratios for long-term sickness absence for both measures. Both the MDI and the MHI-5 had a highly significant prediction of long-term sickness absence. A one standard deviation change in score was associated with an increased risk of long-term sickness absence of 27% for the MDI and 37% for the MHI-5. When both measures were included in the same analysis, the MHI-5 performed best. In general population surveys, the MHI-5 is a better predictor of long-term sickness absence than the MDI.

  14. Structural validity of the Maslach Burnout Inventory and influence of depressive symptoms in banking workplace: Unfastening the occupational conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Maria do Socorro da Silva; Wang, Yuan-Pang; Menezes, Paulo Rossi

    2018-06-04

    Burnout and mental disorders have been reported in the financial industry. This study aims to examine the structural validity of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and to investigate the connection between the dimensions of burnout and depressive symptoms in a sample of 1046 bank employees from North Brazil who completed the MBI and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were used to cross-check the factorial structure of the MBI. One-way analysis of variance and correlation analysis were applied to elucidate the relationship between burnout and depressive symptoms. Both 3-factor and 4-factor oblique solutions were plausible EFA models of the burnout syndrome. Results of CFA supported the 19-item 4-factor structure as the best fitting model to data, with two exhaustion factors ("exhausted" and "strained"), depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. The PHQ-9 total score and individual score of depressive items were significantly correlated with all MBI dimensions, notably with the emotional exhaustion dimension. The moderate-to-high correlation observed between burnout and depression suggest the potential utility of the MBI for evaluating burnout among bank employees as well as to point out the need to evaluate systematically the burnout and depressive symptoms given to their potential association. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Re-examining psychometric properties of the Turkish form of the Guilt Inventory in a non-clinical and depression sample (Turkish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burçin Akın

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Object: In the most general sense, guilt is conceptualized as a strong, intense and negative emotion that quickly emerges when people do not live up according to internal values, judgements and social standards or violate them. The aim of the present study was to investigate the factor structure of Guilt Inventory that developed by Kugler and Jones with confirmatory and explanatory factor analyses and reevaluate the psychometric properties of the new Turkish form in depression and non-clinical samples. Methods: For this purpose, 448 university students, 107 healthy controls and 56 adults diagnosed with depression were asked to fill out the questionnaire set consisted of the Guilt Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Disgust Scale- Revised Form and The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-State Anxiety Form.Results: According to the results, original form of Guilt Inventory did not work at the desired level in Turkish culture. Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyzes revealed that the new form with 35 items and 3 subscales works much more appropriately. The analyses of group comparison and correlations with other scales indicated that Turkish version of the Guilt Inventory had satisfactory convergent, divergent and criterion validity. Additively, internal consistency, item-total correlations and Guttman split-half reliability coefficients showed that the Turkish form of Guilt Inventory had good reliability values which were comparable to the original version of the scale. Discussion: In conclusion, results revealed that the Turkish version of Guilt Inventory is a reliable and valid measurement tool.

  16. Early Maladaptive Schemas in Depressed Women and Its Relationship with Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Bolat KONUKÇU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective: Schemas are deep enduring cognitive structures that are the source of dysfunctional cognitions, emotions and behaviors, activate after critical incidents in depression. A subset of schemas called Early Maladaptive Schemas (EMS which are hyphotised to arise from early traumatic and adverse life events are also claimed to be related with not only personality disorders but also mood disorders. In this study we aimed to investigate the relationship between early maladaptive schemas and depression and relationship between schema scores and depression severity in depressed women and compare it with non-depressed controls.Methods: 40 women attending to an outpatient psychiatry clinic and 30 healthy controls participated. All participants were assessed with SCID-1. Data were obtained by using a Sociodemographic Questionnaires, Young Schema Questionnaire-Short Form 3 (YSQ and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI.Results: All except one (enmeshment/undeveloped self maladaptive schema scores of depressed women were higher than controls. BDI was correlated to some schema and schema domain scores in both depressed and control groups but the correlations were stronger in control group. Mean emotional deprivation, negativism, abandonment and instability, failure EMS scores showed the highest difference between two groups. The schema domains most related to depression symptom severity were disconnection and rejection, impaired autonomy and performance.Conclusions: Almost all early maladaptive schemas are related to depression, and some schemas are related to depression symptom severity but these correlations are weaker in control group. This may mean that EMS are stable and mood independent structures. Although other schemas are related to depression, mostly related EMS in women might be emotional deprivation schema. These schemas may also overlap with Beck’s unlovability core belief or sociotropy dimension

  17. Maternal overprotection score of the Parental Bonding Instrument predicts the outcome of cognitive behavior therapy by trainees for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Motoshi; Esaki, Kosei; Wakamatsu, Aya; Kitajima, Tomoko; Narita, Tomohiro; Naitoh, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Norio; Iwata, Nakao

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict the outcome of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) by trainees for major depressive disorder (MDD) based on the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). The hypothesis was that the higher level of care and/or lower level of overprotection score would predict a favorable outcome of CBT by trainees. The subjects were all outpatients with MDD treated with CBT as a training case. All the subjects were asked to fill out the Japanese version of the PBI before commencing the course of psychotherapy. The difference between the first and the last Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score was used to represent the improvement of the intensity of depression by CBT. In order to predict improvement (the difference of the BDI scores) as the objective variable, multiple regression analysis was performed using maternal overprotection score and baseline BDI score as the explanatory variables. The multiple regression model was significant (P = 0.0026) and partial regression coefficient for the maternal overprotection score and the baseline BDI was -0.73 (P = 0.0046) and 0.88 (P = 0.0092), respectively. Therefore, when a patient's maternal overprotection score of the PBI was lower, a better outcome of CBT was expected. The hypothesis was partially supported. This result would be useful in determining indications for CBT by trainees for patients with MDD. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  18. Depression and serum adiponectin and adipose omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalakis, George; Kiriakakis, Michael; Tsibinos, George; Hatzis, Christos; Flouri, Sofia; Mantzoros, Christos; Kafatos, Anthony

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate for a possible relationship between depression and serum adiponectin and adipose tissue omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA. The sample consisted of 90 healthy adolescent volunteers from the island of Crete. There were 54 girls and 36 boys, aged 13 to 18. The mean age was 15.2 years. Subjects were examined by the Preventive Medicine and Nutrition Clinic of the University of Crete. Depression was assessed through the use of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography in adipose tissue. CES-D correlated with dihomo-gamma linolenic acid (DGLA). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that BDI was negatively associated with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), while CES-D was positively associated with DGLA in adipose tissue. Serum adiponectin was not significantly associated with depression. The negative relationship between adipose EPA and depression in adolescents, is in line with findings of previous studies involving adult and elderly subjects, demonstrating negative relations between depression and adipose omega-3 PUFA. This is the first literature report of a relationship between depression and an individual omega-3 fatty acid in adolescents. The inverse relationship between adipose EPA and depression indicates that a low long-term dietary intake of EPA is associated with an increased risk for depression in adolescents.

  19. Correlation of symptom depression levels with mean platelet volume rate on patients of acute coronary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasugian, L.; Hanum, H.; Hanida, W.; Safri, Z.

    2018-03-01

    Patients with Depression and the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is rarely detected, although in some studies say that depression can worsen cardiovascularly and increase mortality. From research, Canan F et al found that increasing levels of Mean platelet volume (MPV) as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and MPV was higher in patients with depression compared with patients without depression. In this study used observational methods of measurement of cross-sectional data. Research began in November 2015 - May 2016 against General Hospital inpatients H. Adam Malik Medan. There are 64 patients with a diagnosis of ACS were given quieter Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), then calculated a score of BDI patients and MPV levels were seen when they first entered the hospital before being given treatment. Patients answered quieter on days 3-7 after diagnosis ACS. ACS Patients were divided into 3 groups: acute myocardial infarction with ST elevation, acute myocardial infarction with non-ST elevation and unstable angina pectoris. The level of depression is grouped into not depression, mild depression, moderate depression and severe depression. Statistically significant with p-value<0.05Based on the linear correlation analysis, it was found a positive correlation with r=0.542. And the relationship is statistically significant with p-value 0.000003.

  20. Financial incentives for smoking cessation among depression-prone pregnant and newly postpartum women: effects on smoking abstinence and depression ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alexa A; Skelly, Joan M; Higgins, Stephen T

    2015-04-01

    We examined whether pregnant and newly postpartum smokers at risk for postpartum depression respond to an incentive-based smoking-cessation treatment and how the intervention impacts depression ratings. This study is a secondary data analysis. Participants (N = 289; data collected 2001-2013) were smokers at the start of prenatal care who participated in 4 controlled clinical trials on the efficacy of financial incentives for smoking cessation. Women were assigned either to an intervention wherein they earned vouchers exchangeable for retail items contingent on abstaining from smoking or to a control condition wherein they received vouchers of comparable value independent of smoking status. Treatments were provided antepartum through 12-weeks postpartum. Depression ratings (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]-1A) were examined across 7 antepartum/postpartum assessments. Women who reported a history of prior depression or who had BDI scores ≥ 17 at the start of prenatal care were categorized as depression-prone (Dep+), while those meeting neither criterion were categorized as depression-negative (Dep-). The intervention increased smoking abstinence independent of depression status (p postpartum BDI ratings as well as the proportion of women scoring in the clinical range (≥17 and >21) compared with the control treatment (ps ≤ .05). Treatment effects on depression ratings were attributable to changes in Dep+ women. These results demonstrate that depression-prone pregnant and newly postpartum women respond well to this incentive-based smoking-cessation intervention in terms of achieving abstinence, and the intervention also reduces the severity of postpartum depression ratings in this at-risk population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Evaluation of depressive symptoms and sleep alterations in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moo-Estrella, Jesús; Pérez-Benítez, Hugo; Solís-Rodríguez, Francisco; Arankowsky-Sandoval, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that sleep alterations could favor subsequent depression development. In order to identify the simultaneous occurrence of these parameters in young people, in this work we evaluated the prevalence of depressive symptoms, sleep habits, and possible sleep disturbances in college students. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and a Sleep Habits Questionnaire were applied to students registered at the Autonomous University of Yucatan, Merida (mean age 20.2 +/- 2.6 years). The final sample was composed of 340 (53%) women and 298 (47%) men. Reliability of the BDI and ESS was assessed by Cronbach's alpha method. Taking 10 as ESS cut-off point, it was found that 31.6% of the students had a high level of sleepiness. Students with depressive symptoms had a greater number of days with somnolence during class (p students without symptoms. In comparison to subjects without depressive symptoms, students with those symptoms rated their sleep quality as poor (p sleep after going to bed (p sleep alterations in a large proportion of the studied subjects, which were more severe in those who showed depressive symptoms. Educating students for appropriate sleep hygiene and encouraging them to seek professional advice to treat sleep disturbances may be useful to prevent depression.

  2. Depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation and acne: a study of male Finnish conscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, L M H; Meririnne, E; Höök-Nikanne, J; Isometsä, E; Henriksson, M

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the association among acne, depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in Finnish male military conscripts. Consecutive 165 acne patients and 150 patients with mild knee symptoms for comparison were enrolled in the study conducted in the Central Military Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. They filled out the following questionnaires: General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. The Leeds acne grading scale was used to estimate the severity of acne. Sixteen (9.7%) acne patients and 20 (13.3%) comparison patients had at least moderate level of depressive symptoms (BDI score 10; P > 0.05, between groups). Suicidal ideation (BDI suicidal item score 1) was reported by 24 (14.5%) acne patients and 16 (10.7%) comparison patients (P > 0.05, between groups). When comparing the mild facial acne patients (Leeds score 0-3) with those with moderate-severe facial acne (Leeds score 4), there were no statistical differences in depressive symptoms (9.5% vs. 10.0%) or suicidal ideation (13.7% vs. 15.7%). No linear relationship was observed between the BDI and facial Leeds scores (P > 0.05). Risk factors for suicidal ideation among the acne patients were depression and alcohol risk use. Young male patients with acne do not suffer more depressive symptoms or suicidal ideation than patients with mild knee symptoms, and the severity of acne is not associated with the presence of depressive symptoms. The risk factors for suicidal ideation among acne patients seem to be similar to those found in the general population.

  3. Online CBT Is Effective in Overcoming Cultural and Language Barriers in Patients With Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Nazanin; Hirji, Alyssa; Sutton, Chloe; Naeem, Farooq

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of weekly email in delivering online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) to treat mild to moderately depressed individuals. The effectiveness of the online CBT was measured following treatment and then again at a 6-month follow-up and was compared with outcomes in a waitlist control group. Participants were recruited through announcements on psychology Web sites, Iranian organization Web sites, and weblogs and flyers. Ninety-three individuals who met inclusion criteria, including a score >18 on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), participated in the study, with 47 randomly assigned to the CBT group and 46 to the control group. The CBT group received 10 to 12 sessions of online CBT conducted by a psychiatrist and a psychiatry resident. Following completion of the CBT, a second BDI was sent to participants. Another BDI was then sent to participants 6 months after the completion of treatment. Email-based CBT significantly reduced BDI scores compared with results in a waitlist control group following 10 to 12 weeks of treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Email is a viable method for delivering CBT to individuals when face-to-face interaction is not possible. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

  4. Verbal learning in marijuana users seeking treatment: a comparison between depressed and non-depressed samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebke, Patrick V; Vadhan, Nehal P; Brooks, Daniel J; Levin, Frances R

    2014-07-01

    Both individuals with marijuana use and depressive disorders exhibit verbal learning and memory decrements. This study investigated the interaction between marijuana dependence and depression on learning and memory performance. The California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II) was administered to depressed (n = 71) and non-depressed (n = 131) near-daily marijuana users. The severity of depressive symptoms was measured by the self-rated Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the clinician-rated Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). Multivariate analyses of covariance statistics (MANCOVA) were employed to analyze group differences in cognitive performance. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to examine the relative associations between marijuana use, depression and CVLT-II performance. Findings from each group were compared to published normative data. Although both groups exhibited decreased CVLT-II performance relative to the test's normative sample (p marijuana-dependent subjects with a depressive disorder did not perform differently than marijuana-dependent subjects without a depressive disorder (p > 0.05). Further, poorer CVLT-II performance was modestly associated with increased self-reported daily amount of marijuana use (corrected p depressive symptoms (corrected p > 0.002). These findings suggest an inverse association between marijuana use and verbal learning function, but not between depression and verbal learning function in regular marijuana users.

  5. Incorporating BDI Agents into Human-Agent Decision Making Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphorst, Bart; van Wissen, Arlette; Dignum, Virginia

    Artificial agents, people, institutes and societies all have the ability to make decisions. Decision making as a research area therefore involves a broad spectrum of sciences, ranging from Artificial Intelligence to economics to psychology. The Colored Trails (CT) framework is designed to aid researchers in all fields in examining decision making processes. It is developed both to study interaction between multiple actors (humans or software agents) in a dynamic environment, and to study and model the decision making of these actors. However, agents in the current implementation of CT lack the explanatory power to help understand the reasoning processes involved in decision making. The BDI paradigm that has been proposed in the agent research area to describe rational agents, enables the specification of agents that reason in abstract concepts such as beliefs, goals, plans and events. In this paper, we present CTAPL: an extension to CT that allows BDI software agents that are written in the practical agent programming language 2APL to reason about and interact with a CT environment.

  6. BDI: the Cadarache data bank for LMBFR integral experiment data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimpault, G.; Reynaud, G.

    1986-09-01

    The Integral Data Bank is part of the procedure to create the so-called neutronic formulaire with which every design calculation is performed with associated uncertainty. A modern way to store the integral data has been set up in order to handle and recalculate easily with a standard procedure (fig. 1) each experimental programme. A direct access way to read the data allows an automatic way to obtain the calculation/experiment discrepancies associated with a particular data base. The BDI has proved to be fully operational and has been used with the new nuclear data file JEF1. In the present version of the BDI more than 140 experiments (critical mass, spectrum indexes, buckling, etc...) both from MASURCA and SNEAK critical experiments are documented and stored in an easy-to-retrieve from. Also included are irradiation experiments in PHENIX and the STEK fission product related experiments. Future plans of development concern reactivity measurements in critical assemblies, irradiation experiments and start-up experiments of SUPER PHENIX and ZEBRA critical experiments

  7. Depression. Does it affect the comprehension of receptive skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtchi, Mojgan; Zokaee, Zahra; Ghaffarinejad, Ali R; Sadeghi, Mohammad M

    2012-07-01

    To compare the comprehension of depressed and non-depressed male and female Iranian learners of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in receptive skills, and to investigate whether inefficiency in learning English could be due to depression. We selected 126 boys and 96 girls aged between 15 and 18 by simple random sampling from 2 high schools in Kerman, Iran to examine whether there was any significant relationship between depression and comprehension of receptive skills in males and females. We undertook this descriptive, correlational study between January and May 2011 in Kerman, Iran. After administration of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), we found that 93 students were non-depressed, 65 had minimal depression, 48 mild depression, and 16 suffered from severe depression. The correlation between participants` scores on listening and reading test with depression level indicated a significant relationship between depression and comprehension of both listening, and reading. Males had higher scores in both reading and listening. In listening, there was no significant difference among the levels of depression and males and females. Regarding the reading skill, there was no significant difference among levels of depression; however, the reading comprehension of males and females differed significantly. Learners who show a deficiency in receptive skills should be examined for the possibility of suffering from some degree of depression.

  8. Association of different levels of depressive symptoms with symptomatology, overall disease severity, and quality of life in women with fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Amris, Kirstine; Ortega, Francisco B

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study examined the associations of different levels of depression with pain, sleep quality, fatigue, functional exercise capacity, overall fibromyalgia (FM) severity, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in women with FM. METHODS: A total of 451 women with FM participated.......4-23.7), as well as poorer sleep quality (3.2-units; 95 % CI 1.7-4.7) and mental component of HRQoL (-17.0-units; 95 % CI -21.0 to -12.9) than participants with minimal signs of depression. There was no association of signs of depression with pain sensitivity, exercise capacity, or the physical component of HRQo...... in this cross-sectional study. Depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory; BDI-II), pain intensity (numerical rating scale; NRS), pain sensitivity (algometry), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory), functional exercise capacity (6-min walk test), FM...

  9. Sensitivity to changes during antidepressant treatment: a comparison of unidimensional subscales of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Isabella; Wagner, Stefanie; Mergl, Roland; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Hautzinger, Martin; Henkel, Verena; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tadić, André

    2012-06-01

    In the efficacy evaluation of antidepressant treatments, the total score of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) is still regarded as the 'gold standard'. We previously had shown that the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) was more sensitive to detect depressive symptom changes than the HAMD17 (Helmreich et al. 2011). Furthermore, studies suggest that the unidimensional subscales of the HAMD, which capture the core depressive symptoms, outperform the full HAMD regarding the detection of antidepressant treatment effects. The aim of the present study was to compare several unidimensional subscales of the HAMD and the IDS regarding their sensitivity to changes in depression symptoms in a sample of patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression (MIND). Biweekly IDS-C28 and HAMD17 data from 287 patients of a 10-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of sertraline and cognitive-behavioural group therapy in patients with MIND were converted to subscale scores and analysed during the antidepressant treatment course. We investigated sensitivity to depressive change for all scales from assessment-to-assessment, in relation to depression severity level and placebo-verum differences. The subscales performed similarly during the treatment course, with slight advantages for some subscales in detecting treatment effects depending on the treatment modality and on the items included. Most changes in depressive symptomatology were detected by the IDS short scale, but regarding the effect sizes, it performed worse than most subscales. Unidimensional subscales are a time- and cost-saving option in judging drug therapy outcomes, especially in antidepressant treatment efficacy studies. However, subscales do not cover all facets of depression (e.g. atypical symptoms, sleep disturbances), which might be important for comprehensively understanding the nature of the disease depression. Therefore, the cost-to-benefit ratio must be

  10. Antepartum/postpartum depressive symptoms and serum zinc and magnesium levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Jacek; Dudek, Dominika; Schlegel-Zawadzka, Małgorzata; Grabowska, Mariola; Marcinek, Antoni; Florek, Ewa; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Nowak, Rafał J; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Nowak, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between depressive symptoms and serum zinc and magnesium level in antepartum and postpartum women. All women received standard vitamin, zinc and magnesium supplementation. Sixty-six pregnant women in the Czerwiakowski Hospital in Kraków were assessed for prepartum depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Sixty-two and fifty-eight women were also assessed for postpartum depressive symptoms (using Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Rating Scale, EPDRS) at 3 and 30 days after delivery, respectively. Serum zinc and magnesium levels were also determined at these time points, however, the number of examined subjects were diminished. A significantly higher EPDRS score (by 45%), indicating severity of depressive symptoms, was found on the 3rd day after childbirth compared with the 30th postpartum day. Moreover, the early post-delivery period (3rd day) was characterized by a 24% lower serum zinc concentration than that found on the 30th day after childbirth. BDI scores assessed a month before childbirth revealed mild depressive symptoms, which was accompanied by a serum zinc concentration similar to that found on the 3rd day after delivery. No significant alterations were found in the magnesium levels between these time points. The present results demonstrated a relationship between severity of depressive symptoms and decreased serum zinc (but not magnesium) concentration in a very specific type of affective disorder, the postpartum depression.

  11. The Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self Report (IDS-SR) : Psychometric properties of the Indonesian version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arjadi, Retha; Nauta, Maaike H; Utoyo, Dharmayati B; Bockting, Claudi L H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression screening and examination in Indonesia are highly challenging due to the disproportionately low number of mental health professionals in comparison to the Indonesian population. Self-report questionnaires on depression are cost-effective and time-efficient. The current study

  12. The Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self Report (IDS-SR): Psychometric properties of the Indonesian version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arjadi, Retha; Nauta, Maaike H.; Utoyo, Dharmayati B.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.

    2017-01-01

    Depression screening and examination in Indonesia are highly challenging due to the disproportionately low number of mental health professionals in comparison to the Indonesian population. Self-report questionnaires on depression are cost-effective and time-efficient. The current study investigates

  13. Exercise impact on depressed patients’ self

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi-Nezhad, Mahdi

    . A sample of 96 Danish psychiatric patients completed the PSPP, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA). The Danish version of the PSPP showed high internal consistency and Applying the exploratory and confirmatory factor......The overall aim of the present thesis is to investigate the effects of aerobic, anaerobic and relaxation forms of exercise on physical self-perception and self-esteem of Danish epressed patients. This study was designed as part of a larger project called DEMO which was a parallel-group, randomised...... of the Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP) in Danish depressed patients. We also tested the ability of the PSPP for discriminant validity when depression groups were compared with normal adults. The mediating role of self-esteem in physical self-perceptions and negative affect relationship were examined...

  14. Inpatients with major depressive disorder: Psychometric properties of the new Multidimensional Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darharaj, Mohammad; Habibi, Mojtaba; Power, Michael J; Farzadian, Farzaneh; Rahimi, Maesoumeh; Kholghi, Habibeh; Kazemitabar, Maryam

    2016-12-01

    The New Multi-dimensional Depression Scale (NMDS) is one of the most comprehensive scales that measures depression symptoms in four domains, including emotional, cognitive, somatic, and interpersonal. This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure and psychometric properties of the NMDS in a group of Iranian inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). At first, the scale was translated into Persian and used as part of a battery consisting of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Oxford Happiness Inventory (OHI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The battery was administered to 271 inpatients with MDD (90 men and 181 women) aged from 18 to 60 who had been referred to psychiatric hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Persian version of the NMDS upheld its original four-factor structure. Moreover, the results showed its good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha coefficient ranging from 0.70 for the emotional subscale to 0.83 for the interpersonal subscale). In addition, the NMDS scores were correlated with other constructs in empirically and theoretically expected ways, which provides evidence for the convergent (positive significant relationships with anxiety and cognitive and somatic-affective symptoms of depression) and divergent (negative significant relationships with happiness and mental health and physical health) validity of the scale. These findings supported the Persian version of the NMDS as a reliable and valid measure for the assessment of depression symptoms in patients with MDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Depression and Attachment Styles in Predicting Students' Addiction to Cell Phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasempour, Abdollah; Mahmoodi-Aghdam, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the role of depression and attachment styles in predicting cell phone addiction. In this descriptive correlational study, a sample including 100 students of Payame Noor University (PNU), Reyneh Center, Iran, in the academic year of 2013-2014 was selected using volunteer sampling. Participants were asked to complete the adult attachment inventory (AAI), Beck depression inventory-13 (BDI-13) and the cell phone overuse scale (COS). Results of the stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that depression and avoidant attachment style were the best predictors of students' cell phone addiction (R(2) = 0.23). The results of this study highlighted the predictive value of depression and avoidant attachment style concerning students' cell phone addiction.

  16. Mother-Infant Attachment Style as a Predictor of Depression among Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Amani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: There are an increasing number of studies showing an association of adult attachment styles to psychopathology. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation between attachment style and depression among students of Bu-Ali Sina University in Iran. Methods: This descriptive correlational study was conducted on 157 girl students who were randomly selected. They were evaluated by demographic questionnaire, Adult Attachment Inventory (AAI (Hazan and Shaver, and theBeck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. The data was analysis by using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis in SPSS 16 statistical package. Results: Findings indicated that secure attachment style had no significant correlation with depression and insecure attachment styles had a significant positive correlation with depression (p

  17. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS: validation in a Greek general hospital sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patapis Paulos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS has been used in several languages to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients with good results. Methods The HADS was administered to 521 participants (275 controls and 246 inpatients and outpatients of the Internal Medicine and Surgical Departments in 'Attikon' General Hospital in Athens. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used as 'gold standards' for depression and anxiety respectively. Results The HADS presented high internal consistency; Cronbach's α cofficient was 0.884 (0.829 for anxiety and 0.840 for depression and stability (test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient 0.944. Factor analysis showed a two-factor structure. The HADS showed high concurrent validity; the correlations of the scale and its subscales with the BDI and the STAI were high (0.722 – 0.749. Conclusion The Greek version of HADS showed good psychometric properties and could serve as a useful tool for clinicians to assess anxiety and depression in general hospital patients.

  18. A case-control study assessing depression in patients with periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyamali Sundararajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the tooth. One of the important non-oral risk factors for periodontitis is psychosocial stress and depression. Depression affects oral health by affecting the immune system through its effects on hypothalamic pituitary axis system. Periodontal inflammatory surface area (PISA is a system used to assess inflammatory burden in the periodontal tissue. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the relationship between PISA and depression. Settings and Design: The design of the study is case-control study. Materials and Methods: The study design is a case-control study with forty patients each in case and control groups. The periodontal inflammatory level was assessed by PISA system and the levels of depression was assessed by using Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI. Statistical Analysis: Student's t-test was used to compare PISA and BDI scores. The BDI score (mean ± standard deviation [SD] for controls was 12.75 ± 6.82 compared to 22.73 ± 4.40 for the cases. The comparison (t = 7.78 was statistically significant at P < 0.0001. The PISA score (mean ± SD for controls was 210.47 ± 76.80 compared to the PISA score of 1069.50 ± 204.21 for cases which was statistically significant (t = 24.90; P < 0.0001. Results: Significantly higher BDI scores were observed in patients with chronic periodontitis than healthy controls. Conclusion: This study clearly reveals a significant association between the severity of depression and inflammatory burden.

  19. Improvement of depressive symptoms in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis treated with ustekinumab: an open label trial validated using beck depression inventory, Hamilton depression rating scale measures and 18fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Jang; Park, Min-Young; Pak, Kyoungjune; Han, Junhee; Kim, Gun-Wook; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2018-05-07

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease associated with psychiatric co-morbidities, especially depression. Early detection of psychological vulnerability in patients with psoriasis seems to be of great clinical importance and significantly impacts the quality of life of the patients. We sought to clarify the association between psoriasis and depressive symptoms in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis, and to determine the risk factors for depressive symptoms and analyze the effect of ustekinumab on the symptoms. We also aimed to evaluate the changes in glucose metabolism using 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Fifteen patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis scheduled to be treated with ustekinumab were enrolled. At baseline and after achieving a 75% reduction in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score (PASI75), all patients underwent a psychiatric interview and FDG-PET. Fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled for comparison. Patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis were more depressed than those in the control group were (p Inventory and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale psychiatric interviews (p < .05). However, FDG-PET of the brain showed no significant difference before and after PASI75 achievement using ustekinumab injection. Patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis are at an increased risk for depressive symptoms, and treatment with ustekinumab may be beneficial. FDG-PET does not reflect the changes in depressive symptoms in such patients.

  20. Validez Convergente de la Version Espanola Preliminar del Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depresion y Aduste Marital (Convergent Validity of the Preliminary Spanish Version of the Child Abuse Potential Inventory: Depression and Marital Adjustment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruabarrena, M. Ignacia; de Paul, Joaquin

    1992-01-01

    "Convergent validity" of preliminary Spanish version of Child Abuse Potential (CAP) Inventory was studied. CAP uses ecological-systemic model of child maltreatment to evaluate individual, family, and social factors facilitating physical child abuse. Depression and marital adjustment were measured in three groups of mothers. Results found…

  1. Psychometric evaluation of the Major Depression Inventory among young people living in Coastal Kenya [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Otiende

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The lack of reliable, valid and adequately standardized measures of mental illnesses in sub-Saharan Africa is a key challenge for epidemiological studies on mental health.  We evaluated the psychometric properties and feasibility of using a computerized version of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI in an epidemiological study in rural Kenya. Methods: We surveyed 1496 participants aged 13-24 years in Kilifi County, on the Kenyan coast. The MDI was administered using a computer-assisted system, available in three languages. Internal consistency was evaluated using both Cronbach’s alpha and the Omega Coefficient. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to evaluate the factorial structure of the MDI. Results:  Internal consistency using both Cronbach’s Alpha (α= 0.83 and the Omega Coefficient (0.82; 95% confidence interval 0.81- 0.83 was above acceptable thresholds. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated a good fit of the data to a unidimensional model of MDI (χ2 (33, N = 1409 = 178.52 p < 0.001, TLI = 0.947, CFI = 0.961, and Root Mean Square Error of Approximation, RMSEA = .056, and this was confirmed using Item Response Models (Loevinger’s H coefficient 0.38 that proved the MDI was a unidimensional scale. Equivalence evaluation indicated invariance across sex and age groups. In our population, 3.6% of the youth presented with scores suggesting major depression using the ICD-10 scoring algorithm, and 8.7% presented with total scores indicating presence of depression (mild, moderate or severe.  Females and older youth were at the highest risk of depression. Conclusions: The MDI has good psychometric properties.  Given its brevity, relative ease of usage and ability to identify at-risk youth, it may be useful for epidemiological studies of depression in Africa.  Studies to establish clinical thresholds for depression are recommended. The high prevalence of depressive symptoms suggests that depression may be an important

  2. Cardiac Vagal Control and Depressive Symptoms in Response to Negative Emotional Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonhajzerova, I; Visnovcova, Z; Mestanikova, A; Jurko, A; Mestanik, M

    We aimed to study complex cardiovagal control using heart rate variability (HRV), linear and nonlinear analyses at rest and during negative emotional stress in healthy students with varying depressive symptoms. ECG recording in 20 students was performed at baseline, negative emotional stress, and recovery period. The HRV parameters evaluated were the following: RR interval, spectral power in high-frequency band (HF-HRV), and symbolic dynamics index 2LV%. The subjects were divided into two groups based on the score of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) - normal mood (BDI: 0.6 ± 0.2) and mild mood disturbance (BDI: 14.3 ± 1.4). We found significantly lower logHF-HRV during emotional stress in mild mood disturbance compared with normal mood (p = 0.047). No significant differences were found in the remaining parameters. We conclude that negative emotional stress attenuated the cardiovagal control during mood disturbance, which points to discrete abnormalities in the neurocardiac reflex system associated with depressive symptoms. Hampered cardiovagal control could represent a potential pathomechanism leading to depression-linked cardiovascular complications.

  3. BDI position on energy policy and energy market deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreklau, C.

    2003-01-01

    Secure energy supplies are indispensable for our modern way of life and our economy. Energy policy is a part of economic policy and must be shaped within the magic triangle of objectives, i.e. security, competitiveness, environmental compatibility. As a result of their outstanding role, electricity and natural gas, with respective shares of 70% in industrial energy use and 85% in energy costs, are in the focus of energy policy interest of the Federation of German Industries (BDI). One important development over the past few years has been the deregulation of the markets for electricity and gas. However, the markedly lower electricity rates to be paid by industry, commercial tariff consumers, and private customers are being offset by new burdens arising from government intervention and taxes. Other dirigistic interventions into the energy market by the red-green federal government since 1998, referred to as 'turning point of energy policy', are invalidating what market opening had been achieved. With a view to a sustainable energy policy for the future, BDI pleads in favor of a broad energy mix. In a mix neutral with respect to competition, this includes the classical energy sources, the renewables, and low-cost, environmentally friendly nuclear power. In principle, it is the forces of the market, coupled with responsible action, which are to steer further developments. On a European level, speedy implementation of the opening of the electricity and gas markets, as decided, should be urged. It is important that the leeway won as a result of deregulation not be constrained again by new regulations. More market, less regulation, and more direct responsibility must provide room for a powerful energy supply system under the premises of the triangle of objectives referred to above. (orig.) [de

  4. Personality in remitted major depressive disorder with single and recurrent episodes assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Sasayama, Daimei; Matsuo, Junko; Ogawa, Shintaro; Ishida, Ikki; Nagashima, Anna; Kinoshita, Yukiko; Ota, Miho; Hattori, Kotaro; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies consistently reported increased harm avoidance (HA) assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, such findings may have been related with depression severity and number of depressive episodes. The aims of the present study were twofold: to examine TCI personality profile in remitted MDD (DSM-IV) patients and to compare TCI personality between MDD patients with single episode (SGL-MDD) and those with recurrent episodes (REC-MDD) in order to elucidate personality profile associated with recurrence. TCI was administered to 86 outpatients with remitted SGL-MDD (12 male and 17 female patients; mean age 43.2 ± 12.1 years) and REC-MDD (26 male and 31 female patients; 40.3 ± 11.6 years), and 529 healthy controls (225 men and 304 women; 43.4 ± 15.5 years), matched for age, sex and education years. Logistic regression analyses were performed in which single/recurrent episodes of depression were the dependent variable and age, sex, age of onset, family history of psychiatric disease and TCI scores were entered as possible predictors. The remitted MDD patients had significantly higher scores on HA (P differences in personality profile between remitted MDD patients and controls, and between remitted REC-MDD and SGL-MDD patients, suggesting that they are trait markers. HA and fatigability might be useful to assess risk for recurrence of depression. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  5. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression among adults in Japanese clinical settings: a single-group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating Japanese patients with major depression is lacking, therefore, a feasibility study of CBT for depression in Japanese clinical settings is urgently required. Findings A culturally adapted, 16-week manualized individual CBT program for Japanese patients with major depressive disorder was developed. A total of 27 patients with major depression were enrolled in a single-group study with the purpose of testing the feasibility of the program. Twenty six patients (96%) completed the study. The mean total score on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) for all patients (Intention-to-treat sample) improved from 32.6 to 11.7, with a mean change of 20.8 (95% confidence interval: 17.0 to 24.8). Within-group effect size at the endpoint assessment was 2.64 (Cohen's d). Twenty-one patients (77.7%) showed treatment response and 17 patients (63.0%) achieved remission at the end of the program. Significant improvement was observed in measurement of subjective and objective depression severity (assessed by BDI-II, Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Rated, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), dysfunctional attitude (assessed by Dysfunctional Attitude Scale), global functioning (assessed by Global Assessment of Functioning of DSM-IV) and subjective well-being (assessed by WHO Subjective Well-being Inventory) (all p values < 0.001). Conclusions Our manualized treatment comprised of a 16-week individual CBT program for major depression appears feasible and may achieve favorable treatment outcomes among Japanese patients with major depression. Further research involving a larger sample in a randomized, controlled trial design is warranted. Trial registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000002542. PMID:20529252

  6. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression among adults in Japanese clinical settings: a single-group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Toshiaki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for treating Japanese patients with major depression is lacking, therefore, a feasibility study of CBT for depression in Japanese clinical settings is urgently required. Findings A culturally adapted, 16-week manualized individual CBT program for Japanese patients with major depressive disorder was developed. A total of 27 patients with major depression were enrolled in a single-group study with the purpose of testing the feasibility of the program. Twenty six patients (96% completed the study. The mean total score on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II for all patients (Intention-to-treat sample improved from 32.6 to 11.7, with a mean change of 20.8 (95% confidence interval: 17.0 to 24.8. Within-group effect size at the endpoint assessment was 2.64 (Cohen's d. Twenty-one patients (77.7% showed treatment response and 17 patients (63.0% achieved remission at the end of the program. Significant improvement was observed in measurement of subjective and objective depression severity (assessed by BDI-II, Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Rated, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, dysfunctional attitude (assessed by Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, global functioning (assessed by Global Assessment of Functioning of DSM-IV and subjective well-being (assessed by WHO Subjective Well-being Inventory (all p values Conclusions Our manualized treatment comprised of a 16-week individual CBT program for major depression appears feasible and may achieve favorable treatment outcomes among Japanese patients with major depression. Further research involving a larger sample in a randomized, controlled trial design is warranted. Trial registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000002542.

  7. Treating major depression with yoga: A prospective, randomized, controlled pilot trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Prathikanti

    Full Text Available Conventional pharmacotherapies and psychotherapies for major depression are associated with limited adherence to care and relatively low remission rates. Yoga may offer an alternative treatment option, but rigorous studies are few. This randomized controlled trial with blinded outcome assessors examined an 8-week hatha yoga intervention as mono-therapy for mild-to-moderate major depression.Investigators recruited 38 adults in San Francisco meeting criteria for major depression of mild-to-moderate severity, per structured psychiatric interview and scores of 14-28 on Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI. At screening, individuals engaged in psychotherapy, antidepressant pharmacotherapy, herbal or nutraceutical mood therapies, or mind-body practices were excluded. Participants were 68% female, with mean age 43.4 years (SD = 14.8, range = 22-72, and mean BDI score 22.4 (SD = 4.5. Twenty participants were randomized to 90-minute hatha yoga practice groups twice weekly for 8 weeks. Eighteen participants were randomized to 90-minute attention control education groups twice weekly for 8 weeks. Certified yoga instructors delivered both interventions at a university clinic. Primary outcome was depression severity, measured by BDI scores every 2 weeks from baseline to 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes were self-efficacy and self-esteem, measured by scores on the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES at baseline and at 8 weeks.In intent-to-treat analysis, yoga participants exhibited significantly greater 8-week decline in BDI scores than controls (p-value = 0.034. In sub-analyses of participants completing final 8-week measures, yoga participants were more likely to achieve remission, defined per final BDI score ≤ 9 (p-value = 0.018. Effect size of yoga in reducing BDI scores was large, per Cohen's d = -0.96 [95%CI, -1.81 to -0.12]. Intervention groups did not differ significantly in 8-week change scores for either the GSES or

  8. The problems during choice of profession and comparison of these problems with anxiety and depression in final year of high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Kars

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to investigate the relationship between prevalence of anxiety, depressive disorder symptoms and some sociodemographic variables in the final year of high-school students, secondly to determine the socio-economic and cultural factors which affect choosing professions among the high school senior students in the province of Van. Methods: In this context, the study was performed in the provincial center of Van in the second semester of 2011. Unpaired t test and one way Anova test were used for statistical analysis. Socio-demographic Information Form, Awareness of Career Choice Form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI were applied to a total of 412 students. Results: In this study BAI and BDI scores were 15.4±13.3 and 15.3±12.8 respectively. BAI scores of the students in Anatolian high school were found higher than the normal high school. Both the anxiety and depressive levels of female students were higher than the males. The mean age was 16,8 years, 73.8% of whom were male. In 58% of the students’ BAI point, in 66% BDI point were higher than 41; and in 37% BDI point were higher than 17. Female students had higher BAI points. There was a positive correlation between BAI and BDI points. Conclusion: It was noticed in our study that the great amount of anxiety discovered in last grade high school students affect. The student’s job choice negatively. We think that providing last grade high school students with guidance service about job selection will be useful.

  9. Prevalence of depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Calvín, J L; Zapatero Gaviria, A; Martín Ríos, M D

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between depression and diabetes has been widely documented but there have been methodological limitations such as the failure to conduct a diagnostic interview of the depressive condition. We have estimated the prevalence of depression in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and its relationship with sociodemographic, lifestyle and clinical variables. This was a cross-sectional, randomized study (stratified by sex and age) of patients with DM2 treated in a healthcare area with approximately 3000 eligible patients. The depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (depression defined as a BDI score>16) and a psychiatric interview. We used a multivariate logistic regression model to evaluate the association between depression and DM2, after adjusting for known risk factors. We examined 275 patients with DM2 (mean age, 64.5 years; men, 56.4%). The prevalence of depression was calculated at 32.7% (95% CI 27.4-38.5) and increased with age. A greater prevalence of depression was found in women, widowers, patients with obesity, those with poor compliance with the prescription, those with poor glycemic control and those who developed complications from diabetes. Thirty-five percent (95% CI 26.4-45.8) of the patients who scored>16 on the BDI scale had not been diagnosed with depression. Depression is highly prevalent in patients with DM2, especially in women. For approximately one-third of the patients, a diagnosis of depression had not been reached. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  10. Multiagent Systems and Applications Volume 2 Development Using the GORITE BDI Framework

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    Jarvis, Dennis; Ronnquist, Ralph; Jain, Lakhmi C

    2013-01-01

    Since its conception almost 30 years ago, the BDI (Belief Desire Intention) model of agency has become established, along with Soar, as the approach of choice for practitioners in the development of knowledge intensive agent applications. However, in developing BDI agent applications for over 15 years, the authors of this book have observed a disconnect between what the BDI model provides and what is actually required of an agent model in order to build practical systems. The GORITE BDI framework was  developed to address this gap and this book is written for students, researchers and practitioners who wish to gain a practical understanding of how GORITE is used to develop BDI agent applications. In this regard, a feature of the book is the use of complete, annotated examples. As GORITE is a Java framework,  a familiarity with Java (or a similar language) is assumed, but no prior knowledge of the BDI model is required.

  11. Psychometric properties of the postpartum depression screening scale beyond the postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeli, Jo M; Hooker, Stephanie A; Everhart, Kevin D; Kaplan, Peter S

    2018-04-01

    Accurate postpartum depression screening measures are needed to identify mothers with depressive symptoms both in the postpartum period and beyond. Because it had not been tested beyond the immediate postpartum period, the reliability and validity of the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) and its sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value for diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD) were assessed in a diverse community sample of 238 mothers of 4- to 15-month-old infants. Mothers (N = 238; M age = 30.2, SD = 5.3) attended a lab session and completed the PDSS, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and a structured clinical interview (SCID) to diagnose MDD. The reliability, validity, specificity, sensitivity, and predictive value of the PDSS to identify maternal depression were assessed. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the construct validity of five but not seven content subscales. The PDSS total and subscale scores demonstrated acceptable to high reliability (α = 0.68-0.95). Discriminant function analysis showed the scale correctly provided diagnostic classification at a rate higher than chance alone. Sensitivity and specificity for major depressive disorder (MDD) diagnosis were good and comparable to those of the BDI-II. Even in mothers who were somewhat more diverse and had older infants than those in the original normative study, the PDSS appears to be a psychometrically sound screener for identifying depressed mothers in the 15 months after childbirth. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Depression symptoms and stressful life events among college students in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rodríguez, Mae Lynn; Rivera-Medina, Carmen L; Cámara-Fuentes, Luis; Suárez-Torres, Alba; Bernal, Guillermo

    2013-03-05

    The transition from adolescence to adulthood is associated with stressful adaptation experiences that may increase symptoms of depression. We explored the prevalence and sex differences of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation in freshmen Latino college students in Puerto Rico, and identified stressful life events that could contribute to symptoms of depression. Two thousand one hundred sixty-three freshmen college students from the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) public education system were assessed for depression symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and stressful life events using open questions. Nine percent of the sample reported depression symptoms at a moderate or severe level (BDI>20). Chi square analyses revealed a significantly higher prevalence for three of the stressful life events in females than males: relocation (10.2% females vs. 7.3% males; X(2) (1)=4.13, p=.042), break-up of a significant relationship (25.3% females vs. 17.8% males; X(2) (1)=13.76, pstressful life events are associated with an increased prevalence of depression symptoms. Early detection of depression and tailored prevention programs should be developed to improve both mental health and academic performance among the college population. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress

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    Milgrom Jeannette

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Methods Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26–32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161 also completed questionnaires at 10–12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1. Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2. Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3. Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator

  14. Risk factors for antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Bronwyn; Milgrom, Jeannette

    2008-04-16

    Given that the prevalence of antenatal and postnatal depression is high, with estimates around 13%, and the consequences serious, efforts have been made to identify risk factors to assist in prevention, identification and treatment. Most risk factors associated with postnatal depression have been well researched, whereas predictors of antenatal depression have been less researched. Risk factors associated with early parenting stress have not been widely researched, despite the strong link with depression. The aim of this study was to further elucidate which of some previously identified risk factors are most predictive of three outcome measures: antenatal depression, postnatal depression and parenting stress and to examine the relationship between them. Primipara and multiparae women were recruited antenatally from two major hoitals as part of the beyondblue National Postnatal Depression Program 1. In this subsidiary study, 367 women completed an additional large battery of validated questionnaires to identify risk factors in the antenatal period at 26-32 weeks gestation. A subsample of these women (N = 161) also completed questionnaires at 10-12 weeks postnatally. Depression level was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Regression analyses identified significant risk factors for the three outcome measures. (1). Significant predictors for antenatal depression: low self-esteem, antenatal anxiety, low social support, negative cognitive style, major life events, low income and history of abuse. (2). Significant predictors for postnatal depression: antenatal depression and a history of depression while also controlling for concurrent parenting stress, which was a significant variable. Antenatal depression was identified as a mediator between seven of the risk factors and postnatal depression. (3). Postnatal depression was the only significant predictor for parenting stress and also acted as a mediator for other risk factors. Risk factor profiles for

  15. Confluence of depression and acute psychological stress among patients with stable coronary heart disease: effects on myocardial perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Matthew M; Meadows, Judith; Shimbo, Daichi; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E; Soufer, Robert

    2014-10-30

    Depression is prevalent in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients and increases risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) recurrence and mortality despite optimal medical care. The pathways underlying this risk remain elusive. Psychological stress (PS) can provoke impairment in myocardial perfusion and trigger ACS. A confluence of acute PS with depression might reveal coronary vascular mechanisms of risk. We tested whether depression increased risk for impaired myocardial perfusion during acute PS among patients with stable CHD. Patients (N=146) completed the Beck Depression Inventory-I (BDI-I), a measure of depression linked to recurrent ACS and post-ACS mortality, and underwent single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging at rest and during acute PS. The likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS as a function of depression severity was tested. On the BDI-I, 41 patients scored in the normal range, 48 in the high normal range, and 57 in the depressed range previously linked to CHD prognosis. A BDI-I score in the depressed range was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS (odds ratio =2.89, 95% CI: 1.26 to 6.63, P=0.012). This remained significant in models controlling ACS recurrence/mortality risk factors and medications. There was no effect for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications. Depressed patients with CHD are particularly susceptible to impairment in myocardial perfusion during PS. The confluence of PS with depression may contribute to a better understanding of the depression-associated risk for ACS recurrence and mortality. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Depression or depressiveness in patients diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa - pilot research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dêbska, Ewa; Janas, Adam; Bañczyk, Wojciech; Janas-Kozik, Małgorzata

    2011-09-01

    The target of this work is to consider if depressive symptoms intercurrent with patients suffering from Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and Bulimia Nervosa (BN) form a depression complex or whether they are physiological depression accompanying adolescence. We wished to observe the perception of these patients,of their functioning, both social and within their families and also looking for common point in the issues mentioned above trying to locate them within the course of the basic illness. We studied 19 patients suffering from eating disorders, and aged between 12 and 24 years old. 15 of them suffered from the restrictive form of AN and 4 suffered from BN. The control group consisted of 30 healthy girls in the same age interval. In the study authors used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Quebec Quality of Life Questionnaire. Comparison of a number of points acquired in the survey using Beck Depression Scale revealed statistic significance at the level pdepression symptoms among persons with eating disorders comparing to control group. The survey using the Questionnaire for Social Quality showed no statistically significant differences between study and control groups (p>0.05). The authors observed a statistically significant increased frequency of suicidal thoughts in the study group compared to the controls. To diagnose depression, depressive symptoms presented by the patients must give the image of depression at the clinical level. The result of the Beck's scale needs to be confronted with the clinical picture. Depression in adolescence requires differentiation from depressiveness.

  17. Detailed course of depressive symptoms and risk for developing depression in late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a cohort study

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    Jinnin R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ran Jinnin,1 Yasumasa Okamoto,1 Koki Takagaki,1 Yoshiko Nishiyama,1 Takanao Yamamura,1 Yuri Okamoto,2 Yoshie Miyake,2 Yoshitake Takebayashi,3 Keisuke Tanaka,4 Yoshinori Sugiura,5 Haruki Shimoda,6 Norito Kawakami,6 Toshi A Furukawa,7 Shigeto Yamawaki1 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, 2Health Service Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 3Risk Analysis Research Center, The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo, Japan; 4Graduated School of Education, Joetsu University of Education, Niigata, Japan; 5Graduated School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 6Department of Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 7Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Purpose: Despite its clinical importance, adolescent subthreshold depression remains a largely neglected topic. The aims of this study were to accurately identify the natural course of depressive symptoms and the risk for developing major depressive episode (MDE in late adolescents with subthreshold depression over 1 year.Patients and methods: One hundred and seventy-two participants <20 years of age (mean age: 18.32 years, standard deviation: 0.50, who did not meet the full criteria for an MDE, were selected from 2,494 screened freshmen based on the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II. We conducted a cohort study of three groups (low-, middle-, and high-symptom groups divided based on BDI-II scores, over a 1 year period with the use of bimonthly assessments. Temporal changes of depressive symptoms were analyzed using linear mixed modeling and growth mixture modeling.Results: First, we found that late adolescents with subthreshold depression (high depressive symptoms were split between the increasing and decreasing depressive symptoms groups, whereas the majority of the less-symptoms group remained

  18. Preliminary Psychometric Testing of the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised (PDPI-R) in Portuguese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Stephanie; Fonseca, Ana; Canavarro, Maria Cristina; Pereira, Marco

    2018-04-01

    Introduction Postpartum depression (PPD) is a prevalent condition with a serious impact. The early identification of women at risk for developing PPD allows for primary prevention and the delivery of timely appropriate referrals. This study investigated the validity and reliability of the postnatal version of the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised (PDPI-R), an instrument widely studied internationally, in Portuguese women. Methods The sample consisted of 204 women who participated in an online cross-sectional survey. Participants completed the European Portuguese versions of the PDPI-R, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), and the Postnatal Negative Thoughts Questionnaire at 1-2 months postpartum. Additionally, ROC analyses were performed to conduct an exploratory analysis of the instruments' predictive validity. Results The prevalence rates of clinical postpartum depressive symptoms were 27.5 and 14.2% using the cut-off scores of 9 and 12, respectively, on the EPDS. The European Portuguese postnatal version of the PDPI-R demonstrated acceptable reliability and satisfactory construct and convergent validity. When using the EPDS > 9 cut-off score, the exploratory analyses yielded a sensitivity of 76.8% and a specificity of 73.0% with a cut-off score of 5.5 [area under the curve = 0.816]. Discussion These preliminary findings encourage the use of the postnatal version of the PDPI-R as a screening tool to identify Portuguese women at high risk for developing PPD. Subsequent assessments are needed to support the routine application of the PDPI-R both in research and for clinical purposes.

  19. Depressive Symptoms among Fourth Form Students in St. Kitts and Nevis High Schools

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    Gillian A. Lowe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been limited research on depressive symptoms among high school students in St. Kitts and Nevis. This project examines levels of depressive symptoms among fourth form (grade 10 students attending all high schools in St. Kitts and Nevis. Students enrolled in the fourth form during the 2006/2007 academic year in all high schools were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. A near census of the students was conducted (n = 744 students; 50.4% females, 47.6% males, and 2% no gender reported; age 13–19 years, mean = 15.5 ± 0.8 years. Six in every ten students (62.1% reported some symptoms of depression, with 14.8% reporting moderate to severe and 9.7% reporting severe symptoms of depression. Females reported significantly higher BDI-II scores (t(727 = 7.11, p < 0.01 with 70% of females reporting some level of depressive symptoms compared with 52% of their male counterparts (X2(1 = 24.6, p < 0.05. Additionally, 34% of females were in the moderate to severe or severe range of depressive symptoms, while 15% of males were in the same range. Students who were older than expected for their grade (i.e., 17 years or older reported significantly higher BDI-II scores (F(2,740 = 2.88, p < 0.05 than students who were younger or at the expected age (i.e., 14–16 years. Students whose mothers had a high school or postsecondary education reported significantly lower levels of depressive symptoms than students whose mothers had less than a high school education (F(3, 637, = 4.23, p < 0.05. Symptoms of depression among fourth form students in St. Kitts and Nevis are a prevalent problem that is influenced by students’ age, gender, and social class as indicated by maternal education.

  20. Parents of childhood X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: high risk for depression and neurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratsubo, Izumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Kondo, Naomi

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess mental health in parents of patients with the childhood cerebral form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (CCALD) and to investigate factors relating to psychological problems in order to improve clinical management and quality of life. Sixteen fathers and 21 mothers of patients with CCALD completed a battery of psychological examinations including the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II), the General Health Questionnaire 60 (GHQ60), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Three fathers and 11 mothers showed high scores on the BDI-II, suggesting that they were in a depressive state. Depression in the mothers was serious as compared with previous reports. Six fathers and 11 mothers were considered to be in a state of neurosis, according to the results of the GHQ60. Four fathers and 8 mothers showed high levels of anxiety on the STAI. Health and social status of the mothers correlated with their mental health, and younger mothers with young patients tended to be more depressed. Thus, parents of patients with CCALD have a high risk of depression and neurosis. Understanding the mental state of these parents and improvements in the social support system including mental counseling, home nursing care, supports in workplace and community are necessary to prevent and treat psychological problems. Especially, early intervention for mental health problems should be provided for younger mothers with few years since the child's diagnosis.

  1. Postnatal Mother-to-Infant Attachment in Subclinically Depressed Mothers: Dyads at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Hannah F; Konrad, Kerstin; Goecke, Tamme W; Fakhrabadi, Roya; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Firk, Christine

    Dyadic interactions between children and depressed mothers have been characterized as less synchronous and with lower maternal sensitivity, fostering an inharmonious, insecure attachment relationship between mother and child. Thus, these children may experience enhanced early life stress and are at higher risk of disturbed socioemotional development. Recently, this association has also been found in women with mild depressive symptoms. However, potential confounding effects of mother's history of own rearing experiences or infant temperament on the link between depressive symptoms and postnatal mother-to-infant attachment have not yet been investigated. Differences in mother-to-infant attachment (e.g. quality of attachment, absence of hostility, and pleasure in interaction) between mothers with and without symptoms of depression 6-8 months postpartum were analyzed in a low-risk community sample (n = 38, 19 per group). Depressive symptomatology was measured with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Depressed mothers indicated mild-to-moderate depressive symptomatology (mean BDI-II 11.26 ± 3.86) but did not fulfill criteria for a major depressive episode and, thus, were referred to as 'subclinically' depressed. Potential confounders, namely maternal history of own rearing experiences and infant temperament, were explored by multivariate AN(C)OVA. Primiparous mothers with subclinical depression differed significantly from healthy control mothers, i.e. showed poorer mother-to-infant attachment and higher infant-related hostility 6-8 months postpartum. As expected, infant temperament and mother's history of own rearing experiences were both associated with mother-to-infant attachment but did not explain the negative effects of subclinical depression on the mother-infant relationship. Given the high prevalence of maternal depression, the current findings give reason for increased concern for the developing mother

  2. Postprandial oxytocin secretion is associated with severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Holsen, Laura M; Santin, McKale; DeSanti, Rebecca; Meenaghan, Erinne; Eddy, Kamryn T; Herzog, David B; Goldstein, Jill M; Klibanski, Anne

    2013-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa, a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation, is associated with endocrine dysfunction and comorbid anxiety and depression. Animal data suggest that oxytocin may have anxiolytic and antidepressant effects. We have reported increased postprandial oxytocin levels in women with active anorexia nervosa and decreased levels in weight-recovered women with anorexia nervosa compared to healthy controls. A meal may represent a significant source of stress in patients with disordered eating. We therefore investigated the association between postprandial oxytocin secretion and symptoms of anxiety and depression in anorexia nervosa. We performed a cross-sectional study of 35 women (13 women with active anorexia nervosa, 9 with weight-recovered anorexia nervosa, and 13 healthy controls). Anorexia nervosa was diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. Serum oxytocin and cortisol and plasma leptin levels were measured fasting and 30, 60, and 120 minutes after a standardized mixed meal. The area under the curve (AUC) and, for oxytocin, postprandial nadir and peak levels were determined. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). The study was conducted from January 2009 to March 2011. In women with anorexia nervosa, oxytocin AUC and postprandial nadir and peak levels were positively associated with STAI trait and STAI premeal and postmeal state scores. Oxytocin AUC and nadir levels were positively associated with BDI-II scores. After controlling for cortisol AUC, all of the relationships remained significant. After controlling for leptin AUC, most of the relationships remained significant. Oxytocin secretion explained up to 51% of the variance in STAI trait and 24% of the variance in BDI-II scores. Abnormal postprandial oxytocin secretion in women with anorexia nervosa is associated with increased symptoms of anxiety and depression. This

  3. Neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in depressive disorder Correlation between 1H-MRS and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory

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    Jun Xia; Minjie Yang; Yi Lei; Yicheng Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)and functional MRI to study depression have primarily focused on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-MRS)appearance in various areas of the brain and volume measurements in the limbic system.However,results have not been consistent.To the best of our knowledge,very little is known about the relationship between 1H-MRS appearance and depression inventory.In the present study,the relationship between 1H-MRS appearance in depressive patients and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 scale was analyzed.MRI and 1H-MRS exhibited widened sulci and cisterns,as well as an absence of abnormal signals in depressive patients.In addition,N-acetyl aspartate/total creatine ratios in bilateral hippocampi and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly less in depressive patients than in control subjects(P < 0.01).In contrast,choline-containing compounds/total creatine ratios in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were significantly greater in depressive patients than in control subjects(P < 0.01).These ratios significantly and positively correlated with patient total depression scores as assessed using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 scale(r=0.934 7,0.878 7,P < 0.01).These results suggested that 1H-MRS could be used to reveal a reduced number of neurons in the hippocampus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex,as well as altered membrane phospholipid metabolism in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex,in patients with depressive disorder.Abnormal mechanisms partially reflected severity of depressive disorder.

  4. Depression and anxiety levels in mothers of children with cerebral palsy: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, H; Erkin, G; Nalbant, L

    2013-12-01

    Studies investigating depression and anxiety levels in mothers of children with CP and related factors are limited, and controversial findings are reported in these studies. The study was aimed to determine depression and anxiety levels in mothers of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to define factors related to depression and anxiety levels. A descriptive study. Outpatient physical medicine and rehabilitation clinic of an education and research hospital. The study was composed of two groups: group 1, 116 mothers of children with CP and group 2, 114 mothers of healthy children. Mothers of children with spastic-type CP were included into group 1. Functional levels in children with CP were investigated with The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Depression levels of mothers in both groups were assessed with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and anxiety levels with Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). BDI and BAI scores were statistically and significantly higher in group 1, compared to group 2. Among mothers in group 1, a positive correlation was determined between GMFCS score, and depression and anxiety levels. However, no correlation was detected between depression and anxiety levels, and body involvement of CP, education status, age and economic level among patients. In logistic regression analysis, the most significant risk factors of depressive symptoms were detected to be GMFCS score and speech defects. Our findings indicate that depression and anxiety levels of mothers with CP children are higher than those with healthy children and associated with speech defects and functional disability levels in children with CP. Healthcare professionals should take into account that depression and anxiety levels may be higher in mothers of children with CP. For an effective rehabilitation program related to children with CP, depression and anxiety levels in mothers of such children should be taken into account, and mothers should closely be followed and if

  5. Intensive Communicative Therapy Reduces Symptoms of Depression in Chronic Nonfluent Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Bettina; Stahl, Benjamin; Berthier, Marcelo L.; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2017-01-01

    Background. Patients with brain lesions and resultant chronic aphasia frequently suffer from depression. However, no effective interventions are available to target neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with aphasia who have severe language and communication deficits. Objective. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of 2 different methods of speech and language therapy in reducing symptoms of depression in aphasia on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) using secondary analysis (BILAT-1 trial). Methods. In a crossover randomized controlled trial, 18 participants with chronic nonfluent aphasia following left-hemispheric brain lesions were assigned to 2 consecutive treatments: (1) intensive language-action therapy (ILAT), emphasizing communicative language use in social interaction, and (2) intensive naming therapy (INT), an utterance-centered standard method. Patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups, receiving both treatments in counterbalanced order. Both interventions were applied for 3.5 hours daily over a period of 6 consecutive working days. Outcome measures included depression scores on the BDI and a clinical language test (Aachen Aphasia Test). Results. Patients showed a significant decrease in symptoms of depression after ILAT but not after INT, which paralleled changes on clinical language tests. Treatment-induced decreases in depression scores persisted when controlling for individual changes in language performance. Conclusions. Intensive training of behaviorally relevant verbal communication in social interaction might help reduce symptoms of depression in patients with chronic nonfluent aphasia. PMID:29192534

  6. Depressed mood, positive affect, and heart rate variability in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mimi R; Whitehead, Daisy L; Rakhit, Roby; Steptoe, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    To test associations between heart rate variability (HRV), depressed mood, and positive affect in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Depression is associated with impaired HRV post acute cardiac events, but evidence in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) is inconsistent. Seventy-six patients (52 men, 24 women; mean age = 61.1 years) being investigated for suspected CAD on the basis of symptomatology and positive noninvasive tests, completed 24-hour electrocardiograms. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered, and positive and depressed affect was measured over the study period with the Day Reconstruction Method (DRM). A total of 46 (60.5%) patients were later found to have definite CAD. HRV was analyzed, using spectral analysis. Typical diurnal profiles of HRV were observed, with greater normalized high frequency (HF) and lower normalized low frequency (LF) power in the night compared with the day. BDI depression scores were not consistently associated with HRV. But positive affect was associated with greater normalized HF power (p = .039) and reduced normalized LF power (p = .007) independently of age, gender, medication with beta blockers, CAD status, body mass index, smoking, and habitual physical activity level. In patients with definite CAD, depressed affect assessed using the DRM was associated with reduced normalized HF power and heightened normalized LF power (p = .007) independently of covariates. Relationships between depression and HRV in patients with CAD may depend on affective experience over the monitoring period. Enhanced parasympathetic cardiac control may be a process through which positive affect protects against cardiovascular disease.

  7. Validation of the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI for Iranian Patients with Chronic Pain

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    S. M. Mirzamani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: This study aimed to validate the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI for Iranian patients with chronic pain. Methods: 585 patients with chronic pain in legs, back, hands, neck and shoulders were entered into this study. The West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI was used for assessment of pain in these patients. For validation of this inventory the results were compared with those obtained from Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, State Trait Anxiety Questionnaire and Enrich marriage inventory. Results: Using Cronbach's alpha, validity of the first section of WHYMPI was 0.86, the second section was 0.78, and the third section was 0.75. The Test-retest correlation was 0.95. Also, the correlation of each individual section with the whole inventory was positive and significant.Conclusion: The results indicate that modified form of the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (WHYMPI can be used in Iran. Keywords: Inventory; Validity; Pain; Pain Measurement

  8. Interferon and ribavarin associated depression in hcv patients and role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, K.; Hussain, C.A.; Amer, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and severity of depression associated with antiviral therapy of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and effect of selective serotonin reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) to treat these depressive symptoms. Type of Study: Observational Analytical study. Place of Study and Duration: The study was conducted at Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology department of Combined Military Hospital Sialkot Pakistan from February 2009 to July 2010. Subjects and Methods: All the patients in this study were suffering from HCV infection and were managed with Interferon (3 m.i.u. s/c thrice weekly) and Cap Ribavirin (400 mg bid) for six months. Patients were assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) - Urdu Version and Beck's Depressive Inventory (BDI) Scores after twelve weeks of antiviral therapy. Depressed patients were managed with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for six weeks and again evaluated on HADS and BDI Scores. Response to SSRIs was defined as complete response, partial response and no response. Results: A total of 105 patients were studied out of which 75 were male and 30 were female with mean age 29.4 years. Out of these 54 (51.43%) patients developed depression and this tendency to develop depression was not related with the age and sex of the patients. The mean HADS and BDI scores before and after treatments with SSRIs were compared for significance and it was quite significant. There was not a single patient who did not show response to SSRIs. Conclusion: Depression is frequently associated with antiviral therapy of HCV RNA viraemia with interferon and SSRIs have proved an effective and safe remedy in these patients. (author)

  9. Comparative Analysis of Emotional Symptoms in Elderly Koreans with Hwa-Byung and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chae-Sung; Baeg, Sengmi; Choi, Jin-Hoon; Lee, Miji; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Chee, Ik-Seung; Ahn, So-Hyun; Kim, Jeong Lan

    2017-11-01

    This study compared the symptomatic emotional traits of elderly South Korean patients with hwa-byung and those with depression. We enrolled 58 patients with hwa-byung, 180 patients with depression, and 181 healthy control subjects. All participants completed the Hwa-byung Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), State Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI), Reaction Inventory (RI), and Aggression Questionnaire (AQ). Chi-square tests and a one-way analysis of variance with Games-Howell post-hoc tests were used to compare demographic variables and scores. A binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine risk factors for hwa-byung. Scores in the hwa-byung group were higher than those in the depression group for the HDRS; BDI; GDS; trait anger STAXI subscale (trait anger temperament and trait anger reaction); state anger and anger expression STAXI subscales (anger-in, anger-out, and anger control); physical and verbal aggression as well as anger and hostility AQ subscales; and disturbance, embarrassing circumstances, personal disrespect, and unpleasant encounters RI subscales. A binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the state anger STAXI subscale, verbal aggression and anger AQ subscales, and unpleasant encounters RI subscale were significantly associated with hwa-byung. Elderly patients with hwa-byung had more severe anger traits and states as well as higher depression severity compared to those diagnosed with clinical depression. Excessive anger and anger reactivity to unpleasant factors may be risk factors for hwa-byung, whereas the appropriate expression (rather than suppression) of anger may decrease the risk of hwa-byung.

  10. Sociodemographic Correlates of Unipolar and Bipolar Depression in North-East India: A Cross-sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Kamal Narayan; Hazarika, Jyoti; Sharma, Mohan; Saikia, Shilpi; Patangia, Priyanka; Hazarika, Pranabjyoti; Sarmah, Anil Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Early diagnosis and management of depression is important for better therapeutic outcome. Strategies for distinguishing between unipolar and bipolar depression are yet to be defined, resulting improper management. This study aims at comparing the socio-demographic and other variables between patients with unipolar and bipolar depression, along with assessment of severity of depression. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care psychiatry hospital in North-East India. The study included total of 330 subjects selected through purposive sampling technique from outpatient department after obtaining due informed consent. Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) version 6.0 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were applied. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0 was applied for analysis. Results: Bipolar group had onset of illness at significantly younger age with more chronicity (32.85 ± 11.084). Mean BDI score was significantly higher in the unipolar depressive group. Conclusion: Careful approach in eliciting symptom severity and associated socio demographic profiles in depressed patients may be helpful in early diagnosis of bipolar depression. PMID:28250558

  11. A review of depression research in malaysia.

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    Ng, C G

    2014-08-01

    Depression is a debilitating illness and has become a leading cause of morbidity globally. We aim to summarise the evidence available in regard to the prevalence, type of assessment tools used and treatment options for depression in Malaysia. Two hundred and forty seven articles related to depression were found in a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published in Malaysia between the years 2000-2013. Fifty seven articles were selected and reviewed on the basis of clinical relevance and future research implications. Findings were summarised, categorised and presented according to prevalence of depression, depression in women, depression in clinical condition, assessment tools, and treatment of depression. The prevalence of depression in Malaysia was estimated to be between 8 and 12%. The figures were higher among women of low socio-economic background or those with comorbid medical condition. The common assessment tools used in Malaysia include Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS), Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). They were translated into the Malay language and their psychometric properties were established. Both pharmacological treatment and psychotherapy were commonly used in Malaysia, and were highly recommended in local clinical practice guidelines. There are discrepancies in the reported rates of depression in Malaysia and this needs to be addressed. There were lack of studies looking into the depression among subgroups in Malaysia especially in the male population. There were several instruments available for assessment of depression in Malaysia but their suitability for the local setting need further research. Both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy were recommended in the local treatment guideline in Malaysia. With the emergence of generic medication, we need to compare their clinical efficacy and tolerability

  12. University student depression inventory (USDI): confirmatory factor analysis and review of psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Madeline; Khawaja, Nigar G

    2013-09-25

    The 30-item USDI is a self-report measure that assesses depressive symptoms among university students. It consists of three correlated three factors: lethargy, cognitive-emotional and academic motivation. The current research used confirmatory factor analysis to asses construct validity and determine whether the original factor structure would be replicated in a different sample. Psychometric properties were also examined. Participants were 1148 students (mean age 22.84 years, SD=6.85) across all faculties from a large Australian metropolitan university. Students completed a questionnaire comprising of the USDI, the depression anxiety stress scale (DASS) and Life Satisfaction Scale (LSS). The three correlated factor model was shown to be an acceptable fit to the data, indicating sound construct validity. Internal consistency of the scale was also demonstrated to be sound, with high Cronbach alpha values. Temporal stability of the scale was also shown to be strong through test-retest analysis. Finally, concurrent and discriminant validity was examined with correlations between the USDI and DASS subscales as well as the LSS, with sound results further supporting the construct validity of the scale. Cut-off points were also developed to aid total score interpretation. Response rates are unclear. In addition, the representativeness of the sample could be improved potentially through targeted recruitment (i.e. reviewing the online sample statistics during data collection, examining the representativeness trends and addressing particular faculties within the university that were underrepresented). The USDI provides a valid and reliable method of assessing depressive symptoms found among university students. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors and Prevalence of Depression in Students at Iran’s Urmia University of Medical Sciences

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    Hamid Reza Khalkhali

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is characterized by decreased tendency to work, reduced pleasure from work, increased or decreased weight, increased or decreased appetite, insomnia or narcolepsy, irritability, fatigue, loss of energy, feelings of worthlessness, feelings of guilt, reduced ability to concentrate and think, and thoughts of suicide or actual suicide attempts. In this 2016 study, we examined the factors and prevalence of depression in students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Urmia, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 400 students. Data were collected through the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II: a 21- item standard questionnaire in multiple-choice format to evaluate depression. The questionnaires were distributed randomly by trained students over a period of 5 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver. 19 software and by descriptive statistics, independent t-tests, logistic regression models, and the chi-squared test. Results: The mean BDI score was 14.67 ± 11.30. Of the study population, 278 (69.8% were men and 120 (30.2% were women. In terms of depression, 40.2% of the students were in the normal range and had no depression, 23.6% were slightly depressed, and 18.3% were partially depressed. Also, 6.03% of students had severe depression, and 3.51% of students had very severe depression. No statistically signi cant relationship was observed between depression and sex (P = 0.11. However, signi cant relationships were observed between depression and education level (P = 0.001, smoking history (P = 0.001, and age (P = 0.023. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically signi cant. Conclusion: The prevalence of different degrees of depression in the plurality of students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences necessitates the development and institution of psychological training classes.

  14. Depression, suicidality and alcohol abuse among medical and business students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Curran, T A

    2012-02-01

    We determined the prevalence and correlates of depression, alcohol abuse and suicidal ideation among medical and business students in Trinity College, Dublin and University College, Dublin. We rated depression and suicidal ideation in the past month with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and alcohol abuse with the CAGE. Of 539 students registered, 338 (62.7%) responded. 47 (13.9%) students were depressed, scoring > or = 10 on the BDI. 83 (24.6%) students had an alcohol use disorder (CAGE > or = 2). Alcohol abuse was more common among business students than medical students (AOR = 2.9; 95% C.I. = 1.7-5.1); there were no other inter-faculty differences. 20 (5.9%) students reported suicidal ideation in the last month. Suicidal ideation correlated positively with stressful life events (AOR = 1.4; 95% C.I.= 1.1-1.7), and negatively with social support (AOR = 0.6; 95\\/ C.I. =0.5-0.7). These findings suggest that students are a vulnerable group, and underscore the need for mental health education and psychosocial support services in universities.

  15. Prevalence of restless legs symptoms according to depressive symptoms and depression type: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinen, Piritta; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Koponen, Hannu; Kautiainen, Hannu; Korniloff, Katariina; Ahonen, Tiina; Vanhala, Mauno

    2018-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome is a sensorimotor disorder and it is associated with several other diseases especially mental illnesses. To analyze the relationship between the symptoms of restless legs syndrome and the severity of depressive symptoms and the prevalence of restless legs symptoms in depression subtypes. A cross-sectional study of primary care patients in the Central Finland Hospital District. The prevalence of restless legs symptoms was studied in 706 patients with increased depressive symptoms and 426 controls without a psychiatric diagnosis by using a structured questionnaire. The depressive symptoms were evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the psychiatric diagnosis was confirmed by means of a diagnostic interview (Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview). The subjects with increased depressive symptoms were divided into three groups (subjects with depressive symptoms without a depression diagnosis, melancholic depression and non-melancholic depression). In the whole study population, the prevalence of restless legs symptoms increased with the severity of depressive symptoms. The prevalence of restless legs symptoms was highest in the melancholic and non-melancholic depressive patients (52 and 46%, respectively) and then in subjects with depressive symptoms without a depression diagnosis (43.4%), but the prevalence was also substantial (24.6%) in subjects without a psychiatric diagnosis. Restless legs symptoms are very common in primary care among subjects with depression, regardless of the depression type. The prevalence of restless legs symptoms increased with increasing severity of depressive symptoms, regardless of the diagnosis. These findings should be considered in clinical evaluation and treatment of patients visiting their physician due to restless legs or depressive symptoms.

  16. Perceived functional impairment and spirituality/religiosity as predictors of depression in a Sri Lankan spinal cord injury patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, S; Arya, S; Embuldeniya, A; Narammalage, H; da Silva, T; Williams, S; Ravindran, A

    2016-12-01

    Cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study. To test the hypothesis that self-perceived functional impairment and religiosity/spirituality (S/R) predict depression among traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients in Sri Lanka. Ragama Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Hospital, Ragama, Sri Lanka. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure, Benefit Through Spirituality/Religiosity Scale, Sheehan Disability Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) were administered to 61 consenting in-patients with traumatic SCI between June and July 2014. A linear regression model on BDI-II score was developed to examine the impact of self-perceived functional impairment and S/R activities on psychiatric outcomes in context of various sociodemographic variables. Psychiatric consequences of SCI were reflected in a 41% prevalence of depression. Thirty-six percent (R 2 =0.36) of the variance in BDI-II scores (F(5, 55)=6.07, P<0.001) was explained by the regression model. Functional impairment (β=0.54, t(55)=4.73, P<0.001) and perceived benefit through S/R activities (β=-0.31, t(55)=-2.55, P<0.05) emerged as the strongest predictors for depression severity. Perceived functional impairment in work, social and family domains predicted depressive symptomatology among SCI inpatients in Sri Lanka, while perceived benefit through S/R protected against depression. The findings emphasize the need for rehabilitative programming to support patients' S/R activities and mental wellbeing, promoting reintegration into their community roles.

  17. Diagnostic validity and reliability of a Korean version of the Parent and Adolescent General Behavior Inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Joo, Yeonho; Youngstrom, Eric A; Yum, Sun Young; Findling, Robert L; Kim, Hyo-Won

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of a Korean version of the Parent General Behavior Inventory-10-item Mania Scale (P-GBI-10M) and the Adolescent General Behavior Inventory (A-GBI) for bipolar and depressive disorder in youths. Ninety-two subjects with mood disorder and their parents were recruited from September 2011 to June 2013 through the Department of Psychiatry at the Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. In addition, 125 community participants were recruited through two middle schools and one high school in Seoul. The parents of subjects completed the Parent-version Mood Disorder Questionnaire (P-MDQ), P-GBI-10M and Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder Rating Scale (ARS). Adolescents complete the 76-item A-GBI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Adolescent version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (A-MDQ). Different profiles were evident between the clinic-referred group and the community control, including different P-GBI-10M (t=3.07, p=0.003), A-GBI Depressive (t=4.99, pInventories showed excellent internal consistency, fair-to-good construct, and discriminant validity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does the Association between Depressive Symptomatology and Physical Activity Depend on Body Image Perception? A Survey of Students from Seven Universities in the UK

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    Xiaoling Hu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study assessed the association between depression and PA in university students of both genders and the role of body image perception as a potential effect modifier. Undergraduate students (N = 3706 from seven universities in the UK completed a self-administered questionnaire that assessed sociodemographic information; a range of health, health behaviour and health awareness related factors; the modified version of Beck’s Depression Inventory (M-BDI; educational achievement, and different levels of physical activity (PA, such as moderate PA (at least 5 days per week moderate exercise of at least 30 minutes, and vigorous PA (at least 3 days per week vigorous exercise of at least 20 minutes. Only 12.4% of the sample achieved the international recommended level for moderate PA, and 33.1% achieved the recommendations for vigorous PA. Both moderate and vigorous PA were inversely related to the M-BDI score. Physically active students, regardless of the type of PA, were significantly more likely to perceive their health as good, to have higher health awareness, to perform strengthening exercises, and to be males. The stratified analyses indicated that the association between depression and PA differed by body image. In students perceiving their body image as ‘just right’, moderate (>4th percentile and high (>5th percentile M-BDI scores were inversely related to vigorous PA. However, in students who perceived their body image as ‘overweight’, the inverse association was only significant in those with high M-BDI scores. We conclude that the positive effect of PA on depression could be down modulated by the negative impact of a ‘distorted’ body image on depression. The practical implications of these findings are that PA programmes targeting persons with depressive symptoms should include effective components to enhance body image perception.

  19. Treatment response in relation to subthreshold bipolarity in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant monotherapy: a post hoc data analysis (KOMDD study

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    Park YM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Young-Min Park,1 Bun-Hee Lee2 1Department of Psychiatry, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang, 2Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Eunpyeong Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Background: The aim of this observational study was to determine whether subthreshold bipolarity affects treatment response and remission in patients with major depressive disorder receiving antidepressant (AD monotherapy over a 6-month follow-up period. Methods: Seventy-eight patients with major depressive disorder were stratified into two subgroups according to the presence of subthreshold bipolarity, identified using the Korean version of the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (K-MDQ, which classifies patients as positive for a screening of bipolarity based on the cutoff for the total K-MDQ score (ie, 7 points. They received AD monotherapy such as escitalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, or tianeptine for 6 months. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD, Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation were applied at baseline, 1 week, 3 weeks, 2 months, 3 months, and 6 months. Results: The mean HAMD, BDI, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation scores were higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 3 weeks. The mean BDI score was also higher in the bipolarity group than in the nonbipolarity group at 6 months. Evaluation of the ratio of improvement for each scale revealed different patterns of percentage changes between the two groups over the 6-month follow-up period. Furthermore, the response and remission rates (as assessed using BDI and HAMD scores were higher in the nonbipolarity group than in the bipolarity group, with the exception of HAMD scores at the 3-week follow-up time point. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that depressed patients with bipolarity had a worse response to AD monotherapy than did those without bipolarity. Keywords: subthreshold bipolarity

  20. Depression in Main Caregivers of Dementia Patients: Prevalence and Predictors

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    Victoria Omranifard

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common neurodegenerative disease is dementia. Family of dementia patients says that their lives have been changed extensively after happening of dementia to their patients. One of the problems of family and caregivers is depression of the caregiver. In this study, we aimed to find the prevalence of depression and factors can affect depression in the dementia caregivers. Materials and Methods: This study was cross-sectional study with convenient sampling method. Our society was 96 main caregivers of dementia patients in the year 2015 in Iran. We had two questionnaires, a demographic and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. BDI Cronbach's alpha is 0.86 for psychiatric patients and 0.81 for nonpsychiatric persons, and Beck's scores are between 0 and 64. We used SPSS version 22 for statistical analysis. Results: According to Beck depression test, 69.8% (n = 67 out of 96 of all caregivers had scores in the range of depression. In bivariate analysis, we found higher dementia severity and lower support of other family members from the caregiver can predict higher depression in the caregiver. As well, in regression analysis using GLM model, we found higher age and lower educational level of the caregiver can predict higher depression in the caregiver. Moreover, regression analysis approved findings about severity and support of other family members in bivariate analysis. Conclusion: High-level depression is found in caregivers of dementia patients. It needs special attention from healthcare managers, clinicians and all of health-care personnel who deals with dementia patients and their caregivers.

  1. The quality of life of hematological malignancy patients with major depressive disorder or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Omid; Sharifian, Ramezan-Ali; Soleimani, Mehdi; Jahanian, Amirabbas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the quality of life of hematological malignancy patients with major depressive disorder or subsyndromal depression. Sample consisted of 93 hematological malignancy patients recruited from oncology ward of Valieasr hospital for Imam Khomeini complex hospital at Tehran through purposeful sampling. Participants were divided into three groups through diagnostic interview based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and the Beck Depression Inventory-2 (BDI-II): Major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 41; 44.1%); subsyndromal depression (SSD) (n = 23; 24.7%), and without depression (WD) (n = 29; 31.2%). Participants completed the short-form health survey (SF-36) as a measure of the quality of life. We carried out an analysis of covariance to examine the collected data. Findings showed that there was not a significant difference between patients with MDD and SSD based on measure of quality of life. But patients with MDD and SSD showed significantly worse quality of life than patients with WD. This finding highlights the clinical importance of subsyndromal depressive symptoms and casts doubt on the clinical utility of separation between MDD and subsyndromal depression in terms of important clinical outcomes.

  2. Effectiveness of a second deep TMS in depression: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, O; Isserles, M; Levkovitz, Y; Kotler, M; Zangen, A; Dannon, P N

    2011-06-01

    Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (DTMS) is an emerging and promising treatment for major depression. In our study, we explored the effectiveness of a second antidepressant course of deep TMS in major depression. We enrolled eight patients who had previously responded well to DTMS but relapsed within 1 year in order to evaluate whether a second course of DTMS would still be effective. Eight depressive patients who relapsed after a previous successful deep TMS course expressed their wish to be treated again. Upon their request, they were recruited and treated with 20 daily sessions of DTMS at 20 Hz using the Brainsway's H1 coil. The Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS), Hamilton anxiety rating scale (HARS) and the Beck depression inventory (BDI) were used weekly to evaluate the response to treatment. Similar to the results obtained in the first course of treatment, the second course of treatment (after relapse) induced significant reductions in HDRS, HARS and BDI scores, compared to the ratings measured prior to treatment. The magnitude of response in the second course was smaller relative to that obtained in the first course of treatment. Our results suggest that depressive patients who previously responded well to deep TMS treatment are likely to respond again. However, the slight reduction in the magnitude of the response in the second treatment raises the question of whether tolerance or resistance to this treatment may eventually develop. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between dysphagia and depressive states in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meng; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Nonaka, Michio; Yamauchi, Rika; Hozuki, Takayoshi; Hayashi, Takashi; Saitoh, Masaki; Hisahara, Shin; Imai, Tomihiro; Shimohama, Shun; Mori, Mitsuru

    2011-07-01

    Aspiration pneumonia related to dysphagia is known to be the leading cause of death in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We investigated the relationship between depressive states and dysphagia in patients with PD. A hundred and twenty-seven PD patients gave their informed consent and were enrolled in this study. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) questionnaire to determine the participants' depressive states, and also used a questionnaire to assess participants' state of dysphagia. Participants were divided into four groups according to their BDI score. We compared the PD patients with Swallowing Disturbances Questionnaire (SDQ) scores of more than or equal to 11 with the SDQ scores of less than 11 regarding depressive categories. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) adjusting for age, sex, disease duration, wearing-off phenomenon and severity of movement disorder. OR (95%CI) of depressive categories, in which the trivial class was set as a reference group, were 3.28 (0.93-11.55), 13.44 (3.10-58.16), 30.35 (5.65-162.97) in the mild class, the moderate class and the severe class, respectively. This study suggests that there may be a strong relationship between depressive states and dysphagia in patients with PD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening for depression in epilepsy clinics. A comparison of conventional and visual-analog methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampling, Jeremy; Mitchell, Alex J; Von Oertzen, Tim; Docker, James; Jackson, Jemima; Cock, Hannah; Agrawal, Niruj

    2012-10-01

    Depression is an important but underdiagnosed complication of epilepsy. This study compares potentially suitable screening tools head-to-head. We enrolled 266 attendees with a confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy at a specialized neurologic epilepsy service in London and compared verbal self-report and visual analog (VAS) screening methods for depression. These included two generic depression scales (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS], Beck Depression Inventory II [BDI-II]), one epilepsy specific scale (Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy [NDDI-E]) and one new visual-analog scale (Emotional Thermometers [ET]). We used Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for major depression and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) criteria for depressive episode as the reference standard. Against ICD-10-defined depression the most accurate scales by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve area were HADS Total (HADS-T, 0.924), BDI-II (0.898) and NDDI-E (0.897). New visual-analog methods had similar accuracy measured either in combination or individually. Although no test performed well in a case-finding role, several performed well as a rule-out initial step, owing to high negative predictive value and specificity. In this role, the optimal performing conventional tools were the HADS depression subsscale (HADS-D) and the NDDI-E and the optimal single VAS were the depression thermometer (DepT) and the distress thermometer (DT). Against DSM-IV- defined major depression, results were similar with optimal performance by the HADS-T, BDI-II, and NDDI-E, but here the anxiety thermometer (AnxT) as well as DepT and DT also offered good performance. Given that no test performed well in a case-finding role, we suggest that these tests are used as an initial first step to rule out patients who are unlikely to have depression. We suggest that the six-item NDDI-E or seven-item HADS

  5. Depressive symptoms and other risk factors predicting suicide in middle-aged men: a prospective cohort study among Korean Vietnam War veterans

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    Sang-Wook Yi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few studies have prospectively examined whether depressive symptoms and other risk factors are associated with a higher risk of suicide death in individuals other than high-risk populations such as psychiatric patients and individuals with self-harm histories. The purpose of the study is to prospectively examine whether depressive symptoms assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI are associated with greater risk of suicide death and whether depressive symptoms and other risk factors are independent predictors of suicide in general-risk populations. Another aim is to evaluate the sensitivity of the BDI for predicting suicide death.Methods. 10,238 Korean Vietnam War veterans (mean age: 56.3 years who participated in two surveys in 2001 were followed up for suicide mortality over 7.5 years.Results. 41 men died by suicide. Severely depressed participants had a higher adjusted hazard ratio (aHR = 3.4; 95% CI [1.5–7.7] of suicide than non-to-moderately depressed ones. Higher suicide risk was associated with more severe depressive symptoms (p for trend = 0.009. After adjustment for depressive symptoms and other factors, very poor health, low education, and past drinking were associated with higher suicide risk, while good health, body mass index, and marital status were not associated with suicide. The sensitivity at the cut-off score of 31 for detecting suicide was higher during the earlier 3.5 years of the follow-up (75%; 95% CI [50–90] than during the latter 4 years (60%; 95% CI [41–76].Conclusions. Depressive symptoms are a strong independent predictor and very poor health, low education, and drinking status may be independent predictors of future suicide. The BDI may have acceptable diagnostic properties as a risk assessment tool for identifying people with depression and suicidal potential among middle-aged men.

  6. Depressive symptoms and other risk factors predicting suicide in middle-aged men: a prospective cohort study among Korean Vietnam War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sang-Wook; Hong, Jae-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Background. Few studies have prospectively examined whether depressive symptoms and other risk factors are associated with a higher risk of suicide death in individuals other than high-risk populations such as psychiatric patients and individuals with self-harm histories. The purpose of the study is to prospectively examine whether depressive symptoms assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) are associated with greater risk of suicide death and whether depressive symptoms and other risk factors are independent predictors of suicide in general-risk populations. Another aim is to evaluate the sensitivity of the BDI for predicting suicide death. Methods. 10,238 Korean Vietnam War veterans (mean age: 56.3 years) who participated in two surveys in 2001 were followed up for suicide mortality over 7.5 years. Results. 41 men died by suicide. Severely depressed participants had a higher adjusted hazard ratio (aHR = 3.4; 95% CI [1.5-7.7]) of suicide than non-to-moderately depressed ones. Higher suicide risk was associated with more severe depressive symptoms (p for trend = 0.009). After adjustment for depressive symptoms and other factors, very poor health, low education, and past drinking were associated with higher suicide risk, while good health, body mass index, and marital status were not associated with suicide. The sensitivity at the cut-off score of 31 for detecting suicide was higher during the earlier 3.5 years of the follow-up (75%; 95% CI [50-90]) than during the latter 4 years (60%; 95% CI [41-76]). Conclusions. Depressive symptoms are a strong independent predictor and very poor health, low education, and drinking status may be independent predictors of future suicide. The BDI may have acceptable diagnostic properties as a risk assessment tool for identifying people with depression and suicidal potential among middle-aged men.

  7. Antidepressant-like effects of ecstasy in subjects with a predisposition to depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Irina; White, Jason M; Irvine, Rodney J

    2012-10-01

    Positive effects of ecstasy on mood and self-esteem due to increased synaptic serotonin levels may indicate a potential antidepressant-like action. This effect may be more prominent in subjects with a pre-existing mood disturbance who may use ecstasy more frequently as a 'self-medication'. This study compared depressive symptoms and the immediate effects of ecstasy on mood in subjects with (WP) and without (NP) a predisposition to depression. Current ecstasy users were assessed using the profile of mood states (POMS) and beck depression inventory (BDI) when drug-free, and during social gathering, when 20 subjects voluntarily consumed ecstasy (ecstasy group) and 20 abstained from ecstasy (control group). Predisposition to depression was determined using the Brief Symptom Inventory. During social gathering, POMS and BDI were administered 60 min after ecstasy consumption, or at matched time for controls. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) exposure was confirmed using saliva samples collected 60 min after pill ingestion. There was no difference in ecstasy use patterns between the groups. When drug-free, the WP subjects had greater mood disturbance and depressive symptoms than the NP group (POMS: NP 5.85±1.63, WP 14.5±2.81, pecstasy reported a significant decrease in depressive symptoms (F(1,35)=5.47, p<0.05). A decrease in depressive symptoms was observed in subjects predisposed to depression. This antidepressant-like action of MDMA may contribute to its use, particularly among people with an existing or latent depressive disorder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Association of social anxiety disorder with depression and quality of life among medical undergraduate students

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    Imran Jahangirali Ratnani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Social anxiety disorder (SAD, (also known as social phobia, is characterized by intense fear of social interaction and often associated with social avoidance and impairments. There is high risk for depression, substance use disorder, and suicide among them. Subjects and Methods: It is an observational, cross-sectional, single centered, questionnaire-based study assessing the frequency of SAD and depression and their possible association with quality of life among 290 consenting medical undergraduate students. Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN, Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI II, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment scale (WHOQOL-BREF were used to screen and assess severity of SAD, depression, and quality of life, respectively. The statistical analysis of proportions was done by Chi-square test, while the scores of SPIN, BDI II, and WHOQOL-BREF was compared using Mann–Whitney test or Kruskal–Wallis test followed by Dunn posttest multiple comparison, using GraphPad InStat version 3.06. Results: Frequency of SAD is 11.37%, and depression is 8.96%. Females are more likely to experience SAD. Participants with SAD are more likely to experience depression (P < 0.0001 and have poor quality of life (P = 0.01. Participants with depression have higher SPIN score (P < 0.0001 and poor quality of life (P < 0.0001. Females are more likely to experience social fear (P = 0.02. Participants staying away from their family are more likely to experience social anxiety in comparison to their peers (P = 0.01. Severity of depression is correlated with severity of social anxiety (Spearman r = 0.4423 [0.3416–0.5329], P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Participants with SAD are more likely to experience depressive symptoms and have poor quality of life and vice versa.

  9. Improvement in depression scores after 1 hour of light therapy treatment in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Gloria M; Nijjar, Gagan Virk; Langenberg, Patricia; Johnson, Mary A; Khabazghazvini, Baharak; Sleemi, Aamar; Vaswani, Dipika; Lapidus, Manana; Manalai, Partam; Tariq, Muhammad; Acharya, Monika; Cabassa, Johanna; Snitker, Soren; Postolache, Teodor T

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible rapid effects of light therapy on depressed mood in patients with seasonal affective disorder. Participants received 1 hour of bright light therapy and 1 hour of placebo dim red light in a randomized order crossover design. Depressed mood was measured at baseline and after each hour of light treatment using two self-report depression scales (Profile of Mood States-Depression-Dejection [POMS-D] subscale and the Beck Depression Inventory II [BDI-II]). When light effects were grouped for the two sessions, there was significantly greater reduction in self-report depression scores by -1.3 (p = 0.02) on the BDI-II and -1.2 (p = 0.02) on the POMS-D. A significant but modest improvement was detected after a single active light session. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to document an immediate improvement with light treatment using a placebo-controlled design with a clinical sample of depressed individuals.

  10. Pretreatment depression as a prognostic indicator of survival and nutritional status in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Ae; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Lee, Sang-Ah; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Sung-Bae; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The emotional status of cancer patients is associated with disease course and treatment outcomes. In this study, the authors evaluated associations between the presence of pretreatment depression and pretreatment quality of life (QOL), nutritional status, and survival outcomes in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). For this prospective study, 241 patients with previously untreated HNSCC who underwent curative treatments were enrolled. Patients completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 30-item Core QOL Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), and the EORTC QLQ Head and Neck Cancer module (QLQ-H&N35). EORTC QLQ scores were compared between depressive and nondepressive patients, as determined according to pretreatment BDI-II scores ≥ 14 and nutritional status and laboratory data. Pretreatment depression was present in 60 patients (24.9%). In depressive and nondepressive patients, the 3-year overall survival rates were 70.8% and 82.7%, respectively (P = .045), and the 3-year DFS rates were 63.5% and 79.1%, respectively (P = .015). After controlling for clinical factors, the presence of depression was predictive of 3-year DFS (P = .032). EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-HN35 scores on all items except feeding tube, nutritional supplement, and problem with mouth opening differed between depressive and nondepressive patients (P nutritional status, and survival outcomes in patients with HNSCC. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. Prevalence of depressive symptoms and its correlates among medical students in China: a national survey in 33 universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiong-Fei; Wen, Ying; Zhao, Yun; Hu, Jun-Mei; Li, Si-Qi; Zhang, Shao-Kai; Li, Xiang-Yun; Chang, Hong; Xue, Qing-Ping; Zhao, Zhi-Mei; Gu, Yan; Li, Chang-Chang; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Chun-Xia; Fu, Christine

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a national survey among medical students in China to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and explore associated risk factors based on an established questionnaire composed of demographic information, life events in the past four weeks before survey, and the validated Chinese version of the 21-item Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). The mean age of enrolled 9010 students was 20.7 (standard deviation: 1.6) years. BDI scores indicated that 19.9% had depressive symptoms based on the cut-off score of 14. Socioeconomic factors and student characteristics such as male sex, low monthly income per capita, father's poor education background, and higher year of study were associated with higher prevalence of depressive symptoms among medical students. Students who studied in comprehensive universities were more likely to have depressive symptoms compared with those from medical universities. Habitual smoking and alcohol drinking, sleep deprivation, and hospitalization or medication for one week or more in the last four weeks also predisposed students to higher risk of depressive symptoms. Our results indicate that depressive symptoms are becoming a highly prevalent health problem among Chinese medical students. Primary and secondary prevention should be prioritized to tackle this issue based on potential risk factors.

  12. Recognizing depression in patients with Parkinson’s disease: accuracy and specificity of two depression rating scale Reconhecimento de depressão em pacientes com doença de Parkinson: acurácia e especificidade de duas escalas de avaliação de depressão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Débora Silberman

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to find cut-off scores for the Montgomery-Asberg rating scale (MADRS and the Beck depression inventory (BDI that can relate to specific clinical diagnoses of depression in Parkinson´s disease (PD. Mild and moderate PD patients (n=46 were evaluated for depression according to the DSM IV criteria. All patients were assessed with the MADRS and the BDI. A "receiver operating characteristics" (ROC curve was obtained and the sensibility, specificity, positive and the negative predictive values were calculated for different cut-off scores of the MADRS and the BDI. The Kappa statistic was calculated for different cut-off scores to assess the agreement between the clinical judgment and both scales. Depression was present in 18 patients. MADRS cut-off scores of 6 and 10 showed Kappa 0.5 and 0.56, respectively. Specificity of cut-off score of 6 was 78.6% and of cut-off score of 10 was 96.4%. Kappa agreement of BDI cut-off scores of 10 and 18 were 0.36 and 0.62, respectively. Specificity was 60.7% for 10 and 92.9% for 18. Both rating scales show similar accuracy within the ROC curves (84.3% for MADRS and 79.7% for BDI. The MADRS and the BDI show a good accuracy and correlation to the clinical diagnosis when a cut-off score of 10 is used to MADRS and a cut-off score of 18 is used to BDI to recognize depression in mild to moderate PD patients. This may help clinicians to recognize depression in PD.Este estudo objetivou encontrar pontos de corte da escala de depressão de Montgomery-Asberg (MADRS e inventário de depressão de Beck (IDB que possam estar relacionados ao diagnóstico clínico específico de depressão na doença de Parkinson (DP. Os pacientes com DP leve e moderada (n= 46 foram avaliados para depressão de acordo com os critérios diagnósticos da DSM-IV. MADRS e IDB foram aplicadas em todos os pacientes. Uma curva "receiver operating characteristics" (ROC foi obtida calculando-se sensibilidade, especificidade, valores

  13. Anxiety and depressive symptoms in primary caregivers of patients with severe depression. A snapshot from a military mental health care facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, M.; Ayaz, S.B.; Ullah, A.; Matee, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the frequency and severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms in primary caregivers of severely depressed patients and evaluate the impact of demographic factors. Methodology: It was a cross-sectional study conducted in the out-patient as well as the in-patient setting of Armed Forces institute of Mental Health, Rawalpindi, from September 2009 to May 2012. Through non-probability purposive sampling, primary caregivers of patients diagnosed with severe depression by consultant psychiatrists were included and scored by resident psychiatrists on Revised Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Results: Of 316 caregivers (mean age: 37.75 ± 12.26 years), majority (52.8%) were females, married (70.6%), employed (58.5%), earned < Rs. 5,000 per month (40.5%) and literate from grade 1-5 (21.8%). Most of them were mothers (25.3%) of the patients and were the caregivers for less than one year (43.4%). The mean total BDI-II score was 17.29 ± 13.94.It was significantly high in subjects belonging to age group of < 44 years. The mean total BAI score was 14.44 ± 11.56 and it was not significantly related to any demographic factor. Conclusion: Caregivers of severely depressed patients suffered considerable levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Younger caregivers were at higher risk of developing depressive symptoms but the age did not significantly affect development of anxiety. Gender, marital status, employment status, monthly income, relationship with the patient, ethnicity based on provinces, educational level and duration of care giving did not appear to be significantly related to the development of anxiety or depressive symptoms in our sample. (author)

  14. Association of depression with social support and self-esteem among HIV positives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannath, Vinita; Unnikrishnan, B; Hegde, Supriya; Ramapuram, John T; Rao, S; Achappa, B; Madi, D; Kotian, M S

    2011-12-01

    Depression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positives has implications such as poor drug compliance, lower quality of life, faster progression to full blown Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and higher mortality. To assess depression, social support and self-esteem in HIV positives and to find out the association of depression with social support and self-esteem among HIV positive patients. Kasturba Medical College (KMC) Hospital, a tertiary care hospital, Mangalore, India and cross-sectional design. Study constituted of 105 HIV positive subjects; depression was assessed using BDI (Beck depression inventory), social support was assessed using Lubben social network scale and self-esteem was assessed using Rosenberg self-esteem scale. Kappa statistics was used to measure the agreement of depression assessed by BDI with clinical diagnosis of depression. Logistic regression analyses were done to find out predictors of depression among HIV positives. All analyses were conducted using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 11.5. Depression was found to be present in 43.8% of HIV positives. Among the study subjects, 10.5% had high risk for isolation and low self-esteem was found only among 5.7%. In univariate analysis both gender and self-esteem were significantly associated with depression whereas in multivariate analysis only self-esteem was found to be significantly associated with depression. The present study shows a high prevalence of depression in HIV positive patients along with the importance of self-esteem. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes in depression mediate the effects of AA attendance on alcohol use outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Claire E; Tonigan, J Scott

    2018-01-01

    Depression may contribute to increased drinking in individuals with alcohol use disorder. Although Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) attendance predicts drinking reductions, there is conflicting information regarding the intermediary role played by reductions in depression. We explored whether AA attendance reduces depressive symptoms, the degree to which improvement in depression results in reductions in drinking, and in which subgroups these effects occur. 253 early AA affiliates (63% male) were recruited and assessed at baseline 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and was administered at baseline 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. AA attendance and alcohol use outcomes were obtained with the Form 90. Mediation analyses were performed at early (3, 6, and 9 months) and late (12, 18, and 24 months) follow-up to investigate the degree to which reductions in depression mediated the effect of AA attendance on drinking, controlling for concurrent drinking. In addition, a series of moderated mediation analyses were performed using baseline depression severity as a moderator. At early follow-up, reductions in depression (6 months) mediated the effects of AA attendance (3 months) on later drinking (drinks per drinking day) (9 months) (b = -0.02, boot CI [-0.055, -0.0004]), controlling for drinking at 6 months. Baseline depression severity did not moderate the degree to which BDI mediated the effects of AA attendance on alcohol use (ps > .05). These findings provide further evidence that depression reduction is a mechanism by which AA attendance leads to reductions in alcohol use. Improving depression may help reduce alcohol use in individuals with AUD, and AA attendance may be an effective way to achieve that goal.

  16. Is alexithymia a risk factor for major depression, personality disorder, or alcohol use disorders? A prospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkalampi, Kirsi; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli; Lehto, Soili M; Hintikka, Jukka; Haatainen, Kaisa; Rissanen, Teemu; Viinamäki, Heimo

    2010-03-01

    Disagreements concerning the stability of alexithymia and its ability to predict subsequent psychiatric disorders prevail. The aim of this 7-year follow-up study was to examine whether alexithymia predicts subsequent major depression, personality disorder, or alcohol use disorders in a population-based sample. The four-phase Kuopio Depression Study (KUDEP) was conducted in the eastern part of Central Finland. The study population (aged 25-64, n=2050) was randomly selected from the National Population Register. Data were collected in 1998, 1999, and 2001. In 2005, a subsample (n=333, 43 were excluded) of the 3-year follow-up population (1998-2001) was gathered and their diagnoses of mental disorders were confirmed by the Structure Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I (SCID-I). Alexithymia was measured using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21). For both of these measures, two groups were formed based on the median of their sum score (summing the 1998, 1999, and 2001 scores). Logistic regression analyses were performed. BDI sum scores, but not those of TAS, were associated with subsequent major depressive disorder, personality disorder, and alcohol use disorders in 2005. The BDI sum scores explained 35.7% of the variation in concurrent TAS sum scores. Alexithymia did not predict diagnoses of major depressive disorder, personality disorder, or alcohol use disorders. Alexithymia was closely linked to concurrent depressive symptoms. Thus, depressive symptoms may act as a mediator between alexithymia and psychiatric morbidity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and in non-neurological medical illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assogna F

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Assogna,1 Sabrina Fagioli,1 Luca Cravello,1 Giuseppe Meco,2 Mariangela Pierantozzi,3 Alessandro Stefani,3 Francesca Imperiale,2 Carlo Caltagirone,1,3 Francesco E Pontieri,4 Gianfranco Spalletta11I.R.C.C.S. Santa Lucia Foundation, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry (Parkinson’s Centre and Research Centre of Social Diseases (CIMS, University “Sapienza”, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Neuroscience, University “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy; 4Department of Neuroscience, Mental Health and Sensory Systems, University “Sapienza”, Movement Disorder Unit, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome, ItalyBackground: Patients with neurological and non-neurological medical illnesses very often complain of depressive symptoms that are associated with cognitive and functional impairments. We compared the profile of depressive symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients with that of control subjects (CS suffering from non-neurological medical illnesses.Methods: One-hundred PD patients and 100 CS were submitted to a structured clinical interview for identification of major depressive disorder (MDD and minor depressive disorder (MIND, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR, criteria. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were also administered to measure depression severity.Results: When considering the whole groups, there were no differences in depressive symptom frequency between PD and CS apart from worthlessness/guilt, and changes in appetite reduced rates in PD. Further, total scores and psychic and somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI did not differ between PD and CS. After we separated PD and CS in those with MDD, MIND, and no depression (NODEP, comparing total scores and psychic/somatic subscores of HDRS and BDI, we found increased total depression severity in NODEP PD and reduced severity of the psychic symptoms of

  18. What is the relationship between the recognition of emotions and core beliefs: Associations between the recognition of emotions in facial expressions and the maladaptive schemas in depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csukly, Gábor; Telek, Rita; Filipovits, Dóra; Takács, Barnabás; Unoka, Zsolt; Simon, Lajos

    2011-03-01

    Depressed patients are both characterized by social reality distorting maladaptive schemas and facial expression recognition impairments. The aim of the present study was to identify specific associations among symptom severity of depression, early maladaptive schemas and recognition patterns of facially expressed emotions. The subjects were inpatients, diagnosed with depression. We used 2 virtual humans for presenting the basic emotions to assess emotion recognition. The Symptom Check List 90 (SCL-90) was used as a self-report measure of psychiatric symptoms and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was applied to assess symptoms of depression. The Young Schema Questionnaire Long Form (YSQ-L) was used to assess the presence of early maladaptive schemas. The recognition rate for happiness showed significant associations with both the BDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90. After performing the second order factor analysis of the YSQ-L, we found statistically significant associations between the recognition indices of specific emotions and the main factors of the YSQ-L. In this study we found correlations between maladaptive schemas and emotion recognition impairments. While both domains likely contribute to the symptoms of depression, we believe that the results will help us to better understand the social cognitive deficits of depressed patients at the schema level and at the emotion recognition level. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anxiety, depression and quality of life in patients with beta thalassemia major and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengil, Erhan; Acipayam, Can; Kokacya, Mehmet Hanifi; Kurhan, Faruk; Oktay, Gonul; Ozer, Cahit

    2014-01-01

    Mental health and health related quality of life is commonly affected in patients with chronic problems and their caregivers. In the present study, it was aimed to assess depression and anxiety in patients with beta thalassemia major (BTM) and in their caregivers; and to evaluate effects of these disorders on quality of life. The study was carried out in a district Hereditary Hemoglobinopathy Center and included 88 patients with BTM and 63 of their caregivers. All subjects were assessed using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) by a trained psychiatry resident via face-to-face interview. The BDI scores were 17 or above in 20.5% of the patients with BTM and 28.6% of their caregivers (P = 0.248). Of the patients with BTM, there were mild anxiety symptoms in 19.3%, while moderate and severe anxiety symptoms in 14.8% and 4.5%, respectively. Anxiety levels were similar between the patients with BTM and their caregivers (P = 0.878). It was found that BDI and BAI scores were negatively correlated to scores of physical health and mental health components of SF-36 in patients with BTM and their caregivers. In linear regression analysis, it was seen that depression affected physical and mental health of the patients with BTM and their caregivers regardless from anxiety. BTM leads an increase in the frequency of depression and anxiety in both patients and their caregivers, and affects negatively physical and mental components of quality of life.

  20. CORRELATION OF MOBILE PHONE ADDICTION SCALE (MPAS) SCORE WITH CRANIOVERTEBRAL ANGLE, SCAPULAR INDEX AND BECKS DEPRESSION INVENTORY SCORE IN YOUNG ADULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Rupali Salvi; Sneha Battin

    2018-01-01

    Background: Mobile phone usage has become increasingly common in today’s youth. Its heavy use often leads to an addiction. Dependency on these devices could lead to postural dysfunctions as well as produce an adverse effect on psychology. Hence, this study is done to correlate mobile addiction with the craniovertebral angle, scapular index and Beck’s depression inventory score in young adults. Methods: An observational study was performed on 100 subjects out of which 51 were males and 49 w...

  1. Hybrid POMDP-BDI Agent Architecture with Online Stochastic Planning and Desires with Changing Intensity Levels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rens, GB

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors propose an agent architecture which combines Partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) and the belief-desire-intention (BDI) framework have several complementary strengths. The authors propose an agent architecture, which...

  2. A hybrid POMDP-BDI agent architecture with online stochastic planning and plan caching

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, D

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an agent architecture for controlling an autonomous agent in stochastic, noisy environments. The architecture combines the partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP) model with the belief-desire-intention (BDI...

  3. The impact of personality disorder pathology on the effectiveness of Cognitive Therapy and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bronswijk, Suzanne C; Lemmens, Lotte H J M; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Huibers, Marcus J H; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P M L

    2018-01-01

    Despite extensive research, there is no consensus how Personality Disorders (PD) and PD features affect outcome for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The present study evaluated the effects of PD (features) on treatment continuation and effectiveness in Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) for MDD. Depressed outpatients were randomized to CT (n=72) and IPT (n=74). Primary outcome was depression severity measured repeatedly with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) at baseline, three months, at the start of each therapy session, at post-treatment and monthly during five months follow-up. Comorbid PD and PD features did not affect dropout. Multilevel and Cox regression models indicated no negative effect of PD on BDI-II change and remission rates during treatment and follow-up, irrespective of the treatment received. For both therapies, higher dependent PD features predicted overall lower BDI-II scores during treatment, however this effect did not sustain through follow-up. Cluster A PD features moderated treatment outcome during treatment and follow-up: individuals with high cluster A PD features had greater BDI-II reductions over time in CT as compared to IPT. Not all therapists and participants were blind to the assessment of PD (features), and assessments were performed by one rater. Further research must investigate the state and trait dependent changes of PD and MDD over time. We found no negative impact of PD on the effectiveness and treatment retention of CT and IPT for MDD during treatment and follow-up. If replicated, cluster A PD features can be used to optimize treatment selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Depression, social support, and clinical outcomes following lung transplantation: a single-center cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick J; Snyder, Laurie D; Palmer, Scott M; Hoffman, Benson M; Stonerock, Gregory L; Ingle, Krista K; Saulino, Caroline K; Blumenthal, James A

    2018-05-01

    Depressive symptoms are common among lung transplant candidates and have been associated with poorer clinical outcomes in some studies. Previous studies have been plagued by methodologic problems, including small sample sizes, few clinical events, and uncontrolled confounders, particularly perioperative complications. In addition, few studies have examined social support as a potential protective factor. We therefore examined the association between pretransplant depressive symptoms, social support, and mortality in a large sample of lung transplant recipients. As a secondary aim, we also examined the associations between psychosocial factors, perioperative outcomes [indexed by hospital length of stay (LOS)], and mortality. We hypothesized that depression would be associated with longer LOS and that the association between depression, social support, and mortality would be moderated by LOS. Participants included lung transplant recipients, transplanted at Duke University Medical Center from January 2009 to December 2014. Depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and social support using the Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS). Medical risk factors included forced vital capacity (FVC), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO 2 ), donor age, acute rejection, and transplant type. Functional status was assessed using six-minute walk distance (6MWD). We also controlled for demographic factors, including age, gender, and native disease. Transplant hospitalization LOS was examined as a marker of perioperative clinical outcomes. Participants included 273 lung recipients (174 restrictive, 67 obstructive, 26 cystic fibrosis, and six "other"). Pretransplant depressive symptoms were common, with 56 participants (21%) exhibiting clinically elevated levels (BDI-II ≥ 14). Greater depressive symptoms were associated with longer LOS [adjusted b = 0.20 (2 days per 7-point higher BDI-II score), P social support (P social support were

  5. Self-schema in irritable bowel syndrome and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, B B; Garfinkel, P E; Jeejeebhoy, K N; Scher, H; Shulhan, D; Di Gasbarro, I

    1990-01-01

    Some investigators have suggested that irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) represents a physiologic expression of an affective disorder. This study investigated whether IBS patients differed in their self-schema from depressed patients. Self-schema refers to a cognitive framework of the individual's beliefs, attitudes, and self-perceptions which is stored in memory and which influences incoming information. The sample consisted of 21 IBS patients, 21 psychiatric outpatients with major depression (MD), and 19 normal controls. All groups were age matched. Subjects completed a structured psychiatric interview (Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) and a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), in addition to a test of self-schema, which involved rating and recall of a variety of "depressed" and "nondepressed" content adjectives. Consistent with previous work on self-schema, the MD group recalled significantly more depressed adjectives rated under the self-referent task than the Control group (p less than 0.05) and, also, the IBS group (p less than 0.05). Most striking was the finding that a subgroup of IBS patients who met criteria for MD (43% of the sample) recalled significantly more self-referent nondepressed words (and less self-referent depressed words) than the MD group (p less than 0.05). In other words, IBS patients with MD do not view themselves as depressed. These findings suggest that while some IBS and depressed psychiatric outpatients may share depressive symptoms, these groups can be differentiated by their self-schema.

  6. Objective Methods for Reliable Detection of Concealed Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia eSolomon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that it is possible to automatically detect clinical depression from audio-visual recordings. Before considering integration in a clinical pathway, a key question that must be asked is whether such systems can be easily fooled. This work explores the potential of acoustic features to detect clinical depression in adults both when acting normally and when asked to conceal their depression. Nine adults diagnosed with mild to moderate depression as per the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 were asked a series of questions and to read a excerpt from a novel aloud under two different experimental conditions. In one, participants were asked to act naturally and in the other, to suppress anything that they felt would be indicative of their depression. Acoustic features were then extracted from this data and analysed using paired t-tests to determine any statistically significant differences between healthy and depressed participants. Most features that were found to be significantly different during normal behaviour remained so during concealed behaviour. In leave-one-subject-out automatic classification studies of the 9 depressed subjects and 8 matched healthy controls, an 88% classification accuracy and 89% sensitivity was achieved. Results remained relatively robust during concealed behaviour, with classifiers trained on only non-concealed data achieving 81% detection accuracy and 75% sensitivity when tested on concealed data. These results indicate there is good potential to build deception-proof automatic depression monitoring systems.

  7. Mindfulness-based yoga intervention for women with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuver, Katie J; Lewis, Beth A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of a 12-week mindfulness-based yoga intervention on depressive symptoms and rumination among depressed women. Prospective, randomized, controlled 12 week intervention pilot study. Depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline, post-intervention (12 weeks), and one-month follow-up. Women with a history of diagnosed depression and currently depressed were randomized to a mindfulness-based yoga condition or a walking control. The mindfulness-based yoga intervention consisted of a home-based yoga asana, pranayama and meditation practice with mindfulness education sessions delivered over the telephone. The walking control condition consisted of home-based walking sessions and health education sessions delivered over the phone. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Ruminative Responses Scale (RRS). Both groups reported decreases in depressive symptoms from baseline to post-intervention, f(1,33)=34.83, pyoga condition reported significantly lower levels of rumination than the control condition at post-intervention, after controlling for baseline levels of rumination, f(1,31)=6.23, pyoga may provide tools to manage ruminative thoughts among women with elevated depressive symptoms. Future studies, with larger samples are needed to address the effect of yoga on depression and further explore the impact on rumination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Child behavior checklist profiles in adolescents with bipolar and depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Kukju; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Kee Jeong; Joo, Yeonho; Kim, Hyo-Won

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) profiles in youths with bipolar and depressive disorders. Seventy-four subjects with a mean age of 14.9±1.6years (36 boys) with mood disorders and their parents were recruited from September 2011 to June 2013 in the Department of Psychiatry, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosis of mood disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorder was confirmed by child psychiatrists using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children - Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL). The parents of the subjects completed the Parent General Behavior Inventory-10-item Mania Scale (P-GBI-10M), Parent-version of Mood Disorder Questionnaire (P-MDQ), ADHD rating scale (ARS) and CBCL. The adolescents completed the 76-item Adolescent General Behavior Inventory (A-GBI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Adolescent-version of Mood Disorder Questionnaire (A-MDQ). When adjusted for gender and the comorbidity with ADHD, the Withdrawn and Anxious/Depressed subscale scores of the CBCL were higher in subjects with bipolar disorder than in those with depressive disorder. Higher scores of A-GBI Depressive subscale, A-MDQ and BDI were shown in subjects with bipolar disorder than in those with depressive disorder. There was no significant difference on CBCL-DP, P-GBI-10M, P-MDQ, A-GBI Hypomanic/Biphasic subscale and ARS between two groups. All eight subscales of the CBCL positively correlated with the P-GBI-10M and P-MDQ scores, and seven of all eight subscales of the CBCL positively correlated with A-GBI Depressive and Hypomanic/Biphasic subscales. The BDI score was positively associated with the Withdrawn, Somatic Complaints, Anxious/Depressed, and Social Problems subscale scores. CBCL-DP score was strongly correlated with manic/hypomanic symptoms measured by P-GBI-10M and P-MDQ (r=0.771 and 0.826). This study suggests that the CBCL could be used for measuring mood symptoms and combined psychopathology

  9. Validation of Standardized Questionnaires Evaluating Symptoms of Depression in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Approaches to Screening for a Frequent Yet Underrated Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englbrecht, Matthias; Alten, Rieke; Aringer, Martin; Baerwald, Christoph G; Burkhardt, Harald; Eby, Nancy; Fliedner, Gerhard; Gauger, Bettina; Henkemeier, Ulf; Hofmann, Michael W; Kleinert, Stefan; Kneitz, Christian; Krueger, Klaus; Pohl, Christoph; Roske, Anne-Eve; Schett, Georg; Schmalzing, Marc; Tausche, Anne-Kathrin; Peter Tony, Hans; Wendler, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    To validate standard self-report questionnaires for depression screening in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and compare these measures to one another and to the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), a standardized structured interview. In 9 clinical centers across Germany, depressive symptomatology was assessed in 262 adult RA patients at baseline (T0) and at 12 ± 2 weeks followup (T1) using the World Health Organization 5-Item Well-Being Index (WHO-5), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). The construct validity of these depression questionnaires (using convergent and discriminant validity) was evaluated using Spearman's correlations at both time points. The test-retest reliability of the questionnaires was evaluated in RA patients who had not undergone a psychotherapeutic intervention or received antidepressants between T0 and T1. The sensitivity and the specificity of the questionnaires were calculated using the results of the MADRS, a structured interview, as the gold standard. According to Spearman's correlation coefficients, all questionnaires met convergent validity criteria (ρ > |0.50|), with the BDI-II performing best, while correlations with age and disease activity for all questionnaires met the criteria for discriminant validity (ρ questionnaire to meet the predefined retest reliability criterion (ρ ≥ 0.70) was the BDI-II (r s  = 0.77), which also achieved the best results for both sensitivity and specificity (>80%) when using the MADRS as the gold standard. The BDI-II best met the predefined criteria, and the PHQ-9 met most of the validity criteria, with lower sensitivity and specificity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Validity and reliability of the Portuguese version of the quality of life in epilepsy inventory (QOLIE-31) for Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Tatiana Indelicato; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita; Alonso, Neide Barreira; Azevedo, Auro Mauro; Westphal-Guitti, Ana Carolina; Pascalicchio, Tatiana Frascarelli; Marques, Carolina Mattos; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; Cramer, Joyce A; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2007-03-01

    We report the cultural adaptation and psychometric properties of the Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 Inventory (QOLIE-31) for the Portuguese language and Brazilian culture. This study involved 150 outpatients: 50 presurgical patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) related to mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS), 50 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), and 50 seizure-free patients with TLE. They completed the QOLIE-31, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Adverse Events Profile (AEP) and underwent a neuropsychological evaluation (NE). Internal consistency reliability, interrater and test-retest reliability, and construct validity were assessed. QOLIE-31 mean scores were 33.1 (Social Function), 68.9 (Overall Quality of Life), 56.5 (Seizure Worry), 64.1 (Emotional Well-Being), 63.7 (Energy/Fatigue), 38.9 (Cognitive Function), and 49.7 (Medication Effects). Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's alpha), as were the associations between QOLIE-31 and the BDI, NHP, AEP, and NE. The Portuguese/Brazilian version of the QOLIE-31 inventory showed good reliability, validity, and construct validity.

  11. Anxiety and depressed mood decline following smoking abstinence in adult smokers with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Lirio S.; Hu, Mei-Chen; Winhusen, Theresa; Lima, Jennifer; Berlin, Ivan; Nunes, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A preponderance of relevant research has indicated reduction in anxiety and depressive symptoms following smoking abstinence. This secondary analysis investigated whether the phenomenon extends to smokers with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods The study setting was an 11-Week double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial of osmotic release oral system methylphenidate (OROS-MPH) as a cessation aid when added to nicotine patch and counseling. Participants were 255 adult smokers with ADHD. The study outcomes are: anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI)) and depressed mood (Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI)) measured one Week and six Weeks after a target quit day (TQD). The main predictor is point - prevalence abstinence measured at Weeks 1 and 6 after TQD. Covariates are treatment (OROS-MPH vs placebo), past major depression, past anxiety disorder, number of cigarettes smoked daily, demographics (age, gender, education, marital status) and baseline scores on the BAI, BDI, and the DSM-IV ADHD Rating Scale. Results Abstinence was significantly associated with lower anxiety ratings throughout the post-quit period (p<0.001). Depressed mood was lower for abstainers than non-abstainers at Week 1 (p<0.05), but no longer at Week 6 (p=0.83). Treatment with OROS-MPH relative to placebo showed significant reductions at Week 6 after TQD for both anxiety (p<0.05) and depressed mood (p<0.001), but not at Week 1. Differential abstinence effects of gender were observed. Anxiety and depression ratings at baseline predicted increased ratings of corresponding measures during the post-quit period. Conclusion Stopping smoking yielded reductions in anxiety and depressed mood in smokers with ADHD treated with nicotine patch and counseling. Treatment with OROS-MPH yielded mood reductions in delayed manner. PMID:26272693

  12. Association of social anxiety disorder with depression and quality of life among medical undergraduate students.

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    Ratnani, Imran Jahangirali; Vala, Ashok Ukabhai; Panchal, Bharat Navinchandra; Tiwari, Deepak Sachchidanand; Karambelkar, Smruti S; Sojitra, Milankumar G; Nagori, Nidhi N

    2017-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD), (also known as social phobia), is characterized by intense fear of social interaction and often associated with social avoidance and impairments. There is high risk for depression, substance use disorder, and suicide among them. It is an observational, cross-sectional, single centered, questionnaire-based study assessing the frequency of SAD and depression and their possible association with quality of life among 290 consenting medical undergraduate students. Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN), Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI II), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment scale (WHOQOL-BREF) were used to screen and assess severity of SAD, depression, and quality of life, respectively. The statistical analysis of proportions was done by Chi-square test, while the scores of SPIN, BDI II, and WHOQOL-BREF was compared using Mann-Whitney test or Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn posttest multiple comparison, using GraphPad InStat version 3.06. Frequency of SAD is 11.37%, and depression is 8.96%. Females are more likely to experience SAD. Participants with SAD are more likely to experience depression ( P social fear ( P = 0.02). Participants staying away from their family are more likely to experience social anxiety in comparison to their peers ( P = 0.01). Severity of depression is correlated with severity of social anxiety (Spearman r = 0.4423 [0.3416-0.5329], P < 0.0001). Participants with SAD are more likely to experience depressive symptoms and have poor quality of life and vice versa.

  13. Development and evaluation of a self-care assessment inventory for workers.

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    Ogasawara, Eiko; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Ando, Michiyo

    2013-06-01

    To develop and evaluate a self-care assessment inventory for workers (SCAI-W). A study using a self-care assessment inventory for workers consisting of 27 self-care items, the Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Japanese version of the University of Wales Institute of Science and Technology Mood Adjective Checklist (JUMACL) was conducted. These questionnaires were distributed to 2297 workers. There were 893 valid responses (39.9%, 584 men and 309 women, mean age 37.2±10.2 years). Three primary and eight secondary factors were established for the conceptual structure of self-care and validated by structural equation modeling. "Positive attitude" comprised the secondary factors, "hope" and "sense of fulfillment", and was influenced by another secondary factor, "social support". "Positive attitude" contributed to "attitude toward health". "Attitude toward health" comprised the secondary factors, "care about one's health" and "correction of bad habits". "Attitude toward health" influenced a primary factor, "everyday behavior", comprised of "wakefulness", "eating in moderation", and "lack of self-control". The primary factors "positive attitude" and "everyday behavior" influenced the BDI scores. A multiple regression analysis indicated that JUMACL subscale scores (energetic arousal and tense arousal), demographic data (living alone, sex, and age) and health-related data (exercise, smoking, body mass index, drinking more than three alcoholic drinks/day, and gambling) predicted the scores of the self-care assessment inventory for workers. This assessment inventory could be a useful measure of workers' self-care because it establishes a relationship between psychological and behavioral concepts that are important for health promotion. © 2012 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2012 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  14. Expressed Emotion-Criticism and Risk of Depression Onset in Children

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    Burkhouse, Katie L.; Uhrlass, Dorothy J.; Stone, Lindsey B.; Knopik, Valerie S.; Gibb, Brandon E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The primary goal of the current study was to examine the impact of maternal criticism (expressed emotion-criticism; EE-Crit) on the prospective development of depressive episodes in children. In addition to examining baseline levels of EE-Crit, we also sought to determine whether distinct subgroups (latent classes) of mothers could be identified based on the levels of EE-Crit they exhibited over a multi-wave assessment and whether that latent class membership would predict depression onset in children. Finally, we examined whether EE-Crit and maternal depression would independently predict children's depression risk or whether EE-Crit would moderate the link between maternal depression and children's depression onset. Method Children of mothers with or without a history of major depression (N=100) were assessed five times over 20 months. Children completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and mothers completed the Five Minute Speech Sample and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at the baseline assessment, and at 2, 4, and 6 month follow-up assessments. Children and mothers completed diagnostic interviews assessing children's onsets of depressive episodes at the 20 month follow-up. Results Latent class analysis of the 4 waves of EE-Crit assessments revealed two distinct groups, exhibiting relatively lower versus higher levels of EE-Crit across the first 6 months of follow-up. EE-Crit latent class membership predicted children's depression onset over the subsequent 14 months. This finding was maintained after controlling for mother's and children's depressive symptoms during the initial 6 months of follow-up. Finally, maternal depression did not moderate the link between EE-Crit and childhood depression onset. Conclusions Continued exposure to maternal criticism appears to be an important risk factor for depression in children, risk that is at least partially independent of the risk conveyed by maternal depression. These results highlight the

  15. Association between severity of depression and clinico-biochemical markers of polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    Enjezab, Behnaz; Eftekhar, Maryam; Ghadiri-Anari, Akram

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), as the most common endocrine disorder among reproductive-aged women may lead to psychological morbidity. The present study set out to evaluate the severity of depression in PCOS and non-PCOS women and to evaluate correlation between depression score with body mass index, HOMA-IR, and testosterone level in every group (PCOS and non-PCOS women) in Yazd province. In this cross-sectional study, 62 women with PCOS and 61 non- PCOS subjects (20 to 40 years) who were attending Imam-Ali Clinic in Yazd, Iran from September 2014 through March 2015 participated. These persons completed the Beck Depression Short Inventory (BDI-S) Questionnaire. Frequency of depression in PCOD and healthy persons and correlation between depression severity with body mass index, HOMA-IR, testosterone level in PCOS and non- PCOS women were evaluated by ANOVA test and independent-samples t-test and Pearson correlation. P-value of less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Data analyses were performed using SPSS version 16. Of 62 PCOS subjects, 40 (64.5%) were verified positive for depression, determined by the BDI-S Questionnaire. In the control group, 60.7% had depression. Mean±SE score of depression for PCOS and non-PCOS women were 7.47±5.54 and 7.57±5.77 respectively. There was no statistically significant correlation between body mass index, HOMA-IR, testosterone level with depression score in either group separately or together. We found considerable amounts of depression in our population. There is no correlation between body mass index, HOMA-IR, and testosterone level with depression score in our study.

  16. Comparative study of hostility in depressive patients with and without a suicide attempt history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Christos; Efstathiou, Vasiliki; Ferentinos, Panagiotis; Poulios, Antonios; Papadopoulou, Athanasia; Douzenis, Athanassios

    2017-08-01

    Hostility in association with depression seems to be connected to suicidal behavior. This study aimed to evaluate hostility and its dimensions in relation to depression in patients who suffered from diagnosed depression with and without a suicide attempt history. The study included 168 participants; 58 patients with depression and suicide attempt history, 55 patients with depression without a suicide attempt history and 55 healthy controls. Hostility was assessed with the Hostility and Direction of Hostility Questionnaire, while depression with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Patients with depression and a suicide attempt history compared with the patients without attempt history presented statistically significantly higher total hostility (28.71 ± 6.43 vs 24.20 ± 7.66), extroverted hostility (17.16 ± 4.37 vs 14.15 ± 4.63), acting out hostility (6.03 ± 2.09 vs 4.73 ± 1.93), and self criticism (6.95 ± 2.12 vs 5.89 ± 2.32). No statistically significant differences were found between the two clinical groups in depression according to the BDI. Moreover depressive patients with suicide attempt history scored higher in all the hostility dimensions than the controls. Therefore, it could be suggested that hostility and especially its extrapunitive dimensions are associated with suicidal behavior, since no differences in depression were recorded between the two clinical groups.

  17. Factors mediating the depression in the adult obese outpatients

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    Gudelj-Rakić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prevalence of obesity is rising to epidemic proportions at the alarming rate in both developed and underdeveloped countries around the world. Current prevalence data from individual national studies suggest that the obesity prevalence in the European countries ranges from 10% to 20% for men, and 10% to 25% for women. Health consequences of obesity imply both a number of fatal and non-fatal health problems (out of which the most common are cardiovascular problems, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, cancers, and also a wide spectrum of psychological consequences from diminished self-esteem to clinical depression. Causal relationship between obesity and many chronic diseases is evidence- based. At the same time, there are marked differences in research data regarding causal obesity-depression relationship. Several studies have found no direct association between obesity and depression, while in others the prevalence of depression in obese patients was up to 50%. Gender, obesity grade, socioeconomic status and asking for professional help are named as moderators and mediators of this relationship. Among recommended screening methods, BDI-II is the most frequently used in the adult outpatient departments. Objective The aim of the study was to determine possible risk factors of depression in adult obese patients treated for obesity. Gender, obesity and education level as well as marital status were analyzed as possible moderators of depression-obesity relationship. Method The research included 267 patients, 38.0±14.6 years of age, who referred to the Outpatient Nutrition Department for dietetic consultation or nutritional medical therapy. Nutritional status was assessed by BMI (kg/mІ, calculated from measured values of body weight and height according to WHO recommendations. An estimate of the existence and/or depression level was investigated by Beck Depression Inventory - self administered questionnaire recommended for use

  18. Symptoms of depression in patients with mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease

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    Ana Lara Soares Blum Malak

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the most frequent depressive symptoms and their association with cognition in Parkinson's disease (PD patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Methods: 48 patients with PD and 44 controls (CG, aged between 50 and 80 years and with at least 4 years of formal education, all with MCI and none diagnosed with depression, were assessed. Patients and controls were matched for age, education, and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE score. Participants underwent clinical evaluation with a neurologist followed by neuropsychological assessment employing the instruments: MMSE, Clock Drawing Test, Verbal Fluency Test (semantic and phonemic, Figures Memory Test (FMT, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test, Digit Span (WAIS III, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT, Hooper Visual Organization Test, and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: The most frequent depressive symptoms in the PD group were: difficulty working, fatigue and sleep disorders (the latter also being present in CG. BDI score correlated negatively with learning and recognition memory in both groups. Episodic memory, evaluated by the FMT and RAVLT tests, was the cognitive function showing greatest impairment. Conclusion: Some of the depressive symptoms observed in PD patients with MCI seem to be attributable to complications of PD, while others are common to both PD and MCI, making differential diagnoses complex but crucial.

  19. Effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy on neurotrophic factors in patients with major depressive disorder

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    Sally K. da Silva

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To correlate neurotrophic factors – brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, and beta-nerve growth factor (beta-NGF – and severity of depressive symptoms in patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD undergoing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, participants were selected by convenience and received 16 sessions of CBT. The outcomes of interest were severity of depressive symptoms and changes in neurotrophic factor levels after CBT. The differences between variables before and after treatment (deltas were analyzed. Results: Patients had significant changes in symptom severity after treatment. No significant associations were found between Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II scores and any independent variable. No correlations were observed between BDNF or GDNF levels and BDI scores before or after treatment, although there was a trend toward significant differences in beta-NGF levels. Conclusion: BDNF, beta-NGF, and GDNF were not influenced by the effects of CBT on depressive symptoms.

  20. Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in individuals with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: A cross-sectional survey.

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    Chaturvedi, Shruti; Clancy, Marianne; Schaefer, Nicole; Oluwole, Olalekan; McCrae, Keith R

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by frequent severe bleeding, particularly epistaxis, and life-threatening complications including stroke, brain abscess and heart failure. The psychological impact of HHT is not known. We conducted this cross sectional study to determine the prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to HHT. A survey tool comprising demographic and clinical information and two validated self-administered questionnaires, the PTSD checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), was distributed to individuals with HHT. Associations with clinical and demographic variables with depression and PTSD were evaluated in a logistic regression model. A total of 222 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 185 completed either the BDI II or PCL-5 and were included in the analysis. Median age was 54years and 142 (76.8%) were female. An existing diagnosis of depression, anxiety disorder and PTSD was present in 81 (43.8%), 59 (31.9%) and 16(8.6%) respondents, respectively. BDI-II scores>13 indicating at least mild depressive symptoms were present in 142 (88.7%) patients and 52 (28.1%) patients had a positive screen for PTSD (PCL-5 score≥38). On multivariable analysis, depression [OR 2.17 (95% CI 1.045-4.489), p=0.038], anxiety disorder [OR 2.232 (95% CI 1.066-4.676), p=0.033], and being unemployed [OR 2.234 (95% CI 1.46-4.714), p=0.019) were associated with PTSD. We report a high prevalence of depressive and PTSD symptoms in individuals with HHT. While selection bias may lead to overestimation of prevalence in this study, our results are concerning and clinicians should remain vigilant for signs of psychological distress and consider screening for these disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of Aerobic Exercise as an Augmentation Therapy for Inpatients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Shachar-Malach, Tal; Cooper Kazaz, Rena; Constantini, Naama; Lifschytz, Tzuri; Lerer, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise has been shown to reduce depressive symptoms when used in combination with antidepressant medication. We report a randomized controlled trial of aerobic exercise compared to stretching as an augmentation strategy for hospitalized patients with major depression. Male or female patients, 18-80 years, diagnosed with a Major Depressive Episode, were randomly assigned to three weeks of augmentation therapy with aerobic (n=6) or stretching exercise (n=6). Depression was rated, at several time points using the 21-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and other scales. According to the HAM-D, there were four (out of six) responders in the aerobic group, two of whom achieved remission, and none in the stretching group. According to the BDI, there were two responders in the aerobic group who were also remitters and none in the stretching group. The results of this small study suggest that aerobic exercise significantly improves treatment outcome when added to antidepressant medication. However, due to the small sample size the results must be regarded as preliminary and further studies are needed to confirm the findings.

  2. Death by suicide long after electroconvulsive therapy. Is the sense of coherence test of Antonovsky a predictor of mortality from depression?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Erik Berg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of increased risk of suicide is difficult. We had the opportunity to follow up 20 patients receiving electroconvulsive therapy (ECT because of severe depression. They filled in the Antonovsky sense of coherence test (SOC and Beck depression inventory (BDI before and after a series of ECT treatments. Seventeen surviving patients had a mean observation time of 20.6 months, whereas the three deceased patients had 11.3 months. There was a lower mean age at onset of illness and a longer mean duration of disease in the deceased. Other clinical parameters did not differ. The surviving patients had a significant decrease on the BDI from 35 to 18 (P less than 0.001 and an increase on the SOC test after ECT from 2.45 to 3.19 (P less than 0.001, indicating both less depression and better functioning in life. The deceased had a larger change on the BDI from 32 to 13, not attaining significance because of the low number of deceased. The SOC test, however, did not increase to a purported normal level; that is, from 2.43 to 2.87. Although the SOC scale has been shown to predict mortality in substance abusers, the SOC test has not been part of earlier reviews of predictive power. Tentatively, a low pathological score on the SOC test may indicate low sense of coherence in life that might increase the propensity for suicide. These preliminary results need replication in larger studies.

  3. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of cognitive therapy, rational emotive behavioral therapy, and fluoxetine (Prozac) in treating depression: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Florin A; Yates, Brian T; Lupu, Viorel; Szentagotai, Aurora; David, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of cognitive therapy (CT), rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), and fluoxetine (Prozac) for major depressive disorder (MDD) were compared in a randomized clinical trial with a Romanian sample of 170 clients. Each intervention was offered for 14 weeks, plus three booster sessions. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores were obtained prior to intervention, 7 and 14 weeks following the start of intervention, and 6 months following completion of intervention. CT, REBT, and fluoxetine did not differ significantly in changes in the BDI, depression-free days (DFDs), or Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs). Average BDI scores decreased from 31.1 before treatment to 9.7 six months following completion of treatment. Due to lower costs, both psychotherapies were more cost-effective, and had better cost-utility, than pharmacotherapy: median $26.44/DFD gained/month for CT and $23.77/DFD gained/month for REBT versus $34.93/DFD gained/month for pharmacotherapy, median $/QALYs=$1,638, $1,734, and $2,287 for CT, REBT, and fluoxetine (Prozac), respectively. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Group Positive Psychotherapy and Depression of Females Affected by Multiple Sclerosis

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    Tayebeh Khayatan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Multiple Sclerosis is one of the most important and prevalent central nervous system diseases, causing disorders such as depression among affected patients. Positive psychotherapy is also a new approach that can be effective in reducing the depression of these people. This study aims to investigate the efficiency of group positive psychotherapy for decreasing the depression among females affected by Multiple Sclerosis. Methods: A samples of 30 females affected by Multiple Sclerosis with mild to moderate depression were participated, and were divided into two groups, intervention and control. Both groups completed Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II at the beginning, he intervention group received six sessions of positive psychotherapy. After the intervention both group completed the questionnaire again. Data was analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistical methods. Results: The result demonstrated that, the decline of depression was more in the intervention group than the control group. Moreover in the intervention group than control group, there was obtained significant reduction in both sub-scales of Beck Depression Inventory II. Discussion: Results of this study indicated that group positive psychotherapy is effective in reducing the depression of females affected by Multiple Sclerosis. This treatment can be widely used in the caring centers for treatment of people affected by Multiple Sclerosis and this can be justified because of its low cost and good efficiency.

  5. Relationship between premature ejaculation and depression in Korean males.

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    Son, Hwancheol; Song, Sang Hoon; Lee, Jun-Young; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2011-07-01

    The psychological impacts of premature ejaculation (PE), which include guilt, anxiety, and distress, have been well established in Western countries. However, in Asia, although a substantial number of epidemiological studies have surveyed the prevalence of PE, researchers have not thoroughly investigated the relationship between PE and depression, or have defined PE properly. We studied the association between PE and depression and other psychological disturbances, in a Korean cohort by applying an appropriate definition for PE and validated outcome measures of depression. METHODS.  A total of 956 males (≥20 years) were initially approached via an Internet survey company. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire requesting detailed medical and sexual histories, which included questions from the Erectile Function Domain score in the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EF) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The prevalence of PE was evaluated using two different definitions-self-assessed PE and presumed PE. Presumed PE was defined as a short ejaculation time (an estimated intravaginal ejaculatory latency time ≤5 minutes), an inability to control ejaculation, and the presence of distress resulting from PE. Ejaculation-related questionnaire, the IIEF-EF, and BDI. A total of 334 men were evaluated. The prevalence of PE was 10.5% according to the Presumed PE definition, whereas by self-assessment, it was 25.4%. Self-assessed PE patients suffered from various psychological problems, such as depression, low self-esteem, bother, and low sexual satisfaction. Even after excluding erectile dysfunction (ED) subjects, a significant relationship was found between self-assessed PE and depression. Moreover, after further classification of the Self-assessed PE group, we found that subjects included in this group, but not in the Presumed PE group, suffered more from psychological burden than any other members of the cohort. Korean men with subjective

  6. Effects of long-term AA attendance and spirituality on the course of depressive symptoms in individuals with alcohol use disorder.

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    Wilcox, Claire E; Pearson, Matthew R; Tonigan, J Scott

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is associated with depression. Although attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings predicts reductions in drinking, results have been mixed about the salutary effects of AA on reducing depressive symptoms. In this single-group study, early AA affiliates (n = 253) were recruited, consented, and assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months. Lagged growth models were used to investigate the predictive effect of AA attendance on depression, controlling for concurrent drinking and treatment attendance. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and was administered at baseline 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Additional predictors of depression tested included spiritual gains (Religious Background and Behavior questionnaire [RBB]) and completion of 12-step work (Alcoholics Anonymous Inventory [AAI]). Eighty-five percent of the original sample provided follow-up data at 24 months. Overall, depression decreased over the 24 month follow-up period. AA attendance predicted later reductions in depression (slope = -3.40, p = .01) even after controlling for concurrent drinking and formal treatment attendance. Finally, increased spiritual gains (RBB) also predicted later reductions in depression (slope = -0.10, p = .02) after controlling for concurrent drinking, treatment, and AA attendance. In summary, reductions in alcohol consumption partially explained decreases in depression in this sample of early AA affiliates, and other factors such as AA attendance and increased spiritual practices also accounted for reductions in depression beyond that explained by drinking. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Coexisting anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Rebecca L; Lennie, Terry A; Doering, Lynn V; Chung, Misook L; Wu, Jia-Rong; Moser, Debra K

    2014-04-01

    Among patients with heart failure (HF), anxiety symptoms may co-exist with depressive symptoms. However, the extent of overlap and risk factors for anxiety symptoms have not been thoroughly described. The aim of this study was to describe the coexistence of anxiety and depressive symptoms, and to determine the predictors of anxiety symptoms in patients with HF. The sample consisted of 556 outpatients with HF (34% female, 62±12 years, 54% New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III/IV) enrolled in a multicenter HF quality of life registry. Anxiety symptoms were assessed with the Brief Symptom Inventory-anxiety subscale. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI). We used a cut-point of 0.35 to categorize patients as having anxiety symptoms or no anxiety symptoms. Logistic regression was used to determine whether age, gender, minority status, educational level, functional status, comorbidities, depressive symptoms, and antidepressant use were predictors of anxiety symptoms. One-third of patients had both depressive and anxiety symptoms. There was a dose-response relationship between depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms; higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with a higher level of anxiety symptoms. Younger age (odds ratio (OR)= 0.97, p=0.004, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95-0.99) and depressive symptoms (OR =1.25, panxiety symptoms. Patients with HF and depressive symptoms are at high risk for experiencing anxiety symptoms. Clinicians should assess these patients for comorbid anxiety symptoms. Research is needed to test interventions for both depressive and anxiety symptoms.

  8. CORRELATION OF MOBILE PHONE ADDICTION SCALE (MPAS SCORE WITH CRANIOVERTEBRAL ANGLE, SCAPULAR INDEX AND BECKS DEPRESSION INVENTORY SCORE IN YOUNG ADULTS

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    Rupali Salvi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile phone usage has become increasingly common in today’s youth. Its heavy use often leads to an addiction. Dependency on these devices could lead to postural dysfunctions as well as produce an adverse effect on psychology. Hence, this study is done to correlate mobile addiction with the craniovertebral angle, scapular index and Beck’s depression inventory score in young adults. Methods: An observational study was performed on 100 subjects out of which 51 were males and 49 were females in the age group of 18- 25 years who were pursuing their graduation and post-graduation courses. Mobile Phone Addiction Scale was used to determine the level of addiction. Craniovertebral angle, Scapular Index, and Beck’s Depression Inventory score were measured. Correlation of Mobile Phone Addiction Scale score with the above-mentioned parameters was done using GraphPad Instat Version 3.10 (Pearson correlation coefficient and Spearman correlation coefficient. Results: Mobile phone addiction was found low in 27%, moderate in 30% and high in 43% participants. There is significant correlation of mobile phone addiction scale score with Craniovertebral angle (r = -0.6470, p = <0.0001, Scapular Index (r = -0.4370, p = < 0.001 and Beck’s depression Inventory score (r = 0.3172, p = 0.0013. Conclusion: This study shows that mobile phone addiction is common amongst the youth and it contributes to considerable stresses on neck and shoulder. It could even cause unfavorable repercussion on an individual’s psychological status, such as depression. Hence, it is important to create awareness amongst the youth and take preventive measures for the same.

  9. Mood disturbance and depression in Arab women following hospitalisation from acute cardiac conditions: a cross-sectional study from Qatar

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    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Al Suwaidi, Jassim Mohd; Al-Qahtani, Awad; Asaad, Nidal; Fung, Tak; Singh, Rajvir; Qader, Najlaa Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Depression is associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates among cardiovascular patients. Depressed patients have three times higher risk of death than those who are not. We sought to determine the presence of depressive symptoms, and whether gender and age are associated with depression among Arab patients hospitalised with cardiac conditions in a Middle Eastern country. Setting Using a non-probability convenient sampling technique, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 1000 Arab patients ≥20 years who were admitted to cardiology units between 2013 and 2014 at the Heart Hospital in Qatar. Patients were interviewed 3 days after admission following the cardiac event. Surveys included demographic and clinical characteristics, and the Arabic version of the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II). Depression was assessed by BDI-II clinical classification scale. Results 15% of the patients had mild mood disturbance and 5% had symptoms of clinical depression. Twice as many females than males suffered from mild mood disturbance and clinical depression symptoms, the majority of females were in the age group 50 years and above, whereas males were in the age group 40–49 years. χ2 Tests and multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that gender and age were statistically significantly related to depression (p<0.001 for all). Conclusions Older Arab women are more likely to develop mood disturbance and depression after being hospitalised with acute cardiac condition. Gender and age differences approach, and routine screening for depression should be conducted with all cardiovascular patients, especially for females in the older age groups. Mental health counselling should be available for all cardiovascular patients who exhibit depressive symptoms. PMID:27388362

  10. Depression and migraine Depressão e migrânea

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    José Carlos Busto Galego

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate both the presence and intensity of depressive symptoms in patients with episodic migraine (EM and transformed migraine (TM or chronic migraine, comparing them with a control group. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was used for this purpose. The median of BDI score of the control group was significantly lower than the EM and TM groups (pO objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a presença e a intensidade de sintomas depressivos entre pacientes com migrânea episódica (ME e migrânea transformada (MT ou migrânea crônica, comparando-os com um grupo controle. O Inventário de Depressão de Beck (IDB foi aplicado para esta finalidade. A mediana das pontuações do IDB do grupo controle foi significantemente menor que a dos grupos ME e MT (p< 0,0005. Os grupos ME e MT não apresentaram diferenças significantes em suas medianas das pontuações (p=0,12. Quando avaliados de forma qualitativa, pela análise de dependência, o grupo MT apresentou freqüência maior de depressão severa. Sintomatologia depressiva mais severa do ponto de vista qualitativo poderia reforçar possível co-morbidade entre depressão e migrânea transformada. Esta associação poderia ser considerada mais como um fator de perpetuação da MT do que um fator de risco de transformação da ME para a MT.

  11. Glucocorticoid mediated regulation of inflammation in human monocytes is associated with depressive mood and obesity.

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    Cheng, Tiefu; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Pruitt, Christopher; Hong, Suzi

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is observed in various conditions, including depression and obesity, which are also often related. Glucocorticoid (GC) resistance and desensitization of peripheral GC receptors (GRs) are often the case in HPA dysregulation seen in depression, and GC plays a critical role in regulation of inflammation. Given the growing evidence that inflammation is a central feature of some depression cases and obesity, we aimed to investigate the immune-regulatory role of GC-GR in relation to depressive mood and obesity in 35 healthy men and women. Depressive mood and level of obesity were assessed, using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-Ia) and body mass index (BMI), respectively. We measured plasma cortisol levels via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated intracellular tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production by monocytes, using flow cytometry. Cortisol sensitivity was determined by the difference in monocytic TNF production between the conditions of 1 and 0 μM cortisol incubation ("cortisol-mediated inflammation regulation, CoMIR"). GR vs. mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism for CoMIR was examined by using mifepristone and spironolactone. A series of multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate independent contribution of depressive mood vs. obesity after controlling for age, gender, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and plasma cortisol in predicting CoMIR. CoMIR was explained by somatic subcomponents of depressive mood (BDI-S: β=-0.499, p=0.001), or BMI (β=-0.466, pcortisol dose (1 μM). There was initial indication that greater obesity and somatic depressive symptoms were associated with smaller efficacy of the blockers, which warrants further investigation. Our findings, although in a preclinical sample, signify the shared pathophysiology of immune dysregulation in depression and obesity and warrant further mechanistic investigation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The Efficacy of Neurofeedback in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: An Open Labeled Prospective Study.

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    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Choi, Joong-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of neurofeedback on depressive symptoms and electrophysiological disturbances in patients with major depressive disorder. We recruited participants suffering from depression to evaluate efficacy of left prefrontal beta with alpha/theta training. An 8-week, prospective, open-label study was undertaken. Twenty participants were recruited. The treatment protocol was twice or three times a week training of beta at F3 with alpha/theta at Pz for 8 weeks. When every visit, patients were received beta training for 30 min, and then alpha/theta training for 30 min. Baseline, 4 and 8 week scores of; the Hamilton rating scale for Depression (HAM-D), the Hamilton rating scale for Anxiety (HAM-A), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Clinical global impression-severity (CGI-S), and pre- and post-treatment resting state EEGs were compared. Interhemispheric alpha power asymmetry (A score) was computed for homologous sites F3-F4. Pre- and post-training clinical assessments revealed significant improvements in HAM-D, HAM-A, BDI, and CGI-S scores. Cumulative response rates by HAM-D were 35.0 and 75.0 % at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, corresponding cumulative remission rates by HAM-D were 15.0 and 55.0 %, respectively. No significant differences were found between pre- and post-treatment A score. Neurofeedback treatment could improve depressive symptoms significantly. In addition, anxiety symptoms and clinical illness severity decreased significantly after neurofeedback treatment. Despite its several limitations, such as, small sample size and lack of a control group, this study suggested neurofeedback has significant effects in patients with major depressive disorder.

  13. Anxiety, Depression, and General Psychological Distress in Patients with Coronary Slow Flow

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    Mehmet Baran Karataş

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground:The relationship between psychiatric illness and heart disease has been frequently discussed in the literature. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between anxiety, depression and overall psychological distress, and coronary slow flow (CSF.Methods:In total, 44 patients with CSF and a control group of 50 patients with normal coronary arteries (NCA were prospectively recruited. Clinical data, admission laboratory parameters, and echocardiographic and angiographic characteristics were recorded. Symptom Checklist 90 Revised (SCL-90-R, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI scales were administered to each patient.Results:The groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, and atherosclerotic risk factors. In the CSF group, BAI score, BDI score, and general symptom index were significantly higher than controls (13 [18.7] vs. 7.5 [7], p = 0.01; 11 [14.7] vs. 6.5 [7], p = 0.01; 1.76 [0.81] vs. 1.1[0.24], p = 0.01; respectively. Patients with CSF in more than one vessel had the highest test scores. In univariate correlation analysis, mean thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI frame counts were positively correlated with BAI (r = 0.56, p = 0.01, BDI (r = 0.47, p = 0.01, and general symptom index (r = 0.65, p = 0.01. The psychiatric tests were not correlated with risk factors for atherosclerosis.Conclusion:Our study revealed higher rates of depression, anxiety, and overall psychological distress in patients with CSF. This conclusion warrants further studies.

  14. Anxiety, Depression, and General Psychological Distress in Patients with Coronary Slow Flow

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    Mehmet Baran Karataş

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The relationship between psychiatric illness and heart disease has been frequently discussed in the literature. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between anxiety, depression and overall psychological distress, and coronary slow flow (CSF. Methods: In total, 44 patients with CSF and a control group of 50 patients with normal coronary arteries (NCA were prospectively recruited. Clinical data, admission laboratory parameters, and echocardiographic and angiographic characteristics were recorded. Symptom Checklist 90 Revised (SCL-90-R, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI scales were administered to each patient. Results: The groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, and atherosclerotic risk factors. In the CSF group, BAI score, BDI score, and general symptom index were significantly higher than controls (13 [18.7] vs. 7.5 [7], p = 0.01; 11 [14.7] vs. 6.5 [7], p = 0.01; 1.76 [0.81] vs. 1.1[0.24], p = 0.01; respectively. Patients with CSF in more than one vessel had the highest test scores. In univariate correlation analysis, mean thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI frame counts were positively correlated with BAI (r = 0.56, p = 0.01, BDI (r = 0.47, p = 0.01, and general symptom index (r = 0.65, p = 0.01. The psychiatric tests were not correlated with risk factors for atherosclerosis. Conclusion: Our study revealed higher rates of depression, anxiety, and overall psychological distress in patients with CSF. This conclusion warrants further studies.

  15. Religion, coping and outcome in out-patients with depression or diabetes mellitus.

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    Amadi, K U; Uwakwe, R; Odinka, P C; Ndukuba, A C; Muomah, C R; Ohaeri, J U

    2016-06-01

    The study assesses the association between religiosity and coping style with the outcome of depression and diabetes. Using a simple random sampling, we recruited 112 participants with diabetes and an equal number with depression consecutively, matching for gender. Religiosity was determined using Religious Orientation Scale (revised) (ROS-R), coping styles with Brief Religious Coping (Brief RCOPE) scale and Mental Adjustment to Cancer (MAC) scale (adapted). Primary and secondary outcomes were evaluated using Sheehan's Disability Scale (SDS) and Becks Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) respectively. Among participants with diabetes, BDI-II total scores correlated negatively with ROS-R Extrinsic Social (r = -0.2, P < 0.05) and Fighting Spirit (r = -0.3, P < 0.05) but correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.3, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.4, P < 0.05). SDS global scores correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.3, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.4, P < 0.05). Among participants with depression, BDI-II total scores correlated negatively with Intrinsic religiosity (r = -0.2, P < 0.05) and Fighting Spirit (r = -0.4, P < 0.05) but correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.6, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.7, P < 0.05). SDS global scores correlated negatively with Intrinsic religiosity (r = -0.2, P < 0.05) and Fighting Spirit (r = -0.3, P < 0.05) but correlated positively with Helplessness/Hopelessness (r = 0.5, P < 0.05) and Brief RCOPE Negative (r = 0.4, P < 0.05). High intrinsic and extrinsic religiosities are likely to be associated with positive coping skills and better treatment outcome in patients with depression or diabetes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Cumulative Psychosocial Risk is a Salient Predictor of Depressive Symptoms among Vertically HIV-Infected and HIV-Affected Adolescents at the Kenyan Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Amina; Van de Vijver, Fons J R; Hassan, Amin S; Fischer, Ronald; Nyongesa, Moses K; Kabunda, Beatrice; Berkley, James A; Stein, Alan; Newton, Charles R

    Little is known of mental health outcomes among vertically HIV-infected or HIV-affected adolescents in Africa. The current study set out to describe depressive symptoms and their correlates among vertically HIV-infected and HIV-affected adolescents at the Kenyan Coast. 130 adolescents (vertically HIV-infected [n = 44], HIV-affected [n = 53], and unexposed [n = 33]) and their caregivers participated in this cross-sectional study. An adapted version of the Beck Depression Inventory-11 (BDI) was administered to examine depressive symptoms in both adolescents and caregivers, together with measures of sociodemographic, medical, and anthropometric characteristics. Our analysis indicated a main effect of HIV status on mean BDI scores in HIV-infected (18.4 [SD = 8.3) and HIV-affected (16.8 [SD = 7.3]) adolescents compared to the community controls (12.0 [SD = 7.9]), F (2, 127) = 6.704, P = .002, η 2  = .095. Post hoc analysis showed that BDI scores of HIV-infected adolescents were higher than those of community controls (P HIV-affected adolescents had BDI scores that were higher than those of community controls (P = .007). However, there was no difference in BDI scores between HIV-infected and HIV-affected adolescents (P = .304). A path analytic model indicated that cumulative psychosocial risk (orphanhood, family poverty, and caregiver depressive symptoms) were positive predictors of BDI scores among adolescents, while nutritional status had a limited role. Both HIV-infected and HIV-affected adolescents are at a high risk of experiencing depressive symptoms, largely due to the multiple psychosocial risk factors in their environment. The provision of adequate psychosocial support and counseling needs to become an integral part of the care program for adolescents from families living with HIV/AIDS at the Kenyan coast and other similar settings. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The greek translation of the symptoms rating scale for depression and anxiety: preliminary results of the validation study

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    Gougoulias Kyriakos

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study was to assess the reliability, validity and the psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the Symptoms Rating Scale For Depression and Anxiety. The scale consists of 42 items and permits the calculation of the scores of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-21, the BDI 13, the Melancholia Subscale, the Asthenia Subscale, the Anxiety Subscale and the Mania Subscale Methods 29 depressed patients 30.48 ± 9.83 years old, and 120 normal controls 27.45 ± 10.85 years old entered the study. In 20 of them (8 patients and 12 controls the instrument was re-applied 1–2 days later. Translation and Back Translation was made. Clinical Diagnosis was reached by consensus of two examiners with the use of the SCAN v.2.0 and the IPDE. CES-D and ZDRS were used for cross-validation purposes. The Statistical Analysis included ANOVA, the Spearman Correlation Coefficient, Principal Components Analysis and the calculation of Cronbach's alpha. Results The optimal cut-off points were: BDI-21: 14/15, BDI-13: 7/8, Melancholia: 8/9, Asthenia: 9/10, Anxiety: 10/11. Chronbach's alpha ranged between 0.86 and 0.92 for individual scales. Only the Mania subscale had very low alpha (0.12. The test-retest reliability was excellent for all scales with Spearman's Rho between 0.79 and 0.91. Conclusions The Greek translation of the SRSDA and the scales that consist it are both reliable and valid and are suitable for clinical and research use with satisfactory properties. Their properties are close to those reported in the international literature. However one should always have in mind the limitations inherent in the use of self-report scales.

  18. Depression and auto-aggressiveness in adolescents in Zagreb.

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    Tripković, Mara; Vuković, Iris Sarajlić; Frančišković, Tanja; Pisk, Sandra Vuk; Krnić, Silvana

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the frequency of depression among the general population of adolescents who were high school students in the city of Zagreb. As depression is associated with increased suicidal risk we wanted to check to what extent depression, as an emotional problem among youth, is associated with auto-aggression in the general population of adolescents. The study was conducted on a sample of high school students in Zagreb and it included 701 students of both genders aged from 14-19 years of age. To test the depression a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered for youth between 11-18 years of age (Youth Self Report for ages 11-18). To test auto-aggression a Scale of Auto-destructiveness (SAD) was used. Results obtained by this study show that about 20.7% of high school students have mild and borderline depressive disorders while moderate or severe depression shows about 5% of them, whereby depression is statistically significant among girls who, on average, report more symptoms of depression. It has also been proven a significant impact of depression levels (F (2,423)=35.860, p<0.001) on auto-aggression in subjects of both genders. In both genders, moderately depressed show more auto destructiveness than those without depression symptoms (p<0.01). In the group of heavily depressed (n=30), significantly higher self-destructiveness is shown by girls (p<0.01). The data suggest the importance of early recognition, understanding and treatment of depressive symptoms in adolescents in order to reduce the risk of subsequent chronic psychosocial damage.

  19. Association of Depressive Symptoms and Heart Rate Variability in Vietnam War-Era Twins: A Longitudinal Twin Difference Study.

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    Huang, Minxuan; Shah, Amit; Su, Shaoyong; Goldberg, Jack; Lampert, Rachel J; Levantsevych, Oleksiy M; Shallenberger, Lucy; Pimple, Pratik; Bremner, J Douglas; Vaccarino, Viola

    2018-05-16

    Depressive symptoms are associated with lower heart rate variability (HRV), an index of autonomic dysregulation, but the direction of the association remains unclear. To investigate the temporal association between depression and HRV. A longitudinal, cross-lagged twin difference study, with baseline assessments from March 2002 to March 2006 (visit 1) and a 7-year follow-up (visit 2) at an academic research center with participants recruited from a national twin registry. Twins (n = 166) from the Vietnam Era Twin Registry, who served in the US military during the Vietnam War, and were discordant for depression at baseline were recruited. At both visits, depressive symptoms were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and HRV was measured through 24-hour electrocardiogram monitoring. To assess the direction of the association, within-pair differences in multivariable mixed-effects regression models were examined, and standardized β coefficients for both pathways were calculated. The associations were evaluated separately in monozygotic and dizygotic twins. In the final analytic sample (N = 146), all participants were men, 138 (95%) were white, and the mean (SD) age was 54 (3) years at baseline. Results showed consistent associations between visit 1 HRV and visit 2 BDI score across all HRV domains and models (β coefficients ranging from -0.14 to -0.29), which were not explained by antidepressants or other participant characteristics. The magnitude of the association was similar in the opposite pathway linking visit 1 BDI score to visit 2 HRV, with β coefficients ranging from 0.05 to -0.30, but it was largely explained by antidepressant use. In stratified analysis by zygosity, significant associations were observed in monozygotic and dizygotic twins for the path linking visit 1 HRV to visit 2 BDI score, although the associations were slightly stronger in dizygotic twins. The association between depression and autonomic dysregulation

  20. Collaborative care for depression in general practice: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

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    Brinck-Claussen, Ursula Ødum; Curth, Nadja Kehler; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Mikkelsen, John Hagel; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Lundsteen, Merete; Csillag, Claudio; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Nordentoft, Merete; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2017-07-21

    Depression is a common illness with great human costs and a significant burden on the public economy. Previous studies have indicated that collaborative care (CC) has a positive effect on symptoms when provided to people with depression, but CC has not yet been applied in a Danish context. We therefore developed a model for CC (the Collabri model) to treat people with depression in general practice in Denmark. Since systematic identification of patients is an "active ingredient" in CC and some literature suggests case finding as the best alternative to standard detection, the two detection methods are examined as part of the study. The aim is to investigate if treatment according to the Collabri model has an effect on depression symptoms when provided to people with depression in general practice in Denmark, and to examine if case finding is a better method to detect depression in general practice than standard detection. The trial is a cluster-randomised, clinical superiority trial investigating the effect of treatment according to the Collabri model for CC, compared to treatment as usual for 480 participants diagnosed with depression in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary outcome is depression symptoms (Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI-II)) after 6 months. Secondary outcomes include depression symptoms (BDI-II) after 15 months, anxiety symptoms (Beck's Anxiety Inventory (BAI)), level of functioning (Global Assessment of Function (GAF)) and psychological stress (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R)). In addition, case finding (with the recommended screening tool Major Depression Inventory (MDI)) and standard detection of depression is examined in a cluster-randomized controlled design. Here, the primary outcome is the positive predictive value of referral diagnosis. If the Collabri model is shown to be superior to treatment as usual, the study will contribute with important knowledge on how to improve treatment of depression in

  1. Pain, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Cervical Miyofascial Pain Syndrome

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    Ümit Dundar

    2014-03-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of depression, pain and disability in patients with chronic cervical miyofascial pain syndrome (MPS and to determine their association with quality of life. Material and Method: Forty patients with Cervical MPS and 40 age and sex-matched healthy controls enrolled in this study. The social and demographic characteristics of the patients and controls were examined. All patients and controls were evaluated with respect to pain (at night, rest and movement and assessed by visual analog scale (VAS. Neck disability index (NDI was used to calculate functional disability. Quality of life was evaluated with the the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36. Also all of the patients and controls underwent Beck depression inventory (BDI. Results: There was no statistical difference between the patients and control cases according to demographical data. The SF-36 scores of the study patients were lower than controls. NDI, BDI and VAS scores were higher in the patients with chronic cervical MPS compared to controls. BDI scores of the patients with chronic cervical MPS  were negatively and closely associated with subparameters of the SF-36 (physical function (r:-0,599, p<0.001, role limitations due to physical functioning (r:-0,558, p<0.001, bodily pain (r:-0.540, p<0.001, general health (r:- 0,708 p<0.001, vitality (r:-0,692, p<0.001, social functioning (r:-0,559, p<0.001, role limitations due to emotional problems (r:-0,537, p<0.001 and mental health (r: -0,787, p<0.001. Discussion: BDI scores are higher in patients with chronic cervical MPS than healthy controls and negatively affect their quality of life. Psychiatric evaluation of the patients with chronic cervical MPS may improve their quality of life and treatments outcome.

  2. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants, talk therapy, or both. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  3. Dry Eye Disease in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiskaoglu, Nesime Setge; Yazıcı, Alper; Karlıdere, Tunay; Sari, Esin; Oguz, Elif Yilmaz; Musaoglu, Musa; Aslan, Seyda; Samet Ermiş, Sıtkı

    2017-05-01

    Psychiatric conditions and not just the treatments themselves might be involved in the pathophysiology of dry eye disease (DED). The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between depression and DED using objective and subjective tests in patients with newly diagnosed depressive disorder who were not using any medication which may help us to determine the sole effect of depression on dry eye. Thirty-six patients from the psychiatry clinic with a new diagnosis of depressive disorder and 32 controls were included in the study. All met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV criteria for depression. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to measure depression severity and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Stai1, Stai2) for concomitant anxiety symptoms. The Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) and Visual Functioning Questionnaires (VFQ25) were completed and used to confirm diagnosis of DED in conjunction with the tear break up time (TBUT), ocular surface vital dye staining, and Schirmer's test. The comparison of depressive and control groups revealed significantly lower Schirmer (20.3 ± 9.9 vs. 25.7 ± 9.3 mm) and TBUT (7.8 ± 5.7 vs. 12.5 ± 7.8 s) scores with a consistently higher Oxford score (1.8 ± 3.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.4) in the depressive group. Although the parameters were affected in the depressive group, this did not influence OSDI (86.1 ± 13.6 vs. 86.6 ± 13.3) and VFQ25 (30.8 ± 21.6 vs. 38.5 ± 29.1) scores. In both groups, the three psychological test scores (Stai1-2 and BDI) were correlated to each other but none of these tests were correlated to OSDI, VRQL, Schirmer, TBUT, and Oxford staining scores. Our study shows a definite association between depression and DED. We feel that it is important that psychiatrists take this into account especially while prescribing antidepressants which may aggravate dry eye signs.

  4. A psychometric evaluation of the clinician-rated Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-C16) in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Ira H; Rush, A John; Suppes, Trisha; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Woo, Ada; Kyutoku, Yasushi; Crismon, M Lynn; Dennehy, Ellen; Carmody, Thomas J

    2009-06-01

    The clinician-rated, 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-C16) has been extensively evaluated in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This report assesses the psychometric properties of the QIDS-C16 in outpatients with bipolar disorder (BD, N = 405) and MDD (N = 547) and in bipolar patients in the depressed phase only (BD-D) (N = 99) enrolled in the Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP) using classical test theory (CTT) and the Samejima graded item response theory (IRT) model. Values of coefficient alpha were very similar in BD, MDD, and BD-D groups at baseline (alpha = 0.80-0.81) and at exit (alpha = 0.82-0.85). The QIDS-C16 was unidimensional for all three groups. MDD and BD-D patients (n = 99) had comparable symptom levels. The BD-D patients (n = 99) had the most, and bipolar patients in the manic phase had the least depressive symptoms at baseline. IRT analyses indicated that the QIDS-C16 was most sensitive to the measurement of depression for both MDD patients and for BD-D patients in the average range. The QIDS-C16 is suitable for use with patients with BD and can be used as an outcome measure in trials enrolling both BD and MDD patients. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  5. Randomized Trial of Group Music Therapy With Chinese Prisoners: Impact on Anxiety, Depression, and Self-Esteem.

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    Chen, Xi-Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Gold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of group music therapy on improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in Chinese prisoners. Two-hundred male prisoners were randomly assigned to music therapy (n = 100) or standard care (n = 100). The music therapy had 20 sessions of group therapy compared with standard care. Anxiety (State and Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI]), depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]), and self-esteem (Texas Social Behavior Inventory [TSBI], Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory [RSI]) were measured by standardized scales at baseline, mid-program, and post-program. Data were analyzed based on the intention to treat principle. Compared with standard care, anxiety and depression in the music therapy condition decreased significantly at mid-test and post-test; self-esteem improved significantly at mid-test (TSBI) and at post-test (TSBI, RSI). Improvements were greater in younger participants (STAI-Trait, RSI) and/or in those with a lower level of education (STAI-State, STAI-Trait). Group music therapy seems to be effective in improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem and was shown to be most beneficial for prisoners of younger age or with lower education level. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Antenatal Cognitive-behavioral Therapy for Prevention of Postpartum Depression: A Pilot Study

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    Kwon, Jung Hye; Lee, Jeong Jae

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To examine the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the prevention of postpartum depression (PPD) in "at risk" women. Materials and Methods We recruited 927 pregnant women in 6 obstetric and gynecology clinics and screened them using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Ninety-nine of the screened women who had significantly high scores in BDI (a score above 16) were selected for the study. They were contacted through by telephone, and 27 who had consented to participate in the study were interviewed via SCID-IV-I. Twenty-seven eligible women were randomly assigned to the CBT intervention (n = 15) and control condition (n = 12). All participants were required to complete written questionnaires, assessing demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, negative thoughts, dyadic communication satisfaction, and global marital satisfaction prior to treatment and approximately 1 month postpartum. The 15 women in the CBT condition received 9 bi-weekly 1-hour individual CBT sessions, targeting and modifying negative patterns of thinking and behaviors occurring in the context of the dyadic relationship. Results The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that there were significant differences in all postpartum measures between the 2 groups, indicating that our antenatal intervention with CBT was effective in reducing depressive symptoms and improving marital satisfaction, which lasted until the postpartum period. Conclusion Our pilot study has provided preliminary empirical evidence that antenatal CBT intervention can be an effective preventive treatment for PPD. Further study in this direction was suggested. PMID:18729297

  7. Bilateral hippocampal atrophy in temporal lobe epilepsy: Effect of depressive symptoms and febrile seizures

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    Finegersh, Andrey; Avedissian, Christina; Shamim, Sadat; Dustin, Irene; Thompson, Paul M.; Theodore, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Purpose Neuroimaging studies suggest a history of febrile seizures, and depression, are associated with hippocampal volume reductions in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Methods We used radial atrophy mapping (RAM), a three-dimensional (3D) surface modeling tool, to measure hippocampal atrophy in 40 patients with unilateral TLE, with or without a history of febrile seizures and symptoms of depression. Multiple linear regression was used to single out the effects of covariates on local atrophy. Key Findings Subjects with a history of febrile seizures (n = 15) had atrophy in regions corresponding to the CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus contralateral to seizure focus (CHC) compared to those without a history of febrile seizures (n = 25). Subjects with Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) score ≥14 (n = 11) had atrophy in the superoanterior portion of the CHC compared to subjects with BDI-II <14 (n = 29). Significance Contralateral hippocampal atrophy in TLE may be related to febrile seizures or depression. PMID:21269286

  8. Internet Use, Depression, and Anxiety in a Healthy Adolescent Population: Prospective Cohort Study.

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    Thom, Robyn Pauline; Bickham, David S; Rich, Michael

    2018-05-22

    Psychiatric disorders, including conduct disturbances, substance abuse, and affective disorders, emerge in approximately 20% of adolescents. In parallel with the rise in internet use, the prevalence of depression among adolescents has increased. It remains unclear whether and how internet use impacts mental health in adolescents. We assess the association between patterns of internet use and two mental health outcomes (depression and anxiety) in a healthy adolescent population. A total of 126 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 15 years were recruited. Participants reported their typical computer and internet usage patterns. At baseline and one-year follow-up, they completed the Beck Depression Index for primary care (BDI-PC) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory for Primary Care (BAI-PC). Individual linear regressions were completed to determine the association between markers of internet use at baseline and mental health outcomes at one-year follow-up. All models controlled for age, gender, and ethnicity. There was an inverse correlation between minutes spent on a favorite website per visit and BAI-PC score. No association was found between internet use and BDI-PC score. There is no relationship between internet use patterns and depression in adolescents, whereas internet use may mitigate anxiety in adolescents with higher levels of baseline anxiety. ©Robyn Pauline Thom, David S Bickham, Michael Rich. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 22.05.2018.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Persian version of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-P

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    Mir Mohammad Jalali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tinnitus can have a significant effect on an individual’s quality of life, and is very difficult quantify. One of the most popular questionnaires used in this area is the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of a Persian translation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI-P.   Materials and Methods: This prospective clinical study was performed in the Otolaryngology Department of Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. A total of 102 patients aged 23–80 years with tinnitus completed the (THI-P. The patients were instructed to complete the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Audiometry was performed. Eight-five patients were asked to complete the THI-P for a second time 7–10 days after the initial interview. We assessed test–retest reliability and internal reliability of the THI-P. Validity was assessed by analyzing the THI-P of patients according to their age, tinnitus duration and psychological distress (BDI and STAI. A factor analysis was computed to verify if three subscales (functional, emotional, and catastrophic represented three distinct variables.   Results: Test–retest correlation coefficient scores were highly significant. The THI-P and its subscales showed good internal consistency reliability (α = 0.80 to 0.96. High-to-moderate correlations were observed between THI-P and psychological distress and tinnitus symptom ratings. A confirmatory factor analysis failed to validate the three subscales of THI, and high inter-correlations found between the subscales question whether they represent three distinct factors. Conclusion:  The results suggest that the THI-P is a reliable and valid tool which can be used in a clinical setting to quantify the impact of tinnitus on the quality of life of Iranian patients.

  10. Body-Related Social Comparison and Disordered Eating among Adolescent Females with an Eating Disorder, Depressive Disorder, and Healthy Controls

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    Daniel Le Grange

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between body-related social comparison (BRSC and eating disorders (EDs by: (a comparing the degree of BRSC in adolescents with an ED, depressive disorder (DD, and no psychiatric history; and (b investigating whether BRSC is associated with ED symptoms after controlling for symptoms of depression and self-esteem. Participants were 75 girls, aged 12–18 (25 per diagnostic group. To assess BRSC, participants reported on a 5-point Likert scale how often they compare their body to others’. Participants also completed a diagnostic interview, Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2, Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE. Compared to adolescents with a DD and healthy adolescents, adolescents with an ED engaged in significantly more BRSC (p ≤ 0.001. Collapsing across groups, BRSC was significantly positively correlated with ED symptoms (p ≤ 0.01, and these associations remained even after controlling for two robust predictors of both ED symptoms and social comparison, namely BDI-II and RSE. In conclusion, BRSC seems to be strongly related to EDs. Treatment for adolescents with an ED may focus on reducing BRSC.

  11. Body-related social comparison and disordered eating among adolescent females with an eating disorder, depressive disorder, and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Andrea E; Zaitsoff, Shannon L; Taylor, Andrew; Menna, Rosanne; Le Grange, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between body-related social comparison (BRSC) and eating disorders (EDs) by: (a) comparing the degree of BRSC in adolescents with an ED, depressive disorder (DD), and no psychiatric history; and (b) investigating whether BRSC is associated with ED symptoms after controlling for symptoms of depression and self-esteem. Participants were 75 girls, aged 12-18 (25 per diagnostic group). To assess BRSC, participants reported on a 5-point Likert scale how often they compare their body to others'. Participants also completed a diagnostic interview, Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE). Compared to adolescents with a DD and healthy adolescents, adolescents with an ED engaged in significantly more BRSC (p ≤ 0.001). Collapsing across groups, BRSC was significantly positively correlated with ED symptoms (p ≤ 0.01), and these associations remained even after controlling for two robust predictors of both ED symptoms and social comparison, namely BDI-II and RSE. In conclusion, BRSC seems to be strongly related to EDs. Treatment for adolescents with an ED may focus on reducing BRSC.

  12. Depressive symptoms and drug abuse among incarcerated women in cadeia pública feminina de Votorantim/SP

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    Danilo de Assis Pereira

    2014-06-01

    This is a qualitative study grounded in Social Representations Theory (SRT, with descriptive approach. Objectives: the research aimed to identify the life trajectories of women incarcerated in the Public Jail Women's Votorantim, its prospects and the meanings attributed to prison. The specific objectives were: (1 identify the socio-demographic and clinical data, (2 the prevalence of depressive symptoms and (3 the use, abuse or dependence symptoms in women prisoners. Methods: we interviewed 25 women, trapped interim Chain Public Women's Votorantim. The arrested after signing the Instrument of Consent, responding to a data sheet Sociodemographic and Clinical Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We use the Collective Subject Discourse to present the result of discursive question. For the rest of the specs of sociodemographic and clinical data and the Beck Depression Questionnaire, we chose the descriptive approach. Results: most of the interviewees was arrested for drug trafficking, has fragmented family history, present history of physical abuse and/or sexual abuse, have significant mental health problems, physical and substance abuse; 80% of women who responded to the BDI were identified as having moderate to severe depression, and the items that scored more this index were: loss of libido, sadness, punishment, insomnia. Conclusion: it is vital to ensure the rights of the imprisoned health access. We suggest that every convict follow a process of initial assessment, to be diagnosed soon: substance dependence and depression.

  13. Is the beck anxiety inventory a good tool to assess the severity of anxiety? A primary care study in The Netherlands study of depression and anxiety (NESDA

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    van der Feltz-Cornelis Christina M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appropriate management of anxiety disorders in primary care requires clinical assessment and monitoring of the severity of the anxiety. This study focuses on the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI as a severity indicator for anxiety in primary care patients with different anxiety disorders (social phobia, panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, agoraphobia or generalized anxiety disorder, depressive disorders or no disorder (controls. Methods Participants were 1601 primary care patients participating in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA. Regression analyses were used to compare the mean BAI scores of the different diagnostic groups and to correct for age and gender. Results Patients with any anxiety disorder had a significantly higher mean score than the controls. A significantly higher score was found for patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia compared to patients with agoraphobia only or social phobia only. BAI scores in patients with an anxiety disorder with a co-morbid anxiety disorder and in patients with an anxiety disorder with a co-morbid depressive disorder were significantly higher than BAI scores in patients with an anxiety disorder alone or patients with a depressive disorder alone. Depressed and anxious patients did not differ significantly in their mean scores. Conclusions The results suggest that the BAI may be used as a severity indicator of anxiety in primary care patients with different anxiety disorders. However, because the instrument seems to reflect the severity of depression as well, it is not a suitable instrument to discriminate between anxiety and depression in a primary care population.

  14. Prevalence rates and socioeconomic characteristics of post-partum depression in Hungary.

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    Nagy, Emese; Molnar, Peter; Pal, Attila; Orvos, Hajnalka

    2011-01-30

    The rapid socioeconomic transition in post-communist Hungary adversely affected the overall morbidity and mortality rates in the 1990s. Prevalence data on depressive disorders from the region are still scarce, however. This study reports the findings of the first epidemiological survey, using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), on the prevalence of post-partum depression and the associated risk factors in Hungary. A total of 1030 mothers who delivered their babies between May and July 1999 in 16 counties in Hungary were screened for depressive symptoms 3-26 weeks post-partum. The survey found that 10.81% of the sample was above the cut-off score of 13, and the EPDS detected post-partum depressive symptoms with 76% (95% confidence interval (CI)=60.5-87.1) sensitivity and 92% (95% CI=90.5-94.1) specificity. In addition, 24 socio-demographic, socio-psychiatric data and personal and obstetric variables were surveyed. Results of a hierarchical logistic regression analysis showed that depression of the mother during pregnancy was the strongest predictor of depressive symptoms post-partum. Depression before pregnancy, housing conditions, marital relationship status and family history of alcohol problems were also identified as predictors for post-partum depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Perception of Community Tolerance and Prevalence of Depression among Transgender Persons.

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    Owen-Smith, Ashli A; Sineath, Craig; Sanchez, Travis; Dea, Robin; Giammattei, Shawn; Gillespie, Theresa; Helms, Monica F; Hunkeler, Enid M; Quinn, Virginia P; Roblin, Douglas; Slovis, Jennifer; Stephenson, Robert; Sullivan, Patrick S; Tangpricha, Vin; Woodyatt, Cory; Goodman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the study was to examine the association between depression and perceived community tolerance after controlling for various demographic and personal characteristics, treatment receipt, and past experiences with abuse or discrimination. An on-line survey assessed depressive symptoms among transgender and gender non-conforming individuals. Depression was assessed using the 7-item Beck Depression Inventory for Primary Care (BDI-PC) and the 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CESD-10) scale. The prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing depression in persons who did and did not perceive their area as tolerant were 0.33 (0.20-0.54) for BD-PC and 0.66 (0.49-0.89) for CESD-10. Other factors associated with depression were experience with abuse or discrimination, lower education, and unfulfilled desire to receive hormonal therapy. Depression was common in this sample of transgender and gender non-conforming individuals and was strongly and consistently associated with participants' perceptions of community tolerance, even after adjusting for possible confounding. The association between desire to receive hormonal therapy and depression is a finding that warrants further exploration. Future research should also assess depression and changes in perception of community tolerance in transgender individuals before and after initiation of gender confirmation treatment.

  16. Impact of severity of personality disorder on the outcome of depression.

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    Kelly, Brendan D; Nur, Ula A; Tyrer, Peter; Casey, Patricia

    2009-06-01

    The influence of severity of personality disorder on outcome of depression is unclear. Four hundred and ten patients with depression in 9 urban and rural communities in Finland, Ireland, Norway, Spain and the United Kingdom, were randomised to individual problem-solving treatment (n=121), group sessions on depression prevention (n=106) or treatment as usual (n=183). Depressive symptoms were recorded at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Personality assessment was performed using the Personality Assessment Schedule and analysed by severity (no personality disorder, personality difficulty, simple personality disorder, complex personality disorder). Complete personality assessments were performed on 301 individuals of whom 49.8% had no personality disorder; 19.3% had personality difficulties; 13.0% had simple personality disorder; and 17.9% had complex personality disorder. Severity of personality disorder was correlated with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores at baseline (Spearman's r=0.21; ppersonality disorder and treatment type for depression. While multi-variable analyses indicate that depressive symptoms at baseline are the strongest predictor of depressive symptoms at 6 and 12 months, the strong correlations between severity of personality disorder and depressive symptoms make it difficult to establish the independent effect of personality disorder on outcome of depression.

  17. The association of academic tracking to depressive symptoms among adolescents in three Caribbean countries

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    Clarke Nelson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Students who are tracked into low performing schools or classrooms that limit their life chances may report increased depressive symptoms. Limited research has been conducted on academic tracking and its association with depressive symptoms among high school students in the Caribbean. This project examines levels of depressive symptoms among tenth grade students tracked within and between high schools in Jamaica, St. Vincent and St. Kitts and Nevis. Methods Students enrolled in grade ten of the 2006/2007 academic year in Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Vincent were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. In Jamaica and St. Vincent, academic tracking was operationalized using data provided by the local Ministries of Education. These Ministries ranked ordered schools according to students' performance on Caribbean school leaving examinations. In St. Kitts and Nevis tracking was operationalized by classroom assignments within schools whereby students were grouped into classrooms according to their levels of academic achievement. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between academic tracking and BDI-II depression scores. Results A wide cross-section of 4th form students in each nation was sampled (n = 1738; 278 from Jamaica, 737 St. Kitts and Nevis, 716 from St. Vincent; 52% females, 46.2% males and 1.8% no gender reported; age 12 to 19 years, mean = 15.4 yrs, sd = .9 yr. Roughly half (53% of the students reported some symptoms of depression with 19.2% reporting moderate and 10.7% reporting severe symptoms of depression. Students in Jamaica reported significantly higher depression scores than those in either St. Kitts and Nevis or St. Vincent (p Conclusions There appears to be an association between academic tracking and depressive symptoms that is differentially manifested across the islands of Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis and St. Vincent.

  18. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reasons why a woman may have depression: Family history . Women with a family history of depression may be more at risk. But depression can also happen in women who don’t have a family history of depression. Brain changes. The brains of people ...

  19. Healthy Eating Index scores associated with symptoms of depression in Cuban-Americans with and without type 2 diabetes: a cross sectional study

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    Exebio Joel C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low diet quality and depression symptoms are independently associated with poor glycemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D; however, the relationship between them is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the association between diet quality and symptoms of depression among Cuban-Americans with and without T2D living in South Florida. Methods Subjects (n = 356 were recruited from randomly selected mailing list. Diet quality was determined using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-05 score. Symptoms of depression were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Both linear and logistic regression analyses were run to determine whether or not these two variables were related. Symptoms of depression was the dependent variable and independent variables included HEI-05, gender, age, marital status, BMI, education level, A1C, employment status, depression medication, duration of diabetes, and diabetes status. Analysis of covariance was used to test for interactions among variables. Results An interaction between diabetes status, gender and HEI-05 was found (P = 0.011. Among males with a HEI-05 score ≤ 55.6, those with T2D had a higher mean BDI score than those without T2D (11.6 vs. 6.6 respectively, P = 0.028. Among males and females with a HEI-05 score ≤ 55.6, females without T2D had a higher mean BDI score compared to males without T2D (11.0 vs. 6.6 respectively, P = 0.012 Conclusions Differences in symptoms of depression according to diabetes status and gender are found in Cuban-Americans with low diet quality.

  20. Loneliness and Depression among Wives of Pakistani Expatriate Husbands

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    Najam-us-SAHAR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to assess loneliness and depression among wives of expatriated husbands with focus on the role of family. The sample comprised of 50 married women divided in two groups (29 living in joint family & 21 living in nuclear family setup whose husbands are living abroad for last one year or more. Differential Loneliness Scale (DLS & Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were administered. Statistical analysis revealed that n=16(32% of the participants experience severe depression. Furthermore a significant positive relation was found between loneliness & depression especially in intimate relations domain(r=.66**. Another significant finding is difference in loneliness & depression based on family system. Women living in joint family system experienced more loneliness (M+SD= 29.1+11.9, t=2.1* and severe depression (35% as compared to those living in nuclear family system (M+SD= 21.8+12.5 for loneliness, 29% for severe depression. This study will be helpful in analyzing the psychological impact of husband’s expatriation on their wives mental health and it will also serve as a representative and expressive effort to open new avenues for further researchers to consider social variables including family dynamics.

  1. Depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease

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    Débora Maria Mendonça da Cunha

    Full Text Available Objective.To assess the presence of depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease in the preoperative period for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Methods. A cross-sectional study with 63 hospitalized patients prior to CABG. Two instruments were used for data collection; one for the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and the other to evaluate the presence of depressive symptoms, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results. The mean age was 58 years; most were male (60.3%; with a partner (81% low educational level (71.4% attended school through elementary school. Among the patients, 36.5% were classified with dysphoria, and 25.4% had some degree of depression (6.3% mild, 17.5% moderate, and 1.6% severe. The group of patients with lower educational level presented higher depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Six of every ten patients with coronary artery disease showed dysphoria or some degree of depression. The results of this study can support the planning of nursing care for patients before and after CABG, as well as the development of public health policies to ensure complete, quality care for these patients, understanding depression as a variable that can interfere with recovery after cardiac surgery.

  2. Occupational stress, anxiety and depression among Egyptian teachers.

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    Desouky, Dalia; Allam, Heba

    2017-09-01

    Occupational stress (OS) among teachers predispose to depression and anxiety. No study was done to assess these problems among Egyptian teachers. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of OS, depression and anxiety among Egyptian teachers. A cross sectional study was done on 568 Egyptian teachers. The respondents filled a questionnaire on personal data, and the Arabic version of the Occupational Stress Index (OSI), the Arabic validated versions of Taylor manifest anxiety scale and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to assess OS, anxiety and depression respectively. The prevalence of OS, anxiety and depression among teachers was (100%, 67.5% and 23.2%) respectively. OS, anxiety and depression scores were significantly higher among teachers with an age more than 40years, female teachers, primary school teachers, those with inadequate salary, higher teaching experience, higher qualifications and higher workload. A significant weak positive correlation was found between OS scores and anxiety and depression scores. This study indicated the need for future researches to address risk factors of OS and mental disorders among Egyptian teachers, and the need of periodical medical evaluation of teachers and medical and psychological support for the identified cases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The relationship between hydration status, male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis patients.

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    Hassan, Kamal; Elimeleh, Yotam; Shehadeh, Mona; Fadi, Hassan; Rubinchik, Irina

    2018-01-01

    Disturbances in sexual function are common among dialysis patients. Normal erections require a complex balance of physiological, psychological, emotional, hormonal, neurological and vascular factors. This study examined a possible association of overhydration (OH) with male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This cross-sectional study assessed hydration status by whole-body bioimpedance spectroscopy in patients on maintenance HD for more than 12 months. Patients were categorized according to OH to extracellular water (ECW) ratio: OH/ECW ratio >0.15 and OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15. Sexual function was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) score. Psychological status was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score. Serum sex hormones were determined. Of 39 stable participants on HD, 53.8% were overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio >0.15) and 46.2% not overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15). Of participants with OH/ECW ratio >0.15, 85.7% had mild to severe ED, and 71.4% had abnormal BDI scores, ranging from mild mood disturbance to severe depression. Compared to patients with OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15, BDI scores, serum estradiol and plasma hsCRP were higher (18.48±8.34 vs 10.61±5.46, p 0.15, while their IIEF score, serum total testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were lower (12.81±7.31 vs 41.44±23.79, p <0.001; 8.97±5.43 vs 14.10±8.30, p =0.013; and 85.31±55.14 vs 133.3±95.48, p =0.029; respectively). The OH/ECW ratio correlated inversely with the IIEF score ( r =-0.69, p <0.001) and positively with BDI scores ( r =0.64, p <0.001). IIEF scores were inversely correlated with BDI scores ( r =-0.54, p <0.001). OH in HD patients was found to be associated with a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction and depression, lower serum levels of total testosterone and DHEA, and higher levels of serum estradiol.

  4. The relationship between hydration status, male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis patients

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    Hassan, Kamal; Elimeleh, Yotam; Shehadeh, Mona; Fadi, Hassan; Rubinchik, Irina

    2018-01-01

    Background Disturbances in sexual function are common among dialysis patients. Normal erections require a complex balance of physiological, psychological, emotional, hormonal, neurological and vascular factors. This study examined a possible association of overhydration (OH) with male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Patients and methods This cross-sectional study assessed hydration status by whole-body bioimpedance spectroscopy in patients on maintenance HD for more than 12 months. Patients were categorized according to OH to extracellular water (ECW) ratio: OH/ECW ratio >0.15 and OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15. Sexual function was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) score. Psychological status was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score. Serum sex hormones were determined. Results Of 39 stable participants on HD, 53.8% were overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio >0.15) and 46.2% not overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15). Of participants with OH/ECW ratio >0.15, 85.7% had mild to severe ED, and 71.4% had abnormal BDI scores, ranging from mild mood disturbance to severe depression. Compared to patients with OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15, BDI scores, serum estradiol and plasma hsCRP were higher (18.48±8.34 vs 10.61±5.46, p0.15, while their IIEF score, serum total testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were lower (12.81±7.31 vs 41.44±23.79, p<0.001; 8.97±5.43 vs 14.10±8.30, p=0.013; and 85.31±55.14 vs 133.3±95.48, p=0.029; respectively). The OH/ECW ratio correlated inversely with the IIEF score (r=−0.69, p<0.001) and positively with BDI scores (r=0.64, p<0.001). IIEF scores were inversely correlated with BDI scores (r=−0.54, p<0.001). Conclusion OH in HD patients was found to be associated with a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction and depression, lower serum levels of total testosterone and DHEA, and higher levels of serum estradiol. PMID:29559788

  5. Depressive symptoms, anxiety, and quality of life in women with pelvic endometriosis.

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    Sepulcri, Rodrigo de P; do Amaral, Vivian F

    2009-01-01

    To assess depressive symptoms, anxiety and quality of life in women with pelvic endometriosis. A prospective study of 104 women diagnosed with pelvic endometriosis. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) were used to evaluate depressive symptoms; the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) to evaluate anxiety symptoms; and the short (26-item) version of the World Health Organization Quality Of Life instrument (WHOQOL-BREF) to evaluate quality of life. Of the patients evaluated, 86.5% presented depressive symptoms (mild in 22.1%, moderate in 31.7%, and severe in 32.7%) and 87.5% presented anxiety (minor in 24% and major in 63.5%). Quality of life was found to be substandard. Age correlated positively with depressive symptoms, as determined using the BDI (P=0.013) and HAM-D (P=0.037). There was a positive correlation between current pain intensity and anxiety symptoms, as assessed using the STAI (state, P=0.009; trait, P=0.048) and HAM-A (P=0.0001). The complaints related to physical limitations increased in parallel with the intensity of pain (P=0.017). There was an inverse correlation between duration of treatment and quality of life (P=0.017). There was no correlation between psychiatric symptoms and endometriosis stage. A rational approach to endometriosis should include an evaluation of the emotional profile and quality of life. That approach would certainly reduce the functional damage caused by the endometriosis.

  6. Combined therapy of major depression with concomitant borderline personality disorder: comparison of interpersonal and cognitive psychotherapy.

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    Bellino, Silvio; Zizza, Monica; Rinaldi, Camilla; Bogetto, Filippo

    2007-11-01

    The combination of antidepressants and brief psychotherapies has been proven more efficacious in treating major depression and is particularly recommended in patients with concomitant personality disorders. We compare the effects of 2 combined therapies, fluoxetine and interpersonal therapy (IPT) or fluoxetine and cognitive therapy (CT), on major depression in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Thirty-five consecutive outpatients with a diagnosis of BPD and a major depressive episode (not bipolar and not psychotic) were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 combined treatments and treated for 24 weeks. Assessment included a semistructured interview, Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS), Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P) for quality of life (QOL), and Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-64). Statistical analysis was performed using the univariate General Linear Model to calculate the effects of duration and type of treatment. No significant differences between treatments were found at CGI, HDRS, BDI-II, and SOFAS score. Combined treatment with CT had greater effects on HARS score and on psychological functioning factor of SAT-P. Combined treatment with IPT was more effective on social functioning factor of SAT-P and on domains domineering or controlling and intrusive or needy of IIP-64. Both combined therapies are efficacious in treating major depression in patients with BPD. Differences between CT and IPT concern specific features of subjective QOL and interpersonal problems. These findings lack reliable comparisons and need to be replicated.

  7. Measuring stress in medical education: validation of the Korean version of the higher education stress inventory with medical students

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    Eun-Jung Shim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical students face a variety of stressors associated with their education; if not promptly identified and adequately dealt with, it may bring about several negative consequences in terms of mental health and academic performance. This study examined psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Higher Education Stress Inventory (K-HESI. Methods The reliability and validity of the K-HESI were examined in a large scale multi-site survey involving 7110 medical students. The K-HESI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and questions regarding quality of life (QOL and self-rated physical health (SPH were administered. Results Exploratory factor analysis of the K-HESI identified seven factors: Low commitment; financial concerns; teacher-student relationship; worries about future profession; non-supportive climate; workload; and dissatisfaction with education. A subsequent confirmatory factor analysis supported the 7-factor model. Internal consistency of the K-HESI was satisfactory (Cronbach’s α = .78. Convergent validity was demonstrated by its positive association with the BDI. Known group validity was supported by the K-HESI’s ability to detect significant differences on the overall and subscale scores of K-HESI according to different levels of QOL and SPH. Conclusions The K-HESI is a psychometrically valid tool that comprehensively assesses various relevant stressors related to medical education. Evidence-based stress management in medical education empirically guided by the regular assessment of stress using reliable and valid measure is warranted.

  8. Measuring stress in medical education: validation of the Korean version of the higher education stress inventory with medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Eun-Jung; Jeon, Hong Jin; Kim, Hana; Lee, Kwang-Min; Jung, Dooyoung; Noh, Hae-Lim; Roh, Myoung-Sun; Hahm, Bong-Jin

    2016-11-24

    Medical students face a variety of stressors associated with their education; if not promptly identified and adequately dealt with, it may bring about several negative consequences in terms of mental health and academic performance. This study examined psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Higher Education Stress Inventory (K-HESI). The reliability and validity of the K-HESI were examined in a large scale multi-site survey involving 7110 medical students. The K-HESI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and questions regarding quality of life (QOL) and self-rated physical health (SPH) were administered. Exploratory factor analysis of the K-HESI identified seven factors: Low commitment; financial concerns; teacher-student relationship; worries about future profession; non-supportive climate; workload; and dissatisfaction with education. A subsequent confirmatory factor analysis supported the 7-factor model. Internal consistency of the K-HESI was satisfactory (Cronbach's α = .78). Convergent validity was demonstrated by its positive association with the BDI. Known group validity was supported by the K-HESI's ability to detect significant differences on the overall and subscale scores of K-HESI according to different levels of QOL and SPH. The K-HESI is a psychometrically valid tool that comprehensively assesses various relevant stressors related to medical education. Evidence-based stress management in medical education empirically guided by the regular assessment of stress using reliable and valid measure is warranted.

  9. Application of the Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory in clinical patients Aplicação do inventário de expressão de raiva estado-traço de Spielberger em pacientes clínicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Barros de Azevedo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the factor structure of the Portuguese version of State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI in clinical patients. METHOD: 400 subjects from an internal medicine outpatient unit and 200 from a medical ward were recruited. Patients answered questions about clinical data, the STAXI, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Raw score of the STAXI was submitted to reliability assessment and factor analysis. RESULTS: Internal consistency using the Cronbach's alpha coefficient was of 0.84. The STAXI significantly correlated with BDI at r=0.352 (pOBJETIVO: Avaliar o construto e as propriedades psicométricas da versão em português do Inventário de Expressão de Raiva Estado-Traço (STAXI em pacientes clínicos. MÉTODO: 400 indivíduos de uma unidade ambulatorial e 200 de uma enfermaria de clínica médica foram recrutados. Foram coletadas informações sobre aspectos clínicos, o STAXI e o Inventário de Depressão de Beck (BDI. Os escores brutos do STAXI foram submetidos à análise de confiabilidade e análise fatorial. RESULTADOS: A consistência interna pelo coeficiente alfa de Cronbach foi de 0,84. O STAXI se correlacionou significativamente com BDI (r=0,352; p<0,01. A análise de Componentes Principais identificou cinco fatores significativos: Raiva-traço, Raiva-estado, Controle-de-raiva, Raiva-para-fora e Raiva-para-dentro. Esse modelo estrutural é similar ao apresentado originalmente por Spielberger. CONCLUSÃO: A versão em português do STAXI apresenta uma estrutura fatorial adequada que permite a avaliação das dimensões da raiva em pacientes clínicos.

  10. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  11. Childhood trauma in the lives of substance-dependent patients: The relationship between depression, anxiety and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Suat; Kandemir, Hasan

    2015-05-01

    High levels of childhood traumatic experiences have been observed among substance abusers. There has been insufficient study of the effects of childhood trauma in adulthood. The aim of this study is to research the relationship between childhood trauma, self-esteem, and levels of depression and anxiety in substance-dependent (SD) people. This study took place between March 2012 and April 2013, at Balıklı Rum Hospital (Istanbul) substance dependency clinic. It included 50 patients diagnosed as substance dependent according to the criteria of DSM-IV as compared with 45 healthy controls. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Diagnosis (SCID-I) was used to identify Axis I disorders. All other data was collected using a semi-structured socio-demographic questionnaire, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The total scores of the SD group on the CTQ and on its Emotional Abuse/Emotional Neglect (EA/EN), Physical Abuse (PA) and Sexual Abuse (SA) subscales were statistically significant. In relation to the healthy controls, the SD group scored higher on the RSES, BDI and BAI. A correlation was observed between the total scores of SD individuals on the CTQ and their scores on the RSES, BDI and BAI. This study showed high levels of childhood traumatic experiences for SD people and indicates that there may be a relationship between these experiences and their levels of self-esteem, depression and anxiety.

  12. The association between serum lipid levels, suicide ideation, and central serotonergic activity in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Bun-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2014-04-01

    There is some evidence that low lipid levels cause suicide in depressed patients. The purpose of this study was to identify whether low serum lipid levels are associated with suicide ideation or are correlated with central serotonin function. Auditory processing for the loudness dependence of auditory evoked potentials (LDAEP) was measured in 73 outpatients with major depressive disorder. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered on the same day as measurement of the LDAEP. In addition, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride (TG) levels were measured. All subjects had received antidepressant monotherapy. The depressed subjects were divided into those with and without suicide ideation according to the score for HAMD item 3 or BDI item 9. TG levels differed significantly between the two groups, whereas body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and LDAEP did not. The scores for HAMD item 3 and BDI item 9 were negatively correlated with TG levels (p=0.045 and 0.026, respectively). The LDAEP was negatively correlated with TG levels (p=0.012). Although there was tendency toward a negative correlation between the LDAEP and serum LDL, it did not reach statistical significance (p=0.068). The cross-sectional design of this study means that baseline serum lipid levels were not measured. The findings of this study revealed a relationship between TG and suicide ideation that is independent of both BMI and body weight. Furthermore, serum lipid levels were associated with central serotonergic activity, as assessed using the LDAEP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. ANN based Performance Evaluation of BDI for Condition Monitoring of Induction Motor Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Raj Kumar; Giri, V. K.

    2017-06-01

    One of the critical parts in rotating machines is bearings and most of the failure arises from the defective bearings. Bearing failure leads to failure of a machine and the unpredicted productivity loss in the performance. Therefore, bearing fault detection and prognosis is an integral part of the preventive maintenance procedures. In this paper vibration signal for four conditions of a deep groove ball bearing; normal (N), inner race defect (IRD), ball defect (BD) and outer race defect (ORD) were acquired from a customized bearing test rig, under four different conditions and three different fault sizes. Two approaches have been opted for statistical feature extraction from the vibration signal. In the first approach, raw signal is used for statistical feature extraction and in the second approach statistical features extracted are based on bearing damage index (BDI). The proposed BDI technique uses wavelet packet node energy coefficients analysis method. Both the features are used as inputs to an ANN classifier to evaluate its performance. A comparison of ANN performance is made based on raw vibration data and data chosen by using BDI. The ANN performance has been found to be fairly higher when BDI based signals were used as inputs to the classifier.

  14. Evaluation of health-related physical fitness parameters and association analysis with depression, anxiety, and quality of life in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Umit; Ucok, Kagan; Ulasli, Alper M; Genc, Abdurrahman; Karabacak, Hatice; Coban, Necip F; Simsek, Hasan; Cevik, Halime

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical fitness parameters (maximal aerobic capacity, muscle strength and flexibility), daily physical activity, resting metabolic rate (RMR), pulmonary function tests (PFTs), body composition, depression, anxiety and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) changes as well as the associations among these parameters in patients with fibromyalgia and to compare them with healthy controls. Thirty-nine women with fibromyalgia and 40 controls were included in this study. Physical measurements, HRQoL questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) score were applied to all participants. Maximal aerobic capacity, trunk flexibility, daily step numbers, total energy expenditure, RMR and PFT values were not significantly different between the patients and the controls. Fibromyalgia patients had higher daily moderate activity times, active energy expenditure values, and BDI and BAI scores, while their lower handgrip strength and back-leg strength values and Short-form health survey (SF)-36 scores were comparable to controls. Handgrip strength and back-leg strength values showed moderately positive correlations with SF-36 scores (total, physical health, mental health) and moderately negative correlations with BDI and BAI scores in patients with fibromyalgia. Our results suggested that muscle strength, HRQoL, depression and anxiety symptomatology were impaired in fibromyalgia patients compared to healthy controls. Low muscle strength is related to reduced HRQoL and increased depression and anxiety symptomatology in patients with fibromyalgia. Also we suggest that performing daily exercises, including aerobic and strength training, as part of one's lifestyle may have beneficial effects in fibromyalgia patients. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Is interpersonal counselling (IPC) sufficient treatment for depression in primary care patients? A pilot study comparing IPC and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontunen, Jarmo; Timonen, Markku; Muotka, Joona; Liukkonen, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Psychotherapeutic treatment is underused in primary care, where even short-term psychotherapy can be perceived as too lengthy and labour-intensive. We tested here for the first time the preliminary efficacy of seven sessions of interpersonal counselling (IPC) by comparison with sixteen sessions of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in regular clinical settings. Patients seeking treatment for the first time who met the DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD, mild/moderate) were randomized to either IPC (n=20) or IPT (n=20). The efficacy of the treatments was assessed using the 34-item Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-OM) scale and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale. 90% of the patients completed all the treatment sessions. IPC delivered by psychiatric nurses in primary care proved equally as effective as IPT delivered by psychotherapists/psychologists in secondary care. The pre-treatment to 12-month follow-up within-group effect sizes were large: 1.52 (CORE-OM) and 1.41 (BDI) in the IPC group and 1.58 (CORE-OM) and 1.40 (BDI) in the IPT group. At the 12-month follow-up 59% of the patients in the IPC group and 63% in the IPT group were classified as recovered on the CORE-OM scale, with corresponding remission rates of 61% for both groups on the BDI scale. The small sample size limited the power to detect differences between the groups and the naturalistic settings may have confounded the results. This clinical trial suggests that IPC is an appropriate and even sufficient first-phase intervention for handling previously untreated mild to moderate depression in primary health care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Smoking patterns, depression, and sociodemographic variables among Flemish women during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Katrien S; Trommelmans, Leen C; Laevens, Hans H; Maes, Lea R; Temmerman, Marleen; Boudrez, Hedwig L

    2013-01-01

    Relationships among feelings of depression, smoking behavior, and educational level during pregnancy have been documented. Feelings of depression may contribute to persistent smoking during pregnancy. No longitudinal studies assessing feelings of depression in women with different antepartum and postpartum smoking patterns are available. The aim was to determine relationships between depressive symptoms, sociodemographic characteristics, and smoking pattern during and after pregnancy. An observational, prospective, noninterventional study was conducted. Data were collected during two stages of pregnancy (T0: postpartum (T2: >6 weeks) in 523 Flemish women. Feelings of depression (measured using the Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]), smoking behavior, and sociodemographic variables were analyzed using a general linear mixed model implemented in SAS Proc MIXED. Smokers and initial smokers reported significantly more depressive symptoms at all time points compared with recent ex-smokers, nonsmokers, and initial nonsmokers (p postpartum. Smoking patterns were associated with depression and showed complex interactions with educational level. Assessment and intervention for both smoking and depression are needed throughout the perinatal period to support the health of mothers, their infants, and families.

  17. Unrevealed Depression Involves Dysfunctional Coping Strategies in Crohn’s Disease Patients in Clinical Remission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Viganò

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. This study investigated the proportion of CD patients in clinical remission with clinical depression, and coping strategies in those with severe depressive disorders. Materials and Methods. One hundred consecutive CD patients in clinical remission were screened for anxiety and depression by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and patients with depressive symptoms were further investigated by means of Cognitive Behavioural Assessment 2.0 and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Afterwards the coping strategies were assessed through the Brief-COPE questionnaire. Results. Twenty-one patients had anxious symptoms and 16 had depressive symptoms with or without anxiety. Seven of these patients (43.8% showed significant depressive symptoms. Compared to patients without psychiatric disorders, these patients showed significant lower score in “positive reframing” (p: 0.017 and in “planning” (p: 0.046 and higher score in “use of instrumental social support” (p<0.001, in “denial” scale (p: 0.001, and in “use of emotional social support” (p: 0.003. Conclusions. Depressed CD patients in clinical remission may have dysfunctional coping strategies, meaning that they may not be able to implement functional strategies to manage at best stress related with their disease.

  18. Detecting Postpartum Depression in Referents to Medical and Health Centers in Hamadan City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shobeiri

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Pregnancy and childbirth are significant developmental excitable for most women. Physical, intrapersonal and relational adaptations are needed to adjust successfully to pregnancy and delivery. Postpartum depression is a serious psychiatric disorder and the adverse impact on infants has been noted. The purpose of this study was to detect postpartum depression in referents to medical and health centers in Hamadan city.Materials & Methods: A descriptive and cross-sectional study involving 400 women completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI within 2-8 weeks of delivery was conducted in urban health centers in Hamadan city, Iran. Data were collected through interviews with women in the clinics in the health centers. Data processing and statistical analysis were performed using SPSS 10.0.Results: The results revealed that majority of women (68.0% were considered normal. Depression was detected in 32.0% of women. Out of these 19.0, 4.0 and 9.0% were mild, moderate and severe depression, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between postpartum depression and age, number of delivery, education, job and husband's job (P=0.000.Conclusion: Nearly 32.0% of selected women had depression. Therefore, it is important for medical personnel to be well versed in the course and treatment of postpartum depression. Post partum depression should be screened and treated as early as possible for several reasons. It can cause significant suffering for the woman who experiences it, and it can have deleterious consequences for the newborn.

  19. Perceptions of health status, medication side effects and depression after successful renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, F.; Masood, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the perceptions of health status and depression among Renal Transplant Recipients (RTRs). Stydy Design: A longitudinal research design was used. Methods: Recipients’ perceived health status (PHS) was measured by a self-developed questionnaire that reflected the symptom severity and frequency of common immunosuppressant side effects. Depression levels were assessed using Beck Depression Inventory B.D.I II) .The sample population comprised of RTRs with a successful and healthy renal transplant recruited from private and government sector renal units in Lahore, Pakistan. Results: Recipients with poorer perceptions of health status tend to be more depressed as indicated by significant negative correlations between PHS and depression. However, further regression analysis found both constructs as significant predictors of each other, raising a question of causal direction. A cross lagged correlation analysis indicated that PHS appears to be a stronger predictor of depression comparatively. Most recipients tend to have positive perceptions of their health status (M = 30.84, S.D = 3.64) with minimum to moderate level of depression (M = 9.50, S.D = 4.00), It is found that a positive perception of health status is associated with lowered depression. Conclusion: Most recipients’ with a healthy kidney transplant tend to report a positive perception of their health status despite adverse medication side effects. However, the perceived health status is significantly associated with consequent feeling of depression. The study confirms the efficacy and positive health outcomes of renal transplantation in Pakistan. (author)

  20. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Teens / Depressants Print en español Depresores del sistema nervioso What They Are: Tranquilizers and other depressants ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  1. Affective temperaments are associated with specific clusters of symptoms and psychopathology: a cross-sectional study on bipolar disorder inpatients in acute manic, mixed, or depressive relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasevoli, Felice; Valchera, Alessandro; Di Giovambattista, Emanuela; Marconi, Massimo; Rapagnani, Maria Paola; De Berardis, Domenico; Martinotti, Giovanni; Fornaro, Michele; Mazza, Monica; Tomasetti, Carmine; Buonaguro, Elisabetta F; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Perugi, Giulio; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether different affective temperaments could be related to a specific mood disorder diagnosis and/or to different therapeutic choices in inpatients admitted for an acute relapse of their primary mood disorder. Hundred and twenty-nine inpatients were consecutively assessed by means of the Structured and Clinical Interview for axis-I disorders/Patient edition and by the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego auto-questionnaire, Young Mania Rating Scale, Hamilton Scale for Depression and for Anxiety, Brief Psychiatry Rating Scale, Clinical Global impression, Drug Attitude Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and Symptoms Checklist-90 items version, along with records of clinical and demographic data. The following prevalence rates for axis-I mood diagnoses were detected: bipolar disorder type I (BD-I, 28%), type II (31%), type not otherwise specified (BD-NOS, 33%), major depressive disorder (4%), and schizoaffective disorder (4%). Mean scores on the hyperthymic temperament scale were significantly higher in BD-I and BD-NOS, and in mixed and manic acute states. Hyperthymic temperament was significantly more frequent in BD-I and BD-NOS patients, whereas depressive temperament in BD-II ones. Hyperthymic and irritable temperaments were found more frequently in mixed episodes, while patients with depressive and mixed episodes more frequently exhibited anxious and depressive temperaments. Affective temperaments were associated with specific symptom and psychopathology clusters, with an orthogonal subdivision between hyperthymic temperament and anxious/cyclothymic/depressive/irritable temperaments. Therapeutic choices were often poorly differentiated among temperaments and mood states. Cross-sectional design; sample size. Although replication studies are needed, current results suggest that temperament-specific clusters of symptoms severity and psychopathology domains could be

  2. The Depressive Experiences Questionnaire: validity and psychological correlates in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, W T; McCranie, E W

    1990-01-01

    This study sought to compare the original and revised scoring systems of the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ) and to assess the construct validity of the Dependent and Self-Critical subscales of the DEQ in a clinically depressed sample. Subjects were 103 depressed inpatients who completed the DEQ, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hopelessness Scale, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ), the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS), and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The original and revised scoring systems of the DEQ evidenced good concurrent validity for each factor scale, but the revised system did not sufficiently discriminate dependent and self-critical dimensions. Using the original scoring system, self-criticism was significantly and positively related to severity of depression, whereas dependency was not, particularly for males. Factor analysis of the DEQ scales and the other scales used in this study supported the dependent and self-critical dimensions. For men, the correlation of the DEQ with the MMPI scales indicated that self-criticism was associated with psychotic symptoms, hostility/conflict, and a distress/exaggerated response set, whereas dependency did not correlate significantly with any MMPI scales. Females, however, did not exhibit a differential pattern of correlations between either the Dependency or the Self-Criticism scales and the MMPI. These findings suggest possible gender differences in the clinical characteristics of male and female dependent and self-critical depressive subtypes.

  3. Effect of Music Practice on Anxiety and Depression of Iranian Dental Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Ghasemi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The practice of dentistry has long been associated with high levels of occupational stress and anxiety and music has been shown as a method of reducing stress. Considering the reportedly high level of stress among dental students and its consequences and also considering the positive effect of music therapy, the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between music practice and level of stress in dental students.  Materials and Methods: In this analytical, cross-sectional study, 88 students, including 44 with a history of music practice and 44 matched controls without music practice who met the defined inclusion criteria, participated. Upon obtaining written informed consent, all volunteers filled the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI and Beck depression inventory (BDI questionnaires. Data were analyzed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and multiple linear regression test with backward method was used to evaluate the effect of demographic factors on anxiety and depression scores.Results: The level of anxiety was higher in students who did not have music practice and this difference was significant (P<0.001. The same was observed for depression (P=0.027. Other factors including age, gender, and being far from family had no significant effect on depression and anxiety (P>0.05. But level of anxiety and depression was higher in students of universities with tuition fee compared to free public institutes (P<0.05.Conclusions: It may be concluded that music practice can reduce anxiety and depression of dental students.

  4. Relationship between social phobia and depression differs between boys and girls in mid-adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, Juha-Matti; Fröjd, Sari; Ranta, Klaus; Marttunen, Mauri; Helminen, Mika; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu

    2011-09-01

    Earlier studies suggest that social phobia (SP) and depression (DEP) often have their onset in adolescence, and are highly comorbid, with SP mainly preceding depression. There is a lack of population-based prospective studies among adolescents vulnerable to both disorders, taking into account possible gender differences in the relationship between the two. This study is part of a prospective Adolescent Mental Health Cohort (AMHC) study. Subjects are 9th grade pupils (mean age 15.5 years (sd 0.39)) responding to a survey conducted 2002-2003 (T1) and a 2-year follow-up 2004-2005 (T2) (N=2038). Social phobia was measured by the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) and depression by the 13-item Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13). Risk for depression at T2 by SP at T1 was elevated only among boys (OR 3.6, 95% C.I. 1.507-8.579, p=0.004), whereas among girls, risk for SP at T2 by DEP at T1 was elevated (OR 7.8, 95% CI 4.529-13.391, pdepression in adolescence seems different for boys and girls. Further studies are needed to explore factors explaining the different course of these disorders among boys and girls. Clinicians need to be alert to comorbidity when examining an adolescent with SP or depression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Parental bonding and depression: personality as a mediating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagianou, Penelope-Alexia; Zafiropoulou, Maria

    2008-01-01

    According to Bowlby's theory of attachment, the role of early experience and parenting is of crucial importance to child development and mental health. In addition, several research findings suggest that parental bonding and different types of attachment play a crucial role in personality development. The present study examines the association between parental bonding experiences (lack of parental care, overprotection or both) and depression during adulthood. The objective of the present study was to evaluate different personality dimensions as possible mediators of the relation between perceptions of parental bonding and depressive symptoms in adult life. 181 participants (15- 49-years-old) completed the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF). The results show that lack of parental care and overprotection is linked with depressive symptoms and a number of personality characteristics, such as low self-esteem, introversion, distress and emotional instability. In contrast, high care and low protection (optimal bonding) is linked with increased self-confidence, less distress and less depressive symptoms. The results presented here are in line with Bowlby's theory of attachment and show that parental bonding is linked with problematic personality development and psychopathology. The present study provided evidence that personality factors may mediate the observed relationship between parental rearing style and depression. The potential causal mechanisms warrant longitudinal evaluation.

  6. Depressive mood and quality of life in functional gastrointestinal disorders: differences between functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome and overlap syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heon-Jeong; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Jin, Choon Jo; Kang, Seung-Gul; Yoon, Hiejin; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the differences in depressive mood and quality of life in patients with between functional dyspepsia (FD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and FD-IBS overlap as diagnosed based on Rome III criteria. The subjects completed a questionnaire based on Rome III criteria, the Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI) including Cognitive Depression Index (CDI) for depressive mood evaluation and the 36-item Short Form general health survey (SF-36) for quality of life assessment. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy were performed to exclude organic disease. Of 279 subjects, 70 and 124 subjects were diagnosed as FD and IBS, respectively. FD-IBS overlap patients (n=42) and FD alone patients (n=28) showed higher BDI scores than normal subjects (n=127) (PIBS alone patients (n=82) did not show difference (P=.17). All the SF-36 subscores of the FD-IBS overlap patients were significantly lower than normal subjects (Pmood was significantly related to FD and FD-IBS overlap but not to IBS based on Rome III criteria. FD-IBS overlap patients have worse quality of life than FD-alone and IBS-alone patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  8. [State and trait anxiety level and increase of depression among mothers of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder. pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolafnczyk, Tomasz; Wolafnczyk, Tomasz; Kolakowski, Artur; Pisula, Agnieszka; Liwska, Monika; Zlotkowska, Malgorzata; Srebnicki, Tomasz; Bryliska, Anita

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate anxiety level (as a trait and as a state) and the intensity of depressive symptoms in mothers of children with hyperkinetic disorder (HD) and with and without comorbid conduct disorder (CD); to determine the relationship between the intensity of anxiety and depression and intensity of symptoms of HD. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and STAI questionnaire to measure state-trait anxiety were filled by 24 mothers of children with HD and 26 mothers of children without HD. Mothers of children with HD were also asked to complete the Conners Questionnaire for Parents and Teachers (IOWA). Teachers were asked to complete the Conners Questionnaire for Teachers (RCTS). 75% of HD subjects had a comorbid CD, in comparison with 19.2 % in the control group. No significant differences were found between the mothers of children with HD and the control group in the results of BDI scale and STAI questionnaire in anxiety state and anxiety trait subscales. The difference was found between mothers of children with CD and without CD in anxiety-state subscale in STAI questionnaire. No correlations were found between the number of depressive symptoms, anxiety as a state and as a trait and the results of Conners IOWA and RCTS. The presence of HD in children does not correlate with the level of depression and anxiety in their mothers. There is a relationship between the presence of CD in children and elevated levels of state anxiety in their mothers.

  9. Changes in interpersonal problems in the psychotherapeutic treatment of depression as measured by the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarquhar, Tara; Luyten, Patrick; Fonagy, Peter

    2018-01-15

    Interpersonal problems are commonly reported by depressed patients, but the effect of psychotherapeutic treatment on them remains unclear. This paper reviews the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions for depression on interpersonal problems as measured by the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP). An electronic database search identified articles reporting IIP outcome scores for individual adult psychotherapy for depression. A systematic review and, where possible, meta-analysis was conducted. Twenty-eight studies met inclusion criteria, 10 of which could be included in a meta-analysis investigating changes in the IIP after brief psychotherapy. Reasons for exclusion from the meta-analysis were too few participants with a diagnosis of depression (n=13), IIP means and SDs unobtainable (n=3) and long-term therapy (n=2). A large effect size (g=0.74, 95% CI=0.56-0.93) was found for improvement in IIP scores after brief treatment. Paucity of IIP reporting and treatment type variability mean results are preliminary. Heterogeneity for improvement in IIP after brief psychotherapy was high (I 2 =75%). Despite being central to theories of depression, interpersonal problems are infrequently included in outcome studies. Brief psychotherapy was associated with moderate to large effect sizes in reduction in interpersonal problems. Of the dimensions underlying interpersonal behaviour, the dominance dimension may be more amenable to change than the affiliation dimension. Yet, high pre-treatment affiliation appeared to be associated with better outcomes than low affiliation, supporting the theory that more affiliative patients may develop a better therapeutic relationship with the therapist and consequently respond more positively than more hostile patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adaptation and validation of the depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS) to Brazilian Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignola, Rose Claudia Batistelli; Tucci, Adriana Marcassa

    2014-02-01

    Depression and anxiety have been associated with a range of symptoms that often overlap. Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) is a single instrument to assess symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress. This study aimed to adapt and validate the DASS-21 for use in the Brazilian Portuguese language. The DASS-21 has been adapted following the translation-back translation methodology from English to Portuguese. 242 subjects completed the following assessments: the DASS-21, the Beck Depression Index (BDI), Beck Anxiety Index (BAI) and the Inventory of Stress Symptoms of Lipp (ISSL). The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) result was .949, indicating that the adequacy of the model was high. Cronbach's alpha was .92 for the depression, .90 for the stress, and .86 for the anxiety, indicating a good internal consistency for each subscale. The correlations between DASS scale and BDI scale, BAI scale and ISSL inventory were strong. The factorial analysis and distribution of factors among the subscales indicated that the structure of three distinct factors is adequate. Older subjects over 65 years of age were not largely represented in this sample. A study specific to this elderly population should be conducted. Another limitation of the study was education level. The impact of low education in its applicability should be considered. The findings support the validity of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the DASS-21 and add to the evidence of the DASS-21 quality and ability to assess emotional states separately, eliminating the use of different instruments to assess these states. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Duration of unemployment and depression: a cross-sectional survey in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankunas, Mindaugas; Kalediene, Ramune; Starkuviene, Skirmante; Kapustinskiene, Violeta

    2006-07-05

    In spite of a growing economy, unemployment is still a severe socio-economic problem in Lithuania. Nonetheless, no studies have been performed about the associations between unemployment and mental health in Lithuania. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between unemployment duration and depression in Lithuania. The data was collected in a cross-sectional study in 2005. There were 429 filled-in questionnaires received (53.6% response rate) from unemployed persons registered with the Kaunas Labour Market Office. The severity of depression symptoms was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk factors for occurrence of depression. Sex, age, place of residence, marital status, education, income and practiced religion were the independent variables. Long-term unemployment was defined as lasting a duration of 12 months or more. The findings showed that long-term unemployed persons had more episodes of a depressive mood in the past 12 months in comparison with the group of the short-term unemployed. In addition, the BDI score mean was higher among the long-term unemployed compared with the short-term unemployed (10.1 +/- 8.8 and 14.2 +/- 9.5 respectively, p unemployment and BDI score had a positive correlation (r = 0.1968, p unemployed, the risk of depression increased significantly when the person was female, had an older age and had experienced more episodes of unemployment. Among the long-term unemployed, an older age was the risk factor for development of depression. However, higher education and income were the factors that significantly decreased the risk of developing depression for-short term as well as for long-term unemployed. The results indicated that depression is a severe problem in the unemployed population. Depression is more elevated among the long-term unemployed. This leads to arguing for common efforts in providing needed social support and health care to reduce the

  12. Judgment of emotional information expressed by prosody and semantics in patients with unipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eSchlipf

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It was the aim of this study to investigate the impact of major depressive disorder (MDD on judgment of emotions expressed at the verbal (semantic content and non-verbal (prosody level and to assess whether evaluation of verbal content correlate with self-ratings of depression-related symptoms as assessed by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. We presented positive, neutral, and negative words spoken in happy, neutral, and angry prosody to 23 MDD patients and 22 healthy controls (HC matched for age, sex, and education. Participants rated the valence of semantic content or prosody on a 9-point scale. MDD patients attributed significantly less intense ratings to positive words and happy prosody than HC. For judgment of words, this difference correlated significantly with BDI scores. No such correlation was found for prosody perception. MDD patients exhibited attenuated processing of positive information which generalized across verbal and non-verbal channels. These findings indicate that MDD is characterized by impairments of positive rather than negative emotional processing, a finding which could influence future psychotherapeutic strategies as well as provide straightforward hypotheses for neuroimaging studies investigating the neurobiological correlates of impaired emotional perception in MDD.

  13. Affective and cognitive theory of mind in borderline personality disorder: The role of comorbid depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihzadeh, Abbas; Maleki, Gheysar; Richman, Mara J; Hatami, AmirJalal; Alimardani, Zahedeh; Heidari, Mostafa

    2017-11-01

    Disturbed interpersonal relationships and misreading of others' intentions are core symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD). Despite these impairments, some studies have found an enhanced theory of mind (ToM) in BPD patients. Taking this into consideration, the current study attempts to further understand these discrepancies by separating ToM into two domains: affective and cognitive. Moreover, the study considered the role of comorbid symptoms of depression in these patients. Subjects were 21 patients with BPD, 23 patients with BPD and comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD), and 25 healthy controls (HC). ToM was measured with the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET) and the Faux Pas Task, which assessed the affective and cognitive aspects of ToM, respectively. In addition, all participants were evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results showed that in both BPD groups (i.e., BPD without MDD and BPD with MDD) affective ToM scores were higher than in the HC group; however, in the cognitive ToM, the HC group performed better than the both BPD groups. Also, overall the BPD group with MDD had decreased ToM skills. Finally, BPD groups received greater scores on the BDI as compared to the HC group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Suicide attempts among depressed inpatients with depressive disorder in a Malaysian sample. Psychosocial and clinical risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, L F; Maniam, T; Shamsul, A S

    2011-01-01

    Depressed inpatients constitute a high-risk population for suicide attempts. To describe the interactions of clinical and psychosocial risk factors influencing suicide attempts among a Malaysian sample of depressed inpatients. Seventy-five subjects were diagnosed with a depressive disorder according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders-Clinical Version (SCID-CV). Data on suicide attempts, suicidal ideation (Scale for Suicidal Ideation, SSI), depression severity (Beck's Depression Inventory, BDI), recent life-event changes (Social Readjustment Rating Scale, SRRS), sociodemographic and other relevant clinical factors were collected. A third of the subjects presented after a current suicide attempt. Significant factors for a current suicide attempt were race, religion, recent life-event changes, suicidal ideation, and alcohol use disorder. Independent predictive risk factors for a current suicide attempt were Chinese race, recent marital separation, major mortgage or loans, and being newly diagnosed with depression. Any recent change in personal habits was shown to be a protective factor against current suicide attempt. Age and gender were nonsignificant factors. The findings are generally consistent with existing studies and highlight the role of psychosocial risk factors.

  15. Depression among people living with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Benin City, Nigeria: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikezie, U E; Otakpor, A N; Kuteyi, O B; James, B O

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a common co-morbidity among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) (PLWHAs). It is associated with poor treatment adherence and higher mortality rates. Few reports have, however, emanated from developing countries where socioeconomic factors may confound this association. We conducted a cross-sectional comparative study of PLWHAs and apparently healthy staff of three LGA's. The depression module of the Schedule for the Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to diagnose depression and depression symptom severity, respectively. Depression was commonly co-morbid among individuals with HIV/AIDS. It was five times more common in PLWHAs than in apparently healthy populations (29.3% vs. 7.3%, OR: 5.25, 95% CI: 2.50-11.76). A similar trend was observed for depression symptom severity. Among PLWHAs, depression was significantly more likely among females (OR: 7.91, 95% CI: 1.83-71.00, P 3 years (OR: 7.90, P risk. Depression was commonly co-morbid among PLWHAs studied. Clinicians should be aware of risk factors for depression among PLWHAs in order to improve treatment outcomes.

  16. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effects of rasagiline on depressive symptoms in non-demented Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, P; Santangelo, G; Morgante, L; Onofrj, M; Meco, G; Abbruzzese, G; Bonuccelli, U; Cossu, G; Pezzoli, G; Stanzione, P; Lopiano, L; Antonini, A; Tinazzi, M

    2015-08-01

    Depressed mood is a common psychiatric problem associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), and studies have suggested a benefit of rasagiline treatment. ACCORDO (see the ) was a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of rasagiline 1 mg/day on depressive symptoms and cognition in non-demented PD patients with depressive symptoms. The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline to week 12 in depressive symptoms measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-IA) total score. Secondary outcomes included change from baseline to week 12 in cognitive function as assessed by a comprehensive neuropsychological battery; Parkinson's disease quality of life questionnaire (PDQ-39) scores; Apathy Scale scores; and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) subscores. One hundred and twenty-three patients were randomized. At week 12 there was no significant difference between groups for the reduction in total BDI-IA score (primary efficacy variable). However, analysis at week 4 did show a significant difference in favour of rasagiline (marginal means difference ± SE: rasagiline -5.46 ± 0.73 vs. placebo -3.22 ± 0.67; P = 0.026). There were no significant differences between groups on any cognitive test. Rasagiline significantly improved UPDRS Parts I (P = 0.03) and II (P = 0.003) scores versus placebo at week 12. Post hoc analyses showed the statistical superiority of rasagiline versus placebo in the UPDRS Part I depression item (P = 0.04) and PDQ-39 mobility (P = 0.007) and cognition domains (P = 0.026). Treatment with rasagiline did not have significant effects versus placebo on depressive symptoms or cognition in PD patients with moderate depressive symptoms. Although limited by lack of correction for multiple comparisons, post hoc analyses signalled some improvement in patient-rated cognitive and depression outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European

  17. Escitalopram treatment for depressive disorder following acute coronary syndrome: a 24-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Min; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Stewart, Robert; Jung, Bo-Ok; Kang, Hee-Ju; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Ju Han; Shin, Hee-Young; Kang, Gaeun; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Jong-Keun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Depression is common after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and has adverse effects on prognosis. There are few evidence-based interventions for treating depression in ACS. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of escitalopram in treating depressive disorders identified 2-14 weeks after a confirmed ACS episode. A total of 217 patients with DSM-IV depressive disorders (121 major and 96 minor) and ACS were randomly assigned to receive escitalopram in flexible doses of 5-20 mg/d (n = 108) or placebo (n = 109) for 24 weeks. The study was conducted from 2007 to 2013. The primary outcome measure was the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Secondary outcome measures included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness scale (CGI-S), Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS), and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule-12. Cardiovascular safety outcomes included echocardiography, electrocardiography, laboratory test, body weight, and blood pressure results. Escitalopram was superior to placebo in reducing HDRS scores (mean difference = 2.3, P = .016, effect size = 0.38). Escitalopram was also superior to placebo in decreasing depressive symptoms evaluated by the MADRS, BDI, and CGI-S and in improving SOFAS functioning level. Escitalopram was not associated with any harmful changes in cardiovascular safety measures. Dizziness was significantly more frequently reported in the escitalopram group (P = .018), but there were no significant differences in any other adverse events. These results indicate that escitalopram has clinically meaningful antidepressant effects with no evidence of reduced cardiovascular safety in depressive disorder following ACS. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00419471. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  18. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) and Its Relationship to Hopelessness and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Caroline L.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Numerous existing measures assess attitudes toward suicide yet fail to account for contextual factors. The Trinity Inventory of Precursors to Suicide (TIPS) is presented as an alternative, with implications for the development of prevention programs. Having previously reported exploratory analysis of the TIPS; confirmatory factor analysis and…

  19. Depression and anxiety mediate the relationship between temperament and character and psychotic-like experiences in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochwicz, Katarzyna; Gawęda, Łukasz

    2016-12-30

    In this study we examined the hypothesis that depression and anxiety may mediate the relationship between personality traits and both positive and negative psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) in healthy adults. The Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) scale, Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were administered to 492 healthy individuals. Multiple stepwise regression and mediation analyses were performed to examine whether depressive and anxiety symptoms influence the relationship between the TCI dimensions and positive and negative PLEs. Self-transcendence, persistence, novelty-seeking and self-directedness significantly predicted positive PLEs; self-directedness and harm avoidance were predictable for negative PLEs. Self-transcendence, self-directedness, persistence and harm avoidance also predicted the distress caused by positive PLEs, whereas self-directedness and harm avoidance predicted distress raised by negative PLEs. Depressive symptoms and the state of anxiety partially mediated the linkage between self-directedness and positive PLEs, and between self-directedness, harm avoidance and negative PLEs. Our findings confirm that the personality pattern influences both positive and negative PLEs as well as distress caused by experiencing positive and negative PLEs, and they indicate that certain personality traits may influence the development of PLEs via the emotional pathway of heightened depression and anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sexual Compulsivity Comorbidity With Depression, Anxiety, and Substance Use in Students From Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzanan Berberovic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to examine relationships between sexual compulsivity, depression (including level of self-esteem anxiety, and the use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs in a sample of 1,711 students from Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina. Sexual compulsivity, depression, and anxiety were measured with standardized scales and inventories (the Sexual Compulsivity Scale – SCS, the Beck Depression InventoryBDI, and the Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait, STAI-T, respectively, whereas specific questions about tobacco, alcohol, and drug use were modified for the purpose of this study. Results indicated positive, significant but low correlations between sexual compulsivity and depression; sexual compulsivity and anxiety; and sexual compulsivity and substance use; whereas a low, negative but significant correlation was obtained between sexual compulsivity and self-esteem. The strongest predictor of sexual compulsivity was drug use; two other significant predictors were alcohol and depression. Limitations of the study are discussed in the end.

  1. Dissociative symptoms reflect levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha in patients with unipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizik G

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gustav Bizik,1 Petr Bob,1 Jiri Raboch,1 Josef Pavlat,1 Jana Uhrova,2 Hana Benakova,2 Tomas Zima2 1Center for Neuropsychiatric Research of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry and UHSL, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Recent evidence indicates that the nature of interactions between the nervous system and immune system is important in the pathogenesis of depression. Specifically, alterations in pro-inflammatory cytokines have been related to the development of several psychological and neurobiological manifestations of depressive disorder, as well as to stress exposure. A number of findings point to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α as one of the central factors in these processes. Accordingly, in the present study, we test the hypothesis that specific influences of chronic stressors related to traumatic stress and dissociation are related to alterations in TNF-α levels. We performed psychometric measurement of depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]-II, traumatic stress symptoms (Trauma Symptom Checklist [TSC]-40, and psychological and somatoform dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale [DES] and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire [SDQ]-20, respectively, and immunochemical measure of serum TNF-α in 66 inpatients with unipolar depression (mean age 43.1 ± 7.3 years. The results show that TNF-α is significantly related to DES (Spearman R=−0.42, P<0.01, SDQ-20 (Spearman R=−0.38, P<0.01, and TSC-40 (Spearman R=−0.41, P<0.01, but not to BDI-II. Results of the present study suggest that TNF-α levels are related to dissociative symptoms and stress exposure in depressed patients. Keywords: depression, dissociation, TNF-alpha, traumatic stress

  2. Duration of unemployment and depression: a cross-sectional survey in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starkuviene Skirmante

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of a growing economy, unemployment is still a severe socio-economic problem in Lithuania. Nonetheless, no studies have been performed about the associations between unemployment and mental health in Lithuania. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between unemployment duration and depression in Lithuania. Methods The data was collected in a cross-sectional study in 2005. There were 429 filled-in questionnaires received (53.6% response rate from unemployed persons registered with the Kaunas Labour Market Office. The severity of depression symptoms was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk factors for occurrence of depression. Sex, age, place of residence, marital status, education, income and practiced religion were the independent variables. Long-term unemployment was defined as lasting a duration of 12 months or more. Results The findings showed that long-term unemployed persons had more episodes of a depressive mood in the past 12 months in comparison with the group of the short-term unemployed. In addition, the BDI score mean was higher among the long-term unemployed compared with the short-term unemployed (10.1 ± 8.8 and 14.2 ± 9.5 respectively, p Conclusion The results indicated that depression is a severe problem in the unemployed population. Depression is more elevated among the long-term unemployed. This leads to arguing for common efforts in providing needed social support and health care to reduce the effects of unemployment on mental health.

  3. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  4. Depression and dementia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanović, Osman; Hudić, Josip; Zukić, Sanela; Kapidžić, Almasa; Zonić, Lejla; Vidović, Mirjana

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder causing not only motor dysfunction but also cognitive, psychiatric, autonomic and sensory disturbances. Depression is the most common psychiatric disturbance identified in patients with PD and has been shown to be more common in PD than in other chronic and disabling disorders, occurring in approximately 40% of PD patients. However, the prevalence and clinical features associated with depression in PD remain controversial. Dementia is increasingly recognized as a symptom associated with idiopathic PD, and is found in up to 40% of all patients suffering from that condition. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depressive and dementia symptoms in PD patients. The study included 35 consecutive patients with PD, 13 (37.4%) male and 22 (62.6%) female (mean age 62.9 ± 11.0, range 36-85 years), mean duration of disease 4.7 ± 2.9 (range 1-10) years, hospitalized during one year at Clinical Department of Neurology, Tuzla University Clinical Center, Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used for assessment of cognitive deterioration and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) for depression. Computerized tomography was performed in all patients. According to BDI scale, depressive symptoms were present in all 35 PD patients: minimal in 4 (11.4%), low in 7 (20%), moderate in 8 (22.8%), severe in 9 (25.4%) and extreme in 7 (20%) patients. On MMSE scale, 9 (25.4%) patients were free from cognitive deterioration and 26 (74.6%) patients had moderate to severe deterioration, but 21 (60%) patients (7 (33.33%) male and 14 (66.66%) female) had symptoms of dementia (MMSE score ≤ 23). Using MMSE scale, 8 (22.8%) patients were free from dementia and 27 (77.2%) patients had some cognitive deterioration. Very mild symptoms of dementia were found in 6 (25.9%) and overt features of dementia in 21 (74.1%) PD patients. So, out of 35 PD study patients, 21 (60%) (7 (33.3%) male and 14

  5. [Suicidal ideation, self-directed violence and depression among Chilean school adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroilhet, Sergio; Fritsch, Rosemarie; Guajardo, Viviana; Martínez, Vania; Vöhringer, Paul; Araya, Ricardo; Rojas, Graciela

    2012-07-01

    Suicidal behaviors and depression are prevalent phenomena among adolescents, and are considered a public health problem. To determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors and the relationship between both phenomena, in a representative sample of students from ninth grade in Santiago, Chile. We recruited a probability sample of 2,597 adolescents who answered a questionnaire with questions about suicidal behavior and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). The lifetime prevalence of suicidal ideation and planning was 21 and 14%, respectively. The prevalence for the past two weeks was 6.7 and 4.4% for suicidal ideation and planning, respectively. Autolytic behaviors, once in lifetime and in the past week were referred by 26 and 4% of respondents, respectively. In one third of these, self-harm coincided with recent suicide ideation or planning. All levels of suicidal behavior were more frequently reported by women. Clinically significant depressive symptoms were present in 23.5% of adolescents. Females doubled male rates. Severe depressive symptoms were present in 9.4% of the sample. A higher level of suicidal behavior correlated with more severe forms of depression. Sixty percent of adolescents who reported recent self-harm, had clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Two thirds of them had severe symptoms. Suicidal behavior in Chilean adolescents is prevalent, and there is an association between this behavior and the level of depression. The school is a good place to identify and develop preventive measures for teenagers.

  6. Increased social anhedonia and reduced helping behaviour in young people with high depressive symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setterfield, Megan; Walsh, Mallory; Frey, Anna-Lena; McCabe, Ciara

    2016-11-15

    Social anhedonia, the decreased enjoyment of pleasant social experiences, is associated with depression. However, whether social anhedonia in depression affects prosocial behaviours is unclear. The current study aimed to examine how high levels of depressive symptomatology in young people affect responses to usually rewarding social situations, including helping behaviour. We recruited 46 females, 16 scoring high on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI scores>20, M age =19; HD) and 30 scoring low (BDIemotion task (SET), participants were presented with social scenarios and asked to rate their expected emotional responses. Subsequently, participants' helping behaviour was measured by dropping a pile of papers near them and recording their responses. Lastly, participants completed the SET again. The SET at time 1 revealed that HD individuals reported significantly stronger negative (pemotional responses to social situations than LD subjects. Additionally, all participants showed a significant increase in positive responses (pbehaviour than LD participants. Limitations of the study are that only females were tested and that no psychiatric screening interview was conducted. Our results indicate that young females with high levels of depression symptoms expect to respond less positively to social situations and engage less in helping behaviour compared to those with low depressive symptomatology. Social anhedonia in depression may thus contribute to decreased engagement in rewarding social situations. This, in turn, may lead to social withdrawal and might maintain depression symptoms though a lack of exposure to positive social feedback. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A genetic variant in 12q13, a possible risk factor for bipolar disorder, is associated with depressive state, accounting for stressful life events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Shimasaki

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified a number of susceptibility genes for schizophrenia (SCZ and bipolar disorder (BD. However, the identification of risk genes for major depressive disorder (MDD has been unsuccessful because the etiology of MDD is more influenced by environmental factors; thus, gene-environment (G × E interactions are important, such as interplay with stressful life events (SLEs. We assessed the G×E interactions and main effects of genes targeting depressive symptoms. Using a case-control design, 922 hospital staff members were evaluated for depressive symptoms according to Beck Depressive Inventory (BDI; "depression" and "control" groups were classified by scores of 10 in the BDI test, SLEs, and personality. A total of sixty-three genetic variants were selected on the basis of previous GWASs of MDD, SCZ, and BD as well as candidate-gene (SLC6A4, BDNF, DBH, and FKBP5 studies. Logistic regression analysis revealed a marginally significant interaction (genetic variant × SLE at rs4523957 (P uncorrected = 0.0034 with depression and a significant association of single nucleotide polymorphism identified from evidence of BD GWAS (rs7296288, downstream of DHH at 12q13.1 with depression as the main effect (P uncorrected = 9.4 × 10(-4, P corrected = 0.0424. We also found that SLEs had a larger impact on depression (odds ratio ∼ 3, as reported previously. These results suggest that DHH plays a possible role in depression etiology; however, variants from MDD or SCZ GWAS evidence or candidate genes showed no significant associations or minimal effects of interactions with SLEs on depression.

  8. Depressogenic medications and other risk factors for depression among Polish patients with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosak M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magdalena Bosak,1 Wojciech Turaj,1 Dominika Dudek,2 Marcin Siwek,2 Andrzej Szczudlik1 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Psychiatry, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depression among patients with epilepsy and to establish the risk factors of depression in that group, with special focus on the use of potentially depressogenic medications. Patients and methods: We studied 289 consecutive patients who visited epilepsy outpatient clinic (University Hospital of Krakow and met inclusion criteria. All patients were screened with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and those with BDI score ≥12 were further evaluated by a psychiatrist. Results: Mean age of patients was 35.7 years, and mean duration of epilepsy was 14.7 years. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy was diagnosed in 63 patients (21.8%, focal epilepsy was found in 189 subjects (65.4%, and unclassified epilepsy was diagnosed in 37 patients (12.8%. Frequent seizures (>1 per month were reported in 107 patients (37.0%. Thirty-five patients (12.1% reported an ongoing treatment with one or more of the predefined potentially depressogenic medication (ß-blockers, combined estrogen and progestogen, corticosteroid, or flunarizine. In a group of 115 patients (39.8% who scored ≥12 points in BDI, depression was finally diagnosed in 84 subjects (29.1% after psychiatric evaluation. Only 20 of those patients (23.8% were treated with antidepressant. Independent variables associated with the diagnosis of depression in the logistic regression model included frequent seizures (odds ratio [OR] =2.43 [95% confidence interval, 95% CI =1.38–4.29], P=0.002, use of potentially depression-inducing medications (OR =3.33 [95% CI =1.50–7.39], P=0.003, age (OR =1.03 [95% CI =1.01–1.05] per year], P=0.005, and use of oxcarbazepine (OR =2.26 [95% CI =1.04–4.9], P=0.038. Conclusion: The prevalence of depression among consecutive

  9. A General Agent Model of Emotion and Trust using the BDI Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Höhle, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    To endow virtual agents with more human-like behaviour, the current project proposes a new model for decision making based on emotions and trust. The project focuses first on the conceptual design of the model, then on the implementation of this model. To try to reproduce human decision making, the model has, mostly, been based on psychologically grounded findings. This model is based on the BDI structure, and has been extended with submodels for emotions and trust. To further prove the imple...

  10. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  11. A quantitative, cross-sectional study of depression and self-esteem in teenage and young adult burn victims in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira Nicolosi, Júlia; Fernandes de Carvalho, Viviane; Llonch Sabatés, Ana

    2013-09-01

    Burns can have a negative physiological and emotional impact, particularly among teenage victims. To assess the presence of depression and level of self-esteem, a cross-sectional study was conducted among 63 teenage and young adult burn victims ages 12 to 20 years undergoing physical and psychological rehabilitation at the Outpatient Unit for Plastic Surgery and Burns at the Central Institute of the Clínicas Hospital of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Assessment instruments included Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE). Internal consistency within and between the two scales was established via Cronbach's-α coefficient. All variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and the statistical difference between means was compared using Student's t-test. The majority of participants were female (38, 60.3%) and unmarried (59, 93.7%) with a mean total body surface area (TBSA) burn of 23.84%. Most burns (58, 92.10%) were the result of accidents and were located on the trunk (47, 74.6%), head (43, 68%), arms (41, 65%), hands (38, 60%), neck (34, 54%), and forearm (29, 46%). Participants had received physical and psychological rehabilitation for an average of 124.74 months (SD 63.67) from a multidisciplinary team. The majority of participants (33, 52.4%) reported functional and aesthetic after-effects and appraised their scar as visible (51, 81.0%). BDI results showed low levels or absence of depression (mean = 7.63, SD 8.72; scale 0 = no depression to 63 = serious depression); the RSE showed adequate levels of self-esteem (mean = 8.41, SD 4.74; scale 0-30, where higher scores indicate worst levels of self-esteem). Burn location did not affect depression (BDI: P = 0.26) or self-esteem (RSE: P = 0.21). However, depression and self-esteem were more significant in participants who were not able to work and/or go to school than in those who were (BDI: P = 0.04 and self-esteem RSE: P = 0

  12. Fasting Glucose and the Risk of Depressive Symptoms: Instrumental-Variable Regression in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

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    Wesołowska, Karolina; Elovainio, Marko; Hintsa, Taina; Jokela, Markus; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Pitkänen, Niina; Lipsanen, Jari; Tukiainen, Janne; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Juonala, Markus; Raitakari, Olli; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2017-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been associated with depressive symptoms, but the causal direction of this association and the underlying mechanisms, such as increased glucose levels, remain unclear. We used instrumental-variable regression with a genetic instrument (Mendelian randomization) to examine a causal role of increased glucose concentrations in the development of depressive symptoms. Data were from the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (n = 1217). Depressive symptoms were assessed in 2012 using a modified Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-I). Fasting glucose was measured concurrently with depressive symptoms. A genetic risk score for fasting glucose (with 35 single nucleotide polymorphisms) was used as an instrumental variable for glucose. Glucose was not associated with depressive symptoms in the standard linear regression (B = -0.04, 95% CI [-0.12, 0.04], p = .34), but the instrumental-variable regression showed an inverse association between glucose and depressive symptoms (B = -0.43, 95% CI [-0.79, -0.07], p = .020). The difference between the estimates of standard linear regression and instrumental-variable regression was significant (p = .026) CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the association between T2D and depressive symptoms is unlikely to be caused by increased glucose concentrations. It seems possible that T2D might be linked to depressive symptoms due to low glucose levels.

  13. Impaired decision making and delayed memory are related with anxiety and depressive symptoms in acromegaly.

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    Crespo, Iris; Santos, Alicia; Valassi, Elena; Pires, Patricia; Webb, Susan M; Resmini, Eugenia

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of cognitive function in acromegaly has revealed contradictory findings; some studies report normal cognition in patients with long-term cured acromegaly, while others show attention and memory deficits. Moreover, the presence of affective disorders in these patients is common. Our aim was to evaluate memory and decision making in acromegalic patients and explore their relationship with affective disorders like anxiety and depressive symptoms. Thirty-one patients with acromegaly (mean age 49.5 ± 8.5 years, 14 females and 17 males) and thirty-one healthy controls participated in this study. The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) were used to evaluate decision making, verbal memory, anxiety, and depressive symptoms, respectively. Acromegalic patients showed impairments in delayed verbal memory (p decision-making strategy compared to controls, choosing a lower number of the safer cards (p memory and decision making were found. Impaired delayed memory and decision making observed in acromegalic patients are related to anxiety and depressive symptoms. Providing emotional support to the patients could improve their cognitive function. A key clinical application of this research is the finding that depressive symptoms and anxiety are essentially modifiable factors.

  14. Stress, depression, quality of life and salivary cortisol levels in community health agents.

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    Knuth, Berenice Scaletzky; Cocco, Rafaela Abreu; Radtke, Vinicius Augusto; Medeiros, João Ricardo Carvalho; Oses, Jean Pierre; Wiener, Carolina David; Jansen, Karen

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of and factors associated with depression and stress with perceived quality of life and the salivary cortisol levels in Community Health Agent (CHA). Materials and Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study of CHAs in Pelotas-RS, Brazil. Data collection, including sociodemographic information and factors related to work and health. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) II was used to assess depressive symptoms, Inventory of Stress Symptoms Lipp (ISSL) was used for the analysis of stress and the WHOQOL-BREF was used to investigate quality of life. Salivary cortisol was quantified via ELISA test. The assessments showed that 71.0% are in a state of stress resistance, 30.5% were in the alert state of stress and 32.8% were in the stress state of exhaustion. Depressive episodes (BDI≥12) were observed in 28.2%. The environmental domain had the lowest score for quality of life. We observed significantly higher salivary cortisol levels in CHAs with less than 1 year of service and with the lowest quality of life scores in the environmental subsection. A high prevalence of stress and depression was observed in this sample of CHAs. In addition, the worst levels of quality of life were identified in the environmental subsection. Cortisol levels corroborate these findings regarding quality of life within the environmental domain and began working less than a year previously.

  15. Assessment of psychological pain in major depressive episodes.

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    Mee, Steven; Bunney, Blynn G; Bunney, William E; Hetrick, William; Potkin, Steven G; Reist, Christopher

    2011-11-01

    Severe psychological or mental pain is defined as an experience of unbearable torment which can be associated with a psychiatric illness (e.g., major depressive disorder) or a tragic loss such as the death of a child. A brief self-rating scale (Mee-Bunney Psychological Pain Assessment Scale [MBPPAS]) was developed to assess the intensity of psychological pain. The scale was used to measure psychological pain in 73 major depressive episode (MDE) patients and 96 non-psychiatric controls. In addition to the MBPPAS, all subjects completed four additional instruments: Suicidal Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Known-groups, content and convergent validity, and internal reliability of the scale were established. MDE and control subjects were ranked according to MBPPAS scores. A threshold was set at 32 representing 0.5 SD above the mean for MDEs. MDE subjects above the threshold of 32 had significantly higher SBQ scores than those below. A significant linear correlation between psychological pain and SBQ suicidality scores was observed. This is the first study to contrast psychological pain in controls and patients with MDE. Our results suggest that psychological pain is a useful and unique construct in patients with MDE that can be reliably assessed and may aid in the evaluation of suicidal risk. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Lifestyle change recommendations in major depression: Do they work?

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    Serrano Ripoll, M J; Oliván-Blázquez, B; Vicens-Pons, E; Roca, M; Gili, M; Leiva, A; García-Campayo, J; Demarzo, M P; García-Toro, M

    2015-09-01

    Modifying some lifestyle factors can be useful in depression, at least as an adjuvant treatment. Combining different lifestyle interventions seems to be an adequate strategy to increase their antidepressant efficacy according with preliminary studies, but this issue has not been enough investigated. The present study is a randomized, double-blinded, multicentre, two arm-parallel clinical trials, with a 12 month follow-up. The sample consisted of 273 Primary Care patients. Four combined hygienic-dietary written recommendations were given to the patients about diet, exercise, light exposure and sleep hygiene. Both active and control interventions were associated with improvement on BDI (Beck Depression Inventory) scores. However, there were not statistically significant differences (7.0 vs. 7.6; p=0.594). We were unable to monitor whether patients carry out recommendations. Intervention could be too difficult to accomplish for depressed patients without enough support and supervision. Just giving written lifestyle recommendations are not enough for depressive patients to benefit from them, so perhaps lifestyle change recommendations work or do not work on Depression depending on how they are presented to patients and on monitoring systems of their implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kanwal, S.; Ishfaq, Y.; Hassan, H.; Waheed, N.

    2014-01-01

    To compare the frequency of depression among fertile and infertile women reporting in CMH Abbottabad. Study Design: A case control study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was conducted in Combined Military Hospital Abbottabad, over a period of six months from January 2013 to June 2013. Patients and Methods: The inclusion criteria were all those patients who were married. All the cases were selected from the women reporting in the obstetrics and gynecology department of CMH Abbottabad for investigation and treatment of infertility. A total of 200 patients, 100 fertile and 100 infertile women were included. Patients were given questionnaire form with their consent for research. Beck depression inventory (BDI) was used to assess depression among fertile and infertile women. Other factors such as age, educational level, and duration of infertility, pressure from family members, miscarriages, and support from husband were studied. Results: Depression was significantly higher in infertile women as compared to fertile women i.e. 95% vs. 63% (p < 0.001). It was higher among women with more than 1 year of duration of marriage as compared to those with infertility of one year duration or less. Conclusion: Infertility is associated with depression. (author)

  18. Quality of Life, Depression, Anxiety and Coping Strategies after Heart Transplantation

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    Fulvio Bergamo Trevizan

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Heart transplantation is the therapeutic procedure indicated to increase the survival of patients with refractory heart failure. Improvement in overall functioning and quality of life are expected factors in the postoperative period. Objective: To identify and evaluate mental disorders and symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, quality of life and coping strategies in the post-surgical situation of heart transplantation. Methods: A cross-sectional, quantitative study with patients who have undergone heart transplantation. Participants answered to the Sociodemographic Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Escala Modos de Enfrentamento de Problemas (Ways of Coping Scale (EMEP and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF. For data analysis, the significance level was considered P≤0.05. Results: A total of 33 patients participated in the study. The BDI-II results indicated that 91% (n=30 of the patients presented a minimal level. In BAI, 94% (n=31 of the patients demonstrated minimal level of anxiety symptoms. WHOQOL-BREF showed a perception of quality of life considered good in all domains. The EMEP data have registered a problem-focused coping strategy. According to MINI, a single case of major depressive episode, current and recurrent was recorded. Conclusion: Although most participants in the sample had symptoms of depression and anxiety, only one patient was identified with moderate symptoms in both domains. The most used strategy was coping focused on the problem. Patients have classified the perceptions of quality of life as 'good', pointing out satisfaction with their health.

  19. Psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the 42 item Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-42) in a clinical sample.

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    Hekimoglu, Levent; Altun, Zeren Ozturk; Kaya, Emine Zeynep; Bayram, Nuran; Bilgel, Nazan

    2012-01-01

    To study the psychometric properties of the Turkish translation of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-42) in a clinical group. Outpatients diagnosed with anxiety (n = 138; mean age = 44.5 years; 74.6% female) or depression (n = 112; mean age = 46.2 years; 77.7% female) from the psychiatric outpatient clinic of a public hospital were evaluated. A group of non-clinical volunteers (n = 250; mean age = 37 years; 68% female) served as a community group for comparison. The participants completed the Turkish versions of the DASS-42, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The structure of the DASS-42 was analyzed in the clinical sample using principal components extraction. The three-factor solution accounted for 56% of the total variance, with eigenvalues of 17.6, 3.0, and 2.6. The range of factor loadings was 0.55-0.85 for depression, 0.47-0.62 for anxiety, and 0.49-0.74 for stress. The Cronbach alpha values for the DASS depression, anxiety, and stress subscales were 0.94, 0.88, 0.94 respectively. The concurrent validity of the DASS was satisfactory. The non-clincal participants scored lower on all three subscales than the individuals in all of the clinical groups. The Turkish version of the DASS-42 appears to be an excellent instrument for measuring features of depression, hyperarousal, and tension in clinical groups.

  20. Hair cortisol as a marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal Axis activity in female patients with major depressive disorder.

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    Pochigaeva, Ksenia; Druzhkova, Tatiana; Yakovlev, Alexander; Onufriev, Mikhail; Grishkina, Maria; Chepelev, Aleksey; Guekht, Alla; Gulyaeva, Natalia

    2017-04-01

    Hair cortisol is regarded as a promising marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) activity alterations due to stress, somatic and mental health conditions. Hair cortisol was previously reported to be elevated in patients with depression, however the data related to remission and recurrent depressive episodes are different. In this study, levels of hair cortisol were assessed in female patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the validity of hair cortisol as a marker of HPAA activity in this condition was evaluated. Hair cortisol was measured in 1 cm hair segments of 21 female patients with MDD and 22 female age-matched controls using enzyme-immunoassay analysis. Concurrently, serum cortisol was assessed and psychological status was evaluated using 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Spielberger state trait anxiety inventory (STAI). The levels of hair cortisol were significantly lower in the MDD group, while serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in patients, as compared with controls. A significant negative correlation was found between HAMD-17 scores and hair cortisol. Decreased hair cortisol found in female patients with MDD as compared to controls suggests downregulation of HPAA activity during the preceding month. Further studies are needed to investigate the profiles of hair cortisol at different stages of depressive disorder to establish this parameter as a handy clinical tool.

  1. Peripheral chemokine levels in women with recurrent major depression with suicidal ideation Níveis periféricos de quimiocina em mulheres com depressão maior com ideação suicida

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    Rodrigo Grassi-Oliveira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare serum levels of MCP-1/CCL2, RANTES/CCL5, and Eotaxin/CCL11 between female patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD and healthy controls, verifying if there is a difference in the levels of these mediators between those with or without current suicidal ideation. METHODS: Thirty female outpatients with recurrent MDD were divided in two groups accordingly the presence or absence of suicidal ideation. These groups were compared with 16 healthy controls. Serum levels of MCP-1/CCL2, RANTES/CCL5, and Eotaxin/CCL11 were determined. Depression severity was evaluated by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Suicidal ideation was assessed by SCID-I and BDI. RESULTS: Patients with recurrent MDD and healthy controls did not differ in age, socioeconomic status, and education. All patients reported high scores of BDI (mean, SD, n; 29.75, 10.55, 28. Multivariable analysis of covariance adjusted for age and BMI showed that MDD patients with suicidal ideation presented lower levels of MCP-1/ CCL2 and RANTES/CCL5 (p OBJETIVO: Comparar os níveis séricos de MCP-1/CCL2, RANTES/CCL5 e Eotaxin/CCL11 entre pacientes do sexo feminino com transtorno depressivo maior (TDM recorrente e controles saudáveis, verificando se há diferença nos níveis desses mediadores entre os indivíduos com ou sem ideação suicida. MÉTODOS: Trinta pacientes do sexo feminino com TDM recorrente foram divididas em dois grupos de acordo com a presença ou ausência de ideação suicida. Esses grupos foram comparados com 16 controles saudáveis. Os níveis séricos de MCP-1/CCL2, RANTES/CCL5 e Eotaxin/CCL11 foram determinados. A gravidade da depressão foi avaliada usando o Beck Depression Inventory (BDI e a ideação suicida foi avaliada usando o SCID-I e o BDI. RESULTADOS: As pacientes com TDM recorrente e os controles saudáveis não diferiram em idade, status socioeconômico e educação. Todas as pacientes relataram altas pontuações no BDI (média, SD, n

  2. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample.

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    Vivilaki, Victoria G; Dafermos, Vassilis; Kogevinas, Manolis; Bitsios, Panos; Lionis, Christos

    2009-09-09

    Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. 8 (6.7%) of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7%) with moderate and 38 (31.7%) with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68.3%. Our data confirm the validity of the Greek

  3. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample

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    Kogevinas Manolis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Methods 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. Results 8 (6.7% of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7% with moderate and 38 (31.7% with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68

  4. Did depressive symptoms affect recognition of emotional prosody in Parkinson’s disease?

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    Adriana Vélez Feijó

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Vélez Feijó1, Carlos RM Rieder3, Márcia LF Chaves21Medical Sciences Post-Graduate Course; 2Internal Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; 3Movement Disorders Clinic Coordinator, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, BrazilObjective: Evaluate the influence of depressive symptoms on the recognition of emotional prosody in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients, and identify types of emotion on spoken sentences.Methods: Thirty-five PD patients and 65 normal participants were studied. Dementia was checked with the Mini Mental State Examination, Clinical Dementia Rating scale, and DSM IV. Recognition of emotional prosody was tested by asking subjects to listen to 12 recorded statements with neutral affective content that were read with a strong affective expression. Subjects had to recognize the correct emotion by one of four descriptors (angry, sad, cheerful, and neutral. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was employed to rate depressive symptoms with the cutoff 14.Results: Total ratings of emotions correctly recognized by participants below and above the BDI cutoff were similar among PD patients and normal individuals. PD patients who correctly identified neutral and anger inflections presented higher rates of depressive symptoms (p = 0.011 and 0.044, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the normal group.Conclusions: Depression may modify some modalities of emotional prosody perception in PD, by increasing the perception of non-pleasant emotions or lack of affection, such as anger or indifference.Keywords: emotional prosody, Parkinson’s disease, depression, emotion

  5. Work-family conflict as a mediator in the association between work stress and depressive symptoms: cross-sectional evidence from the German lidA-cohort study.

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    du Prel, Jean-Baptist; Peter, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The demographic change leads to a shrinking German work force. Depressive symptoms cause many days absent at work, loss of productivity and early retirement. Therefore, pathways for prevention of depressive symptoms are important for the maintenance of global competitiveness. We investigated the role of work-family conflict (WFC) in the well-known association between work stress and depressive symptoms. A total of 6,339 employees subject to social insurance, born in 1959 or 1965 and randomly drawn from 222 sample points in Germany participated in the first wave of the leben in der Arbeit-study. In the analysis, 5,906 study subjects working in full-time or part-time positions were included. Work stress was measured by effort-reward imbalance ratio, depressive symptoms by the applied Becks depression inventory (BDI-V) and WFC by items of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ)-scale. Multiple linear regression analysis adjusted for age, education, negative affectivity (PANAS), overcommitment and number of children was performed. Mediation was defined according to the criteria of Baron and Kenny. Work stress was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (BDI-V) in all full-time [ß1female = 6.61 (95 % CI 3.95-9.27); ß1male = 8.02 (95 % CI 5.94-10.09)] and female part-time employees [ß2female = 4.87 (95 % CI 2.16-7.59)]. When controlling for WFC effect, estimates became smaller in men and were even halved in women. WFC was also significantly associated with work stress and depressive symptoms: All criteria for partial mediation between work stress and depressiveness were fulfilled. Prevention of WFC may help to reduce days absent at work and early retirement due to work stress-related depressive symptoms in middle-aged women and men.

  6. Persistent CSF but not Plasma HIV RNA, is Associated with Increased Risk of New-onset Moderate-to-Severe Depressive Symptoms; A Prospective Cohort Study

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    Hammond, Edward R.; Crum, Rosa M.; Treisman, Glenn J.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Clifford, David B.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.; Marra, Christina M; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; McArthur, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is the most common neuropsychiatric complication in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and is associated with worse clinical outcomes. We determined if detectable cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA) at threshold ≥50 copies/ml is associated with increased risk of depression. The CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort is a six-center US-based prospective cohort with bi-annual follow-up 674 participants. We fit linear mixed models (N=233) and discrete-time survival models (N=154; 832 observations), to evaluate trajectories of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) II scores, and the incidence of new-onset moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms (BDI≥17) among participants, on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), who were free of depression at study entry, and received a minimum of three CSF examinations over 2,496 person-months follow-up. Detectable CSF HIV RNA (threshold ≥50 copies/ml) at any visit was associated with a 4.7-fold increase in new-onset depression at subsequent visits adjusted for plasma HIV RNA and treatment adherence; hazard ratio (HR)=4.76, (95% CI: 1.58–14.3); P=0.006. Depression (BDI) scores were 2.53 points higher (95% CI: 0.47–4.60; P=0.02) over 6 months if CSF HIV RNA was detectable at a prior study visit in fully adjusted models including age, sex, race, education, plasma HIV RNA, duration and adherence of cART, and lifetime depression diagnosis by DSM-IV criteria. Persistent CSF but not plasma HIV RNA, is associated with an increased risk for new-onset depression. Further research evaluating the role of immune activation and inflammatory markers may improve our understanding of this association. PMID:26727907

  7. A survey of relationship between anxiety, depression and duration of infertility

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    Shariat Mamak

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cross sectional study was designed to survey the relationship between anxiety/depression and duration/cause of infertility, in Vali-e-Asr Reproductive Health Research Center, Tehran, Iran. Methods After obtaining their consents, 370 female patients with different infertility causes participated in, and data gathered by Beck Depression Inventory(BDI and Cattle questionnaires for surveying anxiety and depression due to the duration of infertility. This was studied in relation to patients' age, educational level, socio-economic status and job (patients and their husbands. Results Age range was 17–45 years and duration and cause of infertility was 1–20 years. This survey showed that 151 women (40.8% had depression and 321 women (86.8% had anxiety. Depression had a significant relation with cause of infertility, duration of infertility, educational level, and job of women. Anxiety had a significant relationship with duration of infertility and educational level, but not with cause of infertility, or job. Findings showed that anxiety and depression were most common after 4–6 years of infertility and especially severe depression could be found in those who had infertility for 7–9 years. Conclusions Adequate attention to these patients psychologically and treating them properly, is of great importance for their mental health and will improve quality of their lives.

  8. Prevalence of depression among a population aged over 45 years in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

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    Wangtongkum, Suparus; Sucharitakul, Phongsakorn; Wongjaroen, Sriwanna; Maneechompoo, Suthin

    2008-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of depression in Thai people of 45 years and over. The presented project was a cross sectional study on the prevalence of depression and cognitive impairment in Chiang Mai. Door-to-door interview technique was assigned in condition with multistage probability random sampling to obtain subjects that represent a population of Chiang Mai. The research was conducted between October 2004 and September 2005. Data were collected on subject that were 45 years old and over. All subjects were selected from all districts in Chiang Mai. Thai Mini Mental State Examination (TMSE) and Thai Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used as the assessment tool If the subjects had a TMSE score less than 24 points, it was assumed as a cognitive impairment. One thousand four hundred ninety two people, 610 males and 882 females, were enrolled in the present study. Their mean age was 59.7 +/- 10.4 years (45-88 year). The prevalence of depression only was 29.2%, the prevalence of cognitive impairment only was 5.63% and the prevalence of cognitive impairment with depression was 3.96%. The prevalence of depression increased with age. The prevalence of depression in Thai people of 45 years and over was 29.2% and increased with age.

  9. A study on construction, validation and determination of normalization of adolescents depression scale

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    Khadijeh Babakhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to construct, to validate and to determine normalization factors associated with adolescents depression scale. The study is performed among 750 randomly selected guided and high school students, 364 male and 386 female, who live in city of Zanjan, Iran. Validity of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Validity of Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS and divergence validity of the Coopersmith self- esteem coefficients are 0.72, 0.37 and -0.71, respectively. Result suggests that adolescents’ depression test is a reliable and valid tool for assessing depression, with utility in both research and clinical settings, counseling centers. In addition, the results of correlation test indicate there are some meaningful differences between depression levels of female and male students. In fact, our survey indicates that female students have more depression than male students do (F-value = 33.06, Sig. = 0.000. In addition, there are some meaningful differences between depression levels in various educational levels (F-value = 8.59, Sig. = 0.000. However, the study does not find sufficient evidence to believe there is any meaningful correlation between educational backgrounds and gender.

  10. The impact of childhood traumas, depressive and anxiety symptoms on the relationship between borderline personality features and symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in Turkish university students.

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    Dalbudak, Ercan; Evren, Cuneyt

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies reported that there is a significant association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood and borderline personality disorder (BPD) in adulthood. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship of borderline personality features (BPF) and ADHD symptoms while controlling the effect of childhood traumas, symptoms of depression and anxiety in adulthood on this relationship in Turkish university students. A total of 271 Turkish university students participated in this study. The students were assessed through the Turkish version of the Borderline Personality Inventory (BPI), the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Correlation analyses have revealed that severity of BPF is related with adult ADHD symptoms, emotional, physical abuse and depression scores. Hierarchical regression analysis has indicated that depressive symptoms, emotional and physical abuse and the severity of ADHD symptoms are the predictors for severity of BPF. Findings of the present study suggests that clinicians must carefully evaluate these variables and the relationship between them to understand BPF and ADHD symptoms in university students better. Together with depressive symptoms, emotional and physical abuse may play a mediator role on this relationship. Further studies are needed to evaluate causal relationship between these variables in both clinical and non-clinical populations.

  11. The severity of Internet addiction risk and its relationship with the severity of borderline personality features, childhood traumas, dissociative experiences, depression and anxiety symptoms among Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbudak, Ercan; Evren, Cuneyt; Aldemir, Secil; Evren, Bilge

    2014-11-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of Internet addiction (IA) risk with the severity of borderline personality features, childhood traumas, dissociative experiences, depression and anxiety symptoms among Turkish university students. A total of 271 Turkish university students participated in this study. The students were assessed through the Internet Addiction Scale (IAS), the Borderline Personality Inventory (BPI), the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The rates of students were 19.9% (n=54) in the high IA risk group, 38.7% (n=105) in the mild IA risk group and 41.3% (n=112) in the group without IA risk. Correlation analyses revealed that the severity of IA risk was related with BPI, DES, emotional abuse, CTQ-28, depression and anxiety scores. Univariate covariance analysis (ANCOVA) indicated that the severity of borderline personality features, emotional abuse, depression and anxiety symptoms were the predictors of IAS score, while gender had no effect on IAS score. Among childhood trauma types, emotional abuse seems to be the main predictor of IA risk severity. Borderline personality features predicted the severity of IA risk together with emotional abuse, depression and anxiety symptoms among Turkish university students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 17 CFR 249.618 - Form BD-Y2K, information required of broker-dealers pursuant to section 17 of the Securities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Form BD-Y2K, information... Exchange Members, Brokers, and Dealers § 249.618 Form BD-Y2K, information required of broker-dealers... FR 37674, July 13, 1998] Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form BD-Y2K, see...

  13. Design and psychometric analysis of the Hopelessness and Suicide Ideation Inventory “IDIS”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertha Lucía Avendaño Prieto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to design the Hopeless and Suicide Ideation Inventory, also know as IDIS - Spanish acronym for Inventario de Desesperanza e Ideación Suicida - and to analyze its psychometric properties. A quantitative empirical research was conducted employing a non-experimental design, an instrumental variable and cross-sectional analysis. Three hundred and thirty-nine people participated in the study (67.6% females, 31.6% males, in which 54.6% were students and 34.8% were employees. Participants completed the IDIS, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, the Positive and Negative Suicide Ideation Inventory, and the Beck Hopelessness Scale. The results indicated an inter-rater reliability and a positive convergent validity in both scales. Suicidal ideation revealed an internal consistency of α = .76, and α = .81 for hopelessness; a total variance of 41.77% and 47.52% was obtained correspondingly. Based on the Item Response Theory (IRT, the adjustments for INFIT and OUTFIT fell under the expected range. It was concluded that the IDIS is a reliable and valid measure, however, further evaluations on sensitivity and specificity are encouraged.

  14. Comparison of automatical thoughts among generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder and generalized social phobia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, A I; Simsek, G; Karaaslan, Ö; Inanir, S

    2015-08-01

    Automatic thoughts are measurable cognitive markers of the psychopathology and coping styles of individuals. This study measured and compared the automatic thoughts of patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized social phobia (GSP). Fifty-two patients with GAD, 53 with MDD, and 50 with GSP and 52 healthy controls completed the validated Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ) and a structured psychiatric interview. Patients with GAD, MDD, and GSP also completed the validated Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) to determine the severity of their illnesses. All scales were completed before treatment and after diagnosis. The ATQ scores of all pairs of groups were compared. The ATQ scores of the GAD, MDD, and GSP groups were significantly higher than were those of the control group. We also found significant correlations among scores on the GAD-7, BDI, and LSAS. The mean age of patients with GSP was lower than was that of the other groups (30.90 ± 8.35). The significantly higher ATQ scores of the MDD, GAD, and GSP groups, compared with the control group, underscore the common cognitive psychopathology characterizing these three disorders. This finding confirms that similar cognitive therapy approaches should be effective for these patients. This study is the first to compare GAD, MDD, and GSP from a cognitive perspective.

  15. Gender differences in depression scores of Iranian and german medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Ahmadi, Nahid; Soltani, Fereshteh; Bayat, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate gender differences in depression scores of Iranian and German medical students. Two hundred Iranian medical students (100 men and 100 women) and 200 German medical students (100 men and 100 women) were selected randomly and completed the English form of the self-rating Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Analysis gave a mean rating of 10.7 ± 6.6 for Iranian men and 10.9 ± 7.81 for Iranian women (NS). Also, 5 ± 4.9 for German men and 5.6 ± 5.0 for German women (NS). On Item 2, which asked whether the person was pessimistic 33% of Iranian men and 30% of Iranian women indicated that they were pessimistic (NS). Also, 21% of German men and 20% of German women indicated that they were pessimistic (NS). On Item 9, which asked about suicidal tendencies, 9% of Iranian men and 13% of Iranian women reported as having suicidal tendencies (NS). Also, 13% of German men and 21% of German women reported as having self-harming thoughts (NS). The present study showed no gender differences in Iranian and German medical students' scores on the BDI.

  16. The Prevalence of Depression and Its Associated Factors among Students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences In 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zamanian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is one of the mental disorders which have become a public health problem throughout of the world. The objective of this study was to investigate depression and to determine its correlated factors among students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS. Methods: 358 students of SUMS participated in this crosssectional study in 2012. The participants were selected by Proportion Partition sampling method. A two-part questionnaire was used as the data collecting tool. In the first part, demographic characteristics and in the second part the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI were included. Results: Mean score of depression in the studied population was 10.98. More than half of all the participants (54.7% were symptomless; 41% of them were in the weak to moderate depression categories, and 4.2% in the strong and very strong categories. The data showed a significant relationship between scores of depression and marital status, academic grade, field content of study, use of psychoactive drugs, job outlook, problem with marriage and religious commitments. The depression scores in the married, religious and postgraduate participants and in those participants with course pleasure and excellent career perspective were lower than those in the other groups. Conclusion: Taking measures to reduce the factors leading to mental disorders is recommended. The involvement of students in socio-cultural, recreational and sport activities, reinforcement of consultation and clinical psychological services, and promotion of religious beliefs are instrumental in the enhancement of moral values and amelioration of depression among university students.

  17. Prevalence and Intensity of Depression in Mothers of Children with Beta-Thalassemia Major In Talghani Hospital of Gorgan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargesbeygom Mirbehbahani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thalassemia is a chronic disease that it leads to psychological and social problems for parents. Mothers are at markedly increased risk of suffering from psychological distress and depression because they usually take on a considerable part of extra care that their children need.This study was designed to determine prevalence and intensity of depression in mothers with a thalassemic child. Material and Methods: In this cross – sectional study, 65 mothers of children with thalassemia major (case group and 65 mothers of children without thalassemia major (control group were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Data were analyzed by using SPSS (v 16.0 for windows. Results: Prevalence of depression was significantly higher in case group than that in control group (84.6%vs. 56.9%, p <0.05. Moderate depression had a highest prevalence in the both groups (33.4% in case group and 30.8% in control group. Prevalence of severe depression in case group was markedly higher than that in control group (29.2% vs. 3.1% p<0.05. There was a significant difference between intensity of depression in mothers of case group that had another child with beta-thalassemia major (p<0.05. Conclusion: Mothers of children with thalassemia major are vulnerable to depression. They need psychosocial support to promote their health.

  18. Revalidation of the Malay Version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) Among Malay Postpartum Women Attending the Bakar Bata Health Center in Alor Setar, Kedah, North West Of Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Wan Mohd. Rushidi Wan; Awang, Amir; Mohamed, Mahmood Nazar

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To reevaluate the psychometric characteristics of the Malay version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale among a sample of postpartum Malay women attending the Bakar Bata Health Center in Alor Setar, Kedah, North West of Peninsular Malaysia. Materials and methods: 64 women between 4 to 12 weeks postpartum were recruited for there validation study. They were given questionnaires on socio-demography, the 21-item Malay version of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the 10-item Malay version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). All the participants were later interviewed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). All diagnoses were made based on the Tenth Edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) Results: 9 women (14.1%) were diagnosed to have significant depression (7 mild depressive episodes and 2 moderate depressive episodes according to ICD-10). EPDS was found to have good internal consistency (Cronbach alpha =0.86) and split half reliability (Spearman split half coefficient = 0.83). The instrument also showed satisfactory discriminant and concurrent validity as evidenced by the statistically significant difference in EPDS scores between the depressed group and their non-depressed counterparts (Mann Whitney U test: 2 tailed p value Depression Scale in identifying postpartum depression among recently delivered Malay women attending the Bata Bata Health Center in Alor Setar, Kedah, North West of Peninsular Malaysia. PMID:23386800

  19. The relationship between students’ study habits, happiness and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Susan; Rajaeepour, Saeed; Rizi, Hasan Ashrafi; Zahmatkesh, Monereh; Nematolahi, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the important requirements for cultural, social and even economic development is having a book-loving nation. In order to achieve this, there is a need for purposeful and continuous programming. The purpose of this research was to determine the relationship between students’ study habits, happiness and depression in Isfahan University of Medical Science. METHODS: This research was a kind of descriptive and correlation survey. Statistical population included all MSc and PhD students in the second semester of the Isfahan University of Medical Science (263 students). In this research, stratified and random sampling was used in which a sample of 100 students was selected. Data collection instruments were Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Oxford Happiness Inventory and a researcher-made questionnaire to determine the amount of students’ study. Validity of this questionnaires was determined by structure and content related validity and its reliability was calculated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the first (r = 0.94), second (r = 0.91) and third (r = 0.85) questionnaire. Analysis of research findings was done through descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: Findings showed that 68.8 percent of students study less than 5 hours and only 2.5 percent of students study more than 10 hours. 65 percent of students had high amount of happiness and 35 percent had medium amount of happiness. In 60 percent of students there was no symptom of depression and 7.5 had depression symptoms. Also, there was no significant relationship between happiness and studying but there was a significant and negative relationship between studying and depression and happiness and depression. CONCLUSIONS: The amount of study and tendency for reading are among the most important indices of human growth in terms of potential abilities for achieving a perfect human life and to prevent one-dimensional thinking. Thus, finding ways to encourage students to study is

  20. The relationship between students' study habits, happiness and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Susan; Rajaeepour, Saeed; Rizi, Hasan Ashrafi; Zahmatkesh, Monereh; Nematolahi, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    One of the important requirements for cultural, social and even economic development is having a book-loving nation. In order to achieve this, there is a need for purposeful and continuous programming. The purpose of this research was to determine the relationship between students' study habits, happiness and depression in Isfahan University of Medical Science. This research was a kind of descriptive and correlation survey. Statistical population included all MSc and PhD students in the second semester of the Isfahan University of Medical Science (263 students). In this research, stratified and random sampling was used in which a sample of 100 students was selected. Data collection instruments were Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Oxford Happiness Inventory and a researcher-made questionnaire to determine the amount of students' study. Validity of this questionnaires was determined by structure and content related validity and its reliability was calculated by Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the first (r = 0.94), second (r = 0.91) and third (r = 0.85) questionnaire. Analysis of research findings was done through descriptive and inferential statistics. Findings showed that 68.8 percent of students study less than 5 hours and only 2.5 percent of students study more than 10 hours. 65 percent of students had high amount of happiness and 35 percent had medium amount of happiness. In 60 percent of students there was no symptom of depression and 7.5 had depression symptoms. Also, there was no significant relationship between happiness and studying but there was a significant and negative relationship between studying and depression and happiness and depression. The amount of study and tendency for reading are among the most important indices of human growth in terms of potential abilities for achieving a perfect human life and to prevent one-dimensional thinking. Thus, finding ways to encourage students to study is considered essential to achieve a healthy and developed

  1. Persistent Depressive Symptoms are Independent Predictors of Low-Grade Inflammation Onset Among Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Fábio Gazelato de Mello; Laurinavicius, Antonio Gabriele; Lotufo, Paulo A; Conceição, Raquel D; Morita, Fernando; Katz, Marcelo; Wajngarten, Maurício; Carvalho, José Antonio Maluf; Bosworth, Hayden B; Santos, Raul Dias

    2017-06-29

    Depressive symptoms are independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among individuals with non-diagnosed CVD. The mechanisms underlying this association, however, remain unclear. Inflammation has been indicated as a possible mechanistic link between depression and CVD. This study evaluated the association between persistent depressive symptoms and the onset of low-grade inflammation. From a database of 1,508 young (mean age: 41 years) individuals with no CVD diagnosis who underwent at least two routine health evaluations, 134 had persistent depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory - BDI ≥ 10, BDI+) and 1,374 had negative symptoms at both time points (BDI-). All participants had been submitted to repeated clinical and laboratory evaluations at a regular follow-up with an average of 26 months from baseline. Low-grade inflammation was defined as plasma high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (CRP) concentrations > 3 mg/L. The outcome was the incidence of low-grade inflammation evaluated by the time of the second clinical evaluation. The incidence of low-grade inflammation was more frequently observed in the BDI+ group compared to the BDI- group (20.9% vs. 11.4%; p = 0.001). After adjusting for sex, age, waist circumference, body mass index, levels of physical activity, smoking, and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, persistent depressive symptoms remained an independent predictor of low-grade inflammation onset (OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.03-3.02; p = 0.04). Persistent depressive symptoms were independently associated with low-grade inflammation onset among healthy individuals. Sintomas depressivos estão associados de forma independente ao risco aumentado de doença cardiovascular (DCV) em indivíduos com DCV não diagnosticada. Os mecanismos subjacentes a essa associação, entretanto, não estão claros. Inflamação tem sido indicada como um possível elo mecanicista entre depressão e DCV. Este estudo avaliou a associação entre

  2. The Organisation and Rationalisation of Java Based Applications in the BDI Group

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, S; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2005-01-01

    The AB/BDI software section is responsible for providing all the software necessary to develop, test, diagnose and maintain the different instruments produced by the group. Almost all graphical user interface applications produced by the group are written in Java and the Java Web Start architecture is used to launch these applications. Java Web Start provides a solid basis for application deployment, but lacks several key features essential for ensuring a proper and easily manageable working environment. This note describes an internally developed tool, which extends the Java Web Start functionality in order to provide these missing features.

  3. No relationship between baseline salivary alpha-amylase and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Score in drug-naïve patients with short-illness-duration first episode major depressive disorder: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarmach, Joanna; Cubała, Wiesław-Jerzy; Landowski, Jerzy; Chrzanowska, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) activity alternations are observed in major depressive disorder (MDD) being associated with depression severity and its specific psychopathological dimensions with anxiety being attributed to distress. No data is available on sAA in MDD according to Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The exploratory study examines whether and to what extent baseline sAA level is interrelated to the psychopathological features including severity of symptoms and specific psychopathological dimensions. The basal, non-stimulated sAA activity was studied in 20 non-late-life adult, treatment-naïve MDD patients with short-illness-duration and in 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls along with psychometric assessments with Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Significantly lower ( p =0.011) sAA activity was observed in MDD as compared to controls. No significant correlations were observed between sAA activity and the total HAMD-17 score as well as with regard to the specific core depression, insomnia, anxiety and somatic HAM-D psychopathological dimensions. No significant correlations were also found between sAA and STAIX-1 and STAIX-2 scores. Low baseline sAA levels in MDD with no correlations between sAA and psychopathological features including severity of symptoms and specific psychopathological dimensions was found. Key words: Salivary alpha-amylase, major depressive disorder, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression.

  4. The relationship between hydration status, male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan K

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Kamal Hassan,1,2 Yotam Elimeleh,1 Mona Shehadeh,3 Hassan Fadi,4 Irina Rubinchik2 1Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, Israel; 2Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Galilee Medical Center, Nahariya, Israel; 3Biochemistry Laboratory, Galilee Medical Center, Nahariya, Israel; 4Internal Medicine Department E, Galilee Medical Center, Nahariya, Israel Background: Disturbances in sexual function are common among dialysis patients. Normal erections require a complex balance of physiological, psychological, emotional, hormonal, neurological and vascular factors. This study examined a possible association of overhydration (OH with male sexual dysfunction and depression in hemodialysis (HD patients. Patients and methods: This cross-sectional study assessed hydration status by whole-body bioimpedance spectroscopy in patients on maintenance HD for more than 12 months. Patients were categorized according to OH to extracellular water (ECW ratio: OH/ECW ratio >0.15 and OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15. Sexual function was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF score. Psychological status was evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score. Serum sex hormones were determined. Results: Of 39 stable participants on HD, 53.8% were overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio >0.15 and 46.2% not overhydrated (OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15. Of participants with OH/ECW ratio >0.15, 85.7% had mild to severe ED, and 71.4% had abnormal BDI scores, ranging from mild mood disturbance to severe depression. Compared to patients with OH/ECW ratio ≤0.15, BDI scores, serum estradiol and plasma hsCRP were higher (18.48±8.34 vs 10.61±5.46, p<0.001; 140.10±44.51 vs 126.10±32.26, p=0.034; and, 17.70±12.14 vs 9.76±8.79, p=0.013; respectively in those with OH/ECW ratio >0.15, while their IIEF score, serum total testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA were lower (12.81±7.31 vs 41.44±23.79, p<0.001; 8.97±5.43 vs 14.10±8.30, p=0.013; and

  5. Prevalence and Correlates of Depressive Symptoms Among High School Students in Hanover, Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniyi J. Ekundayo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Jamaican adolescents and examine its association with individual and family factors. We used an abbreviated form of the Beck's Depression Inventory II (BDI-II to assess depressive symptoms among 748 students, attending public high schools in the parish of Hanover Jamaica. In the analysis, we classified adolescents with scores in the upper quartile of the depressive symptom score as having depressive symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of depressive symptoms. 14.2% of participants reported depressive symptoms. There was association between engagement in sexual activity [Odds Ratio (OR = 1.61, 95% Confidence Interval (CI = 1.02-2.51], parental monitoring of adolescent activity (OR=2.04, 95%CI=1.33 -3.12, maternal affection and support (OR= 4.07, 95%CI= 2.62-6.33, and paternal affection and support (OR= 1.58, 95%CI= 1.05-2.39 with self reported depressive symptoms at the bivariate level. In the final model, depressive symptoms was associated with perceived lack of maternal affection and support (OR= 4.06, 95%CI= 2.61-6.32 and showed marginal association with being sexually experienced (OR= 1.59, 95%CI= 1.00-2.52. As most homes are female-headed, establishing support systems for the mother to take care of their adolescent children may decrease the odds of depressive symptoms. Sexually experienced adolescents may require screening for depression. Further research is required to fully explore all factors that could predispose Jamaican adolescents to depression.

  6. Comparing telehealth-based and clinic-based group cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depression and anxiety: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nasreen Khatri, Elsa Marziali, Illia Tchernikov, Nancy ShepherdRotman Research Institute, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: The primary objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate reliable adherence to a group cognitive behavioral (CBT therapy protocol when delivered using on-line video conferencing as compared with face-to-face delivery of group CBT. A secondary aim was to show comparability of changes in subject depression inventory scores between on-line and face-to-face delivery of group CBT.Methods: We screened 31 individuals, 18 of whom met the criteria for a DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition diagnosis of mood and/or anxiety disorder. All qualifying participants had the necessary equipment (computer, webcam, Internet for participation in the study, but could exercise their preference for either the on-line or face-to-face format. Eighteen completed the 13 weekly session intervention program (ten face-to-face; eight video conferencing. We coded adherence to protocol in both intervention formats and generated pre–post changes in scores on the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II for each participant.Results: Application of the CBT protocol coding system showed reliable adherence to the group CBT intervention protocol in both delivery formats. Similarly, qualitative analysis of the themes in group discussion indicated that both groups addressed similar issues. Pre–post intervention scores for the BDI-II were comparable across the two delivery formats, with 60% of participants in each group showing a positive change in BDI-II severity classification (eg, from moderate to low symptoms.Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrates that group CBT could be delivered in a technology-supported environment (on-line video conferencing and can meet the same professional practice standards and outcomes as face-to-face delivery of the intervention program.Keywords: psychotherapy, gerontology, mood

  7. Abnormal brain glucose metabolism and depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease: SPM analysis of F-18 FDG positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Sung Min; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive mood and pre-dialytic CKD, to localize and quantify depressive mood -related lesions in pre-dialytic CKD patients through statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET), and to examine the usefulness of brain PET for early detection and proper treatment of depressive mood. Twenty one patients with stage 5 CKD and 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed by depressive mood assessment and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of 18F-FDG PET. Depressive mood assessment was done by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The largest clusters were areas including precentral gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulated cortex of left hemisphere. Other clusters were left transverse temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46, 44), right inferior frontal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left angular gyrus. In addition, correlation was found between hypometabolized areas and HDRS scores of CKD patients in right prefrontal cortex (BA 11) and right anterior cingulated gyrus (BA 24). In conclusion, this study demonstrated specific depressive mood-related abnormal metabolic lesion. Interestingly, in CKD patients with severe depressive mood, cerebral metabolism was similar to that of MDD.

  8. Abnormal brain glucose metabolism and depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease: SPM analysis of F-18 FDG positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Sung Min; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive mood and pre-dialytic CKD, to localize and quantify depressive mood -related lesions in pre-dialytic CKD patients through statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET), and to examine the usefulness of brain PET for early detection and proper treatment of depressive mood. Twenty one patients with stage 5 CKD and 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed by depressive mood assessment and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of 18F-FDG PET. Depressive mood assessment was done by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The largest clusters were areas including precentral gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulated cortex of left hemisphere. Other clusters were left transverse temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46, 44), right inferior frontal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left angular gyrus. In addition, correlation was found between hypometabolized areas and HDRS scores of CKD patients in right prefrontal cortex (BA 11) and right anterior cingulated gyrus (BA 24). In conclusion, this study demonstrated specific depressive mood-related abnormal metabolic lesion. Interestingly, in CKD patients with severe depressive mood, cerebral metabolism was similar to that of MDD

  9. The Mini-Cog, Clock Drawing Test, and the Mini-Mental State Examination in a German memory clinic: specificity of separation dementia from depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milian, Monika; Leiherr, Anna-Maria; Straten, Guido; Müller, Stephan; Leyhe, Thomas; Eschweiler, Gerhard W

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the specificities of the Mini-Cog, the Clock Drawing Test (CDT), and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) against depression and healthy controls in a German Memory Clinic. Furthermore, we analyzed the specificities of all three screening instruments in dependence of actual depression severity. Data from 142 depressed elderly, 438 dementia patients, and 64 healthy controls were retrospectively analyzed. The CDT and an extraction of the three-item recall of the MMSE were used to constitute the Mini-Cog algorithm. Depression severity was rated by either the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) or the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) depending on the age of the patients. The Mini-Cog achieved a specificity of 79.6% against depressed elderly and 100.0% against healthy subjects (p Mini-Cog and the CDT, but also showed the lowest sensitivity for the detection of dementia. Surprisingly, the depression severity had no effect on the specificity of the Mini-Cog and the CDT, only the MMSE was susceptible for the depression severity. Although the MMSE showed higher specificities, the weighting between the sensitivities and specificities in all tests prove again the Mini-Cog as a short, valid, and sensitive screening tool.

  10. Problem solving, loneliness, depression levels and associated factors in high school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ummugulsum; Adana, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    To determine problem solving, loneliness, depression levels and associated factors in high school adolescents. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a city west of Turkey (Bursa) in a public high school and the population was 774 and the sampling was 394 students. Students to be included in the study were selected using the multiple sampling method. A personal Information Form with 23 questions, Problem Solving Inventory (PSI), Loneliness Scale (UCLA), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used as data collection tools in the study. Basic statistical analyses, t-test, Kruskall Wallis-H, One Way Anova and Pearson Correlation test were used to evaluate the data. Necessary permissions were obtained from the relevant institution, students, parents and the ethical committee. The study found significant differences between "problem solving level" and family type, health assessment, life quality and mothers', fathers' siblings' closeness level; between "loneliness level" and gender, family income, health assessment, life quality and mothers', fathers', siblings' closeness level; between "depression level" and life quality, family income, fathers' closeness level. Unfavorable socio-economic and cultural conditions can have an effect on the problem solving, loneliness and depression levels of adolescents. Providing structured education to adolescents at risk under school mental health nursing practices is recommended.

  11. Effect of Music Practice on Anxiety and Depression of Iranian Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Mahmood; Lotfollahzadeh, Hana; Kermani-Ranjbar, Tahereh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2017-05-01

    The practice of dentistry has long been associated with high levels of occupational stress and anxiety and music has been shown as a method of reducing stress. Considering the reportedly high level of stress among dental students and its consequences and also considering the positive effect of music therapy, the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between music practice and level of stress in dental students. In this analytical, cross-sectional study, 88 students, including 44 with a history of music practice and 44 matched controls without music practice who met the defined inclusion criteria, participated. Upon obtaining written informed consent, all volunteers filled the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI) and Beck depression inventory (BDI) questionnaires. Data were analyzed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, and multiple linear regression test with backward method was used to evaluate the effect of demographic factors on anxiety and depression scores. The level of anxiety was higher in students who did not have music practice and this difference was significant (P0.05). But level of anxiety and depression was higher in students of universities with tuition fee compared to free public institutes (Pmusic practice can reduce anxiety and depression of dental students.

  12. Silybin supplementation during HCV therapy with pegylated interferon-α plus ribavirin reduces depression and anxiety and increases work ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Bertino, Gaetano; Chisari, Giuseppe; Motta, Massimo; Vecchio, Michele; Vacante, Marco; Caraci, Filippo; Greco, Carmela; Drago, Filippo; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Michele

    2016-11-15

    Hepatitis C virus infection and interferon treatment are often associated with anxiety, depressive symptoms and poor health-related quality of life. To evaluate the Silybin-vitamin E-phospholipids complex effect on work ability and whether health related factors (anxiety and depression) were associated with work ability in subjects with chronic hepatitis C treated with Pegylated-Interferon-α2b (Peg-IFN) and Ribavirin (RBV). Thirty-one patients (Group A) with chronic hepatitis and other 31 subjects in Group B were recruited in a randomized, prospective, placebo controlled, double blind clinical trial. Group A received 1.5 mg/kg per week of Peg-IFN plus RBV and placebo, while Group B received the same dosage of Peg-IFN plus RBV plus association of Silybin 94 mg + vitamin E 30 mg + phospholipids 194 mg in pills for 12 months. All subjects underwent to laboratory exams and questionnaires to evaluate depression (Beck Depression Inventory - BDI), anxiety (State-trait anxiety inventory - STAI) and work ability (Work ability Index - WAI). The comparison between group A and group B showed significant differences after 6 months in ALT (P work ability and reduced depression and anxiety in patients treated with Peg-IFN and RBV. NCT01957319 , First received: September 25, 2013. Last updated: September 30, 2013 (retrospectively registered).

  13. The Level of Anxiety and Depression in Dialysis Patients Undertaking Regular Physical Exercise Training - a Preliminary Study

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    Wioletta Dziubek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a six-month physical training undertaken by haemodialysis (HD patients, on the depression and anxiety. Methods: Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD were recruited from the dialysis station at the Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine in Wroclaw. Physical training took place at the beginning of the first 4-hours of dialysis, three times a week for six months. A personal questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI were used in the study. Results: A total of 28 patients completed the study: 20 were randomised to endurance training and 8 were randomised to resistance training. Statistical analysis of depression and anxiety at the initial (t1 and final examination (t2 indicated a significant reduction in depression and anxiety, particularly anxiety as a trait (X2 in the whole study group. The change in anxiety as a state correlated with the disease duration, duration of dialysis and the initial level of anxiety as a state (t1X1. The change in anxiety as a trait significantly correlated with age and the initial level of anxiety (t1X2. Conclusions: Undertaking physical training during dialysis by patients with ESRD is beneficial in reducing their levels of anxiety and depression. Both resistance and endurance training improves mood, but only endurance training additionally results in anxiety reduction.

  14. The Level of Anxiety and Depression in Dialysis Patients Undertaking Regular Physical Exercise Training--a Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubek, Wioletta; Kowalska, Joanna; Kusztal, Mariusz; Rogowski, Łukasz; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Nikifur, Małgorzata; Szczepańska-Gieracha, Joanna; Zembroń-Łacny, Agnieszka; Klinger, Marian; Woźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a six-month physical training undertaken by haemodialysis (HD) patients, on the depression and anxiety. Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) were recruited from the dialysis station at the Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine in Wroclaw. Physical training took place at the beginning of the first 4-hours of dialysis, three times a week for six months. A personal questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) were used in the study. A total of 28 patients completed the study: 20 were randomised to endurance training and 8 were randomised to resistance training. Statistical analysis of depression and anxiety at the initial (t1) and final examination (t2) indicated a significant reduction in depression and anxiety, particularly anxiety as a trait (X2) in the whole study group. The change in anxiety as a state correlated with the disease duration, duration of dialysis and the initial level of anxiety as a state (t1X1). The change in anxiety as a trait significantly correlated with age and the initial level of anxiety (t1X2). Undertaking physical training during dialysis by patients with ESRD is beneficial in reducing their levels of anxiety and depression. Both resistance and endurance training improves mood, but only endurance training additionally results in anxiety reduction. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The Association Between Trait Gratitude and Self-Reported Sleep Quality Is Mediated by Depressive Mood State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkozei, Anna; Smith, Ryan; Kotzin, Megan D; Waugaman, Debby L; Killgore, William D S

    2017-01-27

    It has been shown that higher levels of trait gratitude are associated with better self-reported sleep quality, possibly due to differences in presleep cognitions. However previous studies have not taken into account the role of depressive symptoms in this relationship. In this study, 88 nonclinical 18-29-year-olds completed the Gratitude Resentment and Appreciation Test (GRAT) as a measure of trait gratitude. The Glasgow Content of Thought Inventory (GCTI) was used to measure the intrusiveness of cognitions prior to sleep onset, the Motivation and Energy Inventory (MEI) assessed daytime fatigue, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to assess self-reported sleep quality. The BDI-II assessed self-reported depressive symptoms. Consistent with previous work, GRAT scores were positively associated with higher daytime energy and greater number of hours of sleep per night. Importantly, however, we further observed that depressive symptoms mediated the relationships between gratitude scores and sleep metrics. Depressive mood state appears to mediate the association between gratitude and self-reported sleep quality metrics. We suggest, as one plausible model of these phenomena, that highly grateful individuals have lower symptoms of depression, which in turn leads to fewer presleep worries, resulting in better perceived sleep quality. Future work should aim to disentangle the causal nature of these relationships in order to better understand how these important variables interact.

  16. Self-Esteem, Social Phobia and Depression Status in Patients with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Ayşe; Gökçe, Gökçen; Büyükburgaz, Ülkü; Selekler, Macit; KOMŞUOğLU, Sezer

    2013-12-01

    The increased risk for psychiatric disorders in epilepsy can be related to a number of clinical, psychosocial and biological factors. Due to the unpredictability of seizures and the possibility that they may occur at any time and in any place, patients with epilepsy may develop social phobia and may have feelings of worthlessness and stigma. These factors decrease their psychosocial function, self-efficacy, and quality of life and even increase the suicide rate. Considering the above-mentioned scientific data, the present study was designed to investigate phobia, self-esteem and depression status in patients with epilepsy. One hundred thirty-two patients (aged 21-52 years) and age- and gender-matched control group of 61 subjects (aged 25-60 years) were included in this study. All patients in both groups were administered the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (CSEI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The mean ages of the patient group and the healthy controls were 29.66±11.3 and 32.16±7.99, respectively. There was no statistical significance between the two groups in terms of age and sex (p>0.05). BDI, LSAS and CSEI scores in the patient group were statistically significantly different than in the control group (pself-esteem and depression are important comorbid conditions in epileptic patients. Psychiatric disorders are usually underrecognized and undertreated in patients with epilepsy. Therefore, it is very important to identify and treat the psychiatric comorbid conditions in epilepsy because of their significant burden on patients' quality of life.

  17. Is immediate adjunctive CBT more beneficial than delayed CBT in treating depression?: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sakina J; Zaretsky, Ari; Schaffer, Ayal; Levitt, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious first-line therapy for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Due to the limited accessibility of CBT, long wait lists result in delayed treatment, which may affect treatment outcomes. The goal of this pilot study was to obtain preliminary data from a randomized controlled trial to determine whether delayed CBT reduces the effectiveness of the therapy compared to immediate CBT in patients with MDD receiving pharmacotherapy. Patients were randomized to receive immediate CBT (n=18) or to begin CBT after 6 months (n=20) and received 14 weekly sessions, followed by two additional booster sessions. During the active treatment months, patients in the immediate group demonstrated reductions in scores on the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) that were similar to those in the delayed CBT group. However, when the analysis was performed using only data from patients in the delayed group who were still in a depressive episode, there was an overall greater decrease in BDI-II scores in the immediate group vs. the delayed group over the active treatment months, but not specifically at the 6-month endpoint. These findings suggest delays in depression treatment, similar to what occurs with real-world wait list times, may not have a significant impact on the effectiveness of CBT in patients who are already receiving treatment as usual. However, such delays may affect the effectiveness of CBT in those patients who remain depressed during the time delay. A larger trial is necessary to confirm these findings. (Journal of Psychiatric Practice 2015;21:107-113).

  18. Internet treatment for depression: a randomized controlled trial comparing clinician vs. technician assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Nickolai; Andrews, Gavin; Davies, Matthew; McIntyre, Karen; Robinson, Emma; Solley, Karen

    2010-06-08

    Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for depression is effective when guided by a clinician, less so if unguided. Would guidance from a technician be as effective as guidance from a clinician? Randomized controlled non-inferiority trial comparing three groups: Clinician-assisted vs. technician-assisted vs. delayed treatment. Community-based volunteers applied to the VirtualClinic (www.virtualclinic.org.au) research program, and 141 participants with major depressive disorder were randomized. Participants in the clinician- and technician-assisted groups received access to an iCBT program for depression comprising 6 online lessons, weekly homework assignments, and weekly supportive contact over a treatment period of 8 weeks. Participants in the clinician-assisted group also received access to a moderated online discussion forum. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Patient Health QUESTIONnaire-9 Item (PHQ-9). Completion rates were high, and at post-treatment, both treatment groups reduced scores on the BDI-II (ptechnician-assisted groups respectively, and on the PHQ-9, were 1.54 and 1.60 respectively. At 4-month follow-up participants in the technician group had made further improvements and had significantly lower scores on the PHQ-9 than those in the clinician group. A total of approximately 60 minutes of clinician or technician time was required per participant during the 8-week treatment program. Both clinician- and technician-assisted treatment resulted in large effect sizes and clinically significant improvements comparable to those associated with face-to-face treatment, while a delayed treatment control group did not improve. These results provide support for large scale trials to determine the clinical effectiveness and acceptability of technician-assisted iCBT programs for depression. This form of treatment has potential to increase the capacity of existing mental health services. Australian New

  19. Relationship of Internet addiction with cognitive style, personality, and depression in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senormancı, Omer; Saraçlı, Ozge; Atasoy, Nuray; Senormancı, Güliz; Koktürk, Fürüzan; Atik, Levent

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of dysfunctional attitudes, self-esteem, personality, and depression with Internet addiction in university students. A total of 720 university students participated in the study in Bülent Ecevit University English Preparatory School which offers intensive English courses. Students were evaluated with a sociodemographic data form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale form A (DAS-A), Internet Addiction Scale (IAS), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised/Abbreviated Form (EPQR-A). The results indicated that 52 (7.2%) of the students had Internet addiction. There were 37 (71.2%) men, 15 (28.8%) women in the addicted group. While the addicted groups' BDI, DAS-A perfectionistic attitude, need for approval, RSES, EPQR-A neuroticism, and psychoticism scores were significantly higher, EPQR-A lie scores were significantly lower than those of the non addicted group. According to the multiple binary logistic regression analysis, being male, duration of Internet usage, depression, and perfectionistic attitude have been found as predictors for Internet addiction. It has been found that perfectionistic attitude is a predictor for Internet addiction even when depression, sex, duration of Internet were controlled. To the knowledge of the researchers, this study is the first study to show the dysfunctional attitudes in Internet addiction. It can be important to evaluate dysfunctional attitudes, personality, self-esteem and depression in people with Internet addiction. These variables should be targeted for effective treatment of people with Internet addiction in cognitive behavioral therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of Protected Sleep Period for Internal Medicine Interns on Overnight Call on Depression, Burnout, and Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Judy A.; Bellini, Lisa M.; Dinges, David F.; Curtis, Meredith L.; Tao, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Jingsan; Small, Dylan S.; Basner, Mathias; Norton, Laurie; Novak, Cristina; Dine, C. Jessica; Rosen, Ilene M.; Volpp, Kevin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient safety and sleep experts advocate a protected sleep period for residents. Objective We examined whether interns scheduled for a protected sleep period during overnight call would have better end-of-rotation assessments of burnout, depression, and empathy scores compared with interns without protected sleep periods and whether the amount of sleep obtained during on call predicted end-of-rotation assessments. Methods We conducted a randomized, controlled trial with internal medicine interns at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center (PVAMC) and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) in academic year 2009–2010. Four-week blocks were randomly assigned to either overnight call permitted under the 2003 duty hour standards or a protected sleep period from 12:30 am to 5:30 am. Participants wore wrist actigraphs. At the beginning and end of the rotations, they completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-HSS), and Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Results A total of 106 interns participated. There were no significant differences between groups in end-of-rotation BDI-II, MBI-HSS, or IRI scores at either location (P > .05). Amount of sleep while on call significantly predicted lower MBI-Emotional Exhaustion (P < .003), MBI-Depersonalization (P < .003), and IRI-Personal Distress (P < .006) at PVAMC, and higher IRI-Perspective Taking (P < .008) at HUP. Conclusions A protected sleep period produced few consistent improvements in depression, burnout, or empathy, although depression was already low at baseline. Possibly the amount of protected time was too small to affect these emotional states or sleep may not be directly related to these scores. PMID:24949128

  1. The Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Man Smokers' Comorbid Depression and Anxiety Symptoms and Smoking Cessation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Mohammadreza; Omidi, Abdollah; Sehat, Mojtaba; Sepehrmanesh, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    Besides physical problems, cigarette smoking is associated with a high prevalence of comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms. One of the reasons behind high post-cessation smoking lapse and relapse rates is inattentiveness to these symptoms during the process of cessation. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) on male smokers' comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms and smoking cessation. This two-group pre-test-post-test randomized controlled trial was done on a random sample of seventy male smokers. Participants were randomly and evenly allocated to an intervention and a control group. Patients in these groups received either acceptance or commitment therapy or routine psychological counseling services include cognitive behavior therapy, respectively. Study data were collected through a demographic questionnaire, the Structural Clinical Interview (SCI) for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th Edition (DSM-IV) disorders, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Micro Smokerlyzer carbon monoxide monitor. The SPSS software was employed to analyze the data. After the intervention, depression and anxiety scores and smoking cessation rate in the intervention group were respectively lower and higher than the control group (P < 0.050). ACT can significantly improve comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms and smoking cessation rate. Thus, it can be used to simultaneously manage depression, anxiety, and cigarette smoking.

  2. Overgeneral autobiographical memory predicts higher prospective levels of depressive symptoms and intrusions in borderline patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, Kris; Pieters, Guido; Claes, Laurence; Berens, Ann; Raes, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM), the tendency to retrieve categories of events from autobiographical memory instead of single events, is found to be a reliable predictor for future mood disturbances and post-traumatic symptom severity. Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often report co-morbid episodes of major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, we investigated whether OGM would predict depression severity and (post-traumatic) stress symptoms in BPD patients. At admission (N = 54) and at six-month follow-up (N ≥ 31), BPD patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders, the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders, the Autobiographical Memory Test, the Beck Depression Inventory-2nd edition (BDI-II), and the Impact of Event Scale. OGM at baseline predicted (a) higher levels of depressive symptoms at follow-up and (b) more intrusions related to a stressful event over and above baseline levels of borderline symptoms, depressive symptoms, and intrusions, respectively. No association was found between memory specificity and event-related avoidance at follow-up. Despite previous findings suggesting that OGM in BPD is less robust than in MDD and PTSD, our results suggest that memory specificity in BPD patients may have some relevance for the course of depressive and stress symptomatology in BPD.

  3. Therapeutic Effect of Comedy Films on Decreasing of Depression in the Schizophrenic Patients

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    Farbod Fadaei

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research is an evaluation of the theraputic efficacy of comedy films in improving the mood of the long – stay schizophrenic inpatients. Materials & Methods: 50 schizophrenic patients in 2 rehabilitation wards of Razi Psychiatric – Center were selected on the basis of available sampling. They were divided into 2 groups (Experimental and Control, each group consisted of 25 patients. Before any therapeutic procedure, the magnitudes of their depression were measured by Beck Depressive Inventory. Afterwards, the experimental group was exposed to silent comedies of Charles Chaplin and Mr. Bean (Roan Atkinson for 30 minutes every other day for two weeks. Meanwhile, the control group were shown a documentary film about the formation of planet Earth. At the end of the second week, the magnitude of depression of all cases were again measured by B.D.I. Furthermore, in order to investigate the statistical significance of differences between depression magnitude among both groups before and after the experiment, Mann Withney – U test, was utilized. Also for defining and explaining the data and drawing the scales, SPSS and Excel softwares were employed as well. Results: According to the findings of this research, the difference between depression magnitude in both groups before and after the exposure to comedy films was significant at P=0.05. Conclusion:  This result shows that comedy films can improve the depressed mood in the long–stay schizophrenic people.

  4. Cognitive Vulnerabilities and Depression in Young Adults: An ROC Curves Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Michela; Imperatori, Claudio; Sergi, Maria Rita; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Continisio, Massimo; Tamburello, Antonino; Innamorati, Marco; Saggino, Aristide

    2013-01-01

    Objectives and Methods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, by means of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, whether cognitive vulnerabilities (CV), as measured by three well-known instruments (the Beck Hopelessness Scale, BHS; the Life Orientation Test-Revised, LOT-R; and the Attitudes Toward Self-Revised, ATS-R), independently discriminate between subjects with different severities of depression. Participants were 467 young adults (336 females and 131 males), recruited from the general population. The subjects were also administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Results. Four first-order (BHS Optimism/Low Standard; BHS Pessimism; Generalized Self-Criticism; and LOT Optimism) and two higher-order factors (Pessimism/Negative Attitudes Toward Self, Optimism) were extracted using Principal Axis Factoring analysis. Although all first-order and second-order factors were able to discriminate individuals with different depression severities, the Pessimism factor had the best performance in discriminating individuals with moderate to severe depression from those with lower depression severity. Conclusion. In the screening of young adults at risk of depression, clinicians have to pay particular attention to the expression of pessimism about the future.

  5. Heterogeneity of sleep quality in relation to circadian preferences and depressive symptomatology among major depressive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, Yavuz; Boysan, Murat; Kandeger, Ali; Uygur, Omer F; Sayin, Ayca A; Akbaba, Nursel; Koc, Basak

    2018-08-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the latent dimensional structure of sleep quality as indexed by the seven components of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), as well as latent covariance structure between sleep quality, circadian preferences and depressive symptoms. Two hundred twenty-five patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), with an average age of 29.92 ± 10.49 years (aged between 17 and 63), participated in the study. The PSQI, Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered to participants. Four sets of latent class analyses were subsequently run to obtain optimal number of latent classes best fit to the data. Mixture models revealed that sleep quality is multifaceted in MDD. The data best fit to four-latent-class model: Poor Habitual Sleep Quality (PHSQ), Poor Subjective Sleep Quality (PSSQ), Intermediate Sleep Quality (ISQ), and Good Sleep Quality (GSQ). MDD patients classified into GSQ latent class (23.6%) reported the lowest depressive symptoms and were more prone to morningness diurnal preferences compared to other three homogenous sub-groups. Finally, the significant association between eveningness diurnal preferences and depressive symptomatology was significantly mediated by poor sleep quality. The cross-sectional nature of the study and the lack of an objective measurement of sleep such as polysomnography recordings was the most striking limitation of the study. We concluded sleep quality in relation to circadian preferences and depressive symptoms has a heterogeneous nature in MDD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Depression in Hemodialysis Patients

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    Badema Čengić

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Depression is the most frequent psychological complication of haemodialysis (HD patients (pts and has been associated with impaired Quality of Life (QoL. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of depression in HD pts in relation to sociodemographic factors and the relationship between depression and QoL.200 pts from Clinic for haemodialysis in Sarajevo, B&H were participating in the study. Mean age was S7,26±13,78 years and mean HD duration was 64’26±58,18 months. From the test material we applied BDI and SF-36.51% of our pts have shown depression (BDI>11 in various degrees (30%-mild depression, 8,5%-moderate depression and 12,5%-severe depression. As we could expect, the most emphasized symptoms of depression were somatic symptoms. 55,5% of pts have shown QoL lower then average. Sociodemographic data such as gender, marital status and HD duration did not influence significantly on pt’s QoL and occurrence of depression (p>0,05. As the age of the pts increased, level of depression increased too and QoL significantly decreased (p<0,05. Employed pts have shown significantly better QoL and lower level of depression in relation to unemployed pts (p<0,05. As the educational level of pts increased, QoL increased too and level of depression significantly decreased (p<0,05. Pts in 1st HD shift were significantly more depressed and have significantly worse mental health in compare to pts in 3rd HD shift (p<0,05. Our results showed a high prevalence of depressive symptoms among the study group that was linked to trend of poor QoL.

  7. Anxiety and depression among infertile women: a cross-sectional survey from Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Enikő; Szigeti, Judit F; Ujma, Péter P; Sexty, Réka; Balog, Piroska

    2017-07-24

    Infertility is often associated with a chronic state of stress which may manifest itself in anxiety-related and depressive symptoms. The aim of our study is to assess the psychological state of women with and without fertility problems, and to investigate the background factors of anxiety-related and depressive symptoms in women struggling with infertility. Our study was conducted with the participation of 225 (134 primary infertile and 91 fertile) women, recruited in a clinical setting and online. We used the following questionnaires: Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T), Shortened Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI). We also interviewed our subjects on the presence of other sources of stress (the quality of the relationship with their mother, financial and illness-related stress), and we described sociodemographic and fertility-specific characteristics. We tested our hypotheses using independent-samples t-tests (M ± SD) and multiple linear regression modelling (ß). Infertile women were younger (33.30 ± 4.85 vs. 35.74 ± 5.73, p = .001), but had significantly worse psychological well-being (BDI = 14.94 ± 12.90 vs. 8.95 ± 10.49, p Depressive symptoms and anxiety in infertile women were associated with age, social concern, sexual concern and maternal relationship stress. Trait anxiety was also associated with financial stress. Our model was able to account for 58% of the variance of depressive symptoms and 62% of the variance of trait anxiety. Depressive and anxiety-related symptoms of infertile women are more prominent than those of fertile females. The measurement of these indicators and the mitigation of underlying distress by adequate psychosocial interventions should be encouraged.

  8. Depression and anxiety in patients on chronic hemodialysis in University Clinical Hospital Mostar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarić, Miro; Letica, Ivona; Petrov, Bozo; Tomić, Monika; Klarić, Branka; Letica, Ludvig; Francisković, Tanja

    2009-12-01

    Depression and anxiety are prevailing mental problem in patients on chronic hemodialysis and they have great influence on outcome of illness. Additionally, these disorders are rarely identified in that population of patients and they are insufficiently treated. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients on chronic hemodialysis in University Clinical Hospital Mostar and to examine the correlation between the demographic variables and the time spent on dialysis with depression and anxiety levels. The experimental group consisted of 56 patients on chronic hemodialysis in Mostar Clinical Hospital. The control group 1 consisted of 53 patients diagnosed with a chronic illness and treated for at least a year, while the control group 2 consisted of 51 persons who were not diagnosed with any chronic somatic or mental illness. Demographic data were collected using the constructed questionnaire. The Beck Depression Inventory-BDI was used to determine depression, while the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-STAI was used to determine anxiety. We recorded significantly higher prevalence of depression in patients on chronic dialysis (51.8%) than in patients with a chronic illness (41.5%) and persons without chronic illnesses (9.8%; p < 0.001). Trait anxiety level was significantly higher in hemodialysed patients compared to the other two groups (p = 0.006) but there were no significant differences in state anxiety level. The study has not shown any significant difference in the prevalence of depression and anxiety level regarding the differences in sex, gender and education level, apart from a higher level of state anxiety in patients with a lower education level (p = 0.032). These results indicate that patients on hemodialysis have a significantly higher level of depression and a higher level of trait anxiety compared to patients with chronic illnesses and especially compared to general population.

  9. Prevalence and predictors of parental grief and depression after the death of a child from cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Maria C; Clarke, Naomi E; Ting, Cheng Lin; Conroy, Rowena; Anderson, Vicki A; Heath, John A

    2010-11-01

    To investigate patterns of grief and depression in a sample of parents whose child had died of cancer, and to examine factors related to burden of illness and end-of-life care as potential predictors of parental grief and depression outcomes. Fifty-eight parents completed standardized self-report questionnaires measuring prolonged grief disorder (Inventory of Complicated Grief-Revised [ICG-R]) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition [BDI-II]) and participated in structured interviews designed to elicit their perceptions of their child's end-of-life care and burden of illness. The majority of participants were mothers (84%) and the mean length of time since child death was 4.5 (standard deviation [SD] = 2.4) years (range, 1.0-9.8 years). Rates of prolonged grief disorder (PGD) were similar to those reported in other bereaved populations (10.3%); however, 41% of parents met diagnostic criteria for grief-related separation distress. Twenty-two percent of parents reported clinically significant depressive symptoms. Time since death and parental perception of the oncologist's care predicted parental grief symptoms but not depressive symptoms. Perceptions of the child's quality of life during the last month, preparedness for the child's death, and economic hardship also predicted grief and depression outcomes. A minority of parents met criteria for PGD and depression, however, almost half the sample was experiencing significant separation distress associated with persistent longing and yearning for their child. Time since death is a significant predictor of parental psychological distress. This study also highlights the importance of end-of-life factors in parents' long-term adjustment and the need for optimal palliative care to ensure the best possible outcomes for parents.

  10. Factors associated to depression and anxiety in medical students: a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Brenneisen Mayer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate personal and institutional factors related to depression and anxiety prevalence of students from 22 Brazilian medical schools. Methods The authors performed a multicenter study (August 2011 to August 2012, examining personal factors (age, sex, housing, tuition scholarship and institutional factors (year of the medical training, school legal status, location and support service in association with scores of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Results Of 1,650 randomly selected students, 1,350 (81.8 % completed the study. The depressive symptoms prevalence was 41 % (BDI > 9, state-anxiety 81.7 % and trait-anxiety in 85.6 % (STAI > 33. There was a positive relationship between levels of state (r = 0,591, p < 0.001 and trait (r = 0,718, p < 0.001 anxiety and depression scores. All three symptoms were positively associated with female sex and students from medical schools located in capital cities of both sexes. Tuition scholarship students had higher state-anxiety but not trait-anxiety or depression scores. Medical students with higher levels of depression and anxiety symptoms disagree more than their peers with the statements “I have adequate access to psychological support” and “There is a good support system for students who get stressed”. Conclusions The factors associated with the increase of medical students’ depression and anxiety symptoms were female sex, school location and tuition scholarship. It is interesting that tuition scholarship students showed state-anxiety, but not depression and trait-anxiety symptoms.

  11. The Relationship between Impulsivity and Internet Gaming Disorder in Young Adults: Mediating Effects of Interpersonal Relationships and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyera; Lee, Ji-Yoon; Choi, Aruem; Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Dai-Jin; Choi, Jung-Seok

    2018-03-06

    Background: This study aimed to explore relationships between impulsivity, interpersonal relationships, depression, and Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) symptoms. Methods: A total of 118 young adults participated in this study: 67 IGD patients who met five or more of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for IGD and 56 healthy controls. We administered questionnaires to assess IGD symptoms (Young's Internet Addiction Test; Y-IAT), impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11), interpersonal relationship (Relationship Change Scale; RCS), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory; BDI). We used PROCESS macro in SPSS to perform mediation analysis. Results: IGD symptom was positively related to depression and impulsivity, and negatively related to the quality of interpersonal relationships. Mediation analysis revealed full mediation effects of interpersonal relationships and depression on the association between impulsivity and IGD symptoms in the IGD group. Specifically, even after adjusting for gender as a covariate, high impulsivity was associated with greater difficulty with interpersonal relationships; which further affected depression and increased the risk of IGD. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the importance of early intervention in IGD patients, particularly in young adults with high impulsivity. When intervening in adults' IGD, we should consider not only individual factors (e.g., depression) but also socioenvironmental factors (e.g., interpersonal relationships).

  12. The Relationship between Impulsivity and Internet Gaming Disorder in Young Adults: Mediating Effects of Interpersonal Relationships and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyera; Lee, Ji-Yoon; Choi, Aruem; Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2018-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to explore relationships between impulsivity, interpersonal relationships, depression, and Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) symptoms. Methods: A total of 118 young adults participated in this study: 67 IGD patients who met five or more of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for IGD and 56 healthy controls. We administered questionnaires to assess IGD symptoms (Young’s Internet Addiction Test; Y-IAT), impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11), interpersonal relationship (Relationship Change Scale; RCS), and depression (Beck Depression Inventory; BDI). We used PROCESS macro in SPSS to perform mediation analysis. Results: IGD symptom was positively related to depression and impulsivity, and negatively related to the quality of interpersonal relationships. Mediation analysis revealed full mediation effects of interpersonal relationships and depression on the association between impulsivity and IGD symptoms in the IGD group. Specifically, even after adjusting for gender as a covariate, high impulsivity was associated with greater difficulty with interpersonal relationships; which further affected depression and increased the risk of IGD. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the importance of early intervention in IGD patients, particularly in young adults with high impulsivity. When intervening in adults’ IGD, we should consider not only individual factors (e.g., depression) but also socioenvironmental factors (e.g., interpersonal relationships). PMID:29509708

  13. The Relationship between Impulsivity and Internet Gaming Disorder in Young Adults: Mediating Effects of Interpersonal Relationships and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyera Ryu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to explore relationships between impulsivity, interpersonal relationships, depression, and Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD symptoms. Methods: A total of 118 young adults participated in this study: 67 IGD patients who met five or more of the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for IGD and 56 healthy controls. We administered questionnaires to assess IGD symptoms (Young’s Internet Addiction Test; Y-IAT, impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11, interpersonal relationship (Relationship Change Scale; RCS, and depression (Beck Depression Inventory; BDI. We used PROCESS macro in SPSS to perform mediation analysis. Results: IGD symptom was positively related to depression and impulsivity, and negatively related to the quality of interpersonal relationships. Mediation analysis revealed full mediation effects of interpersonal relationships and depression on the association between impulsivity and IGD symptoms in the IGD group. Specifically, even after adjusting for gender as a covariate, high impulsivity was associated with greater difficulty with interpersonal relationships; which further affected depression and increased the risk of IGD. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the importance of early intervention in IGD patients, particularly in young adults with high impulsivity. When intervening in adults’ IGD, we should consider not only individual factors (e.g., depression but also socioenvironmental factors (e.g., interpersonal relationships.

  14. A Sectional Study: The Relationship between Perceived Social Support and Depression in Turkish Infertile Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubra Erdem

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies conducted on infertile women in the literature investigated some features such as depression, anxiety, loneliness, and social support. However, there has been no study examining the relationship between levels of perceived social support and depression in infertile women. Considering this deficiency, the study was conducted to determine the relationship between perceived social support and depression in infertile women. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between perceived social support and depression in infertile women. Materials and Methods: This descriptive and sectional study was conducted between 16 April and 31 October 2012 in in vitro fertilisation (IVF Centre of Fırat University Research Hospital. Sampling formula was used in cases when the number of elements in the population was not known to calculate minimum sample size required to be included in the study. A total of 238 women who applied to the relevant centre between the specified dates constituted the sample group of the study. A Questionnaire Form, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS were used to collect the data. A pilot study was carried out on nine infertile women. As a result of the pilot study, we formed the final version of the Questionnaire Form. The data of these nine women were not involved in the research. The data obtained from the study was assessed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA version 15.0. Percentage distribution, mean, t test, one-way analysis of variance (One-Way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation analysis were used to evaluate th