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Sample records for depressed patients showed

  1. Depression in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Asghar-Ali, A; Braun, U K

    2009-02-01

    While the most serious of depressive illnesses in the elderly is major depressive disorder, patients' quality of life can be significantly impacted by dysthmic disorder, sub-threshold depression (minor depression), or a depressive disorder due to a general medical condition, all of which have been shown to be more prevalent than major depression in the community dwelling population of older adults. Older adults are also more likely to develop grief reaction and frequently deal with issues of bereavement. This review will discuss the diagnoses of all relevant depressive diagnoses that primary care physicians are likely to encounter. Among the many different assessment tools that screen for depression the briefest instruments are a two-question screening tool recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and, specifically developed for older adults, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) that is available in a short 15- Yes/No-question version. Many medical illnesses are associated with depressive symptoms. The focus in this review is on dementing illnesses/cerebrovascular disease, dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and Parkinson disease. First-line pharmacological therapy of depression includes selective serotonin inhibitors (SSRIs), and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Side effects of particular drugs can often be geared towards achieving additional benefits, e.g. weight gain associated with the use of some SSRISs may be helpful for patients with dementia.

  2. Hemodynamic changes in depressive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ying; LI Hui-chun; ZHENG Lei-lei; YU Hua-liang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed at exploring the relationship between hemodynamic changes and depressive and anxious symptom in depression patients. Methods: The cardiac function indices including the left stroke index (LSI), ejection fraction (EF), heart rate (HR), diastolic pressure mean (DPM), systolic pressure mean (SPM), left ventricle end-diastolic volume (LVDV), effective circulating volume (ECV), resistance total mean (RTM) and blood flow smooth degree (BFSD) were determined in 65 patients with major depressive disorders and 31 healthy normal controls. The clinical symptoms were assessed with Hamilton depression scale (HAMD) and Hamilton anxiety scale (HAMA). Results: In patients with depression without anxiety,LSI, EF, LVDV, DPM, SPM, ECV, BFSD were significantly lower than those in controls, while RTM was higher than that in controls. Patients with comorbidity of depression and anxiety showed decreased LVDV, ECV, BFSD, and increased HR in comparison with the controls. The anxiety/somatization factor score positively correlated with LSI, EF, LVDV, but negatively correlated with RTM. There was negative correlation between retardation factor score and DPM, SPM, LVDV. Conclusion: The study indicated that there are noticeable changes in left ventricle preload and afterload, blood pressure, peripheral resistance, and microcirculation in depressive patients, and that the accompanying anxiety makes the changes more complicated.

  3. Depression and major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

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    Inoue, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Shin; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-01-15

    The prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) varies greatly. In this study, we investigated major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive symptoms without MDD in patients with PD. The psychopathological characteristics of depressive symptoms were assessed by a psychiatric interview. A total of 105 Japanese patients with PD without dementia were included. The Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with a cutoff score of 13/14 was used to screen for depression. Using a structured interview, a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation of patients with BDI-II scores >13 (high BDI patients) was completed using the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR. Forty patients (38%) had a BDI-II >13, but 29 did not show any depressed mood. Five cases met the criteria for MDD (three current, two past) and one patient was diagnosed with minor depressive disorder. A slight depressed mood that was associated with worrying about PD was seen in 6 of 34 patients without any depressive disorder and fluctuated with aggravation of PD symptoms in two of these patients. For the diagnosis of MDD, the number of positive items from the DSM-IV-TR definition of MDD is most important and useful for differentiating MDD and non-MDD. The low-prevalence rate of MDD in our patient population suggests that PD may be a psychological stressor for MDD, but does not necessarily induce MDD.

  4. Compared to controls, patients with ruptured aneurysm and surgical intervention show increase in symptoms of depression and lower cognitive performance, but their objective sleep is not affected.

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    Brand, Serge; Zimmerer, Stefan; Kalak, Nadeem; Planta, Sandra Von; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, Katja; Müller, Andreas Albert; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2015-02-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) have impaired sleep and cognitive performance together with more difficulties in social and everyday life. Hypocortisolism has also been reported. However, a study assessing all dimensions between aSAH severity, objective and subjective sleep, cortisol secretion, cognitive performance and social and everyday life has not so far been performed. The aim of the present study was therefore two-fold: (1) to assess, in a sample of patients with aSAH, objective and subjective sleep, cognitive functioning, social skills and cortisol secretion concurrently, and (2) to compare patients on these variables with a control group. Twenty-one patients (17 females; mean age: 58.80 years) with ruptured aneurysm and surgical intervention and 21 (14 females; mean age: 58.90 years) age- and gender-matched controls took part in the study. Assessments covered objective sleep-EGG recordings, subjective sleep, salivary cortisol analysis, and psychological functioning including memory performance, mood, and emotion recognition. Compared to healthy controls, patients had lower scores for verbal memory performance and emotion recognition; they also reported more marked depressive symptoms and complained of poor sleep. However, no differences were found for objective sleep or cortisol secretion. Subjective and objective sleep, cortisol secretion and psychological functioning were unrelated. Findings indicate that patients with aSAH face psychological rather than physiological issues.

  5. Depression in Cancer Patients

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    Beyhan Bag

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not enough to consider treatment and care depression in the oncology that is the most common psychiatric illness in cancer patient affects of cancer treatment and the patient`s quality of life negatively, which is determined through researches in the field. With development of psycho-oncology it has been demonstrated to establish an important link between the cancer patient`s treatment as well as psycho-social support for the patient and psychiatric treatment and care for the if it is needed. With this connection between them it has been proposed to use of bio-psycho-social-model in cancer patient to improve their care. To achieve this goal, it is expected from medical personnel to realize patients psychosocial need und if he/she has a psychiatric disorders or syndromes. For the medical personnel that work in oncology services, it is inevitable to organize in order to raise the awareness of depression in the cancer patients. In the present study, it is focused on raising the awareness of depression in cancer patient for the medical personnel. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 186-198

  6. History of Depression in Lung Cancer Patients

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    Iachina, M; Brønserud, M M; Jakobsen, E

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the influence of a history of depression in the process of diagnostic evaluation and the choice of treatment in lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The analysis was based on all patients with non-small cell lung cancer who were registered in 2008-2014; in total, 27 234 patients....... To estimate the effect of depression on the diagnostic process and the choice of treatment in lung cancer we fitted a logistic regression model and a Cox regression model adjusting for age, gender, resection and stage. RESULTS: Depression in a patient's anamnesis had no significant effect on the delay...... in diagnostic evaluation (hazard ratio = 0.99 with 95% confidence interval 0.90; 1.09). Patients with a history of periodic depression had a 33% lower treatment rate (odds ratio = 0.66 with 95% confidence interval 0.51; 0.85) than patients without a history of depression. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows...

  7. Depression and Anxiety in Obese Patients

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    Demet Gulec Oyekcin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Epidemiologic data suggests an association between obesity and depression. However, a limited number of studies have investigated the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among obese patients without a psychiatric diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine psychiatric diagnosis in patients with obesity who applied to the endocrinology department and to determine the pattern of the depression and anxiety symptom levels in obese patients without a psychiatric diagnosis.Materials and Methods: 62 patients with obesity (obesity group and 27 control subjects (control group attending the endocrinology outpatient clinic were included in the study. Body mass index was calculated and diagnostic psychiatric assessment carried out for all patients. All participants were evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAM-D] and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale [HAM-A].Results: Total scores obtained both from HAM-D and HAM-A were significantly greater in the obesity group than in the control group. The most common psychiatric diagnose among obese patients was depression. Nearly more than half of the obese patients without any psychiatric diagnosis marked one of the HAM-D items which describes depressed mood, guilt feeling, somatic anxiety, work and activity loss and general somatic symptoms as well as the items within the HAM-A scale which describes anxious mood, tension, cognitive difficulties, insomnia, depressed mood, somatic anxiety, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal and autonomic symptoms.Conclusion: Most common psychiatric diagnosis in patients with obesity was major depressive disorder. Obese patients who have not been diagnosed with any psychiatric disorder also show certain anxiety and depressive symptoms. The presence of anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients having any psychiatric disorder may be due to the psychosocial effects of obesity and these symptoms should be followed up in obese patients so that

  8. MEMORY SONGS DECREASE DEPRESSION FOR STROKE PATIENTS

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    Harmayetty Harmayetty

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biological, physical and phsycosocial changes in stroke patient could be a stressor that induced a depression state. There would be an emotional disturbance in stroke patient and stroke attack would be recurrent, if it was not treated. One of the alternative techniques to reduce depression is musical therapy especially memory songs. Method: This study was used a quasy experimental pre-post test purposive sampling design. The population was stroke patients who treated in Neurological Ward A and Stroke Unit Dr Soetomo Hospital Surabaya. There were 12 respondents divided into 6 respondents for treatment group and 6 respondents for control group. The independent variable was music (memory song and dependent variable was depression. Data were collected by using questionnaire which adapted from Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Geriatric Depression Rating Scale, then analyzed by using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Mann Whitney U Test with significance level α≤0.05. Result: The result showed that there was a difference between pre test and post test in depression (p=0.0196 and there was a difference in the depression between treatment group and control group (p=0.002. Discussion: It can be concluded that music (memory songs has an effect to the depression of stroke patient. Further studies are needed to concerning other factors that may affect the relaxation technique especially in listening music.

  9. Depression Among Sexually Transmitted Disease Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄长征; 李碧芳; 涂亚庭; 刘志香; 林能兴

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the depression status of patients with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).Methods: The depression status of fifty-one hospitalized STD patients was evaluated in a randomized control study using Zung's Quantitative Table. 18 healthy control patients with similar demographic backgrounds were randomly chosen as controls. Patients with scores above or equal to 40 were considered to be suffering from depression.Results: The prevalence rate of depression in the patient group was obviously higher than that of in the control (X2=16.456,P<0.01). Prevalence of depression was found to be significantly related to occupation (P<0.05). Though the prevalence was not found to differ significantly between those with a treatment course less than 2 months and those with one longer or equal to 2 months (X2=0.041, P>0.05), the mean depression scores of the former group were significantly higher than those of the latter (P<0.01). No significant differences were found between new versus relapsing disease, married versus non-married, male versus female, or differing educational backgrounds.Conclusion: STD patients showed significant prevalence of depression.

  10. Extreme sensory processing patterns show a complex association with depression, and impulsivity, alexithymia, and hopelessness.

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    Serafini, Gianluca; Gonda, Xenia; Canepa, Giovanna; Pompili, Maurizio; Rihmer, Zoltan; Amore, Mario; Engel-Yeger, Batya

    2017-03-01

    The involvement of extreme sensory processing patterns, impulsivity, alexithymia, and hopelessness was hypothesized to contribute to the complex pathophysiology of major depression and bipolar disorder. However, the nature of the relation between these variables has not been thoroughly investigated. This study aimed to explore the association between extreme sensory processing patterns, impulsivity, alexithymia, depression, and hopelessness. We recruited 281 euthymic participants (mean age=47.4±12.1) of which 62.3% with unipolar major depression and 37.7% with bipolar disorder. All participants completed the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP), Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), second version of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS), and Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS). Lower registration of sensory input showed a significant correlation with depression, impulsivity, attentional/motor impulsivity, and alexithymia. It was significantly more frequent among participants with elevated hopelessness, and accounted for 22% of the variance in depression severity, 15% in greater impulsivity, 36% in alexithymia, and 3% in hopelessness. Elevated sensory seeking correlated with enhanced motor impulsivity and decreased non-planning impulsivity. Higher sensory sensitivity and sensory avoiding correlated with depression, impulsivity, and alexithymia. The study was limited by the relatively small sample size and cross-sectional nature of the study. Furthermore, only self-report measures that may be potentially biased by social desirability were used. Extreme sensory processing patterns, impulsivity, alexithymia, depression, and hopelessness may show a characteristic pattern in patients with major affective disorders. The careful assessment of sensory profiles may help in developing targeted interventions and improve functional/adaptive strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Depressive rumination and cognitive processes associated with depression in breast cancer patients and their spouses.

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    Steiner, Jennifer L; Wagner, Christina D; Bigatti, Silvia M; Storniolo, Anna Maria

    2014-12-01

    Depression is common among patients with breast cancer (BC) and their spouses. The diagnosis of BC often results in negative cognitive processes, such as appraisals of harm/loss, intrusive thoughts, and depressive rumination, all of which contribute to the occurrence of depression in both the patient and spouse. The present research is a cross-sectional exploration of the mediating role of depressive rumination in the relationships of intrusive thoughts and appraisal of harm/loss with depression, in a sample of 56 BC patients and their partners. We hypothesized that depressive rumination would mediate the relationships between cognitive processes and depression in both BC patient and their partners. Participants completed self-report measures of depressive symptoms, depressive rumination, cognitive appraisals, and intrusive thoughts. Path analyses using hierarchical linear regression were conducted to assess the relationships among variables. Results indicated that for BC patients, harm/loss appraisals and intrusive thoughts had direct effects on depression; only harm/loss appraisals had indirect effects through depressive rumination. For partners, both harm/loss appraisal and intrusive thoughts had direct effects on depression, and both had indirect effects through depressive rumination. Dyadic analysis showed no relation of partner cognitive variables with patient depression or patient cognitive variables with partner depression. Findings show that the perseverative practice of dwelling on these negative thoughts of loss and harm relates to depressive symptoms. Rumination may act as 1 possible mechanism by which intrusive thoughts and harm/loss appraisals lead to depressive symptoms. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Nightmare in schizophrenic and depressed patients

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    Celestine Okorome Mume

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Nightmare is a common sleep disorder. While a sleep disorder such as insomnia can readily be associated with psychiatric disorders, the same cannot be said of nightmare. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of nightmare in a sample of psychiatric patients, and to compare this rate with the rate obtained in age- and sex- matched healthy control subjects in order to determine if there is a significant difference in the rates of nightmare in the different groups. Methods: Ninety - four randomly selected psychiatric patients made up of 54 schizophrenic patients and 40 depressed patients were recruited into the study. One hundred and twenty - three age- and sex- matched randomly selected control subjects were also recruited into the study. A questionnaire determining the one year prevalence of nightmare was administered to all the subjects. Each of them was required to indicate whether he or she had experienced nightmare in the previous one year and if so to indicate the number of episodes experienced during the said period. Results: The results showed prevalent rates of nightmare of 4.9%, 16.7% and 17.5% respectively for the healthy control subjects, schizophrenic patients and depressed patients. There was an overall prevalence rate of 17% among the psychiatric patients (schizophrenic patients and depressed patients as against 4.9% in the healthy control subjects. Among those who experienced nightmare, the mean values for the number of episodes within the previous one year were, respectively 18 (sd = 6.6 for healthy control subjects (n = 6, 42.7 (sd = 6.3 for schizophrenic patients (n = 9 and 44.6 (sd = 5.9 for depressed patients (n = 7. Conclusions: The findings in this study provide support for a significant association between nightmare and schizophrenia as well as nightmare and depressive illness. In effect, there is a significant association between nightmare and psychopathology.

  13. Depressed Back Pain Patients Often Get Opioids

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    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166796.html Depressed Back Pain Patients Often Get Opioids Study finds they are ... June 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with low back pain who are depressed are more likely to be ...

  14. Depression Often Untreated in Dialysis Patients

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    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163270.html Depression Often Untreated in Dialysis Patients Sometimes it's the ... 26, 2017 THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is common among kidney failure patients undergoing dialysis. ...

  15. Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery

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    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166427.html Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery: Study Screening for ... 9, 2017 FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression affects about one-third of hospital patients and ...

  16. Comparing cognitive and somatic symptoms of depression in myocardial infarction patients and depressed patients in primary and mental health care.

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    Nynke A Groenewold

    Full Text Available Depression in myocardial infarction patients is often a first episode with a late age of onset. Two studies that compared depressed myocardial infarction patients to psychiatric patients found similar levels of somatic symptoms, and one study reported lower levels of cognitive/affective symptoms in myocardial infarction patients. We hypothesized that myocardial infarction patients with first depression onset at a late age would experience fewer cognitive/affective symptoms than depressed patients without cardiovascular disease. Combined data from two large multicenter depression studies resulted in a sample of 734 depressed individuals (194 myocardial infarction, 214 primary care, and 326 mental health care patients. A structured clinical interview provided information about depression diagnosis. Summed cognitive/affective and somatic symptom levels were compared between groups using analysis of covariance, with and without adjusting for the effects of recurrence and age of onset. Depressed myocardial infarction and primary care patients reported significantly lower cognitive/affective symptom levels than mental health care patients (F (2,682 = 6.043, p = 0.003. Additional analyses showed that the difference between myocardial infarction and mental health care patients disappeared after adjusting for age of onset but not recurrence of depression. These group differences were also supported by data-driven latent class analyses. There were no significant group differences in somatic symptom levels. Depression after myocardial infarction appears to have a different phenomenology than depression observed in mental health care. Future studies should investigate the etiological factors predictive of symptom dimensions in myocardial infarction and late-onset depression patients.

  17. Recognizing depression in palliative care patients.

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    Noorani, Nazneen Hyder; Montagnini, Marcos

    2007-04-01

    Clinically significant depression is a common psychiatric disorder in patients with advanced and terminal diseases. Depression is often unrecognized and untreated and it causes major suffering to patients and families. Having adequate knowledge and skills to properly recognize depression in patients with advanced illnesses is essential for providing comprehensive end-of-life care. The objective of this paper is to review the key elements of the assessment of depression in palliative care patients. We also discuss the challenges of making the diagnosis, review the risk factors associated with depression and describe the features of the most common assessment tools that have been studied in this population. Finally, we highlight how to differentiate depression from normal grief, as the overlap between these conditions imposes a diagnostic challenge.

  18. Depression in cancer patients: a critical review

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    Pasquini Massimo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer patients experience several stressors and emotional upheavals. Fear of death, interruption of life plans, changes in body image and self-esteem, changes in social role and lifestyle are all important issues to be faced. Moreover, Depressive Disorders may impact the course of the disease and compliance. The cost and prevalence, the impairment caused, and the diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainty surrounding depressive symptoms among cancer patients make these conditions a priority for research. In this article we discuss recent data, focusing on detection of Depressive Disorders, biological correlates, treatments and unmet needs of depressed cancer patients.

  19. Pituitary gland volume in currently depressed and remitted depressed patients.

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    Lorenzetti, Valentina; Allen, Nicholas B; Fornito, Alex; Pantelis, Christos; De Plato, Giovanni; Ang, Anthony; Yücel, Murat

    2009-04-30

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with increased pituitary gland volume (PGV), which is thought to reflect stress-related dysregulation related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. However, it is unclear whether PGV alteration reflects a "dynamic" change related to current mood instability or if it is a stable marker of illness vulnerability. In this study we investigated PGV in currently depressed patients (cMDD) (n=31), remitted depressed patients (rMDD) (n=31) and healthy controls (n=33), using 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The groups were matched for age and gender. We found no significant PGV, intra-cranial volume (ICV) or whole brain volume (WBV) differences between cMDD patients, rMDD patients and healthy controls. Furthermore, PGV was not correlated with clinical features of depression (e.g., age of onset; number of episodes; and scores on subscales of the Beck Depression Inventory, the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, and the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire). In conclusion, PGV does not appear to be a marker of current or past MDD in adult patients.

  20. Borderline personality features in depressed or anxious patients.

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    Distel, Marijn A; Smit, Johannes H; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2016-07-30

    Anxiety and depression frequently co-occur with borderline personality disorder. Relatively little research examined the presence of borderline personality features and its main domains (affective instability, identity problems, negative relationships and self-harm) in individuals with remitted and current anxiety and depression. Participants with current (n=597) or remitted (n=1115) anxiety and/or depression and healthy controls (n=431) were selected from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Assessments included the Personality Assessment Inventory - Borderline Features Scale and several clinical characteristics of anxiety and depression. Borderline personality features were more common in depression than in anxiety. Current comorbid anxiety and depression was associated with most borderline personality features. Anxiety and depression status explained 29.7% of the variance in borderline personality features and 3.8% (self-harm) to 31% (identity problems) of the variance in the four domains. A large part of the variance was shared between anxiety and depression but both disorders also explained a significant amount of unique variance. The severity of anxiety and depression and the level of daily dysfunctioning was positively associated with borderline personality features. Individuals with a longer duration of anxiety and depression showed more affective instability and identity problems. These findings suggest that patients with anxiety and depression may benefit from an assessment of personality pathology as it may have implications for psychological and pharmacological treatment.

  1. Depression and anxiety in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate symptoms of depression and anxiety in the patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). METHODS: 76 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma participated in this program. All patients were rated with the self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and the self-rating depression scale (SDS). The mean scores of SAS and SDS were compared to those scores of the Norm of Chinese people. In addition, the different treatment results of the patients with different levels of anxiety and depression were studied. Further, the number of patients of SAS, SDS with more than 50 score were compared between primary cancer patients and recurrent cancer patients. RESULTS: The scores of SAS, SDS and the number of patients with more than 50 score in the patients group were obviously higher than those in Chinese Norm (P<0.01).The levels of anxiety and depression in 32 patients with recurrent cancer were more severe than those of 44 patients with primary cancer. The patients with anxiety and/or depression showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Anxiety and depression are common symptoms in patients with OSCC and have negative effects on the prognosis, thus the psychological intervention for the patients must be carried out.

  2. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

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    Winthorst Wim H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic groups 1 healthy controls 2 patients with a major depressive disorder, 3 patients with any anxiety disorder and 4 patients with a major depression and any anxiety disorder. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA. First, in 5549 patients from the NESDA primary care recruitment population the Kessler-10 screening questionnaire was used and data were analyzed across season in a multilevel linear model. Second, in 1090 subjects classified into four groups according to psychiatric status according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, overall depressive symptoms and atypical versus melancholic features were assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms. Anxiety and fear were assessed with the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Fear questionnaire. Symptom levels across season were analyzed in a linear regression model. Results In the primary care population the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms did not show a seasonal pattern. In the diagnostic groups healthy controls and patients with any anxiety disorder, but not patients with a major depressive disorder, showed a small rise in depressive symptoms in winter. Atypical and melancholic symptoms were both elevated in winter. No seasonal pattern for anxiety symptoms was found. There was a small gender related seasonal effect for fear symptoms. Conclusions Seasonal differences in severity or type of depressive and anxiety symptoms, as measured with a general screening instrument and symptom questionnaires, were absent or small in effect size in a primary care population and in patient populations with a major depressive disorder and

  3. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety.

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    Winthorst, Wim H; Post, Wendy J; Meesters, Ybe; Penninx, Brenda W H J; Nolen, Willem A

    2011-12-19

    Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic groups 1) healthy controls 2) patients with a major depressive disorder, 3) patients with any anxiety disorder and 4) patients with a major depression and any anxiety disorder. Data were used from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). First, in 5549 patients from the NESDA primary care recruitment population the Kessler-10 screening questionnaire was used and data were analyzed across season in a multilevel linear model. Second, in 1090 subjects classified into four groups according to psychiatric status according to the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, overall depressive symptoms and atypical versus melancholic features were assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms. Anxiety and fear were assessed with the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Fear questionnaire. Symptom levels across season were analyzed in a linear regression model. In the primary care population the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms did not show a seasonal pattern. In the diagnostic groups healthy controls and patients with any anxiety disorder, but not patients with a major depressive disorder, showed a small rise in depressive symptoms in winter. Atypical and melancholic symptoms were both elevated in winter. No seasonal pattern for anxiety symptoms was found. There was a small gender related seasonal effect for fear symptoms. Seasonal differences in severity or type of depressive and anxiety symptoms, as measured with a general screening instrument and symptom questionnaires, were absent or small in effect size in a primary care population and in patient populations with a major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders.

  4. Depression in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa

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    Onderdijk, A J; van der Zee, H H; Esmann, S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic recurrent inflammatory skin disease with abscess formation and scarring predominantly in the inverse areas. The disease is often difficult to treat and patients experience a decreased quality of life (QoL). It is hypothesized that depression...... is more common in HS patients than among other dermatological patients. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of depression in patients with HS. METHODS: In total 211 HS patients were included in the study and 233 were dermatological control patients. Their QoL and depression scores were assessed using...... the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) questionnaires. HS severity was recorded with a questionnaire and Hurley stages were extracted from the case records. RESULTS: The DLQI was significantly higher for HS patients than for the control patients, 8.4 ± 7.5 vs. 4.3 ± 5...

  5. Scans May Show Consciousness in 'Comatose' Patients

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    ... injury patients who have moved from hospitals to rehabilitation or nursing care facilities, this is the first such study to be conducted in ICU patients, according to the researchers. "Much more work ...

  6. Depression among type 2 diabetic patients

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    Taghreed Mohamed El-Shafie ,Entesar Omar A. El-Saghier and Iman ,Kamal Ramadan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Diabetes and depression are highly prevalent conditions and have significant impact on health outcomes. The combination of depression with type 2 diabetes is a public health problem. Therefore, we aimed to assess some socio-demographic characteristics of type 2 diabetes and to investigate the relationship between type 2 diabetes and depression among patients aged from 40 to 60 years old. Methods: 125 patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes attending diabetes clinics in the Al-Zahraa hospital were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. Patients were interviewed using structured questionnaires to gather data on socio-demographics, clinical, self care compliance, medication usage, and diabetes complications. The MADRS was administered as a screening tool for depression level evaluation. Binary logistic regression model was used to examine association between predictor variables and risk of depression among diagnosed type 2 diabetes at 95% C.I. and P < 0.05. Results: One hundred and twenty five participants completed the interview. More than half of participants were females (58.4% and the mean age was 48 (sd = 5.9, 47.2% hypertensive, and 59.2% on insulin. More than two third (74.4% of patients were depressed; (24.8% mild, 37.6% moderate and 12% severely depressed. Almost four out of five patients (88.8% had diabetes complications, Depression was strongly associated with neuropathy, age, retinopathy, sex and cardiac complications. However, the likelihood of depression was not associated with nephropathy, hypertension and sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: The current study demonstrates a strong correlation between depression and diabetes particularly complications. In particular, patients who are depressed tended to have poorer self-care, more severe physical symptoms and were less likely to adhere to prescribed care regimens. These findings raise the possibility that improving the mental health as part of a

  7. [Illness behavior and depression in tinnitus patients].

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    Schönweiler, R; Neuschulte, C; Paar, G H

    1989-05-01

    Tinnitus patients often complain of psychosomatic disorders and of problems in social life. We intended to prove the modulation of tinnitus perception by psychosocial factors. We examined 48 tinnitus patients, 35 with and 13 without hearing loss. A control group of 48 patients without tinnitus, without hearing disorder and without tumor disease was adapted to correspond to the tinnitus group in respect of age, sex and social factors. A quantitative assessment of complaints as well as of the intensity of depression was made via questionaires (Giessener Beschwerdebogen and Beck Depression Inventory). In tinnitus patients, we found a statistically significantly higher degree of complaints even for non-otological symptoms. They were statistically more depressive than the controls, but less than patients with endogenic depression usually are. Nevertheless, in tinnitus patients it seems to be reasonable to inquire after general symptoms of illness to assess whether cooperation with a psychiatrist is required before initiating somatic treatment.

  8. Screening for Depression In Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Reza ESMAEELI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract How to Cite This Article: Esmaeeli M, Erfani Sayar R, Saghebi A, Elmi Saghi, Rahmani Sh, Elmi S, Rabbani Javadi A. Screening for Depression in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:47-51. Objective In chronically ill children who are hospitalized, many mood changes occur. For example, in children with cancer or renal failure, prolonged hospitalization and chemotherapy can lead to depression. With the improved survival of childhood malignancies, the effect of treatment on child’s psychosocial well-being becomes increasingly relevant. In this study, we examined the prevalence of depression in hospitalized children with chronic and acute conditions in Dr Sheikh Pediatrics Hospital in Mashhad. Materials & Methods After receiving the approval from the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, we did this cross-sectional descriptive study, from April to June 2012 in Dr Sheikh Pediatric Hospital in Mashhad. Ninety children, aged between 8 to 16 years, were screened for depression. The sampling method was census. Children with a history of depressive or other mental disorders were excluded. Three groups of children (children with chronic renal disease, malignancy, and acute disease were evaluated for depression using standard Children Depression Inventory Questionnaire (CDI. Two specifically trained nurses with the supervision of a psychiatrist filled out the questionnaires at patients’ bedside. Depression scores were then analyzed by SPSS software. Results Of 90 children, 43(47.7% were male and 47(52.2% were female. The Children’s mean age was 11±2.3 years, and the mean length of hospitalization was 8±5.3 days. Depression was detected in various degrees in 63% of patients (N=57, and 36.6% of children (N=32 had no symptoms of depression. Severe depression was not seen in any of the patients with acute illness. More than half of patients with cancer and chronic kidney disease had

  9. Emotional recognition in depressed epilepsy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jesse G; Burton, Leslie A; Schaffer, Sarah G; Alper, Kenneth R; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William B

    2009-07-01

    The current study examined the relationship between emotional recognition and depression using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Second Edition (MMPI-2), in a population with epilepsy. Participants were a mixture of surgical candidates in addition to those receiving neuropsychological testing as part of a comprehensive evaluation. Results suggested that patients with epilepsy reporting increased levels of depression (Scale D) performed better than those patients reporting low levels of depression on an index of simple facial recognition, and depression was associated with poor prosody discrimination. Further, it is notable that more than half of the present sample had significantly elevated Scale D scores. The potential effects of a mood-congruent bias and implications for social functioning in depressed patients with epilepsy are discussed.

  10. Attribution style of patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leposavić Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The role of attribution in psychopathology has been investigated most systematically within the depression context. The presumption which makes people depressive consists, to an excessive degree, of internal, stable and global attributions to negative occurrences. Negative attributions for unpleasant events are associated with the loss of self-respect which follows. Objective Establishing the characteristics of attribution style of depressive patients. Methods The investigation included 62 subjects. The first group consisted of 32 patients with endogenous depression in remission. The second group included 30 healthy subjects. The characteristics of attribution style, in both groups, were tested by the Attribution Style Questionnaire (ASQ. Results The group of depressive patients, in comparison with healthy subjects, exhibited a significantly more marked internal attribution for negative events (t(60=-3.700; p<0.01 and global internal negative attributions (t(60=-4.023; p<0.01. There was no significant difference between the groups in the stability of these negative attributions (t(60=-1.937; p>0.05, and also the composite score which represents the measure of hopelessness did not make a significant difference between depressive and healthy subjects (t(60=-1.810; p>0.05. Conclusion Depressive patients exhibit an inclination towards internal and global attribution for negative events. These negative attributions do not have stable character, i.e. these attributions vary in time. Characteristics of attribution judgments of depressive people do not represent a permanent pattern within their cognitive style.

  11. Spouse-aided therapy with depressed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EmanuelsZuurveen, L; Emmelkamp, PMG

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-three non-maritally distressed depressed patients who were married or cohabitating were randomly assigned to either individual behavioral-cognitive therapy or spouse-aided treatment. Both treatment conditions focused on depressed mood, behavioral activity, and dysfunctional cognitions, the di

  12. Depressive features among adult patients receiving antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    general population;[11] therefore, the disease burden of HIV/AIDS is ... Globally, it is estimated that depressive features occur in 15 - 36% of people suffering from chronic .... ageing exposes HIV/AIDS patients to an increased risk of common.

  13. Assessment of depression in medical patients: A systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Pang Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available To perform a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory for detecting depression in medical settings, this article focuses on the revised version of the scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, which was reformulated according to the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. We examined relevant investigations with the Beck Depression Inventory-II for measuring depression in medical settings to provide guidelines for practicing clinicians. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria seventy articles were retained. Validation studies of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, in both primary care and hospital settings, were found for clinics of cardiology, neurology, obstetrics, brain injury, nephrology, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, oncology, and infectious disease. The Beck Depression Inventory-II showed high reliability and good correlation with measures of depression and anxiety. Its threshold for detecting depression varied according to the type of patients, suggesting the need for adjusted cut-off points. The somatic and cognitive-affective dimension described the latent structure of the instrument. The Beck Depression Inventory-II can be easily adapted in most clinical conditions for detecting major depression and recommending an appropriate intervention. Although this scale represents a sound path for detecting depression in patients with medical conditions, the clinician should seek evidence for how to interpret the score before using the Beck Depression Inventory-II to make clinical decisions.

  14. [Anxiety and depression of cancer patients hospitalized and at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellone, Ercole; Sinapi, Nadia; Piria, Paola; Bernardi, Francesca M; Dario, Lucia; Brunetti, Annarita

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anxiety and depression of cancer patients hospitalized and at home. Using a descriptive, correlational and comparative design and the Roy Adaptation Model, a sample of 80 oncologic patients was studied. Several instruments were used to measure anxiety and depression (HADS), quality of life and symptoms (RSCL), sociodemographic factors, variables connected to the hospitalization, quality of the relationship with health practitioners, family members and friends and the degree of satisfaction for the received information and support. The examined variables were measured on the same patients at hospital and at home. About the 30% of the patients were anxious and depressed. Statistical analysis showed that while anxiety did not change from the hospital to home, depression increased soon after the discharge and decreased over time and after the increasing of the number of hospital access. Anxiety and depression were positively correlated to boredom during the hospitalization, physical symptoms, number of the patients children, and previous anxious and depressive problems. Anxiety and depression were negatively correlated to the ward comfort, the support of health practitioners, family members and friends and the satisfaction for the received information. Differences between this study and the international literature are discussed. Recommendations for the future research and nursing practice are given.

  15. Psychosocial Functioning in Depressive Patients: A Comparative Study between Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Affective Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Major depressive disorder (MDD and bipolar affective disorder (BAD are among the leading causes of disability. These are often associated with widespread impairments in all domains of functioning including relational, occupational, and social. The main aim of the study was to examine and compare nature and extent of psychosocial impairment of patients with MDD and BAD during depressive phase. Methodology. 96 patients (48 in MDD group and 48 in BAD group were included in the study. Patients were recruited in depressive phase (moderate to severe depression. Patients having age outside 18–45 years, psychotic symptoms, mental retardation, and current comorbid medical or axis-1 psychiatric disorder were excluded. Psychosocial functioning was assessed using Range of Impaired Functioning Tool (LIFE-RIFT. Results. Domains of work, interpersonal relationship, life satisfaction, and recreation were all affected in both groups, but the groups showed significant difference in global psychosocial functioning score only (P=0.031 with BAD group showing more severe impairment. Conclusion. Bipolar depression causes higher global psychosocial impairment than unipolar depression.

  16. Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among patients with hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Bathla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The association between depression and thyroid function is well known. Both conditions express many similar symptoms, thus making the diagnosis and treatment difficult. Aims: To find the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among patients with hypothyroid. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methodology: A total of 100 patients diagnosed as hypothyroidism were evaluated using Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS and Hamilton scale for anxiety (HAM-A. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed using the SPSS for Windows version 17.0 software. The quantitative data were expressed in number and percentage. The results obtained were compared using the Chi-square test. Results: Females constituted 70% of the sample. A total of 60% reported some degree of depression based on HDRS (males – 56.63% and females – 64.29% whereas about 63% out of the total patients screened showed some degree of anxiety (males –56.66% and females – 65.72% based on HAM-A. The most common depressive symptom among the males was depressed mood (73.33% and among females was gastrointestinal somatic symptoms (68.54%. The most common anxiety symptom among the males was depressed mood (70.0% and among females was anxious mood (92.85%. Conclusions: Psychiatric symptoms/disorders are common in patients with thyroid dysfunction.

  17. Association between depression and survival in Chinese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qianqian; Zheng, Zhenzhen; Guo, Xiaoyan; Ou, Ruwei; Chen, Xueping; Huang, Rui; Yang, Jing; Shang, Huifang

    2016-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of depression, to identify correlated factors for depression, and to explore the impact on the progression or survival of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by depression in a Chinese population. A total of 166 ALS patients were recruited. Diagnosis of depression disorders and the severity of depression were established by using the fourth diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-24 items (HDRS-24) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Major depression was found in 15 patients (9.6 %). The multiple regression analysis showed that a lower ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) score was correlated with increasing HDRS scores and BDI scores (P = 0.018 and P = 0.012). No significant difference in the median survival time between ALS patients with and without depression was revealed by Kaplan-Meier analysis (log-rank P = 0.282). Cox hazard model showed that the presence of depression in ALS was unrelated to the survival, while the severity of depression in ALS was correlated with the survival. The presence and severity of depression in ALS did not correlate with the progression of ALS. Major depression in ALS is uncommon. Depression evaluation should be given to ALS patients, especially those with lower ALSFRS-R score. The severity of depression may be associated with the survival; however, depression does not worse the progression of ALS.

  18. Depression in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Borges Gonçalves

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the comorbidity of depressive disorders in patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. METHOD: We evaluated 25 consecutive patients with refractory TLE (16 women and 9 men, using semi-structured psychiatric interviews, according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10, and the Beck Depression Inventory. RESULTS: Seventeen of 25 patients (68% had depressive disorder: 6 with dysthymia, three with major depressive episodes and 8 with recurrent depressive disorders. Two (8% were diagnosed with mixed anxiety and depression. Only 5 of 17 patients (29.4% were previously diagnosed with depressive disorder and received prior antidepressant treatment. Duration of epilepsy was significantly higher in patients with depressive disorder (p=0.016, but there was no relationship between depression and seizure frequency. CONCLUSION: This study confirmed that depressive disorders are common and underdiagnosed in patients with TLE refractory to AEDs. Patients with longer duration of epilepsy are at higher risk of having depression.

  19. Resource Utilisation and Costs of Depressive Patients in Germany: Results from the Primary Care Monitoring for Depressive Patients Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Krauth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Depression is the most common type of mental disorder in Germany. It is associated with a high level of suffering for individuals and imposes a significant burden on society. The aim of this study was to estimate the depression related costs in Germany taking a societal perspective. Materials and Methods. Data were collected from the primary care monitoring for depressive patients trial (PRoMPT of patients with major depressive disorder who were treated in a primary care setting. Resource utilisation and days of sick leave were observed and analysed over a 1-year period. Results. Average depression related costs of €3813 were calculated. Significant differences in total costs due to sex were demonstrated. Male patients had considerable higher total costs than female patients, whereas single cost categories did not differ significantly. Further, differences in costs according to severity of disease and age were observed. The economic burden to society was estimated at €15.6 billion per year. Conclusion. The study results show that depression poses a significant economic burden to society. There is a high potential for prevention, treatment, and patient management innovations to identify and treat patients at an early stage.

  20. Psychotherapy for depression among patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatsuo

    2012-12-01

    Cancer causes profound suffering for patients, and previous reports have demonstrated that psychological distress, particularly depression, is frequently observed in advanced and/or terminally ill cancer patients. Such depression can lead to serious and far-reaching negative consequences in patients with advanced cancer: reducing their quality of life and causing severe suffering, a desire for early death, and suicide, as well as psychological distress in family members. For the management of their distress, cancer patients are more likely to prefer psychotherapeutic interventions to pharmacotherapy, and psychotherapy is known to be effective for the management of depression among advanced cancer patients. Hence, psychotherapy is an important treatment strategy for alleviating their depression. Furthermore, patients with advanced and/or terminal cancer suffer from various physical symptoms and are forced to face a continuous decline in physical function. In addition, psychological defense mechanisms such as denial are frequently observed in these patients. Hence, an individually tailored and careful psychotherapeutic approach should be followed, which considers the specific nature of the advanced and/or terminal cancer. This review focuses on psychological interventions that can be utilized in the clinical oncology practice to ameliorate depression among advanced and/or terminally ill cancer patients, rather than focusing on the level of evidence for each intervention. In addition, the current review introduces some novel therapeutic strategies that have not yet been proved to be effective but show promise for future studies.

  1. [Depression, social support and compliance in patients with chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutlinger, Julia; Müller-Tasch, Thomas; Schellberg, Dieter; Frankenstein, Lutz; Zugck, Christian; Herzog, Wolfgang; Lossnitzer, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Depressive patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) show less social integration and greater physical impairment as well as poorer compliance than non depressive CHF patients. Using multiple regression analyses, this study (n=84) investigated a potential mediating effect of depression on the relationship between compliance and both social support and physical functioning. Results did not support the hypothesized mediating effect of depression. However, the variables age, depression, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and social support were associated with self-reported compliance. Therefore, a lack of social support and depression should be considered as possible reasons, if patients are noncompliant during the treatment process. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Comorbid personality disorders among patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wongpakaran N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nahathai Wongpakaran, Tinakon Wongpakaran, Vudhichai Boonyanaruthee, Manee Pinyopornpanish, Suthi Intaprasert Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Purpose: To investigate the personality disorders (PDs diagnosed in patients with depressive disorders.Material and methods: This study included a cross-sectional analysis, and was an extension of the Thai Study of Affective Disorder (THAISAD project. Eighty-five outpatients with depressive disorders were interviewed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Inventory to assess for depression, in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision and using the Thai version of the Structured Clinical Interview for PDs to assess for PD.Results: Seventy-seven percent of the patients had at least one PD, 40% had one PD and 60% had two or more PDs (mixed cluster. The most common PDs found were borderline PD (20% and obsessive–compulsive PD (10.6%, while the occurrence of avoidant PD was low when compared to the findings of previous, related studies. Among the mixed cluster, cluster A combined with cluster C was the common mix. Both dysthymic disorder and double depression were found to have a higher proportion of PDs than major depressive disorder (85.7% versus 76.1%. Dependent PD was found to be less common in this study than in previous studies, including those carried out in Asia.Conclusion: The prevalence of PDs among those with depressive disorder varied, and only borderline PD seems to be consistently high within and across cultures. Mixed cluster plays a prominent role in depression, so more attention should be paid to patients in this category. Keywords: personality disorders, depressive disorder, prevalence, Asian, mixed cluster, SCID-II

  3. Parmacologic treatment of depression in patients with myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong-Hoon Ha; Cheuk-Kit Wong

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a common medical problem and is more prevalent among patients with coronary artery disease.Whether early detection and treatment of depression will enhance cardiovascular outcome is uncertain.Obviously,the safety and efficacy of the anti-depression drugs is an important link.This article reviews the pathophysiologic and behavioural links between depression and cardiovascular disease progression,the treatment of depression,and the potential benefits of anti-depressants in patients with coronary disease.

  4. Gender Differences among Patients with a Single Depressive Episode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2010-01-01

    , personality traits and disorders, stressful life events, family history, and treatment response. RESULTS: Female patients showed a higher level of neuroticism and more residual anxiety symptoms after treatment of the depression. There were no gender differences in severity of depression, psychiatric co...... in sociodemographic, clinical and treatment variables among patients suffering exclusively from single-episode depression. METHOD: Systematic recruitment of 301 participants via the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register and assessment by means of questionnaires and interviews regarding psychiatric diagnoses......-morbidity (including personality disorders), stressful life events prior to onset, family loading of psychiatric disorders, or treatment outcome. CONCLUSION: The results provide evidence for a higher level of anxiety and neuroticism among females with a recent onset of depression, whereas other clinical...

  5. Study of compulsive buying in depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejoyeux, M; Tassain, V; Solomon, J; Adès, J

    1997-04-01

    Compulsive buying is defined by the presence of repetitive impulsive and excessive buying leading to personal and familial distress. Patients with this disorder also suffer from mood disorder in 50% to 100% of the cases studied, and antidepressants help to decrease the frequency and the severity of uncontrolled buying. To define the correlation between compulsive buying and depression, we assessed this behavior among 119 inpatients answering to DSM-III-R criteria for major depressive episode. Additionally, we evaluated for comorbidity in the patients suffering from compulsive buying and in those free from this disorder. Impulsivity and sensation seeking were also compared in the two groups. Diagnosis of compulsive buying was made using standardized criteria and a specific rating scale. Diagnosis of depression and assessment of comorbidity were investigated using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and a modified version of the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview. All patients answered the Zuckerman Sensation-Seeking Scale and the Barrat Impulsivity Rating Scale. The prevalence of the disorder was 31.9%; 38 of the 119 depressed patients were diagnosed as compulsive buyers. Patients from the compulsive buying group were younger in age, more often women than men, and more frequently unmarried. They presented more often than others with recurrent depression (relative risk = 1.4), disorders associated with deficits in impulse control such as kleptomania (relative risk = 8.5) or bulimia (relative risk = 2.8), benzodiazepine abuse or dependence disorder (relative risk = 4.7), and two or more dependence disorders (relative risk = 1.99). Subscores for experience seeking using the Zuckerman Sensation-Seeking Scale were significantly higher (p = .04) and scores of impulsivity were much higher (p compulsive buying behavior. Compulsive buying is frequent among depressed patients. In most cases, the behavior is associated with other impulse control disorders or

  6. [Investigation of the effects of cytoflavin on symptoms of depression and autonomic dysfunction in patients with organic depressive disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkova, A N; Osinovskaia, N A; Polunina, A G; Gekht, A B

    2013-01-01

    The present observational study addressed effects of cytoflavin as an adjunctive nootropic therapy in patients with organic depressive disorder (F06.36). 54 female and 46 male in-patients were included into the study. All patients received standard antidepressant therapy (controls) and 48 patients additionally received 2 pills of cytoflavin twice per day. Age, gender distribution, education and severity of depression were equal in cytoflavin and control groups. The follow-up assessment at discharge showed a significantly more pronounced decline in the severity of depression symptoms in patients receiving cytoflavin in comparison with the controls. Importantly, the effect of cytoflavin on the depression symptoms was prominent only in females. Moreover, women receiving cytoflavin demonstrated the more pronounced normalization of autonomic regulation in comparison with control women. The present results allow to recommend cytoflavin in dose 4 pills daily as an adjunctive therapy in female patients with organic depressive disorder.

  7. Does Music Therapy Improve Anxiety and Depression in Alzheimer's Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rubia Ortí, José Enrique; García-Pardo, María Pilar; Cabañés Iranzo, Carmen; Cerón Madrigal, José Joaquin; Castillo, Sandra Sancho; Julián Rochina, Mariano; Prado Gascó, Vicente Javier

    2017-07-17

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of a short protocol of music therapy as a tool to reduce stress and improve the emotional state in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. A sample of 25 patients with mild Alzheimer's received therapy based on the application of a music therapy session lasting 60 min. Before and after the therapy, patient saliva was collected to quantify the level of salivary cortisol using the Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) immunoassay technique and a questionnaire was completed to measure anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). The results show that the application of this therapy lowers the level of stress and decreases significantly depression and anxiety, establishing a linear correlation between the variation of these variables and the variation of cortisol. A short protocol of music therapy can be an alternative medicine to improve emotional variables in Alzheimer patients.

  8. Personality disorders, depression, and coping styles in Argentinean bulimic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Vanesa C; van der Staak, Cees P F; Derksen, Jan J L

    2004-06-01

    This study investigates the coping styles of bulimic patients with personality disorders (PDs) and the effects of the level of depression on the relations between PDs and coping. The sample consisted of 75 Argentinean bulimic outpatients engaged in treatment. Patients completed the SCID II (Structural Interview for DSM IV-Personality Disorders), COPE (Coping Inventory), and the SCL-90-R (Symptom Checklist-90-Revised). No differences in the coping styles of bulimic patients with or without a PD were found. However, when three specific PDs were considered-Avoidant, Obsessive-Compulsive, or Borderline PDs-clear differences in the coping styles of the bulimics were found. However, the differences disappeared when depression was controlled. Regarding the severity of the three specific PDs, coping styles were only found to be associated with the Avoidant PD. Depression showed to affect the relations between coping styles and two specific PDs-Avoidant and Borderline PDs-in bulimic patients.

  9. Personality characteristics of depressed and non-depressed patients with Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damholdt, Malene Flensborg; Callesen, Mette Buhl; Møller, Arne

    2014-01-01

    traits as risk factors for depression. The personality profiles of 290 non-depressed and 119 depressed patients with PD were compared. The depressed patients were characterized by elevated neuroticism, reduced extroversion, and reduced conscientiousness and less convincing findings of reduced openness...... and agreeableness. The largest unique contribution to a regression analysis predicting depression was greater number of motor symptoms, increased neuroticism, and reduced extroversion....

  10. Screening for Depression In Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Reza ESMAEELI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Esmaeeli M, Erfani Sayar R, Saghebi A, Elmi Saghi, Rahmani Sh, Elmi S, Rabbani Javadi A. Screening for Depression in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:47-51. ObjectiveIn chronically ill children who are hospitalized, many mood changes occur. For example, in children with cancer or renal failure, prolonged hospitalization and chemotherapy can lead to depression. With the improved survival of childhoodmalignancies, the effect of treatment on child’s psychosocial well-being becomes increasingly relevant. In this study, we examined the prevalence of depression in hospitalized children with chronic and acute conditions in Dr Sheikh Pediatrics Hospital in Mashhad.Materials & MethodsAfter receiving the approval from the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, we did this cross-sectional descriptive study, from April to June 2012 in Dr Sheikh Pediatric Hospital in Mashhad. Ninety children, aged between 8 to 16 years, were screened for depression. The sampling method was census. Children with a history of depressive or other mental disorders were excluded.Three groups of children (children with chronic renal disease, malignancy, and acute disease were evaluated for depression using standard Children Depression Inventory Questionnaire (CDI. Two specifically trained nurses with the supervisionof a psychiatrist filled out the questionnaires at patients’ bedside. Depression scores were then analyzed by SPSS software.ResultsOf 90 children, 43(47.7% were male and 47(52.2% were female. The Children’s mean age was 11±2.3 years, and the mean length of hospitalization was 8±5.3 days.Depression was detected in various degrees in 63% of patients (N=57, and 36.6% of children (N=32 had no symptoms of depression. Severe depression was not seenin any of the patients with acute illness. More than half of patients with cancer and chronic kidney disease had moderate

  11. Overgeneral autobiographical memory at baseline predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with first-episode depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yansong; Zhang, Fuquan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Leiming; Wang, Jun; Na, Aiguo; Sun, Yujun; Zhao, Xudong

    2016-09-30

    Previous studies have shown that overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is a characteristic of depression. However, there are no studies to explore the association between baseline OGM and depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with first-episode depression (FE). This study investigated whether baseline OGM predicts depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with FE. We recruited 125 patients with FE. The participants were divided into remitted group and non-remitted group according to the severity of their depression at 12 months follow-up. The measures consisted of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Ruminative Response Scale, and Autobiographical Memory Test. Hierarchical linear regression analyses and bootstrap mediation analyses were conducted. The results showed that non-remitted patients had more OGM at baseline. Baseline OGM predicted depressive symptoms at follow-up in patients with FE. Rumination mediated the relationship between baseline OGM and depressive symptoms at follow-up. Our findings highlight OGM as a vulnerability factor involved in the maintenance of depression in patients with FE.

  12. Audiovisual emotional processing and neurocognitive functioning in patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eDoose-Grünefeld

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the processing of emotional stimuli (e.g. facial expressions, prosody, music have repeatedly been reported in patients with major depression. Such impairments may result from the likewise prevalent executive deficits in these patients. However, studies investigating this relationship are rare. Moreover, most studies to date have only assessed impairments in unimodal emotional processing, whereas in real life, emotions are primarily conveyed through more than just one sensory channel. The current study therefore aimed at investigating multi-modal emotional processing in patients with depression and to assess the relationship between emotional and neurocognitive impairments. 41 patients suffering from major depression and 41 never-depressed healthy controls participated in an audiovisual (faces-sounds emotional integration paradigm as well as a neurocognitive test battery. Our results showed that depressed patients were specifically impaired in the processing of positive auditory stimuli as they rated faces significantly more fearful when presented with happy than with neutral sounds. Such an effect was absent in controls. Findings in emotional processing in patients did not correlate with BDI-scores. Furthermore, neurocognitive findings revealed significant group differences for two of the tests. The effects found in audiovisual emotional processing, however, did not correlate with performance in the neurocognitive tests.In summary, our results underline the diversity of impairments going along with depression and indicate that deficits found for unimodal emotional processing cannot trivially be generalized to deficits in a multi-modal setting. The mechanisms of impairments therefore might be far more complex than previously thought. Our findings furthermore contradict the assumption that emotional processing deficits in major depression are associated with impaired attention or inhibitory functioning.

  13. Depressive patienters oplevelse af at modtage ECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christine Damsbo

    Dette studie handler om, hvordan det opleves for den voksne depressive patient at gennemgå et ECT-behandlingsforløb (electroconvulsive therapy). Formålet med projektet er dels at undersøge, hvordan processen omkring ECT-behandlingen udspiller sig og dels at undersøge patienternes oplevelse...

  14. Depression in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onderdijk, A. J.; van der Zee, H. H.; Esmann, S.; Lophaven, S.; Dufour, D. N.; Jemec, G. B. E.; Boer, J.

    Background Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic recurrent inflammatory skin disease with abscess formation and scarring predominantly in the inverse areas. The disease is often difficult to treat and patients experience a decreased quality of life (QoL). It is hypothesized that depression is

  15. Mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Maier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date, mental health professionals’ attitudes toward posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, compared to other psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression, have rarely been studied. Objective: We assessed mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD compared to patients suffering from depression. Method: Case vignettes of a patient with either PTSD or depression were presented to two samples of mental health professionals: attendees of a conference on posttraumatic stress (N=226 or of a lecture for psychiatry residents (N=112. Participants subsequently completed a questionnaire that assessed their attitude reactions to the presented case. Results: Participants showed similarly positive attitudes toward depression and PTSD. PTSD elicited a more favorable attitude with regard to prosocial reactions, estimated dependency, attributed responsibility, and interest in the case, particularly in mental health professionals specializing in psychotraumatology. Across diagnoses, higher age and longer professional experience were associated with more positive attitudes toward patients. Conclusions: Mental health professionals’ positive attitudes toward patients with depression and PTSD correlate with their specific knowledge about the disorder, their level of professional training, and their years of professional experience. Limitations: The instruments used, although based on established theoretical concepts in attitude research, were not validated in their present versions.

  16. Relationship between religiosity and psychopathology in patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swapnil; Avasthi, Ajit; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-10-01

    To compare the psychopathology between depressed patients with low religiosity and those with high religiosity and to correlate the level of religiosity with the psychopathology in the psychiatric clinic of a general hospital in Chandigarh, North India. Thirty depressed patients with low religiosity and 30 patients with high religiosity were assessed on the Religiosity Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale and Suicidal Intent Questionnaire. In the patients with depression, hopelessness and suicidal intent correlated negatively with the level of religiosity. In depressed patients, hopelessness and suicidal intent are inversely related to the level of religiosity.

  17. The effect of escitalopram on sleep problems in depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lader, M; Andersen, H F; Baekdal, T

    2005-07-01

    The results from three 8-week escitalopram studies in major depressive disorder are presented with respect to efficacy and the effect on sleep quality, both in the full population and the subpopulation of patients with sleep problems at baseline. Analysis of pooled data from these randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, studies in which citalopram was the active reference, showed a significant improvement for escitalopram-treated patients (n = 52.0) in the Montgomery-Asberg depression rating scale (MADRS) item 4 ('reduced sleep') scores at weeks 6 and 8 compared with placebo (n=398; p Escitalopram-treated patients with sleep problems (MADRS item 4 score > or = 4; n = 254) at baseline showed a statistically significant improvement in mean MADRS item 4 scores at weeks 4, 6 and 8 compared with patients treated with placebo (n = 191; p escitalopram treatment compared with citalopram at weeks 1, 4, 6 and 8 (observed cases) and endpoint (-2.45; last observation carried forward [LOCF]). Statistical significance in favour of escitalopram versus placebo treatment was found at all visits, including endpoint (-4.2; LOCF).Thus, these post-hoc analyses suggest that escitalopram has a significant beneficial effect compared with placebo or citalopram in reducing sleep disturbance in patients suffering from major depressive disorder. The effect of escitalopram in improving 'reduced sleep' scores was clearly seen in patients with more severe sleep disturbance at baseline. A further prospective study is needed to establish this useful clinical effect in insomniac depressives.

  18. Body Concept, Disability, and Depression in Patients with Spasmodic Torticollis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jahanshahi

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty-five patients with idiopathic spasmodic torticollis were compared with an equally chronic group of 49 cervical spondylosis sufferers in terms of body concept, depression, and disability. The torticollis patients were significantly more depressed and disabled and had a more negative body concept. Depression had different determinants in the two groups. Extent of disfigurement was a major predictor of depression in torticollis. Neuroticism accounted for the greatest proportion of the variance of depression in cervical spondylosis.

  19. Altered fecal microbiota composition in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haiyin; Ling, Zongxin; Zhang, Yonghua; Mao, Hongjin; Ma, Zhanping; Yin, Yan; Wang, Weihong; Tang, Wenxin; Tan, Zhonglin; Shi, Jianfei; Li, Lanjuan; Ruan, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Studies using animal models have shown that depression affects the stability of the microbiota, but the actual structure and composition in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are not well understood. Here, we analyzed fecal samples from 46 patients with depression (29 active-MDD and 17 responded-MDD) and 30 healthy controls (HCs). High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that, according to the Shannon index, increased fecal bacterial α-diversity was found in the active-MDD (A-MDD) vs. the HC group but not in the responded-MDD (R-MDD) vs. the HC group. Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria strongly increased in level, whereas that of Firmicutes was significantly reduced in the A-MDD and R-MDD groups compared with the HC group. Despite profound interindividual variability, levels of several predominant genera were significantly different between the MDD and HC groups. Most notably, the MDD groups had increased levels of Enterobacteriaceae and Alistipes but reduced levels of Faecalibacterium. A negative correlation was observed between Faecalibacterium and the severity of depressive symptoms. These findings enable a better understanding of changes in the fecal microbiota composition in such patients, showing either a predominance of some potentially harmful bacterial groups or a reduction in beneficial bacterial genera. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the temporal and causal relationships between gut microbiota and depression and to evaluate the suitability of the microbiome as a biomarker.

  20. Depression Treatment Preferences in Older Primary Care Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Amber M.; Arean, Patricia A.; Hunkeler, Enid; Tang, Lingqi; Katon, Wayne; Hitchcock, Polly; Steffens, David C.; Dickens, Jeanne; Unutzer, Jurgen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: For depressed older primary care patients, this study aimed to examine (a) characteristics associated with depression treatment preferences; (b) predictors of receiving preferred treatment; and (c) whether receiving preferred treatment predicted satisfaction and depression outcomes. Design and Methods: Data are from 1,602 depressed older…

  1. Depression Treatment Preferences in Older Primary Care Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Amber M.; Arean, Patricia A.; Hunkeler, Enid; Tang, Lingqi; Katon, Wayne; Hitchcock, Polly; Steffens, David C.; Dickens, Jeanne; Unutzer, Jurgen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: For depressed older primary care patients, this study aimed to examine (a) characteristics associated with depression treatment preferences; (b) predictors of receiving preferred treatment; and (c) whether receiving preferred treatment predicted satisfaction and depression outcomes. Design and Methods: Data are from 1,602 depressed older…

  2. Serum cytokines and anxiety in adolescent depression patients: Gender effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavi, Pooja; Sagar, Rajesh; Mehta, Manju; Sharma, Subhadra; Subramanium, Arulselvi; Shamshi, Farah; Sengupta, Utpal; Pandey, Ravindra M; Mukhopadhyay, Asok K

    2015-09-30

    The present study compares the serum cytokine levels between adolescent depression patients and healthy controls and assesses correlation between depression, anxiety scores and serum levels of eight cytokines. Study also checked the variation in serum levels with medication status (medication free/naïve vs. patients on medication). Following clinical and psychometric assessment of 77 adolescent (aged 13-18 years) depression patients (49 males and 28 females; 56 medication free/naïve) and 54 healthy controls (25 males, 29 females), eight cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, TGF-β1 and IL-17A {denoted IL-17 throughout}) were measured in serum using ELISA. Depressed adolescents had significantly high levels of IL-2 (pcytokine (IL-6) in patients. Anxiety scores showed positive correlation (only in female patients) with IL-1β, IL-10 and negative correlation with TGF-β1 and IL-17. The gender effect in relationship between anxiety and cytokines was not straightforward. On comparing study groups on the medication/naïve status, IL-2 and TGF-β1 showed significant difference between the groups (pcytokines with a gender bias for females. Anxiety scores correlated negatively with TGF-β1 and IL-17.

  3. A systematic review of instruments to measure depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lako, Irene M.; Bruggeman, R.; Knegtering, H.; Wiersma, D.; Schoevers, R. A.; Slooff, C. J.; Taxis, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Depressive symptoms require accurate recognition and monitoring in clinical practice of patients with schizophrenia. Depression instruments developed for use in depressed patients may not discriminate depressive symptoms from negative psychotic symptoms. Objective: We reviewed depression

  4. Influence of depression on the quality of life in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavić Slađana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic hepatitis C reduces the quality of life in patients causing fatigue, loss of self-confidence, reduced working capacity, development of depression, emotional problems, and cognitive dysfunction. Objective. The aim of the study was to identify the presence of depression in patients with chronic hepatitis C, predicting factors for its expression, and the impact of depression on the quality of life in these patients. Methods. During the prospective study, we used the Hamilton depression scale to investigate the presence of depression, generic 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and Chronic Liver Diseases Questionnaire (CLDQ to examine the quality of life in 100 patients with chronic hepatitis C, 30 patients with chronic hepatitis B, 30 patients with chronic liver disease non- viral aetiology and 50 healthy persons. Results. A significantly higher presence of depression, and cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic hepatitis C were noted as compared to the healthy individuals (p=0.00. In relation to non-viral patients with chronic liver disease, depression was significantly less present (p=0.004. Depression was rare in younger patients. The largest number of patients with chronic hepatitis C was without depression. The presence of depression caused deterioration of the physical and mental components of the quality of life. Multivariate analysis showed that the most significant positive predictive factor for the presence of depression was married life (B=0.278; SE=0.094; p=0.004. Conclusion. The presence of depression was more often in patients with chronic hepatitis C viral infection compared to healthy population and was correlated with decline in the quality of life. Depression is more pronounced in the elderly and intravenous drug addicts. The lowest depression is expected in patients who are not married.

  5. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Symptoms of Depression among Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Frazier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence of self-reported depressive symptoms and the self reported somatic depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II among patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and explored the impact of gender on both. A convenience sample of 789 adults (248 women and 541 men was recruited for the study during hospital admission for ACS and participants were screened for self-reported depressive symptoms. BDI-II scores of ≥14 indicate a moderate level of depressive symptoms and this cut-off score was used to categorize patients into depressed and non-depressed groups. Pearson chi-square tests for independence (categorical variables and t tests for independent samples (continuous variables were used for gender comparisons. Results showed that depressive symptoms during ACS episodes were different between women and men. Women reported greater overall depressive symptoms (BDI-II mean = 11.89, S.D. = 9.68 than men (BDI-II mean = 9.00, S.D. = 7.93 (P<0.000. Significantly more women (7.66% were identified positive for somatic depressive symptoms (sleep and appetite disturbances and fatigue than men (2.22% (P=0.0003. Findings support that there are gender differences in depressive symptoms experienced by patients hospitalized for ACS. Somatic symptoms of depression may be important indicators of depression especially among female ACS patients.

  6. Cognitive Functions and Depression in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per G. Farup

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is associated with depression and depression with impaired cognitive functions. The primary aim was to study associations between depression and cognitive functions in patients with IBS. Methods. IBS (according to the Rome III criteria, cognitive functions (evaluated with a set of neuropsychological tests, and depression (measured with Beck Depression Inventory II and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Scale were analysed in patients with idiopathic depression and in patients with unspecified neurological symptoms. Results. 18 and 48 patients with a mean age of 47 and 45 years were included in the “Depression” and “Neurological” group, respectively. In the “Depression” group, the degree of depression was significantly higher in patients with IBS than in those without. Depression was associated with impaired cognitive function in 6 out of 17 neuropsychological tests indicating reduced set shifting, verbal fluency, attention, and psychomotor speed. IBS was statistically significantly associated with depression but not with any of the tests for cognitive functions. Conclusions. IBS was associated with depression but not with impaired cognitive functions. Since the idiopathic depression was associated with cognitive deficits, the findings could indicate that the depression in patients with IBS differs from an idiopathic depression.

  7. Neuroendocrinal study of depression in male epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Samah; Fadel, Wael; Morad, Heba; Eldod, Abdo; Gad, Elsayed; Arfken, Cynthia L; Samra, Abou; Boutros, Nash

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine changes are reported in both epilepsy and depression. The interrelationships between mood, epilepsy, and endocrine changes are not well characterized. The authors included 40 epileptic patients (20 depressed, 20 nondepressed) and 20 healthy subjects. All patients had an electroencephalogram, and were given the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. All subjects were tested for serum levels of cortisol, prolactin, testosterone, and thyroid hormones. Patients were medication-free. Patients had elevated prolactin and cortisol and reduced serum testosterone relative to control subjects. Depressed patients had higher cortisol levels than nondepressed. Data suggest that the effects of epilepsy and depression on cortisol, but not other hormones, may be additive.

  8. Female rats exposed to stress and alcohol show impaired memory and increased depressive-like behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, J L; Luine, V N

    2014-01-17

    Exposure to daily life stressors is associated with increases in anxiety, depression, and overall negative affect. Alcohol or other psychoactive drugs are often used to alleviate stress effects. While females are more than twice as likely to develop mood disorders and are more susceptible to dependency than males, they are infrequently examined. In this study, female rats received no stress/no alcohol control (CON), alcohol alone (ALC), stress alone (STR), or stress plus alcohol (STR+ALC). Stress consisted of restraint for 6h/day/7days, and alcohol was administered immediately following restraint via gastric gavage at a dose of 2.0g/kg. Dependent measures included tests utilizing object recognition (OR), Y-maze, elevated plus maze (EPM), forced swim (FST), blood alcohol content, corticosterone levels, and body weights. ALC, STR+ALC, but not stress alone, impaired memory on OR. All treatments impaired spatial memory on the Y-maze. Anxiety was not affected on the EPM, but rats treated with alcohol or in combination with stress showed increased immobility on the FST, suggestive of alcohol-induced depression. Previously, we found alcohol reversed deleterious effects of stress on memory and mood in males, but current results show that females reacted negatively when the two treatments were combined. Thus, responses to alcohol, stress and their combination suggest that sex specific treatments are needed for stress-induced behavioral changes and that self-medicating with alcohol to cope with stress maybe deleterious in females.

  9. Executive functions in young patients with unipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Totić-Poznanović Sanja

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological deficits associated with unipolar depression are seen in a broad range of cognitive domains. Executive deficits may be prominent in depression. Investigation of executive functions in younger adult patients with unipolar depression has been the focus of our study. Twenty-two consecutively depressive inpatients (24-36 years and 21 healthy control subjects, matched on age, gender, education and verbal IQ were included in the study. Neuropsychological tests for executive functions were applied to all subjects. Unipolar young depressives showed significantly reduced number of completed categories and more trials for completion of the first category on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST. No difference of tasks assessing the short-term memory, total errors on WCST, perseverative and non-perseverative errors, and of both phonemic and semantic conditions of verbal fluency was found between groups. The results suggested that unipolar depressives had specific cognitive style characterized by "negative cognitive set" (stronger negative reaction to negative feedback and by failure to use negative feedback to improve their performance.

  10. Sulpiride Psychopharmacotherapy in Patients with Alcohol Addiction and Depression Comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Depression is quite common in the early stage of treatment for alcohol addiction. The patient's awareness of his difficult situation may be one of the reasons for depression. Furthermore, depression can develop as the result of depressive disorders that are primarily or secondarily associated with alcohol addiction. Antidepressive therapy is usually initiated after a two-week detoxification procedure. Only exceptionally it may start earlier in case of severe depressive disorder. The administr...

  11. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Winthorst Wim H; Post Wendy J; Meesters Ybe; Penninx Brenda WHJ; Nolen Willem A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic groups 1) healthy controls 2) patients with a major depressive disorder, 3) patients with any anxiety disorder and 4) patients with a major depression and any anxiety disorder. Methods Data...

  12. Depression and quality of sleep in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trbojević-Stanković Jasna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sleep disorders and psychological disturbances are common in end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients. However, despite their frequency and importance, such conditions often go unnoticed, since all patients do not clearly manifest fully expressed symptoms. Objective. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression and poor sleep quality and to examine the association between these disorders and demographic, clinical and treatment-related characteristics of ESRD patients on hemodialysis (HD. Methods. The study included 222 patients (132 men and 90 women, mean age 57.3±11.9 years, from 3 HD centers in Central Serbia, which provided us with biochemical parameters and demographic data. Sleep quality and depression were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, respectively. Results. The average BDI was 16.1±11.3. Depressed patients were significantly older (p=0.041, had a significantly lower dialysis adequacy (p=0.027 and a significantly worse quality of sleep (p<0.001, while they did not show significant difference as regarding sex, employment, marital status, comorbidities, dialysis type, dialysis vintage, shift and laboratory parameters. The average PSQI was 7.8±4.5 and 64.2% of patients were poor sleepers. Poor sleepers were significantly older (p=0.002, they were more often females (p=0.027 and had a significantly higher BDI (p<0.001, while other investigated variables were not correlated with sleep quality. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between BDI and PSQI (r=0.604; p<0.001. Conclusion. Depression and poor sleep quality are frequent and interrelated among HD patients.

  13. Impact of depression, fatigue and disability on quality of life in Chinese patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kelong; Fan, Yongping; Hu, Rui; Yang, Tao; Li, Kangning

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and analyze the main factors that influence the quality of life (QOL) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The QOL (multiple sclerosis impact scale), disability (expanded disability status scale), fatigue (modified fatigue impact scale) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory) were assessed in 100 MS patients. Correlation analysis shows that QOL is positively correlated with disability status, fatigue and depression, i.e., the more severe the disability, fatigue and depression, the worse the QOL. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that Expanded Disability Status Scale grade and fatigue have important predictive value on the somatic QOL of MS patients. On the other hand, depression and fatigue have important predictive value on the mental QOL of MS patients. The QOL of MS patients is influenced by various factors, nursing care that focuses on patient disability, fatigue and depression should be strengthened. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Prevalence of symptoms of depression among patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chronic kidney disease (CKD) and these include depression, dementia ..... mortality among patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure. Am J ... quality of life, depressive symptoms, anemia, and malnutrition at hemodialysis initiation.

  15. Utilization of health care services by depressed patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... that patients with depression are high utilizers of medical services. Objectives: The ... people's health and quality of life. It accounts for more than ..... Charlson ME, et al. Depression and service utilization in elderly primary care.

  16. Autobiographical memory specificity in patients with tinnitus versus patients with depression and normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gerhard; Hesser, Hugo; Cima, Rilana F F; Weise, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    Several studies show that patients with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder respond with fewer specific autobiographical memories in a cued memory task (i.e. the autobiographical memory test; AMT) compared to healthy controls. One previous study found this phenomenon among tinnitus patients as well (Andersson, Ingerholt, & Jansson, 2003). The aim of this study was to replicate the previous study with an additional control group of depressed patients and memory errors as measured with the AMT as an additional outcome. We included 20 normal hearing tinnitus patients, 20 healthy controls and 20 persons diagnosed with clinical depression. The AMT was administered together with self-report measures of depression, anxiety and tinnitus distress. Both the tinnitus and depression groups differed from the healthy control group in that they reported fewer specific autobiographical memories. There were, however, differences between the tinnitus and depression groups in terms of the errors made on the AMT. The depression group had more overgeneral memories than the normal control group, whereas the tinnitus group did not differ from the control group on this memory error. The tinnitus group had more semantic associations and non-memories than the other two groups, suggesting that executive functioning may play a role for the tinnitus group when completing the AMT. Clinical and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

  17. Sensitivity and specificity of the Distress Thermometer for depression in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Mark T; Collins, E Dale; Kearing, Stephen; Gillock, Karen L; Moore, Caroline P; Ahles, Tim A

    2008-06-01

    Receiving a new diagnosis of breast cancer is a distressing experience that may precipitate an episode of major depressive disorder. Efficient screening methods for detecting depression in the oncology setting are needed. This study evaluated the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) of the single-item Distress Thermometer (DT) for detecting depression in women newly diagnosed with Stage I-III breast cancer. We assessed 321 patients (of 345 consecutive patients) at the time of their pre-surgical consultation at a Comprehensive Breast Cancer Program. Patients were administered the DT along with the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-Item Depression Module (PHQ-9) as a gold standard diagnostic assessment of depression status. Mean DT scores (11-point scale, 0-10) were significantly higher for depressed versus non-depressed patients (8.1 versus 4.4). In ROC analyses the DT showed strong discriminatory power relative to the PHQ-9-derived diagnosis of depression, with an area under the curve of 0.87. Patient age, education, marital status and stage of disease resulted in similar operating characteristics. A score of 7 represented the optimal trade-off between sensitivity (0.81) and specificity (0.85) characteristics for detecting depression. The single-item DT performs satisfactorily relative to the PHQ-9 for detecting depression in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. A cutoff score of 7 on the DT possesses the optimal sensitivity and specificity characteristics. The strength of these findings suggests that a careful psychosocial evaluation should follow a positive screen.

  18. A comparison of the major depression inventory (MDI) and the beck depression inventory (BDI) in severely depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konstantinidis, Anastasios; Martiny, Klaus; Bech, Per

    2011-01-01

    We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression.......We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression....

  19. Acupoints Stimulation for Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients: A Quantitative Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at concluding the current evidence on the therapeutic effects of acupoints stimulation for cancer patients with anxiety and depression. Randomized controlled trials using acupoints stimulation for relieving anxiety and/or depression in cancer patients were searched, and 11 studies were finally included, of which eight trials compared acupoints stimulation with standard methods of treatment/care, and acupoints stimulation showed significantly better effects in improving depress...

  20. The Survey of Depression Frequency in Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Araghchian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Despite the high prevalence of depression and hypertension, the relationship between these disorders has received little attention. Some prospective studies indicate that depression poses a risk factor for hypertension. Depression has been found to be associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. The present study was conducted to examine the prevalence of depression in hypertensive patients' refering to medical and health centers in Hamadan city.Materials & Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional study 525 hypertensive patients who referred to the medical and health centers of Hamadan city in 2008 were studied. Depression status was evaluated by Beck depression inventory. Obtaining a score higher than 18 indicated depression. The data were analyzed with SPSS software(version 10 , chi-square and parson regression coefficient tests Results: Depression prevalence in the hypertensive patients was 48.6%. Positive correlation was detected between age and score of depression(r=0.56 P.V=0.000. The rate of depression was significantly higher in the females than the males (2=34 P.V=<0.5. Depression prevalence in the lower socioeconomic classes and the widows were higher than in the married and high class patients (P.V<0.05.Conclusion: Hypertensive patients are prone to depression. The lifetime co- morbidity of two diseases is significantly higher in females than males. The presence of a positive correlation between hypertension and depression indicates that hypertension is a risk factor for developing depression .High prevalence of depression suggests the need for depression screening and neurological consultation in hypertensive patients.

  1. Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients: The Association with Religiosity and Religious Coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Guan Chong; Mohamed, Salina; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Zainal, Nor Zuraida

    2017-04-01

    There is a lack of studies looking into religiosity and religious coping in cancer patient. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the religiosity using Duke University Religion Index, religious coping using Brief Religious Coping Scale, anxiety and depression based on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale among 200 cancer patients. The association between religiosity and religious coping with anxiety and depression was studied. The findings showed that subjects with anxiety or depression used more negative religious coping and had lower non-organization religiosity. Hence, measurements in reducing negative religious coping and encouraging religious activities could help to reduce psychological distress in cancer patients.

  2. Comparison of two anesthetic induction methods:ketamin and thiopental Na for ECT in major depression disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Barkhori

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: . Severity of depression and seizure duration changes showed that ketamin is better than thiopental Na. Thus, it seems that ketamin administration can be used as an alternative method of anesthesia in depression patients that candidate for ECT..

  3. THE VALIDITY OF THE HAMILTON DEPRESSION RATING SCALE AS A SCREENING AND DIAGNOSTIC INSTRUMENT FOR DEPRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koraliya S. Todorova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the concurrent validity of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17 against ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder and its performance as a screening and diagnostic tool for depression in patients with epilepsy (PWE.Subjects and Methods: One hundred and six PWE underwent clinical psychiatric examination followed by evaluation on HAMD-17. ICD-10 criteria for comorbid depressive disorder were applied. Internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach’s α. A “receiver operating characteristics” (ROC curve was obtained and the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV were calculated for different cut-off points of the HAMD-17.Results: Internal consistency measured by Cronbach’s α was 0.74. Maximal discrimination between depressed and non depressed was obtained at a cut-off score of 8/9 (sensitivity 0.93, specificity 0.98. High sensitivity and NPV at the same cut-off score (sensitivity 0.93, NPV 1.0 show the screening properties, and high specificity and PPV at cut-offs 9/10, the diagnostic properties of the instrument. The area under the ROC curve (AUC=0.746 indicates the concurrent validity of the HAMD-17 score with the ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder.Conclusion: The validity of the HAMD-17 against ICD-10 criteria for depressive disorder in PWE in our study is fair. The concurrent administration of diagnostic criteria can ascertain the presence of core symptoms of depression.

  4. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, Frans

    2017-01-01

    There is ample evidence that depression is000  a common comorbid health issue in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Reviews have also concluded that depression in diabetes is associated with higher HbA1c levels, less optimal self-care behaviours, lower quality of life, incident vascular...... complications and higher mortality rates. However, longitudinal studies into the course of depression in people with type 1 diabetes remain scarce. In this issue of Diabetologia, Kampling and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4123-0 ) report the 5 year trajectories of depression in adults with newly diagnosed...... type 1 diabetes (mean age, 28 years). Their baseline results showed that shortly after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes a major depressive episode was diagnosed in approximately 6% of participants, while 8% suffered from an anxiety disorder. The longitudinal depression data showed that, in a 5 year...

  5. High Risk of Depressive Disorders in Patients With Gout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changchien, Te-Chang; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic abnormalities are common in patients with depressive disorders. However, the relationship between gout and depression is unclear. We explored the causal relationship among gout, antigout medication, and the associated risk of incidental depressive disorders. In this nationwide cohort study, we sampled data from the National Health Insurance Research Database to recruit 34,050 patients with gout as the gout cohort and 68,100 controls (without gout) as the nongout cohort. Our primary endpoint was the diagnosis of depressive disorders during follow-up. The overall study population was followed up until depression diagnosis, withdrawal from the NHI program, or the end of the study. The differences in demographic and clinical characteristics between both cohorts were determined using the Chi-square test for categorical variables and the t-test for continuous variables. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the effect of gout on the risk of depression, represented using the hazard ratio with the 95% confidence interval. Patients with gout exhibited a higher risk of depressive disorders than controls did. The risk of depressive disorders increased with age and was higher in female patients and those with hypertension, stroke, and coronary artery disease. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug and prednisolone use was associated with a reduced risk of depression. Patients with gout who had received antigout medication exhibited a reduced risk of depressive disorders compared with nongout patients. Our findings support that gout increases the risk of depressive disorders, and that antigout medication use reduces the risk. PMID:26717394

  6. Patient specific modelling in diagnosing depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a very common disease. Approximately 10% of people in the Western world experience severe depression during their lifetime and many more experience a mild form of depression. It is commonly believed that depression is caused by malfunctions in the biological system constituted...

  7. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options for depression and depressive symptoms in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania S. Grigoriou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a mental disorder with a high prevalence among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD. It is reported that depression afflicts approximately 20-30% of this patient population, being associated, amongst other, with high mortality rate, low adherence to medication and low perceived quality of life. There is a variety of medications known to be effective for the treatment of depression but due to poor adherence to treatment as well as due to the high need for medications addressing other ESRD comorbidities, depression often remains untreated. According to the literature, depression is under-diagnosed and undertreated in the majority of the patients with chronic kidney disease. In the current review the main pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches and research outcomes for the management of depressive symptoms in hemodialysis patients are discussed.

  8. Depression Screening and Patient Outcomes in Cancer : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Anna; Roseman, Michelle; Milette, Katherine; Coyne, James C.; Stefanek, Michael E.; Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Arthurs, Erin; Leavens, Allison; Palmer, Steven C.; Stewart, Donna E.; de Jonge, Peter; Thombs, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several practice guidelines recommend screening for depression in cancer care, but no systematic reviews have examined whether there is evidence that depression screening benefits cancer patients. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in cancer pati

  9. The prevalence and pharmacotherapy of depression in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, Chong Guan; Boks, Marco P. M.; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; de Wit, Niek J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Depression is a frequent and serious comorbid condition in cancer patients that may require special attention. We investigate the prevalence of depression in cancer and review the current state of evidence regarding the effectiveness of drug treatment of depression in this group. Methods

  10. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-27

    Abstract Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  11. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-01

    Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  12. Evaluation of Anxiety and Depressive Levels in Tinnitus Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Chang Gun; Chi, Jun Hyuk; Song, Jae-Jun; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Kim, Bo Hae

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the relationship between tinnitus and the level of anxiety and depression experienced by subjective tinnitus patients, and to determine the effect of the level of anxiety and depression to the results of tinnitus treatment. Subjects and Methods A total of 104 patients were included in this study. All the patients conducted Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State Trait Anxiety Inventory 1, 2 (ST...

  13. The Effects of Music Therapy on Anxiety and Depression of Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasemi, Madineh; Aazami, Sanaz; Zabihi, Roghaieh Esmaili

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Cancer patients often suffer from anxiety and depression. Various methods are used to alleviate anxiety and depression, but most of them have side effects. Music therapy can be used as a noninvasive method to reduce anxiety and depression. This study aimed to examine the effect of music therapy on anxiety and depression in patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted attaching hospitals in Urmia city. A total number of sixty patients with depression and anxiety were recruited using random sampling method and divided into two groups of control and intervention. Patients in intervention group listened to light music at least 20 min per day for 3 days. The degree of patients’ anxiety and depression was assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at baseline and 3 days after music therapy. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using t-test, Pearson, and ANOVA tests. Results: The results showed no significant differences between demographic variable of intervention and control groups. Our findings indicated a significant decrease in the level of depression and anxiety among intervention group. There were significant relationships between anxiety, depression, and sex (P music therapy on decreasing level of depression and anxiety in patients with cancer. Therefore, it is recommended to include music therapy in the nursing care. PMID:27803568

  14. DEPRESSED-PATIENTS PARENTAL REPRESENTATIONS - STABILITY ACROSS CHANGES IN DEPRESSED MOOD AND SPECIFICITY ACROSS DIAGNOSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GERLSMA, C; DAS, J; EMMELKAMP, PMG

    1993-01-01

    Parental representations of a Dutch sample of psychiatric patients with diagnoses of dysthymia and unipolar depression were compared with those of a matched sample of non-depressed patients and a matched sample of healthy controls. No differences in recalled parental rearing styles were found betwee

  15. Depression and hopelessness in Turkish patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Sevban; Celebioglu, Ayda; Tezel, Ayfer

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the levels of depression and hopelessness of patients receiving chemotherapy. Through knowledge of the levels of hopelessness and depression in such patients, this study could contribute to the planning of nursing interventions. The study involved 101 patients with cancer who presented to the outpatient unit of a medical oncology clinic to receive outpatient chemotherapy between January and March 2006. Data on the patients' sociodemographic features, as well as their scores on the Beck Hopelessness Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory, were obtained. The patients' mean total depression score was 16.0 +/- 8.3 and their mean hopelessness score was 6.9 +/- 3.4. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between depression and hopelessness. The results indicated that depression and hopelessness were strongly and positively correlated.

  16. Reducing depression level of diabetes mellitus patient by psychoeducation by means of poster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wachidah Yuniartika

    2016-08-01

    Results: This study showed that depression level for respondents in intervention group before intervention was in mild category, with the average value of 7.80, then after received psychoeducation therapy, the average value declined 3.60 points to 4.20 (no depression and P value 0.000. In control group, the depression level was in mild category, with the average value of 8.15, these value decreased by 0.2 points to 7.98 (still in mild depression after post test with P value 0.464. The depression level of Diabetes Mellitus patient who received psychoeducation declined significantly compared to the patient in control group. Conclusions: Psychoeducation intervention had significant effect on reducing depression level for Diabetes Mellitus patient. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3348-3353

  17. Depressive and paradepressive symptoms clinical features in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Sincha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia, etiology and pathogenesis of which is still not completely uncovered and cause number of complications, decrease quality of life and hinder rehabilitation of the patients. Materials and metods. In order to establish depression and paradepressive symptoms features in patients with schizophrenia the next methods were used: clinical- psychopathological, anamnestic and catamnestic methods. 107 patients with schizophrenia (F20 and 30 patients with schizoaffective disorder, mixed type (F25 were examined. Conclusion. Correlative relationship between depressive, hallucinatory-delusional, deficits and neuroleptic manifestations symptoms has been indicated. factors of induction and amplification of depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia were determined. Ethiopsychopathogenic variants of depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia were obtained.

  18. Vicarious experience affects patients' treatment preferences for depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth A Berkowitz

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Depression is common in primary care but often under-treated. Personal experiences with depression can affect adherence to therapy, but the effect of vicarious experience is unstudied. We sought to evaluate the association between a patient's vicarious experiences with depression (those of friends or family and treatment preferences for depressive symptoms. METHODS: We sampled 1054 English and/or Spanish speaking adult subjects from July through December 2008, randomly selected from the 2008 California Behavioral Risk Factor Survey System, regarding depressive symptoms and treatment preferences. We then constructed a unidimensional scale using item analysis that reflects attitudes about antidepressant pharmacotherapy. This became the dependent variable in linear regression analyses to examine the association between vicarious experiences and treatment preferences for depressive symptoms. RESULTS: Our sample was 68% female, 91% white, and 13% Hispanic. Age ranged from 18-94 years. Mean PHQ-9 score was 4.3; 14.5% of respondents had a PHQ-9 score >9.0, consistent with active depressive symptoms. Analyses controlling for current depression symptoms and socio-demographic factors found that in patients both with (coefficient 1.08, p = 0.03 and without (coefficient 0.77, p = 0.03 a personal history of depression, having a vicarious experience (family and friend, respectively with depression is associated with a more favorable attitude towards antidepressant medications. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with vicarious experiences of depression express more acceptance of pharmacotherapy. Conversely, patients lacking vicarious experiences of depression have more negative attitudes towards antidepressants. When discussing treatment with patients, clinicians should inquire about vicarious experiences of depression. This information may identify patients at greater risk for non-adherence and lead to more tailored patient-specific education about

  19. Comparing Cognitive and Somatic Symptoms of Depression in Myocardial Infarction Patients and Depressed Patients in Primary and Mental Health Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewold, Nynke A.; Doornbos, Bennard; Zuidersma, Marij; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Aleman, Andre; de Jonge, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Depression in myocardial infarction patients is often a first episode with a late age of onset. Two studies that compared depressed myocardial infarction patients to psychiatric patients found similar levels of somatic symptoms, and one study reported lower levels of cognitive/affective symptoms in

  20. Depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Akmal; Sultan, Sayed Mohammad; Nazli, Rubina; Akhtar, Tasleem; Khan, Mudasar Ahmad; Sher, Nabila; Aslam, Hina

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency of depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus in Peshawar at Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar, from March to September 2010. Depression was assessed by using Beck Depressive Inventory-II (BDI-II). Out of 140 patients with type-II diabetes, 85 (61%) were women and 55 (39%) were men. Mean age was 45±7.45 years. Eighty four (60%) patients presented with severe depression. Depression was higher in females than males and widows. Depression was high in diabetic patients, especially in females and widows. It is of essence that psychiatric attention may be necessary to be incorporated in diabetes care both for prevention and treatment.

  1. Enhanced Depression Care for Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome and Persistent Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Karina W.; Rieckmann, Nina; Clemow, Lynn; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Shimbo, Daichi; Medina, Vivian; Albanese, Gabrielle; Kronish, Ian; Hegel, Mark; Burg, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms are an established predictor of mortality and major adverse cardiac events (defined as nonfatal myocardial infarction or hospitalization for unstable angina or urgent/emergency revascularizations) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study was conducted to determine the acceptability and efficacy of enhanced depression treatment in patients with ACS. Methods A 3-month observation period to identify patients with ACS and persistent depressive symptoms was followed by a 6-month randomized controlled trial. From January 1, 2005, through February 29, 2008, 237 patients with ACS from 5 hospitals were enrolled, including 157 persistently depressed patients randomized to intervention (initial patient preference for problem-solving therapy and/or pharmacotherapy, then a stepped-care approach; 80 patients) or usual care (77 patients) and 80 nondepressed patients who underwent observational evaluation. The primary outcome was patient satisfaction with depression care. Secondary outcomes were depressive symptom changes (assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory), major adverse cardiac events, and death. Results At the end of the trial, the proportion of patients who were satisfied with their depression care was higher in the intervention group (54% of 80) than in the usual care group (19% of 77) (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2–12.9 [P<.001]). The Beck Depression Inventory score decreased significantly more (t155=2.85 [P=.005]) for intervention patients (change, −5.7; 95% CI, −7.6 to −3.8; df=155) than for usual care patients (change, −1.9; 95% CI, −3.8 to −0.1; df=155); the depression effect size was 0.59 of the standard deviation. At the end of the trial, 3 intervention patients and 10 usual care patients had experienced major adverse cardiac events (4% and 13%, respectively; log-rank test, χ12=3.93 [P=.047]), as well as 5 nondepressed patients (6%) (for the intervention vs nondepressed

  2. Study of prevalence of depression and impact of depression in patients following acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby Hmar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression has been found to be associated with cardiovascular diseases in various studies done in different parts of the world. Whether depression really develops after an attack of acute myocardial infarction (AMI in hospitalised patients was not evaluated in this region of our country prior to the current work. Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of depression and impact of depression in AMI patients during the period of hospitalisation. Materials and method: Patients were recruited for the study after fulfilling the selection criteria and who had documented AMI within four to five days of hospitalisation. Informed consent of the patient and ethical committee clearance was obtained. To collect data semi-structured interview schedule was used. Assamese versions of 21 self-report items Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and observer-rated 17 items Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D were administered to 50 AMI patients. Data were analysed with chi-square test, Pearson coefficient of correlation, and student t test wherever applicable. p-value<0.05 was considered test of significance in this study. Result: Fifty cases of AMI were evaluated from August 2007 to July 2008. Thirty six per cent of AMI patients and 34% of AMI patients were found to have depression as per BDI and HAM-D scales respectively. Depression has an impact on duration of hospital stay significantly (p<0.019 but not on gender difference (p=0.089. Correlation of mean scores of both HAM-D and BDI scales was done by Pearson coefficient of correlation and was found to be significant at .01 level. Conclusion: Depression was found to be high in AMI patients during the period of hospitalisation in both the depression rating scales and it has an impact on prognosis of the patients.

  3. Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER: baseline results of Italian patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grassi Luigi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER is a 6-month, prospective, observational study carried out in 12 European countries aimed at investigating health-related quality of life (HRQoL in outpatients receiving pharmacological treatment for a first or new depressive episode. Baseline characteristics of patients enrolled in Italy are presented. Methods All treatment decisions were at the discretion of the investigator. Data were collected at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Baseline evaluations included demographics, medical and psychiatric history, and medications used in the last 24 months and prescribed at enrolment. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, was adopted to evaluate depressive symptoms, while somatic and painful physical symptoms were assessed by using the Somatic Symptom Inventory (SSI and a 0 to 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS, HRQoL via 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36, and the European Quality of Life 5-Dimensions (EQ-5D instrument. Results A total of 513 patients were recruited across 38 sites. The mean ± standard deviation (SD age at first depressive episode was 38.7 ± 15.9 years, the mean duration of depression 10.6 ± 12.3 years. The most common psychiatric comorbidities in the previous 24 months were anxiety/panic (72.6% and obsessive/compulsive disorders (13.4%, while 35.9% had functional somatic syndromes. Most patients (65.1% reported pain from any cause. Monotherapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs was prescribed at enrolment in 64.5% and 6.4% of the cases, respectively. The most commonly prescribed agents were sertraline (17.3%, escitalopram (16.2%, venlaflaxine (15.6% and paroxetine (14.8%. The mean HADS subscores for depression and anxiety were 13.3 ± 4.2 and 12.2 ± 3.9, respectively; 76.4% of patients could be defined as being 'probable cases' for depression and 66.2% for anxiety. The

  4. Depression and pain impair daily functioning and quality of life in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Chen, Ming-Chao; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2014-09-01

    Depression and pain frequently occur together. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of depression and pain on the impairment of daily functioning and quality of life (QOL) of depressed patients. We enrolled 131 acutely ill inpatients with major depressive disorder. Depression, pain, and daily functioning were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Body Pain Index, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Health-related QOL was assessed using three primary domains of the SF-36: social functioning, vitality, and general health perceptions. Pearson׳s correlation and structural equation modeling were used to examine relationships among the study variables. Five models were proposed. In all, 129 patients completed all the measures. Model 5, both depression and pain impaired daily functioning and QOL, was the most fitted structural equation model (χ(2)=9.2, df=8, p=0.33, GFI=0.98, AGFI=0.94, TLI=0.99, CFI=0.99, RMSEA=0.03). The correlation between pain and depression was weak (r=-0.27, z=-2.95, p=0.003). This was a cross-sectional study with a small sample size. Depression and pain exert a direct influence on the impairment of daily functioning and QOL of depressed patients; this impairment could be expected regardless of increased pain, depression, or both pain and depression. Pain had a somewhat separate entity from depression. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Faruk; Kilic, Leyla; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2014-06-01

    Activated coagulation and fibrinolytic system in cancer patients is associated with tumor stroma formation and metastasis in different cancer types. The aim of this study is to explore the correlation of blood coagulation assays for various clinicopathologic factors in breast cancer patients. A total of 123 female breast cancer patients were enrolled into the study. All the patients were treatment naïve. Pretreatment blood coagulation tests including PT, APTT, PTA, INR, D-dimer, fibrinogen levels, and platelet counts were evaluated. Median age of diagnosis was 51 years old (range 26-82). Twenty-two percent of the group consisted of metastatic breast cancer patients. The plasma level of all coagulation tests revealed statistically significant difference between patient and control group except for PT (p50 years) was associated with higher D-dimer levels (p=0.003). Metastatic patients exhibited significantly higher D-dimer values when compared with early breast cancer patients (p=0.049). Advanced tumor stage (T3 and T4) was associated with higher INR (p=0.05) and lower PTA (p=0.025). In conclusion, coagulation tests show significant differences in patients with breast cancer.

  6. Mortality Risk Among Heart Failure Patients With Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelborg, Kasper; Schmidt, Morten; Sundbøll, Jens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of depression is 4- to 5-fold higher in heart failure patients than in the general population. We examined the influence of depression on all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish medical registries, this nationwide population......-based cohort study included all patients with a first-time hospitalization for heart failure (1995-2014). All-cause mortality risks and 19-year mortality rate ratios were estimated based on Cox regression analysis, adjusting for age, sex, time period, comorbidity, and socioeconomic status. The analysis...... included 9636 patients with and 194 887 patients without a diagnosis of depression. Compared with patients without a history of depression, those with depression had higher 1-year (36% versus 33%) and 5-year (68% versus 63%) mortality risks. Overall, the adjusted mortality rate ratio was 1.03 (95% CI 1...

  7. Mortality Risk Among Heart Failure Patients With Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adelborg, Kasper; Schmidt, Morten; Sundbøll, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    included 9636 patients with and 194 887 patients without a diagnosis of depression. Compared with patients without a history of depression, those with depression had higher 1-year (36% versus 33%) and 5-year (68% versus 63%) mortality risks. Overall, the adjusted mortality rate ratio was 1.03 (95% CI 1......BACKGROUND: The prevalence of depression is 4- to 5-fold higher in heart failure patients than in the general population. We examined the influence of depression on all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish medical registries, this nationwide population......-based cohort study included all patients with a first-time hospitalization for heart failure (1995-2014). All-cause mortality risks and 19-year mortality rate ratios were estimated based on Cox regression analysis, adjusting for age, sex, time period, comorbidity, and socioeconomic status. The analysis...

  8. Assessing Depression in Cardiac Patients: What Measures Should Be Considered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ceccarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is highly recommended to promptly assess depression in heart disease patients as it represents a crucial risk factor which may result in premature deaths following acute cardiac events and a more severe psychopathology, even in cases of subsequent nonfatal cardiac events. Patients and professionals often underestimate or misjudge depressive symptomatology as cardiac symptoms; hence, quick, reliable, and early mood changes assessments are warranted. Failing to detect depressive signals may have detrimental effects on these patients’ wellbeing and full recovery. Choosing gold-standard depression investigations in cardiac patients that fit a hospitalised cardiac setting well is fundamental. This paper will examine eight well established tools following Italian and international guidelines on mood disorders diagnosis in cardiac patients: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, the Cognitive Behavioural Assessment Hospital Form (CBA-H, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the two and nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2, PHQ-9, the Depression Interview and Structured Hamilton (DISH, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D/HRSD, and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. Though their strengths and weaknesses may appear to be homogeneous, the BDI-II and the PHQ are more efficient towards an early depression assessment within cardiac hospitalised patients.

  9. Universality of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT problem areas in Thai depressed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thavichachart Nuntika

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have shown the efficacy of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT on depression; however, there are limited studies concerning the universality of the IPT problem areas in different countries. This study identifies whether the interpersonal problem areas defined in the IPT manual are endorsed by Thai depressed patients. Methods The Thai Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (Thai HRSD and Thai Interpersonal Questionnaire were used to assess 90 depressed and 90 non-depressed subjects in King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, during July 2007 - January 2008. The association between interpersonal problem areas/sociodemographic variables and depressive disorder were analyzed by chi-square test. A multivariable analysis was performed by using logistic regression to identify the remaining factors associated with depressive disorder. Results Most of the subjects were young to middle-aged females living in Bangkok and the Central Provinces. All four interpersonal problem areas (grief, interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, and interpersonal deficits were increased in the depressed subjects as compared to the non-depressed subjects, as were the sociodemographic variables (low education, unemployment, low income, and having a physical illness. Logistic regression showed that all interpersonal problem areas still remained problems associated with depression (grief: adjusted OR = 6.01, 95%CI = 1.93 - 18.69, p Conclusion All four interpersonal problem areas were applicable to Thai depressed patients.

  10. Mindfulness, Quality of Life, and Severity of Depressive Symptoms Among Patients With Schizophrenia and Patients With Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Ahmad Hussien Rateb

    2017-05-01

    The current study used a descriptive correlational design to examine the relationship between mindfulness and quality of life (QOL) among patients with schizophrenia (n = 160) and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 161), controlling for demographic and clinical variables. Participants completed self-reported questionnaires regarding demographic variables, severity of depression, QOL, and mindfulness. Patients diagnosed with MDD had higher mindfulness scores than patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Mindfulness scores were significantly associated with the severity of depression among participants. After controlling for the demographic variables and severity of depressive symptoms, mindfulness had a unique variance in QOL among patients with schizophrenia, but not among patients with MDD. The current study provides preliminary evidence regarding the role of mindfulness in improving depressive symptoms and the overall QOL among patients diagnosed with mental illness. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(5), 40-50.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Depression, anxiety and influencing factors in patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chun-ping; LI Xiao-mei; CHEN Hang-wei; CUI Jun-yu; NIU Li-li; HE Yu-bin; TIAN Xin-li

    2011-01-01

    Background Psychological distress has been widely studied in many cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, but the condition in acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate levels of depression and anxiety and their influencing factors in APE patients.Methods Sixty consecutive patients with APE were subjected to investigation of depression and anxiety by the Beck Depression Inventory and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and 60 community-based subjects were enrolled as controls.APE patients were stratified as high-risk, intermediate-risk and low-risk according to the disease severity. Scores of depression and anxiety were compared by statistical analysis using paired t tests between APE patients and controls,and by analysis of variance within the APE patients with the three risk stratification. Factors influencing depression and anxiety were evaluated.Results The mean age of the patients (38 males and 22 females) was (52+12) years. APE patients displayed higher scores of depression (P=0.04) and anxiety (P=0.001) compared with controls. Patients in the high-risk group displayed higher scores of depression (P=0.004) and anxiety (P=0.001) compared with those in the intermediate- and low-risk groups. Depression scores were highly correlated with anxiety scores (r=0.60, P <0.001). Both depression and anxiety inversely related to risk stratification (P <0.01), age (P <0.05), and arterial blood oxygen pressure (PaO2) (P <0.05).Linear regression analysis showed that PaO2 was independently inversely related to both depression (P <0.01) and anxiety (P <0.05); risk stratification and age were independently inversely related to anxiety (P <0.05).Conclusions Patients of APE suffered high levels of depression and anxiety, which were negatively influenced by PaO2,risk stratification and age.

  12. The prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with or without hyperhidrosis (HH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Rayeheh; Zhou, Pingyu; Liu, Yudan; Huang, Yuanshen; Phillips, Arlie; Lee, Tim K; Su, Mingwan; Yang, Sen; Kalia, Sunil; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhou, Youwen

    2016-12-01

    There are conflicting data about the correlation between hyperhidrosis (HH) and anxiety and depression. We sought to determine the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with or without HH. We examined 2017 consecutive dermatology outpatients from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, and Shanghai, China, using Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 scales for anxiety and depression assessments. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate if the impact of HH on anxiety and depression is dependent on demographic factors and diagnoses of the patients' presenting skin conditions. The prevalence of anxiety and depression was 21.3% and 27.2% in patients with HH, respectively, and 7.5% and 9.7% in patients without HH, respectively (P value anxiety and depression. Multivariable analysis showed that HH-associated increase in anxiety and depression prevalence is independent of demographic factors and presenting skin conditions. The data from the questionnaires relied on the accuracy of patients' self-reports. Both single variant and multivariable analyses showed a significant association between HH and the prevalence of anxiety and depression in a HH severity-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of Melancholia in prostate cancer patients' depression

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    Sharpley Christopher F

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although it is well established that prostate cancer (PCa patients are more likely to experience clinical depression than their age-matched non-prostate cancer peers, and that such depression can have negative effects upon survival, little is known about the underlying nature of the depressive symptomatology that these men experience. In particular, the incidence of melancholic symptoms of depression, which are signs of increased risk of suicide and resistance to treatment, has not previously been reported in PCa patients. The present study aimed to measure the incidence and nature of Melancholia in PCa depression. Method A sample of 507 PCa patients in Queensland, Australia, completed anonymous and confidential questionnaires about their background, treatment status, and depression. Data were analysed to select depressive symptoms that were part of the definition of Melancholia vs those which were not. Regression was used to determine the links between Melancholia and overall depressive status, and factor analysis revealed the underlying components of Melancholia, which were mapped over time since diagnosis for 3 years. Results Psychometric data were satisfactory. Melancholia significantly predicted depressive status for the most depressed subset of patients, but not for the total sample. Melancholia was factored into its components of Anhedonia and Agitation, and the first of these was more powerful in predicting Melancholia. Variability over the 3 years following diagnosis was noted for each of these two components of Melancholia. Conclusions The strong presence of Melancholia in the depressive symptomatology of this sample of PCa patients suggests that some forms of treatment for depression may be more likely to succeed than others. The dominance of Anhedonia and Agitation over other symptoms of Melancholia also holds implications for treatment options when assisting these men to cope with their depression.

  14. Thyroid hormones association with depression severity and clinical outcome in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Dominika; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Orzechowska, Agata; Gałecki, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The clinical implications of thyroid hormones in depression have been studied extensively and still remains disputable. Supplementation of thyroid hormones is considered to augment and accelerate antidepressant treatment. Studies on the role of thyroid hormones in depression deliver contradictory results. Here we assess theirs impact on depression severity and final clinical outcome in patients with major depression. Thyrotropin, free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations were measured with automated quantitative enzyme immunoassay. Depression severity and final clinical outcome were rated with 17-itemic Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HDRS(17)] and Clinical Global Impression Scales for severity and for improvement (CGIs, CGIi). FT3 and FT4 concentrations were significantly positively correlated with clinical improvement evaluated with CGIi (R = 0.38, P = 0.012; R = 0.33, P = 0.034, respectively). There was a significant correlation between FT4 concentrations and depression severity assessed in HDRS(17) (R = 0.31, P = 0.047). Male patients presented significantly higher FT3 serum levels (Z = 2.34, P = 0.018) and significantly greater clinical improvement (Z = 2.36, P = 0.018) when compared to female patients. We conclude that free thyroid hormones concentrations are associated with depression severity and have an impact on final clinical outcome. It can be more efficient to augment and accelerate the treatment of major depressive disorder with triiodothyronine instead of levothyroxine because of individual differences in thyroid hormones metabolism.

  15. [Bogus contract between psychiatrists and patients with depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Why are patients with depression so disappointed with their psychiatric treatment? One of the causes of their disappointment is a 'bogus contract' (Smith, 2001) between patients and psychiatrists. Patients tend to idealize modern psychiatry as if it could solve many of their problems, including social ones. Psychiatrists, however, know that modern psychiatry has limited powers and that they cannot solve all problems, especially social ones. There is a huge mismatch between what psychiatrists are trained for and what they are required to do. In fact, the biological model of depression is inadequate to help depressive patients, particularly patients with psycho-social problems. It has long been believed that antidepressant medications represent the best established treatment for major depressive disorder. Recent meta-analyses (Kirsch et al., 2008; Fournier et al., 2010), however, found little evidence that anti-depressants have a specific pharmacological effect relative to a pill placebo for patients with mild or moderate symptoms. This may be owing partly to the fact that depression is associated with ineluctable life events like separation, interpersonal conflicts, unexpected adversities, etc., that are central to being human. Both patients and psychiatrists should be aware of the limitations of psychiatric treatment. A more realistic relationship is required between patients and psychiatrists. Psychiatrists should be open about their limitations. Patients cannot leave social problems to psychiatrists. However, some chronically depressed patients may be capable of managing their social problems. In such cases, respecting patients' autonomy promotes clinical practice and prevents them from entering a state of chronic patienthood.

  16. Frequency of depression among patients with neurocysticercosis Depressão em pacientes portadores de neurocisticercose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Monteiro de Almeida

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a common central nervous system infection caused by Taenia solium metacestodes. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of depression in patients with calcified NCC form. The study group consisted of 114 patients subdivided in four groups: NCC with epilepsy, NCC without epilepsy, epilepsy without NCC and chronic headache. METHOD: Depression was evaluated and quantified by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-21. RESULTS: Percentage of patients with depression was as follows: group 1 (83%; group 2 (88%; group 3 (92%; group 4 (100%. The majority of patients had moderate depression. CONCLUSION: Incidence of depression in all groups was higher than in the general population. It is possible that, in a general way, patients with chronic diseases would have depression with similar intensity. NCC is associated with the presence of depression.Neurocysticercose (NCC é uma infecção do sistema nervoso central comum causada por metacestodes da Taenia solium. OBJETIVO: investigar a ocorrência de depressão nos pacientes com NCC forma calcificada. O grupo de estudo é formado por 114 pacientes subdivididos em quatro grupos: NCC com epilepsia, NCC sem epilepsia, epilepsia sem NCC e cefaléia crônica. MÉTODO: A presença de depressão foi determinada e quantificada pela Escala de Depressão de Hamilton (HRSD-21. RESULTADOS: A porcentagem de pacientes com depressão foi: grupo 1 (83%; grupo 2 (88%; grupo 3 (92%; grupo 4 (100%. A maioria dos pacientes apresentou depressão moderada. CONCLUSÃO: A incidência da depressão em todos os grupos foi mais elevada do que na população geral, contudo não houve diferença entre os grupos estudados. É possível que, de uma maneira geral, os pacientes portadores de doença crônica apresentarem a depressão em intensidade similar. NCC está associada com a presença de depressão.

  17. Older patients' depressive symptoms 6 months after prolonged hospitalization: course and interrelationships with major associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Min; Huang, Guan-Hua; Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the course of depressive symptoms in older patients 6 months following a prolonged, acute hospitalization, especially the interrelationships among depressive symptoms and its major associated factors. For this study, we conducted a secondary analysis of data from a prospective cohort study of 351 patients aged 65 years and older. Participants were recruited from five surgical and medical wards at a tertiary medical center in northern Taiwan and assessed at three time points: within 48 h of admission, before discharge, and 6 months post-discharge. The course of depressive symptoms was dynamic with symptoms increased spontaneously and substantially during hospitalization and subsided at 6 months after discharge, but still remained higher than at admission. Overall, 26.7% of older patients at hospital discharge met established criteria for minor depression (15-item Geriatric Depressive Scale (GDS-15) scores 5-9) and 21.2% for major depression (GDS-15 scores >10). As the strongest associated factors, functional dependence and nutritional status influenced depressive symptoms following hospitalization. Depressive symptoms at discharge showed significant cross-lagged effects on functional dependence and nutritional status at 6 months after discharge, suggesting a reciprocal, triadic relationship. Thus, treating one condition might improve the other. Targeting the triad of depressive symptoms, functional dependence, and nutritional status, therefore, is essential for treating depressive symptoms and improving the overall health of older adults hospitalized for acute illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The predictive value of somatic and cognitive depressive symptoms for cytokine changes in patients with major depression

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    Dannehl K

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Katharina Dannehl,1 Winfried Rief,1 Markus J Schwarz,2 Annika Hennings,1 Sabine Riemer,1 Verena Selberdinger,3 Theresa Stapf,3 Frank Euteneuer11Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Philipps Universität Marburg, Marburg, Germany; 2Institute for Laboratory Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilian Universität, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig-Maximilian Universität, Munich, GermanyContext: Elevated concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines have been hypothesized as an important factor in the pathophysiology of depression. Depression itself is considered to be a heterogeneous disorder. Current findings suggest that “cognitive” and “somatic” symptom dimensions are related to immune function in different ways. So far, little research has been done on the longitudinal aspects of inflammation in patients with major depression, especially with respect to different symptom dimensions of depression. Therefore, we investigated which aspects of depression may predict changes in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and interleukin (IL-6 over 4 weeks. Methods: Forty-one patients with major depression diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV, and 45 healthy controls were enrolled. Serum measurements of TNF-alpha and IL-6 were conducted at baseline and 4 weeks later. Psychometric measures included the assessment of cognitive-affective depressive symptoms and somatic symptoms during the last 7 days as well as somatic symptoms during the last 2 years. Results: Patients with depression showed increased levels of TNF-alpha (P<0.05 compared to healthy controls. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that neither depressive nor somatic symptoms predict changes in proinflammatory cytokines in the whole sample of depressed patients. Moderation analyses and subsequent sex-stratified regression analyses indicated that higher somatoform symptoms during the last 2 years

  19. Do continued antidepressants protect against dementia in patients with severe depressive disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Forman, Julie Lyng; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2011-01-01

    Studies on humans show that depressive disorder is associated with an increased risk of developing cognitive dysfunction, and animal studies suggest that antidepressants may have neuroprotective abilities. On the basis of these observations, it was hypothesized that treatment with antidepressants...... may decrease the risk of developing dementia in patients with depression. We investigated whether continued treatment with antidepressants is associated with a decreased rate of dementia in a population of patients discharged from psychiatric healthcare service with a diagnosis of depression. We used...... register data on all prescribed antidepressants in all patients discharged from psychiatric healthcare service with a diagnosis of depression and with subsequent diagnoses of dementia in Denmark from 1995 to 2005. A total of 37 658 patients with a diagnosis of depression at their first psychiatric contact...

  20. Incidence of depression in Epilepsy patients | Sezibera | Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES ... Patients with generalized seizure are likely to suffer from severe comorbid depression as compared to patients with partial seizure. Epilepsy ...

  1. Depression, anxiety, distress and somatization in asthmatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Mohamed Shalaby Samaha

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Asthmatic patients are at high risk of psychiatric problems, particularly depression, anxiety and somatization. Asthmatic patients need psychotherapy besides their medication of asthma to obtain better asthma out come and management.

  2. Stressful life events preceding the onset of depression in Asian patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Hatim, Ahmad; Si, Tian-Mei; Jeon, Hong Jin; Srisurapanont, Manit; Bautista, Dianne; Liu, Shen-ing; Chua, Hong Choon; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have identified the significant role of stressful life events in the onset of depressive episodes. However, there is a paucity of cross-national studies on stressful life events that precede depression. We aimed to compare types of stressful life events associated with the onset of depressive episodes in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) in five Asian countries. A total of 507 outpatients with MDD were recruited in China (n = 114), South Korea (n = 101), Malaysia (n = 90), Thailand (n = 103) and Taiwan (n = 99). All patients were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the List of Threatening Experiences. The prevalence of each type of stressful life events was calculated and compared between each country. The type of stressful life event that preceded the onset of a depressive episode differed between patients in China and Taiwan and those in South Korea, Malaysia and Thailand. Patients in China and Taiwan were less likely to report interpersonal relationship problems and occupational/financial problems than patients in South Korea, Malaysia and Thailand. Understanding the nature and basis of culturally determined susceptibilities to specific stressful life events is critical for establishing a policy of depression prevention and providing effective counseling services for depressed patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Study of Relationship Between Depression and Quality of Life in Patients With Chronic Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi Shargh, Najme; Rostami, Bahareh; Kosari, Bahareh; Toosi, Zakiye; Majelan, Ghazaleh Ashrafzadeh

    2015-08-06

    Depression is among the personality traits of schizophrenic patients, which results from psychotic features or is a consequence of a period of psychosis. Depression in schizophrenic patients is one of the important factors affecting their quality of life. The study population of this descriptive and analytic study consists of patients with chronic schizophrenia in Zahedan in 2014. The sample included 60 patients who simultaneously suffered from depression and were selected using random sampling (30 males and 30 females). The research instruments included the Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale (SQLS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (the inventory was filled out by the tester). In order to form a statistics analysis, we used Pearson correlation and regression multivariate. Investigating the study hypotheses showed that there was a negative correlation between the high level of depression and low quality of life. the relationship between depression and the quality of life subscales showed that in women, the variable of symptoms and complications was a significant predictor; however, the other two variables (energy and motivation and psychosocial) were not significant predictors. In case of men, psychosocial variable was a significant predictor; however, the other two variables (energy and motivation and symptoms and complications) were not significant predictors. In general, depression on these patients makes discontent of life on them; therefore, elimination of their depression on their treatment is necessary.

  4. Neuropsychological profile of patients with bipolar depression in remission

    OpenAIRE

    Totić-Poznanović Sanja; Marinković Dragan; Pavlović Dragan; Paunović Vladimir R.

    2005-01-01

    Aim. To determine if the patients with bipolar affective disorder, after the depressive phase, would exhibit cognitive impairment in remission. Methods. Twenty three euthymic patients with bipolar disorder were matched, on a case-by-case basis, to twenty-one healthy subjects in the control group, for the presence of the symptoms of depression. The patients and the control group were tested with a battery of neuropsychological tests. Results. Impairments were found in the patients compared wit...

  5. Platelets from pulmonary hypertension patients show increased mitochondrial reserve capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quyen L.; Corey, Catherine; White, Pamela; Watson, Annie; Gladwin, Mark T.; Simon, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that altered cellular metabolism is systemic in pulmonary hypertension (PH) and central to disease pathogenesis. However, bioenergetic changes in PH patients and their association with disease severity remain unclear. Here, we hypothesize that alteration in bioenergetic function is present in platelets from PH patients and correlates with clinical parameters of PH. Platelets isolated from controls and PH patients (n = 28) were subjected to extracellular flux analysis to determine oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates. Platelets from PH patients showed greater glycolytic rates than controls. Surprisingly, this was accompanied by significant increases in the maximal capacity for oxygen consumption, leading to enhanced respiratory reserve capacity in PH platelets. This increased platelet reserve capacity correlated with mean pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, and right ventricular stroke work index in PH patients and was abolished by the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Consistent with a shift to FAO, PH platelets showed augmented enzymatic activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and electron transport chain complex II. These data extend the observation of a metabolic alteration in PH from the pulmonary vascular axis to the hematologic compartment and suggest that measurement of platelet bioenergetics is potentially useful in assessment of disease progression and severity. PMID:28289721

  6. Zinc in thalassemic patients and its relation with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moafi, Alireza; Mobaraki, Gholamhossein; Taheri, Seyed Sadr; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Shahabi, Iraj; Majidi, Farshad

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is a relationship between zinc levels and depression. Thalassemic patients are at risk of zinc deficiency due to various causes including Desferal injection. The aim of this study, therefore, is to investigate hair zinc levels in thalassemic patients and their association with depression. For the purposes of this survey, 50 patients with major thalassemia between 10-20 years old were selected randomly. The patients' hair zinc concentration was compared with a control group of similarly aged healthy individuals. Simultaneously, their psychological status was evaluated with either the "Beck" or "Marya Kovacs" test (according to age) so that the relation between depression and zinc concentration could be assessed. The mean hair zinc concentration in patients was more than the controls (193.96 +/- 92.4 ppm vs 149.6 +/- 72.21 ppm). Zinc deficiency was present in 10% of the patients, and 52% had some degree of depression. There was a reverse correlation between zinc deficiency and blood transfusion rate (p < 0.05). Also, while there were more incidences of depression among the zinc deficient patients, the difference was not significant. Regarding the high prevalence of depression and insignificant relation to the zinc deficiency in these thalassemic patients, this research suggests the need for further consideration concerning patients' psychological status, the risk factors of zinc deficiency, as well as extended assessment into other causes of depression.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF DISEASE ORIENTED DEPRESSION IN BREAST CANCER PATIENT

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    Manoharan Preeth

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a common symptom in cancer patients, which is difficult to be detected and consequently to be treated. It deteriorates over the course of cancer treatment, persists long after the end of therapy and influences negatively the quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence rate and level anxiety and depression in breast cancer patient using HAD scale.The study was conducted on 94 female patients suffering from various stages of breast cancer. Patients included who were in the age group between 18-65yrs, estimated survival time more than six months, ability to speak and patients were excluded if they were affected by known mental disorder and metastasis in brain. Demographic data was collected from each patient’s medical record e.g. cancer type, date of cancer diagnosis, extension of the diseases, sites of metastasis, estimated life time. Levels of anxiety and depression were self rated by HADS (hospital anxiety and depression scaleOut of 94 patients twenty patients (21% were reported as mild depression (mean score 8.93 and 23 (24% patients as mild anxiety (mean score 9.42 likewise five Patients were reported as (positive cases chronic depression (mean score is 12.23 and six patients as chronic anxiety.(mean score is 12.23 The results of this present study clearly demonstrated that prevalence of anxiety and depression rates depended on the patients’ educational level, age, occupation, menopause and diagnosis period. Our study found that the depression and anxiety were common in most of the patients affected with breast cancer is also there was no relation between the anxiety and depression and stages of diseases. We think that this study needs to be extended in the future to involve more patient is may be further be tested to evaluate the same sample again, after psychiatric intervention is carried out.

  8. Early depression screening is feasible in hospitalized stroke patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul R Karamchandani

    Full Text Available Post-stroke depression (PSD is common but is not routinely assessed for in hospitalized patients. As a Comprehensive Stroke Center, we screen all stroke inpatients for depression, though the feasibility of early screening has not been established. We assessed the hypothesis that early depression screening in stroke patients is feasible. We also explored patient level factors associated with being screened for PSD and the presence of early PSD.The medical records of all patients admitted with ischemic stroke (IS or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH between 01/02/13 and 15/04/13 were reviewed. A depression screen, modified from the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, was administered (maximum score 27, higher scores indicating worse depression. Patients were eligible if they did not have a medical condition precluding screening. Feasibility was defined as screening 75% of all eligible patients.Of 303 IS and ICH inpatients, 70% (211 were eligible for screening, and 75% (158 of all eligible patients were screened. More than one-third of all patients screened positive for depression (score > 4. Women (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.06-4.01 and younger patients (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.99 were more likely to screen positive. Screening positive was not associated with poor discharge/day 7 outcome (mRS > 3; OR 1.45, 95% CI 0.74-2.83.Screening stroke inpatients for depression is feasible and early depression after stroke is common. Women and younger patients are more likely to experience early PSD. Our results provide preliminary evidence supporting continued screening for depression in hospitalized stroke patients.

  9. Study of the Serum Copper Levels in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styczeń, Krzysztof; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Siwek, Marcin; Dudek, Dominika; Reczyński, Witold; Misztak, Paulina; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Topór-Mądry, Roman; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    Copper may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Clinical data on this issue are very limited and not conclusive. The purpose of the study was to determine the copper concentration in the serum of patients with major depressive disorder and to discuss its potential clinical usefulness as a biomarker of the disease. A case-control clinical study included 69 patients with current depressive episode, 45 patients in remission and 50 healthy volunteers. Cu concentration was measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The mean serum copper level in depressed patients was slightly lower (by 11 %; not statistically significant) than in the control group. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in Cu(2+) concentration between depressive episode and remission, nor between remission and control group. In the remission group were observed significant correlations between copper levels and the average number of relapses over the past years or time of remission. There was no correlation between serum copper and severity of depression, as measured by HDRS and MADRS. The obtained results showed no significant differences between the copper concentration in the blood serum of patients (both with current depressive episode and in remission) and healthy volunteers, as well as the lack of correlations between the copper level in the active stage of the disease and clinical features of the population. Our study is the first conducted on such a large population of patients, so the results may be particularly important and reliable source of knowledge about the potential role of copper in depression.

  10. Access to Care and Depression among Emergency Department Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abar, Beau; Hong, Steven; Aaserude, Eric; Holub, Ashley; DeRienzo, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of depression among patients in the emergency department (ED) is significantly higher than in the general population, making the ED a potentially important forum for the identification of depression and intervention. Concomitant to the identification of depression is the issue of patient access to appropriate care. This study sought to establish prevalence estimates of potential barriers to care among ED patients and relate these barriers with symptoms of depression. Two medical students conducted brief surveys on all ED patients ≥ 18 years on demographics, perceived access to care, and depression. A total of 636 participants were enrolled. The percentage of participants with mild or greater depression was 42%. The majority of patients reported experiencing some barriers to care, with the most prominent being difficulty finding transportation, work responsibilities, and the feeling that the doctor is not responsive to their concerns. Higher depression scores were bivariately associated with higher overall barriers to care mean scores (r = 0.44; p patients' concerns, embarrassment about a potential illness, and confusion trying to schedule an appointment. Across all barriers analyzed, there was a greater incidence of depression associated with a greater perception of barriers. These barriers may be used as potential targets for intervention to increase access to health care resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Japanese Parkinson’s disease patients: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmei, Issei; Kobayashi, Kei; Oe, Yuki; Takagishi, Yuriko; Kanie, Ayako; Ito, Masaya; Takebayashi, Yoshitake; Murata, Miho; Horikoshi, Masaru; Dobkin, Roseanne D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the feasibility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for Japanese Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients with depression. To increase cultural acceptability, we developed the CBT program using manga, a type of Japanese comic novel. Methods Participants included 19 non-demented PD patients who had depressive symptoms (GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score ≥8). A CBT program comprising six sessions was individually administered. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of the CBT program in terms of the dropout rate and occurrence of adverse events. The primary outcome was depressive symptom reduction in the GRID-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression upon completion of CBT. Secondary outcomes included changes in the self-report measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Depression), anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety, State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale), functional impairment, and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey). Results Of the 19 participants (mean age =63.8 years, standard deviation [SD] =9.9 years; mean Hohen–Yahr score =1.7, SD =0.8), one patient (5%) withdrew. No severe adverse event was observed. The patients reported significant improvements in depression (Hedges’ g =−1.02, 95% confidence interval =−1.62 to −0.39). The effects were maintained over a 3-month follow-up period. Most of the secondary outcome measurements showed a small-to-moderate but nonsignificant effect size from baseline to post-intervention. Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that CBT is feasible among Japanese PD patients with depression. Similar approaches may be effective for people with PD from other cultural backgrounds. The results warrant replication in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:27354802

  12. Thyroid axis activity and suicidal behavior in depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Fabrice; Mokrani, Marie-Claude; Lopera, Felix Gonzalez; Diep, Thanh Son; Rabia, Hassen; Fattah, Saïd

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between suicidal behavior and hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis activity in depressed patients. The serum levels of thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were evaluated before and after 0800 and 2300 h thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) challenges, on the same day, in 95 medication-free DSM-IV euthyroid major depressed inpatients and 44 healthy hospitalized controls. Compared to controls: (1) patients with a positive suicide history (PSH; n=53) showed lower basal FT4 (at 0800 h: p<0.005; at 2300 h: p<0.03), but normal FT3 levels, while patients with a negative suicide history (NSH; n=42) showed normal FT4 and FT3 levels; (2) TSH responses to TRH (DeltaTSH) were blunted in NSHs (at 0800 h: p<0.03; at 2300 h: p<0.00001), but not in PSHs; (3) both NSHs and PSHs showed lower DeltaDeltaTSH values (differences between 2300 h-DeltaTSH and 0800 h-DeltaTSH) (p<0.000001 and p<0.003, respectively). Compared to NSHs, basal FT4 levels were reduced in PSHs (at 0800 h: p<0.002; at 2300h: p<0.006). HPT parameters were not significantly different between recent suicide attempters (n=32) and past suicide attempters (n=21). However, compared to controls, recent suicide attempters showed lower 2300 h-DeltaTSH (p<0.04) and DeltaDeltaTSH (p<0.002) values, and lower basal FT4 values (at 0800 h: p<0.006; at 2300 h: p<0.02). Our results, obtained in a large sample of depressed inpatients, indicate that various degrees of HPT axis dysregulation are associated with the history of suicide.

  13. Patient specific modelling in diagnosing depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a very common disease. Approximately 10% of people in the Western world experience severe depression during their lifetime and many more experience a mild form of depression. It is commonly believed that depression is caused by malfunctions in the biological system constituted...... diagnoses more precise and to offer individual treatment plans and drug design. Efficient and reliable methods for parameter estimation are crucial. Presently we are investigating how well the Metropolis-Hastings Algorithm of the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for estimating the parameters...

  14. Depression in non-psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Polikandrioti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Depression is disabling chronic mental illness that prevents a person from functioning normally. The structural setting of depressive disorder requires the distribution of individual symptoms on the five following key - dimensions : a emotional / experiential, b behavioral, c physical, cognitive, and e functional. Most likely, depression is caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. The most common treatment options are medication and psychotherapy. Taken for granted that depression can be effectively treated, early screening and treatment are imperative.

  15. Salivary cortisol in depressed patients versus control persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, Ulla; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars V

    2010-01-01

    for patients with depression and control persons. We did a systematic review with sequential meta-analysis and meta-regression according to the PRISMA Statement based on comprehensive database searches for studies of depressed patients compared to control persons in whom salivary cortisol was measured. Twenty......The pathophysiology of depression has been associated to dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the use of salivary cortisol measures is increasingly being incorporated into research. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether salivary cortisol differs...... case-control studies, including 1354 patients with depression and 1052 control persons were identified. In a random-effects meta-analysis salivary cortisol was increased for depressed patients as compared to control persons on average 2.58 nmol/l (95% C.I.: 0.95-4.21) p=0.002 in the morning...

  16. Depression in hemodialysis patients: the role of dialysis shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Teles

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Depression is the most important neuropsychiatric complication in chronic kidney disease because it reduces quality of life and increases mortality. Evidence demonstrating the association between dialysis shift and depression is lacking; thus, obtaining such evidence was the main objective of this study. METHOD: This cross-sectional study included patients attending a hemodialysis program. Depression was diagnosed using Beck's Depression Inventory. Excessive daytime sleepiness was evaluated using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. RESULTS: A total of 96 patients were enrolled (55 males, age 48±14 years. Depression and excessive daytime sleepiness were observed in 42.7% and 49% of the patients, respectively. When comparing variables among the three dialysis shifts, there were no differences in age, dialysis vintage, employment status, excessive daytime sleepiness, hemoglobin, phosphorus levels, or albumin levels. Patients in the morning shift were more likely to live in rural areas (p<0.0001, although patients in rural areas did not have a higher prevalence of depression (p= 0.30. Patients with depression were more likely to be dialyzed during the morning shift (p= 0.008. Independent risk factors for depression were age (p<0.03, lower levels of hemoglobin (p<0.01 and phosphorus (p<0.01, and dialysis during the morning shift (p= 0.0009. The hospitalization risk of depressive patients was 4.5 times higher than that of nondepressive patients (p<0.008. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that depression is associated with dialysis shift, higher levels of phosphorus, and lower levels of hemoglobin. The results highlight the need for randomized trials to determine whether this association occurs by chance or whether circadian rhythm disorders may play a role.

  17. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Teixeira Maranhão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs.Objective To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls.Method Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals – thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls.Results Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity.Conclusion Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  19. Depression and Associated Factors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, N A; Ariaratnam, S; Salleh, M R; Said, M A; Sulaiman, A H

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of major depressive disorder and its association with socio-demographic and clinical factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This was a cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who attended the hospital-based primary care clinics at the University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The patients were interviewed using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview to diagnose depression based on the DSM-IV criteria. The socio-demographic and clinical data were obtained by interviewing the patients and subsequently verified against their respective case notes. A total of 204 patients were recruited. The prevalence of major depressive disorder was 15.7%. Major depressive disorder was significantly associated with younger age of patients (mean ± standard deviation, 57.8 ± 15.1 years, p = 0.04), younger age at diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (46.2 ± 13.0 years, p = 0.01), having secondary education (p = 0.02), and having a history of depression (p = 0.002). Multivariate analysis showed that current age (p = 0.04), duration of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.04), age at diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.01), and secondary education (p = 0.01) were significant factors. The prevalence of major depressive disorder was high among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Screening of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus for depression should be performed periodically or routinely, especially in the primary care setting.

  20. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on treating tinnitus in patients stratified for presence of depression or anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Naoki; Kanzaki, Sho; Shinden, Seiichi; Saito, Hideyuki; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine, on treating tinnitus.Tinnitus patients stratified for the presence of depression and anxiety were studied retrospectively. Fifty-six patients were observed for more than 6 months. They were initially treated with paroxetine only at a dose of 10 mg/day for 2-4 weeks; thereafter, the dose was increased to 20 mg/day. Tinnitus distress was evaluated with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and with visual analog scales (VASs) for tinnitus loudness and annoyance. Depression and anxiety were measured with the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the trait section of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The patients were grouped according to their SDS and STAI scores, and each variable was compared at baseline and the 6-month follow-up. Changes among these variables were also examined to determine whether reduced tinnitus distress was related to the improvement of depression or anxiety. Patients with both depression and anxiety showed better results (decrease in THI, VASs, SDS and STAI scores) than patients with anxiety alone, or patients without depression and anxiety. In patients with depression and anxiety, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were strongly correlated. In other patients, however, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were not correlated. These results suggest that paroxetine is effective in treating distressed tinnitus patients with depression and anxiety by reducing their tinnitus severity as well as their depression and anxiety.

  1. PARK2 patient neuroprogenitors show increased mitochondrial sensitivity to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Asad A; Tidball, Andrew M; Kumar, Kevin K; Neely, M Diana; Han, Bingying; Ess, Kevin C; Hong, Charles C; Erikson, Keith M; Hedera, Peter; Bowman, Aaron B

    2015-01-01

    Poorly-defined interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors underlie Parkinson's disease (PD) etiology. Here we tested the hypothesis that human stem cell derived forebrain neuroprogenitors from patients with known familial risk for early onset PD will exhibit enhanced sensitivity to PD environmental risk factors compared to healthy control subjects without a family history of PD. Two male siblings (SM and PM) with biallelic loss-of-function mutations in PARK2 were identified. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from SM, PM, and four control subjects with no known family histories of PD or related neurodegenerative diseases were utilized. We tested the hypothesis that hiPSC-derived neuroprogenitors from patients with PARK2 mutations would show heightened cell death, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reactive oxygen species generation compared to control cells as a result of exposure to heavy metals (PD environmental risk factors). We report that PARK2 mutant neuroprogenitors showed increased cytotoxicity with copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) exposure but not manganese (Mn) or methyl mercury (MeHg) relative to control neuroprogenitors. PARK2 mutant neuroprogenitors also showed a substantial increase in mitochondrial fragmentation, initial ROS generation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential following Cu exposure. Our data substantiate Cu exposure as an environmental risk factor for PD. Furthermore, we report a shift in the lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for greater sensitivity to Cu-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in patients SM and PM relative to controls, correlating with their increased genetic risk for PD.

  2. Structural Asymmetry of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Correlates with Depressive Symptoms: Evidence from Healthy Individuals and Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Mao, Yu; Wei, Dongtao; Yang, Junyi; Du, Xue; Xie, Peng; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of structural asymmetry of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in the continuum of depression from healthy individuals to patients. Structural magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 70 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), 49 matched controls, and 349 healthy university students to calculate structural asymmetry indexes of the DLPFC. First-episode, treatment-naive MDD patients showed a relatively lower asymmetry index than healthy controls, and their asymmetry index was negatively correlated with the depressive symptoms. This abnormality was normalized by antidepressants in medicated MDD patients. Furthermore, the asymmetry index was negatively correlated with the depressive symptoms in university students; this was replicated at two time points in a subgroup of students, suggesting good test-retest reliability. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that support the imbalance hypothesis of MDD and suggest a potential structural basis underlying the functional asymmetry of the DLPFC in depression. In future, the structural index of the DLPFC may become a potential biomarker to evaluate individuals' risk for the onset of MDD.

  3. Psychomotor Retardation in Elderly Untreated Depressed Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beheydt, L.L.; Schrijvers, D.L.; Docx, L.; Bouckaert, F.; Hulstijn, W.; Sabbe, B.G.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychomotor retardation (PR) is one of the core features in depression according to DSM V (1), but also aging in itself causes cognitive and psychomotor slowing. This is the first study investigating PR in relation to cognitive functioning and to the concomitant effect of depression and

  4. A comparision of neurocognitive function among patients with bipolar depression,recurrent unipolar depression and schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玥

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare neurocognitive function in patients with bipolar depression type I(BD),recurrent unipolar depression(UD)and schizophrenia(SZ).And try to explore the relationship between neuropsychological function and clinical features in bipolar.Methods 29 patients with BD,25 with UD,30 with SZ were consecutively recruited from clinics and wards of Peking University Sixth Hospital between September 2010 and April2011,also including 30 controls

  5. Unexplained Painful Physical Symptoms in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: Prevalence, Pathophysiology and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaracz, Jan; Gattner, Karolina; Jaracz, Krystyna; Górna, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    Patients with major depression often report pain. In this article, we review the current literature regarding the prevalence and consequences, as well as the pathophysiology, of unexplained painful physical symptoms (UPPS) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). UPPS are experienced by approximately two-thirds of depressed patients. The presence of UPPS makes a correct diagnosis of depression more difficult. Moreover, UPPS are a predictor of a poor response to treatment and a more chronic course of depression. Pain, in the course of depression, also has a negative impact on functioning and quality of life. Frequent comorbidity of depression and UPPS has inspired the formulation of an hypothesis regarding a shared neurobiological mechanism of both conditions. Evidence from neuroimaging studies has shown that frontal-limbic dysfunction in depression may explain abnormal pain processing, leading to the presence of UPPS. Increased levels of proinflamatory cytokines and substance P in patients with MDD may also clarify the pathophysiology of UPPS. Finally, dysfunction of the descending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways that normally suppress ascending sensations has been proposed as a core mechanism of UPPS. Psychological factors such as catastrophizing also play a role in both depression and chronic pain. Therefore, pharmacological treatment and/or cognitive therapy are recommended in the treatment of depression with UPPS. Some data suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are more effective than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the alleviation of depression and UPPS. However, the pooled analysis of eight randomised clinical trials showed similar efficacy of duloxetine (an SNRI) and paroxetine (an SSRI) in reducing UPPS in depression. Further integrative studies examining genetic factors (e.g. polymorphisms of genes for interleukins, serotonin transporter and receptors), molecular factors (e.g. cytokines

  6. Attitudes of Nurses towards Depression and Depressive Patients: A Comperative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altan Eşsizoğlu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine and compare mental health nurses’ and general hospital nurses’beliefs and knowledge about the etiology and treatment of depression and theirattitudes towards depressive patients.70 nurses working in a mental health hospital and 30 nurses working in a generalhospital were interviewed face to face with a questionnaire developed by PsyciatricResearch and Education Center in Turkey.The attitudes of both groups were positive towards depresssion and depressivepatients. But while mental health nurse group accepted depression as a disorder thegeneral hospital nurse group did not consider depression as a disorder but rather asan emotional state everyone can fall into from time to time in their lives. Generalhospital nurse group thought that stressfull life events caused depression more thancompared to mental heath nurse group. They bought considered depression as atreatable illness and they both thought that depression cannot be completely curedwithout resolving social problems. Non of the groups hold the opinion that people withdepression were dangerous and they put less social distance towards depressivepatients.Especially the general hospital nurse group did not consider depression as adisorder while considering schizophrenia as a mental disorder. This positive andaccepting attitude might cause the general hospital nurse group to underrecognizedepression. So this may indicate a need for a theorotical educational programmeabout depression for the general hospital nurse group.

  7. Night locomotor activity and quality of sleep in quetiapine-treated patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todder, Doron; Caliskan, Serdal; Baune, Bernhard T

    2006-12-01

    This research assesses the development of the night-activity rhythm and quality of sleep during course of treatment among patients with unipolar or bipolar depression and receiving antidepressant treatment plus quetiapine. Twenty-seven patients with major depressive episode were included into a 4-week follow-up study and compared with 27 healthy controls. Motor activity was continuously measured with an electronic wrist device (actigraphy), sleep was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and patients were clinically assessed with the Hamilton depression score. All patients received a standard antidepressant treatment plus quetiapine. Whereas we found a rapid and maintaining improvement of subjective sleep parameters during the 4-week study, we observed a rapid improvement of some objective sleep parameters (actigraph) within the first week, but no further significant change of objective sleep parameters during the rest of the study. Another main finding of this study is that changes of subjectively and objectively assessed sleep parameters do not necessarily reflect clinical improvement of depression during the same timeline. Despite partial clinical remission, objective sleep parameters still showed significantly different patterns compared with controls. This study is the first to examine the effect of quetiapine on locomotor activity alongside with sleep in depression. As the studied patients with depression showed improvement in subjective and objective sleep parameters, quetiapine may be a promising drug for patients with depression and insomnia. Further studies need to investigate in detail the timeline of clinical remission and alterations of objective and subjective sleep parameters.

  8. Effect of transcranial direct current stimulation of stroke patients on depression and quality of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Tae-Gyu; Kim, Soo-Han; Kim, Ko-Un

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on depression and quality of life (QOL) in patients with stroke, by conducting conventional occupational therapy with and without tDCS on 20 patients each. [Subjects and Methods] The experimental group (N=20) received both tDCS and conventional occupational therapy, while the control group (N=20) received false tDCS and conventional occupational therapy. The treatment was conducted 20 times over a four-week period; each session was 30 minutes long. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered to score the depression levels in patients before and after the intervention, while the stroke-specific quality of life (SS-QOL) was measured to compare the QOL. [Result] Following the intervention, the patients in the experimental group showed a significant decrease in depression and an increase in the QOL. In contrast, the control group showed no significant changes in depression or QOL. Our findings indicate that tDCS decreased depression while increasing QOL in patients with stroke. [Conclusion] In other words, our study confirmed that the application of tDCS during stroke rehabilitation improves the depression symptoms and QOL in patients.

  9. [Patients on chemotherapy: depression and adherence to treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Bianca Fresche; Pires, Flavia Helena; Dewulf, Nathalie de Lourdes Souza; Inocenti, Aline; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti

    2013-02-01

    This analytical, cross-sectional study applied a quantitative approach to verify the presence of depression and the adherence to a chemotherapy treatment in patients with cancer at the central chemotherapy pharmacy of a university hospital. The sample consisted of 102 patients, and data were collected from October 2010 to May 2011. A structured interview was used to obtain sociodemographic, clinical and therapeutic data; the Morisky Test and Beck Depression Inventory were also applied. The results revealed that 10.8% and 1.9% of participants had moderate and severe depression, respectively. The presence of depression was significantly associated with variables such as income per capita, the number of surgeries, and disease duration. A lack of treatment adherence was identified in 48% of participants. These results indicate the need for health staff training to detect depressive disorders and chemotherapy treatment attrition among patients with cancer.

  10. Depression and sexual desire: an exploratory study in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Mário; Azevedo, Leandra Pinheiro; Gouveia, José Luís

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to study the relation between depression and its effect on the sexual desire in psychiatric patients. The sample comprised 89 patients from the Psychiatric and Mental Health Department of Alto Ave's Hospital Center, Entidade Publica Empresarial. The obtained results in this exploratory study revealed that depressive symptomatology severity is directly related with sexual desire. Variables gender, age, and working status, as well as, sociocultural levels indicated important and significant differences between patients.

  11. Personality disorders and social functioning in depressed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, S; Dekker, J; Duijsens, [No Value; de Jonghe, F; de Jong, P; Schouws, S

    2000-01-01

    There is a high level of comorbidity of personality disorders with major depression. Patients who suffer from both depression and an axis II disorder are, in general, more severely ill and ill for longer periods. The presence of personality disorders also has a negative influence on the social funct

  12. Understanding facial expressions of pain in patients with depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lautenbacher, Stefan; Bär, Karl-Juergen; Eisold, Patricia; Kunz, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Although depression is associated with more clinical pain complaints, psychophysical data sometimes point to hypoalgesic alterations. Studying the more reflex-like facial expression of pain in patients with depression may offer a new perspective. Facial and psychophysical responses to non-painful an

  13. Personality disorders and social functioning in depressed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, S; Dekker, J; Duijsens, [No Value; de Jonghe, F; de Jong, P; Schouws, S

    2000-01-01

    There is a high level of comorbidity of personality disorders with major depression. Patients who suffer from both depression and an axis II disorder are, in general, more severely ill and ill for longer periods. The presence of personality disorders also has a negative influence on the social

  14. Depression in Patients with Epilepsy: A Study from Enugu, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    depression than the general population and studies estimate ... to having the condition or being treated differently because of it. ... studies of this relationship in Nigerian Africans. ... Materials and Methods: Adult patients with epilepsy seen at the University of Nigeria .... Anxiety and depression among the epileptics in general.

  15. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in Dutch advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmenhoven, Franca; van Rijswijk, Eric; Engels, Yvonne; Kan, Cornelis; Prins, Judith; van Weel, Chris; Vissers, Kris

    2012-02-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in advanced cancer patients, but the diagnosis of depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer is difficult. Screening instruments could facilitate diagnosing depressive disorder in patients with advanced cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question as screening tools for depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. Patients with advanced metastatic disease, visiting the outpatient palliative care department, were asked to fill out a self-questionnaire containing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and a single screening question "Are you feeling depressed?" The mood section of the PRIME-MD was used as a gold standard. Sixty-one patients with advanced metastatic disease were eligible to be included in the study. Complete data were obtained from 46 patients. The area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristics analysis of the BDI-II was 0.82. The optimal cut-off point of the BDI-II was 16 with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 69%. The single screening question showed a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 94%. The BDI-II seems an adequate screening tool for a depressive disorder in advanced cancer patients. The sensitivity of a single screening question is poor.

  16. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Depressants KidsHealth > For Teens > Depressants A A A What's ... How Can Someone Quit? Avoiding Depressants What Are Depressants? Depressants are drugs that calm nerves and relax ...

  17. Relationship between depressive symptoms and quality of life in Nigerian patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinsulore, Adesanmi; Aloba, Olutayo O; Mapayi, B M; Oloniniyi, I O; Fatoye, F O; Makanjuola, R O A

    2014-08-01

    Quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia is influenced by various factors such as depressive symptoms. This study assessed the relationship between depressive symptoms and QOL in outpatients with schizophrenia in Nigeria and evaluated the associated socio-demographic and clinical factors. One hundred patients with 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases diagnosis of schizophrenia participated in this study. Socio-demographic and clinical factors such as depression were assessed with Zung Self-rating Depression Scale and symptoms of schizophrenia with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale of schizophrenia (PANSS). The level of functioning was assessed with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. QOL was assessed using the brief version of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life Scale. There were 27 (27.0 %) patients with depression. The depressed patients reported significant lower scores in all QOL domains when compared with the non-depressed group. All QOL domains were significantly negatively correlated with the total PANSS and all its subscales (except for psychological domain with total PANSS and social relationship and environmental domains with PANSS positive). Severity of depressive symptoms was significantly negatively correlated with all QOL domains. Functioning was significantly positively correlated with all QOL domains except in the environmental domain. Multiple regression analysis showed that depressive symptoms predicted all QOL domains except the social relationship domain while negative symptoms predicted social relationship and environmental domains. Depression is a common occurrence during the course of schizophrenia. Depressive and negative symptoms have a significant impact on the QOL of patients with schizophrenia.

  18. Improvement in verbal memory performance in depressed in-patients after treatment with electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, S V; Bumb, J M; Demirakca, T; Ende, G; Sartorius, A

    2016-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and well-tolerated therapy for severe and treatment-resistant depression. Cognitive side-effects are still feared by some patients and clinicians. Importantly, cognitive impairments are among the most disabling symptoms of depression itself. Patients suffering from a severe episode of depression were treated with either ECT or treatment as usual (TAU) in an in-patient setting. Matched healthy participants served as controls (HC). Verbal memory was tested with the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) before the specific treatment started (ECT = 15, TAU = 16, HC = 31) and 2 months after the last ECT session or 2 months after discharge respectively. Before the specific treatment started, depressed patients performed substantially worse compared with HC in total, short- and long-delay recall in the CVLT, while the ECT group showed the worst performance. More severely depressed patients showed worse performances in these measures. Intriguingly, verbal memory showed a significant improvement in ECT-treated patients, but not in the other groups. No differences between the groups were found at follow-up. Contrary to the widely feared assumption that ECT has long-term impact on memory functions, we found evidence that ECT is superior to TAU in improving verbal memory in depressed patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Which increases depressive symptoms in obese patients, hypertension or diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakir Özgür Keskek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression and obesity are common disorders. Obesity is also predictive of several chronic diseases like hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare depression frequency of obese patients with hypertension or diabetes. Methods: Weight, height and body mass index (BMI were measured. The definition of obesity was a body mass index (weight (kg/height (m2 ≥30 kg/m2. Obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were documented. All participants had a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI evaluation. Results: A total of 389 subjects were included, of whom 100, 101, 92, 96 participants were healthy, obese, obese with hypertension, obese with diabetes, respectively. Beck Depression Inventory scores of obese patients, obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were higher compared to the control group. BDI scores of obese patients with diabetes were higher compared to obese and obese with hypertension subjects.

  20. Patients with polymyositis show changes in muscle protein charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E M; Jacobsen, Søren; Rasmussen, L

    1989-01-01

    Polymyositis (PM) appears with indolent proximal muscle weakness and is an inflammatory disease with breakdown of muscle cells. In our study the protein charge concentrations of the contractile proteins in the A and I bands were determined, applying a microelectrode technique. Patients with PM show...... a lower protein charge concentration than healthy control subjects which may be caused by the breakdown and removal of the proteins in the contractile filaments. A tool to judge the state of the disease as well as an aid in diagnosis may have been found in this method....

  1. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) reduces the association between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions in patients with a history of suicidal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhofer, Thorsten; Crane, Catherine; Brennan, Kate; Duggan, Danielle S; Crane, Rebecca S; Eames, Catrin; Radford, Sholto; Silverton, Sarah; Fennell, Melanie J V; Williams, J Mark G

    2015-12-01

    In patients with a history of suicidal depression, recurrence of depressive symptoms can easily reactivate suicidal thinking. In this study, we investigated whether training in mindfulness, which is aimed at helping patients "decenter" from negative thinking, could help weaken the link between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions. Analyses were based on data from a recent randomized controlled trial, in which previously suicidal patients were allocated to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT), an active control treatment, cognitive psychoeducation (CPE), which did not include any meditation practice, or treatment as usual (TAU). After the end of the treatment phase, we compared the associations between depressive symptoms, as assessed through self-reports on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996), and suicidal thinking, as assessed through the Suicidal Cognitions Scale (Rudd et al., 2001). In patients with minimal to moderate symptoms at the time of assessment, comparisons of the correlations between depressive symptoms and suicidal cognitions showed significant differences between the groups. Although suicidal cognitions were significantly related to levels of symptoms in the 2 control groups, there was no such relation in the MBCT group. The findings suggest that, in patients with a history of suicidal depression, training in mindfulness can help to weaken the association between depressive symptoms and suicidal thinking, and thus reduce an important vulnerability for relapse to suicidal depression. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. The expression of depression among Javanese patients with major depressive disorder: a concept mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brintnell, E Sharon; Sommer, Ryan W; Kuncoro, Bambang; Setiawan, G Pandu; Bailey, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we explored the presentation of clinical depression in Java, Indonesia. Interviews were conducted with 20 Javanese patients (male and female) with major depressive disorder from both lower and higher socioeconomic levels. The recruited participants came from provincial and private mental health hospitals in the cities of Solo, Yogykarta (Jogja), Jakarta, and Malang on the island of Java, Indonesia. Concept mapping methodology using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify underlying themes in the expression of depressive phenomena in this Indonesian population. The results identified themes that grouped into six clusters: interpersonal relationships, hopelessness, physical/somatic, poverty of thought, discourage, and defeat. Findings give support to the view that culture influences the expression of Indonesian depressive phenomenology, which nevertheless has some common roots with Western clinical pictures of the disorder. Cultural influences may mask symptoms of the disorder to clinicians. Diagnostic and assessment tools must be carefully selected to ensure they address culturally specific expressions of depression.

  3. Exercise for patients with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Speyer, Helene; Gluud, Christian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The lifetime prevalence of major depression is estimated to affect 17% of the population and is considered the second largest health-care problem globally in terms of the number of years lived with disability. The effects of most antidepressant treatments are poor; therefore, exercise...... has been assessed in a number of randomized clinical trials. A number of reviews have previously analyzed these trials; however, none of these reviews have addresses the effect of exercise for adults diagnosed with major depression. METHODS/DESIGN: The objective of this systematic review...... is to investigate the beneficial and harmful effects of exercise, in terms of severity of depression, lack of remission, suicide, and so on, compared with treatment as usual with or without co-interventions in randomized clinical trials involving adults with a clinical diagnosis of major depression. A meta...

  4. Anhedonia and general distress show dissociable ventromedial prefrontal cortex connectivity in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C B; Chen, T; Nusslock, R; Keller, J; Schatzberg, A F; Menon, V

    2016-05-17

    Anhedonia, the reduced ability to experience pleasure in response to otherwise rewarding stimuli, is a core symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although the posterior ventromedial prefrontal cortex (pVMPFC) and its functional connections have been consistently implicated in MDD, their roles in anhedonia remain poorly understood. Furthermore, it is unknown whether anhedonia is primarily associated with intrinsic 'resting-state' pVMPFC functional connectivity or an inability to modulate connectivity in a context-specific manner. To address these gaps, a pVMPFC region of interest was first identified using activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis. pVMPFC connectivity was then examined in relation to anhedonia and general distress symptoms of depression, using both resting-state and task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging involving pleasant music, in current MDD and healthy control groups. In MDD, pVMPFC connectivity was negatively correlated with anhedonia but not general distress during music listening in key reward- and emotion-processing regions, including nucleus accumbens, ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra, orbitofrontal cortex and insula, as well as fronto-temporal regions involved in tracking complex sound sequences, including middle temporal gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus. No such dissociations were observed in the healthy controls, and resting-state pVMPFC connectivity did not dissociate anhedonia from general distress in either group. Our findings demonstrate that anhedonia in MDD is associated with context-specific deficits in pVMPFC connectivity with the mesolimbic reward system when encountering pleasurable stimuli, rather than a static deficit in intrinsic resting-state connectivity. Critically, identification of functional circuits associated with anhedonia better characterizes MDD heterogeneity and may help track of one of its core symptoms.

  5. Chronobiology, cognitive function and depressive symptoms in surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Melissa Voigt

    2014-01-01

    in this limited population. With regard to safety in our study, melatonin treatment for three months did not cause any serious adverse effects. Finally, we systematically reviewed the literature on the prophylactic or therapeutic effect of melatonin for depression or depressive symptoms in adult patients...... disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are common problems arising around the time of surgery or in the course of a cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment period. The importance of investigating prevention or treatment possibilities in these populations is significant due to the extent...... investigated the effect of 6 mg oral melatonin on depressive symptoms, anxiety, sleep, cognitive function and fatigue in patients with breast cancer in a three month time period after surgery. Melatonin had an effect on reducing the risk of developing depressive symptoms and also increased sleep efficiency...

  6. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Muhammad; Fahim, Ammad; Innocent, Haran; Mansoor, Zainab; Rizvi, Shehrbano; Farrukh, Hizra

    2016-01-01

    Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS). Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7%) patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient's awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7%) uneducated patients, 85 (59.4%) were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients. PMID:27752508

  7. Study exploring depression and cardiovascular diseases amongst Arabic speaking patients living in the State of Qatar: Rationale and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; Al Suwaidi, Jassim M; Alqahtani, Awad; Assad, Nidal; Qader, Najla Abdul; Byrne, Carolyn; Singh, Rajvir; Fung, Tak Shing

    2012-01-01

    In Qatar, cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death. Studies show that depression is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality among cardiovascular patients. Thus, early detection of, and intervention for, depression among cardiovascular patients can reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and save health care costs. To date there is no study in the Gulf region exploring depression among cardiovascular patients. The goals of our three-phase research program are to (1) understand the mental health issues, specifically depression, as experienced by cardiovascular patients living in the State of Qatar; (2) identify and implement strategies that would prevent depression and assist patients to deal with depression; and (3) evaluate, facilitate, and sustain strategies that are effective at reducing depression and foster its treatment among cardiovascular patients. This paper describe phase I of the research program. Using both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies, we will investigate (1) the prevalence and severity of depression among patients who have confirmed diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases (2) how contextual factors such as social, cultural, and economic factors contribute to the risk of depression and its management among cardiovascular patients, and (3) formulate effective intervention strategies that are expected to increase awareness, prevention of and treatment for depression among cardiovascular patients, thus reducing cardiovascular diseases morbidity and mortality in Qatar.

  8. Defense mechanisms in patients with fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tormod Landmark

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Fibromyalgia (FM and depression has been suggested to share a common underlying etiology. Few studies have investigated the role of emotional regulation processes in FM compared to depressive disorders.The purpose of the current study was to explore the use of defense mechanisms in FM patients with and without comorbid lifetime depressive disorder (LDD, and to compare their use of defenses to healthy control subjects and patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. Methods: A total of 91 participants were included (17 with FM and LDD, 25 with FM but not LDD, 24 with MDD, and 25 healthy controls. Depressive disorders were identified by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Axis I disorders (SCID-I. All diagnosis of FM were confirmed to meet the American College of Rheumatology's criteria for FM. The Life Style Index (LSI was used to measure defense mechanisms. Results and Conclusions: Group comparisons indicated that MDD patients and FM patients with LDD made significantly more use of defenses than healthy controls, whereas FM patients without LDD made significantly less use of defenses than both MDD patients and FM patients with LDD, but did not differ from healthy controls. Follow up analyses indicated significant main effects for the defense mechanisms of regression, compensation and displacement. This study suggests that FM and depression do not share common risk factors in terms of restricted affects or avoidance of conflicted feelings.

  9. The management of depressive symptoms in patients with COPD: a postal survey of general practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yohannes, A.M.; Hann, M.; Sibbald, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: We examined the management of depression by general practitioners (GPs), through the use of case vignettes, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), severe osteoarthritis and depressive symptoms alone. BACKGROUND: Depression is common in patients with COPD. Untreated

  10. Depression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: description, causes and mechanisms

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    MARGARETTEN, MARY; JULIAN, LAURA; KATZ, PATRICIA; Yelin, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Two sets of contributory factors to depression among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are generally examined – the social context of the individual and the biologic disease state of that person’s RA. This article will review the evidence for both. RA affects patients both physically and psychologically. Comorbid depression is common with RA and leads to worse health outcomes. Low socioeconomic status, gender, age, race/ethnicity, functional limitation, pain and poor clinical status hav...

  11. Risk factors to suicidal attempt in major depressive disorder patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈林

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the risk factors of socio-demographic and clinical characteristics related to suicidal attempt in major depressive disorder patients.Methods A total of 1 172 major depressive disorder patients were consecutively examined in 13 mental health centers in China from September 1,2010 to February 28,2011.The patients’socio-demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection procedure.

  12. Anxiety and depression in Slovak patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soósová, Mária Sováriová; Macejová, Želmíra; Zamboriová, Mária; Dimunová, Lucia

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity. Mental health conditions are often unrecognized and untreated in primary care. To assess prevalence of anxiety and depression and their impact on arthritis pain and functional disability in Slovak patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Anxiety was assessed by the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), depression by the Zung self-rating depression scale (SDS), pain by the visual analog scale (VAS) and functional disability by the health assessment questionnaire - disability index (HAQ-DI) in 142 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Spearman's rho was calculated to assess relations between variables. Stepwise linear regression analysis was used to assess impact of anxiety and depression on arthritis pain and functional disability. High prevalence of anxiety and depression was observed in arthritis patients. Anxiety and depression were significant predictors of arthritis pain and functional disability. Sex, education, marital status, disease duration and comorbidity had no impact on arthritis pain and functional disability. These findings support the notions that psychological negative affect can influence subjective perception of arthritis pain and disability. The regular screening of anxiety and depression and the psychological approaches can be useful for managing arthritis patients.

  13. Impact of depression on health care utilization and costs among multimorbid patients--from the MultiCare Cohort Study.

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    Jens-Oliver Bock

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to describe and analyze the effects of depression on health care utilization and costs in a sample of multimorbid elderly patients. METHOD: This cross-sectional analysis used data of a prospective cohort study, consisting of 1,050 randomly selected multimorbid primary care patients aged 65 to 85 years. Depression was defined as a score of six points or more on the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15. Subjects passed a geriatric assessment, including a questionnaire for health care utilization. The impact of depression on health care costs was analyzed using multiple linear regression models. A societal perspective was adopted. RESULTS: Prevalence of depression was 10.7%. Mean total costs per six-month period were €8,144 (95% CI: €6,199-€10,090 in patients with depression as compared to €3,137 (95% CI: €2,735-€3,538; p<0.001 in patients without depression. The positive association between depression and total costs persisted after controlling for socio-economic variables, functional status and level of multimorbidity. In particular, multiple regression analyses showed a significant positive association between depression and pharmaceutical costs. CONCLUSION: Among multimorbid elderly patients, depression was associated with significantly higher health care utilization and costs. The effect of depression on costs was even greater than reported by previous studies conducted in less morbid patients.

  14. Prevalence of Depression and Anxiety amongst Cancer Patients in a Hospital Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Anish Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The biomedical care for cancer has not been complemented by psychosocial progressions in cancer care. Objectives. To find the prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients in a hospital setting. Design and Setting. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the tertiary care hospitals Shifa International Hospital Islamabad and Nuclear Medicine, Oncology, and Radiotherapy Institute [NORI]. Patients and Methods. 300 patients were interviewed from both the outpatient and inpatient department using The Aga Khan University Anxiety and Depression Scale (AKUADS. Main Outcome Measures. Using a score of 20 and above on the AKUADS, 146 (48.7% patients were suffering from anxiety and depression. Results. When cross tabulation was done between different factors and the cancer patients with anxiety and depression, the following factors were found out to be significant with associated p value < 0.05: education of the patient, presence of cancer in the family, the severity of pain, and the patient’s awareness of his anxiety and depression. Out of 143 (47.7% uneducated patients, 85 (59.4% were depressed, hence making it the highest educational category suffering from depression and anxiety. Conclusion. The prevalence of anxiety and depression amongst cancer patients was high showing that importance should be given to screening and counseling cancer patients for anxiety and depression, to help them cope with cancer as a disease and its impact on their mental wellbeing. Limitations. The frequency of female patients in our research was higher than those of male patients.

  15. Evaluation of Nutritional Status of Patients with Depression

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    Gülşah Kaner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives. Our goal was to determine nutritional status, body composition, and biochemical parameters of patients diagnosed with depression based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. Methods. A total of 59 individuals, aged 18–60 years admitted to Mental Health Centre of Kayseri Education and Research Hospital, were included in the study. The participants were randomly assigned to two groups; depression group (n=29 and control group (n=30. Anthropometric measurements, some biochemical parameters, demographic data, and 24-hour dietary recall were evaluated. Results. 65.5% of depression and 60.0% of control group were female. Intake of vitamins A, thiamine, riboflavin, B6, folate, C, Na, K, Mg, Ca, P, Fe, Zn, and fibre (p<0.05 were lower in depression group. Median levels of body weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio (p<0.05 were significantly higher in depression group. Fasting blood glucose levels, serum vitamins B12, and folic acid (p<0.05 in depression group were lower than controls. Serum insulin and HOMA levels of two groups were similar. Conclusion. Some vitamin B consumption and serum vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were low while signs of abdominal obesity were high among patients with depression. Future research exploring nutritional status of individuals with depression is warranted.

  16. Implicit and explicit self-esteem in remitted depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeijers, Danique; Vrijsen, Janna N; van Oostrom, Iris; Isaac, Linda; Speckens, Anne; Becker, Eni S; Rinck, Mike

    2017-03-01

    Low self-esteem is a symptom of depression and depression vulnerability. Prior research on self-esteem has largely focused on implicit (ISE) and explicit self-esteem (ESE) as two separate constructs, missing their interaction. Therefore, the current study investigated the interaction between ISE and ESE in a depression-vulnerable group (remitted depressed patients; RDs), compared to never-depressed controls (ND). Seventy-five RDs and 75 NDs participated in the study. To measure ESE, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) was used. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) and the Name Letter Preference Task (NLPT) were used to assess ISE. RDs reported lower ESE than NDs. However, the two groups did not differ on ISE. RDs exhibited a damaged self-esteem or a low-congruent self-esteem, similar to what has been found in currently depressed patients. Moreover, damaged self-esteem was associated with residual depressive symptoms. The results need to be interpreted with care because the IAT and NLPT did not reveal the same associations with the clinical measures. Implicit and explicit self-esteem may be different constructs in depression and studying the combination is important. The present study provides evidence indicating that damaged self-esteem may be more detrimental than low congruent self-esteem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Depression, insomnia and sleep apnea in patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, M.; Rustagi, T.; Rustagi, S.; Kohli, R.

    2011-01-01

    Depression and sleep disorders are more frequent in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) than the general population, and are associated with reduced quality of life and increased mortality risk. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of depression, sleep apnea, insomnia in patients on HD as well as depression in their primary caregiver and to correlate these with the demographic profile. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 69 patients on maintenance HD for more than 3 months. There was high p revalence of depression (47.8%), insomnia (60.9%), increased risk of sleep apnea (24.6%) and depression in caregiver (31.9%). Depression was significantly more in patients with low monthly income (P=0.03), those on dialysis for more than 1 year (P=0.001) and the unemployed (P=0.009). High-risk patients for sleep apnea tended to be males with low monthly income (P=0.02). Insomnia was significantly higher in patients who were on dialysis for more than 1 year (P=0.003). PMID:22022080

  18. The Techniques for Overcoming Depression Questionnaire: Mokken Scale Analysis, Reliability, and Concurrent Validity in Depressed Cardiac Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Lemos, Mariantonia; Doyle, Frank; Steinmeyer, Brian C; Csik, Iris; Carney, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The Techniques for Overcoming Depression (TOD) questionnaire assesses the frequency with which patients being treated for depression use cognitive-behavioral techniques in daily life. This study examined its latent structure, reliability and concurrent validity in depressed cardiac patients. The TOD was administered at the initial and final treatment sessions in three trials of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) (n = 260) for depression in cardiac patients. Mokken scaling was used to determine its dimensionality. The TOD is unidimensional in depressed cardiac patients, both at the initial evaluation (H = .46) and the end of treatment (H = .47). It is sensitive to change and the total score correlates with therapist ratings of the patient's socialization to CBT (r=.40, povercoming depression in cardiac patients. Studies of the TOD in other depressed patient populations are needed.

  19. Interferon-induced depression in patients with hepatitis C: an epidemiologic study

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    Lucas Pereira Jorge de Medeiros

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the incidence rate and severity of depressive symptoms in different time points (12, 24 and 48 weeks in Brazilian patients with HCV treated with PEG IFN plus ribavirin. Methods We conducted an observational prospective study using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D. Results Fifty patients were included. The assessments with either scale showed the highest score of depressive symptoms in the 24th week of treatment; the mean BDI score before treatment was 6.5 ± 5.3 and the mean CES-D was 10.9 ± 7.8. After 24 weeks, the mean BDI was 16.1 ± 10.2 and mean CES-D was 18.6 ± 13.0; 46% were diagnosed with depression according to combined BDI and CES-D scores. The somatic/psychomotor subscales were highly correlated with overall scale scores . Subjects with history of substance and alcohol abuse had higher risk for IFN-induced depression. Conclusion Treatment with PEG IFN was associated with a high incidence rate of depressive symptoms in this sample of Brazilian patients, as measured by CES-D and BDI. Alcohol and substance abuse increase the risk of PEG IFN-induced depression.

  20. Depression symptom ratings in geriatric patients with bipolar mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Al Jurdi, Rayan; Gildengers, Ariel; Greenberg, Rebecca L; Tenhave, Thomas; Bruce, Martha L; Mulsant, Benoit; Young, Robert C

    2011-11-01

    Given the paucity of information available regarding standardized ratings of depression symptoms in bipolar manic states, and in particular those in older adults, we explored depression ratings in symptomatic participants in a multicenter study of treatment of bipolar I disorder in late life. Baseline data was obtained from the first 100 patients enrolled in an NIMH-funded, 9-week, randomized, double-blind RCT comparing treatment with lithium or valproate in patients of age 60 years and older with Type I Bipolar mania or hypomania. This multi-site study was conducted at six academic medical centers in the United States and enrolled inpatients and outpatients with a total Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) score of 18 or greater. Depressive symptoms were evaluated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The criterion for at least moderate bipolar depressive symptoms was the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) Consensus Meeting definition of HAM-D 17 total score >20. Eleven percent of patients had mixed symptoms defined by depression scale severity according to ECNP criterion. In the overall sample, total scores on the two depression scales were highly correlated. Total YMRS scores of this mixed symptom group were similar to the remainder of the sample. These preliminary findings suggest that moderate to severe depressive symptoms occur in about one in ten bipolar manic elders. Future studies are needed to further evaluate symptom profiles, clinical correlates, and treatments for bipolar older adults with combined manic and depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Low serum BDNF levels in depressed patients cannot be attributed to individual depressive symptoms or symptom cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, B. A. A.; Molendijk, M. L.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Buitelaar, J. K.; Prickaerts, J.; Elzinga, B. M.; Oude Voshaar, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Low serum BDNF levels have been found in depressed patients. No study has systematically investigated whether individual symptoms or symptom profiles within a depressed population contribute to low BDNF levels found in depressed subjects. METHODS: All 1070 patients with a past 6-month di

  2. Self-stigma in depressive patients: Association of cognitive schemata, depression, and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotsu, Sakie; Horikawa, Naoshi

    2016-12-01

    Many empirical studies have indicated that various psychosocial and psychiatric variables are correlated with levels of self-stigma. Treatment methods for reducing self-stigma have been investigated in recent years, especially those examining the relationship between negative cognitive schemata and self-stigma. This study examined the relationship of self-stigma with cognitive schemata, depression, and self-esteem in depressive patients. Furthermore, structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to evaluate three hypothetical models. Study participants were 110 patients with depression (54 men, 56 women; mean age=45.65years, SD=12.68; 83 diagnosed with mood disorders; 22 with neurotic, stress-related, or somatoform disorders; and 5 with other disorders) attending a psychiatric service. Outcomes were measured using the Japanese versions of the Devaluation-Discrimination Scale, Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and Rosenberg's Self Esteem Scale. The analysis indicated a better fit of the model that assumed self-stigma as mediator, suggesting that cognitive schemata influence self-stigma, while self-stigma affects depression and self-esteem. The tested models using SEM indicated that (1) self-stigma has the potential to mediate the relationship between cognitive schemata and depression, and (2) depression and self-stigma have a similar influence on self-esteem. Although low self-esteem is considered one of the symptoms of depression, when we aim to recover self-esteem, we do not only observe improvement in depressive symptoms; thus, approaches that focus on the reduction of self-stigma are probably valid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Seasonality in depressive and anxiety symptoms among primary care patients and in patients with depressive and anxiety disorders; results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winthorst, Wim H.; Post, Wendy J.; Meesters, Ybe; Penninx, Brenda W. H. J.; Nolen, Willem A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Little is known about seasonality of specific depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms in different patient populations. This study aims to assess seasonal variation of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a primary care population and across participants who were classified in diagnostic

  4. The effect of psychological capital intervention in patients with depression

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    Rui-jun Song

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of psychological capital intervention on the depressed patients. Method: 62 patients with depression were randomly divided into control group and experimental group. Control group was taken with drug treatment, experimental group was taken with drug treatment and psychological capital intervention. Two groups of patients had been evaluated by psychological capital questionnaire (PPQ and depression self rating scale (SDS , before and after treatment. Results: After treatment, the two groups of patients’ scores of PPQ and SDS both dropped significantly. The treatment results of the experimental group was better than the control group. Conclusion: In conventional drug treatment with psychological intervention of capital at the same time, can efetively improve the patients’ level of psychological capital, significantly alleviate symptoms of depression.

  5. Lateralization Pattern in Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression

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    Dr. Rajneesh Gupta

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to see the incidence of peripheral laterality in schizophrenics and depressed patients. A total of 147 male subjects (29 schizophrenics, 38 depressed, 80 non-patient controls were asked to indicate their preferences for hand, foot, eye, and ear on the Sidedness Bias Schedule. The correlations among the laterality quotients (LQ in all the three groups were positive and highly significant except the foot-eye correlation in the non-patient controls. The left and mixed-handed schizophrenics and depressed subjects exhibited extreme left and mixed preference for foot, eye, and ear, respectively. Hand and ear preferences emerged as the predictors of schizophrenia and depression in the logistic regression analysis. The findings indicate a possible relationship between psychopathology and extreme left-mixed dominance.

  6. Effect of depression on patients with Parkinson's disease

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    Huan-yu WANG

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate depressive symptoms and quality of life in 100 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD by using Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Healthy Survey (SF-36. Physiological role had no significant difference (P > 0.05, while physiological function (P = 0.001, emotions (P = 0.000, social function (P = 0.007, body pain (P = 0.000, energy (P = 0.000, mental health (P = 0.000, general health (P = 0.004 and total score (P = 0.000 had statistically significant difference in PD patients with different degrees of depressive symptoms. The study indicates that depressive symptoms may impact the quality of life in PD patients. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.09.015

  7. Reduced sleep quality and depression associate with decreased quality of life in patients with pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistner, Sarah M; Klotsche, Jens; Dimopoulou, Christina; Athanasoulia, Anastasia P; Roemmler-Zehrer, Josefine; Pieper, Lars; Schopohl, Jochen; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Stalla, Günter K; Fulda, Stephany; Sievers, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    Several studies reported decreased quality of life (QoL) and sleep as well as increased rates of depression for patients with pituitary adenomas. Our aim was to explore to what extent differences in depression and sleep quality contribute to differences in QoL between patients with pituitary adenomas and controls. A cross-sectional case-control study. Endocrine Outpatient Unit of the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Department of Internal Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, and the Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Technical University, Dresden. Patients with pituitary adenomas (n=247) and controls (from the DETECT cohort, a large epidemiological study in primary care patients) matched individually by age and gender (n=757). Sleep quality was assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and QoL was measured by the generic EQ-5D and calculated by the time trade-off- and VAS-method. Depression was categorized as 'no depression', 'subclinical depression', and 'clinical depression' according to the Beck Depressions Inventory for patients and the Depression Screening Questionnaire for control subjects. General linear and generalized, logistic mixed models as well as proportional odds mixed models were calculated for analyzing differences in baseline characteristics and in different subgroups. Patients with pituitary adenomas showed decreased QoL (VAS index: 0.73±0.19) and sleep (PSQI score: 6.75±4.17) as well as increased rates of depression (subclinical or clinical depression: 41.4%) compared with their matched control subjects (VAS index: 0.79±0.18, PSQI score: 5.66±4.31, subclinical or clinical depression: 25.9%). We have shown that a substantial proportion of the reduced QoL (48% respectively 65%) was due to the incidence of depression and reduced sleep quality. These findings emphasize the importance of diagnosing depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances in patients with pituitary disease, with the ultimate

  8. Nonverbal behavioral similarity between patients with depression in remission and interviewers in relation to satisfaction and recurrence of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Erwin; van Os, Titus; Ormel, Johan; Bouhuys, Netty

    2006-01-01

    Unsatisfying interpersonal relationships are involved in the onset and course of depression. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study we investigated the nonverbal communication between 101 patients with remitted depression and interviewers. We related the interaction

  9. Nonverbal behavioral similarity between patients with depression in remission and interviewers in relation to satisfaction and recurrence of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Erwin; van Os, Titus; Ormel, Johan; Bouhuys, Netty

    2006-01-01

    Unsatisfying interpersonal relationships are involved in the onset and course of depression. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study we investigated the nonverbal communication between 101 patients with remitted depression and interviewers. We related the interaction

  10. Evaluation of Depression and Anxiety in patients with tinnitus

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    S.A.A. Hosseininasab, M.D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Tinnitus is a troublesome disease that may cause several problems, including the following: insomnia decreased concentration and diminished quality of life. This study was designed in order to evaluate depression and anxiety in patients with tinnitus.Materials and Methods: This study was an experimental survey and carried out with case – control method. There were 50 persons in case and control groups, case group included patients with non-organic tinnitus. The patients in case and control group completed Beck and Spiel Berger questionnaire, in order to evaluate their level of depression and anxiety.Results: Age, sex, marital status and smoking of case and control groups were similar. Case groups included 50 patients in which 20 of those were smokers and their level of depression and anxiety were higher than non smokers and this difference was significant (P=0.03. Level of depression in patients with tinnitus was higher than control group (p=0.03, patients with tinnitus experienced more anxiety than control group.Conclusion: The patients with tinnitus suffered more depression and anxiety in comparison to patients without tinnitus.

  11. Depression, hopelessness, and sleep in cancer patients' desire for death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Pathiaki, Maria; Galanos, Antonis; Vlahos, Lambros

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of clinical characteristics and risk factors for hastened death in advanced cancer patients. Patients completed the Greek version of Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death (G-SAHD), a sleep quality measure, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), a Greek version of a depression inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), a hopelessness scale, the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for the assessment of pain. The final sample consisted of 102 terminally ill cancer patients attending a Palliative Care Unit. Statistically significant associations were found between G-SAHD and patients performance status (ECOG) (chi2 = 8.62, p = 0.003). Strongest associations were observed between desire for death, depression, and hopelessness (r = 0.468, p hopelessness" (p depression" (p Depression, hopelessness, and sleep quality appeared to have a statistically significant relationship with desire for hastened death. Health care professionals finding desire for death in advanced cancer patients should not only consider depression and hopelessness, but also other factors such as poor sleep quality in their diagnostic formulations in order to provide the appropriate treatment.

  12. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for recurrent depression: Do we need to exclude currently depressed patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalderen, J.R. van

    2016-01-01

    For many patients, major depression is a recurrent disorder and a potential chronic disease causing significant levels of distress. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is an 8-week training combining meditation exercises and cognitive therapy aimed at preventing relapse in patients with remi

  13. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies.

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    Oliver Groene

    Full Text Available Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures.We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ, a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level.Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute myocardial infarction n = 1

  14. Unrevealed Depression Involves Dysfunctional Coping Strategies in Crohn’s Disease Patients in Clinical Remission

    OpenAIRE

    Caterina Viganò; Roberta Calzolari; Paola Marianna Marinaccio; Cristina Bezzio; Federica Furfaro; Gabriella Ba; Giovanni Maconi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. This study investigated the proportion of CD patients in clinical remission with clinical depression, and coping strategies in those with severe depressive disorders. Materials and Methods. One hundred consecutive CD patients in clinical remission were screened for anxiety and depression by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and patients with depressive symptoms were further investigated by means of Cognitive Behavioural Assessment 2.0 and Beck Depression Invento...

  15. Neuropsychological profile of patients with bipolar depression in remission

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    Totić-Poznanović Sanja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine if the patients with bipolar affective disorder, after the depressive phase, would exhibit cognitive impairment in remission. Methods. Twenty three euthymic patients with bipolar disorder were matched, on a case-by-case basis, to twenty-one healthy subjects in the control group, for the presence of the symptoms of depression. The patients and the control group were tested with a battery of neuropsychological tests. Results. Impairments were found in the patients compared with the control group in tests of verbal learning and memory and in tests of executive function. Verbal learning and memory, as well as executive functions, did not correlate either with the clinical indices of patients, or with the demographic and baseline clinical measures of depression. Conclusion. Impaired verbal learning and memory and executive functions may represent a trait rather than the state variables in bipolar disorder.

  16. Efficacy of Desvenlafaxine Compared With Placebo in Major Depressive Disorder Patients by Age Group and Severity of Depression at Baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Daniel; Zhang, Min; Prieto, Rita; Boucher, Matthieu

    2017-04-01

    This post hoc meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of desvenlafaxine 50 and 100 mg versus placebo across age groups and severity of depression at baseline in patients with major depressive disorder. Data from placebo and desvenlafaxine 50-mg and 100-mg dose arms were pooled from 9 short-term, placebo-controlled, major depressive disorder studies (N = 4279). Effects of age (18-40 years, >40 to depression severity (mild, 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total score [HAM-D17] ≤18; moderate, HAM-D17 >18 to depression and function compared with placebo for patients 18 to 40 years, older than 40 to younger than 55 years, and 55 to younger than 65 years, with no significant evidence of an effect of age. Desvenlafaxine significantly improved most measures of depression and function in moderately and severely depressed patients. There was a significant baseline severity by treatment interaction for HAM-D17 total score only (P = 0.027), with a larger treatment effect for the severely depressed group. Desvenlafaxine significantly improved depressive symptoms in patients younger than 65 years and in patients with moderate or severe baseline depression. Sample sizes were not adequate to assess desvenlafaxine efficacy in patients 65 years or older or with mild baseline depression.

  17. Patients' opinions about knowing their risk for depression and what to do about it. The predictD-qualitative study.

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    Juan Á Bellón

    Full Text Available The predictD study developed and validated a risk algorithm for predicting the onset of major depression in primary care. We aimed to explore the opinion of patients about knowing their risk for depression and the values and criteria upon which these opinions are based.A maximum variation sample of patients was taken, stratified by city, age, gender, immigrant status, socio-economic status and lifetime depression. The study participants were 52 patients belonging to 13 urban health centres in seven different cities around Spain. Seven Focus Groups (FGs were given held with primary care patients, one for each of the seven participating cities.The results showed that patients generally welcomed knowing their risk for depression. Furthermore, in light of available evidence several patients proposed potential changes in their lifestyles to prevent depression. Patients generally preferred to ask their General Practitioners (GPs for advice, though mental health specialists were also mentioned. They suggested that GPs undertake interventions tailored to each patient, from a "patient-centred" approach, with certain communication skills, and giving advice to help patients cope with the knowledge that they are at risk of becoming depressed.Patients are pleased to be informed about their risk for depression. We detected certain beliefs, attitudes, values, expectations and behaviour among the patients that were potentially useful for future primary prevention programmes on depression.

  18. Oral mucosal diseases in anxiety and depression patients: Hospital based observational study from south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Kandagal V; Shenai, Prashanth; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Ronad, Yusuf-Ahammed A; Bilahari, Naduvakattu; Pramod, Redder C; Kumar, Sreeja P

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of different Oral Mucosal diseases in Anxiety and Depression patients. A hospital based observational Study was conducted in the department of Psychiatry and department of Oral Medicine and Radiology. Patients who were diagnosed with Anxiety or Depression by the psychiatrists using Hamilton Anxiety and Depression scale were subjected to complete oral examination to check for oral diseases like Oral Lichen Planus (OLP), Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS), and Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS). Equal number of control group subjects were also included. In this study statistically significant increase in the oral diseases in patients with anxiety and depression than the control group was recorded. Oral diseases were significantly higher in anxiety patients (20.86%) than in depression (9.04%) and control group patients (5.17%). In anxiety patients, the prevalence of RAS was 12%, OLP was 5.7%, and BMS was 2.87%. In depression patients, the prevalence of RAS was 4.02%, OLP was 2.01% and BMS was 3.01%. In control group the prevalence was 2.2%, 1.33% and 1.62% in RAS, OLP and BMS respectively. RAS and OLP were significantly higher in the younger age group (18-49) and BMS was seen between the age group of 50-77 years in both study and control groups. The results of the present study showed a positive association between psychological alterations and changes in the oral mucosa, particularly conditions like OLP, RAS and BMS. Thus psychogenic factors like anxiety and depression may act as a risk factor that could influence the initiation and development of oral mucosal diseases. Hence psychological management should be taken into consideration when treating patients with these oral diseases. Key words:Lichen planus, anxiety, depression, burning mouth syndrome, recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

  19. The risk of being depressed is significantly higher in cancer patients than in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, T J; Brähler, E; Faller, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a common co-morbidity of cancer that has a detrimental effect on quality of life, treatment adherence and potentially survival. We conducted an epidemiological multi-center study including a population-based random comparison sample and estimated the prevalence.......0), thyroid (M = 7.8, SD = 6.3) and brain tumours (M = 7.6, SD = 4.9) showed the highest prevalence, whereas patients with prostate cancer (M = 4.3, SD = 3.8) and malignant melanoma (M = 5.3, SD = 4.3) had the lowest levels of depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our results help clinicians identify cancer...... of depressive symptoms by cancer site, thereby identifying cancer patients with the highest prevalence of depression. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included 4020 adult cancer inpatients and outpatients from five distinct regions across Germany in a proportional stratified random sample based on the nationwide cancer...

  20. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Klazinga, Niek S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes...... are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect......-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management...

  1. The effect of acupuncture on mood and working memory in patients with depression and schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peggy Bosch; Maurits van den Noort; Sujung Yeo; Sabina Lim; Anton Coenen; Gilles van Luijtelaar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with depression, as wel as in patients with schizophrenia, both mood and working memory performance are often impaired. Both issues can only be addressed and improved with medication to some extent. OBJECTIVE: This study investigates the mood and the working memory performance in patients with depression or schizophrenia and whether acupuncture can improve these. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: A pragmatic clinical trial design was used. The study was conducted in a psychiatric clinic. Fifty patients with depression and 50 with schizophrenia were randomly divided into an experimental and a waiting-list group. Additional y, 25 healthy control participants were included. Twelve weeks of individualized acupuncture treatment was used as the clinical intervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Al patients were tested before (T1) and after (T2) acupuncture treatment on a mood scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI-II), a simple working memory task (digit span), and a complex working memory task (letter-number sequencing); the healthy controls were tested at T1 only. RESULTS: Patients with depression scored worse than the others on the BDI-II, and patients with schizophrenia scored worse than the healthy controls. On the digit span, patients with schizophrenia did not differ from healthy controls whereas they scored worse of al on the letter-number sequencing. With respect to the acupuncture findings, first, the present study showed that the use of acupuncture to treat patients with schizophrenia was both practical and safe. Moreover, acupuncture had a positive effect on the BDI-II for the depression group, but acupuncture had no effect on the digit span and on the letter-number sequencing performance for the two clinical groups. CONCLUSION: The clinical improvement in patients with depression after acupuncture treatment was not accompanied by any significant change in a simple working memory task or in a more complex working memory

  2. Depressive symptoms and pain evaluations among persons with chronic pain: catastrophizing, but not pain acceptance, shows significant effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Elizabeth J; Ness, Timothy J; Doleys, Daniel M; Baños, James H; Cianfrini, Leanne; Richards, J Scott

    2009-12-15

    Cognitive factors such as catastrophic thoughts regarding pain, and conversely, one's acceptance of that pain, may affect emotional functioning among persons with chronic pain conditions. The aims of the present study were to examine the effects of both catastrophizing and acceptance on affective ratings of experimentally induced ischemic pain and also self-reports of depressive symptoms. Sixty-seven individuals with chronic back pain completed self-report measures of catastrophizing, acceptance, and depressive symptoms. In addition, participants underwent an ischemic pain induction procedure and were asked to rate the induced pain. Catastrophizing showed significant effects on sensory and intensity but not affective ratings of the induced pain. Acceptance did not show any significant associations, when catastrophizing was also in the model, with any form of ratings of the induced pain. Catastrophizing, but not acceptance, was also significantly associated with self-reported depressive symptoms when these two variables were both included in a regression model. Overall, results indicate negative thought patterns such as catastrophizing appear to be more closely related to outcomes of perceived pain severity and affect in persons with chronic pain exposed to an experimental laboratory pain stimulus than does more positive patterns as reflected in measures of acceptance.

  3. Screening for depression in terminally ill cancer patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akechi, Tatsuo; Okuyama, Toru; Sugawara, Yuriko; Shima, Yasuo; Furukawa, Toshiaki A; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2006-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the performance of several screening instruments for adjustment disorders (ADs) and major depression (MD) among terminally ill Japanese cancer patients. Two hundred and nine consecutive patients were assessed for ADs and MD using a structured clinical interview at the time of their registration with a palliative care unit, and two single-item interviews ("Are you depressed?" and "Have you lost interest?") and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were administered. Screening performance was investigated by calculating sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value, negative predictive value, likelihood ratio, and stratum-specific likelihood ratios. When the screening target included both an AD and MD, the HADS is a more useful screening method than the single-item interviews. Regarding screening for MD, both single-item interviews and the HADS possess useful screening performance. Different screening instruments may be recommended depending on the depressive disorders and specific populations.

  4. Presence of anxiety and depression in patients with bronchiectasis unrelated to cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón Moreno, Rosa María; Fernandes Vasconcelos, Gilda; Cisneros, Carolina; Gómez-Punter, Rosa Mar; Segrelles Calvo, Gonzalo; Ancochea, Julio

    2013-10-01

    Patients with chronic bronchiectasis (BQ) may suffer from psychological disorders. The objective of this study was to assess the presence of anxiety and depression in patients from a specialised BQ Unit, using validated questionnaires. We included patients consecutively diagnosed with BQ (unrelated to cystic fibrosis) by high resolution computed tomography in the study. Patients were clinically stable in the previous three weeks and voluntarily completed the Beck Depression Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, after signing the informed consent. They were classified according to their scores on the psychological screening questionnaires, and their results were compared with the clinical, radiological and functional parameters and Quality of Life. Seventy patients were included, 48 women and 22 men, with a mean age of 64.19years. Thirty-four percent (34%) of patients showed symptoms of depression, and around 55% had scores above the 50th percentile in trait and state anxiety. The amount of sputum was associated with trait anxiety. Bacterial colonization was related to anxiety (trait and state), especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization. Female patients showed a higher risk of depression. There was no relationship between the Quality of Life scores and the established classifications of anxiety and depression. A high percentage of patients with BQ presented anxiety (trait and state) and depression. The daily sputum production and bacterial colonization (especially with P. aeruginosa) were the variables most related to anxiety; depression was more common in women. We believe that the presence of psychological disorders should be evaluated, especially in patients with this profile. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Brain activation to favorite music in healthy controls and depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuch, Elizabeth A; Bluhm, Robyn L; Williamson, Peter C; Théberge, Jean; Densmore, Maria; Neufeld, Richard W J

    2009-08-26

    Reward-processing neurocircuitry has been delineated using verbal or visual processing and/or decision-making tasks. We examined more basic processes of listening to enjoyable music in healthy and depressed patients. The paradigm was passive, individualized, and brief. Sixteen depressed and 15 control individuals provided favorite music and identified neutral music from selections provided. In the fMRI scanner, individuals heard their neutral and their favorite music for 3 min each. Favorite versus neutral music-listening contrasts showed greater activation in controls than depressed patients in medial orbital frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens/ventral striatum. Left medial prefrontal cortex activity was positively correlated with pleasure scores, whereas middle temporal cortex and globus pallidus were negatively correlated with pleasure. This paradigm activated neurocircuitry of reward processing and showed clinically meaningful alterations in depression.

  6. Depressive symptoms accelerate cognitive decline in amyloid-positive MCI patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendel, Matthias; Xiong, Guoming; Delker, Andreas [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Pogarell, Oliver [University of Munich, Department of Psychiatry, Munich (Germany); Bartenstein, Peter; Rominger, Axel [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich (Germany); Collaboration: for the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2015-04-01

    Late-life depression even in subsyndromal stages is strongly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Furthermore, brain amyloidosis is an early biomarker in subjects who subsequently suffer from AD and can be sensitively detected by amyloid PET. Therefore, we aimed to compare amyloid load and glucose metabolism in subsyndromally depressed subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). [{sup 18}F]AV45 PET, [{sup 18}F]FDG PET and MRI were performed in 371 MCI subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Subjects were judged β-amyloid-positive (Aβ+; 206 patients) or β-amyloid-negative (Aβ-; 165 patients) according to [{sup 18}F]AV45 PET. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire depression item 4. Subjects with depressive symptoms (65 Aβ+, 41 Aβ-) were compared with their nondepressed counterparts. Conversion rates to AD were analysed (mean follow-up time 21.5 ± 9.1 months) with regard to coexisting depressive symptoms and brain amyloid load. Aβ+ depressed subjects showed large clusters with a higher amyloid load in the frontotemporal and insular cortices (p < 0.001) with coincident hypermetabolism (p < 0.001) in the frontal cortices than nondepressed subjects. Faster progression to AD was observed in subjects with depressive symptoms (p < 0.005) and in Aβ+ subjects (p < 0.001). Coincident depressive symptoms additionally shortened the conversion time in all Aβ+ subjects (p < 0.005) and to a greater extent in those with a high amyloid load (p < 0.001). Our results clearly indicate that Aβ+ MCI subjects with depressive symptoms have an elevated amyloid load together with relative hypermetabolism of connected brain areas compared with cognitively matched nondepressed individuals. MCI subjects with high amyloid load and coexistent depressive symptoms are at high risk of faster conversion to AD. (orig.)

  7. Auditory hallucinations in tinnitus patients: Emotional relationships and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, Rosa Maria Rodrigues dos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the last few years, our Tinnitus Research Group has identified an increasing number of patients with tinnitus who also complained of repeated perception of complex sounds, such as music and voices. Such hallucinatory phenomena motivated us to study their possible relation to the patients' psyches. Aims: To assess whether hallucinatory phenomena were related to the patients' psychosis and/or depression, and clarify their content and function in the patients' psyches. Method: Ten subjects (8 women; mean age = 65.7 years were selected by otolaryngologists and evaluated by the same psychologists through semi-structured interviews, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and psychoanalysis interviews. Results: We found no association between auditory hallucinations and psychosis; instead, this phenomenon was associated with depressive aspects. The patients' discourse revealed that hallucinatory phenomena played unconscious roles in their emotional life. In all cases, there was a remarkable and strong tendency to recall/repeat unpleasant facts/situations, which tended to exacerbate the distress caused by the tinnitus and hallucinatory phenomena and worsen depressive aspects. Conclusions: There is an important relationship between tinnitus, hallucinatory phenomena, and depression based on persistent recall of facts/situations leading to psychic distress. The knowledge of such findings represents a further step towards the need to adapt the treatment of this particular subgroup of tinnitus patients through interdisciplinary teamwork. Prospective.

  8. The effect of lithium on resting-state brain networks in patients with bipolar depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunhong Liu; Xin Ma; Yuan Zhen; Yu Zhang; Lirong Tang; Feng Li; Changle Tie; Chuanyue Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although lithium has been a commonly prescribed neurotrophic/neuroprotective mood-stabilizing agents, its effect on spontaneous brain activity in patients with bipolar depression remains un-clear. The aim of this study is to reveal the basic mech-anism underlying the pathological influences of lithium on resting-state brain function of bipolar depression pa-tients. Methods:97 subjects including 9 bipolar depres-sion patients with lithium treatment, 19 bipolar depres-sion patients without lithium treatment and 69 healthy controls, were recruited to participate in this study. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation ( ALFF ) and fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation ( fALFF) were used to capture the changes of spontane-ous brain activity among different groups. In addition, further analysis in terms of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the number of depressive episodes, and illness duration in pooled bipolar depression patients were con-ducted, which combined FLEF and fALEF to identify the basic neural features of bipolar depression patients. Results: It was observed from the imaging results that both the bipolar depression patients receiving lithium treatment and healthy control subjects showed signifi-cantly decreased ALFF/fALFF values in the right anteri-or cingulate cortex and right middle frontal gyrus com-pared to that from the bipolar depression patients with-out lithium treatmetn. The ALFF values of the right middle temporal gyrus was also found to be negative re-lated to the number of depressive episode and the total episodes. Conclusions:Our findings suggested that the bipolar depression subjects were identified to have ab-normal ALFF/ fALFF in the cortico-limbic systems, in-cluding regions like right anterior cingulate cortex, bi-lateral middle frontal gyrus, right orbital frontal gyrus, and right middle temporal gyrus. In addition, it was al-so revealed that the decreased ALFF/fALFF in the right anterior cingulate cortex and right

  9. Depression and coping styles of stress in patients with stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Barreda S., Dennys; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    The stroke is defined as the sudden interruption of blood flow in vessels in any area of the brain. The presence of depression is given with great regularity in those affected. Also, people with more stress are potential candidates for developing stroke. For this reason, this research describe the relationship between depression and stress coping styles, in a sample of 50 stroke patients treated at the outpatient service of neurology at Daniel Alcides Carrion Hospital . For this purpose used ...

  10. Treating depression in HIV-positive patients affects adherence

    OpenAIRE

    M Y H Moosa; F Y Jeenah

    2012-01-01

    Aim. To determine changes in adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-positive patients with depression, following treatment with an antidepressant or psychotherapy. Methods. The study was prospective, randomised and controlled. Consenting volunteers aged ≥18 years and stable on ART for ≥6 months were included in the study. Sociodemographic data were obtained, and a clinical diagnostic evaluation and the Hamilton Depression rating scale (HAMD) were performed on all subjects at en...

  11. Determinants of depression in 111 italian patients with systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scorza

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: A high prevalence of depressive symptoms has been described in systemic sclerosis (SSc, but no clear association with organ involvement or objective indices of disease severity has been depicted. To date, no effort has been made to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Italian patients with SSc or to clarify their cause. Methods: One-hundred-eleven SSc patients were asked to fill in the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI questionnaire, the scleroderma Health Assessment Questionnaire (sHAQ and two additional questions assessing the patient’s familiar support and the social consequences of the patient’s change in physical appearnace. Results: Thirty-seven subjects (33.4% presented mild to severe depressive symptoms (BDI ³17. On univariate analysis the diffuse cutaneous form of the disease (p=0.019, higher pulmonary systolic pressures on echocardiogram (p=0.016, lower FVC percentage of predicted values (p=0.022, higher sHAQ values (p<0.001 or higher VAS values for pain (p=0.007, lung involvement (p=0.02, Raynaud’s phenomenon severity (p=0.002, ulcers severity (p=0.006 or disease severity (p<0.001, were associated with the presence of pathologic depressive symptoms. On multivariate analysis only the VAS for disease severity relevant to BDI scores (p=0.016. Social behaviour changes due to SSc-related physical involvement were reported in 14 patients (38% with depressive symptoms (p=0,006 and were more likely to be observed in younger patients (p=0.001 with a more severe Raynauds’s phenomenon (p=0.013. Conclusions: Mild to severe depressive symptoms are common in SSc patients especially in those with a worse perception of disease severity, these patients should be carefully monitored and a psychological assistance counselled whenever necessary.

  12. Attitudes and beliefs of patients with chronic depression toward antidepressants and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob SA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Anne Jacob,1 Ab Fatah Ab Rahman,2 Mohamed Azmi Ahmad Hassali3 1School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Sunway, 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Gong Badak Campus, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA, Kuala Terengganu, 3School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Science Malaysia, Minden, Malaysia Background: Many patients have erroneous views with regard to depression and its management, and it was noted that these attitudes and beliefs significantly affected their adherence rates.Objectives: The primary aim of this study was to determine the attitudes and beliefs of patients with depression toward depression and antidepressants. A secondary aim was to assess the influence of ethnicity on patients’ attitudes and beliefs.Patients and methods: The study involved patients with chronic depression being followed up at an outpatient clinic at a government-run hospital in Malaysia. Patients’ attitudes and beliefs were assessed using the Antidepressant Compliance Questionnaire.Results: A total of 104 patients of Malay, Chinese, and Indian ethnic groups met the selection criteria. Chinese patients had significantly negative attitudes and beliefs toward depression and antidepressants compared to Malays and Indians (b=-8.96, t103=-3.22; P<0.05. Component analysis revealed that 59% of patients believed that antidepressants can cause a person to have less control over their thoughts and feelings, while 67% believed that antidepressants could alter one’s personality; 60% believed it was okay to take fewer tablets on days when they felt better, while 66% believed that antidepressants helped solve their emotional problems and helped them worry less.Conclusion: Patients had an overall positive view as to the benefits of antidepressants, but the majority had incorrect views as to the acceptable dosing of antidepressants and had concerns about the safety of the medication. Assessing patients’ attitudes and beliefs, as well as the

  13. [Relationship of depression and anxiety with social desirability in chronic pain patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarahadi, F L; Maurischat, C; Härter, M; Bengel, J

    2004-02-01

    This study examines the extent of self-reported pain and psychological distress in chronic pain patients and the influence of social desirability on the data collected. In a cross-sectional multi-center study with 494 chronic pain patients, a pain questionnaire was used similar to the German Federal Health Survey of 1998. Depression and anxiety were measured with the German version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) and social desirability with the German Marlowe-Crowne short scale for the measurement of social desirability (KS-SE). Chronic pain patients reported stronger and more frequent pain, as well as higher psychological distress than the general population of Germany. Of the patients, 36.4% showed depression (HADS-D/D >or =9) and 31.4% anxiety (HADS-D/A > or =11). Depressed/anxious patients stated pain intensities higher than non-depressed/non-anxious patients. In all, 48.4% of the patients achieved social desirability levels in the marked or moderate range. There were positive correlations for social desirability with self-reported pain and the use of therapy, as well as age. A negative correlation was found between anxiety and social desirability, while for depression this interaction appeared only after partial correlation analysis with control of pain and therapy variables. Both psychological distress and social desirability are common in chronic pain patients. Patients with high scores for social desirability reveal less depression and anxiety. The psychological distress caused by pain seems to be expressed by somatic complaints and therapy seeking. Since pain research is strongly dependent on the patient's self-report, social desirability should be considered as a factor which may impact measurements and decisions.

  14. Depression in elderly patients with Alzheimer dementia or vascular dementia and its influence on their quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav Winter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer dementia (AD and vascular dementia (VD are the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. Depression is an important co-morbid disorder in these diseases, which is often challenging to recognize. We investigated the prevalence of depression in patients with AD and VD and estimated the influence of depression on the health-related quality of life (HrQoL in these patients. Materials and Methods: We evaluated prevalence of depression in consecutively recruited patients with AD or VD (n= 98. Depression was diagnosed according to criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV and scored using the Geriatric Depression Scale. The EuroQol (EQ-5D and visual analogue scale was applied to evaluate HrQoL. The severity of cognitive impairment was measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify factors predicting severity of depression. Results: The prevalence of depression in AD/VD was 87%. In comparison to the general population, HrQoL measured on the visual analogue scale was reduced by 54% in patients with AD/VD. In the dimension "anxiety/depression" of the EQ-5D, 81% of patients with AD/VD had moderate or severe problems. Depression showed significant association with reduced HrQoL (P<0.01. Independent predictors of more severe depression were older age, male gender, better MMSE scores and being not married. Conclusions: Depression is a prevalent psychiatric co-morbidity in patients with AD/VD, which is often under-diagnosed being masked by cognitive impairment. Depression is a predictor of reduced HrQoL in elder people with AD/VD. Therefore, they should be screened for presence of depressive symptoms and receive adequate antidepressant treatment.

  15. Cotard Syndrome without Depressive Symptoms in a Schizophrenic Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Pedro; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Cerqueira, João J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Cotard syndrome is a rare condition characterized by nihilistic delusions concerning body or life that can be found in several neuropsychiatry conditions. It is typically associated with depressive symptoms. Method. We present a case of Cotard syndrome without depressive symptoms in the context of known paranoid schizophrenia. A literature review of Cotard syndrome in schizophrenia was performed. Results. Although there are few descriptions of this syndrome in schizophrenia, patients usually present depressive mood and psychomotor retardation, features not seen in our patient. Loss of the sense of the inner self, present in schizophrenia, could explain patient's symptomatology but neurobiological bases of this syndrome remain unclear. Conclusion. Despite not being considered in actual classifications, Cotard syndrome is still relevant and psychiatric evaluation is critical to diagnosing and treating this condition in psychiatric patients.

  16. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of patients with a major depressive episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothuber, Helfried; Mitterauer, Bernhard

    2011-05-01

    A major depressive episode diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria can be accompanied by symptoms that DSM-IV does not include. These symptoms are sometimes classified as comorbidities. Our study assessed altered behavioral modes during a major depressive episode; ie, if 1 or more modes of behavior operated less or even not at all ("never"), or if the operation of others was more frequent or even constant ("always"). We hypothesize that these altered behavioral modes, especially the extreme positions "never" (hypomodes) and "always" (hypermodes) might correlate with depression scores and thus represent a typical symptom of depression. We used the 35-item Salzburg Subjective Behavioral Analysis (SSBA) questionnaire to measure altered behavioral modes in 63 depressed patients and 87 non-depressed controls. Depression was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale. In our test group (n=63) we found a total of 888 extreme positions. The mean number of extreme positions per patient was 11.15±5.173 (SD). Extreme positions were found in all 35 behavioral modes. The mean Hamilton score was 22.08±7.35 (SD). The association of the incidence of extreme positions and the Hamilton score in our test group was highly significant (Spearman's Rho=0.41; p=.001). In the control group (n=87), only 11 persons were found to display extreme positions, with a total of only 25. Although this study has several limitations, such as the small sample or the use of a questionnaire in the validation procedure, the significant correlation of extreme positions and the Hamilton score indicate that altered modes of behavior as detected with the SSBA might be typical symptoms in a major depressive episode.

  17. Leucocyte Telomere Shortening in relation to Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhelong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate the association between oxidative stress and telomere length shortening in the comorbid depression and diabetes. Therefore, 71 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D and 52 subjects with normal glycemic level (control, Ctrl were enrolled. Depressive status was identified with the Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D. Leukocyte telomere length ratio (T/S ratio was determined with quantitative PCR. Oxidative stress status was evaluated with 8-hydroxy-desoxyguanosine (8-OHdG assay kit. Some other biochemical blood testing was also performed. The data showed that T2D patients had higher proportion of depression evaluated by the HADS-D (x2=4.196, P=0.041. T/S ratio was significantly negatively correlated with 8-OHdG, HADS-D, age, HbA1c, FPG, and HOMA-IR. In addition, HADS-D was significantly positively correlated with HbA1c, FPG, HOMA-IR, and 8-OHdG. Both HADS-D and 8-OHdG were the major independent predictors for T/S ratio. This study indicates that oxidative stress contributes to both telomere length shortening and depression development in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients, while in depression status, some other mechanisms besides oxidative stress may also affect the telomere length.

  18. The clinical significance of disordered renal excretion of xanthurenic acid in depressive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoes, M J; Sijben, N

    1981-01-01

    Xanthurenic acid is a metabolite of L-tryptophanicotinic acid ribonucleotide biosynthesis. The excretion of xanthurenic acid from urine 24 h after ingestion of 5 g L-tryptophan is increased in depressive patients, and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids are considered of primary importance to this disorder. However, in this study, the excretion of xanthurenic acid and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids did not correlate with the scores of the Raskin depression scale, Hamilton depression scale, Zung depression scale, or the Zung anxiety scale in depressive patients. The patients were treated with either pyridoxine plus L-tryptophan, a presumably serotonin-enhancing treatment (n = 10) or maprotiline, a noradrenaline-enhancing drug (n = 10). Repeated measurements showed no differences between treatments after 2 or 4 weeks of treatment. The improvement in xanthurenic acid excretion precedes clinical improvements in depression. The excretion of xanthurenic acid only at 2 weeks correlated significantly with the anxiety and depression scores at 4 weeks, making prediction of clinical improvement possible. The neurobiological mode of action on noradrenergic or serotonergic neurons of antidepressant medication is of questionable significance to their therapeutic effect.

  19. Qualitative Characteristics of Depression in Parkinson's Patients and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritzinger, Cleo; Vollstedt, Eva-Juliane; Hückelheim, Katja; Lorwin, Anne; Graf, Julia; Tunc, Sinem; Klein, Christine; Kasten, Meike

    2015-01-01

    Depression is common in Parkinson's disease (PD); in light of typical PD pathology it may differ phenomenologically from depression in the general population. To assess depressive symptoms in PD patients and control groups and compare symptom profiles. After postal screening of 10,000 citizens of Lübeck, 642 participants were examined and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was sufficiently answered by 477 subjects. Based on motor examinations, we distinguished PD patients, Healthy Controls (HC, no motor impairment), and Disease Controls (DC, motor impairment other than PD). The sample comprised 331 men and 311 women, aged 65 ± 8 years. Out of the overall sample, 198 (41.5%) had a BDI score ≥9. BDI results above 9 points occurred in 34.5% of HC, 50.3% of DC, and 42.4% of PD patients. Compared to the control groups (HC, DC) the PD patients endorsed more "dissatisfaction" and "loss of appetite" but less "feelings of guilt," "self-hate," and "loss of libido." Depressive symptoms are more frequent in PD patients compared to HC but not DC. Interestingly, the distribution of individual symptoms of the BDI differs between groups with an emphasis on loss of pleasure/enjoyment in the PD group, a symptom typically considered to be dopaminergically transmitted.

  20. Reduced amygdala volume in newly admitted psychiatric in-patients with unipolar major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Golo; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Regen, Francesca; Deuschle, Michael; Heuser, Isabella; Colla, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Structural neuroimaging studies investigating amygdala volumes in patients suffering from major depression have yielded variable results. Discrepant findings across studies may be attributable in part to heterogeneity with respect to antidepressant medication and to lack of adequate control for the effects of total brain volume and age. Here, 24 unipolar depressed in-patients newly admitted to a psychiatric unit and 14 healthy control participants matched for age, gender, and years of education underwent quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) toward the end of a one-week washout period. Saliva cortisol was measured at 08.00 and at 16.00h in patients during washout. Absolute amygdala volumes were significantly reduced in the patient group (by 13% in left amygdala and 12% in right amygdala). The effect of reduced amygdala volumes in patients remained significant after correction for brain volume (BV) and age. Furthermore, amygdala volume measurements in the patient sample showed a significant inverse relationship to the number of preceding depressive episodes. In patients, severity of disease (baseline HAMD scores) and baseline cortisol levels were not related to amygdala volume. This study of a sample of unmedicated depressed in-patients adds to the small, yet growing, body of evidence linking untreated major depression to reduced amygdala volume.

  1. Plasma cytokine profiles in depressed patients who fail to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Sinead M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Approximately 30% of patients with depression fail to respond to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Few studies have attempted to define these patients from a biological perspective. Studies suggest that overall patients with depression show increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. We examined pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in patients who were SSRI resistant. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha and sIL-6R were measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in DSM-1V major depressives who were SSRI resistant, in formerly SSRI resistant patients currently euthymic and in healthy controls. RESULTS: Patients with SSRI-resistant depression had significantly higher production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (p=0.01) and TNF-alpha (p=0.004) compared to normal controls. Euthymic patients who were formerly SSRI resistant had proinflammatory cytokine levels which were similar to the healthy subject group. Anti-inflammatory cytokine levels did not differ across the 3 groups. CONCLUSION: Suppression of proinflammatory cytokines does not occur in depressed patients who fail to respond to SSRIs and is necessary for clinical recovery.

  2. Leptin-LepRb Expressed in Gastric Cancer Patients and Related to Cancer-Related Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chenyan; Hui, Lingyun; Huang, Tianhe

    2017-01-01

    Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among cancer patients. Studies have not only highlighted that leptin and its receptor (LepRb) are independent poor prognostic factors in gastric cancer (GC) patients but also shown that the leptin-LepRb is necessary for antidepressant-like behaviors. In this study, we examined the serum and tissue leptin-LepRb expression in GC patients. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that depressive GC patients had significantly higher serum leptin-LepRb than healthy donors. Leptin-LepRb levels in GC tissues were also significantly higher than in matched paracarcinoma tissues using real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, we observed that both serum and tissue leptin-LepRb were significantly higher in depressive GC patients than those in nondepressive GC patients. Further, the patients with high tumor stage tend to have higher leptin-LepRb mRNA levels than that with low tumor stage. Together, our findings suggest that leptin-LepRb plays an important role in the pathogenesis and depression in GC. Leptin-LepRb therefore could be a potential diagnostic marker and therapeutic target in GC patients with depression.

  3. Self-examination therapy as an adjunct treatment for depressive symptoms in substance abusing patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, V; Ward, L C; Bowman, D; Scogin, F

    1996-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of Self-Examination Therapy as an adjunct treatment for depressive symptoms in substance abusing patients, 28 adult male volunteers from a substance abuse unit at a VA Medical Center were randomly assigned to either Self-Examination Therapy or a Current Events comparison group. Analyses indicated that participants in Self-Examination Therapy showed significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms and overall psychopathology than participants in the Current Events comparison group. These results suggest that Self-Examination Therapy is a viable adjunct treatment for substance abusers, particularly those with depressive symptoms.

  4. Assessment of dietary habits of patients with recurrent depressive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefańska, Ewa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was evaluation of selected dietary habits of patients with recurrent depressive disorders. Methods. The study included 150 patients (75 patients suffering from recurrent depressive disorders. and 75 healthy people aged 18-64 years. The assessment of dietary habits was carried out by using a food frequency questionnaire. Results. It has been shown that in the compared groups of women, patients with depression consumed significantly less groats (p<0.001, rice (p= 0.02, red meat (p<0.01, fish (p<0.01, vegetables (p<0.001, fruits (p<0.01 and wine (p<0.001 in comparison with women without depression, and they were significantly more likely to consume wheat-rye bread (p= 0.03, cheese (p=0.02, butter (p=0.03, cream (p<0.01, lard (p <0.001, coffee (p=0.03 and sugar (p=0.02 in comparison with women without depression. Statistically significant differences between the two groups of men were diagnosed in the frequent intake of lard (p<0.001 and less frequent vegetable oils (p<0.01, beer (p= 0.01, and fast food (p<0.01 for men with depression compared with men in the control group. Conclusions. In the treatment of patients with depression during the declared change of diet, the need for nutrition education on the principles of rational nutrition should be taken into attention, including the selection of appropriate food groups in order to ensure an optimal supply of all necessary to the proper functioning of the body’s nutrients.

  5. Role of depression severity and impulsivity in the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-yu; Jiang, Neng-zhi; Cheung, Eric F C; Sun, Hong-wei; Chan, Raymond C K

    2015-09-01

    Hopelessness, depression and impulsivity all contribute to the development of suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder, but the pathway of these factors to suicidal ideation is not clear. This study examined the meditating effect of depression severity on the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation and explored how this mediating effect was moderated by impulsivity. A total of 162 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) completed a structured clinical diagnostic interview and a battery of scales assessing depression severity, hopelessness, suicidal ideation, and impulsivity. Regression analyses with bootstrapping methods were used to examine the mediating and moderating effects of various risk factors. Mediation analysis revealed a significant indirect effect of hopelessness on suicidal ideation, and the effect was fully mediated through depression severity. On moderation analysis, the moderating effects of the relationship between depression severity and suicidal ideation were significant in both the medium and high impulsivity groups. The present study was limited by the assessment of trait impulsivity and observer-rated depression severity, which might not fully reflect momentary impulsivity and feeling of depression when suicidal ideation occurs. Depression severity plays a mediator role in the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation and this mechanism is contingent on the levels of impulsivity. MDD patients with higher impulsivity appear to be more likely to have suicidal ideations even when they are less depressed. These findings highlight the importance of impulsivity assessment and alleviation of depressive symptoms to prevent suicidality in patients with MDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Depressed patients' perceptions of facial emotions in depressed and remitted states are associated with relapse - A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouhuys, AL; Geerts, E; Gordijn, MCM

    1999-01-01

    Within the framework of interpersonal and cognitive theories of depression, we investigated whether the perception of facial emotions was associated with subsequent relapse into depression. The 23 inpatients with major depression who remitted (65 admitted patients) were studied at admission (TO), at

  7. Screening for depression while patients dialyse: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcot, Joseph; Wellsted, David; Farrington, Ken

    2008-08-01

    The lack of routine depression screening among the haemodialysis (HD) population may contribute to depression being under-recognised. While screening patients could be beneficial, the optimum screening procedure remains unclear. One method would be to screen HD patients while they receive their treatment. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI) could be administered while patients dialysed. Forty HD patients completed the BDI while dialysing and again at a time when off-dialysis. Level of agreement analysis (Bland and Altman) was undertaken to determine if the assessment condition influenced BDI scoring. The off-dialysis assessment also involved a short clinical interview that was compared with the BDI assessment. There was a high level of agreement between the on- and off-dialysis assessments, but differences in response to the somatic items on the BDI scale were apparent between the conditions. The clinical interview revealed that 22% of the sample met the DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. The optimal cut-off value for the BDI as determined by receiver operating characteristic curves was >or=16, with 88.9% sensitivity and 87.1% specificity. The results indicate that the procedure of on-dialysis assessment using the BDI is a viable screening procedure. The practicality of employing this screening procedure may facilitate improved detection of depression in the dialysis population.

  8. EEG alpha power as an intermediate measure between brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met and depression severity in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoon, Harriët F A; Veth, C P M; Arns, Martijn; Drinkenburg, W H I M; Talloen, Willem; Peeters, Pieter J; Kenemans, J L

    2013-06-01

    Major depressive disorder has a large impact on patients and society and is projected to be the second greatest global burden of disease by 2020. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene is considered to be one of the important factors in the etiology of major depressive disorder. In a recent study, alpha power was found to mediate between BDNF Met and subclinical depressed mood. The current study looked at a population of patients with major depressive disorder (N = 107) to examine the association between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, resting state EEG alpha power, and depression severity. For this purpose, repeated-measures analysis of variance, partial correlation, and multiple linear models were used. Results indicated a negative association between parietal-occipital alpha power in the eyes open resting state and depression severity. In addition, Met/Met patients showed lower global absolute alpha power in the eyes closed condition compared with Val-carriers. These findings are in accordance with the previously uncovered pathway between BDNF Val66Met, resting state EEG alpha power, and depression severity. Additional research is needed for the clarification of this tentative pathway and its implication in personalized treatment of major depressive disorder.

  9. Effects of hyperthermic baths on depression, sleep and heart rate variability in patients with depressive disorder: a randomized clinical pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Johannes; Grebe, Julian; Kaifel, Sonja; Weinert, Tomas; Sadaghiani, Catharina; Huber, Roman

    2017-03-28

    Despite advances in the treatment of depression, one-third of depressed patients fail to respond to conventional antidepressant medication. There is a need for more effective treatments with fewer side effects. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether hyperthermic baths reduce depressive symptoms in adults with depressive disorder. Randomized, two-arm placebo-controlled, 8-week pilot trial. Medically stable outpatients with confirmed depressive disorder (ICD-10: F32/F33) who were moderately depressed as determined by the 17-item Hamilton Scale for Depression (HAM-D) score ≥18 were randomly assigned to 2 hyperthermic baths (40 °C) per week for 4 weeks or a sham intervention with green light and follow-up after 4 weeks. Main outcome measure was the change in HAM-Dtotal score from baseline (T0) to the 2-week time point (T1). A total of 36 patients were randomized (hyperthermic baths, n = 17; sham condition, n = 19). The intention-to-treat analysis showed a significant (P = .037) difference in the change in HAM-Dtotal score with 3.14 points after 4 interventions (T1) in favour of the hyperthermic bath group compared to the placebo group. This pilot study suggests that hyperthermic baths do have generalized efficacy in depressed patients. DRKS00004803 at drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de, German Clinical Trials Register (registration date 2016-02-02), retrospectively registered.

  10. Depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder in patients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demartini, Benedetta; Ranieri, Rebecca; Masu, Annamaria; Selle, Valerio; Scarone, Silvio; Gambini, Orsola

    2014-08-01

    The relationship between subclinical hypothyroidism and depression is still controversial. Our objective was to compare the prevalence of depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder in a population of patients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism and a control group without thyroid disease. The authors enrolled 123 consecutive outpatients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism undergoing follow-up at the endocrinology department of San Paolo Hospital in Milan and 123 controls without thyroid disease under the charge of general physicians.All patients and controls underwent an evaluation by means of a psychiatric interview; Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D); Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); and serum thyroid stimulating hormone, free T4, and free T3 levels. Patients were also screened for thyroid peroxidase antibodies and thyroglobulin antibodies. Patients affected by subclinical hypothyroidism had a prevalence of depressive symptoms of 63.4% at HAM-D and 64.2% at MADRS; 22 patients (17.9%) had a diagnosis of depressive episode (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria). The control group had a prevalence of depressive symptoms of 27.6% at HAM-D and 29.3% at MADRS, and only seven controls had a diagnosis of depressive episode. The prevalence of depressive symptoms between these two groups was statistically different. This study underlines a strong association between subclinical hypothyroidism and depressive symptoms, which could have some important diagnostic and therapeutic implications in the clinical practice.

  11. Depression and quality of life in patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schram, Miranda T; Baan, Caroline A; Pouwer, Francois

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes patients are known to have a worse quality of life than individuals without diabetes. They also have an increased risk for depressive symptoms, which may have an additional negative effect on their quality of life. This systematic review summarizes the current knowledge on the association...... between depressive symptoms and quality of life in individuals with diabetes. A systematic literature search using MEDLINE, Psychinfo, Social SciSearch, SciSearch and EMBASE was conducted from January 1990 until September 2007. We identified studies that compared quality of life between diabetic...... individuals with and without depressive symptoms. Twenty studies were identified, including eighteen cross-sectional and two longitudinal studies. Quality of life was measured as generic, diabetes specific and domain specific quality of life. All studies reported a negative association between depressive...

  12. Metabolic syndrome in first-time hospitalized patients with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, L; Vestergaard, C H; Lund, H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies on metabolic syndrome (MetS) in younger patients with depression are few. We examined the prevalence and progression of MetS in first-time hospitalized patients with depression during 1 year of follow-up. Furthermore, we explored putative risk factors of MetS. METHOD: We...... increase in WC and triglycerides and a non-significant increase in the prevalence of MetS. Antipsychotic medication (OR 10.5, 95% CI 1.18-94.14) and low aerobic fitness (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.68-0.93) were significantly correlated with MetS (P Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent...... evaluated MetS and its components in first-time hospitalized patients with depression (N = 52) and healthy controls (N = 50) (18-45 years). Physical activity, aerobic fitness, sleeping disturbances, smoking and dietary habits, and psychopharmacological treatment were recorded at baseline for all...

  13. Cotard Syndrome without Depressive Symptoms in a Schizophrenic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Morgado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cotard syndrome is a rare condition characterized by nihilistic delusions concerning body or life that can be found in several neuropsychiatry conditions. It is typically associated with depressive symptoms. Method. We present a case of Cotard syndrome without depressive symptoms in the context of known paranoid schizophrenia. A literature review of Cotard syndrome in schizophrenia was performed. Results. Although there are few descriptions of this syndrome in schizophrenia, patients usually present depressive mood and psychomotor retardation, features not seen in our patient. Loss of the sense of the inner self, present in schizophrenia, could explain patient’s symptomatology but neurobiological bases of this syndrome remain unclear. Conclusion. Despite not being considered in actual classifications, Cotard syndrome is still relevant and psychiatric evaluation is critical to diagnosing and treating this condition in psychiatric patients.

  14. Study of KIC 8561221 observed by Kepler: an early red giant showing depressed dipolar modes

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, R A; Benomar, O; Aguirre, V Silva; Ballot, J; Davies, G R; Dogan, G; Stello, D; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Houdek, G; Lignieres, F; Mathur, S; Takata, M; Ceillier, T; Chaplin, W J; Mathis, S; Mosser, B; Ouazzani, R M; Pinsonneault, M H; Reese, D R; Regulo, C; Salabert, D; Thompson, M J; van Saders, J L; Neiner, C; De Ridder, J

    2013-01-01

    The continuous high-precision photometric observations provided by the CoRoT and Kepler space missions have allowed us to better understand the structure and dynamics of red giants using asteroseismic techniques. A small fraction of these stars shows dipole modes with unexpectedly low amplitudes. The reduction in amplitude is more pronounced for stars with higher frequency of maximum power. In this work we want to characterize KIC 8561221 in order to confirm that it is currently the least evolved star among this peculiar subset and to discuss several hypotheses that could help explain the reduction of the dipole mode amplitudes. We used Kepler short- and long-cadence data combined with spectroscopic observations to infer the stellar structure and dynamics of KIC 8561221. We then discussed different scenarios that could contribute to the reduction of the dipole amplitudes such as a fast rotating interior or the effect of a magnetic field on the properties of the modes. We also performed a detailed study of the...

  15. Sera from chronic chagasic patients depress cardiac electrogenesis and conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa P.C.S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We report results obtained with sera from 58 chronic chagasic patients that were evaluated for effects on heart rate and atrioventricular (AV conduction in isolated rabbit hearts and screened for the presence of muscarinic and beta-adrenergic activity. We show that sera from 26 patients decreased heart rate, while 10 increased it and 22 had no effect. Additionally, sera from 20 of the 58 patients blocked AV conduction. Muscarinic activation seems to be involved in both effects, but is not the only mechanism, since atropine did not antagonize the decrease in heart rate in 23% of sera or AV block in 40%. Sera from patients with complex arrhythmias were significantly more effective in depressing both heart rate and AV conduction. Sera that induce increases in heart rate seem to operate exclusively through beta-adrenergic activation. Two of these sera, evaluated with respect to intercellular communication in primary cultures of embryonic cardiomyocytes were able to block gap junction conductance evaluated by a dye injection technique after 24-h exposure. The mechanisms underlying this uncoupling effect are currently being investigated.

  16. Predictors of the depressive symptomatology of the family caregivers of Chinese stroke patients in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C G; Tang, W K; Wong, K S; Mok, V; Ungvari, G S

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with depressive symptoms in the family caregivers of Hong Kong Chinese stroke patients. One hundred and twenty-three patients at a stroke clinic and their family caregivers formed the study sample. The depressive symptoms of both the patients and their family caregivers were rated with the Chinese version of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Participants' socio-demographic data and clinical characteristics served as the independent variables in relation to the caregivers' GDS scores. Patients' and caregivers' somatic and psychological conditions were measured with 10 scales. In univariate analysis, caregivers' GDS scores were significantly correlated with certain of their characteristics [Modified Life Event Scale (MLES), Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) and Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS) scores, sex and being a housewife] and those of the patients (GDS score and being a housewife). Multiple regression analysis showed caregivers' MLES and CIRS scores and patients' GDS scores to be independent correlates of caregivers' GDS scores. Adverse events encountered by caregivers in the past 6 months, their current health problems and patients' depressive symptoms were found to be the principal factors associated with caregivers' depressive symptoms. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  17. Role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids for the treatment of patients with major depression disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A rising number of studies have raised questions regarding the association of mental illness in a particular mood disorders such as depression with low intake of omega-3 fatty acids. Given all the side-effects that traditional antidepressants put patients at risk for, omega-3 is certainly a better alternative that might improve depressive symptoms and patient′s compliance to treatment by removing the stigma of psychiatric drugs. This study critically reviewed 12 relevant studies from PubMed published between 1992 - 2013 in order to determine whether omega-3 supplements or diet rich in fish were likely to show affectivity in reducing depressive symptoms. Most of the studies showed clear association between omega-3 and reduced depressive symptoms. Studies support the adjunctive role of omega-3 and high fish consumption in reducing depression. Omega-3 fatty acids have also shown to be safe when used during pregnancy to prevent postpartum depression. Although some studies showed mixed results of positive findings, the use of omega-3 supplements could not be an absolute substitute of antidepressants due to limitation in their studies. Minority of the studies reviewed did not correlate omega-3 with the improvement of depressive symptoms for many reasons such as the healthy life-style of subjects, etc. Given the fact that depression has various causes, this puts the testing of omega-3 in a lot of bias due to several variables such as dose, formula, period administered as well as the candidates′ state of health. Further research is definitely warranted on a larger sample size with close follow-up using proper assessment tools. Omega-3 has shown to have minimal or no side-effects at all, which makes it important for mental health professional to at least ensure that patients diagnosed with depression have adequate amounts of omega-3 fatty acids whether by supplementation or in their daily diet.

  18. Comorbid Chronic Pain and Depression: Patient Perspectives on Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternke, Elizabeth A; Abrahamson, Kathleen; Bair, Matthew J

    2016-12-01

    Clinician empathy is a well-documented component of effective patient/provider communication. Evidence surrounding the association between patient perspectives on clinician empathy and perception of pain management is currently limited, particularly among patients with chronic pain and depression. The aim of this study was to analyze patients' perspectives on the emergent theme of empathy and describe how patients construct their experiences and expectations surrounding empathic interactions. A secondary analysis of focus group data was designed using grounded theory methodology. Veterans Affairs (VA) and University Primary Care Clinics. Respondents with chronic pain and comorbid depression (N = 18) were 27 to 84 years old (mean 54.8 years), 61% women, 22% black, and 74% white. Study participants highly valued empathy and two types of empathic interactions: empathic listening and empathic action. Patients who provided examples of empathic interactions claimed that others understood, valued, and cared for them. In contrast, patients who perceived a lack of empathy and empathic interactions felt frustrated and uncared for by others (including their physicians) physically and emotionally. Patients with chronic pain and depression claimed that empathy helped them feel understood, believed, taken seriously, and that their needs were met. In demonstrating empathy and engaging in empathic interactions with patients, providers relate better to patients, better understand their life experience, and provide patient-centered care that is meaningful for patients, providers, and the health care systems within which they interact. Future research is needed to purposefully study the effects of empathic interactions on outcomes for patients with chronic pain and comorbid depression. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. All rights reserved.

  19. Transient autonomic dysfunction precedes ST-segment depression in patients with syndrome X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikowski, P; Rosano, G M; Amadi, A A; Collins, P; Coats, A J; Poole-Wilson, P A; Kaski, J C

    1996-05-01

    Increased sympathetic drive has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of syndrome X (angina pectoris, positive exercise testing, and angiographically normal coronary arteries). Heart rate variability (HRV) studies have shown that patients with syndrome X have an imbalance in autonomic nervous system activity (sympathetic predominance). However, it is not known if transient ST-segment depression which occurs in syndrome X during daily activities is related to this autonomic nervous system dysfunction. This study investigates the relation between the response of the autonomic nervous system, as assessed by HRV analysis, and the occurrence of transient ST-segment depression during 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring in 23 patients (4 men and 19 women, mean age 55 +/- 6 years) with syndrome X. The frequency-domain variables of HRV low-frequency (0.04 to 0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (0.15 to 0.40 Hz) power were measured at 6-minute intervals during the 30 minutes preceding the onset of transient ST-segment depression. Fourteen patients (61%) had > or = 1 episode of ST-segment depression in the 24 hours, whereas the remaining 9 patients (39%) had no significant ST-segment change. HRV measures differed according to whether or not ST-segment depression was associated with increased heart rate. Episodes of ST-segment depression associated with increased heart rate were preceded by a reduction of high-frequency power and an increase in the low-frequency--high-frequency ratio, whereas episodes of ST-segment depression not associated with increased heart rate showed no significant HRV changes. Low-frequency power remained unchanged irrespective of heart rate. Thus, in patients with syndrome X, a sympathovagal imbalance (sympathetic predominance due to vagal tone withdrawal) precedes episodes of ST-segment depression that are associated with an increased heart rate.

  20. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression in Japanese Parkinson's disease patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinmei I

    2016-06-01

    =1.7, SD =0.8, one patient (5% withdrew. No severe adverse event was observed. The patients reported significant improvements in depression (Hedges’ g =-1.02, 95% confidence interval =-1.62 to -0.39. The effects were maintained over a 3-month follow-up period. Most of the secondary outcome measurements showed a small-to-moderate but nonsignificant effect size from baseline to post-intervention.Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidence that CBT is feasible among Japanese PD patients with depression. Similar approaches may be effective for people with PD from other cultural backgrounds. The results warrant replication in a randomized controlled trial. Keywords: CBT, anxiety, Japan, dPD, comorbidity

  1. Association between depression, patient scar assessment and burn-specific health in hospitalized burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Chung, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Boeun; Kim, Giyon

    2012-06-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychological problems arising after a burn, but its relationship with patient scar assessment and burn-specific health are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of in-hospital symptoms of depression, compare level of patient scar assessment, and burn-specific health by depression cutoff point, and identify the relationship between depression and these variables. In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 113 burn patients from two inpatient burn centers were divided into two groups based on the cutoff point of the Korean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (Korean CES-D): ≥25 or Patient Scar Assessment Scale and Korean Burn-Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B-K) were used to identify associations with depression. Incidence of severe, definite depression as assessed by a score of 25 or above on the Korean CES-D was approximately 50% on an average at 60.9 days after injury. Burn patients with the Korean CES-D≥25 had significantly higher total mean patient scar assessment scores (43.34±11.49 vs. 36.84±9.56, t=3.265, p=.001), and lower burn-specific health subscale scores compared to patients with Korean CES-DPatient Scar Assessment, ranging from r=.196 to .335 except scar color. Depression was significantly correlated with all subscales of the BSHS-B-K, range from r=-.320 to -.725. Results indicate that incidence of symptoms of depression is relatively high, and depressed burn patients report worse burn scar or sensation and lower levels of burn-specific health. Early, timely recognition and management of depression in these patients are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Association between anxiety and depression in patients with acute coronary syndromes due to financial crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampropoulos, Kostandinos; Kavvouras, Charalampos; Megalou, Aikaterini; Tsikouri, Pinelopi; Kafkala, Chrysanthi; Derka, Dimitra; Bonou, Maria; Barbetseas, John

    2016-01-01

    The effect of anxiety and depression on patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) warrants investigation, especially during periods of economic crisis. To investigate the relation between anxiety and depression in patients presenting with ACS due to financial crisis and to investigate whether these two entities could predict long-term cardiovascular mortality. Anxiety and depression symptoms were assessed in 350 patients (210 men) presenting with ACS, with 70 (20%) patients showing elevated scores (Hellenic Heart Failure Protocol). Over a mean follow-up of 48 months there were 36 (10%) cardiovascular deaths. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for other prognostic factors (including age, sex, marital status, creatinine levels, left ventricular ejection fraction, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, previous hospitalisation, and baseline medications) showed that elevated anxiety and depression scores significantly predicted cardiovascular mortality (primary outcome) and all-cause mortality. Elevated anxiety and depression symptoms are related to cardiovascular mortality due probably to financial crisis, even after adjustment for other prognostic indicators in patients with ACS, who received optimised medical treatment.

  3. Subjective deficits of attention, cognition and depression in patients with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarian, Laura; Högl, Birgit; Delazer, Margarete; Hingerl, Katharina; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Patients with narcolepsy often complain about attention deficits in everyday situations. In comparison with these subjective complaints, deficits in objective testing are subtler. The present study assessed the relationships between subjective complaints, objectively measured cognitive performance, disease-related variables, and mood. A total of 51 patients with narcolepsy and 35 healthy controls responded to questionnaires regarding subjectively perceived attention deficits, sleepiness, anxiety and depression. Moreover, they performed an extensive neuropsychological assessment tapping into attention, executive functions, and memory. Patients rated their level of attention in everyday situations to be relatively poor. In an objective assessment of cognitive functioning, they showed only slight attention and executive function deficits. The subjective ratings of attention deficits significantly correlated with ratings of momentary sleepiness, anxiety, and depression, but not with objectively measured cognitive performance. Momentary sleepiness and depression predicted almost 39% of the variance in the ratings of subjectively perceived attention deficits. The present study showed that sleepiness and depression, more than objective cognitive deficits, might play a role in the subjectively perceived attention deficits of patients with narcolepsy. The results suggested that when counselling and treating patients with narcolepsy, clinicians should pay attention to potential depression because subjective cognitive complaints may not relate to objective cognitive impairments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Recited depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucci, M; Cossio, M

    1984-01-01

    Several subjects who tell their depression and play a part of it in front of the doctor without being really depressed are reported. Some of them try to hide the symptoms (irritability or erethism, ceremonials of obsessive neurosis, shunning of phobia) which, in their opinion, might be detrimental to their reputation. Others neglect to describe some of the symptoms of their polymorphous clinical picture only underlining the depressive signs. Some others play a part of depression because they have believed to recognize themselves in persons presented by mass media, because it seems to them a duty to show an adequate depression in case of mournful event, or because they "convert" their problem into a depression. Some others use depression as a blackmail, or to obtain an advantage from doctor's conviction about their illness. The reason for the high frequency of similar cases in the present time are examined: the scientific divulgation and the acceptance of depression by the modern society are among the most important ones. The peculiar semantic vicissitudes of the word depression are also reviewed. A widening of the boundaries of depression has contributed to an increase in the number of the cases. Finally, in addition to patients who are depressed without being aware of it, the authors focus the inverse possibility: patients who believed or try to make their doctor believe (playing the part of depression in front of them) that they are depressed.

  5. Psychotherapeutic strategies in the management of depressed and suicidal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiev, A

    1975-07-01

    This paper examines the Crisis Intervention Therapy developed by Dr. Kiev's Cornell Program, for the management of depressed and suicidal patients. Combining chemotherapy with supportive psychotherapy, he emphasizes the acquisition of Life Strategy Skills, using motivational audiotaped material. The therapeutic rationale is also explored and related to the explosive and unpredictable interpersonal world of suicidal patients and attiudes of patients and significant others toward the sick role.

  6. Combined treatment with sulpiride and paroxetine for accelerated response in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Takefumi; Nomura, Kensuke; Watanabe, Koichiro; Kashima, Haruo

    2005-12-01

    Although serotonin reuptake inhibitors are recommended as first-line agents for major depressive disorder, delayed onset of action is problematic, and faster effective treatment is needed. Sulpiride, a dopamine-mediated agent, has been reported to show faster antidepressant efficacy, and we examined the efficacy of adjunctive sulpiride in combination with paroxetine (PAX), compared with PAX alone, to clarify whether the combined treatment exerts faster effect. Forty-one major depressive disorder patients were enrolled in this 12-week open-label trial and were randomly assigned to a PAX (10-40 mg/d) or a PAX (10-40 mg/d) plus sulpiride (100 mg/d) group. Assessments included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale on an intent-to-treat basis, and safety was also monitored. Thirty-three patients completed the study. Both PAX + sulpiride and PAX treatments showed a mean reduction in the total Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score of 34.4 to 5.6 and 32.2 to 10.4, respectively (P Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Zung Self-rating Depression Scale scores between week 1 and the study end point (P < 0.05). Median times to response among responders alone for the combined treatment and monotherapy were 2 and 6 weeks, respectively. Both treatments were well tolerated, with no clinically significant differences in safety measures except for an elevation of prolactin in the combined treatment group. The combination treatment may be a safe and effective strategy for accelerating antidepressant response.

  7. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its association with depression in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suttajit S

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sirijit Suttajit, Sutrak PilakantaDepartment of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailandPurpose: To identify the point prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia and to evaluate the association between depressive symptoms and metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia.Patients and methods: Metabolic syndrome was assessed based on an updated definition derived from the modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III and the International Diabetes Federation criteria. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17 was used to measure depressive symptoms in 80 patients with schizophrenia. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression for the association between each depressive symptom and metabolic syndrome.Results: The point prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome according to the modified NCEP-ATP III and International Diabetes Federation criteria were 37% and 35%, respectively. The risk of having metabolic syndrome significantly increased in those who were widowed or separated, or had longer duration of illness. Central obesity was the metabolic feature with the highest odds ratios for metabolic syndrome at 19.3. Three out of 17 items of HDRS subscales were found to be significantly associated with metabolic syndrome, including depressed mood, middle insomnia, and retardation with the odds ratios of 3.0, 3.4, and 3.6, respectively.Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia was higher than the overall rate but was slightly lower than in the general population in the USA. Central obesity, measured by waist circumference, was found to be highly correlated with metabolic syndrome. Depressed mood, middle insomnia, and retardation were significantly associated with metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia. Waist circumference and screening

  8. The effect of psycho educational program on stress and depression among cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Mardani Hamoleh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Cancer is one of the life-threatening diseases that cause the numerous changes in the life style, public interaction and social activities of the patients. Usually cancer patients have some degrees of stress and depression. This study aimed to determine the effects of educational program on stress and depression among cancer patients. Materials & Methods: This study is a semi experimental research. 52 cancer patients referred to Seyedoshohada hospital of Isfahan were selected through purposeful method and then divided into 2 groups randomly, the Cooper stress and Beck depression questionnaires were used in this study. The two groups of patients (control 24 and experimental 28 both appear for the pre test. Then after one month of applying psychological intervention only on experimental group, both the groups appeared for the post test. The data were collected and analyzed with analysis of covariance. P< 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The results of covariance showed significant differences between the 2 groups in the Cooper stress inventory (F=10.8, P<0.003 and Beck depression inventory (F=12.87, P< 0.001 and the hypothesis of study was confirmed. Conclusion: Globally, the findings proved that psychological intervention based on stress and depression reduction would be a successful approach in promoting mental health on cancer patients.

  9. Quality of life and depression in multiple sclerosis patients: longitudinal results of the BetaPlus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzilli, Carlo; Schweikert, Bernd; Ecari, Ugo; Oentrich, Wolfgang; Bugge, Jörg-Peter

    2012-11-01

    Enhancing quality of life (QoL) is an important objective of disease-modifying therapies in multiple sclerosis (MS). Strategies to substantiate the effect on QoL and depression have been suggested, including injection devices and nursing support. This study assesses QoL and depression in MS patients treated with interferon beta-1b (IFNB-1b) and evaluates the impact of different elements of a patient support programme and of coping strategies on QoL and depression. A prospective, observational, 2-year cohort study was conducted. MS patients were eligible if they had previously switched to IFNB-1b. Data were collected every 6 months. For the measurement of QoL the Functional Assessment of MS (FAMS) was used. Depression symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); coping strategies were assessed using the 66-item version of Ways of Coping Questionnaire. A total of 1,077 patients were recruited into the study. Seven hundred (65 %) patients completed the study. Within the subgroup completing questionnaires on QoL (N = 472) and depression (N = 363), QoL increased (110.4 vs. 115.8, p QoL and depressions, the use of the autoinjector Betaject(®) over time showed a positive association with QoL (p = 0.049). The support from a nurse was positively associated with lower depressive symptoms (p = 0.039). The coping strategies 'planful problem-solving' and 'positive reappraisal' were associated with higher QoL and lower depressive symptoms. Patients on IFNB-1b treatment who were included in the patient support programme and completed the study showed an improvement in QoL. Moreover, compared to baseline the proportion of depressive patients decreased. Coping strategies as well as supportive elements such as autoinjectors and nurses had a significant impact on QoL and depression. However, the study had the general limitations of a non-controlled design.

  10. Aggressiveness across development and suicidal behavior in depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, Juan J; García-Nieto, Rebeca; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill; de Leon-Martinez, Victoria; Baca-García, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine differences in the pathway of aggressiveness across development between depressive subjects and normal controls, and to examine males and females separately with regard to level of aggression and suicidal behavior among depressed subjects. Participants were classified into 5 groups: depressed suicide attempters (DSA; n = 339), depressed non-suicide attempters (DNSA; n = 92), psychiatric controls who had attempted suicide (PSA; n = 188), psychiatric controls who had not attempted suicide (PNSA; n = 222), and normal controls (NC; n = 532). The level of aggressiveness across development in the different groups was examined using a 5 (DSA vs. DNSA vs. PSA vs. PNSA vs. NC)×3 (Childhood, Adolescence, and Adulthood) MANCOVA. Adjusted and separate models for males and females were conducted. Depressed subjects differed in severity of aggressiveness. The level of aggressiveness in individuals in the NC group remained stable across development, while subjects in the DSA and DNSA groups showed significantly higher levels of aggressiveness. This finding was also observed in subjects of the PSA and PNSA groups. The level of aggressiveness in males with depression significantly increased over time. In women, increasing levels of aggressiveness across development were only observed in depressed suicide attempters. Limitations of this study included use of semi-structured interview for the assessment of risk factors. We found significant differences in severity and in the pathway of aggressiveness across development between depressive subjects and normal controls. In addition, sex differences regarding level of aggression and suicidal behavior among depressed subjects were found.

  11. Treatment-Resistant Depressed Youth Show a Higher Response Rate If Treatment Ends during Summer School Break

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseddeen, Wael; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Emslie, Graham; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Porta, Giovanna; Mayes, Taryn; Keller, Martin B.; Brent, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is little work on the effect of school on response to treatment of depression, with available research suggesting that children and adolescents with school difficulties are less likely to respond to fluoxetine compared with those with no school difficulties. Method: Depressed adolescents in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in…

  12. Treatment-Resistant Depressed Youth Show a Higher Response Rate If Treatment Ends during Summer School Break

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseddeen, Wael; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Emslie, Graham; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Porta, Giovanna; Mayes, Taryn; Keller, Martin B.; Brent, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is little work on the effect of school on response to treatment of depression, with available research suggesting that children and adolescents with school difficulties are less likely to respond to fluoxetine compared with those with no school difficulties. Method: Depressed adolescents in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in…

  13. Psychosocial functioning in patients with treatment-resistant depression after group cognitive behavioral therapy

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    Kunisato Yoshihiko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although patients with Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD often have impaired social functioning, few studies have investigated the effectiveness of psychosocial treatment for these patients. We examined whether adding group cognitive behavioral therapy (group-CBT to medication would improve both the depressive symptoms and the social functioning of patient with mild TRD, and whether any improvements would be maintained over one year. Methods Forty-three patients with TRD were treated with 12 weekly sessions of group-CBT. Patients were assessed with the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF, the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD, the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (DAS, and the Automatic Thought Questionnaire-Revised (ATQ-R at baseline, at the termination of treatment, and at the 12-month follow-up. Results Thirty-eight patients completed treatment; five dropped out. For the patients who completed treatment, post-treatment scores on the GAF and SF-36 were significantly higher than baseline scores. Scores on the HRSD, DAS, and ATQ-R were significantly lower after the treatment. Thus patients improved on all measurements of psychosocial functioning and mood symptoms. Twenty patients participated in the 12-month follow-up. Their improvements for psychosocial functioning, depressive symptoms, and dysfunctional cognitions were sustained at 12 months following the completion of group-CBT. Conclusions These findings suggest a positive effect that the addition of cognitive behavioural group therapy to medication on depressive symptoms and social functioning of mildly depressed patients, showing treatment resistance.

  14. Comparison of the Levels of Anxiety, Depression and Hopelessness of Patients with Epilepsy and Healthy Individuals

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    Emine Rabia Koç

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Epilepsy is characterized by sudden seizures and loss of control in patients; it leads to constantly be under stress. Psychiatric disorders, particularly depressive disorders are more frequent in patients with epilepsy than in the whole of society. In this study; we aimed to compare depression,anxiety and desperation levels between epileptic patients and healthy ones. METHODS: 34 patients and 34 healthy controls were enrolled to the study. Demographic features of all subjects were also recorded. Neurologic examination, Electroencephalography (EEG and cranial magnetic resonance imaging(MRI of patients were also evaluated. State-Trait Anxety Inventory (STAI is for anxiety, Beck Depression Inventory (BDE is for depression, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BUO is for hopelessness were evaluated. RESULTS: Epileptic patients were with mean age of 24.56 ± 8.49, healthy subjects were with the mean age 27.44 ± 5.66 years. 13 of patients were female(38.2% and 21 patients were male(%38.2 in all groups.There was no significant difference about demographic features(p>0.05. When continuous and instant anxiety levels of epileptic and healthy groups were compared, no significant difference was observed between instant anxiety levels(p> 0.05; but there was difference between continuous anxiety levels (p <0.05. Also, hopelessness and depression levels were similar between groups (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The results of the study showed that depression, anxiety and hopelessness levels were higher in epileptic patients when compared to healthy people. In addition, patients with seizure control with less drug use will reduce the level of trait anxiety was concluded.

  15. Depression, pain, exposure to stressful life events, and long-term outcomes in temporomandibular disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, S M; Laskin, D M; Frantsve, L M; Orr, T

    2001-06-01

    This study investigated the role of psychological factors in temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Orofacial pain patients' pretreatment levels of depression, disability caused by pain, and exposure to stressful life events were measured, and differences on these variables between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease patients and patients whose pain was of muscular origin (MPD) were evaluated. The use of these variables and patient diagnostic status in predicting response to treatment in a subsample of these patients was also evaluated. Before undergoing treatment, 258 patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Pain Disability Index (PDI), and the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS). Follow-up data on pain disability, current level of pain, depression, and satisfaction with treatment were obtained on 48 of these patients who were contacted at varying intervals after completing treatment. BDI scores obtained at the outset of treatment were significantly elevated and were positively correlated with SRRS and PDI scores. MPD patients had higher SRRS, BDI depression, and PDI pain disability scores than TMJ patients, and differences between the 2 groups in pain disability were greatest in areas that are often sources of interpersonal stress. Among follow-up patients, PDI scores declined after treatment, with MPD patients showing greater decreases than TMJ patients. Independent of patients' diagnostic status, their pretreatment PDI scores were predictive of their pain level at follow-up and were inversely related to their degree of satisfaction with treatment at follow-up; their pretreatment BDI scores were predictive of their depression level at follow-up. The findings are consistent with previous research indicating a link between emotional dysfunction and TMD and are largely supportive of the conclusion that psychological factors play a more pronounced role when pain is of muscular origin. Promising behavioral interventions are available for

  16. Quality of life in patients with bipolar I depression: data from 920 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatham, Lakshmi N; Lecrubier, Yves; Fieve, Ronald R; Davis, Kimberly H; Harris, Soyna D; Krishnan, Anupama A

    2004-10-01

    To determine the impact of acute depression on quality of life (QOL) in patients with bipolar I disorder and to compare these results with published data on QOL in patients with unipolar depression. Quality of life was assessed using the SF-36 in bipolar patients (n = 958) who had recently experienced an episode of acute bipolar depression and participated in a large randomized, double-blind, safety and efficacy trial. Seven studies that included SF-36 data from patients with unipolar depression were identified in the published literature and descriptive comparisons of SF-36 scores were made between the unipolar depression trials and this bipolar depression trial. There were 920 patients who completed the SF-36. Mean transformed scores, which could range from 0 to 100, were very low in bipolar depressed patients for the role-physical (36.7), vitality (22.4), social functioning (29.9), role-emotion (11.4), and mental health (31.0) subscales. Mean SF-36 scores for all subscales were significantly and inversely correlated (p < 0.0001) with the HAM-D indicating that patients with milder depressive symptoms had better QOL. Further, the mean SF-36 scores for the bipolar sample were consistently lower compared with published data on QOL in unipolar depression on four of the eight subscales: general health; social functioning; role-physical, and role-emotional. While both unipolar and bipolar depression have serious detrimental effects on patient QOL, our results suggest that some aspects of QOL may be worse in bipolar depression.

  17. Impact of exercise on patients with depression and anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oeland, Anne-Marie; Læssøe, Uffe; Olesen, Anne Vingaard

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persons with common mental disorders are at risk of lowered physical activity. AIMS: To investigate if patients with depressive and/or anxiety disorders can achieve a level of physical activity meeting public health recommendations, increase their physical fitness and quality of life...... was maintained after a 12-week follow-up period. Findings should be conservatively interpreted because of high attrition rate. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with anxiety and/or depressive disorders who participated in a structured, supervised exercise programme achieved in accordance with public health recommendations...... a higher level of physical activity and VO(2)max. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The clinical implications of the study may be a suggestion of offering physical exercise to milder and moderate severe cases of depression and anxiety....

  18. Treating depression in HIV-positive patients affects adherence

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    M Y H Moosa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine changes in adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-positive patients with depression, following treatment with an antidepressant or psychotherapy. Methods. The study was prospective, randomised and controlled. Consenting volunteers aged ≥18 years and stable on ART for ≥6 months were included in the study. Sociodemographic data were obtained, and a clinical diagnostic evaluation and the Hamilton Depression rating scale (HAMD were performed on all subjects at entry to and at the end of the study. Participants found to be depressed were randomly assigned antidepressant treatment (20 mg citalopram or interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT (5 sessions. Medication was dispensed at each visit and patients were asked to return all unused medication to determine ART adherence. The study was approved by the University of the Witwatersrand. Results. Sixty-two HIV-positive persons receiving ART participated; 30 were not depressed (control group and 32 were depressed (patient group. No significant differences in demographic characteristics existed between the control and patient groups. Mean ART adherence at the start of the study was 99.5% (standard error (SE ±0.46 and 92.1% (SE ±1.69 in the control and patients groups, respectively. Mean ART adherence at the end of the study changed marginally in the control group (99.7%; SE ±0.46 and increased significantly in the patient group (99.5%; SE± 0.13 (p>0.05. The mean ART adherence rate of patients who received pharmacotherapy increased from 92.8% to 99.5%, and of those who received psychotherapy increased from 91.1% to 99.6% (p>0.05. There was no significant association between the increased adherence in the patient group and baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, irrespective of antidepressant therapy or IPT (p>0.05. Conclusion. Successful treatment of depression with an antidepressant or psychotherapy was associated with improved ART adherence, independent of the type

  19. Patients' Outcome Expectations Matter in Psychological Interventions for Patients with Diabetes and Comorbid Depressive Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, Evelien; Schroevers, Maya J.; Tovote, Annika; Sanderman, Robbert; Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.; Fleer, Joke

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether patients' expectations of treatment outcome predict treatment completion, homework compliance, and depressive symptom improvement in cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Study participants were patients with diabetes and comorbi

  20. Symptoms of depression and quality of life in functional dyspepsia patients

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    Muhammad Eko Cahyanto Neneng Ratnasari Agus Siswanto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dyspepsia is a common disorder characterized by heartburn, nausea, vomiting, bloating, feelingof fullness or early satiety, and belching. Functional dyspepsia (FD or non-ulcer dyspepsia is asyndrome without any physical or endoscopic abnormalities underlying these symptoms. Theimpacts of FD on psychological disturbances and quality of life in patients have been postulated.However, it has not much been a concern. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationshipbetween symptoms of depression and quality of life in patients with FD. This was an observationalstudy with cross-sectional design involving 30 patients. The symptoms of depression weremeasured by beck depression inventory (BDI and the quality of life of patients were measuredby SF-36. The results showed that FD were more suffered consecutively by female patients(66.7%, age over 45 years (53.4%, housewives (56.6%, educated graduates (56.6% andmarried (90.0%. Moreover, patients who experienced symptoms of clinical depression withlow, moderate and severe levels were 16.3%, 33.3% dan 10.0%, respectively. A significantcorrelation between depressive symptoms and the overall of patients quality of life was observed(r = 0.481; p<0.05. Furthermore analysis showed that among eight domains of health in SF-36analyzed, a negative significant correlation was observed between the depressive symptoms andthe three domains of health i.e. general physical function, limitation of motion caused byphysical problems, and vitality. In conclusion, there is a negative correlation between depressivesymptoms and quality of life in patients with FD.

  1. Depressive symptoms and disability in acute patients with comorbidities in departments of internal medicine

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    Salvatore La Carrubba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are few data on the prevalence of depression among acute patients with comorbidities. The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients admitted to Internal Medicine Units and the correlation between these symptoms and comorbidities and disability indexes. Materials and methods: All consecutive patients admitted to 26 Internal Medicine Units of the Italian National Public Health System in Sicily, Italy, from September 2001 to March 2002 were screened. Within 24 hours of admission, patients were administered the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, Mini-Mental State Examination, Activities of Daily Living (ADL, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL and Charlson’s Comorbidity Index. Results: 1,947 subjects were included in the analyses. Of the patients, 509 (26.1% showed depressive symptoms (indicated by GDS score > 15. Depression was significantly associated (univariate analyses with hypertension (OR 1.45; CI 95% 1.18-1.79, diabetes (OR 1.48, CI 95% 1.17-1.87, cerebrovascular disease (OR 1.50, CI 95% 1.08-2.07, cirrhosis (OR 1.49, CI 95% 1.01- 2.19, ADL score (OR 0.72: CI 95% 0.63-0.82, and IADL score (OR 0.83; CI 95% 0.78-0.87, but not with Charlson’s Comorbidity Index (OR 1.04; CI 95% 0.98-1.10. Multivariate analysis showed that independent predictive factors for depression were age (OR 1.02, CI 95% 1.01-1.02, female gender (OR 2.29, CI 95% 1.83 - 2.87, and IADL score (OR 0.86, CI 95% 0.81 - 0.93. Conclusions: The data suggest that depressive symptoms are not linked to worse clinical conditions but are associated with the loss of autonomy in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living.

  2. The Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER study: final results of Italian patients with depression

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    Quail Deborah

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors Influencing Depression Endpoints Research (FINDER is a 6-month, prospective, observational study carried out in 12 European countries aimed at investigating health-related quality of life (HRQoL in outpatients receiving treatment for a first or new depressive episode. The Italian HRQoL data at 6 months is described in this report, and the factors associated with HRQoL changes were determined. Methods Data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months of treatment. HRQoL was measured using components of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36; mental component summary (MCS, physical component summary (PCS and the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D; visual analogue scale (VAS and health status index (HSI. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS was adopted to evaluate depressive symptoms, while somatic and painful physical symptoms were assessed by using the 28-item Somatic Symptom Inventory (SSI-28 and a VAS. Results Of the initial 513 patients, 472 completed the 3-month observation and 466 the 6-month observation. The SF-36 and EQ-5D mean (± SD scores showed HRQoL improvements at 3 months and a further smaller improvement at 6 months, with the most positive effects for SF-36 MCS (baseline 22.0 ± 9.2, 3 months 34.6 ± 10.0; 6 months 39.3 ± 9.5 and EQ-5D HSI (baseline 0.4 ± 0.3; 3 months 0.7 ± 0.3; 6 months 0.7 ± 0.2. Depression and anxiety symptoms (HADS-D mean at baseline 13.3 ± 4.2; HADS-A mean at baseline 12.2 ± 3.9 consistently decreased during the first 3 months (8.7 ± 4.3; 7.5 ± 3.6 and showed a further positive change at 6 months (6.9 ± 4.3; 5.8 ± 3.4. Somatic and painful symptoms (SSI and VAS significantly decreased, with the most positive changes in the SSI-28 somatic item (mean at baseline 2.4 ± 0.7; mean change at 3 months: -0.5; 95% CI -0.6 to -0.5; mean change at 6 months: -0.7; 95% CI -0.8 to -0.7; in 'interference of overall pain with daily activities' (mean at baseline 45

  3. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003213.htm Depression - overview To use the sharing features on this ... older adults Major depression Persistent depressive disorder Postpartum depression Premenstrual ... Review Date 1/4/2016 Updated by: Timothy Rogge, ...

  4. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in patients with depressive disorder on antidepressive medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojević, Albina; Popović, Irena; Nenadović, Milutin; Ravanić, Dragan; Paunović-Milosavljević, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent depression is a psychiatric disorder of which etiology and pathogenesis might be related to immune response. Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and its components are also strongly associated with elevated inflammatory indicators, as so as the body mass index (BMI) and total cholesterol levels. Objective of this study was to investigate if there was any difference in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in patients with recurrent depressive disorder, treated with antidepressants, compared to a healthy control group of subjects and if there was an association between increased CRP levels and the presence of MetS in these two groups. Sixty subjects entered the study; of these 35 patients with the diagnosis of recurrent depressive disorder, while the healthy control group included 25 subjects. MetS was defined according to the NCEP ATP III criteria. The cut-off point for CRP was set at > 5 mg/L. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of MetS and CRP values between the studied groups. Waist circumference and total cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the experimental group. Patients that fulfilled the criteria for MetS showed significantly higher values of central obesity and arterial hypertension in the experimental group as well. The elevated CRP levels were associated with increased frequency of MetS in depressed patients. Both CRP levels and metabolic risk profile screening, according to the international criteria, may be beneficial in order to obtain better assessment for depressive long-term medicated patients.

  5. Blood transcriptomic biomarkers in adult primary care patients with major depressive disorder undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redei, E E; Andrus, B M; Kwasny, M J; Seok, J; Cai, X; Ho, J; Mohr, D C

    2014-09-16

    An objective, laboratory-based diagnostic tool could increase the diagnostic accuracy of major depressive disorders (MDDs), identify factors that characterize patients and promote individualized therapy. The goal of this study was to assess a blood-based biomarker panel, which showed promise in adolescents with MDD, in adult primary care patients with MDD and age-, gender- and race-matched nondepressed (ND) controls. Patients with MDD received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and clinical assessment using self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). The measures, including blood RNA collection, were obtained before and after 18 weeks of CBT. Blood transcript levels of nine markers of ADCY3, DGKA, FAM46A, IGSF4A/CADM1, KIAA1539, MARCKS, PSME1, RAPH1 and TLR7, differed significantly between participants with MDD (N=32) and ND controls (N=32) at baseline (qdepressed. Thus, blood levels of different transcript panels may identify the depressed from the nondepressed among primary care patients, during a depressive episode or in remission, or follow and predict response to CBT in depressed individuals.

  6. Symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence among patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peggy Bosch; Janina Waberg; Maurits van den Noort; Heike Staudte; Sabina Lim; Jos Egger

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Treatment non-adherence is a common problem in patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression. This study investigated the possible relationships between symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence.Methods: Thirty outpatients with schizophrenia and 58 outpatients with depression were enroled in this study. The beck depression Inventory-II, the positive and negative syndrome scale, and the pittsburgh sleep quality index were used to assess symptom severity and quality of sleep, and sleep log data were used to measure treatment adherence.Results: The preliminary results showed no signiifcant relationship between symptom severity and treatment adherence or between quality of sleep and treatment adherence in patients with depression. However, a signiifcant positive relationship was found between negative symptoms and treatment adherence and a signiifcant negative relationship between quality of sleep and treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia.Conclusion: The present exploratory study revealed a positive relationship between symptom severity and treatment adherence and a negative relationship between quality of sleep and treatment adherence in patients with schizophrenia, but no signiifcant relationships in patients with depression were found. Future studies are needed in order to gain a better understanding of possible risk factors related to treatment non-adherence.

  7. Classifying depression patients and normal subjects using machine learning techniques and nonlinear features from EEG signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinifard, Behshad; Moradi, Mohammad Hassan; Rostami, Reza

    2013-03-01

    Diagnosing depression in the early curable stages is very important and may even save the life of a patient. In this paper, we study nonlinear analysis of EEG signal for discriminating depression patients and normal controls. Forty-five unmedicated depressed patients and 45 normal subjects were participated in this study. Power of four EEG bands and four nonlinear features including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), higuchi fractal, correlation dimension and lyapunov exponent were extracted from EEG signal. For discriminating the two groups, k-nearest neighbor, linear discriminant analysis and logistic regression as the classifiers are then used. Highest classification accuracy of 83.3% is obtained by correlation dimension and LR classifier among other nonlinear features. For further improvement, all nonlinear features are combined and applied to classifiers. A classification accuracy of 90% is achieved by all nonlinear features and LR classifier. In all experiments, genetic algorithm is employed to select the most important features. The proposed technique is compared and contrasted with the other reported methods and it is demonstrated that by combining nonlinear features, the performance is enhanced. This study shows that nonlinear analysis of EEG can be a useful method for discriminating depressed patients and normal subjects. It is suggested that this analysis may be a complementary tool to help psychiatrists for diagnosing depressed patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality of Life and Spiritual Well-Being in Geriatric Patients With Chronic Depression

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    Izadmehr

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Most people do not appreciate the aging period because of lack of knowledge or unknown backgrounds; therefore, they get affected by chronic mental disorders. Depression is one of the most predominant chronic mental disorders. Objectives In this study, we aimed to examine the relationship between quality of life (QOL and spiritual well-being among geriatric retired employees of the oil industry in Khuzestan, Iran, who had chronic depression. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study on 200 retired employees of the oil industry in Khuzestan, Iran, selected using simple random sampling technique. The variables were measured by three different standard questionnaires, including the QOL questionnaire (SF12, spiritual well-being scale (SWB, and depression scale (GDS. Results The mean age of the study group was 65 ± 4 years. Most of the patients had elementary or middle school level of education (44%. Hypertension was the predominant chronic disease associated with depression (37%. The mean QOL, spiritual well-being, and depression scores were 27.9 ± 6.4, 105 ± 13.8, and 4.2 ± 4.35, respectively. Spiritual well-being had a significant negative correlation with depression (P = 0.0001, indicating that the prevalence of chronic diseases such as depression decreased as spiritual well-being increased. There was also a significant negative correlation between the QOL and depression (P = 0.0001. Conclusions The results of our study showed that chronic depression disorder was significantly correlated with QOL and spiritual well-being of the elderly. To have healthy, independent, and happy geriatrics, it is important to consider such problems.

  9. Body mass index, cognitive deficit and depressive symptoms in high cardiovascular risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lucas da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract To evaluate the relationship of obesity, cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms in patients with high cardiovascular risk. Methods: A sample of 93 patients aged 50 years or older was selected from the Center of Dyslipidemia and High Cardiovascular Risk from Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA. Patients with stroke were excluded. For cognitive evaluation, the MMSE (Mini Mental State Examination was used. A score of 24 or less was considered as cognitive impairment, and for those who had 4 years or less of education, the cutoff point was 17. The GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale was also used, with the cutoff of 6 for presence of depressive symptoms. Results: Obese patients showed lower mean MMSE scores compared to non-obese patients (p=0.0012. Additionally, for every one point increase in BMI above 30 there was a 27% increase in the chances of the patient having cognitive impairment. The obese patients presented 31% chance of having cognitive impairment compared with overweight subjects. Conclusions: Our findings corroborated the association between obesity and cognitive impairment in high cardiovascular risk patients. This association however, was not observed for depressive symptoms.

  10. The Effect of Group Cognitive Therapy on Reducing Depression in the Female Patients with Severe Obsessive-compulsive Disorder

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    Vida Mohammadi Heris

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The high prevalence of mental health problems among psychiatric patients with severe obsessivecompulsive disorder is depression that is one of the methods of non-pharmacological treatment of group cognitive therapy. In this study, the effect of cognitive therapy in reducing depression of female patients suffering from severe obsessive-compulsive disorder examined. Methods: In this study, patients were randomly divided into control and experimental groups and both groups were tested by Beck Depression Inventory before the intervention (second revision. The experimental group participated in ten sessions of cognitive therapy while the control group received no intervention. At the end of the intervention, both groups were evaluated by the test. Results: The data obtained using dependent and independent T test were evaluated. A positive impact in the cognitive therapy group showed decreased depression. Conclusion: The method of group cognitive therapy is effective in reducing depression in patients with severe obsessive-compulsive.

  11. Depression and risk of suicide in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder: A hospital-based study

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    Rupesh Kumar Chaudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD is a chronic, distressing, anxiety disorder associated with significant functional impairment. Patient with OCD often suffer from one or more co-morbid disorders. Major depression has been the most common co-morbid syndrome. Comorbid Axis I disorders along with increased severity of comorbid depressive and anxiety symptoms, increased severity of obsessions, feelings of hopelessness and past history of suicide attempts have been associated with worsening levels of suicidality in OCD (Angelakis I, Gooding P., 2015. As per data Thirty-six percent of the patients of OCD report lifetime suicidal thoughts and 11% have a history of attempted suicide(Torres AR, Ramos-Cerqueira AT, et al, 2011. There is a reasonable probability that the patient of OCD have suicidal thoughts, plans or actually attempt suicide. Aim: To assess depression and suicidality in OCD patients. Method: This study was conducted on 50 patients diagnosed with OCD as per ICD 10 criteria, both outpatient & indoor, from department of psychiatry, Dayanand Medical College & Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. A socio-demographic proforma (containing demographic details, Hamilton Depression Rating & Scale, Columbia suicide severity rating scale (CSSRS & Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Symptom Checklist (YBOCS were administered. Results: Mild depression was found out to be 40% whereas 16% were suffering from moderate depression and 10% and 14% had severe and very severe depression respectively. Suicidal ideation was found in 52 % of patients.16% of patients had history of actual attempt. Data showed that 70% of females had suicidal ideations. It was also found that in cases of severe and very severe depression associated with OCD all the patients had suicidal ideations as compared to 35% in mild and 87.5% in moderate depressive patients. It was found that 40% of severe depressive and 28.57% of very severe depressive patients had attempted

  12. Vitamin D and depression in geriatric primary care patients

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    Lapid MI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Maria I Lapid,1 Stephen S Cha,2 Paul Y Takahashi31Division of Outpatient Consultation, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, 2Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, 3Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USAPurpose: Vitamin D deficiency is common in the elderly. Vitamin D deficiency may affect the mood of people who are deficient. We investigated vitamin D status in older primary care patients and explored associations with depression.Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted and association analyses were performed. Primary care patients at a single academic medical center who were ≥60 years with serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D levels were included in the analysis. The primary outcome was a diagnosis of depression. Frailty scores and medical comorbidity burden scores were collected as predictors.Results: There were 1618 patients with a mean age of 73.8 years (±8.48. The majority (81% had optimal (≥25 ng/mL 25(OHD range, but 17% met mild-moderate (10–24 ng/mL and 3% met severe (<10 ng/mL deficiencies. Those with severe deficiency were older (P < 0.001, more frail (P < 0.001, had higher medical comorbidity burden (P < 0.001, and more frequent depression (P = 0.013. The 694 (43% with depression had a lower 25(OHD than the nondepressed group (32.7 vs 35.0, P = 0.002. 25(OHD was negatively correlated with age (r = −0.070, P = 0.005, frailty (r = −0.113, P < 0.001, and medical comorbidity burden (r = −0.101, P < 0.001. A 25(OHD level was correlated with depression (odds ratio = 0.990 and 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.983–0.998, P = 0.012. Those with severe vitamin D deficiency were twice as likely to have depression (odds ratio = 2.093 with 95% CI 1.092–4.011, P = 0.026.Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency was present in a fifth of this older primary care population. Lower vitamin D levels

  13. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianying Li; Cheng Xu; Xiaohua Cao; Qiang Gao; Yan Wang; Yanfang Wang; Juyi Peng; Kerang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for

  14. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianying; Xu, Cheng; Cao, Xiaohua; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yanfang; Peng, Juyi; Zhang, Kerang

    2013-06-25

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for

  15. Persistent genital arousal disorder: confluent patient history of agitated depression, paroxetine cessation, and a tarlov cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibye, Simone; Jensen, Hans Mørch

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a woman suffering from persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) after paroxetine cessation. She was admitted to a psychiatric department and diagnosed with agitated depression. Physical investigation showed no gynaecological or neurological explanation; however, a pelvic MRI scan revealed a Tarlov cyst. Size and placement of the cyst could not explain the patient's symptoms; thus neurosurgical approach would not be helpful. Her depression was treated with antidepressant with little effect. Electroconvulsive therapy improved the patient's symptoms though they did not fully resolve. More awareness of PGAD and thorough interdisciplinary conferences are necessary to insure an unequivocal treatment strategy.

  16. Major Depressive Symptoms Increase 3-Year Mortality Rate in Patients with Mild Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jindong Ding; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Depression and dementia are commonly concurrent and are both associated with increased mortality among older people. However, little is known about whether home-dwelling patients newly diagnosed with mild dementia coexisting with depressive symptoms have excess mortality. We conducted a post hoc...... them, 12 were with MD-S at baseline. Multivariable analysis adjusting for the potential confounders (age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education, BMI, household status, MMSE, CCI, QoL-AD, NPIQ, ADSC-ADL, medication, and RCT allocation) showed that patients with MD-S had a 2.5-fold higher...

  17. HOW AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL MEMORY DEFICITS AFFECT PROBLEM-SOLVING IN DEPRESSED PATIENTS

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    H. Kaviani

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, there have been several studies showing autobiographical memory retrieval and problem‑solving deficits in depressed population. The present study aimed to first to examine the roles of autobiographical memory specificity and problemsolving effectiveness in Iranian depressed people with or without suicide ideation and secondly, to test the correlations between autobiographical memory and problem-solving components. A group of depressed patients with suicide ideation (n=20, aged 18-45 and a matched control group (depressed without suicide ideation were tested by a autobiographical memory test, a means-ends problem-solving task, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS. Both groups met DSM-IV criteria for major depression disorder without psychotic features. In line with hypotheses, the suicide ideators scored significantly higher on the hopelessness scale than the control group. The suicide ideators also provided significantly less effective problem-solving strategies and more over-general memories than the control group. A significant correlation was found between low effectiveness of problem-solving strategies and over-general memory retrieval. The present results suggest that access to non-specific memories in depressed people can lead probably to ineffective problem solutions and subsequently hopelessness and suicide.

  18. Assessment of anxiety and depression after lower limb amputation in Jordanian patients

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    Ziad M Hawamdeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ziad M Hawamdeh1, Yasmin S Othman2, Alaa I Ibrahim31Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 2Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 3Lecturer, Department of Physical Therapy for Pediatrics and Pediatric surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, EgyptObjective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Jordanian lower limb amputees with different clinical characteristics and sociodemographic data (gender, marital status, social support, income, type and level of amputation, and occupation.Methods: Participants were 56 patients with unilateral lower limb amputation with mean duration (8.4 ± 5.75 years. They were recruited from inpatient and outpatient clinics of Jordan University hospital, Royal Farah Rehabilitation Center, and Al-basheer hospital in Amman, Jordan. Participants responded to a questionnaire that included a battery of questions requesting brief information about sociodemographic variables and characteristics of amputation. The level of depression and anxiety in each participating patient was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS.Results: The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms were 37% and 20%, respectively. Factors associated with high prevalence of psychological symptoms included female gender, lack of social support, unemployment, traumatic amputation, shorter time since amputation, and amputation below the knee. These findings were confirmed by a significant reduction of anxiety and depression scores in patients who received social support, patients with amputation due to disease, and patients with amputation above the knee. Presence of pain and use of prosthesis had no effect on the prevalence.Conclusions: The findings of the present study highlight the high incidence of psychiatric disability and

  19. Are Depression and Anxiety Common in Hemodialyzed Patients?

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    Pop-Jordanova Nada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researchers confirmed that depression and anxiety are two common comorbid disorders in chronic kidney patients. The aim of our study was to screen the level of depression and anxiety in a group of end-stage kidney diseases treated with hemodialysis. The evaluated sample comprised 230 participants; 110 females (mean age 55.5±13.5 years, and 120 males (mean age 54.5±14.3 years. The mean duration of maintenance dialysis was 8.3±5.8 years (from 0.5 to 24 years. Patients were selected randomly from three dialysis centers in R. Macedonia. As psychometric instruments Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and scores from Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-201 were used. Our study confirmed that majority of evaluated dialyzed patients are depressed and anxious in different level, but unfortunately the mental problems are frequently unrecognized. We suggested some response measures for management of these conditions in order to avoid risks for complications as well of suicide.

  20. Temporomandibular disorders, otologic symptoms and depression levels in tinnitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgenberg, P B; Saldanha, A D D; Cunha, C O; Rubo, J H; Conti, P C R

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and otologic symptoms in patients with and without tinnitus. The influence of the level of depression was also addressed. The tinnitus group was comprised of 100 patients with tinnitus, and control group was comprised of 100 individuals without tinnitus. All subjects were evaluated using the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) to determine the presence of TMD and depression level. Chi-square, Spearman Correlation and Mann-Whitney tests were used in statistical analysis, with a 5% significance level. TMD signs and symptoms were detected in 85% of patients with tinnitus and in 55% of controls (P≤0·001). The severity of pain and higher depression levels were positively associated with tinnitus (P≤0·001). It was concluded that tinnitus is associated with TMD and with otalgia, dizziness/vertigo, stuffy sensations, hypoacusis sensation and hyperacusis, as well as with higher depression levels.

  1. Clinical features of depressive disorders in patients with brain tumors

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    Ogorenko V.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the structure of psychopathology and clinical features of depressive disorders in patients with brain oncopathology. Polymorphic mental disorders of various clinical content and severity in most cases not only are comorbid to oncological pathology of the brain, but most often are the first clinical signs of early tumors. The study was conducted using the following methods: clinical psychiatric, questionnaire Simptom Check List- 90 -Revised-SCL- 90 -R, Luscher test and mathematical processing methods. Sample included 175 patients with brain tumors with non-psychotic level of mental disorders. The peculiarities of mental disorders and psychopathological structure of nonpsychotic depressive disorders have been a clinical option of cancer debut in patients with brain tumors. We found that nonpsychotic depression is characterized by polymorphism and syndromal incompletion; this causes ambiguity of diagnoses interpretation on stages of diagnostic period. Features of depressive symptoms depending on the signs of malignancy / nonmalignancy of brain tumor were defined.

  2. Dopaminergic mechanism of antidepressant action in depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Paul; Hale, Anthony S; Argyropoulos, Spilios

    2005-05-01

    Clinical studies have not yet determined a common mechanism of action for antidepressant drugs, which have primary sites of action on a variety of different neurotransmitter systems. However, a large body of evidence from animal studies demonstrates that sensitisation of D2-like dopamine receptors in the mesolimbic dopamine system may represent a 'final common pathway' in antidepressant action. The present study aimed to determine whether, consistent with data from animal studies, the clinical antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is reversed by acute administration of a receptor antagonist selective for D2-like receptors in the mesolimbic dopamine system. The participants were patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (n = 8) who had been treated successfully (Hamilton Depression Scale depressed, untreated volunteers (n = 10). They attended a psychiatric research ward on an out-patient basis, and received double-blind acute administration of either placebo, or a low dose of the selective dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist sulpiride (200 mg), in a counterbalanced order. Mood and psychomotor effects were assessed using visual analogue scales and the Fawcett-Clark Pleasure Capacity Scale. Sulpiride slightly improved subjective well-being in the control group, but in the antidepressant-treated patients, sulpiride caused a substantial reinstatement of depressed mood. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that sensitisation of D2-like receptors may be central to the clinical action of SSRIs.

  3. Collaborative health literate depression care among predominantly Hispanic patients with coronary heart disease in safety net care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ell, Kathleen; Oh, Hyunsung; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Guterman, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether evidence-based socioculturally health literate-adapted collaborative depression care improves depression care, depressive symptoms, and quality of life among predominantly Hispanic patients with coronary heart disease. The 12-month trial included 97 patients with coronary heart disease (79% of eligible patients) who met the depression criteria assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Patients were recruited from 3 safety net clinics and offered depression team care by a bilingual clinical social worker and community patient navigator, a consulting psychiatrist, and a primary care physician. The team provided problem-solving therapy (PST) or pharmacotherapy or both, telephone symptom monitoring and behavioral activation, and patient resource navigation support. Recruited patients were given patient and family member health literacy-adapted educational and community resource materials in Spanish or English. Overall, depression treatment was 74% (PST, 55%; PST plus antidepressant medications, 18%; and antidepressant medications alone, 2%). Nearly half of the patients showed a 50% reduction of the Symptom Checklist-20 (49% at 6 mo and 48% at 12 mo) and of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score with 47% of patients at 6 months and 43% at 12 months. The 50% improvement in Patient Health Questionnaire and Symptom Checklist-20 score reduction did not vary significantly between patients who received PST or antidepressant only or those who received PST plus antidepressant. The quality of life Short-Form Health Survey SF-12, the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire, and the Sheehan Disability Scale outcomes also improved significantly. Socioculturally literacy-adapted collaborative depression care was accepted by patients with coronary heart disease and improved depression care and symptoms, quality of life, and functional outcomes among predominantly Hispanic patients with heart disease. Copyright © 2014 The Academy of Psychosomatic

  4. Attitudes and beliefs of patients with chronic depression toward antidepressants and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob SA; Ab Rahman AF; MA Hassali

    2015-01-01

    Sabrina Anne Jacob,1 Ab Fatah Ab Rahman,2 Mohamed Azmi Ahmad Hassali3 1School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Sunway, 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Gong Badak Campus, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin (UniSZA), Kuala Terengganu, 3School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Science Malaysia, Minden, Malaysia Background: Many patients have erroneous views with regard to depression and its management, and it was noted that these attitudes and beliefs significantly affected their adh...

  5. Cognitive content structure of anxious and depressive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novović Zdenka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available There were three aims of the study: to determine psychometric properties of Serbian translation of Beck's Cognition Check List, to analyze factor structure of both subscales of Check List and to check the relationship among determined dimensions of the subscales. Patients with depressive anxiety and mixed diagnoses participated. Results suggest that subscale of depressive cognitions is of satisfactory reliability and both concurrent and divergent validity. Subscale of anxious cognitions has satisfactory internal consistency, but is weakly correlated with anxiety symptoms and is not discriminatively valid. Principal components analysis of depressive cognitions subscale yielded three factors that corresponded to the elements of Beck's "Negative Cognitive Triad". Analysis of anxious subscale did not provided dimensions hypothesized by Beck, but three dimensions, which correspond to three groups of anxious symptoms, where identified. Results indicate possibility of applying Beck’s Content Specificity Hypothesis on separation of specific anxiety or phobic disorders.

  6. Anxiety and depression in patients with head and neck cancer: 6-month follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu YS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Shan Wu,1 Pao-Yen Lin,1,2 Chih-Yen Chien,3 Fu-Min Fang,4 Nien-Mu Chiu,1 Chi-Fa Hung,1 Yu Lee,1 Mian-Yoon Chong11Department of Psychiatry, 2Institute for Translational Research in Biomedical Sciences, 3Department of Otolaryngology, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, TaiwanObjective: We aimed to assess psychiatric morbidities of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC in a prospective study at pretreatment, and 3 and 6 months after treatment, and to compare their health-related quality of life (HRQL between those with and without depressive disorders (depression.Materials and methods: Patients with newly diagnosed HNC from a tertiary hospital were recruited into the study. They were assessed for psychiatric morbidities using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. Their HRQL was simultaneously evaluated using the quality of life questionnaire of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer with a specific module for head and neck cancer; and depressed and nondepressed HNC patients were compared by using the generalized mixed-effect model for repeated measurements.Results: A total of 106 patients were recruited into this study. High rates of anxiety were found at pretreatment, but steadily declined over time (from 27.3% to 6.4%, and later 3.3%. A skew pattern of depression was observed, with prevalence rates from 8.5% at pretreatment to 24.5% and 14% at 3 and 6 months, respectively, after treatment. We found that loss of sense (P=0.001, loss of speech (P<0.001, low libido (P=0.001, dry mouth (P<0.001, and weight loss (P=0.001 were related to depression over time. The depressed patients had a higher consumption of painkillers (P=0.001 and nutrition supplements (P<0.001. The results showed that depression was predicted by sticky saliva (P<0.001 and trouble with

  7. Depression screening and patient outcomes in cardiovascular care : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thombs, Brett D.; de Jonge, Peter; Coyne, James C.; Whooley, Mary A.; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Mitchell, Alex J.; Zuidersma, Marij; Eze-Nliam, Chete; Lima, Bruno B.; Smith, Cheri G.; Soderlund, Karl; Ziegelstein, Roy C.

    2008-01-01

    Context Several practice guidelines recommend that depression be evaluated and treated in patients with cardiovascular disease, but the potential benefits of this are unclear. Objective To evaluate the potential benefits of depression screening in patients with cardiovascular disease by assessing (

  8. Prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders in dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kokoszka

    2016-05-01

    A very high rate of prevalence of depressive disorders in dialysis patients was confirmed in the Polish population when a clinical structured interview was applied. It indicates that routine screening for depressive disorders in these patients is necessary.

  9. Effect of Sahaj Yoga on neuro-cognitive functions in patients suffering from major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Das, S; Mondal, S; Goswami, U; Gandhi, A

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive functions are impaired in Major Depression. Studies on the effects of Yoga on cognitive functions have shown improvement in memory, vigilance and anxiety levels. 30 patients suffering from Major depression (age 18 to 45 years) were randomly divided into two groups: Group 1: (10 males and 5 Females) Patients who practised Sahaj Yoga meditation and also received conventional anti-depressant medication. Group 2: (9 males and 6 Females) Patients who only received conventional antidepressant medication. Group 1 patients were administered Sahaj Yoga practice for 8 weeks. Neuro-cognitive test battery consisting of Letter cancellation test (LCT), Trail making test 'A' (TTA), Trail making test 'B' (TTB), Ruff figural fluency test (RFFT), Forward digit span (FDS) & Reverse digit span test (RDS) was used to assess following cognitive domains: Attention span, visuo-motor speed, short-term memory, working memory and executive functions. After 8 weeks, both Group 1 and Group 2 subjects showed significant improvement in LCT, TTA & TTB but improvement in LCT was more marked in Group 1 subjects. Also, there was significant improvement in RDS scores in only Group 1 subjects (P Yoga practice in addition to the improvement in various other cognitive domains seen with conventional anti-depressants, can lead to additional improvement in executive functions like manipulation of information in the verbal working memory and added improvement in attention span and visuo-motor speed of the depressives.

  10. The significance of routine biochemical markers in patients with major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, You-Fan; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Ye-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to examine the levels of routine biochemical markers in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and combine multiple biochemical parameters to assess the discriminative power for patients with MDD. We used the Hamilton Depression (HAMD) score to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms in 228 patients with MDD. The phase of depression severity was between moderate and severe in MDD patients. There were significant differences between MDD patients and healthy controls in alanine transaminase (ALT), urea nitrogen (UN), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), uric acid (UA), total protein (TP), total bile acid (TBA), creatinine (Cr), total bilirubin (Tbil), direct bilirubin (Dbil) and indirect bilirubin (Ibil), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), fasting blood-glucose (FBG) and fructosamine (SF). Multivariate analysis showed that UN, FBG, HDL-C, SF, TP, Cr and Tbil remained independently association with MDD. Further, a logit equation was established to identify patients with MDD. The composite markers exhibited an area under the curve of 0.810 with cut-off values of 0.410. Our results suggest the associations between UN, FBG, HDL-C, TP, Cr, Tbil, SF and MDD, use of these routine biochemical markers in combination may contribute to improve the complete management for patients with MDD. PMID:27683078

  11. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and personality traits in patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Baba, Hajime; Satomura, Emi; Maeshima, Hitoshi; Takebayashi, Naoko; Namekawa, Yuki; Suzuki, Toshihito; Arai, Heii

    2015-03-04

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors. Previous studies have demonstrated lower serum BDNF levels in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and reported an association between BDNF levels and depression-related personality traits in healthy subjects. The aim of the present study was to explore for a possible association between peripheral BDNF levels and personality traits in patients with MDD. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 123 inpatients with MDD (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 4th edition) at the Juntendo University Koshigaya Hospital were recruited. Serum levels of BDNF were measured. Personality traits were assessed using the 125-item short version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, dose of antidepressant, and depression severity showed that TCI Self-Directedness (SD) scores were negatively associated with serum BDNF levels (β = -0.23, p = 0.026). MDD patients who have low SD did not show the reduction in serum BDNF levels that is normally associated with depressive state. Our findings suggest that depression-related biological changes may not occur in these individuals.

  12. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued......, that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression...

  13. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Veddel; Bukh, Jens Drachmann

    2014-01-01

    , that these diagnostic criteria represent an oversimplification, which has blurred the concept of depression. We suggest a greater emphasis on the depressed mood as the core symptom of depression, which may increase the specificity of the diagnosis. Furthermore, basic principles for the treatment of depression......The prevalence of depression is not clearly established, but estimated to 3-4% in a Danish questionnaire study. Lifetime's prevalences of 12-17% are reported in other community samples. In the current diagnostic system depression is defined categorically and operationally. It has been argued...

  14. Quality of life among free clinic patients associated with somatic symptoms, depression, and perceived neighborhood environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Prevedel, Jamie A; Tabler, Jennifer; Hamilton, Brian J; Ashby, Jeanie; Reel, Justine J

    2014-06-01

    Free clinics provide free or reduced fee healthcare to individuals who lack access to primary care and are socio-economically disadvantaged. The purpose of this study is to examine health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among free clinic patients and its association with somatic symptoms, depression, and perceived neighborhood environment. Free clinic patients (n = 186) aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. HRQoL, depression, somatic symptoms, and perceived neighborhood environment were measured using standardized instruments. Overall, the participants reported low level of HRQoL compared to the general healthy population. US born participants (n = 97) reported poorer psychological QoL and social relations, more somatic symptoms, and were more likely to be depressed than non-US born participants (n = 89). Higher numbers of somatic symptoms were associated with poorer environmental QoL. Depression was associated with all aspects of QoL; a higher level of depression was related to poorer QoL in all aspects. Our findings show that free clinic patients, especially US born patients, have poor HRQoL. Depression and perceived neighborhood satisfaction are key factors to determine HRQoL among free clinic patients. Mental health services and collaboration with other community organizations may help in improving HRQoL among free clinic patients. Finally, health promotion programs at the community level, not just at the clinic level, would be valuable to improve health of free clinic patients as perceived neighborhood environment is associated with their HRQoL.

  15. The course of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, F; Denollet, J

    2012-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of the study was to examine the course (incidence, recurrence/persistence) of depressive symptoms in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes and to identify significant predictors of these different course patterns. METHODS: A cohort of 2,460 primary care patients...... = 310), while recurrence/persistence in those with baseline depression was found in 66% (n = 212).The presence of any depression was associated with being female, low education, non-cardiovascular chronic diseases, stressful life events and a self-reported history of depression. Incident depression...... was predicted by female sex, low education and depression history, while patients with a history of depression had a 2.5-fold increased odds of recurrent/persistent depression. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Depression is common in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes, with one in seven patients reporting...

  16. The Relation Between Depressive Symptoms and Self-Care in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopjani, Idriz; Vehapi, Shemsedin; Gorani, Daut; Imeri, Miradije; Vitoja, Sidita; Tahiri, Shqipe

    2016-12-01

    The depression is a significant problem in patients with diabetes. This research is the first of it's kind conducted in the Republic of Kosovo to determine the prevalence of depression diagnosed in people with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2) and interrelation between depressive symptoms and behavior of diabetes self-care (glucose monitoring, exercise, diet, and self- health care). Research was conducted in the University Clinical Center of Kosovo (UCCK), in Pristine. The sample consisted of 200 individuals. Data collection was done through structured questionnaires. HANDS (Harvard Department of Psychiatry / National Depression Screening Day Scale) questionnaire was used to assess depressive symptoms and DSMQ (The Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire) was used to assess self-care behavior. Data analysis was run through SSPS program, version 21. The results showed that the prevalence of depression in diabetic patients was 66.5% in Kosovo. Being a woman, a resident of rural areas or with low level of education, there were significant predictors and were associated with increased chance of developing the symptoms of major depression. Significant relations were found between major depression and physical activity (p<0.05). While between major depression and management of blood glucose level, dietary control and self health care, no significant correlation was found. This paper concluded the involvement of psychological aspect in health care plan for diabetics, in order to reduce the number of individuals affected by depression, to diagnose and to treat these individuals for a better quality of life.

  17. Enhanced depression care for patients with acute coronary syndrome and persistent depressive symptoms: coronary psychosocial evaluation studies randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Karina W; Rieckmann, Nina; Clemow, Lynn; Schwartz, Joseph E; Shimbo, Daichi; Medina, Vivian; Albanese, Gabrielle; Kronish, Ian; Hegel, Mark; Burg, Matthew M

    2010-04-12

    Depressive symptoms are an established predictor of mortality and major adverse cardiac events (defined as nonfatal myocardial infarction or hospitalization for unstable angina or urgent/emergency revascularizations) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This study was conducted to determine the acceptability and efficacy of enhanced depression treatment in patients with ACS. A 3-month observation period to identify patients with ACS and persistent depressive symptoms was followed by a 6-month randomized controlled trial. From January 1, 2005, through February 29, 2008, 237 patients with ACS from 5 hospitals were enrolled, including 157 persistently depressed patients randomized to intervention (initial patient preference for problem-solving therapy and/or pharmacotherapy, then a stepped-care approach; 80 patients) or usual care (77 patients) and 80 nondepressed patients who underwent observational evaluation. The primary outcome was patient satisfaction with depression care. Secondary outcomes were depressive symptom changes (assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory), major adverse cardiac events, and death. At the end of the trial, the proportion of patients who were satisfied with their depression care was higher in the intervention group (54% of 80) than in the usual care group (19% of 77) (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-12.9 [P < .001]). The Beck Depression Inventory score decreased significantly more (t(155) = 2.85 [P = .005]) for intervention patients (change, -5.7; 95% CI, -7.6 to -3.8; df = 155) than for usual care patients (change, -1.9; 95% CI, -3.8 to -0.1; df = 155); the depression effect size was 0.59 of the standard deviation. At the end of the trial, 3 intervention patients and 10 usual care patients had experienced major adverse cardiac events (4% and 13%, respectively; log-rank test, chi(2)(1) = 3.93 [P = .047]), as well as 5 nondepressed patients (6%) (for the intervention vs nondepressed cohort, chi(2)(1) = 0

  18. A comparison of psychosocial and cognitive functioning between depressed and non-depressed patients with cannabis dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secora, Alex M; Eddie, David; Wyman, Bertram J; Brooks, Daniel J; Mariani, John J; Levin, Frances R

    2010-07-01

    Cannabis use and depressive disorders are thought to impair cognitive performance and psychosocial functioning. Both disorders co-occurring may compound the negative effects of these diagnoses. In this study, the authors used the California Computerized Assessment Package as the cognitive performance measure and the Addiction Severity Index as the psychosocial functioning measure to compare individuals who were cannabis dependent and either depressed or not depressed (N= 108: 54 cannabis dependent only, 54 cannabis dependent and depressed or dysthymic). As predicted, cannabis dependent individuals with comorbid depression showed more psychosocial impairment than individuals with cannabis dependence alone. However, contrary to the authors' hypothesis, individuals who were cannabis dependent with comorbid depression showed less cognitive impairment in some California Computerized Assessment Package modules than individuals with cannabis dependence alone. Based on the authors' results, they concluded that the additive effects of cannabis dependency and depression may only be limited to psychosocial domains and may not extend to cognitive functioning.

  19. Depression, Anxiety, and Anger in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    BALIKCI, Adem; ERDEM, Murat; KESKIN, Uğur; BOZKURT ZINCIR, Selma; GÜLSÜN, Murat; ÖZÇELIK, Fatih; AKGÜL, Emin Özgür; AKARSU, Süleyman; ÖZTOSUN, Muzaffer; ERGÜN, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a syndrome of heterogeneous nature, affecting multiple systems, particularly the endocrine system. We propose to investigate the possible relationships among hormonal changes, levels of anxiety, depression, and anger in patients with PCOS. Method Forty-four female patients with PCOS and 44 body mass index (BMI )-matched healthy women participated in this study. We measured the sociodemographic features, some serum hormonal levels (insulin, gonadotropins, prolactin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), 17 OH-progesterone, and total and free testosterone), and some other biochemical parameters of the participants. Also, all participants completed the Trait Anger-Anger Expression Scale (STAS), Beck Depression, and Beck Anxiety Inventories. We evaluated the psychiatric scale scores obtained from PCOS patients and control subjects. We used the independent-samples t-test for parametric data to evaluate normal distribution, and Mann-Whitney U-test was used for both abnormally distributed and nonparametric data. We used Pearson correlation analysis to evaluate the potential connection between the two groups’ data. Results The mean ages of the patients with PCOS and control subjects who participated in this study were 27.3±5.6 and 27.4±6.1 years, respectively. The measures of BMI, insulin, luteinizing hormone (LH), DHEAS, and total testosterone serum levels in the patient group were significantly higher than in the control group (pdepression scores (Pdepression with DHEAS serum levels via the autonomic nervous system, considering the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-antagonistic effect of DHEAS. Obesity, hirsutism, and infertility may reduce self-confidence and create depressive symptoms in patients with PCOS. In addition, changes in hormonal levels may lead to anxiety directly. Possibly, depressive symptoms are a secondary reflection of these

  20. 76 FR 63355 - Proposed Information Collection (Prevalence and Clinical course of Depression Among patients with...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ...: Prevalence and Clinical Course of Depression Among Patients with Heart Failure, VA HSR&D, Nursing Research... Collection (Prevalence and Clinical course of Depression Among patients with Heart Failure); Comment Request... information needed to identify the patterns of depression in heart failure patients. DATES: Written...

  1. Physical Activity of Depressed Patients and Their Motivation to Exercise: Nordic Walking in Family Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suija, Kadri; Pechter, Ulle; Kalda, Ruth; Tahepold, Heli; Maaroos, Jaak; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to find out how motivated depressed patients are to exercise regularly, to measure the physical activity of depressed patients and to find out how regular Nordic Walking affects the mood and physical fitness of depressed patients. A cross-sectional study was carried out. Three years after the Prediction of Primary…

  2. Psychological vulnerabilities in patients with major depression vs panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, B J; Enns, M W; Walker, J R; Kjernisted, K; Pidlubny, S R

    2001-05-01

    The tripartite model (Clark & Watson, 1991: Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and taxonomic implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336) posits that anxiety and depression share nonspecific features of neuroticism but that somatic arousal appears unique to anxiety, and low positive affect appears unique to depression. The present study controlled for these higher-order effects and evaluated the relative contributions of four, specific lower-order vulnerabilities (anxiety sensitivity, rumination, self-criticism, self-oriented perfectionism). Participants were 38 depressed patients and 38 patients with panic disorder matched as closely as possible for age and gender, and all were diagnosed using the same structured interview by an experienced clinician. Results from hierarchical logistic regression analysis were consistent with predictions from the tripartite model in that only the unique features of arousal and positive affectivity differentiated the two diagnostic groups. At a lower-order level, only anxiety sensitivity (and its facet of fear of physical symptoms) and a ruminative response style demonstrated incremental predictive ability. The discussion focuses on the relationships among these higher-order and lower-order variables, and their potential importance for understanding specific manifestations of psychopathology.

  3. Depressive mixed state: Evidence for a new form of depressive state in type I and II bipolar patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia M’Bailara

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Katia M’Bailara1, Donatienne Van den Bulke2, Nicolas Demazeau2, Jacques Demotes-Mainard3, Chantal Henry11EA4139 Laboratoire de psychologie, Université Victor Segalen, Bordeaux Cedex, France; 2Centre Hospitalier Charles Perrens, Bordeaux Cedex, France; 3INSERM-DRCT, ECRIN, Paris, FranceBackground: A high proportion of unipolar and bipolar type II patients can present a depressive mixed state (DMX. This state is defined by an association of a major depressive episode with at least two specific hypomanic symptoms. This state seems underdiagnosed and this could have treatment implications. The aims of our study were: (i to investigate the frequency of DMX in type I and II bipolar patients hospitalized for a severe or resistant depressive episode and (ii to assess the therapeutic response in naturalistic conditions.Methods: Forty-two consecutive bipolar patients referred by psychiatrists for a severe or resistant depressive episode were assessed using the French version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview 5.0 (MINI 5.0, which assesses the suicide risk and provides DSM-IV diagnosis. The intensity of mood episodes was evaluated using the MADRS and Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Scale. One group of patients included patients presenting only depressive symptoms (ie, pure major depressive episode (MDE, and the second group included patients with a major depressive episode and at least two specific hypomanic symptoms (DMX.Results: Twenty-one patients (50% had a pure MDE and 21 patients (50% had a DMX. The treatment leading to recovery was very different in the two groups. Antidepressants were effective (77% in MDE patients, whereas antipsychotics were effective (81% in DMX. 38% of patients with a MDE also received a mood stabilizer versus 86% in the group of DMX. Five MDE patients (24% and one DMX patient required electroconvulsive therapy. The suicidal ideations did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.7.Conclusions: Some mood episodes in

  4. Depressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  5. Vitamin D Deficiency and Depressive Symptomatology in Psychiatric Patients Hospitalized with a Current Depressive Episode: A Factor Analytic Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland von Känel

    Full Text Available Low vitamin D levels have been associated with depressive symptoms in population-based studies and non-clinical samples as well as with clinical depression. This study aimed to examine the association of vitamin D levels with the severity and dimensions of depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression taking into account confounding variables.We investigated 380 patients (mean age 47 ± 12 years, 70% women who were consecutively hospitalized with a main diagnosis of an ICD-10 depressive episode. All patients self-rated depressive symptom severity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D, the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, and the Brief Symptom Inventory. A principal component analysis was performed with all 34 items of these questionnaires and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D were measured.Vitamin D deficiency ( 75 nmol/l were present in 55.5%, 31.8% and 12.6%, respectively, of patients. Patients with vitamin D deficiency scored higher on the HADS-D scale and on an anhedonia symptom factor than those with insufficient (p-values ≤ 0.023 or sufficient (p-values ≤ 0.008 vitamin D. Vitamin D deficient patients also scored higher on the BDI-II scale than those with sufficient vitamin D (p = 0.007; BDI-II cognitive/affective symptoms, but not somatic/affective symptoms, were higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.005 and insufficiency (p = 0.041 relative to those with sufficient vitamin D. Effect sizes suggested clinically relevant findings.Low vitamin D levels are frequent in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression. Especially 25-OH D levels < 50 nmol/l were associated with cognitive/affective depressive symptoms, and anhedonia symptoms in particular.

  6. Vitamin D Deficiency and Depressive Symptomatology in Psychiatric Patients Hospitalized with a Current Depressive Episode: A Factor Analytic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Känel, Roland; Fardad, Nasser; Steurer, Nadine; Horak, Nicole; Hindermann, Esther; Fischer, Franz; Gessler, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Low vitamin D levels have been associated with depressive symptoms in population-based studies and non-clinical samples as well as with clinical depression. This study aimed to examine the association of vitamin D levels with the severity and dimensions of depressive symptoms in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression taking into account confounding variables. We investigated 380 patients (mean age 47 ± 12 years, 70% women) who were consecutively hospitalized with a main diagnosis of an ICD-10 depressive episode. All patients self-rated depressive symptom severity with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and the Brief Symptom Inventory. A principal component analysis was performed with all 34 items of these questionnaires and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D) were measured. Vitamin D deficiency ( 75 nmol/l) were present in 55.5%, 31.8% and 12.6%, respectively, of patients. Patients with vitamin D deficiency scored higher on the HADS-D scale and on an anhedonia symptom factor than those with insufficient (p-values ≤ 0.023) or sufficient (p-values ≤ 0.008) vitamin D. Vitamin D deficient patients also scored higher on the BDI-II scale than those with sufficient vitamin D (p = 0.007); BDI-II cognitive/affective symptoms, but not somatic/affective symptoms, were higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.005) and insufficiency (p = 0.041) relative to those with sufficient vitamin D. Effect sizes suggested clinically relevant findings. Low vitamin D levels are frequent in hospitalized patients with a current episode of depression. Especially 25-OH D levels < 50 nmol/l were associated with cognitive/affective depressive symptoms, and anhedonia symptoms in particular.

  7. Prevalence and Determinants of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Surgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Shoar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Mood disorders are prevalent in hospitalized patients. However, risk factors for early diagnosis have not been studied exclusively in surgical patients. Our study aimed to investigate the prevalence and determinants of depression and anxiety symptoms in surgical patients. Methods: We included 392 surgical patients in this prospective cross-sectional study, which took place between June 2011 and June 2012. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS was used to screen for symptoms of depression and anxiety at weekly interviews. Regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for early (the day after admission and late (one week or more in-hospital psychiatry symptoms. Results: Depression and anxiety symptoms increased from the time of admission toward longer hospital stay. Scores obtained in the second and third weeks of admission were associated with the need for surgery while HADS in the third week was associated with lack of familial support and being under the poverty line (p < 0.050. Regression model analysis showed that early depression was associated with female gender, and early anxiety was inversely affected by female gender and protected by higher education level. A history of mood disorder was a risk factor. Later anxiety was also associated with longer hospital stay. Conclusions: Depression and anxiety symptoms are a major concern in surgical patients especially in females and those with a history of mood disorders or lower educational level. Patients with a longer hospital stay, in particular, those with underlying diseases, postoperative complications, lack of familial support, and the need for reoperation were also at increased risk.

  8. Depression Is Associated with Repeat Emergency Department Visits in Patients with Non-specific Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Charles Meltzer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with abdominal pain often return multiple times despite no definitive diagnosis. Our objective was to determine if repeat emergency department (ED use among patients with non-specific abdominal pain might be associated with a diagnosis of moderate to severe depressive disorder. Methods: We screened 987 ED patients for major depression during weekday daytime hours from June 2011 through November 2011 using a validated depression screening tool, the PHQ-9. Each subject was classified as either no depression, mild depression or moderate/ severe depression based on the screening tool. Within this group, we identified 83 patients with non-specific abdominal pain by either primary or secondary diagnosis. Comparing depressed patients versus non-depressed patients, we analyzed demographic characteristics and number of prior ED visits in the past year. Results: In patients with non-specific abdominal pain, 61.9% of patients with moderate or severe depression (PHQ9≥10 had at least one visit to our ED for the same complaint within a 365-day period, as compared to 29.2% of patients with no depression (PHQ9<5, (p=0.013. Conclusion: Repeat ED use among patients with non-specific abdominal pain is associated with moderate to severe depressive disorder. Patients with multiple visits for abdominal pain may benefit from targeted ED screening for depression.

  9. Chronobiology, cognitive function and depressive symptoms in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Melissa Voigt

    2014-09-01

    Biological rhythms are essential for the regulation of many life processes. Disturbances of the circadian rhythm are known to affect human health, performance and well-being and the negative consequences are numerous and widespread. Cognitive dysfunction, fatigue, pain, sleep disturbances and mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are common problems arising around the time of surgery or in the course of a cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment period. The importance of investigating prevention or treatment possibilities in these populations is significant due to the extent of the problems and the derived consequences on morbidity and mortality. Genetic predisposition to these problems is also an issue in focus. In this thesis we initially investigated whether the specific clock gene genotype PER(5/5) was associated with the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction one week after non-cardiac surgery. We did not find any association, although this could have been due to the size of the study. Yet, if PER3(5/5) is associated with a higher incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, the risk seems to be only modestly increased and by less than 10%. Melatonin is a hormone with well-known chronobiotic and hypnotic effects. In addition, exogenous melatonin is also known to have anxiolytic, analgesic, antidepressant and positive cognitive effects. Based on the lack of studies investigating these effects of melatonin, we conducted the MELODY trial in which we investigated the effect of 6 mg oral melatonin on depressive symptoms, anxiety, sleep, cognitive function and fatigue in patients with breast cancer in a three month time period after surgery. Melatonin had an effect on reducing the risk of developing depressive symptoms and also increased sleep efficiency perioperatively and total sleep time postoperatively. No effect was found on anxiety, sleep quality, sleepiness, general well-being or pain, however melatonin seemed to positively

  10. Cancer-related fatigue shows a stable association with diurnal cortisol dysregulation in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martina E; Semik, Johanna; Habermann, Nina; Wiskemann, Joachim; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Steindorf, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a major burden for breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy. Yet, its pathophysiology is still not well understood. Hypothesized mechanisms include dysregulations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which may be reflected in alterations in the diurnal cortisol patterns. However, studies on the association between cortisol and fatigue during adjuvant cancer therapy are rare. We therefore assessed salivary cortisol at awakening, 0.5h post-awakening, noon, 5 pm and 10 pm/bedtime in 265 breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy at three timepoints. Cancer-related fatigue was assessed with the Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) covering the physical, affective, and cognitive fatigue dimensions. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed cross-sectionally at the three timepoints as well as longitudinally considering changes in cortisol and fatigue over time. The results showed that the physical dimension of cancer-related fatigue was significantly associated with increased evening cortisol levels and higher overall cortisol secretion. These associations were independent of depressive symptoms. Morning cortisol levels, the cortisol awakening response and the diurnal slope were not consistently associated with physical fatigue. Affective and cognitive fatigue showed no clear association with any of the cortisol parameters. In conclusion, the physical but not the affective or cognitive dimension of fatigue seems associated with cortisol dysregulations in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy, characterized by an unaffected cortisol level in the morning but blunted decline to the evening level. Research focusing on disturbances of the cortisol rhythm and HPA dysregulations during and after cancer treatment may open new strategies to reduce cancer-related fatigue.

  11. Anipamil prevents ST depression in patients with stable angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C T; Sørum, C; Rasmussen, V

    1993-01-01

    . The patients received anipamil 80 mg once daily, anipamil 160 mg once daily, and placebo in a randomized order. At the end of each treatment period the patients underwent 24-hour ambulatory ECG recording. Nineteen patients were included, all with typical stable angina pectoris for at least 2 months, exercise...... test with > or = 0.10 mV horizontal or down-sloping ST-segment depression and limited by angina pectoris, and at least 10 attacks of angina pectoris in the initial single-blind placebo period. During the placebo period, a total duration of transient myocardial ischemia > or = 0.10 mV during the 24-hour...

  12. 'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayalon, Liat; Goldfracht, Margalit; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    to existing depression screening tools. METHODS: A cross sectional sample of 153 older primary care patients. Participants completed several depression-screening measures (e.g. a single depression screen, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Major Depression Inventory, Visual Analogue Scale). Measures were...

  13. Effectiveness of meta-cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapy in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Ahmad; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Rasoulian, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of metacognitive therapy (MCT) and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) in treating Iranian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Thirty three outpatients meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD without any other axis I and II disorders were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions, i.e. MCT, CBT and pharmacotherapy. The Beck Depression Inventory-II-Second Edition (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) were administered for pre-treatment, post-treatment and follow-up. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Based on repeated measures ANOVA, all the participants demonstrated improvement in depression, anxiety, dysfunctional attitude and ruminative response. Based on percentage results, all the patients in MCT and CBT groups showed significant improvement at post-treatment phase. MCT and CBT were more effective than pharmacotherapy alone In treatment of MDD. None.

  14. Depression, anxiety and anger in subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Micò, Umberto; Stilo, Simona; Scaffidi, Mariagrazia; Consolo, Pierluigi; Tortora, Andrea; Pallio, Socrate; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Familiari, Luigi; Zoccali, Rocco

    2010-03-01

    The present study aimed to elucidate the differences in depression, anxiety, anger, and quality of life in a sample of non-psychiatric IBS patients, starting from the hypothesis that IBS subtypes may have different symptomatic expressions of negative emotions with different outcomes on quality of life measures. Forty-two constipation-predominant IBS (C-IBS) subjects and 44 diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) subjects, after an examination by a gastroenterologist and a total colonoscopy, underwent a clinical interview and psychometric examination for the assessment of depression, anxiety, anger and quality of life. IBS subtypes showed different symptomatic profiles in depression, anxiety and anger, with C-IBS patients more psychologically distressed than D-IBS subjects. Affective and emotional symptoms should be considered as specific and integral to the syndrome, and recognizing the differences between IBS subtypes may have relevant implications for treatment options and clinical outcome.

  15. Acupoints Stimulation for Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients: A Quantitative Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Deng, Renli; Tan, Jing-Yu; Guan, Feng-Guang

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at concluding the current evidence on the therapeutic effects of acupoints stimulation for cancer patients with anxiety and depression. Randomized controlled trials using acupoints stimulation for relieving anxiety and/or depression in cancer patients were searched, and 11 studies were finally included, of which eight trials compared acupoints stimulation with standard methods of treatment/care, and acupoints stimulation showed significantly better effects in improving depression than using standard methods of treatment/care. Four studies compared true acupoints stimulation with sham methods, and no significant differences can be found between groups for either depression or anxiety, although the pooled effects still favored true intervention. For the five studies that evaluated sleep quality, the results were conflicting, with three supporting the superiority of acupoints stimulation in improving sleep quality and two demonstrating no differences across groups. Acupoints stimulation seems to be an effective approach in relieving depression and anxiety in cancer patients, and placebo effects may partially contribute to the benefits. However, the evidence is not conclusive due to the limited number of included studies and the clinical heterogeneity identified among trials. More rigorous designed randomized, sham-controlled studies are necessary in future research.

  16. Acupoints Stimulation for Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients: A Quantitative Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at concluding the current evidence on the therapeutic effects of acupoints stimulation for cancer patients with anxiety and depression. Randomized controlled trials using acupoints stimulation for relieving anxiety and/or depression in cancer patients were searched, and 11 studies were finally included, of which eight trials compared acupoints stimulation with standard methods of treatment/care, and acupoints stimulation showed significantly better effects in improving depression than using standard methods of treatment/care. Four studies compared true acupoints stimulation with sham methods, and no significant differences can be found between groups for either depression or anxiety, although the pooled effects still favored true intervention. For the five studies that evaluated sleep quality, the results were conflicting, with three supporting the superiority of acupoints stimulation in improving sleep quality and two demonstrating no differences across groups. Acupoints stimulation seems to be an effective approach in relieving depression and anxiety in cancer patients, and placebo effects may partially contribute to the benefits. However, the evidence is not conclusive due to the limited number of included studies and the clinical heterogeneity identified among trials. More rigorous designed randomized, sham-controlled studies are necessary in future research.

  17. 31-Year-Old Female Shows Marked Improvement in Depression, Agitation, and Panic Attacks after Genetic Testing Was Used to Inform Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This case describes a 31-year-old female Caucasian patient with complaints of ongoing depression, agitation, and severe panic attacks. The patient was untreated until a recent unsuccessful trial of citalopram followed by venlafaxine which produced a partial response. Genetic testing was performed to assist in treatment decisions and revealed the patient to be heterozygous for polymorphisms in 5HT2C, ANK3, and MTHFR and homozygous for a polymorphism in SLC6A4 and the low activity (Met/Met COMT allele. In response to genetic results and clinical presentation, venlafaxine was maintained and lamotrigine was added leading to remission of agitation and depression.

  18. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cizza, G; Ravn, Pernille; Chrousos, G P

    2001-01-01

    Existing studies of the relationship between depression and osteoporosis have been heterogeneous in their design and use of diagnostic instruments for depression, which might have contributed to the different results on the comorbidity of these two conditions. Nevertheless, these studies reveal...... a strong association between depression and osteoporosis. Endocrine factors such as depression-induced hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and hypercortisolism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency and increased concentration of circulating interleukin 6, might play a crucial role...... in the bone loss observed in subjects suffering from major depression....

  19. Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients: DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Knaster; Ann-Mari Estlander; Hasse Karlsson; Jaakko Kaprio; Eija Kalso

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional ...

  20. Clinical assessment of depression in terminally ill cancer patients: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessin, Hayley; Olden, Megan; Jacobson, Colleen; Kosinski, Anne

    2005-12-01

    Depression is commonly experienced by cancer patients at the end of life. The identification of patients suffering from depression is essential to provide clinicians with an opportunity to relieve considerable suffering. However, the assessment of depressive symptoms is complex and often challenging in a terminally ill cancer population. This article offers practical guidelines to assist clinicians with the diagnosis of depression, reviews the defining symptoms of depression and their unique presentation in patients at the end of life, suggests modifications of the standard diagnostic interview, and provides examples of specific assessment questions to target depressive symptoms at the end of life.

  1. Experiences of wake and light therapy in patients with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Mette; Møller, Dorthe Norden; Schultz Wihlborg, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    the motivation to stay awake and receive daily light therapy. Overall, participants found the treatment worthwhile and would recommend it to others with depression. The study revealed a lack of knowledge among participants about the connection between regular sleep patterns and depression. In conclusion...... week, 30 min of daily light treatment for the entire 9 weeks, and ongoing psychoeducation regarding good sleep hygiene. Patients kept a diary, and individual semistructured interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The participants' overall experience...... with the treatment was positive. Some experienced a remarkable and rapid antidepressant effect, whereas others described more long-term benefits (e.g. improved sleep and diurnal rhythm). Yet recovery was fragile, and patients were only cautiously optimistic. Social support was important for maintaining...

  2. Social adaptability and substance abuse: Predictors of depression among hemodialysis patients?

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    Santos Paulo Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several aspects linked to social are involved in the onset of depressive feelings. We aimed to find out if social adaptability and substance abuse predict depression among end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD. Methods We included 145 ESRD patients undergoing HD. Social adaptability was estimated by the Social Adaptability Index (SAI. Substance abuse was defined according to SAI. We screened for depression by applying the 20-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. A score ≥ 24 classified the patients as depressed. Comparisons between depressed and non-depressed patients were carried out and logistic regression was performed to test gender, age, total SAI, SAI without the substance abuse item, only the substance abuse score and substance abuse as a categorical variable (yes/no as predictors of depression. Results There were 36 (24.8% depressed patients. There were no differences regarding demographic and laboratory data between the depressed and non-depressed patients. Mean SAI among depressed and non-depressed patients was, respectively, 6.1 ± 1.6 vs. 6.2 ± 1.9 (p=0.901. The percentage of patients with or without substance abuse among depressed patients was, respectively, 13.8% vs. 13.9% (p=1.000. Gender, age, total SAI, SAI without the substance abuse item, only the substance abuse score and substance abuse as a categorical variable did not predict depression. Conclusions Social adaptability and substance abuse did not predict depression in HD patients. We propose that aspects related to socioeconomic status not comprised in SAI items should be ruled out as predictors of depression.

  3. Functional neuroanatomy in depressed patients with sexual dysfunction: blood oxygenation level dependent functional MR imaging

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    Yang, Jong Chul [Chonnam National Univ. Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-15

    To demonstrate the functional neuroanatomy associated with sexual arousal visually evoked in depressed males who have underlying sexual dysfunction using Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent-based fMRI. Ten healthy volunteers (age range 21-55: mean 32.5 years), and 10 depressed subjects (age range 23-51: mean 34.4 years, mean Beck Depression Inventory score of 39.6 {+-} 5.9, mean Hamilton Rating Scale Depression (HAMD)-17 score of 33.5 {+-} 6.0) with sexual arousal dysfunction viewed erotic and neutral video films during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 oblique planes using gradient-echo EPI (flip angle/TR/TE=90 .deg. /6000 ms/50 ms). The visual stimulation paradigm began with 60 sec of black screen, 150 sec of neutral stimulation with a documentary video film, 30 sec of black screen, 150 sec of sexual stimulation with an erotic video film followed by 30 sec of black screen. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by SPM99 program. There was a significant difference of brain activation between two groups during visual sexual stimulation. In depressed subjects, the level of activation during the visually evoked sexual arousal was significantly less than that of healthy volunteers, especially in the cerebrocortical areas of the hypothalamus, thalamus, caudate nucleus, and inferior and superior temporal gyri. On the other hand, the cerebral activation patterns during the neutral condition in both groups showed no significant differences ({rho} < 0.01). This study is the first demonstration of the functional neuroanatomy of the brain associated with sexual dysfunction in depressed patients using fMRI. In order to validate our physiological neuroscience results, further studies that would include patients with other disorders and sexual dysfunction, and depressed patients without sexual dysfunction and their treatment response are needed.

  4. The Effect of Self-Transcendence on Depression in Cognitively Intact Nursing Home Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gørill Haugan; Siw Tone Innstrand

    2012-01-01

    Aims. This study's aim was to test the effects of self-transcendence on depression among cognitively intact nursing home patients. Background. Depression is considered the most frequent mental disorder among the elderly population. Specifically, the depression rate among nursing home patients is three to four times higher than that among community-dwelling elderly. Therefore, finding new and alternative ways to prevent and decrease depression is of great importance for nursing home patients' ...

  5. Following up patients with depression after hospital discharge: a mixed methods approach

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    Desplenter Franciska A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A medication information intervention was delivered to patients with a major depressive episode prior to psychiatric hospital discharge. Methods The objective of this study was to explore how patients evolved after hospital discharge and to identify factors influencing this evolution. Using a quasi-experimental longitudinal design, the quantitative analysis measured clinical (using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the somatic dimension of the Symptom Checklist 90 and recording the number of readmissions and humanistic (using the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire outcomes of patients via telephone contacts up to one year following discharge. The qualitative analysis was based on the researcher diary, consisting of reports on the telephone outcome assessment of patients with major depression (n = 99. All reports were analyzed using the thematic framework approach. Results The change in the participants' health status was as diverse as it was at hospital discharge. Participants reported on remissions; changes in mood; relapses; and re-admissions (one third of patients. Quantitative data on group level showed low anxiety, depression and somatic scores over time. Three groups of contributing factors were identified: process, individual and environmental factors. Process factors included self caring process, medical care after discharge, resumption of work and managing daily life. Individual factors were symptom control, medication and personality. Environmental factors were material and social environment. Each of them could ameliorate, deteriorate or be neutral to the patient's health state. A mix of factors was observed in individual patients. Conclusions After hospital discharge, participants with a major depressive episode evolved in many different ways. Process, individual and environmental factors may influence the participant's health status following hospital discharge. Each of the factors

  6. Trajectories of mobility and IADL function in older patients diagnosed with major depression.

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    Hybels, Celia F; Pieper, Carl F; Blazer, Dan G; Fillenbaum, Gerda G; Steffens, David C

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown an association between depression and functional limitations in older adults. Our aim was to explore the latent traits of trajectories of limitations in mobility and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) tasks in a sample of older adults diagnosed with major depression. Participants were 248 patients enrolled in a naturalistic depression treatment study. Mobility/IADL tasks included walking one-fourth mile, going up/down stairs, getting around the neighborhood, shopping, handling money, taking care of children, cleaning house, preparing meals and doing yardwork/gardening. Latent class trajectory analysis was used to identify classes of mobility/IADL function over a 4-year period. Class membership was then used to predict functional status over time. Using time as the only predictor, three latent class trajectories were identified: (1) Patients with few mobility/IADL limitations (42%), (2) Patients with considerable mobility/IADL limitations (37%) and (3) Patients with basically no limitations (21%). The classes differed primarily in their initial functional status, with some immediate improvement followed by no further change for patients in Classes 1 and 2 and a stable course for patients in Class 3. In a repeated measures mixed model controlling for potential confounders, class was a significant predictor of functional status. The effect of baseline depression score, cognitive status, self-perceived health and sex on mobility/IADL score differed by class. These findings show systematic variability in functional status over time among older patients with major depression, indicating that a single trajectory may not reflect the pattern for all patients. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. No evidence for the association between a polymorphism in the PCLO depression candidate gene with memory bias in remitted depressed patients and healthy individuals.

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    Janna N Vrijsen

    Full Text Available The PCLO rs2522833 candidate polymorphism for depression has been associated to monoaminergic neurotransmission. In healthy and currently depressed individuals, the polymorphism has been found to affect activation of brain areas during memory processing, but no direct association of PCLO with memory bias was found. We hypothesized that the absence of this association might have been obscured by current depressive symptoms or genetically driven individual differences in reactivity to stressful events. Experiencing stressful childhood events fosters dysfunctional assumptions that are related to cognitive biases, and may modulate the predisposition for depression via epigenetic effects. The association between PCLO and memory bias, as well as interaction between PCLO and childhood events was studied in patients remitted from depression (N = 299, as well as a sample of healthy individuals (N = 157. The participants performed an emotional verbal memory task after a sad mood induction. Childhood trauma and adversity were measured with a questionnaire. The Genotype main effect, and Genotype by Childhood Events interaction were analyzed for memory bias in both samples. PCLO risk allele carrying remitted depressed patients did not show more negatively biased memory than non-risk allele carriers, not even patients with stressful childhood events. A similar pattern of results was found in healthy individuals. Memory bias may not be strongly associated with the PCLO rs2522833 polymorphism. We did not find any support for the PCLO-childhood events interaction, but the power of our study was insufficient to exclude this possibility.

  8. Antecedent life events, social supports and response to antidepressants in depressed patients.

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    Tomaszewska, W; Peselow, E D; Barouche, F; Fieve, R R

    1996-11-01

    We evaluated 355 subjects who entered one of six double-blind placebo-controlled antidepressant drug trials with respect to the occurrence of antecedent adverse life events and their meaning to the patient. Patients were also assessed with regard to the degree of social support they received for the negative life event. The groups differed as to whether they did or did not meet the criteria for melancholic depression; 43 one-week placebo responders were statistically significantly more likely to believe that adverse life events predisposed them to depressive illness and that such life events precipitated their current depression, compared to 312 one-week placebo non-responders. Of the 312 patients who went on to the double-blind phase in which they were treated with either drug (n = 204) or placebo (n = 108), it was noted that, for both melancholic and non-melancholic patients, responders to drug treatment (but not placebo) had a more favourable ratio of social support received/social support desired than non-responders. Non-melancholic responders to both drug and placebo were statistically significantly more likely to report fewer adverse life events and have a less strong belief that adverse life events predispose one to depressive illness than non-responders. Melancholic patients did not show this trend.

  9. Visual Perception during Mirror-Gazing at One’s Own Face in Patients with Depression

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    Giovanni B. Caputo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In normal observers, gazing at one’s own face in the mirror for a few minutes, at a low illumination level, produces the apparition of strange faces. Observers see distortions of their own faces, but they often see hallucinations like monsters, archetypical faces, faces of relatives and deceased, and animals. In this research, patients with depression were compared to healthy controls with respect to strange-face apparitions. The experiment was a 7-minute mirror-gazing test (MGT under low illumination. When the MGT ended, the experimenter assessed patients and controls with a specifically designed questionnaire and interviewed them, asking them to describe strange-face apparitions. Apparitions of strange faces in the mirror were very reduced in depression patients compared to healthy controls. Depression patients compared to healthy controls showed shorter duration of apparitions; minor number of strange faces; lower self-evaluation rating of apparition strength; lower self-evaluation rating of provoked emotion. These decreases in depression may be produced by deficits of facial expression and facial recognition of emotions, which are involved in the relationship between the patient (or the patient’s ego and his face image (or the patient’s bodily self that is reflected in the mirror.

  10. Relation between personality dimensions and depressive symptoms in patients on hemodialiysis

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    Bugarski Vojislava

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of depressive symptoms and certain dimensions of personality in hemodialysis patients. The study included 93 subjects of both sexes, aged 24-78 years. All subjects were undergoing hemodialysis treatment for terminal stage renal insufficiency. The presence of depressive symptoms was operationally defined by the factor scores for the first principal components on the Beck Depression Inventory. Five personality dimensions were operationally defined by the factor scores for the first principal components on each of the five scales of the Big Five Inventory. The following dimensions of personality were assessed: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. The relationship between the five dimensions of personality and the presence of depressive symptoms was analyzed by the multiple regression analysis. The results showed that personality dimensions are significantly connected with the occurrence of depressive symptoms (R=0.729; R²=0.532; F (5,87=19.822; p=0.000. Two partial predictors were significantly connected with depressive symptoms. They were higher degree of neu­roticism (β=0.082, p=0.000 and a lower degree of openness (β=-0.235, p=0.016.

  11. Relief of depression and pain improves daily functioning and quality of life in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Chen, Ming-Chao; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2013-12-02

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of depression relief and pain relief on the improvement in daily functioning and quality of life (QOL) for depressed patients receiving a 6-week treatment of fluoxetine. A total of 131 acutely ill inpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were enrolled to receive 20mg of fluoxetine daily for 6 weeks. Depression severity, pain severity, daily functioning, and health-related QOL were assessed at baseline and again at week 6. Depression severity, pain severity, and daily functioning were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Body Pain Index, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Health-related QOL was assessed by three primary domains of the SF-36, including social functioning, vitality, and general health perceptions. Pearson's correlation and structural equation modeling were used to examine relationships among the study variables. Five models were proposed. In model 1, depression relief alone improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 2, pain relief alone improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 3, depression relief, mediated by pain relief, improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 4, pain relief, mediated by depression relief, improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 5, both depression relief and pain relief improved daily functioning and QOL. One hundred and six patients completed all the measures at baseline and at week 6. Model 5 was the most fitted structural equation model (χ(2) = 8.62, df = 8, p = 0.376, GFI = 0.975, AGFI = 0.935, TLI = 0.992, CFI = 0.996, RMSEA = 0.027). Interventions which relieve depression and pain improve daily functioning and QOL among patients with MDD. The proposed model can provide quantitative estimates of improvement in treating patients with MDD. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sleep quality and depression among patients with migraine.

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    Khosro Sadeghniiat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the sleep quality and level of depression among Iranian migraineurs. Among 380 cases that were selected by simple random selection from those who attended Outpatient Neurology Clinic of Imam Khomeini Hospital, 332 patients participated in this cross-sectional study. After an inclusive examination by a neurologist, the participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian versions of Pittsburg Sleep Questionnaire (PSQI and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. They also requested to score headache severity by means of a visual analogue scale graded from 1-10. According to frequency of attacks, patients were divided into three groups: with 1-4 migraine days per month, 5-7 migraine days in a month and more than 7 migraine days per month. Mean age of participants was 36.3±10.1 years and mean headache severity score was 6.0±1.9. The PSQI total score and headache severity score were highest among patients with frequent attacks. Mean BDI, PSQI and headache severity scores significantly differ between male and female participants. There was significant positive correlation between BDI and PSQI scores (r=0.5, P<0.001 also there was a positive correlation between headache severity score and PSQI score (r=0.6, P<0.001. Decreased sleep quality with other co-morbidities such as depression in migraineurs cases should be considered.

  13. Orthognathic surgery improves quality of life and depression, but not anxiety, and patients with higher preoperative depression scores improve less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunault, P; Battini, J; Potard, C; Jonas, C; Zagala-Bouquillon, B; Chabut, A; Mercier, J-M; Bedhet, N; Réveillère, C; Goga, D; Courtois, R

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed quality of life (QoL), depression, and anxiety before and after orthognathic surgery and identified risk factors for poorer postoperative outcome. This multicentre prospective study included 140 patients from five French medical centres. We assessed patients before surgery (T1), 3 months after surgery (T2), and 12 months after surgery (T3). We assessed the severity of the orofacial deformity, physical, psychological, social, and environmental QoL (WHOQOL-BREF), and depression and anxiety (GHQ-28). Risk factors for poorer outcome were identified using linear mixed models. Between baseline and 12 months, there was significant improvement in psychological and social QoL and in depression (although below the norms reported in the general population), but not in anxiety. Physical QoL was poorer in patients who were younger, who had a mild orofacial deformity, and who were depressed. Psychological QoL was poorer in younger patients and in depressed patients. Social QoL was poorer in patients who were single, who had a mild orofacial deformity, and who were depressed. Although orthognathic surgery provides a moderate improvement in psychological and social QoL, the systematic screening and treatment of depression could further improve QoL after surgery because it is a major predictor of poor QoL in this population.

  14. Effort-Based Reinforcement Processing and Functional Connectivity Underlying Amotivation in Medicated Patients with Depression and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il Ho; Lee, Boung Chul; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Joong Il; Koo, Min-Seung

    2017-04-19

    Amotivation is a common phenotype of major depressive disorder and schizophrenia, which are clinically distinct disorders. Effective treatment targets and strategies can be discovered by examining the dopaminergic reward network function underlying amotivation between these disorders. We conducted an fMRI study in healthy human participants and medicated patients with depression and schizophrenia using an effort-based reinforcement task. We examined regional activations related to reward type (positive and negative reinforcement), effort level, and their composite value, as well as resting-state functional connectivities within the meso-striatal-prefrontal pathway. We found that integrated reward and effort values of low effort-positive reinforcement and high effort-negative reinforcement were behaviorally anticipated and represented in the putamen and medial orbitofrontal cortex activities. Patients with schizophrenia and depression did not show anticipation-related and work-related reaction time reductions, respectively. Greater amotivation severity correlated with smaller work-related putamen activity changes according to reward type in schizophrenia and effort level in depression. Patients with schizophrenia showed feedback-related putamen hyperactivity of low effort compared with healthy controls and depressed patients. The strength of medial orbitofrontal-striatal functional connectivity predicted work-related reaction time reduction of high effort negative reinforcement in healthy controls and amotivation severity in both patients with schizophrenia and those with depression. Patients with depression showed deficient medial orbitofrontal-striatal functional connectivity compared with healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia. These results indicate that amotivation in depression and schizophrenia involves different pathophysiology in the prefrontal-striatal circuitry.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Amotivation is present in both depression and schizophrenia

  15. Seizure (Ictal—EEG Characteristics in Subgroups of Depressive Disorder in Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT—A Preliminary Study and Multivariate Approach

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    Björn Wahlund

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Examine frequency distributions of ictal EEG after ECT stimulation in diagnostic subgroups of depression. Methods. EEG registration was consecutively monitored in 33 patients after ECT stimulation. Patients were diagnosed according to DSM IV and subdivided into: (1 major depressive disorder with psychotic features (n=7, (2 unipolar depression (n=20, and (3 bipolar depression (n=6. Results. Results indicate that the diagnostically subgroups differ in their ictal EEG frequency spectrumml: (1 psychotic depression has a high occurrence of delta and theta waves, (2 unipolar depression has high occurrence of delta, theta and gamma waves, and (3 bipolar depression has a high occurrence of gamma waves. A linear discriminant function separated the three clinical groups with an accuracy of 94%. Conclusion. Psychotic depressed patients differ from bipolar depression in their frequency based on probability distribution of ictal EEG. Psychotic depressed patients show more prominent slowing of EEG than nonpsychotic depressed patients. Thus the EEG results may be supportive in classifying subgroups of depression already at the start of the ECT treatment.

  16. The effect of isotretinoin (roaccutane therapy on depression and quality of life of patients with severe acne.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Fakour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acne is the most common skin disease and isotretinoin is the most powerful drug among the various drugs used for its treatment, but it has some adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of isotretinoin on depression and quality of life of a group of patients undergoing isotretinoin therapy before and after the treatment course.In this prospective study, 98 patients with severe acne were enrolled consecutively and underwent isotretinoin therapy receiving 0.5 mg/kg/d of isotretinoin for 16 weeks. Isotretinoin effects on quality of life and depression were evaluated using Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI questionnaires, respectively.In this study, 98 patients suffering from severe acne (38 males and 60 females were enrolled. Treatment of acne was associated with improvement of quality of life scores in both male and female patients (p = 0.001. Considering the cutoff value of 13 for mild depressive mood in the BDI score, in total, 48 (49% of the enrolled patients (21 males and 33 females had a mild depressive mood before the commencement of the treatment in this study. The analysis of before and after treatment BDI scores showed that the number of patients and also the mean score of BDI were increased in both male and female patients after the treatment (p<0.05.Isotretinoin therapy improved the quality of life of patients suffering from acne, but depression was accentuated in the patients to some extent.

  17. Decreased Total Antioxidant Activity in Major Depressive Disorder Patients Non-Responsive to Antidepressant Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Song-Eun; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rho, Dae-Young; Kim, Do-Hoon; Huh, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the total antioxidant activity (TAA) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the effect of antidepressants on TAA using a novel potentiometric method. Methods Twenty-eight patients with MDD and thirty-one healthy controls were enrolled in this study. The control group comprised 31 healthy individuals matched for gender, drinking and smoking status. We assessed symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We measured TAA using potentiometry. All measurements were made at baseline and four and eight weeks later. Results There was a significant negative correlation between BDI scores and TAA. TAA was significantly lower in the MDD group than in controls. When the MDD group was subdivided into those who showed clinical response to antidepressant therapy (response group) and those who did not (non-response group), only the non-response group showed lower TAA, while the response group showed no significant difference to controls at baseline. After eight weeks of antidepressant treatment, TAA in both the response and non-response groups was similar, and there was no significant difference among the three groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the response to antidepressant treatment in MDD patients might be predicted by measuring TAA. PMID:27081384

  18. Reliability and validity of Anxiety and Depression Hospital Scales (HADS: Iranian patients with anxiety and depression disorders

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    Kaviani H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Iranian researchers and scientists in the fields of psychiatry and psychology undoubtedly need to spend more time and make considerable efforts to prepare and validate Persian versions of measurements. The present study was designed to validate HADS in Iranian clinically anxious and depressed patients compared to normal population."n"n Methods: 261 anxious and depressed patients referred to the inpatient clinic of Rouzbeh Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, and 261 healthy volunteers (matched for their sex were tested using HADS, and two additional clinical tools, ie., BDI & BAI. Then the patients were interviewed by a psychiatrist or a psychologist (using DSM IV checklist and rated for their anxiety and depression severity levels based on a 10-point scale from 1 to 10. BDI and BAI were regarded as objective device providing other external criteria to examine validity further. Moreover, to assess reliability 10% of the patients (n= 27 were randomly selected and re-tested after three days."n"n Results: Findings showed that all measures and their subscales proved to be valid and reliable with good internal consistencies in Iranian depressed and anxious patients. This study provides clinicians and researchers with

  19. Monoamine transporter availability in Parkinson's disease patients with or without depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Strecker, Karl; Wegner, Florian; Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Schwarz, Johannes [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Oehlwein, Christian [Specialized Parkinson' s Disease Outpatient Centre, Gera (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Depression is a common symptom in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) and markedly reduces their quality of life. As post-mortem studies have shown, its presence may reflect extensive cell loss in the midbrain and brainstem with imbalances in monoaminergic neurotransmitters. However, in vivo evidence of specific monoaminergic deficits in depressed PD patients is still sparse. Therefore, we studied PD patients with depression (PD+D) and without depression (PD-D) using high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the monoamine transporter marker [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. A magnetic resonance imaging-based region-of-interest analysis was applied to quantify the specific-to-nondisplaceable [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT binding coefficient V{sub 3}'' in the striatum, thalamus and midbrain/brainstem regions. PD+D patients had significantly lower V{sub 3}'' compared with PD-D patients in the striatum (p<0.001), thalamus (p=0.002), and midbrain/brainstem (p=0.025). Only PD+D patients without selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment showed lower thalamic and midbrain V{sub 3}'' than controls (p<0.001, p=0.029). In a small sub-group of SSRI-treated PD+D patients neither thalamic V{sub 3}'' nor midbrain/brainstem V{sub 3}'' differed from those in PD-D patients (p=0.168, p=0.201) or controls (p=0.384, p=0.318). Our data indicate that depression in PD is associated with a more pronounced loss of striatal dopamine transporter availability that is most likely secondary to increased dopaminergic degeneration. In addition, depressed PD patients have a lower availability of midbrain/brainstem monoamine transporters than nondepressed PD patients. These findings provide in vivo evidence in support of the known post-mortem data demonstrating more extensive nerve cell loss in PD with depression and indicate that SPECT imaging can help to identify pathophysiological changes underlying nonmotor

  20. Isolating the Norepinephrine Pathway Comparing Lithium in Bipolar Patients to SSRIs in Depressive Patients

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    Andy R. Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this investigatory neuroimaging analysis was done to better understand the pharmacodynamics of Lithium by isolating the norepinephrine pathway in the brain. To accomplish this, we compared patients with Bipolar Disorder treated with Lithium to patients diagnosed with Major Depression or Depressive Disorder who are treated with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs.Methodology: We used Standardized Low Resolution Brain Electrotomography to calculate the whole brain, voxel-by-voxel, unpaired t-tests Statistical non-Parametric Maps. For our first electrophysiological neuroimaging investigation, we compared 46 patients (average age = 34 ± 16.5 diagnosed with Bipolar Affective Disorder to three patient groups all diagnosed with Major Depression or Depressive Episode. The first is with 48 patients diagnosed with Major Depression or Depressive Episode (average age = 49 ± 12.9, the second to 16 male depressive patients (average age = 45 ± 15.1, and the final comparison to 32 depressive females (average age = 50 ± 11.7.Results: The results of sLORETA three-dimensional statistical non-parametric maps illustrated that Lithium influenced an increase in neurotransmission in the right Superior TemporalGyrus (t=1.403, p=0.00780, Fusiform Gyrus (t=1.26, and Parahippocampal Gyrus (t=1.29.Moreover, an increased in neuronal function was found was also identified at the Cingulate Gyrus(t=1.06, p=0.01200.Conclusion: We are proposing a translational clinical biological marker for patients diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder to guide physicians during the course of Lithium therapy and have identified neuroanatomical structures influenced by norepinephrine.

  1. [Analysis of depression intensification in cancer patients before and during chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska-Wieczkowska, Halina; Betłakowski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was a comparative analysis of depression in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and patients during diagnostic process. An attempt was made to solve a research problem whether chemotherapy causes depression intensification in patients with a diagnosis of cancer. Cancer patients before the chemotherapy treatment (n = 77, group A) were examined first. Then a group of patients undergoing standard chemotherapy in hospital was examined (n=105, group B). The tool used was Zung Self-rating Depression Scale. Mean of self-rating depression scale was 35.20 in group B and 32.34 in group A. 93.3% of patients in group B and 92.2% of patients in group A did not have psychopathological symptoms. Mild depression was observed by 6.7% of group B patients and 6.5% of group A patients. Only one person in group A scored 80 points, which indicated severe depression. In group B education level and physical activity highly correlated with the depression scale score. In group A it was gender that significantly differentiated the self-rating depression scores. Patients undergoing chemotherapy got higher scores on the self-rating depression scale which proves that they are more liable to depression. Depression was more often observed in women, people with vocational education and patients unable to continue working.

  2. Comorbidity of Depression and Anxiety: Association with Poor Quality of Life in Type 1 and 2 Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ornelas Maia, Ana Claudia C.; Braga, Arthur de Azevedo; Paes, Flávia; Machado, Sergio; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Silva, Adriana Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is associates with depression and impairment in Quality of Life (QoL). Objective: The objective is to define the frequencies of depressive and anxiety symptoms in a sample of patients diagnosed with type 1 and 2 diabetes, the amount of impairment of QoL and the weight of depression and anxiety in determining the QoL in such of patients. Methods: A total of 210 patients were divided into two groups (type 1 and type 2). Patients completed the HADS and WHOQoL-bref. Results: Groups showed a high prevalence of anxiety (type 1 = 60%, type 2 = 43.8%) and depression (type 1 = 52.4%, type 2 = 38.1%), both measures were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in diabetes type 1 patients. Type 1 patients also showed a QoL in the overall assessment and the physical, psychological and social relations domains. In both Type 1 and 2 diabetes poor QoL was found associated by anxiety and depression comorbidity. Conclusion: In overall diabetes patients depression and anxiety seems to be a determinant of poor QoL. PMID:23935696

  3. Mood induction in depressive patients: a comparative multidimensional approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Falkenberg

    Full Text Available Anhedonia, reduced positive affect and enhanced negative affect are integral characteristics of major depressive disorder (MDD. Emotion dysregulation, e.g. in terms of different emotion processing deficits, has consistently been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate mood changes in depressive patients using a multidimensional approach for the measurement of emotional reactivity to mood induction procedures. Experimentally, mood states can be altered using various mood induction procedures. The present study aimed at validating two different positive mood induction procedures in patients with MDD and investigating which procedure is more effective and applicable in detecting dysfunctions in MDD. The first procedure relied on the presentation of happy vs. neutral faces, while the second used funny vs. neutral cartoons. Emotional reactivity was assessed in 16 depressed and 16 healthy subjects using self-report measures, measurements of electrodermal activity and standardized analyses of facial responses. Positive mood induction was successful in both procedures according to subjective ratings in patients and controls. In the cartoon condition, however, a discrepancy between reduced facial activity and concurrently enhanced autonomous reactivity was found in patients. Relying on a multidimensional assessment technique, a more comprehensive estimate of dysfunctions in emotional reactivity in MDD was available than by self-report measures alone and this was unsheathed especially by the mood induction procedure relying on cartoons. The divergent facial and autonomic responses in the presence of unaffected subjective reactivity suggest an underlying deficit in the patients' ability to express the felt arousal to funny cartoons. Our results encourage the application of both procedures in functional imaging studies for investigating the neural substrates of emotion dysregulation in MDD patients. Mood induction via cartoons appears to

  4. Response of patients in mixed state of anxiety and depression to low dose sulpiride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, K

    1993-02-01

    Two cases with mixed symptoms of anxiety and depression are described. In both cases, a low dose of sulpiride was effective, improving patients anxious and depressive symptoms without severe side effects. These findings suggest that a low dose sulpiride treatment can be useful in the treatment of anxious and depressive patients.

  5. A correlational study of suicidal ideation with psychological distress, depression, and demoralization in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chun-Kai; Chang, Ming-Chih; Chen, Pei-Jan; Lin, Ching-Chi; Chen, Gon-Shen; Lin, Johnson; Hsieh, Ruey-Kuen; Chang, Yi-Fang; Chen, Hong-Wen; Wu, Chien-Liang; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Chiu, Yu-Jing; Li, Yu-Chan

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to study the effects of depression and demoralization on suicidal ideation and to determine the feasibility of the Distress Thermometer as a screening tool for patients with cancer who experience depression and demoralization, and thus to establish a model screening process for suicide prevention. Purposive sampling was used to invite inpatients and outpatients with lung cancer, leukemia, and lymphoma. Two hundred participants completed the questionnaire, which included the Distress Thermometer (DT), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Demoralization Scale-Mandarin Version (DS-MV), and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation. All data obtained were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and SAS 9.3. Tobit regression analysis showed that demoralization influenced suicidal ideation more than depression did (t = 2.84, p < 0.01). When PHQ-9 ≥ 10 and DS-MV ≥42 were used as criteria for the DT, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that the AUC values were 0.77-0.79, with optimal cutoff points for both of DT ≥5; sensitivity 76.9 and 80.6 %, respectively; and specificity of 73.9 and 72.2 %, respectively. Demoralization had more influence on suicidal ideation than depression did. Therefore, attention should be paid to highly demoralized patients with cancer or high demoralization comorbid with depression for the purposes of suicide evaluation and prevention. The DT scale (with a cutoff of ≥5 points) has discriminative ability as a screening tool for demoralization or depression and can also be used in clinical settings for the preliminary screening of patients with cancer and high suicide risk.

  6. Self-Care, Sense Of Coherence And Depression In Patients Hospitalized For Decompensated Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Martinelli Pelegrino Ferreira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the self-care behaviors according to gender, the symptoms of depression and sense of coherence and compare the measurements of depression and sense of coherence according to gender. METHOD A correlational, cross-sectional study that investigated 132 patients with decompensated heart failure (HF. Data were collected through interviews and consultation to medical records, and analyzed using the chi-square and the Student's t tests with significance level of 0.05. Participants were 75 men and 57 women, aged 63.2 years on average (SD = 13.8. RESULTS No differences in self-care behavior by gender were found, except for rest after physical activity (p = 0.017. Patients who practiced physical activity showed fewer symptoms of depression (p<0.001. There were no differences in sense of coherence according to self-care behavior and gender. Women had more symptoms of depression than men (p = 0.002. CONCLUSION Special attention should be given to women with HF considering self-care and depressive symptoms.

  7. Depressive symptoms and harmful alcohol use in hepatitis C patients: prevalence and correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danusa de Almeida Machado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction It is important to understand the characteristics and vulnerabilities of people who have hepatitis C because this disease is currently an important public health problem. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and harmful alcohol use in patients with hepatitis C and to study the association between these outcomes and demographic, psychosocial and clinical variables. Methods This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study involved 82 hepatitis C patients who were being treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin at a public university hospital. The primary assessments used in the study were the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and the Beck Depression Inventory. Bivariate analyses were followed by logistic regression. Results The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 30.5% (n=25, and that of harmful alcohol use was 34.2% (n=28. Logistic regression analysis showed that individuals who were dissatisfied with their social support (OR=4.41; CI=1.00-19.33 and were unemployed (OR=6.31; CI=1.44-27.70 were at a higher risk for depressive symptoms, whereas harmful alcohol use was associated with the male sex (OR=6.78; CI=1.38-33.19 and the use of illicit substances (OR=7.42; CI=1.12-49.00. Conclusions High prevalence rates of depressive symptoms and harmful alcohol use were verified, indicating vulnerabilities that must be properly monitored and treated to reduce emotional suffering in this population.

  8. Depression and anxiety in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: prevalence rates based on a comparison of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS and the hospital, Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covic Tanya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is recognised that depression is prevalent in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, recent studies have also highlighted significant levels of anxiety in RA patients. This study compared two commonly used scales, the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, in relation to their measurement range and cut points to consider the relative prevalence of both constructs, and if prevalence rates may be due to scale-specific case definition. Methods Patients meeting the criteria for RA were recruited in Leeds, UK and Sydney, Australia and asked to complete a survey that included both scales. The data was analysed using the Rasch measurement model. Results A total of 169 RA patients were assessed, with a repeat subsample, resulting in 323 cases for analysis. Both scales met Rasch model expectations. Using the 'possible+probable' cut point from the HADS, 58.3% had neither anxiety nor depression; 13.5% had anxiety only; 6.4% depression only and 21.8% had both 'possible+probable' anxiety and depression. Cut points for depression were comparable across the two scales while a lower cut point for anxiety in the DASS was required to equate prevalence. Conclusions This study provides further support for high prevalence of depression and anxiety in RA. It also shows that while these two scales provide a good indication of possible depression and anxiety, the estimates of prevalence so derived could vary, particularly for anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of comparisons across studies and selection of scales for clinical use.

  9. Psychological factors of propensity for alcoholism (social anxiety, hostility, Machiavellianism in depressive patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popinako A.V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of psychosocial models of alcoholism and depression the general and specific factors of occurrence and course of illness are identified in the present study. The authors put forward hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of activation of psychological addiction to alcohol as an ineffective coping strategy. The necessity of empirical research needed to refine the techniques and targets of patient care within the psychiatric and psychological care is justified. The results of the pilot study show that depressed patients who are subject to alcohol dependence feature marked distress in interpersonal relations, coupled with hostility and aim at gaining profit and pleasure by manipulating other people. These patients are hostile to others, while in interpersonal relationships personal safety is important to them, so they may be more likely to resort to manipulation. In their attitudes with respect to health the communication of these patients is characterized by hedonistic tendencies and histrionic traits in interpersonal contacts.

  10. Altered hippocampal morphology in unmedicated patients with major depressive illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie E Bearden

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite converging evidence that major depressive illness is associated with both memory impairment and hippocampal pathology, findings vary widely across studies and it is not known whether these changes are regionally specific. In the present study we acquired brain MRIs (magnetic resonance images from 31 unmedicated patients with MDD (major depressive disorder; mean age 39.2±11.9 years; 77% female and 31 demographically comparable controls. Three-dimensional parametric mesh models were created to examine localized alterations of hippocampal morphology. Although global volumes did not differ between groups, statistical mapping results revealed that in MDD patients, more severe depressive symptoms were associated with greater left hippocampal atrophy, particularly in CA1 (cornu ammonis 1 subfields and the subiculum. However, previous treatment with atypical antipsychotics was associated with a trend towards larger left hippocampal volume. Our findings suggest effects of illness severity on hippocampal size, as well as a possible effect of past history of atypical antipsychotic treatment, which may reflect prolonged neuroprotective effects. This possibility awaits confirmation in longitudinal studies.

  11. Anxiety and depression among patients with Bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diffuse parenchymatous lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghreed S. Farag*, Manal R. Hafez*, Taghreed Elshafie**and Omaima I. Abo-Elkheir

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychosocial stressors, such as death of a spouse or divorce are closely related to relapses and aggravations of respiratory disease pointing to a link between psychological factors and chronic pulmonary disease. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD cannot cope adequately with everyday needs. This inadequacy may lead to heightened anxiety and depression, which in turn may worsen the everyday inadequacy. It has been reported that this is probably a factor that leads bronchial asthma (BA and COPD patients to frequent hospital admissions, lower treatment adherence and even intensive care unit hospitalizations.Study objectives: to assess anxiety and depressive symptoms among a sample of Egyptian patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, bronchial asthma (BA, and diffuse parenchymatous lung diseases (DPLD.Subjects & methods: A cross-sectional study conducted over a one year period on a sample of 258 Egyptian patients with chronic breathing disorders who attending the outpatient chest clinic at Al-Zahraa University Hospital. All patients diagnosed as having COPD, BA or DPLD were enrolled into the study. Anxiety and depression were assessed by using the Hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI.Results: Psychiatric disorders were most prevalent among DPLD cases (80.0%, followed by COPD patients (74.0%, while BA group showed the least reported cases (38.8% with psychiatric disorders, with a statistically significant difference among the studied groups (P-value < 0.05.Depression was prevalent among 60.1% (155/258 of the studied cases, of them 23.2% had severe depression, followed by 38.7 % had moderate depression and 38.1% had mild depression. DPLD cases had the highest proportion of severe depression (31.8, COPD cases had the highest proportion of moderate depression (52.4 and BA group had the highest proportion of mild depression (68.4%, with a statistically

  12. Dysfunctional attitudes in depressed patients before and after clinical treatment and in normal control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselow, E D; Robins, C; Block, P; Barouche, F; Fieve, R R

    1990-04-01

    To evaluate the role of maladaptive thinking patterns in depression, the authors administered the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale to 112 depressed patients before and after 3-6 weeks of treatment with antidepressants or placebo. Twenty-two normal subjects were also assessed twice. Depressed patients had a significantly higher initial mean score than control subjects, but during treatment their score significantly decreased, and the posttreatment score of those with complete recoveries was nearly as low as the control subjects' final score. The higher the initial dysfunctional attitude score the poorer the response to treatment. Patients with endogenous depression had significantly lower scores than nonendogenously depressed patients.

  13. Effects of escitalopram in prevention of depression in patients with acute coronary syndrome (DECARD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Baiba Hedegaard; Hanash, Jamal Abed; Rasmussen, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Depression is a major problem in patients after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with negative impact on survival and quality of life. No studies have examined prevention of post-ACS depression. We examined whether treatment with escitalopram can prevent post-ACS depression.......Depression is a major problem in patients after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with negative impact on survival and quality of life. No studies have examined prevention of post-ACS depression. We examined whether treatment with escitalopram can prevent post-ACS depression....

  14. Mental rotation evoked potentials P500 in patients with major depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玖

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the difference on mental rotation ability between major depressive disorders and healthy subjects.Methods Twenty-three patients with major depressive disorders and 24 healthy subjects

  15. Depressive Symptoms, Health Behaviors, and Risk of Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whooley, Mary A.; de Jonge, Peter; Vittinghoff, Eric; Otte, Christian; Moos, Rudolf; Carney, Robert M.; Ali, Sadia; Dowray, Sunaina; Na, Beeya; Feldman, Mitchell D.; Schiller, Nelson B.; Browner, Warren S.

    2008-01-01

    Context Depressive symptoms predict adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease, but the mechanisms responsible for this association are unknown. Objective To determine why depressive symptoms are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Design and Part

  16. Contribution of attachment insecurity to health-related quality of life in depressed patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ponizovsky, Alexander M.; Drannikov, Angela

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To examine the individual contributions of insecure attachment styles and depression symptom severity to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients diagnosed with adjustment disorder (AJD) with depressed mood.

  17. Diagnosing major depression in elderly primary care patients: nuances and determinants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, A.C.; Nuijen, J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2003-01-01

    The researchers studied how general practitioners (GPs) diagnosed elderly patients with depressive symptoms. Sociodemographic factors such as younger age, female sex and more education, clinical characteristics such as severe depression and comorbidity of anxiety disorders are suggested to improve t

  18. Patients' Experience of Winter Depression and Light Room Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background. There is a need for more knowledge on the effects of light room treatment in patients with seasonal affective disorder and to explore patients' subjective experience of the disease and the treatment. Methods. This was a descriptive and explorative study applying qualitative content analysis. A purposeful sample of 18 psychiatric outpatients with a major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern and a pretreatment score ≥12 on the 9-item Montgomery-Åsberg Depression self-rating scale was included (10 women and 8 men, aged 24–65 years). All patients had completed light room treatment (≥7/10 consecutive weekdays). Data was collected two weeks after treatment using a semistructured interview guide. Results. Patients described a clear seasonal pattern and a profound struggle to adapt to seasonal changes during the winter, including deterioration in sleep, daily rhythms, energy level, mood, activity, and cognitive functioning. Everyday life was affected with reduced work capacity, social withdrawal, and disturbed relations with family and friends. The light room treatment resulted in a radical and rapid improvement in all the major symptoms with only mild and transient side effects. Discussion. The results indicate that light room treatment is essential for some patients' ability to cope with seasonal affective disorder.

  19. Comparison of Clinical Features and Personality Dimensions between Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Normal Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Ji-Won; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2009-09-01

    Personality dimension is considered as a risk factor of depression. This study was to compare aggression, impulsivity, hopelessness, and TCI (temperament and character dimensions) between patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and normal controls. A total of 56 MDD patients and the same number of normal controls who were matched for age, gender, and education were recruited. All subjects completed the following questionnaires; Aggression Questionnaire (AQ), Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, 11th Version (BIS-11), and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). MDD patients were significantly higher scores in anger, hostility of AQ, BHS, motor impulsivity of BIS-11, and Harm Avoidances (HA) of TCI with all subscales of HA than normal controls, whereas novelty seeking 1 (NS1) (Exploratory of NS), Reward Dependence (RD) with RD3 (Attachment) . RD4 (Dependence), Self-Directedness (SD) with most subscales of SD, Cooperativeness (CO), and ST3 (Spiritual Acceptance) showed lower scores than normal controls. Moreover, BHS and HA, BIS and NS showed moderate positive correlation in MDD patients, while BHS and SD, HA and SD were negatively correlated. The present study showed unique clinical features, especially personality dimensions of patients with MDD. Our results could be applicable to suggest treatment process and to predict one's prognosis for depression in that psychological properties are important for drug compliance and treatment response.

  20. Abnormal resting state corticolimbic blood flow in depressed unmedicated patients with major depression: a (15)O-H(2)O PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkul, E Serap; Silva, Leandro A P; Narayana, Shalini; Peluso, Marco A M; Zamarripa, Frank; Nery, Fabiano G; Najt, Pablo; Li, John; Lancaster, Jack L; Fox, Peter T; Lafer, Beny; Soares, Jair C

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the differences in the resting state corticolimbic blood flow between 20 unmedicated depressed patients and 21 healthy comparisons. Resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with H(2)(15)O PET. Anatomical MRI scans were performed on an Elscint 1.9 T Prestige system for PET-MRI coregistration. Significant changes in cerebral blood flow indicating neural activity were detected using an ROI-free image subtraction strategy. In addition, the resting blood flow in patients was correlated with the severity of depression as measured by HAM-D scores. Depressed patients showed decreases in blood flow in right anterior cingulate (Brodmann areas 24 and 32) and increased blood flow in left and right posterior cingulate (Brodmann areas 23, 29, 30), left parahippocampal gyrus (Brodmann area 36), and right caudate compared with healthy volunteers. The severity of depression was inversely correlated with the left middle and inferior frontal gyri (Brodmann areas 9 and 47) and right medial frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 10) and right anterior cingulate (Brodmann areas 24, 32) blood flow, and directly correlated with the right thalamus blood flow. These findings support previous reports of abnormalities in the resting state blood flow in the limbic-frontal structures in depressed patients compared to healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Depressive Symptoms and Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Stephen; Samad, Zainab; Becker, Richard C.; Williams, Redford; Kuhn, Cynthia; Ortel, Thomas L.; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Prybol, Kevin; Rogers, Joseph; O’Connor, Christopher; Velazquez, Eric J.; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The primary focus of this study was to examine associations between depressive symptoms and mental stress induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods Adult patients with documented CHD were recruited for baseline mental stress and exercise stress screening testing as a part of the enrollment process of the REMIT trial. Patients were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). Following a 24-48-hour Beta-blocker withdrawal, consented patients completed three mental stress tests followed by a treadmill exercise test. Ischemia was defined as 1) any development or worsening of any wall motion abnormality (WMA), 2) reduction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥ 8% by transthoracic echocardiography, and/or ischemic ST-segment change by electrocardiography during stress testing. MSIMI was considered present when ischemia occurred in at least one mental test. Data were analyzed using logistic regression adjusting for age, gender, and resting left ventricular ejection fraction. Results One hundred twenty five (44.2 %) of 283 patients were found to have MSIMI and 93 (32.9%) had ESIMI. Unadjusted analysis showed that BDI-II scores were positively associated with the probability of MSIMI (OR = .1.30: 95% CI 1.06 – 1.60, p = .013) and number of MSIMI positive tasks (all p < .005). These associations were still significant after adjustment for covariates (ps ≤ .05). Conclusions In CHD patients, depressive symptoms were associated with a higher probability of MSIMI. These observations may enhance our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the association of depressive symptoms to future cardiovascular events. PMID:24163385

  2. An investigation into the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on patients with chronic depression: a small case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horn GL

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gemma Louise HornUniversity of Dundee, Scotland, UKBackground: National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE guidelines recommend a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT and antidepressants to treat chronic depression. The Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP is the only therapy model specifically designed for the treatment of chronic depression.Objectives: To determine the clinical response to the CBASP of patients in a specialist clinical service for affective disorder and to ascertain their views on the value of the CBASP for their condition.Methods: Qualitative data from interviews including a questionnaire and objective data from Becks Depression Inventory II symptom rating scales were used to monitor the progress of a small case series of five patients with chronic, treatment refractory depression as they received the CBASP over a 10-month period.Results: Common themes from patient interviews show very positive engagement and attitudes to the CBASP from the questionnaire. Rating scales from Becks Depression Inventory II pre- and posttreatment showed very little change for three patients with improvements between 2 and 7 points but deterioration in symptoms of 2 points for the fourth patient.Conclusion: The CBASP is a well-liked and positive therapy that helps patients manage their lives and deal with personal relationships, although objective data indicate little change in symptom severity.Keywords: cognitive behavioral therapy, chronic depression, CBASP

  3. The Effects of Music Therapy on Anxiety and Depression of Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jasemi, Madineh; Aazami, Sanaz; Zabihi, Roghaieh Esmaili

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Cancer patients often suffer from anxiety and depression. Various methods are used to alleviate anxiety and depression, but most of them have side effects. Music therapy can be used as a noninvasive method to reduce anxiety and depression. This study aimed to examine the effect of music therapy on anxiety and depression in patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted attaching hospitals in Urmia city. A total number of sixty ...

  4. Diabetes education improves depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Xiyao; Xu, Xiuping; LV, XIAOFENG; Yao, Lu; Huang, Xu; Guo, Xueying; Liu, Baozhu; Li, Qiang; CUI, CAN

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of depression is relatively high in individuals with diabetes. However, screening and monitoring of depressive state in patients with diabetes is still neglected in developing countries and the treatment of diabetes-related depression is rarely performed in these countries. In this study, our aim was to study the role of diabetes education in the improvement of depressive state in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: The Dutch version of the cente...

  5. No association between anxiety and depression and adverse clinical outcome among patients with cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Henriette; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety and depression have been linked to adverse prognostic outcome in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) with mixed results. The timing of anxiety and depression measurement has received little attention so far.......Anxiety and depression have been linked to adverse prognostic outcome in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) with mixed results. The timing of anxiety and depression measurement has received little attention so far....

  6. The effects of anxiety and depression symptoms on treatment adherence in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Onur; Yemez, Beyazit; Itil, Oya

    2014-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may cause some psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, similar to other chronic diseases. Treatment adherence may be affected by worsening of cognitive functions. We aimed to show whether the symptoms of anxiety and depression affect treatment adherence by patients. Seventy-eight COPD patients were analysed at the first visit. The use of bronchodilator therapy was revised for standardization before they attended a second visit after six months. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI-3) and SF-36 Questionnaire were carried out at that visit. 'National Guide of Turkish Thoracic Society for Asthma' was used for scoring method of use of the bronchodilator and evaluating treatment adherence (including maintenance therapy). Sixty-two of 78 patients, 53 (85.5%) men and nine (14.5%) women with a mean age of 64.9 ± 9.9 joined the second visit. Thirty-three patients (53.2%) had a high-treatment adherence (HTA), whereas 29 (46.8%) had a low-treatment adherence (LTA). There were high scores of anxiety in 18 (29%) and depression in 11 (17.7%) patients. There was no statistical difference between the HTA and LTA groups in means of age, gender, educational level, presence of comorbidity, classification of COPD, high anxiety scores according to HADS and ASI-3 scores. Of the patients, 41.4% in the LTA group were still smoking, whereas it was only 12.1% in the HTA group (P = 0.009). The LTA group had higher depression scores (P = 0.004) than the HTA group. Dyspnea was found more frequent in LTA patients (P = 0.047); vitality score was also statistically low in this group (P = 0.01). As a result, continuing smoking and the presence of depression symptoms may decrease adherence to treatment. Therefore, to increase the adherence to treatment and reduce symptoms such as dyspnea, it is important to treat any depressive symptoms that are present and to help patients cease smoking.

  7. A follow-up study on features of sensory gating P50 in treatment-resistant depression patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong; CAO Lan; FANG Yi-ru; CHEN Xing-shi; CHEN Jun; WU Zhi-guo; YUAN Cheng-mei; YI Zheng-hui; HONG Wu; ZHANG Chen

    2009-01-01

    Background Depressive disorder is a well-known chronic, recurrent and disabling mental disease with high direct and indirect costs to society in both western and eastern cultures. Approximately 40% of depressed patients show only partial or no response to initial or even multiple antidepressant medications and are usually called treatment-resistant depression (TRD) patients. The present work was to measure the features of sensory gating (SG) P50 in TRD patients with the intent of understanding the characteristics of this disease.Methods In 50 TRD patients, 39 non-treatment-resistant depression (NTRD) patients and 51 healthy controls (HC), auditory evoked potential P50 was measured using the conditioning/testing paradigm presented with auditory double clicks stimuli, and 36 TRD patients had repeated measurements after an 8-week venlafaxine treatment course. Results All the depressive disorder patients, including the TRD and NTRD groups, showed an increased testing stimulus wave (S2-P50) amplitude compared to controls (P0.05).There were significant differences in the ratio of testing stimulus (S2) and conditioning stimulus (S1) (S2/S1) and in the value of 100 x (1-S2/S1) among the three groups. Compared to the baseline, TRD patients had no significant changes of features and different expression of P50 after acute treatment (P >0.05). Meanwhile, a statistically significant positive correlation of S2/S1 with the scores of the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) (P0.05).Conclusions Both the TRD and NTRD patients had obvious SG deficits, with a more severe deficit in TRD patients. Although, with a correlated relationship to the severity of depressive symptoms, SG P50 deficit might be suggested as a trait marker for TRD, and a combination of S2/S1 ratio, S1-S2 and 100 ×(1-S2/S1), was recommended for electrophysiological measurement in TRD patients.

  8. Neural complexity in patients with poststroke depression: A resting EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Chunfang; Sun, Changcheng; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Yongjun; Qi, Hongzhi; He, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Wan, Baikun; Du, Jingang; Ming, Dong

    2015-12-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is one of the most common emotional disorders affecting post-stroke patients. However, the neurophysiological mechanism remains elusive. This study was aimed to study the relationship between complexity of neural electrical activity and PSD. Resting state eye-closed electroencephalogram (EEG) signals of 16 electrodes were recorded in 21 ischemic poststroke depression (PSD) patients, 22 ischemic poststroke non-depression (PSND) patients and 15 healthy controls (CONT). Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) was used to evaluate changes in EEG complexity in PSD patients. Statistical analysis was performed to explore difference among different groups and electrodes. Correlation between the severity of depression (HDRS) and EEG complexity was determined with pearson correlation coefficients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and binary logistic regression analysis were conducted to estimate the discriminating ability of LZC for PSD in specificity, sensitivity and accuracy. PSD patients showed lower neural complexity compared with PSND and CONT subjects in the whole brain regions. There was no significant difference among different brain regions, and no interactions between group and electrodes. None of the LZC significantly correlated with overall depression severity or differentiated symptom severity of 7 items in PSD patients, but in stroke patients, significant correlation was found between HDRS and LZC in the whole brain regions, especially in frontal and temporal. LZC parameters used for PSD recognition possessed more than 85% in specificity, sensitivity and accuracy, suggesting the feasibility of LZC to serve as screening indicators for PSD. Increased slow wave rhythms were found in PSD patients and clearly correlation was confirmed between neuronal complexity and spectral power of the four EEG rhythms. Lesion location of stroke patients in the study distributed in different brain regions, and most of the PSD patients were mild or moderate

  9. Depression, antidepressant therapies, and erectile dysfunction: clinical trials of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) in treated and untreated patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurnberg, H George; Seidman, Stuart N; Gelenberg, Alan J; Fava, Maurizio; Rosen, Raymond; Shabsigh, Ridwan

    2002-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) and depression are highly prevalent conditions and frequently occur concomitantly in predisposed individuals. Men with ED and depression are also likely to have other comorbid conditions, including diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. Because ED is also a common adverse effect of some medications for these conditions, patients are frequently noncompliant with treatment. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) is effective in treating ED of a broad range of etiologies, suggesting that it may be equally beneficial in patients with ED that is associated with depressive symptoms and in those with ED resulting from serotonergic reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressant treatment. We review the results of 3 randomized, placebo-controlled trials and a retrospective analysis of data pooled from 10 clinical trials that examine the efficacy of sildenafil in treating ED associated with depression and as an adverse effect of SRI treatment. The results suggest that sildenafil is efficacious as a first-line treatment for ED in men with untreated minor depression, in men with ED that is refractory to successful SRI treatment of depression, and in those whose depression was successfully treated but who developed ED as a consequence of SRI treatment. Given the complex interrelations among ED, depression, and other comorbid conditions, the key to proper management is a comprehensive evaluation, including sexual function, and an accurate differential diagnosis.

  10. Effect of the EMDR psychotherapeutic approach on emotional cognitive processing in patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas Uribe, Myrna Estela; López Ramírez, Ernesto O; Jarero Mena, Ignacio

    2010-05-01

    The current investigation, framed within the emotional cognitive science field, was conducted with three patients with major depression. They participated in a therapeutic process which involved EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing). Data were obtained in the clinical practice through a longitudinal one subject study design, including: emotional valence identification within affective priming experiments; and depressive emotional representation studies, the data of which was analyzed using multidimensional scaling. The first ones had the purpose of observing the therapeutic impact over the emotional cognitive bias mechanism regarding depresogenic words related to traumatic experiences; and the second, to analyze modifications on depressive schemata. The results showed that EMDR had a positive effect both on emotional cognitive processing and on long-term memory conceptual organization. In the discussion section, interesting remarks are made on the incorporation of emotional cognitive science tools to the EMDR clinical practice.

  11. Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  12. Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jon O. J.

    2013-01-01

    Nyhederne er fulde af historier om depression. Overskrifter som: ’Danskerne propper sig med lykkepiller’ eller ‘depression er stadigvæk tabu’ går tit igen i dagspressen. Men hvor er nuancerne, og hvorfor gider vi læse de samme historier igen og igen? Måske er det fordi, vores egne forestillinger er...

  13. The Treatment of Minor Depression with St. John’s Wort or Citalopram: Failure to Show Benefit over Placebo

    OpenAIRE

    Rapaport, Mark Hyman; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Howland, Robert; Dording, Christina; Pamela J. Schettler; Mischoulon, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents new data addressing two important controversies in psychiatry: the construct of Minor Depression (MinD) and the efficacy of St. John’s Wort for milder forms of depressive disorders. Data are from a three-arm, 12 week, randomized clinical trial of investigating the efficacy of St. John’s Wort (810 mg/day), citalopram (20 mg/day), or placebo for acute treatment of MinD. Due to a high placebo response on all outcome measures, neither St. John’s Wort nor citalopram separated f...

  14. Effects of depression on parameters of cell-mediated immunity in patients with digestive tract cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Jun Nan; Yong-Chang Wei; Fu-Ling Zhou; Chun-Li Li; Chen-Guang Sui; Ling-Yun Hui; Cheng-Ge Gao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of depression on parameters of cell-mediated immunity in patients with cancers of the digestive tract.METHODS: One hundred and eight adult patients of both sexes with cancers of the digestive tract admitted between March 2001 and February 2002 in the Department of Medical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University were randomly enrolled in the study. The Zung self-rating depression scale (SDS), Zung self-rating anxiety scale(SAS), numeric rating scale (NRS) and social support rating scale (SSRS) were employed to evaluate the degree of depression and their contributing factors. In terms of their SDS index scores, the patients were categorized into depression group (SDS≥50) and non-depression group(SDS<50). Immunological parameters such as T-lymphocyte subsets and natural killer (NK) cell activities in peripheral blood were determined and compared between the two groups of patients.RESULTS: The SDS index was from 33.8 to 66.2 in the 108 cases, 50% of these patients had a SDS index more than 50. Similarly, the SAS index of all the patients ranged from 35.0 to 62.0 and 46.3% of the cases had a SAS index above 50. Cubic curve estimation showed that the depression was positively correlated with anxiety and negatively with social support. Furthermore, the depression correlated with the tumor type, which manifested in a descending order as stomach, gallbladder, pancreas, intestine, esophagus,duodenum and rectum, according to their correlativity. Step-wise regression analysis suggested that hyposexuality,dispidtment, agitation, palpitation, low CD56 and anxiety were the significant factors contributing to depression. More severe anxiety (49.7±7.5 vs 45.3±6.9, P<0.05), pain (6.5±2.8 vs4.6±3.2, P<0.05), poor social support (6.8±2.0 vs 7.6±2.1,P<0.05), as well as decline of lymphocyte count (0.33±0.09vs0.39±0.87, P<0.05) and CD56 (0.26±0.11 vs0.29±0.11,P<0.05) were noted in the depression group compared

  15. Abnormal degree centrality in Alzheimer's disease patients with depression: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhongwei; Liu, Xiaozheng; Hou, Hongtao; Wei, Fuquan; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xingli

    2016-06-15

    Depression is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and occurs in AD patients with a prevalence of up to 40%. It reduces cognitive function and increases the burden on caregivers. Currently, there are very few medications that are useful for treating depression in AD patients. Therefore, understanding the brain abnormalities in AD patients with depression (D-AD) is crucial for developing effective interventions. The aim of this study was to investigate the intrinsic dysconnectivity pattern of whole-brain functional networks at the voxel level in D-AD patients based on degree centrality (DC) as measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI). Our study included 32 AD patients. All patients were evaluated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and further divided into two groups: 15 D-AD patients and 17 non-depressed AD (nD-AD) patients. R-fMRI datasets were acquired from these D-AD and nD-AD patients. First, we performed a DC analysis to identify voxels that showed altered whole brain functional connectivity (FC) with other voxels. We then further investigated FC using the abnormal DC regions to examine in more detail the connectivity patterns of the identified DC changes. D-AD patients had lower DC values in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus than nD-AD patients. Seed-based analysis revealed decreased connectivity between the precentral and postcentral gyrus to the supplementary motor area and middle cingulum. FC also decreased in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus. Thus, AD patients with depression fit a 'network dysfunction model' distinct from major depressive disorder and AD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Determinants and prevalence of depression in patients with chronic renal disease, and their caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawamdeh S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sana Hawamdeh, Aljawharah Mohammed Almari, Asrar Salem Almutairi, Wireen Leila T Dator College of Nursing, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: This study explored the prevalence of depression among the patients with chronic kidney disease and their caregivers and its association to their demographic profile.Methods: A descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study that used the Hamilton rating scale tool to assess the prevalence of depression among 226 patients undergoing hemodialysis and 105 of their caregivers in a hospital in Saudi Arabia.Results: Patients with chronic renal disease and their caregivers experience depression at varying levels. Depression was positively associated with the socioeconomic and marital status of the patients. Socioeconomic status of the caregivers was seen to be associated with their depression.Conclusion: Depression is highly prevalent among patients with chronic renal disease and their caregivers. Keywords: caregivers, chronic renal disease, depression

  17. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in drug resistant depressed patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kang, Bong Joo; Chae, Jeong Ho; Lee, Hye Won; Moon, Hyun Jin; Kim, Sung Hoon; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Chung, Soo Kyo [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has recently been clinically applied in the treatment of drug resistant depressed patients. There are mixed findings about the efficacy of rTMS on depression. Furthermore, the influence of rTMS on the physiology of the brain is not clear. We prospectively evaluated changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) between pre- and post-rTMS treatment in patients with drug resistant depression. Twelve patients with drug-resistant depression (7 male, 5 female; age range; 19{approx} 52 years; mean age: 29.3 {+-} 9.3 years) were given rTMS on right prefrontal lobe with low frequency (1 Hz) and on left prefrontal lobe with high frequency (20 Hz), with 20-minute-duration each day for 3 weeks. Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT was obtained before and after rTMS treatment. The changes of cerebral perfusion were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM; t=3.14, uncorrected {rho} < 0.01, voxel = 100). Following areas showed significant increase in rCBF after 3 weeks rTMS treatment: the cingulate gyrus, fusiform gyrus of right temporal lobe, precuneus, and left lateral globus pallidus. Significant decrement was noted in the precental and middle frontal gyrus of right frontal lobe, and fusiform gyrus of left occipital lobe. Low-frequency rTMS on the right prefrontal cortex and high-frequency rTMS on the left prefrontal cortex for 3 weeks as an add-on regimen have increased and decreased rCBF in the specific brain regions in drug-resistant depressed patients. Further analyses correlating clinical characteristics and treatment paradigm with functional imaging data may be helpful in clarifying the pathophysiology of drug-resistant patients.

  18. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in patients with depressive disorder on antidepressive medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Albina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent depression is a psychiatric disorder of which etiology and pathogenesis might be related to immune response. Metabolic Syndrome (MetS and its components are also strongly associated with elevated inflammatory indicators, as so as the body mass index (BMI and total cholesterol levels. Objective. Objective of this study was to investigate if there was any difference in C-reactive protein (CRP levels in patients with recurrent depressive disorder, treated with antidepressants, compared to a healthy control group of subjects and if there was an association between increased CRP levels and the presence of MetS in these two groups. Methods. Sixty subjects entered the study; of these 35 patients with the diagnosis of recurrent depressive disorder, while the healthy control group included 25 subjects. MetS was defined according to the NCEP ATP III criteria. The cut-off point for CRP was set at >5 mg /L. Results. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of MetS and CRP values between the studied groups. Waist circumference and total cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the experimental group. Patients that fulfilled the criteria for MetS showed significantly higher values of central obesity and arterial hypertension in the experimental group as well. The elevated CRP levels were associated with increased frequency of MetS in depressed patients. Conclusion. Both CRP levels and metabolic risk profile screening, according to the international criteria, may be beneficial in order to obtain better assessment for depressive long term medicated patients.

  19. Prevalence of anxiety, depression and quality of life in HTLV-1 infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rita Polo Gascón

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The HAM/TSP caused by HTLV-1 infection usually affects patients to disabling states, and sometimes can lead them to paraplegia presenting symptoms of depression and anxiety, impacting on quality of life. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of depression and anxiety and its impact on quality of life in HTLV-1-infected TSP/HAM patients. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 67 asymptomatic (control group and 63 with TSP/HAM subjects. The instruments used were a demographic questionnaire, scales for anxiety and depression diagnosis (BDI and BAI, questionnaire for the assessment of Quality of Life of the World Health Organization (WHOQOL-Brief and neurological scale to measure the disability level (Osame's Disability Status Scale. All patients had HTLV-I diagnosis by serological and molecular approaches, monitored at Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas from May 2008 to July 2009. Data were analyzed statistically by frequencies, the Mann-Whitney test and the Spearman correlation test. Data among groups were analyzed and correlated with functional and severity aspects. Results: The results showed that patients with HAM/TSP compared to asymptomatic carriers had higher rates of depression (p < 0.001 and anxiety (p < 0.001, and impairment on quality of life in the areas of: dissatisfaction with health (p < 0.001, physical (p < 0.001 and the environment (p = 0.003. The main factors that correlated with levels of depression and anxiety and the domains of the WHOQOL-brief were: education, family income and social class. Conclusion: A well conducted evaluation and counseling may help in treatment, for a better quality of life of these patients.

  20. Prevalence of anxiety, depression and quality of life in HTLV-1 infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascón, Maria Rita Polo; Capitão, Claudio Garcia; Casseb, Jorge; Nogueira-Martins, Maria Cezira Fantini; Smid, Jerusa; Oliveira, Augusto César Penalva de

    2011-01-01

    The HAM/TSP caused by HTLV-1 infection usually affects patients to disabling states, and sometimes can lead them to paraplegia presenting symptoms of depression and anxiety, impacting on quality of life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of depression and anxiety and its impact on quality of life in HTLV-1-infected TSP/HAM patients. This was a cross-sectional study including 67 asymptomatic (control group) and 63 with TSP/HAM subjects. The instruments used were a demographic questionnaire, scales for anxiety and depression diagnosis (BDI and BAI), questionnaire for the assessment of Quality of Life of the World Health Organization (WHOQOL-Brief) and neurological scale to measure the disability level (Osame's Disability Status Scale). All patients had HTLV-I diagnosis by serological and molecular approaches, monitored at Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas from May 2008 to July 2009. Data were analyzed statistically by frequencies, the Mann-Whitney test and the Spearman correlation test. Data among groups were analyzed and correlated with functional and severity aspects. The results showed that patients with HAM/TSP compared to asymptomatic carriers had higher rates of depression (p < 0.001) and anxiety (p < 0.001), and impairment on quality of life in the areas of: dissatisfaction with health (p < 0.001), physical (p < 0.001) and the environment (p = 0.003). The main factors that correlated with levels of depression and anxiety and the domains of the WHOQOL-brief were: education, family income and social class. A well conducted evaluation and counseling may help in treatment, for a better quality of life of these patients.

  1. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among patients with major depressive disorder--differences between newly diagnosed first episode and recurrent disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubicic, Rudolf; Jakovac, Hrvoje; Bistrović, Ivana Ljubicić; Franceski, Tanja; Mufić, Ana Kovak; Karlović, Dalibor

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess differences in prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among depressed patients in regard to the duration of the illness (first episode versus recurrent episodes). A total of 190 patients suffering from major depressive disorder were included in the study, diagnosed according to International classification of disorders, 10th revision. The same criteria were used to divide participants into two groups: first episode major depressive disorder and major depressive disorder with recurrent episodes. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the American National Cholesterol Education Program-Treatment Panel III. Results showed that metabolic syndrome is significantly more prevalent in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (45.2%) compared to patients with first episode of major depressive disorder (27.3%), mainly due to differences in plasma glucose, triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol levels. These findings indicate the importance of the duration of depression and the number of recurring episodes as factors involved in etiopathogenesis of the associated metabolic syndrome.

  2. Morning and nocturnal serum melatonin rhythm levels in patients with major depressive disorder: an analytical cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Khaleghipour

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The pineal gland is an adaptive organ that precisely regulates the biological rhythms of melatonin brain hemostasis. Variation in the regulation of melatonin rhythms is a likely cause of depressive disorder. The purpose of this study was to measure serum melatonin levels in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and normal control subjects. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study at the industrial medical unit of the Iron Smelting Company of Isfahan, Iran. METHODS: The morning and nocturnal serum melatonin levels of patients and controls were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. All data were assessed using variance analysis. RESULTS: The morning and nocturnal serum melatonin levels of depressed and healthy subjects differed (P < 0.05. The nocturnal serum melatonin levels of depressed women were lower than those of depressed men (P < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study showed that the nocturnal serum melatonin levels in the depressed patients were lower than in the controls. Thus, the peak melatonin phase in the depressed patients was reached with delay. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01357083

  3. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program Shows Potential in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Stress among Young People with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J. A.; Evert, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered in groups on the reduction of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress in young people on the autism spectrum. Utilising a quasi-experimental design, comparisons were made between individuals allocated to a group intervention program and individuals allocated to a…

  4. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program Shows Potential in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Stress among Young People with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J. A.; Evert, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered in groups on the reduction of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress in young people on the autism spectrum. Utilising a quasi-experimental design, comparisons were made between individuals allocated to a group intervention program and individuals allocated to a…

  5. Differential gene expression in patients with subsyndromal symptomatic depression and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengqing; Hu, Guoqin; Li, Zezhi; Wang, Qingzhong; Wang, Xuemei; Yuan, Chengmei; Wang, Zuowei; Hong, Wu; Lu, Weihong; Cao, Lan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yong; Yu, Shunying; Zhou, Yimin; Yi, Zhenghui; Fang, Yiru

    2017-01-01

    Subsyndromal symptomatic depression (SSD) is a subtype of subthreshold depressive and can lead to significant psychosocial functional impairment. Although the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD) and SSD still remains poorly understood, a set of studies have found that many same genetic factors play important roles in the etiology of these two disorders. Nowadays, the differential gene expression between MDD and SSD is still unknown. In our previous study, we compared the expression profile and made the classification with the leukocytes by using whole-genome cRNA microarrays among drug-free first-episode subjects with SSD, MDD and matched healthy controls (8 subjects in each group), and finally determined 48 gene expression signatures. Based on these findings, we further clarify whether these genes mRNA was different expressed in peripheral blood in patients with SSD, MDD and healthy controls (60 subjects respectively). With the help of the quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we gained gene relative expression levels among the three groups. We found that there are three of the forty eight co-regulated genes had differential expression in peripheral blood among the three groups, which are CD84, STRN, CTNS gene (F = 3.528, p = 0.034; F = 3.382, p = 0.039; F = 3.801, p = 0.026, respectively) while there were no significant differences for other genes. CD84, STRN, CTNS gene may have significant value for performing diagnostic functions and classifying SSD, MDD and healthy controls.

  6. Depressed patients have decreased binding of tritiated imipramine to platelet serotonin ''transporter''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, S.M.; Rehavi, M.; Skolnick, P.; Ballenger, J.C.; Goodwin, F.K.

    1981-12-01

    The high-affinity tritiated (3H) imipramine binding sites are functionally (and perhaps structurally) associated with the presynaptic neuronal and platelet uptake sites for serotonin. Since there is an excellent correlation between the relative potencies of a series of antidepressants in displacing 3H-imipramine from binding sites in human brain and platelet, we have examined the binding of 3H-imipramine to platelets from 14 depressed patients and 28 age- and sex-matched controls. A highly significant decrease in the number of 3H-imipramine binding sites, with no significant change in the apparent affinity constants, was observed in platelets from the depressed patients compared with the controls. These results, coupled with previous studies showing a significant decrease in the maximal uptake of serotonin in platelets from depressed patients, suggest that an inherited or acquired deficiency of the serotonin transport protein or proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of depression.

  7. Dissociative symptoms reflect levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha in patients with unipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizik G

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gustav Bizik,1 Petr Bob,1 Jiri Raboch,1 Josef Pavlat,1 Jana Uhrova,2 Hana Benakova,2 Tomas Zima2 1Center for Neuropsychiatric Research of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry and UHSL, 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Diagnostics, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Recent evidence indicates that the nature of interactions between the nervous system and immune system is important in the pathogenesis of depression. Specifically, alterations in pro-inflammatory cytokines have been related to the development of several psychological and neurobiological manifestations of depressive disorder, as well as to stress exposure. A number of findings point to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α as one of the central factors in these processes. Accordingly, in the present study, we test the hypothesis that specific influences of chronic stressors related to traumatic stress and dissociation are related to alterations in TNF-α levels. We performed psychometric measurement of depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]-II, traumatic stress symptoms (Trauma Symptom Checklist [TSC]-40, and psychological and somatoform dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale [DES] and Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire [SDQ]-20, respectively, and immunochemical measure of serum TNF-α in 66 inpatients with unipolar depression (mean age 43.1 ± 7.3 years. The results show that TNF-α is significantly related to DES (Spearman R=−0.42, P<0.01, SDQ-20 (Spearman R=−0.38, P<0.01, and TSC-40 (Spearman R=−0.41, P<0.01, but not to BDI-II. Results of the present study suggest that TNF-α levels are related to dissociative symptoms and stress exposure in depressed patients. Keywords: depression, dissociation, TNF-alpha, traumatic stress

  8. Uraemic pruritus markedly affects the quality of life and depressive symptoms in haemodialysis patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suseł, Joanna; Batycka-Baran, Aleksandra; Reich, Adam; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the influence of uraemic pruritus on patients' wellbeing. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of uraemic pruritus on quality of life and depressive symptoms in patients with end-stage renal disease. A total of 200 haemodialysis patients were included into the study. The prevalence of uraemic pruritus was 38%. Patients with uraemic pruritus had significantly lower quality of life according to SF-36 questionnaire compared to the remaining of analysed subjects. Among patients with uraemic pruritus, 64.5% individuals also showed impaired skin-related quality of life evaluated with Dermatology Life Quality Index. The quality of life impairment correlated with uraemic pruritus intensity assessed with VAS and the 4-item itch questionnaire. Depression level significantly correlated with quality of life and severity of depressive symptoms was significantly associated with uraemic pruritus intensity. Our study underscores that uraemic pruritus should be regarded as an important health problem among haemodialysis patients.

  9. Affect School for chronic benign pain patients showed improved alexithymia assessments with TAS-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulesius Hans O

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alexithymia is a disturbance associated with psychosomatic disorders, pain syndromes, and a variety of psychiatric disorders. The Affect School (AS based on Tomkins Affect Theory is a therapy focusing on innate affects and their physiological expressions, feelings, emotions and scripts. In this pilot study we tried the AS-intervention method in patients with chronic benign pain. Methods The AS-intervention, with 8 weekly group sessions and 10 individual sessions, was offered to 59 patients with chronic non-malignant pain at a pain rehabilitation clinic in Sweden 2004-2005. Pre and post intervention assessments were done with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20, the Visual Analogue Scale for pain assessment (VAS-pain, the European Quality of Life health barometer (EQoL and the Stress and Crisis Inventory-93 (SCI-93. After the group sessions we used Bergdahl's Questionnaire for assessing changes in interpersonal relations, general well-being and evaluation of AS. Results The AS intervention was completed by 54 out of 59 (92% patients. Significant reductions in total TAS-20 post-test scores (p = 0.0006 as well as TAS-20 DIF and DDF factors (Difficulties Identifying Feelings, and Difficulties Describing Feelings were seen (p = 0.0001, and p = 0.0008 while the EOT factor (Externally Oriented Thinking did not change. Improvements of HAD-depression scores (p = 0.04, EQoL (p = 0.02 and self-assessed changes in relations to others (p Conclusions This pilot study involving 59 patients with chronic benign pain indicates that the alexithymia DIF and DDF, as well as depression, social relations and quality of life may be improved by the Affect School therapeutic intervention.

  10. QUALITY OF LIFE IN BIPOLAR AND UNIPOLAR DEPRESSIVE PATIENTS: CLINICAL AND SOCIODEMOGRAPHICAL CORRELATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Quality of Life is becoming an increasingly important measure of the impact of psychiatric disorders and is now recognized as useful in the healthcare evaluation of patients with psychiatric disorders. This cross-sectional study examined the relationships between clinical and sociodemographic variables and self-reported quality of life (QOL in 30 bipolar depressive patients and 30 unipolar depressive patients Participants were administered the World Health Organization Quality of Life MeasureAbbreviated Version (WHOQOL-BREF to assess QOL. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE The aims of this study were (i to compare Quality of Life (QOL of patients with bipolar depression to those with unipolar depression and (ii to assess the association of different domains of QOL with severity of clinical Symptoms and level of functioning in bipolar and unipolar depressive patients group. METHODS The QOL on the four domains of the World Health Organization Questionnaire on Quality of Life – Hindi version (WHOQOL-BREF were compared between 30 subjects with bipolar depression and 30 subjects with unipolar depression. The subjects had to be in a moderate to severe depressive state (As confirmed by a Beck Depression Inventory total score >16 with minimum duration of illness being two years prior to the inclusion in the study. The factors that contribute or influence QOL (socio-demographic factors, severity of depression and level of functioning were also studied. Obtained Data were analysed by using unpaired t test, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and z – score. RESULTS The group of bipolar depressive patients obtained statistically significantly lower scores on all the subscales when compared with the unipolar depressive patients. No statistically significant differences appeared when comparing the WHOQOL-BREF scores with the demographic variables. CONCLUSIONS The present findings suggest that depressive patients with bipolar disorder have a poorer QOL in

  11. Lowered omega3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in serum phospholipids and cholesteryl esters of depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Christophe, A; Delanghe, J; Altamura, C; Neels, H; Meltzer, H Y

    1999-03-22

    Depression is associated with a lowered degree of esterification of serum cholesterol, an increased C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3 ratio and decreases in omega3 fractions in fatty acids (FAs) or in the red blood cell membrane. The aims of the present study were to examine: (i) serum phospholipid and cholesteryl ester compositions of individual saturated fatty acids (SFAs), monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) in major depressed patients vs. healthy volunteers; (ii) the relationships between the above FAs and lowered serum zinc (Zn), a marker of the inflammatory response in depression; and (iii) the effects of subchronic treatment with antidepressants on FAs in depression. The composition of the FAs was determined by means of thin layer chromatography in conjunction with gas chromatography. Lipid concentrations were assayed by enzymatic colorimetric methods. The oxidative potential index (OPI) of FAs was computed in 34 major depressed inpatients and 14 normal volunteers. Major depression was associated with: increased MUFA and C22:5omega3 proportions and increased C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3 and C22:5omega6/C22:6omega3 ratios; lower C22:4omega6, C20:5omega3 and C22:5omega3 fractions in phospholipids; lower C18:3omega3, C20:5omega3 and total (sigma)omega3 FAs, and higher C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3 and sigmaomega6/sigmaomega3 ratios in cholesteryl esters; lower serum concentrations of phospholipids and cholesteryl esters; and a decreased OPI. In depression, there were significant and positive correlations between serum Zn and C20:5omega3 and C22:6omega3 fractions in phospholipids; and significant inverse correlations between serum Zn and the sigmaomega6/sigmaomega3, C20:4omega6/C20:5omega3, and C22:5omega6/C22:6omega3 ratios in phospholipids. There was no significant effect of antidepressive treatment on any of the FAs. The results show that, in major depression, there is a deficiency of omega3 PUFAs and a compensatory increase in MUFAs and C22:5omega6 in

  12. Comparison Study of Memory Status in War-PTSD Veterans With Depression and Non- Veterans Depressed Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvari SS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive problems in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD include poor concentration and impaired memory. Prevalence of PTSD in all aspects of life is 8% in USA. Regarding the importance of memory in functional levels, this study was performed to review memory status in these patients. Methods: Fifty male war veterans with PTSD and major depression and 50 male non-veterans with depression participated in this study performed at psychiatric outpatient ward in Baqiyatallah hospital during 2008-2009. The patients met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Depression severity, sex, age, educational level, and marital status were matched in both groups. A psychologist completed demographic and Mississippi questionnaires, PTSD checklist (PCL, beck depression Inventory and wechsler memory scale. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 11.0. A P-value smaller than 0.05 was considered significant.Results: The mean age of the veterans and non-veterans was 43.9±4.7 and 42±9.4 years, respectively. Memory status did not differ between the two groups (P>0.05. There was no statistically significant correlation between duration and severity of PTSD with memory impairment (P>0.05. A negative correlation was found between personal and general information with re-experiencing in the veterans (P<0.05. Impaired memory was correlated with age greater than 45, educational level lower than high school diploma, severity of depression and longer participation in war. Conclusion: Although both PTSD and major depression affected memory, but memory status did not differ between patients with PTSD and depression and patients with chronic depression.

  13. Major life events and development of major depression in Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Bordelon, Y; Thompson, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Non-motor symptoms including depression are important features of Parkinson's disease (PD). We aim to address the relationship between major life events and depression amongst PD patients free of depressive symptoms at baseline. METHODS: New-onset PD patients from California...... were recruited in 2001-2007 and followed up for 3-4 years. The participants (n = 221) were examined by neurologists and responded to comprehensive interviews that included major life events, social support, and coping measures from validated scales. Major depression was assessed using the Structured...... Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV depression module (SCID). RESULTS: More than half of all patients had experienced major life events since diagnosed with PD, and 22 patients developed a major depression. The number of life events was associated with risk of depression in an exposure-dependent manner...

  14. [Depression in epileptic patients with and without history of suicidal attempts: preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, E; Miller, K; Rościszewska, D; Kłosińska, E

    1998-01-01

    Depression is a significant problem in epilepsy. Suicides occur in epileptic patients five times more often than in general population. Material included 34 epileptics with 76 suicidal attempts and 24 patients with no history of suicide. Psychical state was studied with Beck Depression Inventory and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. In the group with suicidal attempts 65% of patients had depression (54.5% of them had major depression) and in group without suicide attempts depression was noted in 54% (23% with major depression). Patients with depression were divided into two groups: group I with suicidal attempts and group II without history of suicide. In group I more patients were alcohol abusers (50% vs 31%), more were treated because of epilepsy longer than 10 years (59% vs 46%) and more had tonic-clonic seizures (82% vs 46%). In group I, 54% of patients were on polytherapy (more than half of them with fenobarbital). In group II, 31% of epileptics were on polytherapy (no one with fenobarbital). Major depression was significantly more frequent in epileptics with suicidal attempts. The severity of depression may influence the risk of suicide. Major depression may be associated with late age of onset of epilepsy, longer treatment duration, tonic-clonic seizures, polytherapy (mainly with fenobarbital) and alcohol abuse.

  15. The scars of childhood adversity: minor stress sensitivity and depressive symptoms in remitted recurrently depressed adult patients.

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    Gemma Kok

    Full Text Available Childhood adversity may lead to depressive relapse through its long-lasting influence on stress sensitivity. In line with the stress sensitization hypothesis, minor (daily stress is associated with depressive relapse. Therefore, we examine the impact of childhood adversity on daily stress and its predictive value on prospectively assessed depressive symptoms in recurrently depressed patients.Daily stress was assessed in recurrently depressed adult patients, enrolled into two randomized trials while remitted. The reported intensity and frequency of dependent and independent daily stress was assessed at baseline. Independent stress is externally generated, for example an accident happening to a friend, while dependent stress is internally generated, for example getting into a fight with a neighbor. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed with childhood adversity, independent and dependent daily stress as predictor variables of prospectively measured depressive symptoms after three months of follow-up (n = 138.We found that childhood adversity was not significantly associated with a higher frequency and intensity of daily stress. The intensity of both independent and dependent daily stress was predictive of depressive symptom levels at follow-up (unadjusted models respectively: B = 0.47, t = 2.05, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 0.02-0.92; B = 0.29, t = 2.20, p = 0.028, 95% CI = 0.03-0.55. No associations were found between childhood adversity and depressive symptoms at follow-up.No evidence was found supporting stress sensitization due to the experience of childhood adversity in this recurrently depressed but remitted patient group. Nevertheless, our research indicates that daily stress might be a target for preventive treatment.Trial A: Nederlands Trial Register NTR1907 Trial B: Nederlands Trial Register NTR2503.

  16. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Different people have different symptoms. Some symptoms of depression include: Persistent sad, anxious, or “empty” mood Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness ...

  17. Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty may trigger depression in some people. Medical illness – ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women’s Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary ...

  18. Brief screening questions for depression in chiropractic patients with low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Alice; Aambakk, Benedicte; Bossen, Sanne;

    2014-01-01

    Depression is an important prognostic factor in low back pain (LBP) that appears to be infrequent in chiropractic populations. Identification of depression in few patients would consequently implicate screening of many. It is therefore desirable to have brief screening tools for depression...

  19. The association of major depressive episode and personality traits in patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyella de Melo Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Personality traits have been associated with primary depression. However, it is not known whether this association takes place in the case of depression comorbid with fibromyalgia. OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the association between a current major depressive episode and temperament traits (e.g., harm avoidance. METHOD: A sample of 69 adult female patients with fibromyalgia was assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview severity of depressive symptomatology with the Beck Depression Inventory, and anxiety symptomatology with the IDATE-state and pain intensity with a visual analog scale. RESULTS: A current major depressive episode was diagnosed in 28 (40.5% of the patients. They presented higher levels of harm avoidance and lower levels of cooperativeness and self-directedness compared with non-depressed patients, which is consistent with the Temperament and Character Inventory profile of subjects with primary depression. However, in contrast to previous results in primary depression, no association between a major depressive episode and self-transcendence was found. CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight specific features of depression in fibromyalgia subjects and may prove important for enhancing the diagnosis and prognosis of depression in fibromyalgia patients.

  20. Prevalence and risk indicators of depression in elderly nursing home patients : the AGED study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2004-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common and disabling psychiatric disorder in later life. Particular frail nursing home patients seem to be at increased risk. Nursing home-based studies on risk indicators of depression are scarce. Methods: Prevalence and risk indicators of depression were assessed in 333

  1. Prevalence and risk indicators of depression in elderly nursing home patients : the AGED study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2004-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common and disabling psychiatric disorder in later life. Particular frail nursing home patients seem to be at increased risk. Nursing home-based studies on risk indicators of depression are scarce. Methods: Prevalence and risk indicators of depression were assessed in 333

  2. Effectiveness of Compassionate Mind Training on Depression, Anxiety, and Self-Criticism in a Group of Iranian Depressed Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Noorbala

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of compassionate mind training (CMT on symptoms of depression and anxiety in Iranian depressed sufferers .Method:Nineteen depressed patients aged 20 to 40 (Beck Depression Inventory value≥20 were randomly assigned into two groups. The experimental group participated in 12 sessions of group therapy based on Paul Gilbert’s manual of CMT. The control group was given no intervention. The participants were assessed by Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, Anxiety Scale (AS, and Levels of Self-Criticism (LSCS questionnaires at the beginning and immediately after the intervention. To follow-up the therapeutic effect of CMT, the three questionnaires were answered again by participants two months after the end of the intervention. Data were analyzed by independent samples ttest. Results:The results revealed that CMT significantly decreases depression (P<0.05 and anxiety score (P<0.05 in the follow-up study, but not immediately after the intervention. Although CMT decreased selfcriticism, this effect was marginally insignificant.Conclusion:The findings indicated that CMT could alleviatedepression and anxiety in a group of Iranian depressed patients.

  3. 'Do you think you suffer from depression?' Reevaluating the use of a single item question for the screening of depression in older primary care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayalon, Liat; Goldfracht, Margalit; Bech, Per

    2010-01-01

    evaluated against a depression diagnosis made by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. RESULTS: Overall, 3.9% of the sample was diagnosed with depression. The most notable finding was that the single-item question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?' had as good or better sensitivity (83......: An easy way to detect depression in older primary care patients would be asking the single question, 'do you think you suffer from depression?'...

  4. The treatment of minor depression with St. John's Wort or citalopram: failure to show benefit over placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, Mark Hyman; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Howland, Robert; Dording, Christina; Schettler, Pamela J; Mischoulon, David

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents new data addressing two important controversies in psychiatry: the construct of Minor Depression (MinD) and the efficacy of St. John's Wort for milder forms of depressive disorders. Data are from a three-arm, 12 week, randomized clinical trial of investigating the efficacy of St. John's Wort (810 mg/day), citalopram (20 mg/day), or placebo for acute treatment of MinD. Due to a high placebo response on all outcome measures, neither St. John's Wort nor citalopram separated from placebo on change in depressive symptom severity, quality of life, or well-being. However, systematic assessment of potential adverse effects (AEs) led to three important observations: (1) prior to the administration of study compound, 60% of subjects endorsed items that would be characterized as AEs once study compound was administered, (2) St. John's Wort and citalopram were each associated with a significant number of new or worsening AEs during treatment, and (3) using a structured interview for identifying AEs at baseline and during treatment is informative. MinD was not responsive to either a conventional antidepressant or a nutraceutical, and both compounds were associated with a notable side effects burden. Other treatment approaches for MinD should be investigated.

  5. The management of depressive symptoms in patients with COPD: a postal survey of general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohannes, Abebaw Mengistu; Hann, Mark; Sibbald, Bonnie

    2011-07-01

    We examined the management of depression by general practitioners (GPs), through the use of case vignettes, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), severe osteoarthritis and depressive symptoms alone. Depression is common in patients with COPD. Untreated depression leads to poor compliance with medical treatment and increases health-care utilisation. We surveyed a random sample of GPs (n = 3956) in England using a postal questionnaire. The questionnaire explored how GPs would approach the management of emotional distress in patients with and without a chronic condition and gauged their views of and experiences with depression in patients with COPD. A total of 864 completed responses were received (22%). In the vignettes, a significantly greater percentage of GPs reported that they would explore or offer the diagnosis of depression in a patient with COPD (95.4%) compared with patients with either severe osteoarthritis (88.3%) or depressive symptoms alone (86.3%). In each case, the vast majority of GPs reported that they would explore a diagnosis of depression using a clinical diagnostic tool. The preferred method of treatment, if offered, in all three cases was a combination of anti-depressant drugs and psychological therapy. GPs endorsed the importance of routinely screening for depression in patients who have COPD and acknowledged that depression impairs patient self-management of COPD.In conclusion, GPs in England were able to diagnose depression from the vignettes and plan appropriate treatment strategies in patients with chronic diseases. This should be complemented with thorough physical examination by GPs to rule out other factors such as the impact of physical illness. GPs believe depression interferes with patient self-management of COPD.

  6. The thyroid function of Graves' disease patients is aggravated by depressive personality during antithyroid drug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyauchi Akira

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that depressive personality (the scores of hypochondriasis, depression and psychasthenia determined by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI and daily hassles of Graves' disease (GD patients treated long trem with antithyroid drug (ATD were significantly higher in a relapsed group than in a remitted group, even in the euthyroid state. The present study aims to examine the relationship among depressive personality, emotional stresses, thyroid function and the prognosis of hyperthyroidism in newly diagnosed GD patients. Methods Sixty-four untreated GD patients responded to the MMPI for personality traits, the Natsume's Stress Inventory for major life events, and the Hayashi's Daily Life Stress Inventory for daily life stresses before and during ATD treatment. Results In the untreated thyrotoxic state, depressive personality (T-scores of hypochondriasis, depression or psychasthenia greater than 60 points in MMPI were found for 44 patients (69%. For 15 (23% of these patients, the scores decreased to the normal range after treatment. However, depressive personality persisted after treatment in the remaining 29 patients (46%. Normal scores before treatment were found for 20 patients (31%, and the scores were persistently normal for 15 patients (23%. The remaining 5 patients (8% had higher depressive personality after treatment. Such depressive personality was not associated with the severity of hyperthyroidism. Serum TSH receptor antibody activity at three years after treatment was significantly (p = 0.0351 greater in the depression group than in the non- depression group. The remission rate at four years after treatment was significantly (p = 0.0305 lower in the depression group than in the non- depression group (22% vs 52%. Conclusion The data indicate that in GD patients treated with ATD, depressive personality during treatment reflects the effect of emotional stress more than that of

  7. Functional versus syndromal recovery in patients with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Trijntje Y G; Seldenrijk, Adrie; van Meijel, Berno; Goossens, Peter J J; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Kupka, Ralph W

    2015-06-01

    Many patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) or bipolar disorder (BD) experience impairments in daily life. We investigated whether patients with single-episode MDD (MDD-s), recurrent MDD (MDD-r), and BD differ in functional impairments, whether time since last episode (syndromal state, in 4 categories) contributes to impairment, whether this association is moderated by diagnosis, and the role of depressive symptoms. Data were derived from 1,664 participants in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (MDD-s, n = 483; MDD-r, n = 1,063; BD, n = 118), from 2006 into 2009. In additional analyses, 530 healthy controls were included. DSM-IV-TR diagnosis and information about syndromal state were based on the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Psychosocial impairment was assessed with the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0). Adjusted associations between diagnosis, syndromal state, impairment, and depression severity were investigated. Syndromal state not being taken into account, patients with BD experienced more functional impairment than patients with MDD-s or with MDD-r, and in all diagnostic groups, impairments decreased with increasing time since last episode. However, impact of syndromal state on functioning showed a different course between diagnostic groups (mean [SD] WHODAS score: current: MDD-s 30.8 [2.8], MDD-r 32.7 [0.9], BD 37.7 [2.1], P = .07; recently remitted: MDD-s 21.7 [3.5], MDD-r 24.0 [1.2], BD 22.1[3.2], P = .7; remitted: MDD-s 10.6 [3.7], MDD-r 21.6 [1.4], BD 19.2 [4.4], P = .02; remitted > 1 year: MDD-s 13.3 [0.6], MDD-r 14.7 [0.5], BD 17.1 [2.2], P = .8). Depression severity accounted for these differences. Moreover, functioning in all remitted patients remained impaired when compared to that in healthy controls. Functional recovery may take up to 1 year after syndromal remission in recurrent depressive and bipolar disorder, mainly due to residual depressive symptoms, emphasizing the

  8. Sigma-1 receptor concentration in plasma of patients with late-life depression: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu H

    2013-12-01

    blots were performed using a specific antibody that acts against the sigma-1 receptor, and the net densities of each band were quantified.Results: All participants showed improvement in depressive symptoms, which was indicated by a significant decrease in the HAM-D scores. The mean plasma sigma-1 receptor concentration also increased significantly following antidepressant treatment. However, no significant correlations were found between changes in plasma sigma-1 receptor concentration and changes in HAM-D scores.Conclusion: In this preliminary study, we demonstrated that the sigma-1 receptor concentration in plasma increases following antidepressant treatment in patients with late-life MDD. Further studies are warranted to confirm this finding with a larger number of patients.Keywords: sigma-1 receptor, late-life depression, depressive symptoms, antidepressant treatment

  9. Effects of sleep deprivation on polysomnography and executive function in patients with depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yingzhi; Ren Qingtao; Zong Li; Wu Yingli; Zhang Qinfeng; Ma Xiuqing; Pu Jinyu

    2014-01-01

    Backgorund Sleep deprivation (SD) has been used in treatment of depression disorder,and could effectively improve the patients' depressive symptoms.The aim of the study was to explore the effects of SD on electroencephalographic (EEG)and executive function changes in patients with depression.Methods Eighteen depression patients (DPs) and 21 healthy controls (HCs) were enrolled in the present study.The whole night polysomnography (PSG) was recorded by Neurofax-1518K (Nihon Kohden,Japan) system before and after 36 hours of SD.The level of subjects' depression state was assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS),and the executive function was assessed by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST).Results Significantly decreased sleep latency (SL; before SD:(31.8±11.1) minutes,after SD:(8.8±5.2) minutes,P <0.01)and REM sleep latency (RL; before SD:(79.8±13.5) minutes,after SD:(62.9±10.2) minutes,P <0.01) were found after SD PSG in depression patients.Decreased Stage 1 (S1; before SD:(11.7±2.9)%,after SD:(7.3±1.1)%,P <0.01) and Stage 2(S2,before SD:(53.8±15.5)%,after SD:(42.3±14.7)%,P <0.05) of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep,and increased Stage 3 (S3,before SD:(11.8±5.5)%,after SD:(23.6±5.8)%,P<0.01) and Stage 4 (S4,before SD:(8.8±3.3)%,after SD:(27.4±4.8)%,P <0.01) NREM sleep were also found.After SD,the depression level in patients decreased from 6.7±2.1to 2.9±0.7 (P <0.01).In WCST,the patients showed significantly decreased Response errors (Re,before SD:22.3±2.4,after SD:18.3±2.7,P <0.01) and Response preservative errors (Rpe,before SD:11.6±3.6,after SD:9.3±2.9,P<0.05).Depression patients' RE (t=2.17,P <0.05) and Rpe (t=2.96,P <0.01) also decreased significantly compared to healthy controls.Conclusion SD can improve depression symptom and executive function in depression patients.

  10. Depression, anxiety and quality of life through the use of complementary and alternative medicine among breast cancer patients in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Kalender

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Based on the previous studies, 20-83.3% of breast cancer patients among different countries and cultures used CAM. Our results suggested that the use of CAM among women is quite popular, but they showed no correlation between CAM usage and anxiety and depression. In addition, CAM usage was more common in breast cancer patients with a poor emotional and financial status.

  11. Depression in patients with schizophrenia admitted to the acute services of the Psychiatric Hospital of Havana

    OpenAIRE

    Llanes Basulto, Yasmani; Barrios Hernández, Yanquiel; Oliva Hernández, Ignacio; Pimentel Noda, Susel de la Caridad; Calvo Guerra, Esvieta

    2014-01-01

    The presence of depression in the acute phase of schizophrenia is evaluated, and the clinical and psychosocial characteristics that can be associated with depression are identified. Participants included 73 patients that were admitted to the acute services of the Psychiatric Hospital of Havana, given that depression is a symptom in a significant amount of the patients with schizophrenia, 35.6% of the patients presented clinically significant symp- toms, and these were related significantly wi...

  12. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaipisuttikul P

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Papan Thaipisuttikul, Pichai Ittasakul, Punjaporn Waleeprakhon, Pattarabhorn Wisajun, Sudawan Jullagate Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Psychiatric comorbidities are common in major depressive disorder (MDD. They may worsen outcome and cause economic burden. The primary objective was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in MDD. The secondary objectives were to compare the presence of comorbidities between currently active and past MDD, and between patients with and without suicidal risk.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 250 patients with lifetime MDD and age ≥18 years were enrolled. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, Thai version, was used to confirm MDD diagnosis and classify comorbidities. MDD diagnosis was confirmed in 190, and 60 patients were excluded due to diagnosis of bipolar disorder.Results: Of the 190 MDD patients, 25.8% had current MDD and 74.2% had past MDD. Eighty percent were women. The mean age at enrollment was 50 years, and at MDD onset was 41 years. Most patients were married (53.2%, employed (54.8%, and had ≥12 years of education (66.9%. There were 67 patients (35.3% with one or more psychiatric comorbidities. Comorbidities included dysthymia (19.5%, any anxiety disorders (21.1% (panic disorder [6.8%], agoraphobia [5.8%], social phobia [3.7%], obsessive–compulsive disorder [OCD] [4.7%], generalized anxiety disorder [5.3%], and post-traumatic stress disorder [4.2%], alcohol dependence (0.5%, psychotic disorder (1.6%, antisocial personality (1.1%, and eating disorders (0%. Compared with past MDD, the current MDD group had significantly higher OCD (P<0.001, psychotic disorder (P=0.048, past panic disorder (P=0.017, and suicidal risk (P<0.001. Suicidal risk was found in 32.1% of patients. Patients with suicidal risk had more comorbid anxiety disorder of any type (P=0.019 and

  13. Depression Is Associated With Muscle Mass And Strength In Patients With End Stage Renal Disease

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    Young Rim Song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is the most common psychiatric complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Sarcopenia, defined as loss of muscle mass and strength, is expected to be associated with depression, because both are closely linked to physical inactivity and functional impairment. We investigated the association of sarcopenia with depression in patients with ESRD. A total of 115 patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD were included in this study. Muscle mass was assessed by lean tissue index (LTI using portable whole body bioimpedance spectroscopy, and muscle strength was measured with handgrip strength (HGS. Depression was defined as Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II score ≥16. About 60% of prevalent HD patients had depression. Compared to subjects without depression, depressed patients had a higher prevalence of sarcopenia (45.5 vs. 8.2%, p<0.001 and significantly increased serum IL-6 and hs-CRP level. However, (prealbumin and body mass index (BMI failed to correlate with BDI-II. HGS and LTI had a consistent negative effect on BDI-II even after adjusting other parameters including inflammation. In multivariate analysis, lower , increased IL-6 and β2-microglobulin,and sarcopenia were significant predictors for depression; sarcopenia was most powerful [odds ratio 9.01, 95% CI 3.60-12.22, p=0.001]. In conclusion, the prevalence of sarcopenia and depression was considerably high and and the presence of sarcopenia was an important predictor for depression.

  14. Depression and religiosity and their correlates in Lebanese breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Kassm, Sandra; Hlais, Sani; Khater, Christina; Chehade, Issam; Haddad, Ramzi; Chahine, Johnny; Yazbeck, Mohammad; Abi Warde, Rita; Naja, Wadih

    2017-01-26

    Breast cancer bears considerable morbidity and mortality and is well known to increase the risk of major depression, whereas religiosity has been reported to be protective. We searched for an association between depression and religiosity in breast cancer patients. We also sought to find an association between depression and various sociodemographic and disease variables. One hundred two patients were interviewed. Sociodemographic, cancer profile, and religiosity questionnaires were administered. We screened for depressive disorders by using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the Beck Depression Inventory. Most of our participants (n = 79; 77.4%) had high religiosity score. The prevalences of lifetime major depression, current major depression, and major depression after cancer diagnosis were 50.9%, 30.1%, and 43.1%, respectively. We could not find a correlation between religiosity and current depression, while the association with depression after cancer diagnosis was close to but did not reach statistical significance (P = .055) and in favor of a deleterious role of religiosity. Depression was only linked to marital status and insurance coverage. No association was found with disease-related variables. Religiosity does not seem to be protective against depression development. The stress of cancer appears to be the main culprit in increasing the risk of depression. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Electrophysiological Neuroimaging using sLORETA Comparing 100 Schizophrenia Patients to 48 Patients with Major Depression

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    Andy R. Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this retrospective of electroencephalograms were to identify a surrogate biomarker for the Dopamine D2 receptors in the brain by comparing patients diagnosed with Schizophrenia taking Atypical Antipsychotics to Depressive patients medicated with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. To achieve this, thirty-seconds of resting EEG were spectrally transformed in sLORETA. Three-dimensional statistical non-paramentric maps (SnPM for the sLORETA Global Field Power within each band were then computed. Our results illustrated that the Right Superior Frontal Gyrus (t=2.049, p=0.007, along the dopamine mesolimbic pathway, had higher neuronal oscillations in the delta frequency band in the 100 Schizophrenia patients as compared to the 32-depressive female patients. The comparisons with both the 48 depressive patient cohort or the sixteen male depressive patient cohort did not yield any statistically significant findings. We conclude that the Superior Frontal Gyrus should be investigated as a possible surrogate biomarker for preclinical and clinical drug discovery in neuropharmacology.

  16. Impact of personality and depression on quality of life in patients with severe haemophilia in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-Y; Kim, S-W; Kim, J-M; Shin, I-S; Baek, H-J; Lee, H-S; Hwang, T-J; Yoon, J-S

    2013-09-01

    Among reports on the psychological variables that influence quality of life (QoL), none has addressed the impact of personality on QoL in patients with haemophilia. We investigated the impact of psychosocial variables including depression and personality on QoL in patients with severe haemophilia. A cross-sectional survey examining psychosocial and clinical characteristics was administered to Korean patients with severe haemophilia. Personality traits were ascertained using the 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory, which quantifies five personality dimensions including extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness. Patient QoL and depression were measured by the World Health Organization Quality of Life-abbreviated version and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) respectively. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used for each domain to determine the impact of psychological variables on QoL. Of the 53 subjects who consented to participate, 46 cases were finally analysed. Multivariate linear regression analyses demonstrated that agreeableness was significantly and positively associated with the physical health domain of QoL. Openness was independently and positively associated with the psychological and social relationship domains of QoL. BDI scores were significantly and negatively associated with all four domains of the QoL. Persistent pain and joint impairment showed strong associations with all domains in a univariate analysis, but the impact was attenuated after adjusting for psychosocial variables. Personality and depression had strong impacts on QoL independent of physical status in patients with severe haemophilia. Providing psychological screening and intervention are recommended for enhancing QoL in patients with severe haemophilia.

  17. PREVALENCE OF DEPRESSION AND ITS GRADING IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasputina, L; Rasputin, V; Ovcharuk, M; Serhiichuk, O; Broniuk, A

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of our work was to determine a prevalence of depression and its distribution by grades in patients with a coronary heart disease, namely - with the myocardial infarction. The study involved 125 patients of average age 64.2±4.7 years, treated at cardiology department for myocardial infarction. The first stage was a depression screening using PHQ - 2 questionnaire. In case of positive answer to at least one question, we assessed the severity of depression using a PHQ-9 tool. We established, that PHQ-2 questionnaire questions for screening depressive disorders were positively answered by 80 patients (64.3%). Total signs of depression of various severity grades was diagnosed in 68 patients (54.4%). Minimal depression was diagnosed in 25 (36.8%) patients, mild depression - in 20 (29.4%) patients, moderately severe disease - in 16 (23.6%) patients, and severe depression - in 7 (10.2%) patients. The severity of depression was clearly related to age, gender of patients, comorbid diseases, and a history of MI and revascularization.

  18. Metabolic syndrome in drug-naïve patients with depressive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS is found to be higher in patients with depression than in the general population. As there is lack of data from India, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of MS in patients with depression who had never been treated with antidepressants for their depressive disorder and compare the same with a matched group of healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Forty-three drug-naïve patients with depressive disorders and 43 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were assessed for the prevalence of MS as per the consensus definition. Results: The prevalence of MS in patients with depression was 37.2% and was significantly higher than that seen in the healthy controls (16.3%. Increased waist circumference was the most common abnormality in both the study groups. Compared to healthy controls, a significantly higher proportion of patients with depression had abnormal waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, or high blood pressure. Besides 16 patients with depressive disorders having MS, another 53.5% of patients fulfilled one or two criteria of MS. None of the sociodemographic variables was associated with development of MS in patients with depression. Conclusions: Slightly more than one-third of depressed patients who are drug-naïve have MS and this prevalence rate is significantly higher than in healthy controls.

  19. Residual symptoms in patients with partial versus complete remission of a major depressive disorder episode: patterns of painful physical symptoms in depression

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    Harada E

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Harada,1 Yoichi Satoi,2 Toshiaki Kikuchi,3 Koichiro Watanabe,3 Levent Alev,1 Masaru Mimura4 1Medical Science, Medicines Development Unit-Japan, 2Statistical Science, Medicines Development Unit-Japan, Eli Lilly Japan K.K., Kobe, Hyogo, 3Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Objective: The patterns of residual painful physical symptoms (PPS and emotional symptoms among patients with partial remission (PR or complete remission (CR of a major depressive disorder (MDD episode were compared. Methods: This is a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study. Patients who had originally been diagnosed with MDD, were treated with an antidepressant for 12 weeks for that episode, and achieved either PR or CR at study entry were enrolled in the study. Using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D17, PR was defined as a score of ≥8 and ≤18 and CR as a score of ≤7. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF and the HAM-D17.Results: A total of 323 patients (CR =158, PR =165 were included in the study. Patients in the PR group had a higher mean (standard deviation score in the HAM-D17 than those in the CR group (11.8 [3.1] and 4.4 [2.0], respectively. BPI-SF results showed that “at least moderate PPS” (score ≥3 on BPI-SF question 5 was significantly more prevalent among patients with PR than those with CR (37.0% vs 16.5%, respectively; odds ratio =3.04; P<0.001. Presence of pain (any severity was also more prevalent among patients with PR than those with CR (54.5% vs 35.4%, respectively. The HAM-D17 results for individual items indicated that impaired work and activities, depressed mood, psychological and somatic anxiety, and general somatic symptoms were observed in at least 75% of patients with PR.Conclusion: PR was associated with a higher prevalence of at least moderate PPS

  20. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  1. Sputum interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and Salivary cortisol as new biomarkers of depression in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yi-jie; Zhang, Hong-ying; Li, Bei; Wu, Xiao; Lv, Yu-bao; Jin, Hua-liang; Cao, Yu-xue; Sun, Jing; Luo, Qing-li; Gong, Wei-yi; Liu, Bao-jun; Wu, Jin-feng; Shi, Shen-xun; Dong, Jing-cheng

    2013-12-02

    Depression is common among lung cancer patients. Increasing evidence has suggested that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a key role in the pathophysiology of depression as well as cancer. This pilot study investigated the efficacy of sputum interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and salivary cortisol as new markers to support the diagnosis of depression in lung cancer patients. The diurnal rhythms of sputum IL-6, sputum TNF-α and salivary cortisol were measured in lung cancer patients with and without depression as well as depressed controls and healthy controls. The area under the diurnal variation curves (AUC) over the 24h time course and relative diurnal variation (VAR) were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed. Patients with co-morbid depression and lung cancer showed highest level of sputum IL-6 AUC, sputum TNF-α AUC and lowest level of cortisol VAR (Pcortisol VAR demonstrated an optimal cutoff point at 77.8% (AUC=0.94; 95% CI, 0.85-0.98), which is associated with a sensitivity of 82.1% and a specificity of 96.0%. Sputum IL-6 AUC demonstrated a sensitivity of 74.4% and a specificity of 92.0% (AUC=0.81; 95% CI, 0.69-0.90). These findings suggested that higher 24h overall levels of sputum IL-6, TNF-α and flattened diurnal salivary cortisol slopes were associated with depression in lung cancer patients. Sputum IL-6 AUC and salivary cortisol VAR performed best as biomarkers in the diagnosis of depression in lung cancer patients.

  2. Successful antidepressant treatment for five terminally ill cancer patients with major depression, suicidal ideation and a desire for death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugaya, A; Akechi, T; Nakano, T; Okamura, H; Shima, Y; Uchitomi, Y

    1999-11-01

    In the debate on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, we have to exclude terminally ill patients in whom the desire for death is caused by major depression. However, it is still not clear to what degree major depression can be treated by psychiatric intervention in this setting. We evaluated the effect of antidepressant treatment in terminally ill cancer patients. Six cancer patients with suicidal ideas thought to be due to major depression were treated with tricyclic antidepressants. Three had requested terminal sedation to relieve them from their suffering. The median survival of five of these patients was 4 weeks after diagnosis; one was lost to follow-up. The efficacy of the antidepressant treatment was assessed using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). One week after the start of treatment with antidepressants, five of the six patients showed a marked improvement in their mood and showed no further suicidal thoughts or requests for terminal sedation. The average reduction in the HRSD score was 23.4 points (14-38; SD = 9. 9). Antidepressant treatment can be effective in alleviating the desire for death due to major depression, even in terminally ill cancer patients.

  3. A pilot study to assess the level of depression and the coping strategies adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl

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    Gitumoni Konwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer, the second most common cause of death, has become a major health problem. Depression is the most common psychological problem encountered in patients with cancer. The coping skills adopted may affect the mental health of patients. Therefore, this research is undertaken to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by the patients diagnosed with cancer. Materials and methods: A descriptive study to assess the level of depression and coping strategy adopted by cancer patients receiving treatment in Mizoram State Cancer Institute, Aizawl was carried out from April to May 2014 with 30 convenient samples. Depression was assessed by using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS developed by Zigmond and Snaith in 1983. Coping strategy adopted by patients were assessed by revised version of the Ways of Coping Checklist developed by Folkman and Lazarus in 1985. Results: Findings of the study showed that depression was universal to all the cancer patients. Majority of cancer patients (66.5% had moderate depression while 13.26% of the cancer patients had severe depression, and only 6.7% of them reported to have low depression. The most effective coping strategy adopted was reappraisal, followed by distancing. There is significant correlation between depression and reappraisal (r=-0.538, p<0.002, and also with depression and acceptance (r=-0.415, p<0.022 strategies. Conclusion: As depression is universal to all cancer patients, use of appropriate coping strategy is very essential to improve their quality of life. The recognition of coping strategies by health team may enable appropriate information and interventions to be provided at optimal times for each individual.

  4. Relationship between urinary incontinence and quality of life/depression in elderly patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahin-Onat, Sule; Unsal-Delialioğlu, Sibel; Güzel, Ozer; Uçar, Demet

    2014-01-01

    ...) and quality of life/depression in elderly patients. Methods: The study included a total of 109 elderly adults aged 65 years and older, consisting of 44 patients with and 65 patients without UI...

  5. Impact of anxiety symptoms on outcomes of depression: an observational study in Asian patients

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    Novick D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diego Novick,1 William Montgomery,2 Jaume Aguado,3 Xiaomei Peng,4 Josep Maria Haro3 1Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK; 2Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, NSW, Australia; 3Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objective: To investigate the impact of anxiety symptoms on depression outcomes in Asian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD (n=714. Methods: The 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD-17, overall severity, somatic symptoms, and quality of life (QOL (EuroQOL Questionnaire-5 Dimensions [EQ-5D] were assessed at baseline and 3 months. Anxiety was measured using items 10 and 11 from the HAMD-17. Linear, tobit, and logistic multiple regression models analyzed the impact of anxiety symptoms on outcomes. Baseline anxiety was related to age and the presence of pain symptoms at baseline. Results: Regression models showed that a higher level of anxiety was associated with a lower frequency of remission and lower QOL at 3 months. Patients with lower baseline anxiety symptoms had higher remission rates (odds ratio for each point of anxiety symptoms, 0.829 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.723–0.951]. Patients with higher levels of baseline anxiety had a lower QOL at 3 months (a decrease in EQ-5D tariff score for each point of anxiety symptoms, 0.023 [95% CI: 0.045–0.001]. Conclusion: In conclusion, the presence of anxiety symptoms negatively impacts the outcomes of depression. Keywords: depression, anxiety, Asia, observational, outcomes

  6. [Adherence and difficulties related to drug treatment in patients with depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Grazielle; Mercedes, Bruna Paiva do Carmo; Vedana, Kelly Graziani Giacchero; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti

    2014-01-01

    This research verified adherence and knowledge of people with depression regarding prescribed pharmacotherapy, satisfaction with the health team and difficulties related to drug treatment. This is descriptive and cross-sectional study, with quail-quantitative approach. The study included 27 people assisted in an outpatient clinic in the interior of the state of São Paulo - Brazil. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and review of medical records and analyzed using descriptive statistics and content analysis. It was found that 29.6% of patients were no adherent to medication and 51.9% were unaware of the dose of prescribed drugs. Impact of drug therapy in depressive symptoms on self-care, dissatisfaction with effects of psychoactive drugs, lack of support, use of multiple medications and lack of knowledge about the disorder and treatment were reported as difficulties in following drug therapy. This study shows critical factors to the promotion of patient safety in following drug therapy.

  7. Seasonal variation of imipramine binding in the blood platelets of normal controls and depressed patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1988-02-01

    Imipramine binding (IB) was studied in the blood platelets from normal controls and depressed patients over a 4-year period (1981-1984) to determine if seasonal variation was present in Bmax or KD. Bimonthly variation in the Bmax of IB was found in normal controls studied longitudinally. No such variation was found when individual values from normal controls were examined on a monthly or seasonal basis. Bmax in depressed patients showed a significant seasonal, but not monthly, variation. KD of IB varied in normal controls using monthly or seasonal data, but not in the probably more reliable bimonthly data. These results suggest that IB studies comparing groups of subjects should match groups for season of the year or, for greater accuracy, month of the year.

  8. Alterations of serum levels of BDNF-related miRNAs in patients with depression.

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    You-Jie Li

    Full Text Available Depression is a serious and potentially life-threatening mental disorder with unknown etiology. Emerging evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and microRNAs (miRNAs play critical roles in the etiology of depression. Here this study was aimed to identify and characterize the roles of BDNF and its putative regulatory miRNAs in depression. First, we identified that miR-182 may be a putative miRNA that regulates BDNF levels by bioinformatic studies, and characterized the effects of miR-182 on the BDNF levels using cell-based studies, side by side with miR-132 (a known miRNA that regulates BDNF expression. We showed that treatment of miR-132 and miR-182 respectively decreased the BDNF protein levels in a human neuronal cell model, supporting the regulatory roles of miR-132 and miR-182 on the BDNF expression. Furthermore, we explored the roles of miR-132 and miR-182 on the BDNF levels in depression using human subjects by assessing their serum levels. Compared with the healthy controls, patients with depression showed lower serum BDNF levels (via the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and higher serum miR-132 and miR-182 levels (via the real-time PCR. Finally, the Pearson's (or Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated to study whether there was a relationship among the Self-Rating Depression Scale score, the serum BDNF levels, and serum BDNF-related miRNA levels. Our results revealed that there was a significant negative correlation between the SDS scores and the serum BDNF levels, and a positive correlation between the SDS scores and miR-132 levels. In addition, we found a reverse relationship between the serum BDNF levels and the miR-132/miR-182 levels in depression. Collectively, we provided evidence supporting that miR-182 is a putative BDNF-regulatory miRNA, and suggested that the serum BDNF and its related miRNAs may be utilized as important biomarkers in the diagnosis or as therapeutic targets of depression.

  9. On some verbal short-term and working memory properties in patients suffering from clinical depression

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    Lalović Dejan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical depression with verbal short-term memory relation research does not yield unequivocal results. While short-term memory (STM deficits in depressed patients are consistently displayed in working memory (WM and executive attention tasks, for STM passive memorizing tasks this holds less correct. Objective. Primary goal was to collect initial data on depressed patients treated in Serbian institutions WM/ STM. In addition, we estimated the power of WAIS IV WM subtests to discriminate depressed patients from normal subjects. Method. Depressed patients' sample was contrasted with the parallel group in WAIS' IV Arithmetic, Digit Span, and Letter- Number Sequencing; free word recall task, semantic fluency task, without and with category switching. Results. All the WM measures, with the exception of Digit Span Backward score, discriminate depressed from no depressed subjects. On the other hand, STM tasks, with the exception of short-term word free recall, fail to do the same. We suggest explanation for both the exceptions in terms of WM efficiency. WAIS IV Arithmetic, Digit Span Sequencing and Letter-Number Sequencing can be used to discriminate depressed from control subjects. Performance in STM/WM tasks is in moderate to strong negative correlation with depression severity as assessed with the Hamilton scale. Conclusion. STM deficits in the depressed are likely to be observed in tasks requiring executive attention and WM efficiency rather than in standard STM span tasks. The deficits are inertly related to depression severity.

  10. Metformin may produce antidepressant effects through improvement of cognitive function among depressed patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Mi, Jia; Jiang, Qiu-Ming; Xu, Jin-Mei; Tang, Ying-Ying; Tian, Geng; Wang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus and depressive disorders are both common chronic diseases that increase functional disability and social burden. Cognitive impairment is a potentially debilitating feature of depression. Previous evidence indicates that the antidiabetic drug metformin could be suitable for diabetic patients with cognitive impairment. However, there is no direct evidence from clinical studies that metformin treatment improves cognitive function in diabetic patients suffering from depression. In the present study, 58 participants diagnosed with depression and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were recruited and divided into two groups, one treated with metformin and the other treated with placebo for 24 weeks. Cognitive function, depressive behaviour and diabetes improvement were evaluated. Chronic treatment with metformin for 24 weeks improved cognitive performance, as assessed by the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, in depressed patients with T2DM. In addition, metformin significantly improved depressive performance and changed the glucose metabolism in depressed patients with diabetes. Depressive symptoms were negatively correlated with cognitive performance in metformin-treated participants. Furthermore, associations were observed between the parameters of blood glucose metabolism and the depression phenotype. These findings suggest that chronic treatment with metformin has antidepressant behavioural effects and that improved cognitive function is involved in the therapeutic outcome of metformin. The results of the present study also raise the possibility that supplementary administration of antidiabetic medications may enhance the recovery of depression, comorbid with T2DM, through improvements in cognitive performance.

  11. Animal Robot Assisted-therapy for Rehabilitation of Patient with Post-Stroke Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikril Zulkifli, Winal; Shamsuddin, Syamimi; Hwee, Lim Thiam

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the utilization of therapeutic animal robots has expanded. This research aims to explore robotics application for mental healthcare in Malaysia through human-robot interaction (HRI). PARO, the robotic seal PARO was developed to give psychological effects on humans. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a common but severe mood disorder. This study focuses on the interaction protocol between PARO and patients with MDD. Initially, twelve rehabilitation patients gave subjective evaluation on their first interaction with PARO. Next, therapeutic interaction environment was set-up with PARO in it to act as an augmentation strategy with other psychological interventions for post-stroke depression. Patient was exposed to PARO for 20 minutes. The results of behavioural analysis complemented with information from HRI survey question. The analysis also observed that the individual interactors engaged with the robot in diverse ways based on their needs Results show positive reaction toward the acceptance of an animal robot. Next, therapeutic interaction is set-up for PARO to contribute as an augmentation strategy with other psychological interventions for post-stroke depression. The outcome is to reduce the stress level among patients through facilitated therapy session with PARO

  12. Blood Transcriptomic Markers in Patients with Late-Onset Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shigeo; Kurachi, Masashi; Okano, Yoshiko; Sakurai, Noriko; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Harada, Kenichiro; Yamagata, Hirotaka; Matsuo, Koji; Takahashi, Keisuke; Narita, Kosuke; Fukuda, Masato; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Mikuni, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We investigated transcriptomic markers of late-onset major depressive disorder (LOD; onset age of first depressive episode ≥ 50 years) from the genes expressed in blood cells and identified state-dependent transcriptomic markers in these patients. We assessed the genes expressed in blood cells by microarray and found that the expression levels of 3,066 probes were state-dependently changed in the blood cells of patients with LOD. To select potential candidates from those probes, we assessed the genes expressed in the blood of an animal model of depression, ovariectomized female mice exposed to chronic ultra-mild stress, by microarray and cross-matched the differentially expressed genes between the patients and the model mice. We identified 14 differentially expressed genes that were similarly changed in both patients and the model mice. By assessing statistical significance using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), the following 4 genes were selected as candidates: cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector c (CIDEC), ribonuclease 1 (RNASE1), solute carrier family 36 member-1 (SLC36A1), and serine/threonine/tyrosine interacting-like 1 (STYXL1). The discriminating ability of these 4 candidate genes was evaluated in an independent cohort that was validated. Among them, CIDEC showed the greatest discriminant validity (sensitivity 91.3% and specificity 87.5%). Thus, these 4 biomarkers should be helpful for properly diagnosing LOD.

  13. The Effects of Donepezil on 15-Item Geriatric Depression Scale Structure in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

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    Youngsoon Yang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In Alzheimer disease (AD, depression is among the most common accompanying neuropsychiatric symptoms and has different clinical manifestations when compared with early-life depression. In patients with drug-naïve AD, we tried to explore the structure of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15 and the effect of donepezil on these substructures. Methods: GDS15, cognitive function, and activities of daily living function tests were administered to 412 patients with probable AD who had not been medicated before visiting the hospital. Using principal component analysis, three factors were identified. The patients with AD who received only donepezil were retrospectively analyzed and we compared the change of cognition and GDS15 subgroup after donepezil medication. Results: Our study identified three factors and revealed that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale. The Barthel index was significantly correlated with factor 1 (positively and factor 2 (negatively. The Korean version of the MMSE (K-MMSE was significantly correlated with factor 2 and factor 3. Compared to the baseline state, K-MMSE and GDS15 showed significant improvement after taking donepezil. Among GDS15 subgroups, factor 2 and factor 3 showed significant improvement after donepezil treatment. Conclusions: These results suggest that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale and donepezil differentially affects the GDS15 subgroup in AD.

  14. The Effects of Donepezil on 15-Item Geriatric Depression Scale Structure in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Youngsoon; Kwak, Yong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In Alzheimer disease (AD), depression is among the most common accompanying neuropsychiatric symptoms and has different clinical manifestations when compared with early-life depression. In patients with drug-naïve AD, we tried to explore the structure of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15) and the effect of donepezil on these substructures. Methods GDS15, cognitive function, and activities of daily living function tests were administered to 412 patients with probable AD who had not been medicated before visiting the hospital. Using principal component analysis, three factors were identified. The patients with AD who received only donepezil were retrospectively analyzed and we compared the change of cognition and GDS15 subgroup after donepezil medication. Results Our study identified three factors and revealed that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale. The Barthel index was significantly correlated with factor 1 (positively) and factor 2 (negatively). The Korean version of the MMSE (K-MMSE) was significantly correlated with factor 2 and factor 3. Compared to the baseline state, K-MMSE and GDS15 showed significant improvement after taking donepezil. Among GDS15 subgroups, factor 2 and factor 3 showed significant improvement after donepezil treatment. Conclusions These results suggest that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale and donepezil differentially affects the GDS15 subgroup in AD.

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy and aerobic exercise training increased BDNF and ameliorated depressive symptoms in patients suffering from treatment-resistant major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Iraj; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Haghighi, Mohammad; Jahangard, Leila; Bajoghli, Hafez; Gerber, Markus; Pühse, Uwe; Kirov, Roumen; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2014-10-01

    To treat patients suffering from treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (TR-MDD), research has focused on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and aerobic exercise training (AET). Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seems to be key in MDD. The aims of the present study were therefore two-fold, to investigate in a three-arm interventional study the differential effects of ECT, ECT plus AET, and AET alone in patients suffering from TR-MDD on 1. depressive symptoms and 2. 60 patients with TR-MDD (mean age: 31 years; 31.6% female patients) were randomly assigned either to the ECT, ECT + AET, or AET condition. The AET condition consisted of treadmill exercise for 30 min, three times a week. Both depression severity and BDNF levels were assessed at baseline and 4 weeks later. All patients were further treated with an SSRI standard medication. BDNF levels increased over time in all three study conditions. After completion of the intervention program, the ECT group showed significantly higher BDNF levels compared to the ECT + AET and the AET conditions. Depressive symptoms decreased in all three conditions over time. The combination of ECT + AET led to a significantly greater decrease than in either the ECT or AET alone conditions. BDNF levels were not associated with symptoms of depression. The pattern of results suggests that ECT, AET and particularly their combination are promising directions for treatment patients suffering from TR-MDD, and that it remains unclear to what extent BDNF is key and a reliable biomarker for TR-MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of lurasidone vs quetiapine extended-release (XR) in patients with bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Krithika; Meyer, Kellie; O'Day, Ken; Denno, Melissa; Loebel, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder imposes a high economic burden on patients and society. Lurasidone and quetiapine extended-release (XR) are atypical antipsychotic agents indicated for monotherapy treatment of bipolar depression. Lurasidone is also indicated as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate for depressive episodes associated with bipolar disorder. The objective of this analysis was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of lurasidone and quetiapine XR in patients with bipolar depression. A cost-effectiveness model was developed to compare lurasidone to quetiapine XR. The model was based on a US third-party payer perspective over a 3-month time horizon. The effectiveness measure in the model was the percentage of patients achieving remission (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] total score ≤12 by weeks 6-8). The comparison of remission rates was made through an adjusted indirect treatment comparison of lurasidone and quetiapine XR pivotal trials using placebo as the common comparator. Resource utilization for remission vs no remission was estimated from published expert panel data, and resource costs were obtained from a retrospective database study of bipolar I depression patients. Drug costs were estimated using the mean dose from clinical trials and wholesale acquisition costs. Over the 3-month model time period, lurasidone and quetiapine XR patients, respectively, had similar mean numbers of emergency department visits (0.48 vs 0.50), inpatient days (2.1 vs 2.2), and office visits (9.3 vs 9.6). More lurasidone than quetiapine XR patients achieved remission (52.0% vs 43.2%) with slightly higher total costs ($4982 vs $4676), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $3474 per remission. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed lurasidone had an 86% probability of being cost-effective compared to quetiapine XR at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $10,000 per remission. Lurasidone may be a cost-effective option when compared to

  17. The Effect of Atropine on Post-ECT Bradycardia in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

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    Hassan Farashbandi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is utilized for treatment of a range of psychiatric disorders including major depressive disorder (MDD. One of the major complications in using ECT is cardiovascular problems i.e., bradycardia. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of atropine on the pulse rate (PR of the patients under treatment with ECT. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 30 patients with diagnosis of MDD who received atropine before ECT treatment (control group were compared with 30 patients with the same diagnosis without receiving atropine (experimental group under ECT treatment. Both groups received ECT under the same term and condition. The PR of the patients were recorded 7 times (twice before anesthesia and ECT and 5 fixed one min intervals immediately after receiving ECT; for 10 sessions of treatment with ECT (3 times a week. The results were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance. The PR under 50 was the cut off point for differentiating the patients suffering from bradycardia and those without it. Results: Slight increment in PRs for experimental group (patient who did not receive atropine in contrast to control group were observed, but it did not reach a statistically significant level. The gender (male/female did not have different PR. The age of the patients and initial PR (regarded as co-variances did not show significant effect on PR for total sample. Conclusion: There seems to be not necessary to use atropine treatment for depressed patients receiving ECT.

  18. Effect of Fluoxetine on Expression of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor in Patients with Post-stroke Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-liang; WANG Shou-yong; SHI Xiang-song; PAN He-yue; HUANG Wen-zhong; GAO Xuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of lfuoxetine on the expression brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in patients with post-stroke depression (PSD). Methods:A total of 62 patients with ischemic stroke and post depression were divided into PSD group (32 cases) given fluoxetine combined with rehabilitation and Non-PSD group (30 cases) given rehabilitation treatment according to the presence of depression after stroke. The degree of depression, activities of daily living and the motor function were evaluated by Hamilton Depression Scale 17 (HAMD-17), Modified Barthel Index (MBI) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) before and after treatment, respectively. And the levels of BDNF were examined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Before treatment, HAMD-17 score and MBI scores were markedly higher in PSD group than in Non-PSD group (P0.05). After 3, 6 and 12-month treatment, BDNF concentrations in PSD group were signiifcantly higher than in Non-PSD group (P<0.01). Relevant analysis showed that BDNF in patients with PSD was in negative relationship with HAMD-17 (r=-0.784,P=0.000) and in positive association with BMI and FMA (r=0.761,P=0.000;r=0.789,P=0.000). Conclusion: Fluoxetine combined with rehabilitation can regulate depression, improve motor function and activities of daily living through increasing the concentration of BNDF in treating PSD patients.

  19. Evaluation of the Frequency and Related Factors of Depression and Anxiety in Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Receiving Renal Replacement Therapies

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    Bennur ESEN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Anxiety and depression are frequently observed among patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT. Our aim is to evaluate the frequency of depression and anxiety and their association with laboratory parameters, disease activity, performance status and sociodemographic properties of patients receiving hemodialysis (HD or peritoneal dialysis (PD. MATERIAL and METHODS: Laboratory parameters and socio-demographic features of 77 patients on PD and 83 patients on HD were recorded. The psychological status of patients was evaluated with the Beck Anxiety-Depression Scale and the performance status was determined with the Karnofsky Scale. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the frequency and severity of depression and anxiety. The percentage of patients with a university graduate degree, monthly income > 600 TL, and social insurance were significantly higher in the PD group (p<0.01. The frequency of depression was 2.66 times higher among female subjects p:0.02. In the HD group, the frequency of depression in patients with anxiety was 4.74 times higher than in patients without anxiety. CONCLUSION: The present study showed that anxiety and depression are prevalent in patients receiving RRT and especially in female patients and university degree graduates. However, the frequencies were similar between patients on PD and HD. Patients on RRT should be monitored.

  20. A Correlational Study of Spiritual Well-being and Depression in the Adult Cancer Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzman, Hannah; Abraham, Sam

    Depression in adult cancer patients has been widely studied, along with spiritual effects of traumatic events and even spiritual growth after a diagnosis of cancer. There has been limited research determining a direct correlation between spiritual well-being and depression in adult cancer patients. The purpose of this research study was to examine the relationship between spiritual well-being and depression in adult cancer patients. This was a descriptive correlational study using 59 patients older than 18 years from an outpatient cancer center. The researchers hypothesized that patients with a low spiritual well-being score would be more likely to have a high depressive symptom score, thus providing support for a correlation between cancer patient's spiritual well-being and risk of depression. Implications of this study lead to evidence for better screening processes for cancer patients regarding spiritual well-being.

  1. Personality styles in patients with fibromyalgia, major depression and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiles Tore C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is suggested to be a manifestation of depression or affective spectrum disorder. We measured the cognitive style of patients with FMS to assess personality styles in 44 patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS by comparing them with 43 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and 41 healthy controls (HC. Methods Personality styles were measured by the Sociotropy and Autonomy Scale (SAS and the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS. The Structured Clinical interview for DSM Axis I was applied to Axis I disorders, while the Beck Depression Inventory was used to measure depression severity. Results Patients with FMS in general have a sociotropic personality style similar to patients with MDD, and different from HC, but FMS patients without a lifetime history of MDD had a cognitive personality style different from patients with MDD and similar to HC. Conclusion These findings suggest that a depressotypic personality style is related to depressive disorder, but not to FMS.

  2. Recollection deficiencies in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakeford, Justine L; Edelstyn, Nicola M J; Oyebode, Femi; Srivastava, Shrikant; Calthorpe, William R; Mukherjee, Tirthankar

    2010-02-28

    Neuropsychological research suggests that recognition memory (RM) and recall memory are impaired in patients with a major depressive disorder or a dysphoric mood state. This study examines the proposal that abnormalities in recollection (a form of recall) result from a breakdown in frontal strategic memory processes involved in encoding and retrieval, and executive functions linked to reality monitoring, planning, problem-solving, reasoning and decision-making. We investigated two predictions arising from this theory. Firstly, patients diagnosed with a major depressive disorder (MDD) will display a dissociation between (deficient) recollection and (preserved) familiarity. Secondly, if recollection impairments are indicative of a breakdown in prefrontal strategic memory processes which are dependent, at least in part, on executive processes, then an explicit correlational approach predicts that recollection will be positively associated with the severity of executive dysfunction in MDD patients. The remember/know paradigm was used to investigate RM for words and neutral faces in 16 MDD patients and 16 healthy volunteers, matched for age, gender and estimates of premorbid IQ. Measures of executive function included working memory, reasoning and decision-making. Applying the Dual Process Signal Detection interpretation of the remember/know data, the MDD group displayed significant impairments in RM and recollection rates for both verbal and neutral facial memoranda. In contrast, familiarity-aware rates were preserved. There was no evidence of executive dysfunction in the patient group, and little evidence that recollection rates correlated with executive function. Furthermore, a single process signal detection approach suggested that the MDD patients displayed a reduction in sensitivity for RM and remember rates but not know responses. The criteria for detecting studied from unstudied items, and remembering from knowing, were the same in both patient and healthy

  3. Depressive Symptoms are the Main Predictor for Subjective Sleep Quality in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment--A Controlled Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Seidel

    Full Text Available Controlled data on predictors of subjective sleep quality in patients with memory complaints are sparse. To improve the amount of comprehensive data on this topic, we assessed factors associated with subjective sleep quality in patients from our memory clinic and healthy individuals.Between February 2012 and August 2014 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and subjective cognitive decline (SCD from our memory clinic and healthy controls were recruited. Apart from a detailed neuropsychological assessment, the subjective sleep quality, daytime sleepiness and depressive symptoms were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II.One hundred fifty eight consecutive patients (132 (84% MCI patients and 26 (16% SCD patients and 75 healthy controls were included in the study. Pairwise comparison of PSQI scores showed that non-amnestic MCI (naMCI patients (5.4 ± 3.5 had significantly higher PSQI scores than controls (4.3 ± 2.8, p = .003 Pairwise comparison of PSQI subscores showed that naMCI patients (1.1 ± 0.4 had significantly more "sleep disturbances" than controls (0.9 ± 0.5, p = .003. Amnestic MCI (aMCI (0.8 ± 1.2, p = .006 and naMCI patients (0.7 ± 1.2, p = .002 used "sleep medication" significantly more often than controls (0.1 ± 0.6 Both, aMCI (11.5 ± 8.6, p < .001 and naMCI (11.5 ± 8.6, p < .001 patients showed significantly higher BDI-II scores than healthy controls (6.1 ± 5.3. Linear regression analysis showed that the subjective sleep quality was predicted by depressive symptoms in aMCI (p < .0001 and naMCI (p < .0001 patients as well as controls (p < .0001. This means, that more depressive symptoms worsened subjective sleep quality. In aMCI patients we also found a significant interaction between depressive symptoms and global cognitive function (p = .002.Depressive symptoms were the main predictor of subjective sleep quality in MCI

  4. Is the geriatric depression scale a reliable screening tool for depressive symptoms in elderly patients with cognitive impairment?

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    Debruyne, Hans; Van Buggenhout, Michael; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Aries, Marcel; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2009-06-01

    To determine the reliability of the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-30) for the screening of depressive symptoms in dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) as the 'gold standard'. Diagnosed according to strictly applied clinical diagnostic criteria, patients with MCI (n = 156) and probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 247) were included. GDS-30, CSDD, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Global Deterioration Scale were assessed in all patients at inclusion. The AD group was divided in three subgroups: mild AD (MMSE>or=18) (n = 117), moderate AD (MMSEor=10) (n = 89) and severe AD (MMSEdepressive symptoms in MCI but not in AD patients. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Hopelessness, suicide ideation, and depression in chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis or transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Sibela Vasconcelos; Sesso, Ricardo; Diniz, Denise Helena de Madureira Pará

    2015-01-01

    Hopelessness, suicide ideation and depression symptoms affect life quality and expectancy of chronic kidney disease patients. To verify whether there are differences in hopelessness, suicide ideation and depression symptoms between chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis or transplant recipients. We also analyzed the influence of sociodemographic factors in these symptoms. Cross-sectional study in which 50 clinically stable chronic hemodialysis patients and 50 renal transplant patients matched by gender and age. Instruments-Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). BHS: 2% of each group scoring > 8 (p = 1.00). BSI: 4% in hemodialysis and 6% of the transplant patients scoring > 1 (p = 1.000). BDI: 20% in hemodialysis and 12% of transplant patients scoring > 14 (p = 0.275). Patients who did not have a labor activity presented more depressive symptoms (average BDI score: 10.5 vs. 7.3, p = 0.027). Transplant patients from deceased donor presented more depressive symptoms compared with those with transplant from living donors (average BDI score: 11.0 vs. 6.7, p = 0.042). There was no difference in the intensity of hopelessness, suicide ideation and depression symptoms between stable hemodialysis and transplant patients. Not performing a labor activity and receiving the transplant from deceased donor lead to more depressive symptoms. The high prevalence of depressive symptoms and the finding of suicide ideation in both modalities of renal replacement therapy point to the need to monitor and care for those patients.

  6. Depression among Patients with Parkinson's Disease in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    had moderate depression and 16.7% had severe depression. ... 's Disease Society Brain Bank Clinical ... to the 95%confidence interval. ... 21-question multiple-choice self-report ... controls that satisfied the recruitment ..... their quality of life.

  7. A prospective study to compare three depression screening tools in patients who are terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Dennis, Mick; Taylor, Fiona

    2004-01-01

    Depression is a significant symptom for approximately one in four palliative care patients. This study investigates the performance of three screening tools. Patients were asked to verbally rate their mood on a scale of 0-10; to respond "yes" or "no" to the question "Are you depressed?," and to complete the Edinburgh depression scale. They were also interviewed using a semi-structured clinical interview according to DSM-IV criteria. Complete data was available for 74 patients. For the single question, a "yes" answer had a sensitivity of 55% and specificity 74%. The Edinburgh depression scale at a cut-off point of > or =13 had a sensitivity of 70% and specificity of 80%. The verbal mood item with a cut-off point of > or =3 had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 43%. The Edinburgh depression scale proved to be the most reliable instrument for detecting clinical depression in palliative care patients.

  8. Screening for depression in patients with myocardial infarction by general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær; Vestergaard, Mogens; Christensen, Bo;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) is highly prevalent and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Routine screening for post-MI depression is recommended. We studied general practitioners’ practice of screening for post-MI depression and analysed whether...... the screening rate varied among subgroups of MI patients with a particular high risk of depression. Design: Population-based cohort study in the Central Denmark Region. Methods: All patients with a first-time MI in 2009 received a questionnaire 3 months after discharge from hospital. The questionnaire included...... information on anxiety and depression according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), severity of the disease, and smoking habits. The responders’ general practitioners received a questionnaire 1 year after the patient had been discharged from hospital. This questionnaire provided information...

  9. Screening for depression in patients with myocardial infarction by general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, K. K.; Vestergaard, M.; Sondergaard, J.;