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Sample records for deposition studies laboratory

  1. Laboratory Deposition Apparatus to Study the Effects of Wax Deposition on Pipe Magnetic Field Leakage Signals

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    Karim Mohd Fauzi Abd

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate technique for wax deposition detection and severity measurement on cold pipe wall is important for pipeline cleaning program. Usually these techniques are validated by conventional techniques on laboratory scale wax deposition flow loop. However conventional techniques inherent limitations and it is difficult to reproduce a predetermine wax deposit profile and hardness at designated location in flow loop. An alternative wax deposition system which integrates modified pour casting method and cold finger method is presented. This system is suitable to reproduce high volume of medium hard wax deposit in pipe with better control of wax deposit profile and hardness.

  2. GEOPHYSICAL AND LABORATORY STUDIES OF THE SPREAD AND QUALITY OF THE ODUKPANI LIMESTONE DEPOSIT

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    A. E. Akpan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Odukpani limestone deposit has been investigated using geophysical and laboratory techniques with the aim of generating information on its spread and quality. Information generated from the analyses of twenty-six Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES and core drilling data were used in the study. The VES data were acquired in both grid and random patterns in the immediate area of the limestone mineralisation and the adjoining areas using the Schlumberger array was adopted in acquiring the VES data in both grid and random patterns in the limestone mineralized and the adjoining areas. Cored limestone samples were analysed using the Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE method in order to determine their elemental composition and consequently quality. Both manual and computer modeling techniques were used in modeling the VES. Results show that the limestones have limited spread and have high concentration of Ca ((11,200% and K (302,400%. Mean electrical resistivity of the limestone horizon is 405 Ωm which is suggestive of a limestone deposit that is not pure but contaminated with Fe (8,620%, shaly and other contaminants. The limestone deposit is limited in both vertical and lateral extents. Thus the deposit will not favor any large scale mining operation and equipment deployed for its exploitation must be corrosion resistant type.

  3. Study on Microbial Deposition and Contamination onto Six Surfaces Commonly Used in Chemical and Microbiological Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Elena; Donegà, Valentina; Marchetti, Maria Gabriella; Pedrini, Paola; Monticelli, Cecilia; Balbo, Andrea

    2015-07-17

    The worktops in both chemical and microbiological laboratories are the surfaces most vulnerable to damage and exposure to contamination by indoor pollutants. The rate at which particles are deposited on indoor surfaces is an important parameter to determine human exposure to airborne biological particles. In contrast to what has been established for inorganic pollutants, no limit has been set by law for microbial contamination in indoor air. To our knowledge, a comparative study on the effect of surfaces on the deposition of microbes has not been carried out. An evaluation of the microbial contamination of worktop materials could be of crucial importance, both for safety reasons and for the reliability of tests and experiments that need to be carried out in non-contaminated environments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall microbial contamination (fungi, mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria, staphylococci) on six widely used worktop materials in laboratories (glass, stainless steel, fine porcelain stoneware, post-forming laminate, high-performing laminate and enamel steel) and to correlate it with the characteristics of the surfaces. After cleaning, the kinetics of microbial re-contamination were also evaluated for all surfaces.

  4. Study on Microbial Deposition and Contamination onto Six Surfaces Commonly Used in Chemical and Microbiological Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tamburini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The worktops in both chemical and microbiological laboratories are the surfaces most vulnerable to damage and exposure to contamination by indoor pollutants. The rate at which particles are deposited on indoor surfaces is an important parameter to determine human exposure to airborne biological particles. In contrast to what has been established for inorganic pollutants, no limit has been set by law for microbial contamination in indoor air. To our knowledge, a comparative study on the effect of surfaces on the deposition of microbes has not been carried out. An evaluation of the microbial contamination of worktop materials could be of crucial importance, both for safety reasons and for the reliability of tests and experiments that need to be carried out in non-contaminated environments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall microbial contamination (fungi, mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria, staphylococci on six widely used worktop materials in laboratories (glass, stainless steel, fine porcelain stoneware, post-forming laminate, high-performing laminate and enamel steel and to correlate it with the characteristics of the surfaces. After cleaning, the kinetics of microbial re-contamination were also evaluated for all surfaces.

  5. Laboratory studies of immersion and deposition mode ice nucleation of ozone aged mineral dust particles

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    Z. A. Kanji

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation in the atmosphere is central to the understanding the microphysical properties of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. Ambient conditions such as temperature (T and relative humidity (RH, as well as aerosol properties such as chemical composition and mixing state play an important role in predicting ice formation in the troposphere. Previous field studies have reported the absence of sulphate and organic compounds on mineral dust ice crystal residuals sampled at mountain top stations or aircraft based measurements despite the long range transport mineral dust is subjected to. We present laboratory studies of ice nucleation for immersion and deposition mode on ozone aged mineral dust particles for 233 T ns are reported and observed to increase as a function of temperature. We present first results that demonstrate enhancement of the ice nucleation ability of aged mineral dust particles in both the deposition and immersion mode due to ageing. Additionally, these are also the first results to show a suppression of heterogeneous ice nucleation without the condensation of a coating of (inorganic material. In immersion mode, low exposure Ka particles showed enhanced ice activity requiring a median freezing temperature of 1.5 K warmer than that of untreated Ka whereas high exposure ATD particles showed suppressed ice nucleation requiring a median freezing temperature of 3 K colder than that of untreated ATD. In deposition mode, low exposure Ka had ice active fractions of an order of magnitude higher than untreated Ka, where as high exposure ATD had ice active fractions up to a factor of 4 lower than untreated ATD. Based on our results, we present parameterizations in terms of ns(T that can represent ice nucleation of atmospherically aged and non-aged particles for both immersion and deposition mode. We find excellent agreement (to within less than a factor of 2 with field measurements when parameterizations derived from our results are used to

  6. Laboratory studies of immersion and deposition mode ice nucleation of ozone aged mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Kanji

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation in the atmosphere is central to the understanding the microphysical properties of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. Ambient conditions such as temperature (T and relative humidity (RH, as well as aerosol properties such as chemical composition and mixing state play an important role in predicting ice formation in the troposphere. Previous field studies have reported the absence of sulfate and organic compounds on mineral dust ice crystal residuals sampled at mountain top stations or aircraft based measurements despite the long-range transport mineral dust is subjected to. We present laboratory studies of ice nucleation for immersion and deposition mode on ozone aged mineral dust particles for 233 T ns are reported and observed to increase as a function of decreasing temperature. We present first results that demonstrate enhancement of the ice nucleation ability of aged mineral dust particles in both the deposition and immersion mode due to ageing. We also present the first results to show a suppression of heterogeneous ice nucleation activity without the condensation of a coating of (inorganic material. In immersion mode, low ozone exposed Ka particles showed enhanced ice activity requiring a median freezing temperature of 1.5 K warmer than that of untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD particles showed suppressed ice nucleation requiring a median freezing temperature of 3 K colder than that of untreated ATD. In deposition mode, low exposure Ka had ice active fractions of an order of magnitude higher than untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD had ice active fractions up to a factor of 4 lower than untreated ATD. From our results, we derive and present parameterizations in terms of ns(T that can be used in models to predict ice nuclei concentrations based on available aerosol surface area.

  7. Laboratory studies of immersion and deposition mode ice nucleation of ozone aged mineral dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Z. A.; Welti, A.; Chou, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2013-09-01

    Ice nucleation in the atmosphere is central to the understanding the microphysical properties of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. Ambient conditions such as temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH), as well as aerosol properties such as chemical composition and mixing state play an important role in predicting ice formation in the troposphere. Previous field studies have reported the absence of sulfate and organic compounds on mineral dust ice crystal residuals sampled at mountain top stations or aircraft based measurements despite the long-range transport mineral dust is subjected to. We present laboratory studies of ice nucleation for immersion and deposition mode on ozone aged mineral dust particles for 233 < T < 263 K. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of untreated kaolinite (Ka) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles is compared to corresponding aged particles that are subjected to ozone concentrations of 0.4-4.3 ppmv in a stainless steel aerosol tank. The portable ice nucleation counter (PINC) and immersion chamber combined with the Zurich ice nucleation chamber (IMCA-ZINC) are used to conduct deposition and immersion mode measurements, respectively. Ice active fractions as well as ice active surface site densities (ns) are reported and observed to increase as a function of decreasing temperature. We present first results that demonstrate enhancement of the ice nucleation ability of aged mineral dust particles in both the deposition and immersion mode due to ageing. We also present the first results to show a suppression of heterogeneous ice nucleation activity without the condensation of a coating of (in)organic material. In immersion mode, low ozone exposed Ka particles showed enhanced ice activity requiring a median freezing temperature of 1.5 K warmer than that of untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD particles showed suppressed ice nucleation requiring a median freezing temperature of 3 K colder than that of untreated ATD. In deposition mode, low

  8. Laboratory measurements and model sensitivity studies of dust deposition ice nucleation

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    G. Kulkarni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT. These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (−25, −30 and −35 °C, and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (−30 and −35 °C. These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RHice. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from ~18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size. Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within ±2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

  9. Laboratory measurements and model sensitivity studies of dust deposition ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of modeled cloud properties to different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT: onset single angle and probability density function (PDF distribution approaches. These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD particles of 100, 300, and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (−25, −30 and −35 °C, and 400 nm ATD and Kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (−30 and −35 °C. These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on the CNT. For the PDF representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution (mean and standard deviation were determined by fitting the CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RHice. Results show that onset single contact angles are not much different between experiments, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to those environmental conditions (i.e., temperature and dust size. The cloud resolving model simulations show that cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters, particularly to the mean value. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within ±2.0°, while our derived PDF parameters have discrepancies.

  10. Impact of aerosol composition and foliage characteristics on forest canopy deposition rates: A laboratory study

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    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are a major sink for atmospheric aerosols. Hence it has been suggested that (i) increased tree planting in urban areas might lead to a reduction in aerosol particle concentrations and thus a reduction in respiratory conditions and heart complications, and (ii) forests may be responsible for removing a disproportionately large fraction of potentially climate-relevant fine and ultra-fine aerosol particles from the atmosphere. However, larger uncertainties remain with respect to controls on uptake rates for forests. E.g. the deposition flux partitioning between foliage and non-foliage elements, the influence of particle size and composition, the role of leaf surface morphology and stomatal aperture in surface uptake. Improved understanding of the relative importance of these factors and the variability across different tree species should help determine how much of a sink naturally occurring and planted forests can provide downstream of fine particle production. In this study, a sample of trees native to southern Indiana were exposed to ultra-fine aerosol particle populations in a 1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.5 m Teflon chamber. Stable particle size distributions (PSD) with geometric mean diameters (GMD) ranging from 40 to 80 nm were generated from sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and sodium sulfite solutions using a TSI model 3940 Aerosol Generation System (AGS). The aerosol stream was diluted using scrubbed and dried zero air to allow a variation of total number concentration across two orders of magnitude. PSD in the chamber are continuously measured using a TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) comprising an Electrostatic Classifier (EC model 3080) attached to a Long DMA (LDMA model 3081) and a TSI model 3025A Butanol Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) operated with both the internal diffusion loss and multiple charge corrections turned on. The composition of the chamber air was also monitored for carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor

  11. Laboratory studies with cloud-derived Bacterial Cells acting as Ice Nuclei in the Immersion and Deposition Mode

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    Oehm, C.; Chou, C.; Amato, P.; Attard, E.; Delort, A.-M.; Morris, C.; Kiselev, A.; Stetzer, O.; Möhler, O.; Leisner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles play an important role in cloud microphysics. Aerosols of biological origin are a subgroup, and some of them are able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei and thus influence cloud life cycles and the climate. Some bacteria species have been found to act as ice nuclei at relatively high temperatures up to -2 degree Celsius and are therefore of particular importance as "high temperature" ice nuclei. Recently, ice nucleation experiments with bacterial cells from different sources were performed at the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. At the AIDA facility, microphysical cloud processes can be simulated and investigated in laboratory at realistic atmospheric cloud conditions. Different ice nucleation active (INA) bacteria strains were isolated from cloud water, glacier melt water and phyllosphere and examined in AIDA experiments. The living cells were suspended in nanopure or artificial cloud water and injected into the cloud chamber through a dispersion nozzle. The injected droplets evaporated in the chamber and the bacterial cells were transformed into the aerosol phase. After the spraying, the cloud formation was started by expansion cooling. Experiments were performed in the temperature range from -2 down to -20 degree Celsius. Detailed measurements of the number concentration and size distribution of the aerosol particles as well as of the droplets and ice particles were carried out during the AIDA experiments. A minor fraction of the bacteria cells was observed to act as ice nuclei in the immersion nucleation mode at higher temperatures as well as in the deposition nucleation mode at lower temperatures. The ice activity started at -6 degree Celsius. The most efficient INA bacteria species were Pseudomonas syringae 32b74 and Pseudomonas fluorescens Antarctica1. The ice active number fraction with respect to the cells varied from 0,01 to 0,1, and it does not change at different

  12. Laboratory and Performance Studies of Anti-wear Coatings Deposited on Nitrided Surfaces of Tools used in an Industrial Hot Die Forging Process

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    Hawryluk, Marek; Widomski, Paweł; Smolik, Jerzy; Kaszuba, Marcin; Ziemba, Jacek; Gronostajski, Zbigniew

    2017-04-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory studies performed on produced anti-wear coatings as well as the results of performance tests conducted on tools with these coatings in industrial conditions, in the process of hot die forging. Three different coatings were selected: AlCrTiSiN, Cr/CrN and AlCrTiN, deposited by means of the vacuum-arc method on test samples as well as forging tools used in the hot forging process of a lid. The first part of the paper discusses the results of the studies performed in laboratory conditions, which included: surface morphology by means of SEM, hardness and Young modulus measurements, determination of the chemical composition by means of the EDS method, adhesion tests by means of the scratch method and tribological tests by means of the ball-on-disk method. The obtained results were correlated and applied in the analysis of the performance tests on forging punches with these coatings at an early stage of their performance (up to 4000 produced forgings), which were tested on 19 tools, of which 3 representatives were selected for each coating. A thorough analysis was performed of the wear phenomena and mechanisms and the manner of wear of hybrid layers as well as their resistance to the particular destructive mechanisms. Based on the performed laboratory and performance studies as well as their analysis, it was possible to select the optimal hybrid layer, which enables an increase in the durability of forging tools used in industrial hot die forging processes. The preliminary results showed that the best results for the whole working surface of the tool were obtained for the Cr/CrN layer, which characterizes in high adhesion as well as a lower Young modulus and hardness. In the case of high pressures and the correlated friction, better results were obtained for the AlCrTiN coating, which, besides its good adhesion properties, also exhibited the highest frictional resistance.

  13. Laboratory study of TLEs

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    Kochkin, P.; Van Deursen, A.; Ebert, U.

    2014-12-01

    Sprites are high-altitude kilometre-scale electrical discharges that happen above thundercloud. Pilot systems are pre-breakdown phenomena that usually attributed to stepped leader development. In Eindhoven University of Technology we investigate meter-scale laboratory discharges looking for similarities with natural lightning and its related phenomena. Negative lightning possesses step-like propagation behaviour which is associated with space leader formation in front of its main leader. Meter-scale laboratory sparks also develop via formation of a space stem that transforms into a pilot system and finally develops into a space leader in longer gaps. With ns-fast photography we investigated the pilot system formation and found striking similarities with high-altitude sprites. But sprites are different in size, environment and polarity. Laboratory pilot barely reaches 70 cm and develops in STP air, while high-altitude sprites reaches ionosphere stretching for dozens of kilometres. Also sprites are assumed to be of opposite to the pilot polarity. Besides that, the pilots are directly involved in x-ray generation in long laboratory sparks. The detailed pilot system development process will be shown, in particular focusing on similarities with natural sprites. Basic properties of the x-ray emission will be presented and discussed.

  14. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  15. Laboratory study on the adsorption of Mn(2+) on suspended and deposited amorphous Al(OH)(3) in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wendong; Zhang, Xiaoni; Wang, Hongping; Wang, Xiaochang; Zhou, Lichuan; Liu, Rui; Liang, Yuting

    2012-09-01

    Manganese (II) is commonly present in drinking water. This paper mainly focuses on the adsorption of manganese on suspended and deposited amorphous Al(OH)(3) solids. The effects of water flow rate and water quality parameters, including solution pH and the concentrations of Mn(2+), humic acid, and co-existing cations on adsorption were investigated. It was found that chemical adsorption mainly took place in drinking water with pHs above 7.5; suspended Al(OH)(3) showed strong adsorption capacity for Mn(2+). When the total Mn(2+) input was 3 mg/L, 1.0 g solid could accumulate approximately 24.0 mg of Mn(2+) at 15 °C. In drinking water with pHs below 7.5, because of H(+) inhibition, active reaction sites on amorphous Al(OH)(3) surface were much less. The adsorption of Mn(2+) on Al(OH)(3) changed gradually from chemical coordination to physical adsorption. In drinking water with high concentrations of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(3+), and HA, the removal of Mn(2+) was enhanced due to the effects of co-precipitation and adsorption. In solution with 1.0 mg/L HA, the residual concentration of Mn(2+) was below 0.005 mg/L, much lower than the limit value required by the Chinese Standard for Drinking Water Quality. Unlike suspended Al(OH)(3), deposited Al(OH)(3) had a much lower adsorption capacity of 0.85 mg/g, and the variation in flow rate and major water quality parameters had little effect on it. Improved managements of water age, pipe flushing and mechanical cleaning were suggested to control residual Mn(2+). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Laboratory Plasma Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-30

    arrVanemat is electron beam loses an amount of energy corresponding to shown in frig. 1. The VERA pulseline accelerato (V-0.6- the capacitive voltage drop...the finite transverse disk, similar to that studied in Subsection 4.&. Over the size, how well is the diffractionless property preserved . same distance...Boeing Aerospace Lean. VA, USA. Company (RAC) is alo shown. Elsevier Science Publishers B.V. (North-Holland) IlL THEORY 9 478 C. . Rob R . Haf•z / Electron

  17. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

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    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation

  18. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation

  19. EROSION RATE OF RESERVOIR DEPOSIT AS REVEALED BY LABORATORY EXPERIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Amar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction of dams and reservoirs in a river can give significant impacts on its flow of water and sediment, and can cause long-term morphological changes on the river. Reservoir sedimentation can reduce a reservoir’s effective flood control volume, and in some severe cases can cause overtopping during floods. Sediment deposition against a dam can reduce its stability, and affect the operation of low-level outlet works, gates, and valves. The abrasive action of sediment particles can roughen the surface of release facilities and can cause cavitations and vibration. Sedimentation can also affect a reservoir’s water quality, and reduce its flood control, water supply, hydropower, and recreation benefits. Consequently, taking sedimentation into consideration not only in the planning and design, but also in the operation and maintenance of a dam and reservoir is important. Keywords: Erosion rate, reservoir deposit, shear stress.

  20. New reactors for laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berty, J.M.

    1978-02-01

    Recent developments in design of laboratory and bench-scale reactors reflect mostly the developments in reaction engineering; that is the improved understanding of physical and chemical rate limiting processes, their interactions, and their effects on commercial-scale reactor performance. Whether a laboratory reactor is used to study the fundamentals of a commercial process or for pure scientific interest, it is important to know what physical or chemical process is limiting or influencing the rate and selectivity. To clarify this, a definition is required of the regime where physical influences exist, and study the intrinsic kinetics at conditions where physical processes do not affect the rate. Reactors are illustrated whose design was influenced by the above considerations. These reactors produce results which are independent of the reactors in which they were measured, and which can be scaled up with up-to-date reaction engineering techniques.

  1. Extrapolation modeling of aerosol deposition in human and laboratory rat lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martonen, T.B.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory test animals are often used as surrogates in exposure studies to assess the potential threat to human health following inhalation of airborne contaminants. To aid in the interpretation and extrapolation of data to man, dosimetric considerations need to be addressed. Therefore, a mathematical model describing the behavior and fate of inhaled particulate matter within the respiratory tracts of man and rats has been developed. In the computer simulations, the CO2 concentrations of inhalation exposure chamber atmospheres are controlled to produce desired breathing patterns in the rat which mimic human breathing patterns as functions of physical activity levels. Herein, deposition patterns in human and rat lung airways are specifically examined as functions of respiratory intensities and particle parameters. The model provides a basis for the re-evaluation of data from past experiments, and, perhaps most importantly, permits new inhalation exposure tests to be designed and conducted in a sound scientific manner regarding this endpoint: the extrapolation of results to human conditions.

  2. Post-depositional changes in snow isotope content: preliminary results of laboratory experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ekaykin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic content of the snow and firn thickness is assumed to be altered significantly due to the post-depositional (PD mass- and isotope exchange with the atmospheric water vapor. If so, these effects should be accounted for in the ice core-based isotope-temperature paleo-reconstructions. In order to study the intensity of the PD processes we set up a series of laboratory experiments. In this paper we describe in detail the experimental technique and briefly overview preliminary results. It is shown that the PD modifications in the upper layer of snow thickness are noticeably strong even under such a low temperature as −35°C (the value typical for the Central Antarctic summer. It is demonstrated that the PD isotopic changes in snow can be approximated as a linear function of the relative mass loss due to snow sublimation. Possible applications for improving the isotope-temperature paleo-reconstructions are shortly discussed.

  3. Predictive models for deposition of inhaled diesel exhaust particles in humans and laboratory species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.P.; Xu, G.B. (State Univ. of New York at Buffalo, Amherst (USA))

    1987-01-01

    Mathematical and computer models of the respiratory tracts of human beings and of laboratory animals (rats, hamsters, guinea pigs) were used to estimate the deposition patterns of inhaled diesel exhaust particles from automobile emissions. Our goal was to be able to predict the relation between exposure to diesel exhaust particles and the deposition of these particles in the lungs of humans of various ages. Diesel exhaust particles are aggregates with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of approximately 0.2 micron. Their actual size depends on the conditions under which they are generated. Using an appropriate particle model, we derived mathematical expressions that describe the effects of diffusion, sedimentation, impaction, and interception on the deposition of these particles. Because of their small size, we found that most diesel exhaust particles deposited through diffusion, and that the role of the other mechanisms was minor. Anatomical models of the human lung from birth to adulthood, as well as models of the lungs of laboratory species were formulated mathematically using available morphometric data. We used these lung models, together with the corresponding ventilation conditions of each species, to calculate deposition of diesel exhaust particles in the lungs. Under normal breathing conditions, we calculated that 7 to 13 percent (depending on particle size) of inhaled diesel exhaust particles deposit in the alveolar region of the adult human lung. Although the breathing mode (nose or mouth breathing) did not appear to affect alveolar deposition, increasing the minute ventilation increased alveolar deposition significantly. The calculated deposition patterns for diesel exhaust particles in younger humans (under age 25) were similar.

  4. Laboratories practice to transducers study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Romero Felizardo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to gather a collection of practical laboratory experiences , to discover the physical principles of different types of electrical transducers , and to compare them with theoretical models.

  5. Laboratory Studies Of Circumstellar Carbonaceous Grain Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2014-06-01

    The study of the formation processes of dust is essential to understand the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar (IS) chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation processes of carbonaceous dust. We report the progress that was recently achieved in this domain using NASA Ames’ COSmIC facility (Contreras & Salama 2013, ApJS, 208, 6). PAHs are important chemical building blocks of IS dust. They are detected in IDPs and in meteoritic samples. Additionally, observational, laboratory, and theoretical studies have shown that PAHs are an important, ubiquitous component of the ISM. The formation of PAHs from smaller molecules has not been extensively studied. Therefore, we have performed laboratory experiments to study the dynamic processes of carbon grain formation, starting from the smallest hydrocarbon molecules into the formation of larger PAH and further into nanograins. Studies of IS dust analogs formed from a variety of PAH and hydrocarbon precursors as well as species that include the atoms O, N, and S, have recently been performed in our laboratory using the COSmIC facility to provide conditions that simulate IS and circumstellar environments. The species formed in the COSmiC chamber through a pulsed discharge nozzle plasma source are detected and characterized with a cavity ringdown spectrometer coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, thus providing both spectroscopic and ion mass information in-situ. Analysis of solid soot particles was also conducted using scanning electron microscopy at the UCSC/NASA Ames’ MACS facility. The SEM analysis of the deposition of soot from methane and acetylene precursors seeded in argon plasmas provide examples on the types of nanoparticles and micrograins that are produced in these gas mixtures under our experimental conditions. From these measurements, we derive information on

  6. Propagation and deposition mechanisms of dense pyroclastic density currents: insights from analogue laboratory experiments. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, O.; Montserrat, S.; Niño, Y.; Tamburrino, A.

    2010-12-01

    Analogue laboratory experiments on air-particle flows represent a useful tool to investigate the mechanisms of propagation and deposition of dense (or the dense part of) pyroclastic density currents. In this context, we carried out experiments in the dam-break configuration and studied the emplacement processes of analogue biphasic currents generated from the quasi-instantaneous release of fluidized columns of fine (80 µm) particles. The low permeability of the granular material permitted relatively slow diffusion of the initial pore pressure within the flows until they came to halt. Analysis of the flow kinematics and comparison with flows of water in the same apparatus revealed that the air-particle currents propagated in two distinct stages. They behaved as their inertial water counterparts for most their emplacement, as both types of flows had the same morphology and propagated at constant front velocity U~√(2gh), h being the initial height of the granular column. This occurred as long as the height of the collapsing fluidized columns was higher than the that of the resultant flows, thus generating a driving pressure gradient. This fluid-inertial behavior suggested that the pore fluid pressure was high during propagation of the mixture. In order to check this hypothesis, we carried out non invasive measurements of the pore fluid pressure at the base of the air-particle flows and made correlation of the pressure signal with the flow structure from analyses of high speed videos. The flow structure consisted of a sliding head that caused underpressure relative to ambient conditions and whose magnitude correlated with the flow velocity. The flow head was followed by a body that generated overpressure and at the base of which a deposit aggraded at a nearly constant rate. Both the flow head and body were sheared pervasively as the internal velocity increased upwards. The combination of pressure advection from the source and relatively slow pressure diffusion

  7. Predictive models for deposition of inhaled diesel exhaust particles in humans and laboratory species. Research report, July 1984-January 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.P.; Xu, G.B.

    1987-07-01

    A deposition model for diesel-exhaust particles was formulated mathematically from available scientific data, and was used to predict the deposition of particles in the airways of laboratory animals and of humans of different ages. In addition, a lung-growth model was formulated for humans, from infancy to adulthood, to predict the effect of age on deposition. The investigators predicted from their models that: (1) deposition in the alveoli is markedly affected by changes in the size distribution of particles; (2) nose- versus mouth-breathing had little effect on deposition in the alveoli; (3) increased minute ventilation substantially increased the rate of particle deposition; and (4) age (in humans) influenced the levels of deposition observed in the unciliated regions of the airways (the highest levels of deposition occurred in infants under two years, decreased in children over two years, and decreased again in adults aged 25 years or older); and (5) the deposition rate in laboratory animals was higher than in humans of all ages.

  8. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph;

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [" Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis...... in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate (15N, 17O, and 18O) provide...... additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters...

  9. Analysis and Interpretation of the Field and Laboratory Geophysical Measurements of Black-Sand Beach Deposits, East Rosetta, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. El-Sadek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the analysis and interpretation of the results of field geophysical survey and laboratory geophysical measurements. The study of the magnetic and electrical methods was selected because the beach sands contain many minerals that have magnetic and electric properties. Analysis and interpretation of the field and laboratory magnetic and geoelectric maps demonstrated that the investigated beach-alluvial deposits can be subdivided according to their magnetic and geoelectric properties into three main zones striking nearly parallel to the shoreline of the Mediterranean Sea at the study area. The northern zone is more enriched in black sands than the central or southern zones. Field and laboratory magnetic susceptibility measurements provided very useful maps for the concentration of heavy minerals. The deep-seated magnetic response was calculated at an average depth of 239.6 m, while the near-surface magnetic responses were computed at average depths of 9.1, 57.9, and 81.8 m, respectively. The correlation between the geophysical features, recorded on the total magnetic field intensity, the electric resistivity, the IP chargeability, and the calculated metal factor, was found to agree to a great extent. The heavymineral concentration was found to decrease with depth. However, the heavyminerals show parallel zones below the surface, suggesting similar sedimentation environments.

  10. A unique laboratory test rig reduces the need for offshore tests to combat calcium naphthenate deposition in oilfield process equipment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediaas, Heidi; Grande, Knut; Hustad, Britt-Marie; Hoevik, Kim Reidar; Kummernes, Hege; Nergaard, Bjoern; Vindstad, Jens Emil

    2006-03-15

    Producing and refining high-TAN crude oils introduces a number of challenges, among which calcium naphthenate deposition in process facilities is the most serious production issue. Until recently, the only option for studying chemicals and process parameters in order to prevent naphthenate deposition has been field tests. Statoil has now developed a small scale pilot plant where these experiments can be performed in the laboratory at Statoil's Research and Technology Center in Trondheim, Norway. The results from the pilot plant are in full agreement with the extensive naphthenate experience obtained from almost 9 years operation of the Heidrun oilfield. The design and operational procedures for this test facility are based on the recent discovery by Statoil and ConocoPhillips of the ARN acid. The ARN acid is a prerequisite for calcium naphthenate deposition. The new continuous flow pilot plant, the Naphthenate Rig, is used to develop new environmental friendly naphthenate inhibitors and to optimize process operating conditions. Since it operates on real crudes the need for field tests in qualifying new naphthenate inhibitors is reduced. To the best of our knowledge, the rig is the first of its kind in the world. (Author)

  11. Laboratory Studies of Ice Nucleation on Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect human respiratory health, atmospheric transport, and global climate. We have performed laboratory studies of the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (Basaltic Ash, Guatemala), Soufriere Hills (Andesetic Ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Rhyolitic Ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. We find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.1. For immersion freezing, however, only the Taupo ash exhibited efficient heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  12. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  13. Bodies in flowing plasmas - Laboratory studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review of early rudimentary laboratory studies of bodies in flowing, rarefied plasmas is presented (e.g., Birkeland, 1908), along with a discussion of more recent parametric studies conducted in steady plasma wind tunnels, which includes the study by Hall et al. (1964), in which a strong ion density enhancement in the center of the ion void created downstream from the body was observed. Good agreement was found between the experimental results and theoretical calculations which omit ion thermal motion. Examples in which in situ data on the interaction between satellites and the ionospheric plasma have been elucidated by the laboratory results are presented, and include evidence for a midwake axial ion peak, and ion current density in the near-wake region. The application of the ionospheric laboratory to basic space plasma physics is discussed, and its application to some types of solar system plasma phenomena is illustrated.

  14. Quality study of a fedspar deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taboada, J.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a pegmatite mineral deposit composed by some veins of a length between 50 and 800 meters and a width of almost 15 meters. With the purpose to evaluate the potential exploitation, we have characterized the quality of the selling product, through a sampling procedure, granulometric classification, magnetic separation, flotation process and mineralogical analysis. In order to establish the more able flotation process, we have tested different methods, that we also include here. Later on, and with the finality to establish the selling feldspar percentage in the deposit, we realized a geostatic study in order to identify, not only the different qualities but also its distribution in the deposit.

    Este trabajo describe un yacimiento de pegmatita compuesto por varios filones, que varían entre 50 y 800 metros de longitud y casi 15 metros de ancho. Con el fin de evaluar el potencial de explotación, se caracteriza la calidad del producto vendible. Esto se lleva a cabo mediante un procedimiento de muestreo, clasificación granulométrica, separación magnética, proceso de flotación y análisis mineralógico. Para establecer el proceso de flotación más eficaz, se ha experimentado con varios procedimientos, cuya breve descripción se incluye. Posteriormente, y con el fin de establecer el porcentaje de feldespato vendible en el yacimiento, se realizó un estudio geoestadístico para identificar tanto las categorías de calidad como su distribución en el yacimiento.

  15. Acid deposition study in the Asian countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soon, Ting-Kueh [Tunku Abdul Rahman College, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Lau, Wai-Yoo [Malaysian Scientific Association, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1996-12-31

    The Association of South East Asian Nations or ASEAN is a regional association of seven countries, namely Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei and Vietnam, located at the south eastern part of the Asian continent. Together with the East Asian States of Japan, China, Korea and Taiwan, this part of the world is experiencing rapid economic growth, especially in the last decade. Rapid industrialization has resulted in an increased demand for energy in the manufacturing and transport sectors, and also for infrastructure development. This has led to a significant increase in gaseous emissions and a corresponding increase in atmospheric acidity. Acid deposition study in the ASEAN countries began in the mid-70s when Malaysia first started her acid rain monitoring network in 1976. This was followed closely by Singapore and the other ASEAN countries in the 80s. By now all ASEAN countries have their own acid rain monitoring networks with a number of these countries extending the monitoring to dry deposition as well.

  16. VDTs: Field levels, epidemiology, and laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavet, R.; Tell, R.A. (Richard Tell Associates, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (USA))

    1991-07-01

    As the use of video display terminals (VDTs) has expanded, questions have been raised as to whether working at a VDT affects the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome. A particular focus for these questions has been the very low frequency (VLF) magnetic field produced by a VDT's horizontal deflection coil. VDTs also produce VLF electric fields, extremely low frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields, and static electric fields, Ten studies of pregnancy outcome in VDT operators have been conducted in six countries, and with one exception, none has concluded that magnetic fields from VDTs may predispose pregnant operators to spontaneous abortion or congenital malformation. The epidemiologic studies conducted thus far do not provide a basis for concluding that VDT work and adverse pregnancy outcome are associated. Studies of fetal resorptions and malformations in rodents exposed to VLF magnetic fields have produced inconsistent findings. Two laboratories in Sweden that studied mice have reported positive results, one laboratory showing field-related malformations (but not resorptions) and the other showing field-related resorptions (but not malformations). Two Canadian laboratories have reported negative results in rats and mice. Studies of avian embryos have also yielded inconsistent results, but lacking a maternal-fetal placental interface, avian embryos are a questionable model for evaluating human reproductive risks. Finally, VLF electric and magnetic fields measured at the operator position are in compliance with field strength standards and guidelines that have been established around the world. 55 refs.

  17. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Studies on initiation, growth and sintering in the formation of utility boiler deposits: Topical technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Austin, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    Three laboratory-scale devices were utilized to investigate the mechanisms of the initiation, growth and sintering process involved in the formation of boiler deposits. Sticking apparatus investigations were conducted to study deposit initiation by comparing the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on four types of steel-based heat exchanger materials under the conditions found in a utility boiler and an entrained slagging gasifier. In addition, the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on a reduced steel surface were investigated. All the ash drops studied in this investigation were produced from bituminous coals.

  18. Prevalence of amyloid deposition in long standing rheumatoid arthritis in Iranian patients by abdominal subcutaneous fat biopsy and assessment of clinical and laboratory characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setarehshenas Roya

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study was aimed at determining the prevalence of secondary amyloidosis in a group of Iranian patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA, and the assessment of its correlation with the clinical and laboratory findings and data. Method A total number of 220 patients (167 female and 53 male with a minimum five-year history of RA were selected. Congo red staining method was used for staining the specimens obtained by abdominal subcutaneous fat biopsy (ASFB method. All of the specimens were examined for apple-green birefringence under polarized light microscope. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of the patients were assessed. Chi-square test and unpaired student's t-test were run for intergroup comparisons. Results Amyloid deposition test yielded positive results in 15 out of the 220 cases (6.8% examined by the ASFB technique. Thirteen patients were found to have minimal amyloid deposits. Of all the clinically significant cases, 8 (53% presented with proteinuria, and 7 cases (46.6% had severe constipation. Conclusion The prevalence of fat amyloid deposits in Iranian patients with RA is low. In up to half of the study group the deposits were subclinical. Follow up studies are required to determine whether this subclinical amyloidosis can develop into full-blown clinically significant amyloidosis.

  19. Laboratory studies in ultraviolet solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Kohl, J. L.; Gardner, L. D.; Raymond, J. C.; Smith, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    The research activity comprised the measurement of basic atomic processes and parameters which relate directly to the interpretation of solar ultraviolet observations and to the development of comprehensive models of the component structures of the solar atmosphere. The research was specifically directed towards providing the relevant atomic data needed to perform and to improve solar diagnostic techniques which probe active and quiet portions of the solar chromosphere, the transition zone, the inner corona, and the solar wind acceleration regions of the extended corona. The accuracy with which the physical conditions in these structures can be determined depends directly on the accuracy and completeness of the atomic and molecular data. These laboratory data are used to support the analysis programs of past and current solar observations (e.g., the Orbiting solar Observatories, the Solar Maximum Mission, the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount, and the Naval Research Laboratory's rocket-borne High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph). In addition, we attempted to anticipate the needs of future space-borne solar studies such as from the joint ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. Our laboratory activities stressed two categories of study: (1) the measurement of absolute rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination and electron impact excitation; and (2) the measurement of atomic transition probabilities for solar density diagnostics. A brief summary of the research activity is provided.

  20. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ANDALIN, AN INSECT GROWTH REGULATOR INTERFERING WITH CUTICLE DEPOSITION, AGAINST MOSQUITO LARVAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N REHIMI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Andalin, a benzoylphenylurea (BPU derivative, was evaluated on Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae. Treatment was made on newly 3rd- and 4th instar larvae for 24 h. The compound exhibited insecticidal activity and mortality occured after earlier inhibition of their development or by their inability to complete their ecdysis. Treatment resulted in a significant larvicidal effect and in a inhibition of adult emergence. Moreover, the compound disturbed growth and development since several morphological types and an increase in the duration of larval stage were observed. Histological study conducted on 4th instar larval integument, showed that Andalin caused a significant reduction in the thickness of cuticles secreted compared to controls. Thus, Andalin prevent molting in C. pipiens by interfering with cuticle deposition confirming the primary mode of action of this BPU insecticide.

  1. Laboratory studies of briquetting and coking of hard brown coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollenberg, R.; Basanshaw, B.

    1988-01-01

    Assesses feasibility of producing lumpy, high strength coke from hard brown coal unsuitable for conventional briquetting and coking technologies. Laboratory studies used brown coal with 11.5 to 23.5% ash content and 11.8 to 48% coal moisture from the Adun-tschulun, Scharin-gol, Baga-nur and Nalaich deposits in Mongolia. Two experimental briquetting technologies (briquetting of pregranulated coal dust, briquetting of dried coal from slurry comminution) were applied. Resulting briquets were coked at maximum 1,000 C temperature. Graphs provide briquetting and coking results. Influence of major briquetting and coking parameters is evaluated. The highest briquet compression strength obtained ranged between 15.2 and 34.3 MPa, the highest coke compression strength was 32.0 up to 87.0 MPa. Studies proved that suitable coke for use in the metallurgical and chemical industry can be produced from various types of hard brown coal. 6 refs.

  2. Pb Isotope Study of Some Nonferrous Metallic Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on Pb-Pb isochron data of more than 40 Precambrian polymetallic deposits, the authors consider that there are four mineralization periods for the Precambrian copper deposits in China, and the major copper deposits were formed at about 1800 Ma; there are three mineralization periods for gold deposits formed from Archaean to Proterozoic. By studying hundreds of lead isotope data from some Mesozoic continental subvolcanic Cu and Ag polymetallic deposits and fine-disseminated gold deposits, the authors found that the calculation based on the lead single-stage evolution model or two-stage evolution model cannot give the true ore-forming ages but can provide more information about mineralization and material sources of the deposits.

  3. Solid Organic Deposition During Gas Injection Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandekar, Abhijit Y.; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2000-01-01

    Recently a series of first contact miscibility (swelling) experiments have been performed on undersaturated light and heavy oils using LPG rich and methane rich injection gases, in which solid organic deposition was observed. A compositional gradient in the oils during the gas injection process w...

  4. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies on the zero G cloud physics laboratory are reported. This program involves the definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineations of a set of candidate experiments that must utilize the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity.

  5. Deposition of hematite particles on alumina seal faceplates of nuclear reactor coolant pumps: Laboratory experiments and industrial feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefèvre Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR, the dynamic sealing system in reactor coolant pumps is ensured by mechanical seals whose ceramic parts are in contact with the cooling solution. During the stretch-out phase in reactor operation, characterized by low boric acid concentration, the leak-off flow has been observed to abnormally evolve in industrial plants. The deposition of hematite particles, originating from corrosion, on alumina seals of coolant pumps is suspected to be the cause. As better understanding of the adhesion mechanism is the key factor in the prevention of fouling and particle removal, an experimental study was carried out using a laboratory set-up. With model materials, hematite and sintered alumina, the adhesion rate and surface potentials of the interacting solids were measured under different chemical conditions (solution pH and composition in analogy with the PWR ones. The obtained results were in good agreement with the DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey- Overbeek theory and used as such to interpret this industrial phenomenon.

  6. Density- and viscosity-stratified gravity currents: Insight from laboratory experiments and implications for submarine flow deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy, L. A.; Peakall, J.; Talling, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Vertical stratification of particle concentration is a common if not ubiquitous feature of submarine particulate gravity flows. To investigate the control of stratification on current behaviour, analogue stratified flows were studied using laboratory experiments. Stratified density currents were generated by releasing two-layer glycerol solutions into a tank of water. Flows were sustained for periods of tens of seconds and their velocity and concentration measured. In a set of experiments the strength of the initial density and viscosity stratification was increased by progressively varying the lower-layer concentration, CL. Two types of current were observed indicating two regimes of behaviour. Currents with a faster-moving high-concentration basal region that outran the upper layer were produced if CL < 75%. Above this critical value of CL, currents were formed with a relatively slow, high-concentration base that lagged behind the flow front. The observed transition in behaviour is interpreted to indicate a change from inertia- to viscosity-dominated flow with increasing concentration. The reduction in lower-layer velocity at high concentrations is explained by enhanced drag at low Reynolds numbers. Results show that vertical stratification produces longitudinal stratification in the currents. Furthermore, different vertical and temporal velocity and concentration profiles characterise the observed flow types. Implications for the deposit character of particle-laden currents are discussed and illustrated using examples from ancient turbidite systems.

  7. Laboratory study of volcanic ash electrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alois, Stefano; Merrison, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Electrostatic forces play an important role in the dynamics of volcanic plumes, for example in ash dispersion and aggregation phenomena. Field measurements of ash electrification are often technically challenging due to poor access and there lacks an accepted physical theory to describe the electrical charge exchange which occurs during particle contact. The goal of the study is to investigate single particle electrification under controlled conditions using advanced laboratory facilities. A novel technique is presented, based on the use of a laser based velocimeter. Here an electric field is applied and the field-induced drift velocity of (micron-sized) ash grains is measured as well as the particles fall velocity. This allows the simultaneous determination of a suspended grains size and electrical charge. The experiments are performed in a unique environmental wind tunnel facility under controlled low-pressure conditions. Preliminary results of particle electrification will be presented.

  8. A laboratory study of breaking waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaros³aw Têgowski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some aspects of the wave-breaking phenomenon. The objectives were to study wave-breaking criteria, and the probability of whitecap coverage under fully controlled wave conditions. An additional task was to in vestigate the characteristic spectral features of the noise produced by breaking waves and the acoustic energy generated during wave breaking events. A controlled experiment was carried out in the Ocean Basin Laboratory at MARINTEK, Trondheim (Norway. Waves were generated by a computer-controlled multi-flap wave maker, which reproduced a realistic pattern of the sea surface for the prescribed spectra. Using wave staff recordings and photographic techniques, correlations between the breaking parameters and the radiated acoustic emissions were established.

  9. Clinico-laboratory study on filarial lymphoedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad A Ebrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Lymphatic filariasis is considered the second leading cause of permanent physical disability in humans next to mood disorder. Aims: To evaluate filarial lymphoedema as a considerable burden to patients and the community. Settings and Design: This study was conducted on 45 patients with filarial lymphoedema among 2,350 patients with lower limb edema and 22 age- and sex-matched controls, from May 2005 to May 2008. Materials and Methods: Subjects were subjected to full history taking, clinical examination, Doppler ultrasound on the affected leg, laboratory tests for filariasis. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Scientist (SPSS for windows 7.5. (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA. Results: Male to female ratio was approximately 1:1.8. The age group 21-30 years was more affected (42%. The majority of cases of filarial lymphoedema in the present study were diagnosed in advanced irreversible stages. Five patients had hydrocele. Four cases (8.9% were detected to be microfilaremic, 60% of cases were positive for Immunoglobulin (Ig G, 4.44% were IgM positive and positive cases for filarial antigenemia were 64.4%. Conclusion: The majority of cases in the present study were detected in advanced irreversible stages with patient disability and serious socioeconomic impact.

  10. Rocket and Laboratory Studies in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Paul D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG5-5122 and covers the period from March 1, 1997 to February 28, 2001. This grant was a continuation of a program in rocket and laboratory studies in ultraviolet astronomy that was supported by NASA grant NAG5-619. As of March 1, 2001, this program is continuing under grant NAG5-5315. During the period of the grant, annual status reports have been submitted detailing the scientific achievements and current objectives of each report period. These will not be repeated here. Among the highlights of the program are four successful rocket launches including participation in the campaign to study comet Hale-Bopp in April 1997. We have continued our emphasis on long-slit spectroscopy of extended sources in the shorter wavelength far-ultraviolet, necessitating the development of evacuated telescope/spectrograph payloads. Finally, we also note the use of our ultraviolet calibration facilities in support of other sounding rocket investigators and for other space missions such as the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We include a list of the sounding rocket launches performed under NASA sponsorship during this period, a list of Ph.D. degrees awarded to students who worked in this program, and a summary bibliography of publications between 1997 and 2001.

  11. Malaria Laboratory Diagnostic Performance: Case studies of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaria Laboratory Diagnostic Performance: Case studies of two ... laboratory for malaria test. ... affected by high humidity and provide no quantification of parasite density (World Health ... Zomba District Health Office reports not less than 250.

  12. A Study of Mathematics Needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Keith J.

    A study was conducted to determine what mathematics skills were needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy. Data obtained from studies, course outlines, textbooks, and reports were used to construct a 79-item mathematics skill questionnaire. This questionnaire was administered to employers,…

  13. A laboratory study of floating lenticular anticyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal, Patrice; de La Rosa, Hector; Cros, Anne; Cruz-Gomez, Raúl; Le Bars, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Oceanic vortices play an important role in the redistribution of heat, salt and momentum in the oceans. Among these vortices, floating lenses or rings are often met in the meanders of warm currents. For instance the North Brazil Current rings are among the most intense and large anticyclonic vortices on Earth. In order to better describe these vortices, we propose here a laboratory study of these floating anticyclonic lenses. A blob of fresh water is slowly injected near the surface of a rotating layer of homogeneous salted water. Because of the opposite effects of rotation that tends to generate columnar structures and density stratification that spreads light water on the surface, the vortices take a finite size three dimensionnal typical shape. Visualization and PIV measurements of the shape, aspect ratios and vorticity profiles are compared to analytical predictions that use first a simple solid body rotation model and then a more realistic isolated Gaussian vorticity field inside the anticyclones. This work was carried out within the framework of a bilateral cooperation between CNRS (France) and CONACYT (Mexico).

  14. Early diagenesis of recently deposited organic matter: A 9-yr time-series study of a flood deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesi, T.; Langone, L.; Goñi, M. A.; Wheatcroft, R. A.; Miserocchi, S.; Bertotti, L.

    2012-04-01

    In Fall 2000, the Po River (Italy) experienced a 100-yr return period flood that resulted in a 1-25 cm-thick deposit in the adjacent prodelta (10-25 m water depth). In the following years, numerous post-depositional perturbations occurred including bioturbation, reworking by waves with heights exceeding 5 m, as well as periods of extremely high and low sediment supply. Cores collected in the central prodelta after the Fall 2000 flood and over the following 9 yr, allowed characterization of the event-strata in their initial state and documentation of their subsequent evolution. Sedimentological characteristics were investigated using X-radiographs and sediment texture analyses, whereas the composition of sedimentary organic matter (OM) was studied via bulk and biomarker analyses, including organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen (TN), carbon stable isotope composition (δ13C), lignin phenols, cutin-products, p-hydroxy benzenes, benzoic acids, dicarboxylic acids, and fatty acids. The 9-yr time-series analysis indicated that roughly the lower half of the original event bed was preserved in the sediment record. Conversely, the upper half of the deposit experienced significant alterations including bioturbation, addition of new material, as well as coarsening. Comparison of the recently deposited material with 9-yr old preserved strata represented a unique natural laboratory to investigate the diagenesis of sedimentary OM in a non-steady system. Bulk data indicated that OC and TN were degraded at similar rates (loss ∼17%) whereas biomarkers exhibited a broad spectrum of reactivities (loss from ∼6% to ∼60%) indicating selective preservation during early diagenesis. Given the relevance of episodic sedimentation in several margins, this study has demonstrated the utility of event-response and time-series sampling of the seabed for understanding the early diagenesis in non-steady conditions.

  15. A Study of Deposition Coatings Formed by Electroformed Metallic Materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Hayashi

    Full Text Available Major joining methods of dental casting metal include brazing and laser welding. However, brazing cannot be applied for electroformed metals since heat treatment could affect the fit, and, therefore, laser welding is used for such metals. New methods of joining metals that do not impair the characteristics of electroformed metals should be developed. When new coating is performed on the surface of the base metal, surface treatment is usually performed before re-coating. The effect of surface treatment is clinically evaluated by peeling and flex tests. However, these testing methods are not ideal for deposition coating strength measurement of electroformed metals. There have been no studies on the deposition coating strength and methods to test electroformed metals. We developed a new deposition coating strength test for electroformed metals. The influence of the negative electrolytic method, which is one of the electrochemical surface treatments, on the strength of the deposition coating of electroformed metals was investigated, and the following conclusions were drawn: 1. This process makes it possible to remove residual deposits on the electrodeposited metal surface layer. 2. Cathode electrolysis is a simple and safe method that is capable of improving the surface treatment by adjustments to the current supply method and current intensity. 3. Electrochemical treatment can improve the deposition coating strength compared to the physical or chemical treatment methods. 4. Electro-deposition coating is an innovative technique for the deposition coating of electroformed metal.

  16. Mineralogical and geological study of quaternary deposits and weathering profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Lee, Bong Ho [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Movement history of a quaternary reverse fault cutting marine terrace deposit and tertiary bentonite in the Yangnammyon, Gyoungju city was studied by the mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clays and weathered terrace deposits. Two types of fault clays were identified as greenish gray before the deposition of the marine terrace deposits and reddish brown after deposition. Greenish gray fault clay is composed mostly of smectite probably powdered from bentonite showing at least two events of movement from microtextures. After the bentonite was covered by quaternary marine gravel deposits, the reverse fault was reactivated cutting marine gravel deposits to form open spaces along the fault plane which allowed the hydrological infiltration of soil particles and deposition of clays in deep subsurface. The reddish brown 'fault' clays enclosed the fragments of dark brown ultrafine varved clay, proving two events of faulting, and slicken sides bisecting reddish brown clays suggest another faulting event in the final stage. Mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clay show total five events of faulting, which had not been recognized even by thorough conventional paleoseismological investigation using trench, highlighting the importance of microtextural and mineralogical analysis in paleoseismology.

  17. Case Studies in Sustainability Used in an Introductory Laboratory Course to Enhance Laboratory Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster-Teasley, Stephanie; Hargrove-Leak, Sirena; Gibson, Willietta; Leak, Roland

    2017-01-01

    This educational research seeks to develop novel laboratory modules by using Case Studies in the Science Teaching method to introduce sustainability and environmental engineering laboratory concepts to 21st century learners. The increased interest in "going green" has led to a surge in the number of engineering students studying…

  18. The DoD Laboratory Utilization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-28

    5. These were computed at $30K per person, which assumes for computation that all reductions would be a pro rata 7 mix of professionals and support...requested statistics and is forwarded in accordance with reference (a). JAMES H’ PROBUS D’:Oeotor of Navy LaboratoriOs (AotinZ) Copy to: ASN (R&D) tNI

  19. Laboratory studies of crystal growth in magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, J. E.; Welsch, B. T.; First, E.; Shea, T.

    2012-12-01

    The proportions, compositions, and interrelationships among crystalline phases and glasses in volcanic rocks cryptically record pre-eruptive intensive conditions, the timing of changes in crystallization environment, and the devolatilization history of eruptive ascent. These parameters are recognized as important monitoring tools at active volcanoes and interpreting geologic events at prehistoric and remote eruptions, thus motivating our attempts to understand the information preserved in crystals through an experimental appoach. We are performing laboratory experiments in mafic, felsic, and intermediate composition magmas to study the mechanisms of crystal growth in thermochemical environments relevant to volcanic environments. We target features common to natural crystals in igneous rocks for our experimental studies of rapid crystal growth phenomena: (1) Surface curvature. Do curved interfaces and spongy cores represent evidence of dissolution (i.e., are they corrosion features), or do they record the transition from dendritic to polyhedral morphology? (2) Trapped melt inclusions. Do trapped liquids represent bulk (i.e., far-field) liquids, boundary layer liquids, or something intermediate, depending on individual species diffusivity? What sequence of crystal growth rates leads to preservation of sealed melt inclusions? (3) Subgrain boundaries. Natural phenocrysts commonly exhibit tabular subgrain regions distinguished by small angle lattice misorientations or "dislocation lamellae" and undulatory extinction. Might these crystal defects be produced as dendrites undergo ripening? (4) Clusters. Contacting clusters of polymineralic crystals are the building blocks of cumulates, and are ubiquitous features of mafic volcanic rocks. Are plagioclase and clinopyroxene aligned crystallographically, suggesting an epitaxial (surface energy) relationship? (5) Log-normal size distribution. What synthetic cooling histories produce "natural" distributions of crystal sizes, and

  20. Study of Natural Background Radiation around Gurvanbulag Uranium Deposit Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhbat, N.; Norov, N.; Bat-Erdene, B.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Otgooloi, B.

    2009-03-01

    In this work, we will show the study of natural background radiation level around the Gurvanbulag (GB) uranium deposit area in the eastern part of Mongolia. We collected environmental soil samples from 102 points around GB Uranium deposit. Collected samples were measured by HPGe gamma spectrometer at Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia. The averaged activity concentrations of Ra-226, Th-232, K-40, and Cs-137 were 37.1, 29, 939, and 17.7 Bq/kg, respectively.

  1. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  2. A Study on Clinical and Pathologic Features in Lupus Nephritis with Mainly IgA Deposits and a Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To study the clinical and pathologic features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that has atypical lupus nephritis (LN) with mainly IgA deposits. Methods. We searched the SLE patients who had nephritis with mainly IgA deposits in our hospital and selected the information including clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, treatments, and prognosis. Results. From January 2009 to June 2012, 5 patients were definitely diagnosed as SLE according to both 1982 and 2009 ACR classifica...

  3. A preliminary study of paleotsunami deposit along the south coast of East Java: Pacitan-Banyuwangi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anugrah, Suci D.; Istiyanati [Tsunami Mitigation Division - Meteorogical Climatologycal and Geophysical Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia); Zaim, Yahdi; Rizal, Yan; Aswan [Geology Department, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology - Bandung Institute of Technolog, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Along the southern coast of East Java Indonesia, at a number of localities, it can be identified and attempted to assign the age of tsunami deposit. Laboratory analyses were conducted also to support this study such as Granulometry, Paleontology and radiometric dating analysis. The presence of tsunami 1994 deposit in the area of Pancer, Lampon, Prigi and Grajagan was found, as a result of 7.8 Magnitude Banyuwangi Earthquake. The radiometric dating analysis also identified some paleotsunami deposit of about 1921 and 1930 in the area of Prigi and Teleng. This paleotsunami is assumed to have a correlation with an earthquake in the south of Java at the same time. An outcrop in the Prigi and Teleng strongly convinced the fact of an earthquake generated tsunami in the south of Java in the year of about 1921 and 1930.

  4. Transport, deposition, and liftoff in laboratory density currents composed of hot particles in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, B. J.; Manga, M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of transport, deposition, and air entrainment in pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) is required for accurate predictions of future current behaviors and interpretations of ancient deposits, but directly observing the interiors of natural PDCs is effectively impossible. We model PDCs with scaled, hot, particle-laden density currents generated in a 6 m long, 0.6 m wide, 1.8 m tall air-filled tank. Comparison of relevant scaling between our experiments and natural PDCs indicates that we are accurately capturing much of the dynamics of dilute PDCs: * Reynolds numbers of our experiments are lower than natural currents, 10^3 compared to 10^6, but still fully turbulent; * Densimetric and Thermal Richardson numbers are of O(1) in both natural and modeled currents; * Stokes and settling numbers for particles in the experiments fall within the expected range for natural PDCs. Conditions within the tank are monitored with temperature and humidity probes. Experiments are illuminated with sheet lighting, and recorded with high-definition video cameras. In general, currents have average velocities of 10-20 cm/s, initial thicknesses of 10-20 cm (although thickness greatly increases as currents entrain and expand air), and run out or lift off distances of 3-5 m. Large Kelvin-Helmholtz type eddies usually form along the top of the current immediately behind the head; these vortices are similar in size to the total current thickness. In currents that lift off, the distal current end typically retreats with time. Preliminary results suggest that lift off distance decreases with increasing thermal Richardson number. Analysis of turbulent structures indicates that the current heads are dominated by large coherent structures with length scales, L, comparable to the current thickness. Within 5-10 L of the current fronts, sequences of similar large eddies often occur. At greater distances behind the current fronts, turbulent structures become smaller and less

  5. Airborne and laboratory studies of interstellar PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Hudgins, D. M.; Witteborn, Fred C.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of the observations which have led to the hypothesis that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) are the carriers of the widespread interstellar emission features near 3050, 1615, '1300' and 890 cm(exp -1) (3.29, 6.2, '7.7', and 11.2 mu m) is presented. The central role of airborne spectroscopy is stressed. The principal reason for the assignment to PAH's was the resemblance of the interstellar emission spectrum to the laboratory absorption spectra of PAH's and PAH-like materials. Since precious little information was available on the properties of PAH's in the forms that are thought to exist under interstellar conditions -isolated and ionized in the emission zones, with the smallest PAH's being dehydrogenated- there was a need for a spectral data base on PAH's taken in these states. Here, the relevant infrared spectroscopic properties of PAH's will be reviewed. These laboratory spectra show that relative band intensities are severely altered and that band frequencies shift. It is shown that these new data alleviate several of the spectroscopic criticisms previously leveled at the hypothesis.

  6. Proton microprobe study of tin-polymetallic deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, S. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1996-12-31

    Tin-polymetallic vein type deposits are a complex mixture of cassiterite and sulfides and they are the main source of technologically important rare metals such as indium and bismuth. Constituent minerals are usually fine grained having wide range of chemical composition and often the elements of interest occur as trace elements not amenable to electron microprobe analysis. PIXE with a proton microprobe can be an effective tool to study such deposits by delineating the distribution of trace elements among carrier minerals. Two representative indium-bearing deposits of tin- polymetallic type, Tosham of India (Cu-ln-Bi-Sn-W-Ag), and Mount Pleasant of Canada (Zn-Cu-In-Bi-Sn-W), were studied to delineate the distribution of medical/high-tech rare metals and to examine the effectiveness of the proton probe analysis of such ore. One of the results of the study indicated that indium and bismuth are present in chalcopyrite in the deposits. In addition to these important rare metals, zinc, copper, arsenic, antimony, selenium, and tin are common in chalcopyrite and pyrite. Arsenopyrite contains nickel, copper, zinc, silver, tin, antimony and bismuth. In chalcopyrite and pyrite, zinc, arsenic, indium, bismuth and lead are richer in Mount Pleasant ore, but silver is higher at Tosham. Also thallium and gold were found only in Tosham pyrite. The Tosham deposit is related to S-type granite, while Mount Pleasant to A-type. It appears that petrographic character of the source magma is one of the factors to determine the trace element distribution in tin-polymetallic deposit. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Distribution and Mobilization of Arsenic in the Ganges plain sedimentary deposits of South-western Bangladesh; implications from field and laboratory observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mano, A.; Udo, K.; Ishibashi, Y.; Han, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The variation of arsenic concentration depending on sediment size and its depositional age in a variety of sediments extracted from four As contaminated sites of the southwestern Bangladesh were studied to elucidate the aquifer geological parameters that controls the vertical As distribution and mobilization in the sediment-water interface. It was found that sediment size, reactive surface area, relative depositional age and presence of other carrier minerals having higher affinity to adsorb As, may greatly dominate the arsenic accumulation. Sorption of As onto sediment surfaces was found to vary based on the variation of the particle diameters (2 to 250 μm), which eventually reflects the role of geological materials in controlling the As distribution in various depositional layers. Medium sands commonly found in the deeper aquifer (~150m), being older in age (> 7000 yrs BP) and having relatively larger diameter (φ~250 μm) were found to contain relatively low amount of As (0.8 μg/g) whereas higher As (5 to 25 μg/g) was identified noticeably in the recently deposited and reasonably younger (100 to 1000 yrs BP) sediment particles including clay and finer sands that commonly have moderately smaller diameter (φ~2 to 90 μm). These observations were supported strongly by the findings obtained from the laboratory batch adsorption tests conducted with those sediments. Presence of As was also observed to be greatly dependent on the availability of its carrier minerals particularly Fe and Al oxide/hydroxide along the aquifer depths. Clay particles with relatively moderate Fe and Al oxide minerals was found to adsorb as much as 70 μg/g As whereas medium sand with less Fe and Al oxide minerals were noticed to capture only 4 μg/g of As in the batch adsorption test. In laboratory leaching test, significant amount of As (12 μg/g) coupled with Fe (4.8 mg/g) were found to be leached out from the shallower brown clay by using sodium bicarbonate (pH~9) as the leaching agent

  8. Robofurnace: A semi-automated laboratory chemical vapor deposition system for high-throughput nanomaterial synthesis and process discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C. Ryan; Westrick, William; Koehler, Jeremy; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; Anagnostopoulos-Politis, Ilias; Cruz-Gonzalez, Tizoc; Hart, A. John

    2013-11-01

    Laboratory research and development on new materials, such as nanostructured thin films, often utilizes manual equipment such as tube furnaces due to its relatively low cost and ease of setup. However, these systems can be prone to inconsistent outcomes due to variations in standard operating procedures and limitations in performance such as heating and cooling rates restrict the parameter space that can be explored. Perhaps more importantly, maximization of research throughput and the successful and efficient translation of materials processing knowledge to production-scale systems, relies on the attainment of consistent outcomes. In response to this need, we present a semi-automated lab-scale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace system, called "Robofurnace." Robofurnace is an automated CVD system built around a standard tube furnace, which automates sample insertion and removal and uses motion of the furnace to achieve rapid heating and cooling. The system has a 10-sample magazine and motorized transfer arm, which isolates the samples from the lab atmosphere and enables highly repeatable placement of the sample within the tube. The system is designed to enable continuous operation of the CVD reactor, with asynchronous loading/unloading of samples. To demonstrate its performance, Robofurnace is used to develop a rapid CVD recipe for carbon nanotube (CNT) forest growth, achieving a 10-fold improvement in CNT forest mass density compared to a benchmark recipe using a manual tube furnace. In the long run, multiple systems like Robofurnace may be linked to share data among laboratories by methods such as Twitter. Our hope is Robofurnace and like automation will enable machine learning to optimize and discover relationships in complex material synthesis processes.

  9. Robofurnace: A semi-automated laboratory chemical vapor deposition system for high-throughput nanomaterial synthesis and process discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, C. Ryan; Westrick, William; Koehler, Jeremy; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; Anagnostopoulos-Politis, Ilias; Cruz-Gonzalez, Tizoc [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hart, A. John, E-mail: ajhart@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Laboratory research and development on new materials, such as nanostructured thin films, often utilizes manual equipment such as tube furnaces due to its relatively low cost and ease of setup. However, these systems can be prone to inconsistent outcomes due to variations in standard operating procedures and limitations in performance such as heating and cooling rates restrict the parameter space that can be explored. Perhaps more importantly, maximization of research throughput and the successful and efficient translation of materials processing knowledge to production-scale systems, relies on the attainment of consistent outcomes. In response to this need, we present a semi-automated lab-scale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace system, called “Robofurnace.” Robofurnace is an automated CVD system built around a standard tube furnace, which automates sample insertion and removal and uses motion of the furnace to achieve rapid heating and cooling. The system has a 10-sample magazine and motorized transfer arm, which isolates the samples from the lab atmosphere and enables highly repeatable placement of the sample within the tube. The system is designed to enable continuous operation of the CVD reactor, with asynchronous loading/unloading of samples. To demonstrate its performance, Robofurnace is used to develop a rapid CVD recipe for carbon nanotube (CNT) forest growth, achieving a 10-fold improvement in CNT forest mass density compared to a benchmark recipe using a manual tube furnace. In the long run, multiple systems like Robofurnace may be linked to share data among laboratories by methods such as Twitter. Our hope is Robofurnace and like automation will enable machine learning to optimize and discover relationships in complex material synthesis processes.

  10. New approaches in geological studies of tsunami deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczucinski, Witold

    2017-04-01

    During the last dozen of years tsunamis have appeared to be the most disastrous natural process worldwide. The dramatic, large tsunamis on Boxing Day, 2004 in the Indian Ocean and on March 11, 2011 offshore Japan caused catastrophes listed as the worst in terms of the number of victims and the economic losses, respectively. In the aftermath, they have become a topic of high public and scientific interest. The record of past tsunamis, mainly in form of tsunami deposits, is often the only way to identify tsunami risk at a particular coast due to relatively low frequency of their occurrence. The identification of paleotsunami deposits is often difficult mainly because the tsunami deposits are represented by various sediment types, may be similar to storm deposits or altered by post-depositional processes. There is no simple universal diagnostic set of criteria that can be applied to interpret tsunami deposits with certainty. Thus, there is a need to develop new methods, which would enhance 'classical', mainly sedimentological and stratigraphic approach. The objective of the present contribution is to show recent progress and application of new approaches including geochemistry (Chagué-Goff et al. 2017) and paleogenetics (Szczuciński et al. 2016) in studies of geological impacts of recent tsunamis from various geographical regions, namely in monsoonal-tropical, temperate and polar zones. It is mainly based on own studies of coastal zones affected by 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami in Thailand, 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami and older paleotsunamis in Japan, catastrophic saltwater inundations at the coasts of Baltic Sea and 2000 landslide-generated tsunami in Vaigat Strait (west Greenland). The study was partly funded by Polish National Science Centre grant No. 2011/01/B/ST10/01553. Chagué-Goff C., Szczuciński W., Shinozaki T., 2017. Applications of geochemistry in tsunami research: A review. Earth-Science Reviews 165: 203-244. Szczuciński W., Pawłowska J., Lejzerowicz F

  11. Leaching of wood ash - Laboratory and field studies; Lakning av vedaska - Laboratorie- och faeltstudier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Per-Erik

    2012-02-15

    High forest production leads to diminishing amounts of base cations and micro nutrients in forest soils. This is due to uptake in, and harvest of, the trees. Losses can be compensated for by spreading stabilized wood ash on the forest ground, which means recycling of base cations and micro nutrients. Chemical composition of wood ash can easily be described by standard methods in the laboratory. However, this does not include the process of leaching in nature, such as which components and leaching rate for different compounds. During field conditions several factors are added, which are not available in the laboratory. After almost 10 years in the forest soils there still remains large quantities of the original product. Only 10-30 % of the wood ash products and 5 % of the lime product has been leached. In the laboratory study the leached amount was slightly larger, at the most 35 % for wood ash and 20 % for lime. Both studies indicate long time for weathering of the products in forest soils. Slower leaching rate from pellets of wood ash compared to leaching rate from crushed wood ash in the laboratory study is not verified by the field study. This indicates limited possibilities to control rates of leaching in the environment

  12. Laboratory and Modeling Studies of Insect Swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-10

    control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. Yale University Office of Sponsored Projects 25 Science Park - 3rd Floor New Haven...Center for the Study of Ecological Perception and Action, Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut (October, 2014) (invited seminar

  13. Laboratory studies of ocean mixing by microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ortiz, Monica; Dabiri, John O.

    2011-11-01

    Ocean mixing plays a major role in nutrient and energy transport and is an important input to climate models. Recent studies suggest that the contribution of fluid transport by swimming microorganisms to ocean mixing may be of the same order of magnitude as winds and tides. An experimental setup has been designed in order to study the mixing efficiency of vertical migration of plankton. To this end, a stratified water column is created to model the ocean's density gradient. The vertical migration of Artemia Salina (brine shrimp) within the water column is controlled via luminescent signals on the top and bottom of the column. By fluorescently labelling portions of the water column, the stirring of the density gradient by the animals is visualized and quantified. Preliminary results show that the vertical movement of these organisms produces enhanced mixing relative to control cases in which only buoyancy forces and diffusion are present.

  14. Application of natural analog studies to exploration for ore deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, D.L. [Consulting Economic Geologist, Reno, NV (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Natural analogs are viewed as similarities in nature and are routinely utilized by exploration geologists in their search for economic mineral deposits. Ore deposit modeling is undertaken by geologists to direct their exploration activities toward favorable geologic environments and, therefore, successful programs. Two types of modeling are presented: (i) empirical model development based on the study of known ore deposit characteristics, and (ii) concept model development based on theoretical considerations and field observations that suggest a new deposit type, not known to exist in nature, may exist and justifies an exploration program. Key elements that are important in empirical model development are described, and examples of successful applications of these natural analogs to exploration are presented. A classical example of successful concept model development, the discovery of the McLaughlin gold mine in California, is presented. The utilization of natural analogs is an important facet of mineral exploration. Natural analogs guide explorationists in their search for new discoveries, increase the probability of success, and may decrease overall exploration expenditure.

  15. Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS): A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Karen S.; Auping, Judith V.; Megargle, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    In the late 70's, a refurbishment of the analytical laboratories serving the Materials Division at NASA Lewis Research Center was undertaken. As part of the modernization efforts, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) was to be included. Preliminary studies indicated a custom-designed system as the best choice in order to satisfy all of the requirements. A scaled down version of the original design has been in operation since 1984. The LIMS, a combination of computer hardware, provides the chemical characterization laboratory with an information data base, a report generator, a user interface, and networking capabilities. This paper is an account of the processes involved in designing and implementing that LIMS.

  16. Field and laboratory procedures used in a soil chronosequence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Michael J.; Janitzky, Peter

    1986-01-01

    In 1978, the late Denis Marchand initiated a research project entitled "Soil Correlation and Dating at the U.S. Geological Survey" to determine the usefulness of soils in solving geologic problems. Marchand proposed to establish soil chronosequences that could be dated independently of soil development by using radiometric and other numeric dating methods. In addition, by comparing dated chronosequences in different environments, rates of soil development could be studied and compared among varying climates and mineralogical conditions. The project was fundamental in documenting the value of soils in studies of mapping, correlating, and dating late Cenozoic deposits and in studying soil genesis. All published reports by members of the project are included in the bibliography.The project demanded that methods be adapted or developed to ensure comparability over a wide variation in soil types. Emphasis was placed on obtaining professional expertise and on establishing consistent techniques, especially for the field, laboratory, and data-compilation methods. Since 1978, twelve chronosequences have been sampled and analyzed by members of this project, and methods have been established and used consistently for analysis of the samples.The goals of this report are to:Document the methods used for the study on soil chronosequences,Present the results of tests that were run for precision, accuracy, and effectiveness, andDiscuss our modifications to standard procedures.Many of the methods presented herein are standard and have been reported elsewhere. However, we assume less prior analytical knowledge in our descriptions; thus, the manual should be easy to follow for the inexperienced analyst. Each chapter presents one or more references of the basic principle, an equipment and reagents list, and the detailed procedure. In some chapters this is followed by additional remarks or example calculations.The flow diagram in figure 1 outlines the step-by-step procedures used to

  17. Self-similarity of skeletal structures in laboratory high current electric discharges (plasmas and fractal dust deposits), severe weather phenomena and space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V. A.

    2003-10-01

    The phenomenon of skeletal structures (tubules, cartwheels, and their simple combinations) formerly found in laboratory plasmas, is extended to atmospheric and cosmic phenomena (Phys. Lett. A 306, 175, Dec. 2002). The long-lived filaments in plasmas have been suggested (1998) to possess a skeleton self-assembled during electric breakdown from wildly produced nanodust. The proof-of-concept studies revealed the skeletal structures in (1) plasmas in tokamaks, Z-pinches, plasma focus (in the range 0.01-10 cm), including the electric breakdown stage of discharge, (2) dust deposits in tokamak (10 nm - 10 microns), (3) hailstones (1-10 cm), tornado (10 m -1 km), (4) a wide class of objects in space (10^11-10^23 cm). The similarity of, and the trend toward self-similarity in, skeletal structures suggest all them to possess a fractal condensed matter of particular topology of the fractal. Here we discuss probable role of skeletal structures in the fast nonlocal transport of energy in strongly localized severe weather phenomena (tornado) and laboratory plasmas.

  18. Study of cadmium electrochemical deposition in sulfate medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montiel, T.; Solorza, O.; Sanchez, H.

    2000-03-01

    The cadmium electrochemical deposition process from sulfate medium was studied by means of different electrochemical techniques in both stationary and nonstationary diffusion regimes. The kinetics of the electrochemical reduction of cadmium on solid cadmium electrodes was examined and the kinetic parameters are presented, as well as the diffusion coefficient derived from the different techniques. Temperature has an important effect on the cadmium reduction kinetics, and the activation energy of the process was evaluated. The electrochemical deposition of cadmium is a complex process due to the coexistence of adsorption and nucleation processes; the adsorbed electroactive species appears to be Cd{sup +2}, and a mechanism for cadmium electrodeposition on solid cadmium electrodes is proposed.

  19. Experimental study on the particles deposition in the sampling duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendel, J.; Charuau, J. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Yvette (France)

    1995-02-01

    A high standard of protection against the harmful effects of radioactive aerosol dissemination requires a measurement, as representative as possible, of their concentration. This measurement depends on the techniques used for aerosol sampling and transfer to the detector, as well as on the location of the latter with respect to the potential sources. The aeraulic design of the apparatus is also an important factor. Once collected the aerosol particles often have to travel through a variably shaped duct to the measurement apparatus. This transport is responsible for losses due to the particles deposition on the walls, leading to a distortion on the concentration measurements and a change in the particle size distribution. To estimate and minimize measurement errors it is important to determine the optimal transport conditions when designing a duct; its diameter and material, the radius of curvature of the bends and the flow conditions must be defined in particular. This paper presents an experimental study in order to determine, for each deposition mechanism, the retained fraction, or the deposition velocity for different flow regimes. This study has pointed out that it exists a favourable flow regime for the particle transport through the sampling ducts (2 500 < Re < 5 000). It has been established, for any particle diameters, equations to predict the aerosol penetration in smooth-walled cylindrical metal ducts.

  20. Experimental Study of Aerosol Deposition in a Realistic Lung Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František LÍZAL

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The inhalation route for administration of medicaments is becoming more and more popular in recent years. The reason is non-invasiveness of the method and instantaneous absorption of drugs to the blood circulation. It is necessary to deliver exact amount of drug to the specific segment because of occurrence of diverse diseases in different segments of lungs. The aim of our work is to contribute to better understanding of transport and deposition of aerosolized drugs in lungs and hence to more effective treatment of respiratory diseases due to the targeted drug delivery. We provided measurements of aerosol deposition in segmented realistic model of lungs without a mouth cavity. Monodisperse particles marked with fluorescein were supplied to the model. The model was then disassembled to segments and each segment was rinsed with isopropanol, whereby fluorescent samples were created. Each sample was analysed by fluorometer and an amount of aerosol deposited in the segment was calculated. Experiences obtained by this study were used for creation of a new model with the mouth cavity. This model will be used for future studies with porous and fiber aerosols.

  1. Energy deposition and radiological studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    CERN Document Server

    Rakhno, I L; Tropin, I S; Eidelman, Y I

    2015-01-01

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system - all with corresponding radiation shielding - was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable design options.

  2. The Essential Role for Laboratory Studies in Atmospheric Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Barnes, Ian; Roberts, James M; Melamed, Megan L; Ammann, Markus; Bertram, Allan K; Cappa, Christopher D; Carlton, Annmarie G; Carpenter, Lucy J; Crowley, John N; Dubowski, Yael; George, Christian; Heard, Dwayne E; Herrmann, Hartmut; Keutsch, Frank N; Kroll, Jesse H; McNeill, V Faye; Ng, Nga Lee; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Orlando, John J; Percival, Carl J; Picquet-Varrault, Bénédicte; Rudich, Yinon; Seakins, Paul W; Surratt, Jason D; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Thornton, Joel A; Tong, Zhu; Tyndall, Geoffrey S; Wahner, Andreas; Weschler, Charles J; Wilson, Kevin R; Ziemann, Paul J

    2017-03-07

    Laboratory studies of atmospheric chemistry characterize the nature of atmospherically relevant processes down to the molecular level, providing fundamental information used to assess how human activities drive environmental phenomena such as climate change, urban air pollution, ecosystem health, indoor air quality, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Laboratory studies have a central role in addressing the incomplete fundamental knowledge of atmospheric chemistry. This article highlights the evolving science needs for this community and emphasizes how our knowledge is far from complete, hindering our ability to predict the future state of our atmosphere and to respond to emerging global environmental change issues. Laboratory studies provide rich opportunities to expand our understanding of the atmosphere via collaborative research with the modeling and field measurement communities, and with neighboring disciplines.

  3. The Essential Role for Laboratory Studies in Atmospheric Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, James B. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Abbatt, Jonathan P. D. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Barnes, Ian [Univ. of Wuppertal (Germany); Roberts, James M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); Melamed, Megan L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Ammann, Markus [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Bertram, Allan K. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Cappa, Christopher D. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Carlton, Annmarie G. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Carpenter, Lucy J. [Univ. of York (United Kingdom); Crowley, John N. [Max Planck Inst. of Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Dubowski, Yael [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel); George, Christian [Univ. of Lyon (France); Heard, Dwayne E. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Herrmann, Hartmut [Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (ITR), Leipzig (Germany); Keutsch, Frank N. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Kroll, Jesse H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); McNeill, V. Faye [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Ng, Nga Lee [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nizkorodov, Sergey A. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Orlando, John J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Percival, Carl J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Picquet-Varrault, Bénédicte [Inst. Pierre-Simon Laplace, Creteil (France); Rudich, Yinon [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Seakins, Paul W. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Surratt, Jason D. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Tanimoto, Hiroshi [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan); Thornton, Joel A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tong, Zhu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Tyndall, Geoffrey S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Wahner, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Julich (Germany); Weschler, Charles J. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Wilson, Kevin R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ziemann, Paul J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Laboratory studies of atmospheric chemistry characterize the nature of atmospherically relevant processes down to the molecular level, providing fundamental information used to assess how human activities drive environmental phenomena such as climate change, urban air pollution, ecosystem health, indoor air quality, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Laboratory studies have a central role in addressing the incomplete fundamental knowledge of atmospheric chemistry. This paper highlights the evolving science needs for this community and emphasizes how our knowledge is far from complete, hindering our ability to predict the future state of our atmosphere and to respond to emerging global environmental change issues. Finally, laboratory studies provide rich opportunities to expand our understanding of the atmosphere via collaborative research with the modeling and field measurement communities, and with neighboring disciplines.

  4. Laboratory Study of High Temperature Corrosion in Straw-fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Maahn, Ernst emanuel

    1997-01-01

    The components contributing to corrosion, HCl(g)SO2(g), KCl and K2SO4 were studied in the laboratory for Sandvik 8LR30 and Sanicro 28. The influence of HCl and SO2 was investigated at 600C material temperature and 600/800C flue gas temperature at time intervals up to 300 hours. The influence of ash...... deposits in air was examined at 525C-700C. Finally exposures were undertaken combining the aforementioned aggressive gas environment with the ash deposits. Thus the corrosion potential of individual components were evaluated and also whether they had a synergistic, antagonistic or additive effect on one...... another to influence the overall corrosion rate....

  5. Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

  6. Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

  7. Experimental study of porosity reduction in high deposition-rate Laser Material Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongliang; Gasser, Andres; Schopphoven, Thomas; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the interest in Additive Manufacturing (AM) is continuously expanding, owing to the paradigm shift that new production processes, such as Laser Material Deposition (LMD), provide over conventional manufacturing technologies. With LMD, three-dimensional, complex components out of a wide range of materials can be manufactured consecutively layer-by-layer. Despite the technological advantages of the LMD process, currently achieved deposition-rates of approx. 0.5 kg/h for Inconel 718 (IN 718) remain a major concern in regards to processing times and economic feasibility. Moreover, processing conditions need to be chosen carefully or else material defects can be systematically formed either at the interface separating two adjacent clad layers, at the bonding zone or within the bulk of the layer. In this respect, the effects of powder humidity, laser power, nominal powder particle size, powder morphology and shielding gas flow rate on the porosity in laser deposited single tracks at an increased deposition-rate of approx. 2 kg/h was investigated through experiments. Based on experimental results, several approaches of reducing porosity in high deposition-rate LMD are proposed in this paper.

  8. Laboratory testing and simulation of the paraffin deposition in Turija field oil well in Vojvodina region, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Dušan Š.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Serbia approx. 70% of the crude oil produced accounts for the heavy oil type, these results in the deposition of paraffin in wells, oil production decrease while increasing the operating costs. Different methods, such as mechanical, chemical and thermal, are applied in effort to solve the paraffin deposition problem. Most methods require an accurate determination of that the deposition zone in well. In this paper, experimental and simulation results of the parameter analysis affecting intensity and zone of paraffin deposition in oil wells are presented. The analysis has been done for heavy oil produced from the oil field Turija, Vojvodina region, Serbia. The paraffin deposition curves and paraffin deposition intensity during time are experimentally defined. The influence of temperature gradient, fluid flow rate and gas content in oil changes on the paraffin deposition zone change was analyzed by the computer simulation. It was found that temperature gradient changes can cause paraffin deposition zone to change approx. 22 m, i.e. maximum 43 m. It was also determined that the length of paraffin deposition zone can change up to 140 m due to the changes in the fluid flow rate or in the gas content in oil. The increase of the flow rate causes paraffin deposition zone to reduce, while increased gas content in oil leads to its increase. On the basis of the obtained results, the optimal working parameters of mechanical method, such as frequency and depth of paraffin scraping as well as temperature and heating cable power of thermal methods can be determined.

  9. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  10. Hiero-Dermato-Glyphics: Laboratory Study of the Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Oakley F.

    1977-01-01

    Explains several laboratory exercises using the skin, including the mapping of receptors, counting of sweat glands, computation of total skin area, comparison of various animal skins, measurement of the palm triradius angle, and study of epidermal ridges (dermatoglyphics) in males and females. (CS)

  11. Study of nickel silicide formation by physical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancharatnam, Shanti

    Metal silicides are used as contacts to the highly n-doped emitter in photovoltaic devices. Thin films of nickel silicide (NiSi) are of particular interest for Si-based solar cells, as they form at lower temperature and consume less silicon. However, interfacial oxide limits the reduction in sheet resistance. Hence, different diffusion barriers were investigated with regard to optimizing the conductivity and thermal stability. The formation of NiSi, and if it can be doped to have good contact with the n-side of a p-n junction were studied. Reduction of the interfacial oxide by the interfacial Ti layer to allow the formation of NiSi was observed. Silicon was treated in dilute hydrofluoric acid for removing the surface oxide layer. Ni and a Ti diffusion barrier were deposited on Si by physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods - electron beam evaporation and sputtering. The annealing temperature and time were varied to observe the stability of the deposited film. The films were then etched to observe the retention of the silicide. Characterization was done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford back scattering (RBS). Sheet resistance was measured using the four-point probe technique. Annealing temperatures from 300°C showed films began to agglomerate indicating some diffusion between Ni and Si in the Ti layer, also supported by the compositional analysis in the Auger spectra. Films obtained by evaporation and sputtering were of high quality in terms of coverage over substrate area and uniformity. Thicknesses of Ni and Ti were optimized to 20 nm and 10 nm respectively. Resistivity was low at these thicknesses, and reduced by about half post annealing at 300°C for 8 hours. Thus a low resistivity contact was obtained at optimized thicknesses of the metal layers. It was also shown that some silicide formation occurs at temperatures starting from 300°C and can thus be used to make good silicide contacts.

  12. Dust deposition: iron source or sink? A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ye

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A significant decrease of dissolved iron (DFe concentration has been observed after dust addition into mesocosms during the DUst experiment in a low Nutrient low chlorophyll Ecosystem (DUNE, carried out in the summer of 2008. Due to low biological productivity at the experiment site, biological consumption of iron can not explain the magnitude of DFe decrease. To understand processes regulating the observed DFe variation, we simulated the experiment using a one-dimensional model of the Fe biogeochemical cycle, coupled with a simple ecosystem model. Different size classes of particles and particle aggregation are taken into account to describe the particle dynamics. DFe concentration is regulated in the model by dissolution from dust particles and adsorption onto particle surfaces, biological uptake, and photochemical mobilisation of particulate iron.

    The model reproduces the observed DFe decrease after dust addition well. This is essentially explained by particle adsorption and particle aggregation that produces a high export within the first 24 h. The estimated particle adsorption rates range between the measured adsorption rates of soluble iron and those of colloidal iron, indicating both processes controlling the DFe removal during the experiment. A dissolution timescale of 3 days is used in the model, instead of an instantaneous dissolution, underlining the importance of dissolution kinetics on the short-term impact of dust deposition on seawater DFe.

    Sensitivity studies reveal that initial DFe concentration before dust addition was crucial for the net impact of dust addition on DFe during the DUNE experiment. Based on the balance between abiotic sinks and sources of DFe, a critical DFe concentration has been defined, above which dust deposition acts as a net sink of DFe, rather than a source. Taking into account the role of excess iron binding ligands and biotic processes, the critical DFe concentration might be applied to

  13. Study on Mineralization Age of Xiaoban Gold Deposit, Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Xiaoban gold deposit is a large-size deposit recently found in middle area of Fujian Province. It belongs to magmatic hydrothermal type occurred in Mayuan Group metamorphic rocks of Middle Proterozoic and is controlled by low angle fault (detachment) structures. The contents of Au in Mayuan Group metamorphic rocks, Caledonian-Indosinian deformed granite and early Yanshanian granite are higher with Au enrichment coefficient of 2.06-5.68, 5.11 and 6.67 than those in other geological bodies. And the higher enrichment coefficients (>2) of Ag, S, Sn and Te are similar to those of gold ore. Meanwhile, the distribution of Au in Mayuan Group metamorphic rocks and early Yanshanian granite with a low D-value (0.58 and 0.67) is favorable to gold mineralization. REE characteristics of gold ore, ratios of (LREE/HREE), (La/Sm)n, (Yb/Lu)n, (La/Tb)n and (Sm/Nd)n are similar to Mayuan Group metamorphic rocks, only non or little normal Eu abnormal of ore is dissimilar to metamorphic rocks. The δ(34S) of the gold ore, with a high homogenization, is (-4.7×10-3)-(-2.7×10-3). The study of inclusion indicates 180-249 ℃ of mineralization temperature, 3.69 %-11.81 % of salinities and 0.869-0.991 g/cm3 of densities of mineralization fluid. Based on hydrogen and oxygen isotope (δ(18O)=11.0×10-3-11.7×10-3, δ(D)=(-48×10-3)-(-62×10-3)) and initial w(87Sr)/w(86Sr) =0.715,combining to the analysis of geological history, regional metamorphism and magamtic activity, the authors confirm that the source for the ore fluid was mainly from magmatic, partly from metamorphic water, and with a little influence of meteoric water. Isotopic dating made on Rb-Sr isochron age of 182 Ma, by using alteration minerals of gold-ores from the deposit, indicates that the mineralization occurs in early Yanshanian epoch. This is close to the age of 187 Ma of the Anchun magmatite with a similar alteration and gold mineralization to the Xiaoban gold deposit. The age of early Yanshanian epoch of the Xiaoban

  14. A Study on Knowledge, Attitude And Practice of Laboratory Safety Measures Among Paramedical Staff of Laboratory Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansa M Goswami, Sumeeta T Soni, Sachin M Patel, Mitesh K Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A lot of accidents occur in the laboratory due to lack of proper knowledge regarding laboratory safety measures, indifferent attitude & improper implementation of safe laboratory practices. In view of this, the present study on knowledge, Attitude & Practice (KAP of laboratory safety measures was carried out among paramedical staff of laboratory services of tertiary care teaching hospital, western India. Method: This was a comparative study which used a standardized, structured self-administered questionnaire to survey knowledge, attitude and practice of paramedical staff. The KAP study enrolled 81 respondents. Results: Regarding knowledge- the majority knew the very important issues related with laboratory safety like Post Exposure Prophylaxis (96.55% & discarding of blood samples (93.10% etc. In regard to attitude towards the scientific process, all are very much aware about importance of protective devices (i.e. Wearing Gloves and Biomedical waste management. In regard to the practice in laboratory, the entire study subject group (100% replied “YES” in each question that shows the good quality work of the laboratory. Conclusion: The induction training on Laboratory safety is very important and motivating exercise for improving the laboratory safety measures.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of graphite in air and in vacuum for field emission studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jadhav, Harshada; Singh, A.K.; Sinha, Sucharita, E-mail: ssinha@barc.gov.in

    2015-07-15

    A comparative study of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) based carbon films when deposited either, in atmospheric air, or under vacuum, has been performed. Micro-structural characterization of deposited films was carried out employing X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic techniques. While, nanocrystalline graphite phase was observed in carbon films deposited in air, PLD films deposited under vacuum were largely amorphous in nature. Field emission (FE) properties of films deposited in air and under vacuum were investigated. Superior FE behavior characterized by a lower turn-on field (2.72 V/μm) and high field enhancement factor (∼2580) was observed for PLD films deposited in air. This improved field emission demonstrated by carbon films deposited via PLD in air can be attributed to presence of nanocrystalline graphite aggregates in such carbon films and local field enhancement near the sp{sup 2} sites. Our results therefore, establish PLD in air as a simple technique for deposition of carbon films having good field emission capability. - Highlights: • Pulsed laser deposition of graphite films, deposited in air and in vacuum. • Micro-structural, X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopic characterization of deposited films. • Field emission properties of deposited films investigated. • Superior field emission behavior observed for films deposited in air than in vacuum. • Pulsed laser deposition in air leads to carbon films with excellent field emission capability.

  16. Energy deposition studies for the LBNE beam absorber

    CERN Document Server

    Rakhno, Igor L; Tropin, Igor S

    2015-01-01

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition studies performed for the LBNE absorber core and the surrounding shielding with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system -- all with corresponding radiation shielding -- was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. This option provides substantial flexibility and automation when developing complex geometry models. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Various design options were considered, in particular the following: (i) filling the decay pipe with air or helium; (ii) the absorber mask material and shape; (iii) the beam spoiler material and size. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable absorber design options.

  17. A Three-Year Feedback Study of a Remote Laboratory Used in Control Engineering Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Amélie; Copot, Cosmin; Ionescu, Clara; De Keyser, Robin

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a feedback study for a remote laboratory used in the education of control engineering students. The goal is to show the effectiveness of the remote laboratory on examination results. To provide an overview, the two applications of the remote laboratory are addressed: 1) the Stewart platform, and 2) the quadruple…

  18. Maintaining plethodontid salamanders in the laboratory for regeneration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Claudia Marcela; Gómez-Molina, Andrea; Delgado, Jean Paul

    2015-01-01

    Limb regeneration studies have been extensively carried out in species of Ambystomatidae and Salamandridae families. So far limited research has been conducted in species belonging to the Plethodontidae family, where some of the species differs from other salamander families due to their direct development, thus absence of a larval life. Here, we describe a protocol to maintain the plethodontid salamanders of genus Bolitoglossa species under laboratory conditions to perform regeneration studies.

  19. Clinical Laboratory Stressors Used to Study Alcohol–Stress Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Suzanne; Bacon, Amy K.; Sinha, Rajita; Uhart, Magdalena; Adinoff, Bryon

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the biologic systems that underlie the relationship between stress and alcohol consumption may lead to better prevention efforts and more effective treatments for alcoholism. Clinical laboratory studies offer a unique opportunity to examine these relationships by using a controlled environment to study how an acute stressor affects alcohol drinking and alcohol craving, how individuals in recovery or those at risk for alcoholism may respond differently to stressors relative to co...

  20. A comparative study of aerosol deposition in different lung models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C P; Diu, C K

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are made on total and regional deposition of inhaled particles in the human respiratory system based upon various current lung models. It is found that although total deposition does not vary appreciably from model to model, considerably large differences are present in regional deposition. Deposition profiles along the airways from different models also show very different patterns. These differences can be explained in terms of airway dimensions and the number of structures in different models. Extension to explain intersubject variability is also made.

  1. Study of liquid deposition during laser printing of liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duocastella, M.; Patrascioiu, A.; Dinca, V.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.

    2011-04-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique which can be used to successfully print various complex and sensitive materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. However, the optimization of its performances requires a deep understanding of the LIFT dynamics. Such understanding should allow correlating the phenomena underlying the liquid transfer process with the morphology of the obtained deposits. To this end, in this work it is presented a study related to two aspects: first, the correlation of the morphological characteristics of the transferred droplets with the variation of the film thickness combined with laser fluence; and second, a correlation of the dependences observed with the dynamics of the transfer process. The work is focused on the understanding of the observed dependences for which the information provided by time-resolved analysis on liquid transfer dynamics has proved to be crucial.

  2. Educational Objectives Of Different Laboratory Types: A Comparative Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A.S. Tolba; Yasser .H. Elawady

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory-based courses play a critical role in scientific education. Automation is changing the nature of the laboratories, and there is a long-running debate about the value of hands-on versus simulated and remote laboratories...

  3. Depositional history and fault-related studies, Bolinas Lagoon, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berquist, Joel R.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of core sediments and seismic reflection profiles elucidate the structure and depositional history of Bolinas Lagoon, Calif., which covers 4.4 km 2 and lies in the San Andreas fault zone at the southeast corner of the Point Reyes Peninsula 20 km northwest of San Francisco. The 1906 trace of the San Andreas fault crosses the west side of the lagoon and was determined from (1) tectonically caused salt-marsh destruction indicated by comparison of 1854 and 1929 U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (U.S.C. & G.S.) topographic surveys, (2) formation of a tidal channel along the border of destroyed salt marshes, and (3) azimuths of the trend of the fault measured in 1907. Subsidence in the lagoon of 30 cm occurred east of the San Andreas fault in 1906. Near the east shore, seismic-reflection profiling indicates the existence of a graben fault that may connect to a graben fault on the Golden Gate Platform. Comparison of radiocarbon dates on shells and plant debris from boreholes drilled on Stinson Beach spit with a relative sea-level curve constructed for southern San Francisco Bay indicates 5.8 to more than 17.9 m of tectonic subsidence of sediments now located 33 m below mean sea level. Cored sediments indicate a marine transgression dated at 7770?65 yrs B.P. overlying freshwater organic-rich lake deposits. Fossil pollen including 2 to 8 percent Picea (spruce) indicate a late Pleistocene (?)-Early Holocene climate, cooler, wetter, and foggier than at present. Above the transgression are discontinuous and interfingering sequences of transgressive-regressive marine, estuarine, and barrier sediments that reflect rapid lateral and vertical shifts of successive depositional environments. Fossil megafauna indicate (1) accumulation in a protected, shallow-water estuary or bay, and (2) that the lagoon was probably continuously shallow and never a deep-water embayment. Analysis of grain-size parameters, pollen frequencies, and organic remains from a core near the north end of

  4. Application of both a physical theory and statistical procedure in the analyses of an in vivo study of aerosol deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, K.H.; Swift, D.L. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Yang, Y.H. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Regional deposition of inhaled aerosols in the respiratory tract is a significant factor in assessing the biological effects from exposure to a variety of environmental particles. Understanding the deposition efficiency of inhaled aerosol particles in the nasal and oral airways can help evaluate doses to the extrathoracic region as well as to the lung. Dose extrapolation from laboratory animals to humans has been questioned due to significant physiological and anatomical variations. Although human studies are considered ideal for obtaining in vivo toxicity information important in risk assessment, the number of subjects in the study is often small compared to epidemiological and animal studies. This study measured in vivo the nasal airway dimensions and the extrathoracic deposition of ultrafine aerosols in 10 normal adult males. Variability among individuals was significant. The nasal geometry of each individual was characterized at a resolution of 3 mm using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and acoustic rhinometry (AR). The turbulent diffusion theory was used to describe the nonlinear nature of extrathoracic aerosol deposition. To determine what dimensional features of the nasal airway were responsible for the marked differences in particle deposition, the MIXed-effects NonLINear Regression (MIXNLIN) procedure was used to account for the random effort of repeated measurements on the same subject. Using both turbulent diffusion theory and MIXNLIN, the ultrafine particle deposition is correlated with nasal dimensions measured by the surface area, minimum cross-sectional area, and complexity of the airway shape. The combination of MRI and AR is useful for characterizing both detailed nasal dimensions and temporal changes in nasal patency. We conclude that a suitable statistical procedure incorporated with existing physical theories must be used in data analyses for experimental studies of aerosol deposition that involve a relatively small number of human subjects.

  5. RHEED study of titanium dioxide with pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Inge Lise; Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) operated at high pressure has been used to monitor the growth of thin films of titanium dioxide (TiO2) on (1 0 0) magnesium oxide (MgO) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The deposition is performed with a synthetic rutile TiO2 target...

  6. Hyaline cartilage involvement in patients with gout and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. An ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippucci, E; Riveros, M Gutierrez; Georgescu, D; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2009-02-01

    The main aim of the present study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in detecting monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals deposits at knee cartilage level using clinical definite diagnosis as standard reference. A total of 32 patients with a diagnosis of gout and 48 patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy were included in the study. Fifty-two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis or osteoarthritis (OA) were recruited as disease controls. All diagnoses were made using an international clinical criterion. US examinations were performed by an experienced sonographer, blind to clinical and laboratory data. Hyaline cartilage was assessed to detect two US findings recently indicated as indicative of crystal deposits: hyperechoic enhancement of the superficial margin of the hyaline cartilage and hyperechoic spots within the cartilage layer not generating a posterior acoustic shadow. Hyperechoic enhancement of the chondrosynovial margin was found in at least one knee of 14 out of 32 (43.7%) patients with gout and in a single knee of only one patient affected by pyrophosphate arthropathy (specificity=99%). Intra-cartilaginous hyperechoic spots were detected in at least one knee of 33 out of 48 (68.7%) patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy and in two disease controls one with OA and the second with RA (specificity=97.6%). The results of the present study indicate that US may play a relevant role in distinguishing cartilage involvement in patients with crystal-related arthropathy. The selected US findings were found to be highly specific.

  7. Studies on Sono-Chemical Biodiesel Production Using Smoke Deposited Nano MgO Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sivakumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive study of smoke deposited nano sized MgO as a catalyst for biodiesel production was investigated. The transesterification reaction was studied under constant ultrasonic mixing for different parameters like catalyst quantity, methanol oil molar ratio, reaction temperature and reaction time. An excellent result of conversion was obtained at 1.5 wt% catalyst; 5:1 methanol oil molar ratio at 55°C, a conversion of 98.7% was achieved after 45 min. The conversion was three to five times higher than those are reported for laboratory MgO in literature. This was mainly due to the enhancement of surface area of the catalyst and the activity of ultrasonic waves. Catalyst is easily recovered and reused up to eight times with easy regeneration steps.  © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 18th March 2013; Revised: 20th August 2013; Accepted: 9th September 2013[How to Cite: Sivakumar, P., Sankaranarayanan, S., Renganathan, S., Sivakumar, P. (2013. Studies on Sono-Chemical Biodiesel Production Using Smoke Deposited Nano MgO Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Re-action Engineering & Catalysis, 8 (2: 89-96.(doi:10.9767/bcrec.8.2.4628.89-96][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.8.2.4628.89-96

  8. Effect of flue gas composition on deposit induced high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions mimicking biomass firing. Part I: Exposures in oxidizing and chlorinating atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Kiamehr, Saeed; Montgomery, Melanie;

    2016-01-01

    bothoxidizing and oxidizing-chlorinating atmospheres, and the resulting corrosionproducts were comprehensively studied with scanning electron microscopy(SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD)techniques. The results show that deposit-free samples suffer grain boundaryattack...... only in an oxidizing-chlorinating atmosphere, otherwise corrosionresults in formation of a duplex oxide. Corrosion attack on deposit-coatedsamples was higher than on deposit-free samples irrespective of the gaseousatmosphere. Specifically, severe volatilization of alloying elements occurred ondeposit...

  9. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovits, Paul [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a

  10. Morphology and structural studies of WO3 films deposited on SrTiO3 by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhori, Hossein; Porter, Stephen B.; Esmaeily, Amir Sajjad; Coey, Michael; Ranjbar, Mehdi; Salamati, Hadi

    2016-12-01

    WO3 films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO3 (001) substrates. The effects of substrate temperature, oxygen partial pressure and energy fluence of the laser beam on the physical properties of the films were studied. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns during and after growth were used to determine the surface structure and morphology. The chemical composition and crystalline phases were obtained by XPS and XRD respectively. AFM results showed that the roughness and skewness of the films depend on the substrate temperature during deposition. Optimal conditions were determined for the growth of the highly oriented films.

  11. Basophilic deposits on the cupula: preliminary findings describing the problems involved in studies regarding the incidence of basophilic deposits on the cupula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, H; Kohut, R I; Ryu, J H; Tokumasu, K; Okamoto, M; Fujino, A; Hoshino, I; Arai, M

    1996-01-01

    In this study, the possibility of whether basophilic deposits adhered to the cupulas in the semicircular canals was investigated histologically. Results indicated that basophilic deposits were present in all three cupulas of the semicircular canals. The overall incidence of basophilic deposits in the superior, lateral and posterior semicircular canal cupulas was 26%, 41% and 37%, respectively. The incidence of basophilic deposits bound to the cupulas increased with age. The possible origin of these basophilic deposits on the cupulas and the increased incidence of basophilic deposits with increasing age are discussed.

  12. Carbon, oxygen and boron isotopic studies of Huangbaishuwan witherite deposit at Ziyang and Wenyuhe witherite deposit at Zhushan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü; Zhicheng(吕志成); LIU; Congqiang(刘丛强); LIU; Jiajun(刘家军); ZHAO; Zhiqi(赵志琦)

    2003-01-01

    Being stratiform or stratoid, the Huangbaishuwan witherite deposit at Ziyang and the Wenyuhe witherite-barite deposit at Zhushan occur in the lower Lower Cambrian siliceous rocks and the orebodies are remarkably controlled by lithological character and petrography. Boron, carbon and oxygen isotopic studies of witherite, barytocalcite and calcite have shown that the carbon, involved in the formation of these minerals, was derived mainly from hydrocarbons and biogenetic gases resulting from degradation, polycondensation and dehydroxylation of bio-organic matter in sediments at the early stage of diagenesis; the boron was a mixture of boron in pore water and that released in the process of degradation of organic matter, with a minor amount of boron from cycling brines in the deep interior of the basin. Boron, carbon and oxygen isotopic studies unanimously demonstrated that witherite was precipitated in this sort of organic carbon-rich pore water medium during the early stage of diagenesis. Extensive occurrence of biodetritus and clastic texture in witherite ores strongly evidenced that Ba2+ was concentrated and settled down in the form of bio-barite on the seafloor as a result of biological processes, thereafter forming the initially enriched orebodies of barium deposits. Biological processes in seawater and early diagenesis in sediments are the major ore-forming mechanisms of witherite deposits in the region studied.

  13. Planetary Simulation Chambers bring Mars to laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateo-Marti, E.

    2016-07-01

    Although space missions provide fundamental and unique knowledge for planetary exploration, they are always costly and extremely time-consuming. Due to the obvious technical and economical limitations of in-situ planetary exploration, laboratory simulations are among the most feasible research options for making advances in planetary exploration. Therefore, laboratory simulations of planetary environments are a necessary and complementary option to expensive space missions. Simulation chambers are economical, more versatile, and allow for a higher number of experiments than space missions. Laboratory-based facilities are able to mimic the conditions found in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of a majority of planetary objects. Number of relevant applications in Mars planetary exploration will be described in order to provide an understanding about the potential and flexibility of planetary simulation chambers systems: mainly, stability and presence of certain minerals on Mars surface; and microorganisms potential habitability under planetary environmental conditions would be studied. Therefore, simulation chambers will be a promising tools and necessary platform to design future planetary space mission and to validate in-situ measurements from orbital or rover observations. (Author)

  14. Organic geochemical study of domanik deposits, Tatarstan Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosova, F. F.; Pronin, N. V.

    2010-05-01

    High-bituminous argillo-siliceous carbonate deposits of domanik formation (DF) occurring within pale depressions and down warps in the east of the Russian platform are treated by many investigators as a main source of oil and gas in the Volga-Ural province. In this study a special attention was turned to organic-rich rocks DF witch outcrop in the central part (Uratminskaya area 792, 806 boreholes) and in the west part (Sviyagskaya, 423) of the Tatarstan Republic. The aim of the present paper is to characterize the organic matter: origin, depositional environments, thermal maturity and biodegradation-weathering effects. Nowadays the most informative geochemical parameters are some biomarkers which qualitatively and are quantitatively defined from distributions of n-alkanes and branched alkanes. Biomarkers - it's original fingerprints of biomass of organic matter, that reflect molecular hydrocarbonic structure. The bulk, molecular composition of oil is initially a function of the type and maturity of the source rock from which it has been expelled, while the source rock type reflects both the nature of precursor organisms and the conditions of its deposition. Methodology used in this study included sampling, bitumen extraction, liquid-column chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. The bitumen was fractionated by column chromatography on silica gel. Non-aromatic or alifatics, aromatics and polar compounds were obtained. Alifatic were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry Percin Elmer. The hydrocarbons present in the sediments of DF and have a carbon numbers ranging from 12 through 38. The samples contain variably inputs from both terrigenous and non-terrigenous (probably marine algal) organic matter as evident in bimodal GC fingerprints of some samples. Pristane and phytane, also, occur in very high concentration in sample extracts. The relatively low Pr/Ph ratios, CPI and OEPbiomarkers distribution of the domanic samples generally

  15. A Study on Clinical and Pathologic Features in Lupus Nephritis with Mainly IgA Deposits and a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hongyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the clinical and pathologic features of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE that has atypical lupus nephritis (LN with mainly IgA deposits. Methods. We searched the SLE patients who had nephritis with mainly IgA deposits in our hospital and selected the information including clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, treatments, and prognosis. Results. From January 2009 to June 2012, 5 patients were definitely diagnosed as SLE according to both 1982 and 2009 ACR classification criteria. But renal biopsy showed that all cases had mainly IgA deposits and were free of IgG, C1q, and fibrinogen-related antigen deposits under immunofluorescent microscopy, which did not match with typical LN. There were 2 males and 3 females, aging from 31 to 64 years and with an average of years. The 5 cases had multiple-system involvements, mainly the renal system. Compared to primary IgAN, the atypical LN showed some differences: older than primary IgAN, more women than men, no previous infection history, lower incidence of serum IgA elevation, and ACL positive rate as high as 100%. Conclusion. Nephritis with mainly IgAN deposits, as an atypical LN, may be a special subtype of SLE.

  16. Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR): clinical, laboratory, and immunofluorescence studies in 13 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Shuzo; Shiigai, Tatsuo; Matsui, Yoshiki

    2002-01-01

    Thirteen elderly patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) are presented. The clinical and laboratory findings suggest that many progressive symptoms are due to the non-specific inflammatory changes in various organs of the body, especially in muscles and joints. An immunofluorescence study of muscle biopsy specimens revealed IgG, IgA, and fibrinogen deposits in the perifascicular area of the perimysium. This finding suggests that immune complexes play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition and that the pathophysiology of PMR is an interstitial inflammatory process. We think that the inflammatory findings affecting the interstitial tissue of muscles in the immunofluorescence study are relatively specific to PMR, and will be affected by steroid treatment.

  17. Deposition of hematite particles on alumina seal faceplates of nuclear reactor coolant pumps: Laboratory experiments and industrial feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Lefèvre Grégory; Živković Ljiljana S.; Jaubertie Anne

    2012-01-01

    In the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR), the dynamic sealing system in reactor coolant pumps is ensured by mechanical seals whose ceramic parts are in contact with the cooling solution. During the stretch-out phase in reactor operation, characterized by low boric acid concentration, the leak-off flow has been observed to abnormally evolve in industrial plants. The deposition of hematite particles, originating from corrosion, on alumina seals of coolant pumps is suspec...

  18. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-03-01

    This publication is one in series of case studies for "Laboratories for the 21st Century," a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This case study describes the Science and Technology Facility, a new laboratory at NREL that incorporated energy-efficient and sustainable design features including underfloor air distribution in offices, daylighting, and process cooling.

  19. Laboratory Study of Dispersion of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory a study on surface dispersion of buoyant plumes in open channel turbulence in made, where the buoyancy is due to both salinity and heat. The measured parameters are the downstream derivative of a plume width and height, which are integral-characteristics of the distributions of density......-differences. Other methods as infra-red sensing are used for visualizing purpose. The results are used to calibrate an integral model of the dispersion. Conclusions are that the dispersion of a buoyant surface plume can be treated the superposition of a buoyancy induced stretching and turbulent diffusion, reduced...

  20. Laboratory studies on electrical effects during volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Büttner

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This laboratory study reports on electrical phenomena during the explosive eruption of a basaltoid silicate melt. Contact electricity is produced in the phase of thermo-hydraulic fracturing of magma during the explosive interaction with water. The electrical charge produced is directly proportional to the force of the explosion, as the force of explosion is linearly proportional to the surface generated by the thermo-hydraulic fracturing. Simulation of the ejection history using inerted gas as a driving medium under otherwise constant conditions did not result in significant electric charging. The results have the potential to explain in nature observed lightening in eruption clouds of explosive volcanic events.

  1. [External quality assessment in clinical biochemistry laboratories: pilot study in 11 laboratories of Lomé (Togo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, Kafui; Fétéké, Lochina; Assignon, Selom; Dorkenoo, Ameyo; Napo-Koura, Gado

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the performance of a few biochemistry analysis and make recommendations to the place of the stakeholders. It is a cross-sectional study conducted between the October 1(st), 2012 and the July 31, 2013 bearing on the results of 5 common examinations of clinical biochemistry, provided by 11 laboratories volunteers opening in the public and private sectors. These laboratories have analysed during the 3 cycles, 2 levels (medium and high) of serum concentration of urea, glucose, creatinine and serum aminotransferases. The performance of laboratories have been determined from the acceptable limits corresponding to the limits of total errors, defined by the French Society of Clinical Biology (SFBC). A system of internal quality control is implemented by all laboratories and 45% of them participated in international programs of external quality assessment (EQA). The rate of acceptable results for the entire study was of 69%. There was a significant difference (p<0.002) between the performance of the group of laboratories engaged in a quality approach and the group with default implementation of the quality approach. Also a significant difference was observed between the laboratories of the central level and those of the peripheral level of our health system (p<0.047). The performance of the results provided by the laboratories remains relatively unsatisfactory. It is important that the Ministry of Health put in place a national program of EQA with mandatory participation.

  2. Laboratory studies on surface sampling of Bacillus anthracis contamination: summary, gaps and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepel, G F; Amidan, B G; Hu, R

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes previous laboratory studies to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing/transporting, processing and analysing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis or related surrogates. The focus is on plate culture and count estimates of surface contamination for swab, wipe and vacuum samples of porous and nonporous surfaces. Summaries of the previous studies and their results were assessed to identify gaps in information needed as inputs to calculate key parameters critical to risk management in biothreat incidents. One key parameter is the number of samples needed to make characterization or clearance decisions with specified statistical confidence. Other key parameters include the ability to calculate, following contamination incidents, the (i) estimates of B. anthracis contamination, as well as the bias and uncertainties in the estimates and (ii) confidence in characterization and clearance decisions for contaminated or decontaminated buildings. Gaps in knowledge and understanding identified during the summary of the studies are discussed. Additional work is needed to quantify (i) the false-negative rates of surface-sampling methods with lower concentrations on various surfaces and (ii) the effects on performance characteristics of: aerosol vs liquid deposition of spores, using surrogates instead of B. anthracis, real-world vs laboratory conditions and storage and transportation conditions. Recommendations are given for future evaluations of data from existing studies and possible new studies.

  3. Study of the work of laboratory-scale oxidation ditch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogina Elena Sergeevna

    Full Text Available The social and economic development of the society to a greater or lesser degree touches upon ecological questions, which include water supply conservation. Waste water treatment plays a very important role. Over the recent years in developed countries the phenomenon of suburbanization has appeared. It means growth and development of the suburban area of the biggest cities. In relation with it, it seems perspective to investigate the technologies aimed at wastewater treatment coming from small settlements. The paper considers the prospects of the use of oxidation ditches as the main biological WWTP-structures for small towns in the Moscow region. In order to study the conditions to achieve high efficiency of nitrogen removal and to investigate the rule of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification removal (SND, the laboratory-scale oxidation ditch model was made in the Laboratory of Biological methods of Wastewater Treatment of Moscow State University of Civil Engineering. The experiment lasted for 6 months and showed good results, which can be used for further studies. The Michaelis - Menten formulas for enzyme kinetics of the studied biological system were obtained.

  4. Fundamental Studies of Underpotential Metal Deposition and Trace Analysis Using Solid Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    7AD-At30 099 FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF UNDERPOTENTIAL METAL DEPOSITION 1 BUFFALO DEPT OF CHEMISTRY S BRUCKENSTEIN 1982 UNCLASSIFIED AFOSR-TR-83-0557...T’S CAT A--CG t,-V5EP A . ITE(ad utilS TYPE OF REPCRT 0 0 .’EOEt’ Fundamental Studies of Underpotential Metal Final Deposition and Trace411111110...siectrocatalyls (by underpotential metal deposition ). A second objective was to develop new approaches to studying electrcxhemical reactions at solid

  5. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, R.G., E-mail: r.ding@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G. [Rolls-Royce plc., Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom); Bowen, P. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  6. Deterioration of concrete structures by acid deposition — an assessment of the role of rainwater on deterioration by laboratory and field exposure experiments using mortar specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Hiroshi; Kameda, Hideki; Hasegawa, Shin-ichi; Saito, Nobuhiko; Kubota, Ken; Igawa, Manabu

    Deterioration of concrete structures caused by acid deposition was investigated by laboratory and field exposure of portland cement mortar specimens to acid deposition. Laboratory exposure experiment showed that the dissolved amount of calcium hydrates, which were the major components in mortar, increased with the increase in the acidity of simulated acid rain solution and the decrease in the flow rate. There was little difference in their amount among different temperature treatments after each exposure to the solution with the same acidity, namely left at room temperature, heated at 70°C, and cooled at -2°C. The neutralization progressed more deeply under the heated and cooled condition and was accelerated by even acid rain with pH 4.7 during a long period (90 exposure cycles, which correspond to the rainfall amount of 15 years in Japan). A field exposure experiment for two years indicated that the carbonation of calcium hydrates and the formation of other corrosion products such as chloride, nitrate, and sulfate were limited to the surface of mortar specimens. The neutralization progressed more deeply in mortar specimens sheltered from rainwater than in those washed by rainwater.

  7. Educational Objectives Of Different Laboratory Types: A Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tolba, A. S.; Elawady, Yasser . H.

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory-based courses play a critical role in scientific education. Automation is changing the nature of the laboratories, and there is a long-running debate about the value of hands-on versus simulated and remote laboratories. The remote lab technology has brought a significant improvement in communication within the Academic community and has improved students' learning experiences. There are different educational objectives as criteria for judging the laboratories: Hands-on advocates em...

  8. Kinetic Study of SiO2/S Coating Deposition by APCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To alleviate catalytic coking on the inner surface of radiant tube for ethylene production in petrochemical plants,SiO2/S coatings were deposited on HP40 alloy specimens using dimethyldisulfide (DMDS) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). A two-dimension mathematical model was made to predict the growth rate of SiO2/S coating and to study the effects of deposition parameters on the deposition rate. The results show that the predicted deposition rate is in good agreement with the experimental one. The deposition rate mainly depends on the concentrations of precursors in the total gas flow, concentrations of intermediates on the deposition surface, total gas flow rate and deposition temperature. The weight of SiO2/S coating linearly increases with the deposition time. When the gas flow rate is below 0.3 m/s, the rate-limiting step of SiO2/S coating deposition is the diffusions of intermediates.However, the surface reactions of intermediates will be the rate-limiting step after the gas flow rate is above 0.3 m/s. When the deposition temperature is below 780℃, the rate-limiting step of SiO2/S coating deposition mainly depends on the surface reactions of intermediates. When the deposition temperature is above 780℃,the rate-limiting step depends on the diffusions of intermediates. The deposition rate increases with increasing the concentrations of the intermediates. However, when the partial pressures of the intermediates reach 8 Pa,the deposition rate keeps constant.

  9. ELLIPSOMETRIC STUDY OF SEMITRANSPARENT SILVER LAYERS DEPOSITED ON GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Toranzos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Using ellipsometry, the film structure is characterized by optical indices n, k (visible region, 450 nm <  < 580 nm and the thickness (15 < d < 35 nm. The optical indices change with the quantity of silver deposited, obtaining effective indices of 1.0 < n < 1.8 and 1.6 < k < 2.6 to the smaller deposits that belong to a volumetric fraction between 0.35 and 0.5 of silver in the air. An effective optical thickness film decrease is observed when the silver volumetric fraction increases, and a thickness increase with close indices to solid silver when the deposited silver increases. Optical and effective medium theory indices are compared.

  10. Laboratory-scale coal and char characterisation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geli, J.; Milani, A.; Damiani, R.; Ferrari, M. [Centro Sviluppo Materiali S.p.A., Roma (Italy)

    1998-12-31

    A laboratory scale study on nine coals, aimed at correlating coal properties (basically determined by rank and maceral composition) with char morphotextural features and combustion behaviour, was carried out. Proximate, ultimate, technological and petrographic analyses on coals were effectuated, and a standard laboratory test, developed at CSM, was carried out in order to determine coal combustion efficiency (EC). The tested coals are resulted single coals and more or less complex blends. Chars were produced by coal pyrolysis in a Drop Tube Furnace (DTF) under nitrogen flow at 1600{degree}C and submitted to a chemical and technological characterization; besides, the morphotextures of char particles were investigated by a polarized optical microscope POM) and classified. Char combustion was carried out in air flow by DTF, too, at 1600{degree}C and the residual combustion particles were submitted to ultimate and petrographic analyses. Finally three coals of the studied series were pyrolysed and their chars burnt by DTF at 1200{degree}C in order to determine the influence of temperature on combustion properties. Results allowed to individuate the main characteristics of coals and chars with resect to the combustion behaviour, and the relationships among them; therefore they provide an evaluation rule for coal selection and a basis of a method for `building` the best blends for pulverized coal boiler. 18 refs., 6 figs., 22 tabs.

  11. Clinical laboratory stressors used to study alcohol-stress relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Suzanne; Bacon, Amy K; Sinha, Rajita; Uhart, Magdalena; Adinoff, Bryon

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the biologic systems that underlie the relationship between stress and alcohol consumption may lead to better prevention efforts and more effective treatments for alcoholism. Clinical laboratory studies offer a unique opportunity to examine these relationships by using a controlled environment to study how an acute stressor affects alcohol drinking and alcohol craving, how individuals in recovery or those at risk for alcoholism may respond differently to stressors relative to control subjects, and how alcohol differentially affects stress reactivity in these groups. This article reviews some of the most common physical, psychological, and pharmacological stressors used in stress-induction studies designed to reveal details about the relationship between stress reactivity and alcohol use and abuse.

  12. Laboratory investigations on the use of chemical methods for the prevention of paraffin deposits in oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liszka, K.; Koehsling, Z.; Jewulski, J.; Ogorzakek, A.

    1970-06-01

    Two major reasons for paraffin precipitation in oil wells are the decrease in temperature caused by the evolving and expanding gas and the accompanied change of the crude oil's physical properties, such as decreased solubility of heavier hydrocarbon components. Seven industrial solvents were tested for their merits in removal of paraffin deposits from production wells and the formation immediately adjacent to the well bore. The tests were made under various temperature conditions; the methods of testing is briefly described. The solubility of paraffin as a function of temperature for the 7 chemicals tested is illustrated in 4 graphs.

  13. Fabrication and kinetics study of nano-Al/NiO thermite film by electrophoretic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daixiong; Li, Xueming

    2015-05-21

    Nano-Al/NiO thermites were successfully prepared as film by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). For the key issue of this EPD, a mixture solvent of ethanol-acetylacetone (1:1 in volume) containing 0.00025 M nitric acid was proved to be a suitable dispersion system for EPD. The kinetics of electrophoretic deposition for both nano-Al and nano-NiO were investigated; the linear relation between deposition weight and deposition time in short time and parabolic relation in prolonged time were observed in both EPDs. The critical transition time between linear deposition kinetics and parabolic deposition kinetics for nano-Al and nano-NiO were 20 and 10 min, respectively. The theoretical calculation of the kinetics of electrophoretic deposition revealed that the equivalence ratio of nano-Al/NiO thermites film would be affected by the behavior of electrophoretic deposition for nano-Al and nano-NiO. The equivalence ratio remained steady when the linear deposition kinetics dominated for both nano-Al and nano-NiO. The equivalence ratio would change with deposition time when deposition kinetics for nano-NiO changed into parabolic kinetics dominated after 10 min. Therefore, the rule was suggested to be suitable for other EPD of bicomposites. We also studied thermodynamic properties of electrophoretic nano-Al/NiO thermites film as well as combustion performance.

  14. Robofurnace: A semi-automated laboratory chemical vapor deposition system for high-throughput nanomaterial synthesis and process discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, C. Ryan; Westrick, William; Koehler, Jeremy; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; Anagnostopoulos-Politis, Ilias; Cruz-Gonzalez, Tizoc; Hart, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory research and development on new materials, such as nanostructured thin films, often utilizes manual equipment such as tube furnaces due to its relatively low cost and ease of setup. However, these systems can be prone to inconsistent outcomes due to variations in standard operating procedures and limitations in performance such as heating and cooling rates restrict the parameter space that can be explored. Perhaps more importantly, maximization of research throughput and the succes...

  15. Educational Objectives Of Different Laboratory Types: A Comparative Study

    CERN Document Server

    Elawady, Yasser H

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory based courses play a critical role in scientific education. Automation is changing the nature of the laboratories, and there is a long running debate about the value of hands on versus simulated and remote laboratories. The remote lab technology has brought a significant improvement in communication within the Academic community and has improved students learning experiences. There are different educational objectives as criteria for judging the laboratories: Hands on advocates emphasize design skills, while remote lab advocates focus on conceptual understanding. Remote laboratories offer all the advantages of the new technology, but are often a poor replacement for real laboratory work. Remote laboratories are similar to simulation techniques in that they require minimal space and time, because the experiments can be rapidly configured and run over the Internet [Web]. But unlike simulations, they provide real data. This paper presents a comparative analysis for the educational objectives of the th...

  16. Laboratory Studies of Vibrational Relaxation: Important Insights for Mesospheric OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogerakis, Konstantinos S.; Matsiev, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The hydroxyl radical has a key role in the chemistry and energetics of the Earth's middle atmosphere. A detailed knowledge of the rate constants and relevant pathways for OH(high v) vibrational relaxation by atomic and molecular oxygen and their temperature dependence is absolutely critical for understanding mesospheric OH and extracting reliable chemical heating rates from atmospheric observations. We have developed laser-based experimental approaches to study the complex collisional energy transfer processes involving the OH radical and other relevant atmospheric species. Previous work in our laboratory indicated that the total removal rate constant for OH(v = 9) + O at room temperature is more than one order of magnitude larger than that for removal by O2. Thus, O atoms are expected to significantly influence the intensity and vibrational distribution extracted from the Meinel OH(v) emissions. We will report our most recent laboratory experiments that corroborate the aforementioned result for OH(v = 9) + O and provide important new insights on the mechanistic pathways involved. We will also highlight relevant atmospheric implications, including warranted revisions of current mesospheric OH models. Research supported by SRI International Internal R&D and NSF Aeronomy grant AGS-1441896. Previously supported by NASA Geospace Science grant NNX12AD09G.

  17. Design of laboratory experiments to study radiation-driven implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, P. A.; Trantham, M.; Malamud, G.; Klein, S. R.; Davis, J.; VanDervort, R.; Shvarts, D.; Drake, R. P.; Stone, J. M.; Fraenkel, M.; Frank, Y.; Raicher, E.

    2017-03-01

    The interstellar medium is heterogeneous with dense clouds amid an ambient medium. Radiation from young OB stars asymmetrically irradiate the dense clouds. Bertoldi (1989) developed analytic formulae to describe possible outcomes of these clouds when irradiated by hot, young stars. One of the critical parameters that determines the cloud's fate is the number of photon mean free paths in the cloud. For the extreme cases where the cloud size is either much greater than or much less than one mean free path, the radiation transport should be well understood. However, as one transitions between these limits, the radiation transport is much more complex and is a challenge to solve with many of the current radiation transport models implemented in codes. We present the design of laboratory experiments that use a thermal source of x-rays to asymmetrically irradiate a low-density plastic foam sphere. The experiment will vary the density and hence the number of mean free paths of the sphere to study the radiation transport in different regimes. We have developed dimensionless parameters to relate the laboratory experiment to the astrophysical system and we show that we can perform the experiment in the same transport regime.

  18. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Regulatory Assessment Dept.] [and others

    1995-12-01

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

  19. Anterior chamber lenses. Part II: A laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, D J; Hansen, S O; Richards, S C; Ellis, G W; Kavka-Van Norman, D; Tetz, M R; Pfeffer, B R; Park, R B; Crandall, A S; Olson, R J

    1987-03-01

    An analysis of 606 surgically removed anterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) specimens revealed that 351 or 58% of these were small-diameter, round loop, closed-loop styles. Because of the extremely high percentage of IOLs with this design received in our laboratory and the correlation of clinical histories with our histopathologic findings, we have concluded that such IOLs do not provide the safety and efficacy achieved by other anterior chamber lens designs. The finely polished, one-piece, all-PMMA styles fared well in our study. Although these one-piece styles comprise well over 50% of the American market share of anterior chamber IOLs, they comprise only 14% of all anterior chamber IOLs accessioned in our laboratory, compared to 58% for closed-loop designs. We believe that implantation of anterior chamber lenses with small-diameter, round, closed loops is no longer warranted. Patients in whom these IOLs have already been implanted should be carefully followed. It is our opinion that the FDA should recall or closely monitor all IOLs of this design and that implantation of closed-loop lenses should be discontinued in the United States. Furthermore, we believe that an IOL deemed to be not medically sound or worthy of implantation in the United States should not be marketed or donated outside of this country.

  20. Rorschach measures of aggression: a laboratory-based validity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivisto, Aaron J; Swan, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to complement the archival research designs that have established the empirical foundations of Rorschach aggression scores, including Exner's ( 2003 ) Aggressive Movement (AG) score and Meloy and Gacono's ( 1992 ) Aggressive Content (AgC), Aggressive Past (AgPast), and Aggressive Potential (AgPot) variables. Utilizing a highly controlled laboratory-based aggression paradigm and self-report measures of violence history in a sample of 35 undergraduate males with an average age of 19.38 (SD = 2.11), this study found that only AgC was positively associated with in vivo aggression (r = .40, p = .02). None of the Rorschach measures of aggression were significantly associated with self-reported violence history, although there were several trends approaching significance. Theoretical and methodological implications are discussed.

  1. The role of dense brines in the formation of vent-distal sedimentary-exhalative (SEDEX) lead-zinc deposits: field and laboratory evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, Donald F.

    2002-03-01

    A majority of the world's sediment-hosted exhalative (SEDEX) lead-zinc deposits are vent-distal. They are not underlain by a discordant alteration zone or stockwork vent complex that would indicate the path by which ore fluids reached the seafloor. The absence of a vent complex, together with sulfide mineral replacement of host rock mineral assemblages has led several investigators to suggest that, in spite of the well-layered nature of these deposits, mineralization was formed by sub-seafloor lateral migration of ore fluids along permeable strata. Field observations, supported by simple laboratory experiments, however, suggest an alternative process for characterizing the genesis of vent-distal SEDEX deposits. Cool, saline brines (e.g., ~120 °C and >15 wt% NaCl equiv.) are denser than seawater and, upon discharging into the sea, would flow away from the discharge vent as bottom-hugging fluids, similar to the behavior of turbidity currents. Their high densities and velocities prevent them from mixing with overlying seawater, thereby precluding significant cooling and dilution of the ore fluid. Upon coming to rest in a seafloor depression, the addition of H2S and/or dilution of the ore fluids to lower salinities result in the eventual precipitation of a vent-distal SEDEX deposit. Furthermore, the dense ore-forming fluid can sink into permeable sediments beneath the brine pool by displacing less dense pore water. The ore fluids are thus capable of effectively overprinting and/or replacing pre-existing minerals in the consolidating sediment pile.

  2. Influence of particle density on flow behavior and deposit architecture of concentrated pyroclastic density currents over a break in slope: Insights from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Sedano, L. A.; Sarocchi, D.; Sulpizio, R.; Borselli, L.; Campos, G.; Moreno Chavez, G.

    2016-12-01

    Geological granular flows are highly complex, gravity-driven phenomena whose different behaviors depend on the mechanical properties, density and granulometric distributions of the constituent materials. Years of research have produced significant advances in understanding transport and deposition processes in granular flows. However, the role and effects of clast densities and density contrast in a granular flow are still not fully understood. In this paper we show the effect that pumice has on dry granular flows; specifically on flow velocity and longitudinal segregation of the deposits. Our work confirms, by experimental results, field observations on pumice/lithic segregation and longer pumice runout. We report results of velocity decay and deposit architecture for a granular flow passing over a break in slope (from 38° to 4° inclination). The 30 experimental runs were carried out in a five-meter long laboratory flume equipped with a series of sensors that include laser gates and high-speed cameras (400 fps). We used two polydisperse mixtures of dacitic lithics and rhyolitic pumice in varying amounts, with Weibull and Gaussian particle size distributions. The pumice/lithic ratio changes the flow response passing over a break in slope. This effect is particularly evident starting from 10% of pumice volume into the flow mixture, independently of its granulometric distribution. Runout relates to mass following a power law, with an exponent close 0.2. The experiments confirm that pumice segregation affects polydispersed mixtures, similarly to what has been observed in real field deposits, where density decoupling produces lithic-enriched proximal areas and pumice-enriched distal areas. The results obtained prove that the presence of low-density materials in a dense granular flow has a strong influence on its behavior.

  3. Boring of full scale deposition holes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Operational experiences including boring performance and a work time analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Christer [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Aasa [SWECO, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    Thirteen experimental deposition holes similar to those in the present KBS-3 design have been bored at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Oskarshamn, Sweden. The objective with the boring program was to test and demonstrate the current technique for boring of large vertical holes in granitic rock. Conclusions and results from this project is used in the planning process for the deposition holes that will be bored in the real repository for spent nuclear fuel. The boreholes are also important for three major projects. The Prototype Repository, the Canister Retrieval Test and the Demonstration project will all need full-scale deposition holes for their commissioning. The holes are bored in full scale and have a radius of 1.75 m and a depth of 8.5 m. To bore the holes an existing TBM design was modified to produce a novel type Shaft Boring Machine (SBM) suitable for boring 1.75 m diameter holes from a relatively small tunnel. The cutter head was equipped with two types of roller cutters: two row carbide button cutters and disc cutters. Removal of the cuttings was made with a vacuum suction system. The boring was monitored and boring parameters recorded by a computerised system for the evaluation of the boring performance. During boring of four of the holes temperature, stress and strain measurements were performed. Acoustic emission measurements were also performed during boring of these four holes. The results of these activities will not be discussed in this report since they are reported separately. Criteria regarding nominal borehole diameter, deviation of start and end centre point, surface roughness and performance of the machine were set up according to the KBS-3 design and were fulfilled with a fair margin. The average total time for boring one deposition hole during this project was 105 hours.

  4. Pilot studies on discolouration loose deposits' build-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poças, Ana; Rebola, Nazaré; Rodrigues, Sérgio; Benoliel, Maria João; Rietveld, Luuk; Vreeburg, Jan; Menaia, José

    2015-01-01

    Tap water discolouration occurs due to resuspension of loose deposits (LD) that accumulate in drinking water distribution systems. Strategies for discolouration control involve network pipe cleaning and replacement of cast-iron pipes. However, the sole application of such measures is not generall

  5. Change in argonne national laboratory: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, A

    1971-10-01

    Despite traditional opposition to change within an institution and the known reluctance of an "old guard" to accept new managerial policies and techniques, the reactions suggested in this study go well beyond the level of a basic resistance to change. The response, indeed, drawn from a random sampling of Laboratory scientific and engineering personnel, comes close to what Philip Handler has recently described as a run on the scientific bank in a period of depression (1, p. 146). It appears that Argonne's apprehension stems less from the financial cuts that have reduced staff and diminished programs by an annual 10 percent across the last 3 fiscal years than from the administrative and conceptual changes that have stamped the institution since 1966. Administratively, the advent of the AUA has not forged a sense of collaborative effort implicit in the founding negotiations or contributed noticeably to increasing standards of excellence at Argonne. The AUA has, in fact, yet to exercise the constructive powers vested in them by the contract of reviewing and formulating long-term policy on the research and reactor side. Additionally, the University of Chicago, once the single operator, appears to have forfeited some of the trust and understanding that characterized the Laboratory's attitude to it in former years. In a period of complex and sensitive management the present directorate at Argonne is seriously dissociated from a responsible spectrum of opinion within the Laboratory. The crux of discontent among the creative scientific and engineering community appears to lie in a developed sense of being overadministered. In contrast to earlier periods, Argonne's professional staff feels a critical need for a voice in the formulation of Laboratory programs and policy. The Argonne senate could supply this mechanism. Slow to rally, their present concern springs from a firm conviction that the Laboratory is "withering on the vine." By contrast, the Laboratory director Powers

  6. Oviposition behaviour of Phlebotomus argentipes - A laboratory-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The breeding habitat of sandflies is a little studied and poorly understood phenomenon. More importantly, oviposition behaviour is a largely neglected aspect of sandfly biology and this knowledge gap further undermines our understanding of the biology of sandflies. Pheromones released by the eggs play an important role in identifying good sites for oviposition by female insects. Several recent studies have examined the oviposition pheromone. The present study provides a preliminary report on the oviposition behaviour of Phlebotomus argentipes, the only vector of kala-azar (or visceral leishmaniasis on the Indian sub-continent. Sandflies prefer to oviposit their eggs on surfaces that contain organic substances, especially substances with an odour of decaying animal products and the remains of conspecific eggs. The results presented here suggest that the odour released by the organic substances of old sandfly colony remains that contain dead flies, old unhatched eggs, larval food containing vertebrate faeces, frass and other organic matter serves as an attractant for the ovipositing females of P. argentipes and hence greatly increases the number of oviposited eggs compared to eggs deposited in controlled oviposition pots. This result will be helpful in maintaining an efficient colony of P. argentipes and may be a promising tool for monitoring and controlling the target insect as part of a synergistic approach.

  7. Study on Laboratory Method for Refining of SR Diesel Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Junling; Zheng Tinglu; Han Zhaping

    2006-01-01

    The method for refining the straight-run diesel fuel was studied in laboratory scale in order to make the acid number of diesel fraction comply with the standard while removing the naphthenic acids contained in diesel without causing environmental pollution. After comparing the effect of refining using three solvents, the isopropyl alcohol-HOA was specified as the best solvent. Meanwhile, the relationship between the acid number of diesel fraction and the amount of solvent used and the relationship between the concentration of solvent and temperature and the stability of diesel in terms of its acid number were also investigated. Experimental results had shown that when the mass fraction of the HOA-IPA solvent was 20% at a dosage of 17 mL of the solvent and a temperature of 30℃, the acid number of the refined diesel fraction was 0.015 mg KOH/g with a good stability of acidity in the diesel traction.

  8. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, C. C. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Burleson, Theodore A. [Colorado State U.; Milton, Stephen V. [Colorado State U.; Morin, Auralee L. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Stephen V. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Hannon, Fay E. [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Carlsten, Bruce E. [LANL; Lewellen, John W. [LANL

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  9. Laboratory aging studies for the HERA-B muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Danilov, M; Titov, M; Zaitsev, Y

    2002-01-01

    The severe radiation environment of the HERA-B experiment leads to a maximum accumulated charge on a wire, within the muon detector, of 200 mC/cm wire. For operation in this high-intensity environment, the main criteria for the gas choice turned out to be stability against aging. We report recent results of laboratory aging studies performed by irradiating proportional wire chambers filled with Ar/CF sub 4 /CH sub 4 (74:20:6), Ar/CF sub 4 /CH sub 4 (67:30:3), and Ar/CF sub 4 /CO sub 2 (65:30:5) mixtures. The penetration of water and oxygen through the walls of plastic tubes has also been investigated. Water can be introduced indirect to the gas mixture by using polyamide (nylon) pipes for gas supply lines.

  10. Design of Laboratory Experiments to Study Photoionization Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William James; Davis, Josh; Drake, R. Paul

    2017-06-01

    Here we present the theoretical foundation for a laboratory experiment to study photoionization fronts. Photoionization fronts play important roles in the formation and evolution of structure in the Universe. A properly designed experiment will have to control the recombination rate, electron impact ionization rate, and the initial thermal spectrum. We show that such an experiment can be designed, but requires the use of the largest high-energy-density laser facilities, such as Omega, Z, and NIF. We also show that prior experiments do not actually generate photoionization fronts, rather a heat front is produced by heat conductions. We show some initial simulation results of the current experimental design and characterize the ionization front.

  11. Studies of Ionospheric Processes in the Atmosphere and the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    relevance to HAARP observations, and on vibrationally-excited levels of the O2 ground state [2] and the b1Σ +g excited state [3]. Synergy with the...UT [20] 29.4 (33) 260 0.94 .077 3/24/95 1737 UT 43.4 (44) 278 0.54 0.53 HAARP 62N, 145W 3/20/04 0617 UT [21] 54 (44) 290 0.33 0.54... HAARP 0.62 5.0E8 1.09E8 4.6 Studies of Ionospheric Processes in the Atmosphere and the Laboratory RTO-MP-IST-056 1 - 9 UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED

  12. Partnering at the National Laboratories: Catalysis as a Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JACKSON,NANCY B.

    1999-09-14

    The role of the national laboratories, particularly the defense program laboratories, since the end of the cold war, has been a topic of continuing debate. The relationship of national laboratories to industry spurred debate which ranged from designating the labs as instrumental to maintaining U.S. economic competitiveness to concern over the perception of corporate welfare to questions regarding the industrial globalization and the possibility of U.S. taxpayer dollars supporting foreign entities. Less debated, but equally important, has been the national laboratories' potential competition with academia for federal research dollars and discussions detailing the role of each in the national research enterprise.

  13. Laboratory Studies of Methane and Its Relationship to Prebiotic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Geppert, Wolf D.; Carrasco, Nathalie; Holm, Nils G.; Mousis, Olivier; Palumbo, Maria Elisabetta; Waite, J. Hunter; Watanabe, Naoki; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2017-08-01

    To examine how prebiotic chemical evolution took place on Earth prior to the emergence of life, laboratory experiments have been conducted since the 1950s. Methane has been one of the key molecules in these investigations. In earlier studies, strongly reducing gas mixtures containing methane and ammonia were used to simulate possible reactions in the primitive atmosphere of Earth, producing amino acids and other organic compounds. Since Earth's early atmosphere is now considered to be less reducing, the contribution of extraterrestrial organics to chemical evolution has taken on an important role. Such organic molecules may have come from molecular clouds and regions of star formation that created protoplanetary disks, planets, asteroids, and comets. The interstellar origin of organics has been examined both experimentally and theoretically, including laboratory investigations that simulate interstellar molecular reactions. Endogenous and exogenous organics could also have been supplied to the primitive ocean, making submarine hydrothermal systems plausible sites of the generation of life. Experiments that simulate such hydrothermal systems where methane played an important role have consequently been conducted. Processes that occur in other Solar System bodies offer clues to the prebiotic chemistry of Earth. Titan and other icy bodies, where methane plays significant roles, are especially good targets. In the case of Titan, methane is both in the atmosphere and in liquidospheres that are composed of methane and other hydrocarbons, and these have been studied in simulation experiments. Here, we review the wide range of experimental work in which these various terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments have been modeled, and we examine the possible role of methane in chemical evolution.

  14. A Prospecting Mineralogy Study:Arsenopyrite In Endogenetic Gold Deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaomin; ZHANG Hongzhi

    2001-01-01

    Arsenopyrite is one of very important and common auriferous minerals in endogenetic gold deposits. In seven gold deposits, the prospecting typomorphic characteristics of arsenopyrite, such as morphological typomorphism, composition typomorphism, pyroelectricity typomorphism and so on, were established. The crystal form of arsenopyrite is simple, and the form symbols mainly are {101}, {120}, {210}, {140}, {230}, {012}, etc. The smaller groin and poor crystal form arsenopyrite indicates the better auriferous characteristics. The major elements (Fe, As and S) of gold- bearing arsenopyrite usually show Fe/As + S > 0.5, As/S< 1 which deviates from its theoretical value. The most important trace element is Au and next is Ag in arsenopyrite, and they often show the positive correlation. The pyroelectricity of arsenopyrite can reflect the mineralization epoch, and it also is related to the crystal form and granudarity.

  15. Optical emission spectroscopy study on deposition process of microcrystalline silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zhi-Meng; Lei Qing-Song; Geng Xin-Hua; Zhao Ying; Sun Jian; Xi Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports that the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to monitor the plasma during the deposition process of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films in a very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system. The OES intensities (SiH*, H*α and H*β) are investigated by varying the deposition parameters. The result shows that the discharge power, silane concentrations and substrate temperature affect the OES intensities. When the discharge power at silane concentration of 4% increases, the OES intensities increase first and then are constant, the intensities increase with the discharge power monotonously at silane concentration of 6%. The SiH* intensity increases with silane concentration, while the intensities of H*α and H*β increase first and then decrease. When the substrate temperature increases, the SiH* intensity decreases and the intensities of H*α and H*β are constant. The correlation between the intensity ratio of IH*α/ISiH* and the crystalline volume fraction (Xc) of films is confirmed.

  16. Spreading and Deposit Characteristics of a Rapid Dry Granular Avalanche Across 3D Topography: Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Xu, Qiang; Cheng, Qian-Gong; Li, Yan; Luo, Zhong-Xu

    2016-11-01

    Aiming to understand the propagation and deposit behaviours of a granular avalanche along a 3D complex basal terrain, a new 3D experimental platform in 1/400 scale was developed according to the natural terrain of the Xiejiadianzi rock avalanche, with a series of laboratory experiments being conducted. Through the conduction of these tests, parameters, including the morphological evolution of sliding mass, run-outs and velocities of surficial particles, thickness contour and centre of final deposit, equivalent frictional coefficient, and energy dissipation, are documented and analysed, with the geomorphic control effect, material grain size effect, drop angle effect, and drop distance effect on rock avalanche mobility being discussed primarily. From the study, some interesting conclusions for a better understanding of rock avalanche along a 3D complex basal topography are reached. (1) For the granular avalanche tested in this study, great differences between the evolutions of the debris along the right and left branch valleys were observed, with an obvious geomorphic control effect on avalanche mobility presented. In addition, some other interesting features, including groove-like trough and superelevation, were also observed under the control of the topographic interferences. (2) The equivalent frictional coefficients of the granular avalanches tested here range from 0.48 to 0.57, which is lower than that reached with a set-up composed of an inclined chute and horizontal plate and higher than that reached using a set-up composed of only an inclined chute. And the higher the drop angle and fine particle content, the higher the equivalent frictional coefficient. The effect of drop distance on avalanche mobility is minor. (3) For a granular avalanche, momentum transfer plays an important role in the motion of mass, which can accelerate the mobility of the front part greatly through delivering the kinetic energy of the rear part to the front.

  17. Study of the deposition process of vinpocetine on the surface of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenshin, A. S.; Polkovnikova, Yu. A.; Seredin, P. V.

    Currently the most prospective way in pharmacotherapy is the obtaining of nanoparticles involving pharmaceutical substances. Application of porous inorganic materials on the basis of silicon is among the main features in solving of this problem. The present work is concerned with the problem of the deposition of pharmaceutical drug with nootropic activity - vinpocetine - into porous silicon. Silicon nanoparticles were obtained by electrochemical anodic etching of Si plates. The process of vinpocetine deposition was studied in dependence of the deposition time. As a result of the investigations it was found that infrared transmission spectra of porous silicon with the deposited vinpocetine revealed the absorption bands characteristic of vinpocetine substance.

  18. Influence of normal daytime fat deposition on laboratory measurements of torpor use in territorial versus nonterritorial hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald R; Brown, Alison R; Van Hook, Jessamyn A

    2003-01-01

    Fat deposition and torpor use in hummingbirds exhibiting distinct foraging styles should vary. We predicted that dominant territorial hummingbirds will use torpor less than subordinate nonterritorial species because unrestricted access to energy by territory owners allows for fat storage. Entry into torpor was monitored using open-flow respirometry on hummingbirds allowed to accumulate fat normally during the day. Fat accumulation was measured by solvent fat extraction. Territorial blue-throated hummingbirds (Lampornis clemenciae) had the highest fat accumulation and used torpor only 17% of the time. Fat storage by L. clemenciae averaged 26% of lean dry mass (LDM) in 1995 and 18% in 1996, similar to that measured for other nonmigratory birds. Fat storage by magnificent hummingbirds (Eugenes fulgens; trapliner) and black-chinned hummingbirds (Archilochus alexandri; nectar robber) averaged 19% and 16% of LDM, respectively, and they used torpor frequently (64% and 92% of the time, respectively). All species initiated torpor if total body fat dropped below 10% of LDM, indicating the existence of a torpor threshold. The ability of L. clemenciae to store enough fat to support nighttime metabolism is likely an important benefit of territoriality. Likewise, frequent torpor use by subordinates suggests that natural restrictions to energy intake can impact their energy budget, necessitating energy conservation by use of torpor.

  19. Tonsillitis in children: unnecessary laboratory studies and antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnamo, Antti; Korppi, Matti; Helminen, Merja

    2016-02-01

    The Finnish Current Care Guidelines on diagnostics and treatment of sore throat recommend the treatment of only group A streptococcus (GAS) positive cases with penicillin. The aim of the study was to evaluate how these guidelines are followed in the pediatric emergency unit. We analyzed retrospectively the data on microbiological studies and blood tests done, and data on prescribing of antibiotics, of 200 children admitted for febrile exudative tonsillitis. After the clinical diagnosis of exudative tonsillitis, antigen test and/or culture for GAS identification was done in >95% of cases. All the 32 (16%) children with GAS infection, but also 52 (38%) of the 137 children without any evidence of bacterial infection received antibiotics. Additional laboratory studies were done in 96% of children. Serum C-reactive concentrations or white blood cell counts were not able to separate streptococcal from non-streptococcal tonsillitis. No serious bacterial infection was diagnosed. The Finnish Current Care Guidelines lead to over-treatment with antibiotics. None of the 200 children returned after discharge, suggesting that undertreatment did not happen.

  20. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies have been conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, (2) experiments on cancer development in animals, and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats have been shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies have been conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels have been shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements have been performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  1. Who are Sleeping in Sleep Laboratory? A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Ayşe Altun Emirza

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study is to compare the results of gold standard in diagnosing sleep disorders polysomnography (PSG with the physician’s preliminary diagnosis and complaints of patients in our data of sleep laboratory. METHODS: 656 patients who made PSG were included in the study. All of the patients age, gender, comorbid chronic disease, complaints, preliminary diagnosis and PSG diagnosis were evaluated retrospectively. RESULTS: In our study, the average age of patients was 56 and 43% women 57% were male. Complaints of patients were snoring, fatigue, stopped breath during sleep, insomnia, headache, daytime sleepiness, restless legs and abnormal behaviors during sleep. According to preliminary diagnoses and PSG diagnoses; Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS, narcolepsy, REM behavior disorder (RBD reduced (p 0.05. Sleep disorders in patients was accompanied by chronic diseases, hypertension (34.3%, diabetes (12.8%, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD (1.2%, epilepsy (1.8%, Parkinson's disease (3.5%, dementia (3.2%, depression (18.4%, cardiovascular disease (13.3% and cerebrovascular disease (4.9%. 9%. CONCLUSION: We are offering a good clinical history and physical examination with the correct interpretation of PSG for the differential diagnosis can be made true, accurate diagnoses and appropriate treatment modalities in our patients.

  2. Molecular Carbon in the Galaxy: Laboratory and Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saykally, Richard James

    2003-01-01

    In a collaboration with the Mats Larsson group from Stockholm, we carried out a new measurement of the rate of dissociative recombination of H(sup *, sub j), using a new pulsed supersonic beam source of rotationally cold H(sup *, sub j). This source was first designed and characterized in our lab by IR cavity ringdown spectroscopy, determining a rotationaYtranslationa1 temperature of 20-60K, depending on conditions. This new source was then taken to Stockholm for the recombination rate studies at the CRYRING storage ring. The recombination rate constant measured against temperature yields values consistent with the most recent calculations, whereas previous experimental measurements varied over a range of 10(exp 4) and were poor agreement with theory. This is a crucial achievement for understanding the ion chemistry of diffuse clouds. Moreover, this result in combination with recent observations implies a greatly enhanced (factor of 40) cosmic ray ionization rate in a diffuse cloud (zeta Persei) relative to previous studies. The implications of this are discussed in our recent Nature paper. An enhanced cosmic-ray flux towards zeta Persei inferred from a laboratory study of the H(sup *, sub j)-e(sup -) recombination rate.

  3. Morphological Study Of Palladium Thin Films Deposited By Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, K L; Rodriguez, C A [Grupo Plasma Laser y Aplicaciones, Ingenieria Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira (Colombia); Perez, F A [WNANO, West Virginia University (United States); Riascos, H [Grupo Plasma Laser y Aplicaciones, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira (Colombia)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a morphological analysis of thin films of palladium (Pd) deposited on a substrate of sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) at a constant pressure of 3.5 mbar at different substrate temperatures (473 K, 523 K and 573 K). The films were morphologically characterized by means of an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM); finding a relation between the roughness and the temperature. A morphological analysis of the samples through AFM was carried out and the roughness was measured by simulating the X-ray reflectivity curve using GenX software. A direct relation between the experimental and simulation data of the Palladium thin films was found.

  4. Laboratory study of methyl isocyanate ices under astrophysical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté, B.; Molpeceres, G.; Timón, V.; Tanarro, I.; Escribano, R.; Guillemin, J. C.; Cernicharo, J.; Herrero, V. J.

    2017-10-01

    Methyl isocyanate has been recently detected in comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/CG) and in the interstellar medium. New physicochemical studies on this species are now necessary as tools for subsequent studies in astrophysics. In this work, infrared spectra of solid CH3NCO have been obtained at temperatures of relevance for astronomical environments. The spectra are dominated by a strong, characteristic multiplet feature at 2350-2250 cm-1, which can be attributed to the asymmetric stretching of the NCO group. A phase transition from amorphous to crystalline methyl isocyanate is observed at ˜90 K. The band strengths for the absorptions of CH3NCO in ice at 20 K have been measured. Deuterated methyl isocyanate is used to help with the spectral assignment. No X-ray structure has been reported for crystalline CH3NCO. Here we advance a tentative theoretical structure, based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, derived taking the crystal of isocyanic acid as a starting point. A harmonic theoretical spectrum is then calculated for the proposed structure and compared with the experimental data. A mixed ice of H2O and CH3NCO was formed by simultaneous deposition of water and methyl isocyanate at 20 K. The absence of new spectral features indicates that methyl isocyanate and water do not react appreciably at 20 K, but form a stable mixture. The high CH3NCO/H2O ratio reported for comet 67P/CG, and the characteristic structure of the 2350-2250 cm-1 band, makes it a very good candidate for future astronomical searches.

  5. Impinging jet study of the deposition of colloidal particles on synthetic polymer (Zeonor)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlček, Jakub; Lapčík, Lubomír; Cech, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an impinging jet deposition experiments were performed on synthetic polymer (Zeonor) original and by micro-embossing modified substrates with exactly defined topology as confirmed by AFM and SEM. Deposition experiments were performed at ambient temperature and at selected flow regime...

  6. Laboratory studies and Pompe disease: from suspicion to therapy monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Savost’yanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease (PD is a rare, progressive, commonly fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease that is difficult to diagnose due to its obvious clinical heterogeneity and low awareness among physicians. Access to the laboratory diagnosis of rare diseases increases every year. In the past several years, Russian and foreign laboratories have achieved considerable success in accelerating and improving the diagnostic accuracy of PD. Unfortunately, the Russian-language literature contains scarce relevant information on the laboratory diagnosis of PD. This review is to fill up this gap. 

  7. The development of virtual laboratories: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyun; Pan, Xinmin

    2004-03-01

    At first, this paper introduces some features about Virtual Reality, which includes concept, practical use, basic character, etc. Then it turns to one of its branch-Virtual Laboratories. Virtual Laboratories developed rapidly in recent years, and it will have great effect on education area. This paper mentions about many advantages compared with traditional laboratories, the supporting technique, practical significance, etc. Later this paper mentions about a practical example in China. "Computer communiction" is a required curriculum in most universities, so "Virtual Communicating Experimental System" is developed to help teaching in TianJin Normal University.

  8. Laboratory study of forced rotating shallow water turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espa, Stefania; Di Nitto, Gabriella; Cenedese, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    During the last three decades several authors have studied the appearance of multiple zonal jets in planetary atmospheres and in the Earths oceans. The appearance of zonal jets has been recovered in numerical simulations (Yoden & Yamada, 1993), laboratory experiments (Afanasyev & Wells, 2005; Espa et al., 2008, 2010) and in field measurements of the atmosphere of giant planets (Galperin et al., 2001). Recent studies have revealed the presence of zonation also in the Earths oceans, in fact zonal jets have been found in the outputs of Oceanic General Circulation Models-GCMs (Nakano & Hasumi, 2005) and from the analysis of satellite altimetry observations (Maximenko et al., 2005). In previous works (Espa et al., 2008, 2010) we have investigated the impact of the variation of the rotation rate and of the fluid depth on jets organization in decaying and forced regimes. In this work we show results from experiments performed in a bigger domain in which the fluid is forced continuously. The experimental set-up consists of a rotating tank (1m in diameter) where the initial distribution of vorticity has been generated via the Lorentz force in an electromagnetic cell. The latitudinal variation of the Coriolis parameter has been simulated by the parabolic profile assumed by the free surface of the rotating fluid. Flow measurements have been performed using an image analysis technique. Experiments have been performed changing the tank rotation rate and the fluid thickness. We have investigated the flow in terms of zonal and radial flow pattern, flow variability and jet scales.

  9. Study of indium tin oxide thin films deposited on acrylics substrates by Ion beam assisted deposition technique

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Lijian; Liang Erjun; Gao Jinsong; Teixeira, Vasco M. P.; Santos, M. P. dos

    2009-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films have been deposited onto acrylics (PMMA) substrates by ion beam assisted deposition technique at different oxygen flows. The structural, optical and electrical properties of the deposited films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmittance, FTIR, ellipometry and Hall effect measurements. The optical constants of the deposited films have been calculated by fitting the ellipsometric spectra. The effects of the oxygen flow on the properties of the ...

  10. Raman microscopic studies of PVD deposited hard ceramic coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Constable, C P

    2000-01-01

    GPa were deposited onto SS and HSS substrates. Subsequent Raman measurements found a correlation coefficient of 0.996 between Raman band position and stress (determined via XRD methods). In addition, there was also a similar correlation coefficient observed between hardness and Raman shift (cm sup - sup 1). The application of mechanical stresses on a TiAICrN coating via a stress rig was investigated and tensile and compressive shifts were observed. stresses caused by the scratching process. These shifts were found to be the largest at the edges of scratches. The Raman mapping of 'droplets', a defect inherent to PVD deposition processes, found that higher compressive stresses and large amounts of disorder occurred for coating growth onto droplets. Strategies designed to evaluate the ability of Raman microscopy to monitor the extent of real wear on cutting tools were evaluated. The removal of a coating layer and subsequent detection of a base layer proved successful. This was then expanded to real wear situatio...

  11. New Laboratory and Field Studies on Shatter Cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaag, P. T.; Hasch, M.; Reimold, W. U.; Raschke, U.; Hipsley, C. A.; Hess, K.-U.; Dobson, K. J.

    2015-09-01

    Investigations of orientation, distribution, and shock micro-deformation of shatter cones were undertaken with micro-Computed Tomography and polarizing microscopy in the laboratory, and in the field at the Keurusselkä impact structure (Finland).

  12. Comparative study of effects of table sugar, laboratory grade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cntaganda

    four weeks, plants grown on the culture medium with laboratory grade sucrose showed consistently ... characteristics to those grown in the field (ZRYD, 1988). ... electrical neutrality, and its apparent lack of inhibitory effect on the majority of.

  13. A laboratory study of the composition and fermentation of various ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grain sorghum, forage sorghum, sunflower and maize were ensiled on laboratory scale. Sunflowers ..... to the bacteria during fermentation without further degradation of .... additions of urea, dried whey and sodium hydroxide. J. Anim. Sci.

  14. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the [sup 218]Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of [center dot]OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO[sub 2] ethylene, and H[sub 2]S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H[sub 2]O and NH[sub 3] in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of [sup 218]Po[sub x][sup +] in O[sub 2] at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited [sup 210]Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  15. Towards a better spatial quantification of nitrogen deposition: A case study for Czech forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hůnová, Iva; Kurfürst, Pavel; Vlček, Ondřej; Stráník, Vojtěch; Stoklasová, Petra; Schovánková, Jana; Srbová, Daša

    2016-06-01

    The quantification of atmospheric deposition flux is essential for assessment of its impact on ecosystems. We present an advanced approach for the estimation of the spatial pattern of atmospheric nitrogen deposition flux over the Czech forests, collating all available measured data and model results. The aim of the presented study is to provide an improved, more complete, more reliable and more realistic estimate of the spatial pattern of nitrogen deposition flux over one country. This has so far usually been based on measurements of ambient NOx concentrations as dry deposition proxy, and [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] in precipitation as wet deposition proxy. For estimation of unmeasured species contributing to dry deposition, we used the CAMx Eulerian photochemical dispersion model, coupled with the Aladin regional numeric weather prediction model. The contribution of fog and dissolved organic nitrogen was estimated using a geostatistical data driven model. We prepared individual maps for particular components applying the most relevant approach and then merged all layers to obtain a final map representing the best estimate of nitrogen deposition over the Czech Republic. Final maps accounting for unmeasured species clearly indicate that the approach used so far may result in a substantial underestimation of nitrogen deposition flux. Our results showed that nitrogen deposition over the Czech forested area in 2008 was well above 2 g N m(-2) yr(-1), with almost 70% of forested area receiving 3-4 g N m(-2) yr(-1). NH3 and gaseous HNO3, contributing about 80%, dominated the dry nitrogen deposition. Estimating the unmeasured nitrogen species by modeled values provides realistic approximations of total nitrogen deposition that also result in more realistic spatial patterns that could be used as input for further studies of likely nitrogen impacts on ecosystems.

  16. Laboratory Studies of Sea-Ice-Wave Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monty, J.; Meylan, M. H.; Babanin, A. V.; Toffoli, A.; Bennetts, L.

    2016-12-01

    A world-first facility for studying the Marginal Ice Zone has been constructed in the Michell Hydrodynamics Laboratory at the University of Melbourne. A 14m long wave tank (0.75m wide, 0.6m deep) resides in a freezer, where air temperature can be controlled down to -15C. This permits the freezing of the water surface. Large stainless steel ice-making trays (up to 4 m long) are also available to create ice of desired thickness and microstructure, which can be lowered onto the water surface. A computer controlled wave generator is capable of creating waves of any desired form. The temperature of the water in the tank can also be controlled between 2 and 30C. The tank frame is constructed of marine-treated wood and the entire tank is glass and acrylic, permitting the use of corrosive fluids, such as salt water. Here we present the first laboratory experiments of break-up of a controlled thickness, fresh water ice sheet impacted by regular and JONSWAP spectrum surface waves. The geometry of the resultant ice-floes is measured with high-resolution, time-resolved imaging, providing the crucial data of floe size distribution. Initial observations show that, in the case of high steepness waves, the primary mechanisms of ice break-up at the ice edge are overwash and rafting, both of which put weight on the ice interior to the ice-water interface. This additional weight (and impact in the case of rafting) breaks more ice, which allows overwash and rafting deeper into the ice sheet, breaking more ice and so on. For lower steepness waves, overwash and rafting are still present but far less significant. Finally, results of vertical ice movement using laser height gauges will be presented showing the attenuation of waves into an ice sheet and through a pack of ice floes. These results are compared with field data and theory available (e.g. Squire & Moore, Nature, 1980 and Kohout et al., Nature, 2014).

  17. Mosses as an integrating tool for monitoring PAH atmospheric deposition: comparison with total deposition and evaluation of bioconcentration factors. A year-long case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foan, Louise; Domercq, Maria; Bermejo, Raúl; Santamaría, Jesús Miguel; Simon, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) atmospheric deposition was evaluated at a remote site in Northern Spain using moss biomonitoring with Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) Schimp., and by measuring the total deposition fluxes of PAHs. The year-long study allowed seasonal variations of PAH content in mosses to be observed, and these followed a similar trend to those of PAH fluxes in total deposition. Generally, atmospheric deposition of PAHs is greater in winter than in summer, due to more PAH emissions from domestic heating, less photoreactivity of the compounds, and intense leaching of the atmosphere by wet deposition. However, fractionation of these molecules between the environmental compartments occurs: PAH fluxes in total deposition and PAH concentrations in mosses are correlated with their solubility (r=0.852, pPAH fluxes can be estimated with moss biomonitoring data if the bioconcentration or 'enriching' factors are known.

  18. Asymmetry of wind waves studied in a laboratory tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ileykin, L. A.; Donelan, M. A.; Mellen, R. H.; McLaughlin, D. J.

    1995-03-01

    Asymmetry of wind waves was studied in laboratory tank tinder varied wind and fetch conditions using both bispectral analysis of wave records and third-order statistics of the surface elevation. It is found skewness S (the normalized third-order moment of surface elevation describing the horizontal asymmetry waves) varies only slightly with the inverse wave u*/Cm (where u* is the air friction velocity and Cm is phase speed of the dominant waves). At the same time asymmetry A, which is determined from the Hilbert transform of the wave record and characterizes the skewness of the rate of change of surface elevation, increase consistently in magnitude with the ratio u*/Cm. This suggests that nonlinear distortion of the wave profile determined by the degree of wind forcing and is a sensitive indicator of wind-wave interaction processes. It is shown that the asymmetric profile of waves can described within the frameworks of the nonlinear nonspectral concept (Plate, 1972; Lake and Yuen, 197 according to which the wind-wave field can be represented as a coherent bound-wave system consisting mainly of dominant component w. and its harmonics propagating with the same speed C. , as observed by Ramamonjiaris and Coantic (1976). The phase shift between o). harmonics is found and shown to increase with the asymmetry of the waves.

  19. Asymmetry of wind waves studied in a laboratory tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Leykin

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetry of wind waves was studied in laboratory tank tinder varied wind and fetch conditions using both bispectral analysis of wave records and third-order statistics of the surface elevation. It is found skewness S (the normalized third-order moment of surface elevation describing the horizontal asymmetry waves varies only slightly with the inverse wave u*/Cm (where u* is the air friction velocity and Cm is phase speed of the dominant waves. At the same time asymmetry A, which is determined from the Hilbert transform of the wave record and characterizes the skewness of the rate of change of surface elevation, increase consistently in magnitude with the ratio u*/Cm. This suggests that nonlinear distortion of the wave profile determined by the degree of wind forcing and is a sensitive indicator of wind-wave interaction processes. It is shown that the asymmetric profile of waves can described within the frameworks of the nonlinear nonspectral concept (Plate, 1972; Lake and Yuen, 197 according to which the wind-wave field can be represented as a coherent bound-wave system consisting mainly of dominant component w. and its harmonics propagating with the same speed C. , as observed by Ramamonjiaris and Coantic (1976. The phase shift between o. harmonics is found and shown to increase with the asymmetry of the waves.

  20. A laboratory study on groundwater quality and mass movement occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jen-Chen; Liu, Che-Hsin; Yang, Chih-Hsiang; Huang, Hsiao-Yu

    2009-06-01

    In this study, soil samples collected from the sides of two streams with high debris flow potential at Shenmu and Fengchiou village in Nantou County, Taiwan, were used for seepage tank tests in the laboratory. While the tests were being conducted, observations were made to investigate the relationships among displacement of the slope, quality of the seepage water and occurrence of mass movement. The results showed that according to the change rate, displacement could be divided into two stages, namely, the initial failure displacement stage and primary failure displacement stage. While the displacement of the slope was in primary failure displacement stages, the probability of slope failure became much higher. Before general slope failure, electrical conductivity (EC) and sulfate ion (SO4 2-) concentration of the seepage water increased significantly. The time when EC of the seepage water started to increase rapidly was much earlier than that when displacement of the slope started to increase significantly. Therefore, from the hazard mitigation view, there will be a longer time for response if EC of the seepage water was monitored.

  1. Laboratory studies of aeolian sediment transport processes on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Keld R.; Valance, Alexandre; Merrison, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    We review selected experimental saltation studies performed in laboratory wind tunnels and collision experiments performed in (splash-) laboratory facilities that allow detailed observations between impinging particles on a stationary bed. We also discuss progress in understanding aeolian transport in nonterrestrial environments. Saltation studies in terrestrial wind tunnels can be divided into two groups. The first group comprises studies using a short test bed, typically 1-4 m long, and focuses on the transitional behavior near the upwind roughness discontinuity where saltation starts. The other group focuses on studies using long test beds - typically 6 m or more - where the saturated saltation takes place under equilibrium conditions between wind flow and the underlying rough bed. Splash studies using upscaled model experiments allow collision simulations with large spherical particles to be recorded with a high speed video camera. The findings indicate that the number of ejected particles per impact scales linearly with the impact velocity of the saltating particles. Studies of saturated saltation in several facilities using predominantly Particle Tracking Velocimetry or Laser Doppler Velocimetry indicate that the velocity of the (few) particles having high trajectories increases with increasing friction velocity. However, the speed of the majority of particles that do not reach much higher than Bagnold's focal point is virtually independent of Shields parameter - at least for low or intermediate u*-values. In this case mass flux depends on friction velocity squared and not cubed as originally suggested by Bagnold. Over short beds particle velocity shows stronger dependence on friction velocity and profiles of particle velocity deviate from those obtained over long beds. Measurements using horizontally segmented traps give average saltation jump-lengths near 60-70 mm and appear to be only weakly dependent on friction velocity, which is in agreement with some

  2. Study of nozzle deposit formation mechanism for direct injection gasoline engines; Chokufun gasoline engine yo nozzle no deposit seisei kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, M.; Saito, A. [Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan); Matsushita, S. [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan); Shibata, H. [Nippon Soken, Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Niwa, Y. [Denso Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Nozzles in fuel injectors for direct injection gasoline engines are exposed to high temperature combustion gases and soot. In such a rigorous environment, it is a fear that fuel flow rate changes in injectors by deposit formation on nozzles. Fundamental factors of nozzle deposit formation were investigated through injector bench tests and engine dynamometer tests. Deposit formation processes were observed by SEM through engine dynamometer tests. The investigation results reveal nozzle deposit formation mechanism and how to suppress the deposit. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Comparative biological potency of acidic sulfate aerosols: implications for the interpretation of laboratory and field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R B; Chen, L C

    1994-04-01

    Biological responses to inhaled acid sulfates result from the deposition of hydrogen ion (H+) on airway surfaces. Thus, effects from sulfuric acid and ammonium bisulfate, the two major ambient species, have been assumed to be the same for a given H+ concentration within the exposure atmosphere, assuming similar respiratory tract deposition patterns. However, recent inhalation studies have indicated that sulfuric acid is disproportionately potent compared to ammonium bisulfate when the H+ content of the exposure atmosphere is considered, suggesting that some factors following inhalation affect the amount of H+ contacting airway surfaces. This study assessed a mechanism potentially underlying this phenomenon, namely, the extent of neutralization by respiratory tract ammonia. This was evaluated using a physical model system designed to mimic transit of these aerosols in the upper respiratory tract of the animal model used in this laboratory, the rabbit. The results suggest that for equal exposure quantities of H+, more acid would be deposited when sulfuric acid is inhaled than when ammonium bisulfate is inhaled. Furthermore, results from a series of in vitro exposures of tracheal epithelial cells to sulfuric acid and ammonium bisulfate aerosols indicated that the biological response is a function of the total mass (ionic) concentration of H+ deliverable to the cells or the total extractable H+ per particle. The results of this study have possible implications for ambient monitoring of particulate-associated strong acidity, suggesting that it may be necessary to specilate such measures into the relative amounts of H+ as sulfuric acid or ammonium bisulfate in order to most accurately relate atmospheric acid levels to observed health effects. In addition, since much of the ambient particulate-associated H+ exists as sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate mixtures rather than pure compounds, H(+)-associated health effects from controlled exposure studies of sulfuric acid may

  4. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph; Jost, Rémy; Bhattacharya, S K; Johnson, Matthew S; Savarino, Joël

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. ["Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ((15)N, (17)O, and (18)O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ(15)N, δ(18)O, and Δ(17)O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of (15)ɛ = (-15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of (15)ɛ = (-47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from -40 to -74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of (14)NO3 (-) and (15)NO3 (-) in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying this model under the experimental temperature as well as considering the

  5. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph; Jost, Rémy; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Savarino, Joël

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. ["Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate (15N, 17O, and 18O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ15N, δ18O, and Δ17O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of 15ɛ = (-15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of 15ɛ = (-47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from -40 to -74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of 14NO3- and 15NO3- in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying this model under the experimental temperature as well as considering the shift in width and center well

  6. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rémy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  7. Studies of tritiated co-deposited layers in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; G. Ascione; A. Carpe; R.A. Causey; T. Hayashi; J. Hogan; S. Langish; M. Nishi; W.M. Shu; W.R. Wampler; K. M. Young

    2000-06-28

    Plasma facing components in TFTR contain an important record of plasma wall interactions in reactor grade DT plasmas. Tiles, flakes, wall coupons, a stainless steel shutter and dust samples have been retrieved from the TFTR vessel for analysis. Selected samples have been baked to release tritium and assay the tritium content. The in-vessel tritium inventory is estimated to be 0.56 g and is consistent with the in-vessel tritium inventory derived from the difference between tritium fueling and tritium exhaust. The distribution of tritium on the limiter and vessel wall showed complex patterns of co-deposition. Relatively high concentrations of tritium were found at the top and bottom of the bumper limiter, as predicted by earlier BBQ modeling.

  8. Studies of tritiated co-deposited layers in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKINNER,C.H.; GENTILE,C.A.; ASCIONE,G.; CAUSEY,R.A.; HAYASKI,T.; HOGAN,J.; NISHI,M.; SHU,W.M.; WAMPLER,WILLIAM R.; YOUNG,K.M.

    2000-05-30

    Plasma facing components in TFTR contain an important record of plasma wall interactions in reactor grade DT plasmas. Tiles, flakes, wall coupons and dust samples have been retrieved from the TFTR vessel for analysis. Selected samples have been baked to release tritium and assay the tritium content. The in-vessel tritium inventory is estimated to be 0.5 g and is consistent with the in-vessel tritium inventory derived from the difference between tritium fueling and tritium exhaust. Relatively high concentrations of tritium were found at the top and bottom of the bumper limiter, as predicted by earlier BBQ modeling. The distribution of tritium on the limiter and vessel wall showed complex patterns of co-deposition.

  9. Field and Laboratory Studies of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, Matthew Mitchell

    This thesis is the culmination of field and laboratory studies aimed at assessing processes that affect the composition and distribution of atmospheric organic aerosol. An emphasis is placed on measurements conducted using compact and high-resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS). The first three chapters summarize results from aircraft campaigns designed to evaluate anthropogenic and biogenic impacts on marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of California. Subsequent chapters describe laboratory studies intended to evaluate gas and particle-phase mechanisms of organic aerosol oxidation. The 2013 Nucleation in California Experiment (NiCE) was a campaign designed to study environments impacted by nucleated and/or freshly formed aerosol particles. Terrestrial biogenic aerosol with > 85% organic mass was observed to reside in the free troposphere above marine stratocumulus. This biogenic organic aerosol (BOA) originated from the Northwestern United States and was transported to the marine atmosphere during periodic cloud-clearing events. Spectra recorded by a cloud condensation nuclei counter demonstrated that BOA is CCN active. BOA enhancements at latitudes north of San Francisco, CA coincided with enhanced cloud water concentrations of organic species such as acetate and formate. Airborne measurements conducted during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) were aimed at evaluating the contribution of ship emissions to the properties of marine aerosol and clouds off the coast of central California. In one study, analysis of organic aerosol mass spectra during periods of enhanced shipping activity yielded unique tracers indicative of cloud-processed ship emissions (m/z 42 and 99). The variation of their organic fraction (f42 and f 99) was found to coincide with periods of heavy (f 42 > 0.15; f99 > 0.04), moderate (0.05 < f42 < 0.15; 0.01 < f99 < 0.04), and negligible (f42 < 0.05; f99 < 0.01) ship influence. Application of

  10. A review of toxicity studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-02-01

    We summarized the findings of in vivo toxicity studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in laboratory animals. The large majority addressed the pulmonary toxicity of SWCNTs in rodents. Inhalation, pharyngeal aspiration, and intratracheal instillation studies revealed that SWCNTs caused acute and chronic inflammation, granuloma formation, collagen deposition, fibrosis, and genotoxic effects in the lungs. Pulmonary toxicity of well-dispersed SWCNTs was more potent than less dispersed ones. Airway exposure to SWCNTs also induced cardiovascular diseases in mice. Oxidative stress was caused by the administration of SWCNTs. Injected SWCNTs were distributed throughout most of the organs including the brain, mainly retained in the lungs, liver, and spleen, and eliminated through the kidney and bile duct. Orally administered SWCNTs are suggested to be absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract to the blood circulation in mice and rats. Although no definitive study on the carcinogenicity of SWCNTs is available at present, evidence of carcinogenicity has not been reported in toxicity studies cited in this review. Overall, the available data provides initial information on SWCNT toxicity. To further clarify their toxicity and risk assessment, studies should be conducted using well-characterized SWCNTs, standard protocols, and the relevant route and doses of human exposure.

  11. Stable isotope studies of nephrite deposits from Fengtien, Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yui, Tzenfu; Yeh, Hsuehwen (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA)); Lee, Chihming Wang (National Taiwan Univ. Taipei (Taiwan))

    1988-03-01

    Metasomatic nephrite deposits (i.e., rodingites) occur between serpentinites and muscovite-quartz schist in the Fengtien area, eastern Taiwan. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of nephrite range from +4.5 to +5.3{per thousand} and the {delta}D values, from {minus}33 to {minus}68{per thousand}. The narrow range in the {delta}{sup 18}O values and wide variation in the {delta}D values indicate low water/rock ratios and multiple origins of the ambient H{sub 2}O during nephrite formation. The ultimate sources of the ambient H{sub 2}O are largely sea water for the early nephrite and meteoric water for the late nephrite. The temperature of nephrite formation is 320-420{degree}C: the estimated O-isotopic fractionation between nephrite (tremolite) and serpentine (antigorite) is 1.0 {plus minus} 0.2{per thousand} in this temperature range. Diopsidefels and epidotite are two other kinds of rodingite in the deposits. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of diopside from diopsidefels range from +3.7 to +4.5{per thousand}, the {delta}D values of clinozoisite from epidotite range from {minus}31 to {minus}34{per thousand} and the {delta}{sup 18}O value of one clinozoisite analyzed is +3.9{per thousand}. These data suggest that most diopsidefels formed in isotopic equilibrium with nephrite and that clinozoisite was not in isotopic equilibrium with either nephrite of diopsidefels. O-isotope compositions of both nephrite and diopsidefels cannot give conclusive evidence of their parental rocks. Circumstantial evidence, however, implies that the nephrite is derived from serpentinite whereas diopsidefels formed from unaltered ultramafic rocks.

  12. Stable isotope studies of nephrite deposits from Fengtien, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Tzen-Fu; Yeh, Hsueh-Wen; Lee, Chihming Wang

    1988-03-01

    Metasomatic nephrite deposits ( i.e., rodingites) occur between serpentinites and muscovite-quartz schist in the Fengtien area, eastern Taiwan. The δ 18O values of nephrite range from +4.5 to +5.3%. and the δD values, from -33 to -68%. The narrow range in the δ 18O values and wide variation in the δD values indicate low water/rock ratios and multiple origins of the ambient H 2O during nephrite formation. The ultimate sources of the ambient H 2O are largely sea water for the early nephrite and meteoric water for the late nephrite. The temperature of nephrite formation is 320-420°C: the estimated O-isotopic fractionation between nephrite (tremolite) and serpentine (antigorite) is 1.0 ± 0.2%. in this temperature range. Diopsidefels and epidotite are two other kinds of rodingite in the deposits. The δ 18O values of diopside from diopsidefels range from +3.7 to +4.5%., theδD values of clinozoisite from epidotite range from -31 to -34%. and the δ 18O value of one clinozoisite analyzed is +3.9%. These data suggest that most diopsidefels formed in isotopic equilibrium with nephrite and that clinozoisite was not in isotopic equilibrium with either nephrite or diopsidefels. O-isotope compositions of both nephrite and diopsidefels cannot give conclusive evidence of their parental rocks. Circumstantial evidence, however, implies that the nephrite is derived from serpentinite whereas diopsidefels formed from unaltered ultramafic rocks.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeln, Terri G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  14. Atomistic study of deposition process of Al thin film on Cu substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yongzhi, E-mail: yzcaohit@gmail.com [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Zhang Junjie; Sun Tao; Yan Yongda; Yu Fuli [Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we report molecular dynamics based atomistic simulations of deposition process of Al atoms onto Cu substrate and following nanoindentation process on that nanostructured material. Effects of incident energy on the morphology of deposited thin film and mechanical property of this nanostructured material are emphasized. The results reveal that the morphology of growing film is layer-by-layer-like at incident energy of 0.1-10 eV. The epitaxy mode of film growth is observed at incident energy below 1 eV, but film-mixing mode commences when incident energy increase to 10 eV accompanying with increased disorder of film structure, which improves quality of deposited thin film. Following indentation studies indicate deposited thin films pose lower stiffness than single crystal Al due to considerable amount of defects existed in them, but Cu substrate is strengthened by the interface generated from lattice mismatch between deposited Al thin film and Cu substrate.

  15. Pinon Pine Tree Study, Los Alamos National Laboratory: Source document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    One of the dominant tree species growing within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, lands is the pinon pine (Pinus edulis) tree. Pinon pine is used for firewood, fence posts, and building materials and is a source of nuts for food--the seeds are consumed by a wide variety of animals and are also gathered by people in the area and eaten raw or roasted. This study investigated the (1) concentration of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup tot}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soils (0- to 12-in. [31 cm] depth underneath the tree), pinon pine shoots (PPS), and pinon pine nuts (PPN) collected from LANL lands and regional background (BG) locations, (2) concentrations of radionuclides in PPN collected in 1977 to present data, (3) committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from the ingestion of nuts, and (4) soil to PPS to PPN concentration ratios (CRs). Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H in soils, were not significantly higher (p < 0.10) in soils, PPS, and PPN collected from LANL as compared to BG locations, and concentrations of most radionuclides in PPN from LANL have decreased over time. The maximum net CEDE (the CEDE plus two sigma minus BG) at the most conservative ingestion rate (10 lb [4.5 kg]) was 0.0018 mrem (0.018 {micro}Sv). Soil-to-nut CRs for most radionuclides were within the range of default values in the literature for common fruits and vegetables.

  16. Laboratory work and pregnancy outcomes: a study within the National Birth Cohort in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, J L; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo;

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To examine pregnancy outcomes in women doing laboratory work. METHODS: Using data from the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), the authors conducted a prospective cohort study of 1025 female laboratory technicians and 8037 female teachers (as reference). The laboratory technicians wer...

  17. The Empirical Study of Japanese Deposit Withdrawal Behaviors on Unstable Financial Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Takemura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: We need to analyze to withdrawal behavior rather than deposit behavior on the situation which financial institutions might fail. However, there are few studies on withdrawal behavior although there are various studies on individual deposit behavior. Approach: Our purpose of this study is to investigate relationships between individual’s deposit withdrawal behavior and economic and psychological factors using micro data from an Internet (Web-based survey. Results: We confirm that individual’s withdrawal behavior is strongly affected by not only economic factors, but also psychological factors. In many cases, sign of estimated coefficient of economic factors are consistent with theory of economic behavior. In addition, effects of psychological factors such as degree of trust in information sources and degree of risk aversion are not uniformly against individual’s deposit-withdrawal behavior. Furthermore, we confirm that the probability that they carelessly withdraw their deposits tends to be lower if individuals correctly understand Japanese deposit insurance scheme. Conclusions: For reducing the ratio of individuals who do not correctly understand the Japanese deposit insurance scheme, we propose that the government should announce and educate the scheme to people strongly.

  18. Geological and geophysical characteristics of massive sulphide deposits: A case study of the Lirhanda massive sulphide deposit of Western Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindi, E.; Maneno, J. B. J.

    2016-08-01

    An integrated geophysical ground survey was conducted on an airborne electromagnetic (EM) anomaly located in Kakamega forest of Western Kenya. The purpose of the study was to establish the existence of massive sulphides and identify suitable optimal geophysical method(s) for the investigation of similar anomalies. The study was also expected to provide information on the geological and geophysical characteristics of the deposit. Field work involved electromagnetic methods: Vertical Loop (VLEM), Horizontal Loop (HLEM), TURAM EM and potential field methods: gravity and magnetics. Geochemical sampling was carried out concurrently with the geophysical survey. All the geophysical methods used yielded good responses. Several conductors conforming to the strike of the geology were identified. TURAM EM provided a higher resolution of the conductors compared to VLEM and HLEM. The conductors were found to be associated with positive gravity anomalies supporting the presence of bodies of higher density than the horst rock. Only the western section (west of 625W) of the grid is associated with strong magnetic anomalies. East of 625W strong EM and gravity anomalies persist but magnetic anomalies are weak. This may reflect variation in the mineral composition of the conductors from magnetic to non-magnetic. Geochemical data indicates strong copper anomalies (upto 300 ppm) over sections of the grid and relatively strong zinc (upto 200 ppm) and lead (upto 100 ppm) anomalies. There is a positive correlation between the location of the conductors as predicted by TURAM EM and the copper and zinc anomalies. A test drill hole proposed on the basis of the geophysical results of this study struck massive sulphides at a depth of 30m still within the weathered rock zone. Unfortunately, the drilling was stopped before the sulphides could be penetrated. The drill core revealed massive sulphide rich in pyrite and pyrrhotite. An attempt has been made to compare characteristics of the Lirhanda

  19. Microbial Evolution at High Pressure: Deep Sea and Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated hydrostatic pressures are present in deep-sea and deep-Earth environments where this physical parameter has influenced the evolution and characteristics of life. Piezophilic (high-pressure-adapted) microbes have been isolated from diverse deep-sea settings, and would appear likely to occur in deep-subsurface habitats as well. In order to discern the factors enabling life at high pressure my research group has explored these adaptations at various levels, most recently including molecular analyses of deep-sea trench communities, and through the selective evolution of the model microbe Escherichia coli in the laboratory to progressively higher pressures. Much of the field work has focused on the microbes present in the deeper portions of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT)and in the Peru-Chile Trench (PCT), from 6-8.5 km below the sea surface (~60-85 megapascals pressure). Culture-independent phylogenetic data on the Bacteria and Archaea present on particles or free-living, along with data on the microeukarya present was complemented with genomic analyses and the isolation and characterization of microbes in culture. Metagenomic analyses of the PRT revealed increased genome sizes and an overrepresentation at depth of sulfatases for the breakdown of sulfated polysaccharides and specific categories of transporters, including those associated with the transport of diverse cations or carboxylate ions, or associated with heavy metal resistance. Single-cell genomic studies revealed several linneages which recruited to the PRT metagenome far better than existing marine microbial genome sequences. analyses. Novel high pressure culture approaches have yielded new piezophiles including species preferring very low nutrient levels, those living off of hydrocarbons, and those adapted to various electron donor/electron acceptor combinations. In order to more specifically focus on functions enabling life at increased pressure selective evolution experiments were performed with

  20. Dry deposition of sulphur on the Mpumalanga highveld: a pilot study using the inferential method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zunckel, M

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available A pilot study which uses the inferential method to estimate dry deposition of sulphur on the central Mpumalanga highveld is discussed in this paper. Ambient concentrations of sulphur dioxide, particulates and micro-meteorological measurements from 2...

  1. GPR monitoring of oil displacement - A laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorali, M.; Slob, E.C.; Arts, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present laboratory experiments where we address the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) capability of monitoring oil displacement processes in porous media. This has significant applications in near-subsurface environments where remediation of contaminant such as oil-derived liquids is c

  2. Shining light on interstellar matter : a laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that the space in between the stars, contains a remarkable amount of highly diverse molecules, ranging from simple diatomics to large complex species. Astronomical observations and dedicated laboratory experiments show that icy dust grains play a prominent role in

  3. An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise for Studying Kinetics of Batch Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhi­-Kultanen, Marjatta; Han, Bing; Nurkka, Annikka; Hatakka, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The present work describes an undergraduate laboratory exercise for improving understanding of fundamental phenomena in cooling crystallization. The exercise of nucleation and crystal growth kinetics supports learning of theories and models presented in lectures and calculation exercises. The teaching methodology incorporates precepts the…

  4. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes.

  5. GPR monitoring of oil displacement - A laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorali, M.; Slob, E.C.; Arts, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present laboratory experiments where we address the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) capability of monitoring oil displacement processes in porous media. This has significant applications in near-subsurface environments where remediation of contaminant such as oil-derived liquids is

  6. Case study: improving efficiency in a large hospital laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Marilynn

    2004-01-01

    Saint Francis Health System (SFHS) consists of three hospitals and one clinic: Saint Francis Hospital (SFH); Broken Arrow Medical Center; Laureate Psychiatric Hospital; and Warren Clinic. SFHS has 670 physicians on staff and serves medical (oncology, orthopedic, neurology, and renal), surgical, cardiac, women and infant, pediatric, transplant, and trauma patients in Tulsa County, Oklahoma, which has a population of 660,000. SFH incorporates 706 staffed beds, including 126 pediatric beds and 119 critical care beds. Each year, the health system averages 38,000 admissions, 70,000 emergency department visits, 25,000 surgeries, and 3,500 births. Saint Francis Laboratory is located within the main hospital facility (SFH) and functions as a core lab for the health system. The lab also coordinates lab services with Saint Francis Heart Hospital, a physician-system joint venture. The Optimal Equipment Configuration (OEC) Project was designed by the Clinical Laboratory Services division of Premier, a group purchasing organization, with the goal of determining whether laboratories could improve efficiency and decrease unit cost by using a single-source vendor. Participants included seven business partners (Abbott, Bayer, Beckman/Coulter, Dade/Behring, J&J/ Ortho, Olympus, and Roche) and 21 laboratory sites (a small, mid-sized, and large site for each vendor). SFH laboratory staff embraced Premier's concept and viewed the OEC project as an opportunity to "energize" laboratory operations. SFH partnered with Abbott, their primary equipment vendor, for the project. Using resources and tools made available through the project, the laboratory was re-engineered to simplify workflow, increase productivity, and decrease costs by adding automation and changing to centralized specimen processing. Abbott and SFH shared a common vision for the project and enhanced their partnership through increased communication and problem solving. Abbott's area representatives provided for third

  7. Investigation on deposition condition, sedimentary environment and genesis of Mandan and Deh-Now bauxite deposits, Dehdasht area, Kohgiloye and Boyer-Ahmad province: using mineralogical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zarasvandi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Mandan and Deh-Now bauxite deposits are located 40 km northeast of Dehdasht in Kohgiloye and Boyer-Ahmad province in the Zagros simply folded belt. The deposits were formed in the oldest rocks of the area of late Cretaceous age. The bauxite horizon is situated between Sarvak and Ilam formations. The aim of this study is to determine the mineralogy and texture relations of the deposits in order to determine the environment and status of bauxite mineralization. In this way, samples were selected from these bauxite deposits for mineralogical studies based on microscopic and XRD techniques. The bauxite horizon in the Mandan deposit consists of white, gray, black, pisolitic, red and yellow bauxites. The sequence was repeated in the Deh-Now without black and gray bauxites. Mineralogy is similar in all bauxitic layers and the main textures are pisolitic-ooide, ooide-spheroid, pisolitic, pelitomorphic and pseoudomorphic. Bohmite, diaspore, kaolinite and calcite are the most important minerals in both bauxitic layers of the Mandan and Deh-Now deposits. Due to bohmite mineralization in the study area, erosional and intense weathering environment in the Touronian-Cenomanian could be suggested for the deposition of bauxite in these deposits. Existence of interclasts in the pisolites and ooides indicate that these bauxites were transformed from the primary in situ environment to karstic sedimentary basin as authigenic origin. These studies indicate that there are two mineralized facies with different environmental status: (1 oxidation facies with bohmite, diaspore, kaolinite and hematite minerals and (2 reduced facies with pyrite, diaspore and chlorite mineralization. The lack of reduced condition at the Deh-Now deposit shows that the deposit formed only in oxidation status.

  8. Study of the Corrosion Resistance of Electroless Ni-P Deposits in a Sodium Chloride Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of electroless Ni-P deposits with phosphorous contents from 12% to 14% in sodium chloride solutions was studied. The deposits were immersed in 3.5% NaCl solutions for 29 d to obtain the electrochemical parameters and were examined in a standard salt spray test for 15 d respectively. The corrosion resistance of the deposits was studied by potentio-dynamic scan, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and cold-field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). The patterns of XRD and the results of FE-SEM showed that the prepared deposits were amorphous. But after a 15 d standard salt spray test, a few pinholes appeared on the surface of the deposit and the weight content of phosphorus on the surface of the deposit was higher (which was beneficial to the formation of the passivation films) than that before the standard salt spray test when the nickel content was lower because the dissolved weight of nickel was greater than that of phosphorus. The results from potentio-dynamic scan and EIS showed that passivation films formed on the Ni-P deposit after immersion in the NaC1 solutions, which decreased the corrosion rate of Ni-P samples. The results of this work show their potential applications in marine corrosion.

  9. Electrical and magnetoresistivity studies in chemical solution deposited La

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angappane, S.; Murugaraj, P.; Sethupathi, K.; Rangarajan, G.; Sastry, V. S.; Chakkaravarthi, A. Arul; Ramasamy, P.

    2001-06-01

    High quality magnetoresistive La{sub (1{minus}x)}Ca{sub x}MnO{sub 3} thin films have been prepared by the chemical solution deposition technique. A solution of propionate precursors of lanthanum, calcium, and manganese in propionic acid was used for this purpose. Films of varying compositions (x varying from 0.1 to 0.4) were spin coated on to LaAlO{sub 3}(100) and SrTiO{sub 3}(100) substrates at room temperature and pyrolyzed in the temperature range 600{endash}850{degree}C. For fixed compositions, annealing at higher temperatures shifts the insulator{endash}metal transition temperature (T{sub I{endash}M}) to higher values accompanied by a reduction in the resistivity values. The T{sub I{endash}M} variation for different x values was found to be less pronounced in the compositions x=0.2, 0.3, and 0.4. Typical T{sub I{endash}M} values of 283 K and 290 K were obtained for La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} coated on LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates, respectively, when annealed at 850{degree}C. The substrate effect was found to be more pronounced for the x value 0.1 which showed two peaks (one at 271 K and another at 122 K) in the {rho}-T curve. The roles of substrate mismatch, composition variation, and annealing temperatures are discussed. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Laboratory studies of imitation/field studies of tradition: towards a synthesis in animal social learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galef, Bennett G

    2015-03-01

    Here I discuss: (1) historical precedents that have resulted in comparative psychologists accepting the two-action method as the "gold standard" in laboratory investigations of imitation learning, (2) evidence suggesting that the two-action procedure may not be adequate to answer questions concerning the role of imitation in the development of traditional behaviors of animals living in natural habitat, and (3) an alternative approach to the laboratory study of imitation that might increase the relevance of laboratory studies of imitation to the work of behavioral ecologists/primatologists interested in animal traditions and their relationship to human cumulative culture. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tribute to Tom Zentall.

  11. Laboratory measurements of HDO/H$_{2}$O isotopic fractionation during ice deposition in simulated cirrus clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lamb, Kara; Bolot, Maximilien; Sarkozy, Laszlo; Saathoff, Harald; Möhler, Ottmar; Moyer, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    The stable isotopologues of water have been used in atmospheric and climatic studies for over fifty years, because the temperature-dependent preferential condensation of heavy isotopologues during phase changes makes them useful diagnostics of the hydrological cycle. However, the degree of preferential condensation has never been directly measured at temperatures below 233 K (-40$^{\\circ}$C), conditions of cirrus formation in the atmosphere and routinely observed at surface elevation in polar regions. (Models generally assume an extrapolation from the warmer experiments of Merlivat and Nief, 1967.) Non-equilibrium effects that should alter preferential partitioning have also not been well-characterized experimentally (Jouzel and Merlivat 1984). We present here the first direct experimental measurements of the HDO/H$_2$O equilibrium fractionation factor between vapour and ice ($\\alpha_{\\mathrm {eq}}$) at cirrus-relevant temperatures, and the first quantitative validation of the kinetic modification to equilibr...

  12. Soot Deposit Properties in Practical Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preciado, Ignacio [University of Utah; Eddings, Eric G. [University of Utah; Sarofim, Adel F. [University of Utah; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Soot deposition from hydrocarbon flames was investigated in order to evaluate the evolution of the deposits during the transient process of heating an object that starts with a cold metal surface that is exposed to a flame. The study focused on the fire/metal surface interface and the critical issues associated with the specification of the thermal boundaries at this interface, which include the deposition of soot on the metal surface, the chemical and physical properties of the soot deposits and their subsequent effect on heat transfer to the metal surface. A laboratory-scale device (metallic plates attached to a water-cooled sampling probe) was designed for studying soot deposition in a laminar ethylene-air premixed flame. The metallic plates facilitate the evaluation of the deposition rates and deposit characteristics such as deposit thickness, bulk density, PAH content, deposit morphology, and thermal properties, under both water-cooled and uncooled conditions. Additionally, a non-intrusive Laser Flash Technique (in which the morphology of the deposit is not modified) was used to estimate experimental thermal conductivity values for soot deposits as a function of deposition temperature (water-cooled and uncooled experiments), location within the flame and chemical characteristics of the deposits. Important differences between water-cooled and uncooled surfaces were observed. Thermophoresis dominated the soot deposition process and enhanced higher deposition rates for the water-cooled experiments. Cooler surface temperatures resulted in the inclusion of increased amounts of condensable hydrocarbons in the soot deposit. The greater presence of condensable material promoted decreased deposit thicknesses, larger deposit densities, different deposit morphologies, and higher thermal conductivities.

  13. Correlation of liquefaction resistance with shear wave velocity based on laboratory study using bender element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan-guo; CHEN Yun-min; KE Han

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies using field case history data yielded new criteria for evaluating liquefaction potential in saturated granular deposits based on in situ, stress-corrected shear wave velocity. However, the conditions of relatively insufficient case histories and limited site conditions in this approach call for additional data to more reliably define liquefaction resistance as a function of shear wave velocity. In this study, a series of undrained cyclic triaxial tests were conducted on saturated sand with shear wave velocity Vs measured by bender element. By normalizing the data with respect to minimum void ratio, the test results, incorporated with previously published laboratory data, statistically revealed good correlation of cyclic shear strength with small-strain shear modulus for sandy soils, which is almost irrespective of soil types and confining pressures. The consequently determined cyclic resistance ratio, CRR, was found to be approximately proportional to Vs4. Liquefaction resistance boundary curves were established by applying this relationship and compared to liquefaction criteria derived from seismic field measurements. Although in the range of Vs1>200 m/s the presented curves are moderately conservative, they are remarkably consistent with the published field performance criteria on the whole.

  14. Mineralogy of evaporite deposits on Mars: Constraints from laboratory, field, and remote measurements of analog terrestrial acid saline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.; Núñez, J. I.; Seelos, F. P., IV; Hook, S. J.; Baldridge, A. M.; Thomson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Remote compositional data from imaging spectrometers such as CRISM, OMEGA, and TES, and high-resolution imagery from MOC, CTX, and HiRISE have provided invaluable information for improving our understanding of the composition and geologic history of the martian surface and identifying potential past and present habitable environments on Mars. Simulated CRISM spectra and summary parameter maps and HiRISE color images were generated using airborne hyperspectral data of two acid-saline lakes in Western Australia. These locations are applicable to Mars, as they contain a suite of clays, sulfates, and salts formed under variable pH and salinity - mineralogies similar to those observed in Noachian and Hesperian terrain. The remote datasets were used to make surface composition predictions which were then verified through field study and sample analysis. We find phyllosilicates intermixed with sulfates in sulfate-rich surfaces exhibit variable spectral responses, even for similar conditions and abundances seen in the field. Where sulfates, such as gypsum and alunite, are found, phyllosilicates are intermixed or reside beneath the surface yet are not always detected. This suggests that geologic complexities may mask phyllosilicate detection at or near the surface on Mars where only sulfates have so far been found.

  15. Laboratory Studies of Halogen Oxides Important to Stratospheric Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmouth, D. M.; Klobas, J. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Inorganic chlorine and bromine molecules are primarily responsible for stratospheric ozone destruction, with BrO, ClO, and ClOOCl comprising the two reaction cycles that cause most polar ozone losses. Despite comprehensive international treaties regulating CFCs and halons, seasonal polar ozone depletion will likely continue for decades to come. Accurate spectroscopic and kinetic measurements of inorganic bromine and chlorine molecules obtained in the laboratory are essential for reducing uncertainty in atmospheric models, better interpreting atmospheric field measurements, and forming trusted projections of future ozone changes. Here we present results from recent work in our laboratory using absorption spectroscopy and atomic resonance fluorescence detection to determine rate constants of halogen reactions, the equilibrium constant of ClO/ClOOCl, and absorption cross sections of several halogen oxides using a new cold trap-thermal desorption approach.

  16. Development of a Zealand white rabbit deposition model to study inhalation anthrax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-01-28

    Despite using rabbits in several inhalation exposure experiments to study diseases such as anthrax, there is a lack of understanding regarding deposition characteristics and fate of inhaled particles (bio-aerosols and viruses) in the respiratory tracts of rabbits. Such information allows dosimetric extrapolation to humans to inform human outcomes. The lung geometry of the New Zealand white rabbit (referred to simply as rabbits throughout the article) was constructed using recently acquired scanned images of the conducting airways of rabbits and available information on its acinar region. In addition, functional relationships were developed for the lung and breathing parameters of rabbits as a function of body weight. The lung geometry and breathing parameters were used to extend the existing deposition model for humans and several other species to rabbits. Evaluation of the deposition model for rabbits was made by comparing predictions with available measurements in the literature. Deposition predictions in the lungs of rabbits indicated smaller deposition fractions compared to those found in humans across various particle diameter ranges. The application of the deposition model for rabbits was demonstrated by extrapolating deposition predictions in rabbits to find equivalent human exposure concentrations assuming the same dose-response relationship between the two species. Human equivalent exposure concentration levels were found to be much smaller than those for rabbits.

  17. Development of a Zealand white rabbit deposition model to study inhalation anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E; Einstein, Daniel R; Kuprat, Andrew P; Corley, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Despite using rabbits in several inhalation exposure experiments to study diseases such as anthrax, there is a lack of understanding regarding deposition characteristics and fate of inhaled particles (bio-aerosols and viruses) in the respiratory tracts of rabbits. Such information allows dosimetric extrapolation to humans to inform human outcomes. The lung geometry of the New Zealand white rabbit (referred to simply as rabbits throughout the article) was constructed using recently acquired scanned images of the conducting airways of rabbits and available information on its acinar region. In addition, functional relationships were developed for the lung and breathing parameters of rabbits as a function of body weight. The lung geometry and breathing parameters were used to extend the existing deposition model for humans and several other species to rabbits. Evaluation of the deposition model for rabbits was made by comparing predictions with available measurements in the literature. Deposition predictions in the lungs of rabbits indicated smaller deposition fractions compared to those found in humans across various particle diameter ranges. The application of the deposition model for rabbits was demonstrated by extrapolating deposition predictions in rabbits to find equivalent human exposure concentrations assuming the same dose-response relationship between the two species. Human equivalent exposure concentration levels were found to be much smaller than those for rabbits.

  18. Study of the various factors influencing deposit formation and operation of gasoline engine injection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Generally, ethanol fuel emits less pollutants than gasoline, it is completely renewable product and has the potential to reduce greenhouse gases emission but, at the same time can present a multitude of technical challenges to engine operation conditions including creation of very adverse engine deposits. These deposits increasing fuel consumption and cause higher exhaust emissions as well as poor performance in drivability. This paper describes results of research and determination the various factors influencing injector deposits build-up of ethanol-gasoline blends operated engine. The relationship between ethanol-gasoline fuel blends composition, their treatment, engine construction as well as its operation conditions and fuel injectors deposit formation has been investigated. Simulation studies of the deposit formation endanger proper functioning of fuel injection system were carried out at dynamometer engine testing. As a result various, important factors influencing the deposit creation process and speed formation were determined. The ability to control of injector deposits by multifunctional detergent-dispersant additives package fit for ethanol-gasoline blends requirements was also investigated.

  19. Electrochemical studies of nickel deposition from aqueous solution in super-gravity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effect of super-gravity on electrochemical deposition of nickel from aqueous solution was studied. The SEM pictures show that the microstructure of nickel film deposited under the super-gravity condition is finer and more uniform compared with that obtained in normal gravity condition, and the crystal grains diminish with the increase of super-gravity coefficient. The XRD patterns indicate that the ar-rangement of crystalline grains of nickel film deposited under the super-gravity field is more regular, and the crystalline grain sizes decrease with the increase of super-gravity coefficient. Toughness, tensile stress and hardness of the nickel film are markedly raised with the increase of super-gravity coefficient, and hydrogen content in the nickel film decreases with the increase of super-gravity coefficient. From the polarization curves of hydrogen evolution reaction under the su-per-gravity condition, a significant reduction of over-potential on electrode was found when current density increased. The process of hydrogen evolution reaction was enhanced under the super-gravity condition. The electro-deposition rate, the microstructure and properties of deposited nickel film under super-gravity condi-tion were still affected by the relative orientation between inertia force and depos-iting surface. It is favorable to gain the nickel film with better mechanic properties when inertia force orientates vertically towards depositing surface.

  20. Electrochemical studies of nickel deposition from aqueous solution in super-gravity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO ZhanCheng; GONG YingPeng; LU WeiChang

    2007-01-01

    The effect of super-gravity on electrochemical deposition of nickel from aqueous solution was studied. The SEM pictures show that the microstructure of nickel film deposited under the super-gravity condition is finer and more uniform compared with that obtained in normal gravity condition, and the crystal grains diminish with the increase of super-gravity coefficient. The XRD patterns indicate that the arrangement of crystalline grains of nickel film deposited under the super-gravity field is more regular, and the crystalline grain sizes decrease with the increase of super-gravity coefficient. Toughness, tensile stress and hardness of the nickel film are markedly raised with the increase of super-gravity coefficient, and hydrogen content in the nickel film decreases with the increase of super-gravity coefficient. From the polarization curves of hydrogen evolution reaction under the super-gravity condition, a significant reduction of over-potential on electrode was found when current density increased. The process of hydrogen evolution reaction was enhanced under the super-gravity condition. The electro-deposition rate, the microstructure and properties of deposited nickel film under super-gravity condition were still affected by the relative orientation between inertia force and depositing surface. It is favorable to gain the nickel film with better mechanic properties when inertia force orientates vertically towards depositing surface.

  1. Analytical Electron Microscopic Study of Mineral Deposits in a Case of Calcionsis Universalis

    OpenAIRE

    KAWAKAMI, TOSHIYUKI; NAKAMURA, CHIHITO; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; EDA, SHIGEO

    1988-01-01

    Calcinosis universalis with dermatomyositis occurred in a 58-year-old woman. Tissues removed from the patient's sublingual region were studied mainly by analytical electron microscopic methods. According to an elemental analysis using a wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscope, most of the mineral deposits contained the elements sodium, phosphorus, calcium, rhenium, and some deposits also contained sulphur and magnesium. The elements sodium, sulphur, chlorine, and calcium were found in the st...

  2. Sensitivity study of the wet deposition schemes in the modelling of the Fukushima accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quérel, Arnaud; Quélo, Denis; Roustan, Yelva; Mathieu, Anne; Kajino, Mizuo; Sekiyama, Thomas; Adachi, Kouji; Didier, Damien; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi release of radioactivity is a relevant event to study the atmospheric dispersion modelling of radionuclides. Actually, the atmospheric deposition onto the ground may be studied through the map of measured Cs-137 established consecutively to the accident. The limits of detection were low enough to make the measurements possible as far as 250km from the nuclear power plant. This large scale deposition has been modelled with the Eulerian model ldX. However, several weeks of emissions in multiple weather conditions make it a real challenge. Besides, these measurements are accumulated deposition of Cs-137 over the whole period and do not inform of deposition mechanisms involved: in-cloud, below-cloud, dry deposition. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis is performed in order to understand wet deposition mechanisms. It has been shown in a previous study (Quérel et al, 2016) that the choice of the wet deposition scheme has a strong impact on the assessment of the deposition patterns. Nevertheless, a "best" scheme could not be highlighted as it depends on the selected criteria: the ranking differs according to the statistical indicators considered (correlation, figure of merit in space and factor 2). A possibility to explain the difficulty to discriminate between several schemes was the uncertainties in the modelling, resulting from the meteorological data for instance. Since the move of the plume is not properly modelled, the deposition processes are applied with an inaccurate activity in the air. In the framework of the SAKURA project, an MRI-IRSN collaboration, new meteorological fields at higher resolution (Sekiyama et al., 2013) were provided and allows to reconsider the previous study. An updated study including these new meteorology data is presented. In addition, a focus on several releases causing deposition in located areas during known period was done. This helps to better understand the mechanisms of deposition involved following the

  3. A gamma scintigraphy study to investigate lung deposition and clearance of inhaled amikacin-loaded liposomes in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weers, Jeffry; Metzheiser, Beth; Taylor, Glyn; Warren, Simon; Meers, Paul; Perkins, Walter R

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhalation of a liposomal formulation of amikacin in healthy male volunteers in terms of pulmonary deposition, clearance, and safety following nebulization with a commercial jet nebulizer. Amikacin was encapsulated in liposomes comprised of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterol via a proprietary manufacturing process (20 mg/mL final amikacin concentration). The liposomes were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc using the tin chloride labeling method. A nominal dose of 120 mg of drug product was loaded into a PARI LC STAR nebulizer, aerosolized using a PARI Boy compressor where subjects inhaled for 20 min. Lung deposition was determined by gamma scintigraphy in three healthy male volunteers at the following time points (0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post-administration). Total lung deposition, expressed as a percentage of the emitted dose, was 32.3 +/- 3.4%. The time-dependent retention of radiolabeled liposomes was biphasic with an initial rapid reduction in counts, followed by a slower phase to 48 h. The overall mean retention at 24 and 48 h was 60.4 and 38.3% of the initial dose deposited, respectively. The observed clearance of radiolabel is consistent with clearance of amikacin following aerosol delivery to rats. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory parameters, vital signs, or ECG. No adverse events including cough or bronchospasm were reported. Inhalation of a single nominal dose of 120 mg liposomal amikacin results in prolonged retention of drug-loaded liposomes in the lungs of healthy volunteers. The treatment was well tolerated.

  4. Dry and wet "deposition" studies of the degradation of cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Ramírez, S.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of portland cement mortars with SO2 gaseous pollutant and artificial 'acid rain' solution has been examined using laboratory exposure chambers, with realistic presentation rates of pollutants. The mortar were previously carbonated to produce superficial carbonation. Two mortars with different w/c ratio and hence specific surface were prepared and exposed into the chambers. For dry deposition of SO2 pollutant gas, the important roles of water and water plus oxidant in increasing chemical reaction are readily revealed. Further, accessible porosity also increases reaction through increased times of reaction of pollutant with the mortars. Interestingly, in the absence of deliberate surface wetting, the presence of oxidant, ozone, leads to a reduction in the already limited extent of reaction. Wet deposition studies using artificial 'acid rain' solution result in gypsum formation, which is more extensive for mortars of increased w/c ratios.

    Se han realizado ensayos de laboratorio de simulación de los procesos ambientales de "deposición" seca y húmeda sobre morteros de cemento portland, estudiándose las reacciones que se producen con el contaminante SO2 ("deposición" seca y la disolución de 'lluvia acida' ("deposición" húmeda. Los morteros de cemento se carbonataron para favorecer la carbonatación superficial de los mismos. Se prepararon morteros con dos relaciones a/c con el fin de estudiar la influencia que la variable superficie específica tenía en el proceso de deterioro de dichos materiales. En los estudios de deposición seca con SO2 como gas agresivo se ha visto la importancia que el agua y el agua junto a un oxidante tienen en la reacción del contaminante con los componentes del mortero. La superficie específica Juega un papel importante, ya que al aumentar, aumenta la reacción con el contaminante. La reacción en presencia de oxidante, (SO2+O3

  5. A laboratory nanoseismological study on deep-focus earthquake micromechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanbin; Zhu, Lupei; Shi, Feng; Schubnel, Alexandre; Hilairet, Nadege; Yu, Tony; Rivers, Mark; Gasc, Julien; Addad, Ahmed; Deldicque, Damien; Li, Ziyu; Brunet, Fabrice

    2017-07-01

    Global earthquake occurring rate displays an exponential decay down to ~300 km and then peaks around 550 to 600 km before terminating abruptly near 700 km. How fractures initiate, nucleate, and propagate at these depths remains one of the greatest puzzles in earth science, as increasing pressure inhibits fracture propagation. We report nanoseismological analysis on high-resolution acoustic emission (AE) records obtained during ruptures triggered by partial transformation from olivine to spinel in Mg2GeO4, an analog to the dominant mineral (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 olivine in the upper mantle, using state-of-the-art seismological techniques, in the laboratory. AEs’ focal mechanisms, as well as their distribution in both space and time during deformation, are carefully analyzed. Microstructure analysis shows that AEs are produced by the dynamic propagation of shear bands consisting of nanograined spinel. These nanoshear bands have a near constant thickness (~100 nm) but varying lengths and self-organize during deformation. This precursory seismic process leads to ultimate macroscopic failure of the samples. Several source parameters of AE events were extracted from the recorded waveforms, allowing close tracking of event initiation, clustering, and propagation throughout the deformation/transformation process. AEs follow the Gutenberg-Richter statistics with a well-defined b value of 1.5 over three orders of moment magnitudes, suggesting that laboratory failure processes are self-affine. The seismic relation between magnitude and rupture area correctly predicts AE magnitude at millimeter scales. A rupture propagation model based on strain localization theory is proposed. Future numerical analyses may help resolve scaling issues between laboratory AE events and deep-focus earthquakes.

  6. Laboratory studies of corona emissions from air terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, F.; Berger, G.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents some of the results obtained from a systematic series of laboratory investigations into the corona emission characteristics of air terminals. Two particular aspects are considered, namely the effect on corona emission of changing the distance between the tip of the air terminal and the overhead energized electrode, and the relationship between the two fundamental corona parameters (`amplitude coefficient' and onset electric field) and the height of the air terminal above a ground plane. The implications of the results for lightning protection designs are discussed.

  7. Toxicological study of plant extracts on termite and laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, I; Gogoi, Inee; Dolui, A K; Handique, Ruma

    2005-04-01

    Toxic activity of leaf extracts of Polygonum hydropiper L. and Pogostemon parviflorus Benth. were tested in the laboratory against tea termite, Odontotermes assamensis Holm. Both the tested extracts caused mortality of the termite. The highest toxic activity (100%) was found in the 2.0% chloroform extracts of P. hydropiper. The chloroform extract of P. hydropiper was explored for possible mammalian toxicological effects. The LD50 was 758.58 mg/kg in male albino mice. Subcutaneous injection of sub-lethal dose of extract into male mice once a week for 6 weeks failed to express any significant influence on WBC, RBC count and blood cholesterol.

  8. Laboratory Studies of the Fe K-shell Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-12-26

    An overview is given of measurements of the Fe K-shell spectrum from low-density laboratory sources. The measurements include wavelengths, electron-impact collision cross sections, innershell ionization phenomena, dielectronic recombination resonance strengths, charge exchange recombination, electron beam polarization effects, resonance excitation, and radiative cascade contributions. K-shell spectra have now also been obtained with microcalorimeters, including microcalorimeter arrays that are twins of the ASTRO-E and ASTRO-E2 missions, which illustrate typical resolving powers and spectral capabilities.

  9. Studies of quaternary deposits in Olkiluoto in 2004; Maaperaetutkimukset tutkimuskaivannoissa TKB ja TK9 Olkiluodossa 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhta, P. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2005-04-15

    The study sections (trenches) TK 8 and TK 9 in Olkiluoto were studied according to the contract in autumn 2004. The investigations were carried out in three phases as the excavation progressed. Samples for grain size determinations were taken from vertical profiles, placed 25 m apart along the trench, with the profiles extending from the soil surface down to bedrock or, if the bedrock was covered with water, to the water table. Between 6 and 7 kg of sediment was taken in a bucket with a shovel and placed in plastic bags for transport to the laboratory. The samples were first dried in the laboratory after which they were sieved. In addition, grain size distribution of the < 63 {mu}m fraction was analyzed with the Micromeritics 5000 ET Sedigraph. Sedimentological observations of the sampling profiles were documented in field by drawing (on a field observation form) and the profiles were photographed using a digital camera. In addition, the excavated sections were photographed along their whole length. The length of the TK 8 trench is approximately 730 m and 30 profiles were sampled from it. The height of the profiles varied from 6 m to 0.8 m with an average of 2.6 m. The till in the trench TK 8 is classified as having a normal amount of cobbles and boulders with the size of the larger clasts varying from 6 to 60 cm. The clasts are normally rounded or sub-angular. Both the size and number of cobbles increases with depth, as does their angularity. In places the till is overlain by postglacial clays/silts and littoral sands. With the exception of one sample, all samples from the TK 8 section can be classified as sandy tills based on the d50 grain size. According to the guidelines for mapping of Quatemary deposits one third of the samples is classified as fine-grained tills. This is because of the high percentages of silt and clay size particles that affect the frost heaving properties of the tills as well as their suitability for construction. A till is considered fine

  10. Studies on the properties of sputter-deposited Al-doped ZnO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, M.; Chaabouni, F.; Abaab, M.; Rezig, B.

    2008-09-01

    ZnO is a well known material; however, the research interest in this material is still high enough because ZnO is one of the materials with the most potential for optoelectronics due to its promising properties of high conductivity as well as good transparency. In this work, aluminum doped zinc oxide films (ZnO:Al) were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering on glass and silicon substrates with different deposition times of 2, 3 and 4 h. The aim of this work is the study of the deposition time effect on the properties of ZnO:Al films. It is shown that films grow with the hexagonal c-axis perpendicular to the substrate surface. The morphological characteristics show a granular and homogenous surface and the cristallinity of the films is enhanced with increased deposition time. The deposited films show good optical transmittance (80%-90%) in the visible and near infrared spectrum. The calculated band gap is about 3.3 eV. The electrical ZnO:Al/Si(p) junction properties were investigated using the Capacitance-Voltage ( C-V) dependence. Calculations of the built-in potential from classical 1/C2-V characterization give values between 0.54 and 0.71 V. This work shows how the variation of deposition time allows the control of structural, electrical and optical properties of the films.

  11. Quantum confinement in amorphous TiO(2) films studied via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David M; Du, Xiaohua; Cavanagh, Andrew S; Weimer, Alan W

    2008-11-05

    Despite the significant recent increase in quantum-based optoelectronics device research, few deposition techniques can reliably create the required functional nanoscale systems. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used here to study the quantum effects attainable through the use of this ångström-level controlled growth process. Size-dependent quantum confinement has been demonstrated using TiO(2) layers of nanoscale thickness applied to the surfaces of silicon wafers. TiO(2) films were deposited at 100 °C using TiCl(4) and H(2)O(2) in a viscous flow ALD reactor, at a rate of 0.61 Å/cycle. The low-temperature process was utilized to guarantee the amorphous deposition of TiO(2) layers and post-deposition thermal annealing was employed to promote crystallite-size modification. Hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the residual chlorine that remained from a typical TiCl(4)-H(2)O ALD process at this temperature, down to 1.6%. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to quantify the optical properties both below and above the bandgap energy. A central composite design was employed to map the surface response of the film thickness-dependent bandgap shift for the as-deposited case and up to a thermal annealing temperature of 550 °C. The Brus model was used to develop a correlation between the amorphous TiO(2) film thickness and the quantum length to promote equivalent bandgap shifts.

  12. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface-A modeling based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuza, S. M.; Taufique, M. F. N.; Banerjee, Soumik

    2017-02-01

    The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  13. Evaporative deposition patterns of bacteria from a sessile drop: effect of changes in surface wettability due to exposure to a laboratory atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Kyle F; Maier, Raina M; Norris, Theresa A; Beam, Brooke M; Mudalige, Anoma; Pemberton, Jeanne E; Curry, Joan E

    2010-05-18

    Evaporative deposition from a sessile drop is a simple and appealing way to deposit materials on a surface. In this work, we deposit living, motile colloidal particles (bacteria) on mica from drops of aqueous solution. We show for the first time that it is possible to produce a continuous variation in the deposition pattern from ring deposits to cellular pattern deposits by incremental changes in surface wettability which we achieve by timed exposure of the mica surface to the atmosphere. We show that it is possible to change the contact angle of the drop from less than 5 degrees to near 20 degrees by choice of atmospheric exposure time. This controls the extent of drop spreading, which in turn determines the architecture of the deposition pattern.

  14. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloiu, Valentin A. [Georgia Southern Univ., Statesboro, GA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuels combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  15. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloiu, Valentin [Georgia Southern Univ., Statesboro, GA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuels combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  16. An Experimental Study on Slurry Erosion Resistance of Single and Multilayered Deposits of Ni-WC Produced by Laser-Based Powder Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu; Hamid, Syed; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Single and multilayered deposits containing different mass fractions of tungsten carbide (WC) in nickel (Ni)-matrix (NT-20, NT-60, NT-80) are deposited on a AISI 4140 steel substrate using a laser-based powder deposition process. The transverse cross section of the coupons reveals that the higher the mass fraction of WC in Ni-matrix leads to a more uniform distribution through Ni-matrix. The slurry erosion resistance of the fabricated coupons is tested at three different impingement angles using an abrasive water jet cutting machine, which is quantified based on the erosion rate. The top layer of a multilayered deposit (i.e., NT-60 in a two-layer NT-60 over NT-20 deposit) exhibits better erosion resistance at all three tested impingement angles when compared to a single-layer (NT-60) deposit. A definite increase in the erosion resistance is noted with an addition of nano-size WC particles. The relationship between the different mass fractions of reinforcement (WC) in the deposited composite material (Ni-WC) and their corresponding matrix (Ni) hardness on the erosion rate is studied. The eroded surface is analyzed in the light of a three-dimensional (3-D) profilometer and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that a volume fraction of approximately 62% of WC with a Ni-matrix hardness of 540 HV resulting in the gouging out of WC from the Ni-matrix by the action of slurry. It is concluded that the slurry erosion resistance of the AISI 4140 steel can be significantly enhanced by introducing single and multilayered deposits of Ni-WC composite material fabricated by the laser-based powder deposition process.

  17. ENERGY DEPOSITION STUDIES FOR POSSIBLE INNOVATIVE PHASE II COLLIMATOR DESIGNS

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2009-01-01

    Due to the known limitations of Phase I LHC collimators in stable physics conditions, the LHC collimation system will be complemented by additional 30 Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimation system is designed to improve cleaning efficiency and to minimize the collimator-induced impedance with the main function of protecting the Super Conducting (SC) magnets from quenching due to beam particle losses. To fulfil these requirements, different possible innovative collimation designs were taken in consideration. Advanced jaw materials, including new composite materials (e.g. Cu–Diamond), jaw SiC insertions, coating foil, in-jaw instrumentation (e.g. BPM) and improved mechanical robustness of the jaw are the main features of these new promising Phase II collimator designs developed at CERN. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used to evaluate the behavior of these collimators in the most radioactive areas of LHC, supporting the mechanical integration. These studies aim to identify the possible criti...

  18. Energy Deposition Studies for Possible Innovative Phase II Collimator Designs

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Brugger, M; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Vlachoudis, V; Weiler, T

    2010-01-01

    Due to the known limitations of Phase I LHC collimators in stable physics conditions, the LHC collimation system will be complemented by additional 30 Phase II collimators. The Phase II collimation system is designed to improve cleaning efficiency and to minimize the collimator-induced impedance with the main function of protecting the Super Conducting (SC) magnets from quenching due to beam particle losses. To fulfil these requirements, different possible innovative collimation designs were taken in consideration. Advanced jaw materials, including new composite materials (e.g. Cu–Diamond), jaw SiC insertions, coating foil, in-jaw instrumentation (e.g. BPM) and improved mechanical robustness of the jaw are the main features of these new promising Phase II collimator designs developed at CERN. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used to evaluate the behavior of these collimators in the most radioactive areas of LHC, supporting the mechanical integration. These studies aim to identify the possible criti...

  19. Study of SnS2 thin film deposited by spin coating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Joshi, Hardikkumar J.; Tailor, Jiten P.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2017-07-01

    Thin film deposition of SnS2 was done by spin coating technique at ambient temperature. Deposition was done for different spin speed and spin time. The film thickness dependence on spin speed and spin time was studied. The spin speed was varied from 1000 rpm to 2000 rpm and spin time from 2 s to 6 s for constant speed of 1000 rpm. The elemental composition and crystal structure along with the phase of the as-deposited thin film was determined by the energy dispersive analysis of x-ray (EDAX) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques respectively. The as-deposited thin film was found to be near stoichiometric and possess hexagonal crystal structure with determined lattice parameters in good agreement with the reported values. The crystallite size calculated from the XRD data using Scherrer’s formula and Hall-Williamson relation came out to be 9.77 nm and 6.49 nm, respectively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of spin deposited thin films showed the film to be continuous. Surface study of the as-deposited thin film was done by simple optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The study showed that the deposited thin film to be flat and uniform without visible cracks and pores. The optical spectroscopy study of the as-deposited thin film showed that the optical bandgap value decreases with increase in film thickness. The d.c. electrical resistivity variation with temperature for spin coating as-deposited SnS2 film showed that the resistivity decreases with increase in temperature corroborating the semiconducting nature. The resistivity variation plot possesses two slopes. The temperature ranges showing two slopes lay between 300 to 383 K and 384 to 423 K having activation energy values for the two temperature ranges as 0.072 eV and 0.633 eV, respectively. The achieved results are deliberated in details.

  20. Brushite coatings on titanium for orthopedic implants: Studies on deposition and transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh

    Hydroxyapatite (HA, Ca5(PO4)3OH) coating on the metallic substrate is expected to assist bone growth and implant integration. However, HA is quite stable in physiological solution and the use of other more reactive calcium phosphate ceramics (CPC) could induce faster bone growth by providing calcium and phosphate ions to the interacting physiological solution. This study utilized a non-line of sight electrodeposition process to achieve brushite (CaHPO4.2H2O) coatings. The uses of potassium or sodium chloride as a conducting electrolyte in the depositing bath enhanced deposition rates and altered the morphology of the coatings. Analysis suggested a strained deposit with sight specific substitution of cations from the conducting electrolyte. Such a deposit (modified brushite) was determined to have CaHPO 4.2H2O and CaY2(1-x)HPO4•2H 2O (x ˜0.95) with Y as Na0 or K. Whereas normal brushite was obtained from unsupported baths. The deposited mass of brushite increased with charge consumed and bonding to the substrate decreased with increasing deposition time. Though inconclusive. in-situ studies on electrodeposition did not rule out the possibility of ionic species responsible for the deposit. Transformations of both forms of brushite were investigated in calcium free Hank's type simulated body fluid. Modified brushite showed periodic appearance of freshly precipitated, but poorly crystalline HA, without the benefit of monetite (CaHPO4) as an intermediate. However, normal brushite transformation showed nonstoichiometric HA with monetite as an intermediate. Normal brushite demonstrated a slower transformation to HA when compared to the transformation kinetics of modified brushite. It is shown that lattice strain due to localized ion incorporation could be used to after the properties of brushite coatings to adjust the kinetics of transformation and indirectly the amount of calcium and phosphate ions released into the surrounding.

  1. Laboratory studies of dune sand for the use of construction industry in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva Jayawardena, Upali; Wijesuriya, Roshan; Abayaweera, Gayan; Viduranga, Tharaka

    2015-04-01

    With the increase of the annual sand demand for the construction industry the excessive excavation of river sand is becoming a serious environmental problem in Sri Lanka. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the possibility for an alternative to stop or at least to minimize river sand mining activities. Dune sand is one of the available alternative materials to be considered instead of river sand in the country. Large quantities of sand dunes occur mainly along the NW and SE coastal belt which belong to very low rainfall Dry Zone coasts. The height of dune deposits, vary from 1m to about 30 meters above sea level. The objective of this paper is to indicate some studies and facts on the dune sand deposits of Sri Lanka. Laboratory studies were carried out for visual observations and physical properties at the initial stage and then a number of tests were carried out according to ASTM standards to obtain the compressive strength of concrete cylinders and mortar cubes mixing dune sand and river sand in different percentages keeping a constant water cement ratio. Next the water cement ratio was changed for constant dune sand and river sand proportion. Microscopic analysis shows that the dune sand consist of 95 % of quartz and 5 % of garnet, feldspar, illmenite and other heavy minerals with clay, fine dust, fine shell fragments and organic matters. Grains are sub-rounded to angular and tabular shapes. The grain sizes vary from fine to medium size of sand with silt. The degree of sorting and particle size observed with dune sands are more suited with the requirement of fine aggregates in the construction industry. The test result indicates that dune sand could be effectively used in construction work without sieving and it is ideal for wall plastering due to its'-uniformity. It could also be effectively used in concrete and in mortars mixing with river sand. The best mixing ratio is 75% dune sand and 25% river sand as the fine aggregate of concrete. For mortar the mixing

  2. Design of laboratory experiments to study photoionization fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. P.; Hazak, G.; Keiter, P. A.; Davis, J. S.; Patterson, C. R.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E.; Busquet, M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper analyzes the requirements of a photoionization-front experiment that could be driven in the laboratory, using thermal sources to produce the necessary flux of ionizing photons. It reports several associated conclusions. Such experiments will need to employ the largest available facilities, capable of delivering many kJ to MJ of energy to an x-ray source. They will use this source to irradiate a volume of neutral gas, likely of N, on a scale of a few mm to a few cm, increasing with source energy. For a gas pressure of several to ten atmospheres at room temperature, and a source temperature near 100 eV, one will be able to drive a photoionization front through a system of tens to hundreds of photon mean free paths. The front should make the familiar transition from the so-called R-Type to D-Type as the radiation flux diminishes with distance. The N is likely to reach the He-like state. Preheating from the energetic photons appears unlikely to become large enough to alter the essential dynamics of the front beyond some layer near the surface. For well-chosen experimental conditions, competing energy transport mechanisms are small. Supported by the U.S. DOE by NNSA Grants DE-NA0002956 (SSAA) and DE-NA0002719 (NLUF), by LLE, and by LLNL.

  3. Laboratory Studies of Cometary Materials - Continuity Between Asteroid and Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Walker, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory analysis of cometary samples have been enabled by collection of cometary dust in the stratosphere by high altitude aircraft and by the direct sampling of the comet Wild-2 coma by the NASA Stardust spacecraft. Cometary materials are composed of a complex assemblage of highly primitive, unprocessed interstellar and primordial solar system materials as well as a variety of high temperature phases that must have condensed in the inner regions of the protoplanetary disk. These findings support and contradict conclusions of comet properties based solely on astronomical observations. These sample return missions have instead shown that there is a continuity of properties between comets and asteroids, where both types of materials show evidence for primitive and processed materials. Furthermore, these findings underscore the importance and value of direct sample return. There will be great value in comparing the findings of the Stardust cometary coma sample return mission with those of future asteroid surface sample returns OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa II as well as future comet nucleus sample returns.

  4. Laboratory studies of biological effects of sulfur oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalbey, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Selected results from exposures of laboratory animals to airborne sulfur oxides were briefly summarized. The main observation during acute exposures was reflex bronchoconstriction and a resultant increase in pulmonary resistance. The increase in resistance due to sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) was potentiated by simultaneous exposure to aerosols under conditions which would increase the transfer of sulfur oxides into the respiratory tract and promote transformation to a higher oxidation state, especially one that is acid. Sulfate aerosols, particularly sulfuric acid aerosols, were more potent than SO/sub 2/ in causing bronchoconstriction. Chronic exposure to high concentrations (400 to 650 ppM) of SO/sub 2/ resulted in experimental bronchitis in several species. Longterm exposure to more realistic concentrations of SO/sub 2/ produced little or no changes in respiratory function or morphology. Significant alterations in both pulmonary function and morphology have been reported after chronic exposure to sulfuric acid aerosols. Recent data indicate that changes in the lung may progress after cessation of such exposures.

  5. SHELTER COMPETITION BETWEEN TWO INVASIVE CRAYFISH SPECIES: A LABORATORY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALONSO F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Alien crayfishes represent a common threat to aquatic ecosystems. Their spread in Europe is leading to more frequent contacts between different invasive species populations. Shelter can be an important factor in the resulting interactions. A laboratory experiment was designed to analyse the competition for shelter in similarly sized males of two species that show an invasive behaviour in Spain, Pacifastacus leniusculus and Procambarus clarkii. We carried out 24 heterospecific, six-hour trials, with 30 min behavioural observations per hour. Most often, red swamp crayfish were both the first (70.8% and the long-term winner (62.5%. Usually, the long-term winner was the first winner. Whenever shelter was occupied, a passive behaviour by unsheltered individuals was more frequent in signal crayfish than in red swamp crayfish. When both were unsheltered, signal crayfish displayed more often a passive behaviour. Although the observed behaviour might be explained as the result of dominance by the red swamp crayfish over the signal crayfish, shelter availability and class, as well as different growth patterns and population size structures, could change the intensity and the outcome of the encounters in the wild, where signal crayfish usually reach larger sizes than red swamp crayfish.

  6. Laboratory studies for stone conservation at the Cathedral of Murcia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esbert, R. M.

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of a series of laboratory tests, carried out on the bioclastic limestone used in the construction of the Murcia cathedral, are presented in this paper in order to evaluate the efficiency of certain treatment products, that eventually could be applied to that stone for improving their state of conservation. Additionally, the behaviour under accelerated ageing tests of non treated samples and the treated ones with the different products employed -ethyl silicate, oligomeric polisiloxane and poliurethane-, is compared.

    En el presente trabajo se recogen los resultados de una serie de experimentos de laboratorio realizados con la caliza bioclástica utilizada en la construcción de la catedral de Murcia, con el fin de conocer la idoneidad de ciertos productos de tratamiento que eventualmente podrían aplicarse a dicha piedra para mejorar su estado de conservación. Además, se compara el comportamiento, frente a diversos ensayos de envejecimiento artificial acelerado, de la piedra sin tratar y tratada con los diferentes productos ensayados: silicato de etilo, polisiloxano oligomérico y poliuretano.

  7. Pilot study on tracing the rapidly buried rock avalanche deposits within the accumulation zone of glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznichenko, Natalya; Dunning, Stuart; Rosser, Nick; McColl, Sam

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies shown that large mass failure events significantly contribute to the glacial sediment budget and affect its final deposition. However, in accumulation zone these events are exceptionally fast subsumed by snowfall and become ingested into the glacier with no evident surface expression. This leads to poor understanding of the magnitude-frequency of these events and their contribution to the sediment budget of the glaciers. The buried rock avalanches travel as englacial load within the ice that becomes the unique geomorphic horizon, which may constitute a major fraction of total glacial debris supplied to supraglacial cover of many debris-covered glaciers, but usually re-emerging in ablation zones not in a form usable to reconstruct the magnitude-frequency of these events. Here we present a first attempt to detect the rock avalanche deposit within the ice that becomes the unique geomorphic horizon or isochrones. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was applied over the large deposit of well documented in January 2013 Mt. Haast/Dixon rock avalanche in Southern Alps of New Zealand, one year after emplacement. The large deposit 2 x 106 m3 of rock, snow and ice travelled 2.9 km over the northern margins of the Grand Plateau, just 200 m west of Plateau Hut, stalling close to the top of the Hochstetter Icefall, Aoraki/ Mt. Cook. The large deposit was lost to conventional remote sensing within 3 month after the event. In April 2014, at the time of the survey the deposit was entirely buried beneath the snow/firn cover, leaving no topographic expression of the deposit at the snow surface. The buried deposit was visible in crevasses, in the Hochstetter Ice Fall, in the Grand Plateau, and the icefall beneath Mt Haast, at depths estimated to be in the order of 5-10 m. Our subsurface data shows a good preservation of a rock avalanche deposit under about 3-5 m of snow and firn with the thickness broadly consistent along the length of the transect (1-2 m), with a thicker (5

  8. Advances in studies of the tribological behavior of molecular deposition films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yuqi; Zhang Siwei; Wang Deguo; Gao Manglai

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the advances in studies on tribology of molecular deposition (MD) films is presented here to summarize the studies of nanofrictional properties, adhesion, wear and mechanical behavior, as well as the molecular dynamics simulation of nanotribological properties of the film in the last decade. Some key research topics which need to be investigate further are addressed.

  9. Mineralogy and fluid inclusion studies in kalchoye Copper- gold deposit, East of Esfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Mehvary

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Kalchoye Copper-gold deposit is located about 110 kilometers east of Esfahan province and within the Eocene volcano sedimentary rocks. Sandy tuff and andesite lava are important members of this complex.The form of mineralization in area is vein and veinlet and quartz as the main gangue phase. The main ore minerals are chalcopyrite, chalcocite, galena and weathered minerals such as goethite, iron oxides, malachite and azurite. Studies in area indicate that ore mineralization Kalchoye is low sulfide, quartz type of hydrothermal ore deposits and results of thermometry studies on quartz minerals low- medium fluid with low potential mineralization is responsible for mineralization in this area.

  10. A comparative study of CdS thin films deposited by different techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez-Hernández, G., E-mail: german.perez@ujat.mx [Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Avenida Universidad s/n, Col. Magisterial, Villahermosa, Tabasco 86040 (Mexico); Pantoja-Enríquez, J. [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo Tecnológico en Energías Renovables, UNICACH, Libramiento Norte No 1150, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas 29039 (Mexico); Escobar-Morales, B. [Instituto Tecnológico de Cancún, Avenida Kábah Km 3, Cancún, Quintana Roo 77500 (Mexico); Martinez-Hernández, D.; Díaz-Flores, L.L.; Ricardez-Jiménez, C. [Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Avenida Universidad s/n, Col. Magisterial, Villahermosa, Tabasco 86040 (Mexico); Mathews, N.R.; Mathew, X. [Centro de Investigación en Energía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico)

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium sulfide thin-films were deposited on glass slides and SnO{sub 2}:F coated glass substrates by chemical bath deposition, sputtering and close-spaced sublimation techniques. The films were studied for the structural and opto-electronic properties after annealing in an ambient identical to that employed in the fabrication of CdTe/CdS devices. Quantum efficiency of the CdTe/CdS solar cells fabricated with CdS buffer films prepared by the three methods were investigated to understand the role of CdS film preparation method on the blue response of the devices. The higher blue response observed for the devices fabricated with chemical bath deposited CdS film is discussed. - Highlights: ► CdS films were prepared by different techniques. ► Role of CdS on the blue response of device was studied. ► Structural and optical properties of CdS were analyzed. ► Chemically deposited CdS has high blue transmittance. ► CdS deposition method influences diffusion of S and Te.

  11. West Florida Shelf: A natural laboratory for the study of ocean acidificiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Pamela; Robbins, Lisa L.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Beck, Tanya; Schwing, Patrick; Martinez-Colon, Michael; Gooch, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Declining oceanic pH and carbonate-ion concentrations are well-known consequences of increased atmospheric and surface-ocean partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). The possible subject of shifts in seawater carbonate chemistry on biocalcification and survival rates of marine organisms provides questions amenable to both experimental and field study (Kleypas and Langdon, 2006). To date, limited quantitative data exist with which to formalize and test hypotheses regarding such impacts, particularly in continental-shelf settings. The continental shelves of Florida provide an ideal natural laboratory in which to test latitudinal (and temperature and depth) shifts in habitat ranges of calcifying organisms. Both the east and west Florida shelves extend from warm temperate to subtropical latitudes; additionally, the west Florida shelf has very little siliciclastic influx to mask the carbonate production. This study utilizes the natural laboratory of the west and southwest Florida shelf (fig 1.1) to examine the transition from foramol (predominately foraminifera and molluscan) carbonate sediments, characteristic of the west-central Florida shelf, to chlorozoan (algal and coral) sediments characteristic of the southwest Florida shelf. The west Florida shelf is a mixed siliciclastic carbonate ramp that to the south transitions to the carbonate-dominated southwest Florida shelf (Enos, 1977; Brooks and others, 2003). The west Florida shelf is a distally steepened carbonate ramp that is ~250 kilometers (km) wide (Read, 1985). It is covered by a veneer of unconsolidated sediment consisting of mainly biogenic carbonate and quartz in the near shore, with subordinate amounts of phosphate. The sediment-distribution pattern is largely a function of proximity to source, with physical processes playing a minor role in distribution. The carbonate sand-and-gravel fraction is produced by organisms within the depositional basin of the west Florida shelf (Brooks and others, 2003). The

  12. Mineralogical Study of Zard Koh and Kulli Koh Iron Ore Deposits of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SULTAN AHMED KHOSO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zard Koh and Kulli Koh are two recently discovered iron ore deposits, existing in the Chagai district, Balochistan, Pakistan. PSM (Pakistan Steel Mill Limited is interested to utilize these ore deposits at priority. Purpose of the present study was to assess the mineralogy of the Zard Koh and Kulli Koh iron ore deposits, as it plays a vital role in the selection of an appropriate processing method. The mineralogical study of ore deposits was carried out by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction, XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope attached with EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscope and SM (Stereomicroscope techniques. Results indicated that the Zard Koh ore is mainly composed of 60.15% maghemite, 23.57% pyrite, 4.07% chlorite, 10.30% grossular and 1.65% admontite minerals. The chemical analysis revealed that Zard Koh iron ore contains an average of 54.27% Fe, 12.73% S, 8.70% Si, 3.07% Al, 4.07% Ca, and 2.16% Mg. Similarly, the mineralogical study of the Kulli Koh iron ore indicated that, ore is containing 51.16% hematite, 29.24% quartz, 8.89% dravite, and 8.76% kaolinite minerals. Elemental analysis of different samples indicated that Kulli Koh iron ore contains an average composition of 40.23% Fe, 20.67% Si, 3.44% Ca, 3.81% Al and 3.25% Mg. Mineralogical study of the Zard Koh and Kulli Koh iron ore deposits suggested that these ore deposits can be beneficiated costeffectively by using magnetic separation techniques.

  13. A Study of Finding Safer Aquifer in the Arsenic Contaminated Holocene Deposit; South-Western Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mano, A.; Udo, K.; Ishibashi, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The depositional pattern, geochemistry and mineralogy of the Arsenic (As) contaminated sediments along with the chemistry of groundwaters extracted from the Holocene deposit of an As hotspot, Kalaroa, Southwestern Bangladesh have been investigated in this study. These were done to elucidate a unified view that could explain the accumulation and distribution of As on the sediment surface and its subsequent release into the groundwater. Such view of As distribution mainly helped to find out eventually the possible existence of any safer aquifer that could provide adequate potable water to that targeted community. Two key geochemical parameters, the reaction rate Kr and the partition coefficient, Kd were found to be very promising in explaining the As release mechanism. Showing the realistic natural biotite dissolution process, the in-situ Kr that was derived by applying inverse mass balance model (2.72 × 10-16 /sec), was found to be slower by only three orders of magnitude than that was determined with the laboratory study (3.19×10-13 /sec). A parametric predictor equation, that can calculate the partition coefficient Kd based on the aquifer sediment’s minerals such as Fe and Al contents along with pore-water pH was developed in this study. Another Kd model based on the diffuse double layer surface complexation theory has also been developed to compare the appropriateness of the parametric Kd model. These two models were compared with the in-situ based field Kd data and were found in a good agreement. Integrating those two essential geochemical parameters (Kd and Kr), a 1D-Finite Difference numerical model was applied to observe and evaluate the As pollution scenario for the studied Holocene aquifer. The simulation showed very promising results introducing the idea that the deeper aquifer’s groundwaters would be remained safe against being contaminated with high As in future, due to the presence of a number of encouraging factors. The most significant among

  14. Experimental Study and Mathematical Modeling of Asphaltene Deposition Mechanism in Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Behbahani T.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experimental studies were conducted to determine the effect of asphaltene deposition on the permeability reduction and porosity reduction of carbonate, sandstone and dolomite rock samples using an Iranian bottom hole live oil sample which is close to reservoir conditions, whereas in the majority of previous work, a mixture of recombined oil (a mixture of dead oil and associated gas was injected into a core sample which is far from reservoir conditions. The effect of the oil injection rate on asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction was studied. The experimental results showed that an increase in the oil injection flow rate can result in an increase in asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction. Also, it can be observed that at lower injection flow rates, a monotonic decrease in permeability of the rock samples can be attained upon increasing the injection flow rate, while at higher injection rates, after a decrease in rock permeability, an increasing trend is observed before a steady-state condition can be reached. The experimental results also showed that the rock type can affect the amount of asphaltene deposition, and the asphaltene deposition has different mechanisms in sandstone and carbonate core samples. It can be seen that the adsorption and plugging mechanisms have a more important role in asphaltene deposition in carbonate core samples than sandstone core samples. From the results, it can be observed that the pore volumes of the injected crude oil are higher for sandstone cores compared with the carbonate cores. Also, it can be inferred that three depositional types may take place during the crude oil injection, i.e., continuous deposition for low-permeability cores, slow, steady plugging for high-permeability cores and steady deposition for medium-permeability cores. It can be seen from the experimental results that damage to the core samples was found to increase when the production pressures were

  15. The 1993 QUASIMEME laboratory-performance study: chlorobiphenyls in fish oil and standard solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, D.E.; Boer, de J.

    1994-01-01

    A laboratory-performance study has been undertaken to improve the measurement of chlorobiphenyls in marine biota as part of the QUASIMEME (EU - Measurement and Testing) project. Fifty-two laboratories were invited to participate, of which 47 returned data on nine congeners in iso-octane solution and

  16. Inter-laboratory comparison study for pyrrolizidine alkaloids in animal feed using spiked and incurred material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, de W.C.M.; Elbers, I.J.W.; Mulder, P.P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are hepatotoxic metabolites produced by plants. PAs in animal feed can cause acute or chronic intoxications in animals and can be transferred to milk. An inter-laboratory comparison study among 12 laboratories, using their own methods of analysis, was conducted for the

  17. A Feasibility Study for Mobile Marketing and Distribution Occupational Laboratories in North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohns, Donald P.

    A study determined the feasibility of a mobile laboratory for marketing and distribution in North Dakota. It attempted to answer four questions: (1) What types of staffing, equipment, curriculum, and delivery systems are presently being utilized in mobile laboratories throughout the nation? (2) What significant information obtained from mobile…

  18. Laboratory and field studies on an Indian strain of the brine shrimp Artemia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Royan, J.P.

    The Tuticorin strain of the brine shrimp @iArtemia@@ was studied under both laboratory and field conditions. Studies on the survival of the nauplii at different temperatures and salinities revealed that the nauplii preferred a salinity of 35 ppt...

  19. Experimental Study on Gold Dissolution from Hosting Minerals of the Hadamengou Gold Deposit and the Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiangzhi; YAN Fengzeng; WANG Xinhu

    2008-01-01

    The Hadamengou gold deposit is located in western part of the northern margin of the NorthChina craton. It is a hydrothermai deposit related to alkaline magmatism. Dissolution of Au, Fe frompyrite and iron oxide (including magnetite and hematite) individual minerals in the three main types ofore shows: in iron oxides (magnetite and hematite), Au and Fe were dissolved simultaneously and theirsolubilities are positively correlated, which means Au is mainly chemical-bonded (lattice gold) and/orcolloidal-adsorbed in iron oxides; while in pyrite, on the contrary, Au dissolution obviously lags behindFe and the solubility of Au shows negative relationship with that of Fe, which indicates Au is mainlyhosted as grains of elemental gold (or native gold) within pyrite. Previous studies revealed that theHadamengou gold deposit is characterized by intensive K-feldspathization and holds high content ofiron oxides occasionally replaced by sulfides, which was caused by oxidizing K-enriched alkaline fluidsunder a stretching geodynamic setting. These geological features, together with the high Au-content iniron oxides, comparable with that of the Olympic Dam deposit in South Australia, suggest that thisdeposit is the first example of iron oxide-type gold deposits in China.

  20. Comparative study of niobium nitride coatings deposited by unbalanced and balanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaya, J.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota Colombia (Colombia); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D. F. 04510 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D. F. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: muhl@servidor.unam.mx

    2008-10-01

    Niobium nitride (NbN) coatings have many interesting properties such as chemical inertness, excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity, high melting point, and a superconducting transition temperature between 16 and 17 K. For this reason, these compounds have many potential thin film applications. In this work we compare the properties of NbN{sub x} films deposited using well-characterized balanced and unbalanced magnetron sputtering systems. Samples of NbN were deposited in the two systems under almost identical deposition conditions, that is, the same substrate temperature, plasma power, gas pressure, substrate to target distance and Ar/N{sub 2} ratio. Prior to the film preparation both the magnetic field geometry and the characteristics of the plasma were determined. The microstructure and composition of the deposits were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance and the micro-abrasion wear resistance were measured by anodic polarization potentiodynamic studies and by ball cratering, respectively. The NbN films grown using the highly unbalanced magnetron configuration had a preferential (111) crystal orientation and a composite hardness of up to 2400 HV{sub 0.025}. While the films deposited using the balanced magnetron had a mixed crystalline orientation and a hardness of 2000 HV{sub 0.025}. The results demonstrate the strong effect of magnetic field configuration on the ion bombardment, and the resultant coating characteristics.

  1. Analytical Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s analytical laboratories in Pittsburgh, PA, and Albany, OR, give researchers access to the equipment they need to thoroughly study the properties of materials...

  2. Study of Energy Deposition and Activation for the LINAC4 Dump

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, F; Mauro, E; Mereghetti, A; Silari, M; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    This document provides estimates of energy deposition and activation for the dump of the future LINAC4 accelerator. Detailed maps of power density deposited in the dump are given, allowing to perform further thermo mechanical studies. Residual dose rates at a few cooling times for different irradiation scenarios have been calculated. Moreover, the air activation has been evaluated and doses to the reference population group and to a worker intervening in the cave at the shutdown have been predicted. Calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo particle transport and interaction code FLUKA.

  3. Studies on chemical bath deposited zinc sulphide thin films with special optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladar, Maria [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); ' Raluca Ripan' Institute for Research in Chemistry, 30 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne [' Raluca Ripan' Institute for Research in Chemistry, 30 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)]. E-mail: jennypopovici@yahoo.com; Baldea, Ioan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Grecu, Rodica [' Raluca Ripan' Institute for Research in Chemistry, 30 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Indrea, Emil [National Institute for R and D of Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Donath 71-103, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2007-05-31

    Adherent and uniform zinc sulphide thin films were deposited on optical glass platelets from chemical bath containing thiourea, zinc acetate, ammonia and sodium citrate. The samples, as they were prepared were investigated by UV-vis absorption/reflection spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The effects of growth conditions such as reagent concentration and deposition technique (mono- and multi-layer) on optical and structural properties of the ZnS thin films have been studied. The ability of ZnS films to exhibit luminescent properties has also been investigated.

  4. Iron-tolerant Cyanobacteria as a Tool to Study Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Iron Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Cooksey, K. E.; McKay, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    We are investigating biological mechanisms of terrestrial iron deposition as analogs for Martian hematite recently confirmed by. Possible terrestrial analogs include iron oxide hydrothermal deposits, rock varnish, iron-rich laterites, ferricrete soils, moki balls, and banded iron formations (BIFs). With the discovery of recent volcanic activity in the summit craters of five Martian volcanoes, renewed interest in the iron dynamics of terrestrial hydrothermal environments and associated microorganisms is warranted. In this study we describe a new genus and species of CB exhibiting elevated dissolved iron tolerance and the ability to precipitate hematite on the surface of their exopolymeric sheathes.

  5. Interface behavior study of WC92-Co8 coating produced by electrospark deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijun, Wang; Yiyu, Qian; Jun, Liu

    2005-02-01

    WC92-Co8 coating produced by electrospark deposition effectively improves the surface performance of the substrate. The behavior of the interface between the WC92-Co8 coating and the substrate is studied in this paper. The high-melting-point WC92-Co8 was deposited onto the surface of Ti alloy, and the coating was usually more than 50 μm thick. The surface of the coating is mainly composed of TiC and W 2C besides a small amount of W, and its micro hardness reaches HV1129. The coating dramatically improves the performance of the substrate.

  6. Particle production and energy deposition studies for the Neutrino Factory target station

    CERN Document Server

    Back, John J

    2013-01-01

    We present FLUKA and MARS simulation studies of the pion production and energy deposition in the Neutrino Factory baseline target station, which consists of a 4 MW proton beam interacting with a liquid mercury jet target within a 20 T solenoidal magnetic field. We show that a substantial increase in the shielding is needed to protect the superconducting coils from too much energy deposition. Investigations reveal that it is possible to reduce the magnetic field in the solenoid capture system without adversely affecting the pion production efficiency. We show estimates of the amount of concrete shielding that will be required to protect the environment from the high radiation doses generated by the target station facility. We also present yield and energy deposition results for alternative targets: gallium liquid jet, tungsten powder jet and solid tungsten bars.

  7. Particle production and energy deposition studies for the neutrino factory target station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, John J.; Densham, Chris; Edgecock, Rob; Prior, Gersende

    2013-02-01

    We present FLUKA and MARS simulation studies of the pion production and energy deposition in the Neutrino Factory baseline target station, which consists of a 4 MW proton beam interacting with a liquid mercury jet target within a 20 T solenoidal magnetic field. We show that a substantial increase in the shielding is needed to protect the superconducting coils from too much energy deposition. Investigations reveal that it is possible to reduce the magnetic field in the solenoid capture system without adversely affecting the pion production efficiency. We show estimates of the amount of concrete shielding that will be required to protect the environment from the high radiation doses generated by the target station facility. We also present yield and energy deposition results for alternative targets: gallium liquid jet, tungsten powder jet, and solid tungsten bars.

  8. Structural and Optical Study of Chemical Bath Deposited Nano-Structured CdS Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Dheeraj; Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Vineet; Barman, P. B.; Katyal, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    CdS is commonly used as window layer in polycrystalline solar cells. The paper presents a structural and optical study of CdS nano-structured thin films. High quality CdS thin films are grown on commercial glass by means of chemical bath deposition. It involves an alkaline solution of cadmium salt, a complexant, a chalcogen source and a non-ionic surfactant. The films have been prepared under various process parameters. The chemically deposited films are annealed to estimate its effect on the structural and optical properties of films. These films (as -deposited and annealed) have been characterized by means of XRD, SEM and UV-Visible spectrophotometer. XRD of films show the nano-crystalline nature. The energy gap of films is found to be of direct in nature.

  9. A Study of Occurrences of Ag in Pb-Zn-Cu Ore Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A systematic study of occurrences of silver in 156 Pb-Zn-Cu ore deposits indicates that silver mainly occurs in nonferrous metal ore deposits in forms of association and paragenesis. It occurs mainly as independent minerals in nature and occasionally as ion adsorption, isomorphous or amorphous silver minerals. Nearly 190 silver minerals have been discovered in China. Their shapes, constituents, textures, grain sizes, embedded types, distribution patterns, mineral assemblages and metallogenic series suggest that these characteristics are closely related to geneses of deposits and dependent of ore-forming conditions. Pb, Zn and Cu sulphides are the main carrier minerals of silver. The partition of silver in ore is constrained by the mineralization intensity, grain size and embedded form of silver minerals and mineral assemblages.

  10. Sediment Deposition Pattern and Flow Conditions in the Three Gorges Reservoir: A Physical Model Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴奎; 邵学军; 李丹勋

    2003-01-01

    Sedimentation in the Three Gorges Reservoir will greatly affect future project functions, such as power generation and navigation, after 50 years of operation. This paper presents results of a physical model study, which indicate that the capacity of both the discharge tunnel and the power plant outlet could be impaired by sediment deposition in front of the dam after 50 years, affecting both the hydropower head and navigation. A flow training scheme based on the third-stage cofferdam for the dam construction is proposed to regulate the flow pattern and control deposition in the near-dam region of the reservoir. This flow training scenario can effectively reduce deposition in the physical model.

  11. Creating organizational innovations in countries in transition using Finnish change laboratory: A case study from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodrožić Zlatko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Finnish Change Laboratory intervention method has been used in several Western countries to support innovation and learning within organizations. This study explored the applicability of the Change Laboratory method to work activities in Eastern European transition economies. The case of a Change Laboratory project at a Serbian publishing house was examined and discussed. The Change Laboratory led to a clear break from previous models and resulted in a new, much more efficient model of work organization based on teams. The studied publishing house can be characterized as an innovator within a relatively laggard industry. This characteristic increased the Serbian publisher’s potential for developing “learning partnerships” with publishing activities in EU Member States. These “learning partnerships” enabled appropriate Western concepts to be found that could be used as stimuli to develop a new model of work for the publishing house during the Change Laboratory.

  12. The interface between clinicians and laboratory staff: A field study in northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coosje J. Tuijn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Strengthening the communication and professional relationships between clinicians and laboratory workers is essential in order to positively change clinicians’ attitudes about the reliability of diagnostic tests, enhancing the use of laboratory diagnostics and, ultimately, improving patient care. We developed an analytical framework to gain insight into the factors that influence communication amongst health professionals.Objective: To explore whether the interaction between clinicians and laboratory workers influences the use of laboratory test results in clinical decision making.Methods: Four health facilities in northern Tanzania were selected using convenience sampling, whereas study participants were selected using purposive sampling. The quantitative and qualitative data collection methods included self-administered questionnaires; semistructured, individual interviews; in-depth, individual interviews; and/or focus group discussions with clinicians and laboratory workers. Thematic content analyses were performedon qualitative data based on the framework. Descriptive statistical analyses of quantitative data were conducted using Microsoft Excel.Results: Contact between clinicians and laboratory professionals is seldom institutionalised and collaboration is rare. The clinicians believe collaboration with laboratory staff is a challenge because of the gap in education levels. Laboratory workers’ education levels areoften lower than their positions require, leading to clinicians’ lack of respect for and confidencein laboratory professionals, which compromises the laboratory staff’s motivation.Conclusions: Hospital managers, clinicians and laboratory workers need to recognise the critical and complementary roles each professional plays and the importance of addressing the gap between them. Field application of the framework proved successful, justifying the expansion of this study to a larger geographical area to include

  13. Platelet deposition studies on copolyether urethanes modified with poly(ethylene oxide)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, E.; Foot, A.; van der Does, L.; Bantjes, A.

    1990-01-01

    Pellethane ® 2363 80A films and tubings were chemically modified and the effect of these modifications on platelet deposition was studied. Grafting of high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) and graft polymerization of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) 400 methacrylate resulted in surfaces with a

  14. Kinetic Study of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Tantalum in Long Narrow Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Petrushina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic study of the chemical vapor deposition of tantalum in long narrow channels is done to optimize the industrial process for the manufacture of tantalum coated plate heat exchangers. The developed model fits well at temperatures between 750 and 850 °C, and in the pressure range of25–990 mb...

  15. Modeling and Testing of EVs - Preliminary Study and Laboratory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guang-Ya; Marra, Francesco; Nielsen, Arne Hejde;

    2010-01-01

    Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid...... tests, followed by the suggestions towards a feasible battery model for further studies....

  16. Application of Lean-Six Sigma Approach in a Laboratory Experimental Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashim Raza Rizvi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments are a conventional activity performed at academic institutions, government and private organizations. These experimental studies provide the basis for new inventions in the field of science and engineering. Laboratory experiments are conducted on the basis of provided guidelines, already established by different standard organizations like ASTM, AASHTO etc. This article is based on a case study in which the process of an experiment is examined on the basis of Value Stream Maps (VSM and potential improvement possibilities have been identified. After determining the potential waste, appropriate Lean tools are selected to implement and observe the improvements. The process is examined after application of the Lean tools and a comparison is performed. University laboratory environment can be improved considerably by applying Lean Tools. MUDA application reduced the total work time from 90.75 hours and 10-CD to 63.75 hours and 7-CD hence saving, 27 hours and 3-CD for one experiment. This is remarkable achievement of this application. Heijunka application provided the students equal workload and they performed explicitly better than they used to. 5-S tool provided the students the opportunity to manage the laboratory in an effective and clean way. Safety of the students is a very major concern at university laboratory environment. 5-S not only upgraded the laboratory overall performance, but it significantly raised the safety standards of the laboratory. More application of the Lean Tools should be exercised explored to have more effective and efficient university laboratory experimental environment.

  17. Scientometric Study of Doctoral Theses of the Physical Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilkumar, N.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of bibliographies compiled from theses submitted in the period 2001-2005. The bibliographies have been studied to find out how research carried out at PRL is being used by the doctoral students. Resources are categorized by type of resource — book, journal article, proceedings, doctoral thesis, etc., to understand the usage of content procured by the library. The period of the study, 2001-2005, has been chosen because technology is changing so fast and so are the formats of scholarly communications. For the sake of convenience, only the "e-journals period" is considered for the sample.

  18. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Candidate experiments definition and preliminary concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, R. V.; Hollinden, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    The candidate definition studies on the zero-g cloud physics laboratory are covered. This laboratory will be an independent self-contained shuttle sortie payload. Several critical technology areas have been identified and studied to assure proper consideration in terms of engineering requirements for the final design. Areas include chambers, gas and particle generators, environmental controls, motion controls, change controls, observational techniques, and composition controls. This unique laboratory will allow studies to be performed without mechanical, aerodynamics, electrical, or other type techniques to support the object under study. This report also covers the candidate experiment definitions, chambers and experiment classes, laboratory concepts and plans, special supporting studies, early flight opportunities and payload planning data for overall shuttle payload requirements assessments.

  19. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140876 Gao Junbo(College of Resources and Environmental Engineering,Guizhou University,Guiyang 550025,China);Yang Ruidong Study on the Strontium Isotopic Composition of Large Devonian Barite Deposits from Zhenning,Guizhou Province(Geochimica,

  20. Modeling and Testing of EVs - Preliminary Study and Laboratory Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Guang-Ya; Marra, Francesco; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2010-01-01

    impact at different geographical areas, as well as driving and charging patterns. Electric circuit model is deployed in this work to represent the electrical properties of a lithium-ion battery. This paper reports the preliminary modeling and validation work based on manufacturer data sheet and realistic......Electric vehicles (EVs) are expected to play a key role in the future energy management system to stabilize both supply and consumption with the presence of high penetration of renewable generation. A reasonably accurate model of battery is a key element for the study of EVs behavior and the grid...... tests, followed by the suggestions towards a feasible battery model for further studies....

  1. Progress in glial cell studies in some laboratories in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Glial cells in the central nervous system(CNS) consist of a heterogeneous population of cell types,each characterized by distinct morphological features,physiological properties,and specific markers.In contrast to the previous view that glial cells were passive elements in the brain,accumulating evidence suggests that glial cells are active participants in various brain functions and brain disorders.This review summarizes recent progress of glial cell studies from several groups in China,ranging from studies about the mechanisms of neuron-glia crosstalking to investigations on the roles of glial cells in various CNS disorders.

  2. Emittances Studies at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhoplav, Rodion; Melissinos, A C; Regis-Guy Piot, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector incorporates an L-band rf-gun capable of generating 1-10 nC bunches. The bunches are then accelerated to 16 MeV with a TESLA superconducting cavity. In the present paper we present parametric studies of transverse emittances and energy spread for a various operating points of the electron source (RF-gun E-field, laser length and spot size, and solenoid settings). We especially study the impact, on transverse emittance, of Gaussian and Plateau temporal distribution of the photocathode drive-laser.

  3. Study of Magnetism in Colmonoy-6 (AWS NiCr-C) Deposit on 316LN Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Gopa, E-mail: gopa_mjs@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Ramasubbu, V., E-mail: vrsubbu@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Albert, S.K., E-mail: shaju@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Bhaduri, A.K., E-mail: bhaduri@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Murugesan, S., E-mail: smurug@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Raj, Baldev, E-mail: dir@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India)

    2010-06-15

    Considerable difference in melting points between the austenitic stainless steel (SS) substrate and Ni-base Colmonoy (AWS NiCr) hardfacing alloys results in significant dilution of the hardface deposit from the substrate. In the present study, it is found that the dilution also affects the magnetic property of the deposit. Although both austenitic SS and the undiluted Ni-base hardfacing alloy deposit are non-magnetic, the deposit diluted by austenitic SS becomes magnetic. Magnetism at different dilution levels of the deposit is measured using Magnegage and Feritscope, and the results correlated with the dilution of the deposit that is estimated from its Fe and Ni contents using SEM-EDS analysis. A good correlation between dilution and magnetic property could be obtained. As dilution also affects the hardness of the deposit, it was also possible to correlate the magnetic property of the deposit with its hardness. These findings have potential application in using magnetic measurement as a non-destructive method for estimating the hardness and/or dilution of the deposit on actual components not amenable for in-situ hardness measurements. The possible origin of magnetism in the deposit layers has been examined. The small variations in the lattice parameters of the deposit with dilution (composition) could be well correlated with variation in magnetic property.

  4. Electric air filtration: theory, laboratory studies, hardware development, and field evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.; Kuhl, W.; Lum, B.; Bogdanoff, A.; Hebard, H.; Hall, M.; Banks, D.; Mazumder, M.; Johnson, J.

    1983-09-01

    We summarize the results of a seven-year research project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop electric air filters that extend the service life of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the nuclear industry. This project was unique to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and it entailed comprehensive theory, laboratory studies, and hardware development. We present our work in three major areas: (1) theory of and instrumentation for filter test methods, (2) theoretical and laboratory studies of electric air filters, and (3) development and evaluation of eight experimental electric air filters.

  5. Dust deposition in Antarctica in glacial and interglacial climate conditions: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sudarchikova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide a unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distance. These cores are a paleoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret paleodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time-slices such as the pre-industrial control (CTRL, mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP, last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP and Eemian (126 000 yr BP. One glacial time interval, which is Last Glacial Maximum (LGM (21 000 yr BP was simulated as well as to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase of mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change of dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher Southern Hemisphere dust emissions, two times stronger atmospheric transport towards

  6. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  7. Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Stable Isotope Studies of the Dopolan Bauxite Deposit, Zagros Mountain, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Salamab Ellahi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Dopolan deposit is a Mediterranean-type bauxite located in the Zagros Fold-Thrust Zone, Iran. This deposit consists of five lithological members including iron-rich, clay-rich, oolitic, pisolitic and organic matter-containing bauxites. The mineralogy of the deposit includes diaspore, boehmite, and kaolinite, nacrite, with minor pyrite, anatase and rutile. Geochemical studies show that light rare earth elements (LREEs are enriched relative to heavy rare earth elements (HREEs in all members, supporting an authigenic origin. Mass changes based on Ti as an immobile element indicate that conventionally-immobile elements (Al, Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf are enriched in situ in the residual units, whereas mobile elements (K, Ca, Si were depleted during bauxitization. This study shows that the Khaneh–Kat argillitic dolomite is the likely parent rock. The δ18O (7.63‰to 9.35‰ and D values (49.91‰to 66.49‰ for kaolinite in the bauxite samples suggest equilibration with meteoric waters which supports a supergene origin. Bauxitization occurred in a warm climate with relatively constant isotopic composition suggesting climate stability during the development of bauxite horizons and remobilization of Al (with formation of secondary boehmite. The δ13C values of calcite (7.3‰ in the bauxite support the idea that the Khaneh–Kat Formation has experienced post-depositional isotope exchange with meteoric waters during the karstification process.

  8. Fluid inclusion study of the Fiumarella barite deposit (Catanzaro — S. Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, L. J.; de Vivo, B.; Kramer, A. K.; Lima, A.

    1981-08-01

    Samples from a barite vein deposit, located in the Catanzaro Fiumarella (Calabria) were examined by fluid inclusion and ore minerographic techniques. The barite vein occur in plutonic rocks of the Stilo Unit, where some Mo mineralizations were reported. The purpose of the study was to determine the characteristics of the fluid inclusions and to compare them to those of typical porphyry Cu/Mo systems. The ore minerographic study shows that the sulfides, associated to the barite, are clearly post-barite. The fluid inclusion results indicate that the average minimum temperature of the barite formation can be assumed to be about 210°C, with a range of 190 235°C. The salinity of the barite forming solutions is in the range 0 19.5 wt% NaCl and the average minimum pressure on the system was of 18.04 bars equivalent to a minimum depth of 201 m of barite formation below the paleowatertable. No genetic link is suggested to exist between the fluid inclusions of the Fiumarella barite deposit and those characteristic of typical porphyry Cu/Mo systems, whereas a close relation with epithermal precious metal (with base metals) vein deposits or with their distant cousins, the Kuroko deposits, is suggested to exist.

  9. Cancer prevention by tea: Evidence from laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chung S; Wang, Hong; Li, Guang Xun; Yang, Zhihong; Guan, Fei; Jin, Huanyu

    2011-08-01

    The cancer preventive activities of tea (Camellia sinensis Theaceae) have been studied extensively. Inhibition of tumorigenesis by green tea extracts and tea polyphenols has been demonstrated in different animal models, including those for cancers of the skin, lung, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, bladder, liver, pancreas, prostate, and mammary glands. Many studies in cell lines have demonstrated the modulation of signal transduction and metabolic pathways by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant and active polyphenol in green tea. These molecular events can result in cellular changes, such as enhancement of apoptosis, suppression of cell proliferation, and inhibition of angiogenesis. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of inhibition of carcinogenesis in animals and humans remain to be further investigated. Future research directions in this area are discussed.

  10. a Design of Experiment Study of the Nucleation of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chi

    1995-01-01

    Because of its property, diamond has a unique role in the semiconductor and tool industry. As diamond synthesis technology advances, more and more applications are emerging. However, in order to take advantage of its exceptional property, reliable control of nucleation and growth must be accomplished. In this study, the author systematically studies the nucleation process in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds. Among many important intricacies concerning diamond nucleation on foreign surfaces, this study addresses the following issues: the role of ultrasonic pre-treatment in CVD; the correlation between hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and microwave assisted chemical vapor deposition (MACVD) control parameters and the nucleation processes; the role of biasing substrates on the nucleation density in MACVD; the correlation between parameters of biasing substrates and the nucleation density; the reliable control of nucleation in CVD diamond synthesis. To achieve the goal of this research, a multi -purpose deposition system was built enabling the author to eliminate unnecessary variables in the deposition process. To ensure the accuracy of the nucleation effects of parameters investigated, great effort was made to calibrate measurement instruments so that noise or fluctuations in the experiments were minimized. The implementation of design of experiments (DOE), a systematic investigating technique, vastly improved the efficiency of this study over the less sophisticated empirical approach. In addition, DOE allowed the author to quantitatively estimate the effects of control parameters. Finally, diamond deposition was confirmed by Scanning Electron microscope, Micro Raman Scattering and Rutherford Backscattering. This research has successfully implemented DOE in estimating the effects of diamond nucleation quantitatively. The mechanism of ultrasonic pre-treatment is explained, and its effects are ascribed to seeding. The effects of primary CVD

  11. STUDY OF CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PROFILE OF MALARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Malaria is a major health concern across the world and is endemic in our country. It is imperative for us to know the varied manifestations and lab features both classically described and rare features for early detection of this disease and further treatment. This study was undertaken to study the clinical features, lab features and complications of malaria in a tertiary care centre. METHODOLOGY: It is a retrospective study done on 75 cases of confirmed and treated cases of malaria for a period of one year in KIMS hospital, Bangalore. Detailed history examination and lab features of these patients were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 75 cases of confirmed malaria were treated during study period of which 57[76%] were males Out of 75 cases 46[61%] had vivax malaria infection, 10[13%] had falciparum infection and 19[26%] had mixed infections of falciparum and vivax. In all 3 groups more number of cases was seen in age group of 18 – 40 years. fever was the major presentation (100% in the patients and Pain abdomen along with fever seen in 15 [20%] patients. Head ache was another predominant complaint in 35[46.6%] On examination Icterus was seen in 11 [14.6%] patients Pallor was seen in 13[17.3%] patients Systolic BP of 2ULN was seen in 9[12%] patients Out of these 6[8%] patients had severe malaria as defined by WHO category of severe malaria. CONCLUSIONS: Being more vigilant and well versed with the varied presentations/lab features of malaria and anticipating complications early, effective treatment can be instituted thus reducing the morbidity and mortality of this endemic disease.

  12. Laboratory studies of paper calendering using a pendulum device

    OpenAIRE

    Hestmo, Rune Harald

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis refers experimental and theoretical studies of the calendering process making use of the pendulum device as a means to simulate the roller calendering. The main task has been to clarify characteristic feature of the device in its capacity to simulate the calendering process with rollers. Measurements are made to enlighten the dependency of the paper characteristics gloss, smoothness and density by the running conditions as nip load, dwell time, roller temperature and moistu...

  13. Laboratory studies of nitrate radical chemistry - application to atmospheric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noremsaune, Ingse

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies atmospheric chemistry and tries in particular to fill gaps in the data base of atmospheric reactions. It studies the nitrate radical reactions with chloroethenes and with but-2-yne (2-butyne). The mechanisms and rate coefficients for the NO{sub 3}-initiated degradation of the chloroethenes and 2-butyne were investigated by means of the static reaction chamber and the fast flow-discharge technique. The reactions between the nitrate radical and the chloroethenes were studied at atmospheric pressure in a reaction chamber with synthetic air as bath gas. FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy) spectroscopy was used to follow the reactions and to identify the products. Products were observed for the reactions with (E)-1,2-dichloroethene and tetrachloroethene, although the absorption bands are weak. The alkyl peroxynitrate and nitrate compounds form very strong and characteristic absorption bands. The rate coefficients for the reactions between NO{sub 3} and the chloroethenes were investigated at room temperature by three different methods. The results are given in tables. 132 refs., 44 figs., 21 tabs.

  14. Depositional environment and sequence stratigraphy of the middle Jurassic deposits: case study of Navia section in the west Bojnurd, west of Kopet-Dagh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Sarbaz

    2016-12-01

    Kashafrud Formation in this section is composed of two depositional sequence (DS1 and DS2. The lower boundary of the first sequence (DS1, based on angular unconformity (above Triassic limestone of Elika Formation and fluvial conglomerate deposits, is type I (SB1. The upper boundary of DS1 is SB2 and is located in proximal delta front deposits with no subaerial exposure evidences. The thickness of the first sequence is about 400 m and consists of LST, TST and HST. The LST is composed of continental sediments (137 m that is covered by transgressive surface. This surface reveals by massive shale (50 m of distal delta fronts and maximum flooding surface is located in the upper part of these deposits. HST (215 m is composed of 12 shallowing and coarsening parasequences. DS2 with thickness of about 349 m is separated from DS1with sequence boundary type 2. This depositional sequence is only composed of TST with Fm and Fl lithofacies that transitionally changes to deeper water black shale that follows by marl and fine grain carbonate sediments of the Chaman-Bid Formation. Therefore, the maximum flooding surface is probably located within the Chaman-Bid Formation. Interpreted sea level fluctuation curve of the study area can be related to regional geological history and sometimes can be relatively correlated with global sea level curve (Haq et al, 1987

  15. Laboratory scale studies on removal of chromium from industrial wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chromium being one of the major toxic pollutants is discharged from electroplating and chrome tanning processes and is also found in the effluents of dyes, paint pigments, manufacturing units etc. Chromium exists in aqueous systems in both trivalent (Cr 3+) and hexavalent (Cr 6+) forms. The hexavalent form is carcinogenic and toxic to aquatic life, whereas Cr3+ is however comparatively less toxic. This study was undertaken to investigate the total chromium removal from industrial effluents by chemical means in order to achieve the Pakistan NEQS level of 1 mg/L by the methods of reduction and precipitation. The study was conducted in four phases.In phase I, the optimum pH and cost effective reducing agent among the four popular commercial chemicals was selected. As a result, pH of 2 was found to be most suitable and sodium meta bisulfate was found to be the most cost effective reducing agent respectively. Phase II showed that lower dose of sodium meta bisulfate was sufficient to obtain 100 % efficiency in reducing Cr6+ to Cr3+, and it was noted that reaction time had no significance in the whole process. A design curve for reduction process was established which can act as a tool for treatment of industrial effluents.Phase III studies indicated the best pH was 8.5 for precipitation of Cr 3+ to chromium hydroxide by using lime. An efficiency of 100 % was achievable and a settling time of 30 minutes produced clear effluent. Finally in Phase IV actual waste samples from chrome tanning and electroplating industries, when precipitated at pH of 12 gave 100 % efficiency at a settling time of 30 minutes and confirmed that chemical means of reduction and precipitation is a feasible and viable solution for treating chromium wastes from industries.

  16. The corrosion of aluminum in dilute solutions: laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draley, J.E.; Arendt, J.W.; English, G.C.; Story, E.F.; Wainscott, M.M.; Berger, R.W.

    1945-06-19

    After it had been decided that aluminum was to be used as a corrosion-resistant material with good heat transfer properties, it was desired to determine the operating conditions to be used in the water-cooled Handford plant in order to avoid danger of corrosion penetration of thin aluminum parts. The studies here reported were undertaken with the object of determining these conditions by investigating the effects of all the known variables which might influence the corrosion behavior of aluminum in a water-coolded plant at HEW. The addition of hydrogen peroxide to the testing solutions was the only effort made to simulate special conditions at the plant.

  17. The corrosion of aluminum in dilute solutions: laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draley, J.E.; Arendt, J.W.; English, G.C.; Story, E.F.; Wainscott, M.M.; Berger, R.W.

    1945-06-19

    After it had been decided that aluminum was to be used as a corrosion-resistant material with good heat transfer properties, it was desired to determine the operating conditions to be used in the water-cooled Handford plant in order to avoid danger of corrosion penetration of thin aluminum parts. The studies here reported were undertaken with the object of determining these conditions by investigating the effects of all the known variables which might influence the corrosion behavior of aluminum in a water-coolded plant at HEW. The addition of hydrogen peroxide to the testing solutions was the only effort made to simulate special conditions at the plant.

  18. Nucleobases in Space: Laboratory Studies of Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, Jamie; Mattioda, Andy; Bernstein, Max; Sandford, Scott; Hudgins, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs) are heterocyclic aromatics Le., PAHs with carbon atoms replaced by a nitrogen atom. These molecules have been detected in meteorite extracts, and in general these nitrogen heterocycles are of astrobiological interest since this class of molecules include nucleobases, basic components of our nucleic acids. These compounds are predicted to be present in the interstellar medium and in Titan tholin, but have received relatively little attention. We will present spectra and reactions of PANHs, frozen in solid H2O at 12 K, conditions germane to astronomical observations. In contrast to simple PAHs, that do not interact strongly with solid H2O, the nitrogen atoms in PANHs are potentially capable of hydrogen bonding with H20 changing their spectra, complicating their remote detection on the surfaces of icy bodies. Moreover, we have studied the photo-chemistry of these interesting compounds under astrophysical conditions and will use our lab studies to assess a potential interstellar heritage of these compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.

  19. KETENE FORMATION IN INTERSTELLAR ICES: A LABORATORY STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark J., E-mail: Reggie.Hudson@NASA.gov [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    The formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO, ethenone) in polar and apolar ices was studied with in situ 0.8 MeV proton irradiation, far-UV photolysis, and infrared spectroscopic analyses at 10-20 K. Using isotopically enriched reagents, unequivocal evidence was obtained for ketene synthesis in H{sub 2}O-rich and CO{sub 2}-rich ices, and several reaction products were identified. Results from scavenging experiments suggested that ketene was formed by free-radical pathways, as opposed to acid-base processes or redox reactions. Finally, we use our results to draw conclusions about the formation and stability of ketene in the interstellar medium.

  20. Preliminary study: Formaldehyde exposure in laboratories of Sharjah university in UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Omer Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Laboratory technicians, students, and instructors are at high risk, because they deal with chemicals including formaldehyde. Thus, this preliminary study was conducted to measure the concentration of formaldehyde in the laboratories of the University of Sharjah in UAE. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two air samples were collected and analyzed for formaldehyde using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH method 3500. In this method, formaldehyde reacts with chromotropic acid in the presence of sulfuric acid to form a colored solution. The absorbance of the colored solution is read in spectrophotometer at wavelength 580 nm and is proportional to the quantity of the formaldehyde in the solution. Results: For the anatomy laboratory and in the presence of the covered cadaver, the mean concentration of formaldehyde was found to be 0.100 ppm with a range of 0.095-0.105 ppm. Whereas for the other laboratories, the highest mean concentration of formaldehyde was 0.024 ppm in the general microbiology laboratory and the lowest mean concentration of formaldehyde was 0.001 ppm in the environmental health laboratory. The 8-hour (time-weighted average concentration of formaldehyde was found to be ranging between 0.0003 ppm in environmental health laboratory and 0.026 ppm in the anatomy laboratory. Conclusions: The highest level of concentration of formaldehyde in the presence of the covered cadaver in anatomy laboratory exceeded the recommended ceiling standard established by USA-NIOSH which is 0.1 ppm, but below the ceiling standard established by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists which is 0.3 ppm. Thus, it is recommended that formaldehyde levels should be measured periodically specially during the dissection in the anatomy laboratory, and local exhaust ventilation system should be installed and personal protective equipment such as safety glass and gloves should be available and be used to prevent

  1. Detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in clinical laboratories in Europe--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, M; Granlund, M; Edwards, H; Saez, A; Petersen, E; Evengard, B; Chiodini, P

    2014-01-01

    To determine the routine diagnostic methods used and compare the performance in detection of oocysts of Cryptosporidium species and cysts of Giardia intestinalis in faecal samples by European specialist parasitology laboratories and European clinical laboratories. Two sets of seven formalin-preserved faecal samples, one containing cysts of Giardia intestinalis and the other, containing oocysts of Cryptosporidium, were sent to 18 laboratories. Participants were asked to examine the specimens using their routine protocol for detecting these parasites and state the method(s) used. Eighteen laboratories answered the questionnaire. For detection of Giardia, 16 of them used sedimentation/concentration followed by light microscopy. Using this technique the lower limit of detection of Giardia was 17.2 cysts/mL of faeces in the best performing laboratories. Only three of 16 laboratories used fluorescent-conjugated antibody-based microscopy. For detection of Cryptosporidium acid-fast staining was used by 14 of the 17 laboratories that examined the samples. With this technique the lower limit of detection was 976 oocysts/mL of faeces. Fluorescent-conjugated antibody-based microscopy was used by only five of the 17 laboratories. There was variation in the lower limit of detection of cysts of Giardia and oocysts of Cryptosporidium between laboratories using the same basic microscopic methods. Fluorescent-conjugated antibody-based microscopy was not superior to light microscopy under the conditions of this study. There is a need for a larger-scale multi-site comparison of the methods used for the diagnosis of these parasites and the development of a Europe-wide laboratory protocol based upon its findings.

  2. STUDY OF DYNAMIC MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF FUSED DEPOSITION MODELLING PROCESSED ULTEM MATERIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Adhiyamaan Arivazhagan; Ammar Saleem; S. H. Masood; Mostafa Nikzad; K. A. JAGADEESH

    2014-01-01

    Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM), a renowned Rapid Prototyping (RP) process, has been successfully implemented in several industries to fabricate concept models and prototypes for rapid manufacturing. This study furnishes terse notes about the material damping properties of FDM made ULTEM samples considering the effect of FDM process parameters. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) is carried out using DMA 2980 equipment to study the dynamic response of the FDM material subjected to single canti...

  3. Clinical and laboratorial study of 19 cases of mucopolysaccharidoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Lilian M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS are a heterogeneous group of inborn errors of lysosomal glycosaminoglycan (GAG metabolism. The importance of this group of disorders among the inborn errors of metabolism led us to report 19 cases. METHOD: We performed clinical, radiological, and biochemical evaluations of the suspected patients, which allowed us to establish a definite diagnosis in 19 cases. RESULTS: Not all patients showed increased GAG levels in urine; enzyme assays should be performed in all cases with strong clinical suspicion. The diagnosis was made on average at the age of 48 months, and the 19 MPS cases, after a full clinical, radiological, and biochemical study, were classified as follows: Hurler -- MPS I (1 case; Hunter -- MPS II (2 cases; Sanfilippo -- MPS III (2 cases; Morquio -- MPS IV (4 cases; Maroteaux-Lamy -- MPS VI (9 cases; and Sly -- MPS VII (1 case. DISCUSSION: The high relative frequency of Maroteaux-Lamy disease contrasts with most reports in the literature and could express a population variability.

  4. Gas migration through cement slurries analysis: A comparative laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arian Velayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cementing is an essential part of every drilling operation. Protection of the wellbore from formation fluid invasion is one of the primary tasks of a cement job. Failure in this task results in catastrophic events, such as blow outs. Hence, in order to save the well and avoid risky and operationally difficult remedial cementing, slurry must be optimized to be resistant against gas migration phenomenon. In this paper, performances of the conventional slurries facing gas invasion were reviewed and compared with modified slurry containing special gas migration additive by using fluid migration analyzer device. The results of this study reveal the importance of proper additive utilization in slurry formulations. The rate of gas flow through the slurry in neat cement is very high; by using different types of additives, we observe obvious changes in the performance of the cement system. The rate of gas flow in neat class H cement was reported as 36000 ml/hr while the optimized cement formulation with anti-gas migration and thixotropic agents showed a gas flow rate of 13.8 ml/hr.

  5. Laboratory Studies on the Effects of Shear on Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Guensch, Greg R.

    2000-09-20

    The overall objective of our studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish's tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system, in other words, determining or assuming that those conditions known to injure fish will provide the descriptions of conditions that engineers must consider in the design of a turbine system. These biological specifications must be carefully and thoroughly documented throughout the design of a fish friendly turbine. To address the development of biological specifications, we designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response.

  6. A Depth Estimation System for Laboratory Studies using Video Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Torres

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple video-based system has been developed for depth estimation based on wave propagation characteristics. A numerical simulation of a long-crested monochromatic wave propagating over a beach with straight and parallel contours is used for testing the depth inversion system. An oblique video, simulating field conditions, is recorded, digitized and rectified for its further analysis. Pixel intensity time series from a virtual array in the rectified images are analyzed using the depth estimation technique developed by Stockdon and Holman. The linear dispersion equation is applied for depth estimation at every cross-shore position and the resulting values are compared with the depth values used to feed the numerical model. Error analysis confirms good performance for depth estimation using this video-system for completely controlled conditions in small-scale experiments. The relative depth estimation error for this idealized case is 2.3%. This accuracy is explained by the use of a linear model for the wave propagation simulation. The methodology proposed here allows the testing of a new video-system and separation of errors resulting from the depth inversion algorithm from those inherent to photogrammetry techniques in small areas. The use of this system could easily be extended for physical models and field studies.

  7. Inter-laboratory comparison study for pyrrolizidine alkaloids in animal feed using spiked and incurred material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nijs, Monique; Elbers, Ingrid J W; Mulder, Patrick P J

    2014-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are hepatotoxic metabolites produced by plants. PAs in animal feed can cause acute or chronic intoxications in animals and can be transferred to milk. An inter-laboratory comparison study among 12 laboratories, using their own methods of analysis, was conducted for the detection and quantification of PAs in animal feed. The participants were asked to quantify PAs in a blank test sample, a blank test sample to be spiked with a provided spiking mixture of seven PA standards, and a test sample contaminated with common groundsel (Senecio vulgaris). Ten of the participating laboratories used an LC-MS/MS method, one used an LC-ToF-MS method, and one used a GC-MS method. None of the laboratories reported false-negative samples, while two laboratories reported false-positive results in the blank sample. z-scores were calculated for each laboratory for seven PAs in test samples B and C. z-scores varied considerably between laboratories for the concentrations of the free bases and less for the N-oxides, probably due to the lower levels of the free bases as compared with the N-oxides in the contaminated feed. Questionable or unsatisfactory results for the z-scores were obtained for 8% of the cases for the spiked sample and for 12% of the incurred sample. Three laboratories scored consequently positive or negative results. No preferred method for quantification of PAs in feed could be identified within the methods used for this study due to the relatively small number of participants. It was concluded that this inter-laboratory study shows that the methods used for PA detection need further development for accurate estimation of PAs in contaminated feed.

  8. [The external evaluation of study quality: the role in maintaining the reliability of laboratory information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V

    2013-08-01

    The external evaluation of quality of clinical laboratory examinations was gradually introduced in USSR medical laboratories since 1970s. In Russia, in the middle of 1990 a unified all-national system of external evaluation quality was organized known as the Federal center of external evaluation of quality at the basis of laboratory of the state research center of preventive medicine. The main positions of policy in this area were neatly formulated in the guidance documents of ministry of Health. Nowadays, the center of external evaluation of quality proposes 100 and more types of control studies and permanently extends their specter starting from interests of different disciplines of clinical medicine. The consistent participation of laboratories in the cycles of external evaluation of quality intrinsically promotes improvement of indicators of properness and precision of analysis results and increases reliability of laboratory information. However, a significant percentage of laboratories does not participate at all in external evaluation of quality or takes part in control process irregularly and in limited number of tests. The managers of a number of medical organizations disregard the application of the proposed possibilities to increase reliability of laboratory information and limit financing of studies in the field of quality control. The article proposes to adopt the national standard on the basis of ISO 17043 "Evaluation of compliance. The common requirements of professional competence testing".

  9. Study on mineralization at Jian copper deposit, Fars province, using petrographical and geochemical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ali Rajabzade

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Jian Cu deposit is hosted by Surian volcano-sedimentary complex of Permo-Triassic age on the eastern edge of the Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone at a distance of 195 km from Shiraz, southwestern Iran. The complex consists mainly of metabasalt, chlorite-quartz schist, chlorite-muscovite schist, mica schist and graphite schist. Pyrite is the most important sulfide and chalcopyrite is the major Cu-bearing mineral occurring as disseminated grains and veinlets in host chlorite-quartz schist and chlorite-muscovite schist. Chondrite-normalized REE pattern of metabasalt with La/LuN=2/9 indicates mantle tholeiitic basalt as the source of metamorphosed igneous rocks. Geochemical data on the metabasalts, especially the content of immobile elements (e.g., Ti and High Field Strength Elements (HFSE (e.g., Zr، Nb and Y, show low degree of partial melting for parental magma with E-MORB affinity. Chloritic, silicification and minor sericitic assemblages are the main alteration types associated with the Jian Cu deposit. The Y/Ho ratio of Cu ores varies from 29.9 to 32.5, indicating the important role of sea water in the mineralizing system. Petrographical and geochemical data indicate that the Jian Cu deposit was formed as volcano-sedimentary hosted massive sulfide. The Ishikawa alteration index (AI in association with chlorite-carbonate-pyrite index (CCP is useful for the geochemical exploration of Cu deposits in the study area.

  10. Ellipsometry study of process deposition of amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide sputtered thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talagrand, C., E-mail: talagrand@emse.fr [Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne CMP-GC, Dept PS2, Gardanne, 880 route de Mimet (France); Boddaert, X. [Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne CMP-GC, Dept PS2, Gardanne, 880 route de Mimet (France); Selmeczi, D.G.; Defranoux, C. [Semilab Semiconductor Physics Laboratory Co. Ltd., Budapest, 1117 (Hungary); Collot, P. [Ecole Nationale Supérieure d' Arts et Métiers ParisTech, Aix-en-Provence, 2 cours des Arts et Métiers (France)

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports on an InGaZnO optical study by spectrometric ellipsometry. First of all, the fitting results of different models and different structures are analysed to choose the most appropriate model. The Tauc–Lorentz model is suitable for thickness measurements but a more complex model allows the refractive index and extinction coefficient to be extracted more accurately. Secondly, different InGaZnO process depositions are carried out in order to investigate stability, influence of deposition time and uniformity. Films present satisfactory optical stability over time. InGaZnO optical property evolution as a function of deposition time is related to an increase in temperature. To understand the behaviour of uniformity, mapping measurements are correlated to thin film resistivity. Results show that temperature and resputtering are the two phenomena that affect IGZO uniformity. - Highlights: • Model and structure are investigated to fit IGZO ellipsometric angles. • Maximum refractive index rises with substrate temperature and thus deposition time. • Resputtering leads to inhomogeneity in IGZO electrical and optical properties.

  11. Resistance repeatability study of ion-beam deposited vanadium oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, P.; Pearson, D. I. C.; Pochon, S.; Thomas, O.; Cooke, M.; Gunn, R.

    2016-09-01

    Ion Beam Sputter Deposition (IBSD) is a versatile technique particularly suited to applications requiring high quality, high performance layer materials as it allows independent and accurate control of the process parameters. Vanadium oxides, used for example in the fabrication of microbolometers, optical switches or optical storage, exhibit interesting properties such as a high Temperature Coefficient of Resistance (TCR), relatively low 1/f noise and a semiconductormetal phase transition close to room temperature. However, it is very challenging to control the stoichiometry of the deposited film as there are at least 25 different oxidation states of vanadium, few of which display the required electrical characteristics. In the present study, vanadium oxide thin layers were deposited by IBSD using an Oxford Ionfab300+ and analyzed with regard to their electrical properties. The impact of the system parameters on the resistance repeatability, wafer-to-wafer and batch-to-batch, was thoroughly investigated to provide the end user with a clear understanding of the factors affecting film resistivity while ensuring at the same time a steep variation of resistance with temperature, as notably required for uncooled bolometers. These parameters were balanced to also achieve a good deposition rate, throughput and uniformity over large device areas, compatible with the requirements of industrial applications.

  12. Formation of Strata—bound Ore Deposits in China:Studies on Fluid Inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢焕章; 刘从强

    1990-01-01

    Fluid inclusion studies were made on the basis of the geological data on the strata-bound ore de-posits of China including those of Pb,Zn,Au,Ag,Sb,U,Hg,W,quartz-crystal and sparry-calcite.An attempt was made to approach the model of formation for each type of ore depos-its by considering the material sources,the migration of fluids and the conditions of mineralization.It is found that ore-forming fluids (especially H2O)originate as heated underground water reacts with the wallrocks and dissolves Na+,Ca2+,K+,Cl+,HCl- and Mg2+ .The ore fluids are mainly of NaCl-Ca-HCO3-H2O system with salinities ranging from 4to 14wt.%.NaCl equivalent and densities ranging from 0.9 to 1.0g/cm3.It may be concluded that the deposits were formed at temperatures ranging from 150 to 250℃ under pressures from 300 to 1000 bars.Ore deposition may have been controlled by temperature and pressure or by the mixing among different fluids.

  13. Computational study of platinum nanoparticle deposition on the surfaces of crevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, H.F., E-mail: guhaifeng@hrbeu.edu.cn [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Niceno, B. [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Grundler, P.V. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sharabi, M. [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Veleva, L. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hot Laboratory Division, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ritter, S. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Nano-particle deposition on the surface of crevices is studied using RANS simulation. • Model results are validated by comparing with experimental data. • Behaviours and mechanisms of particle deposition in different crevices are analyzed. • RANS models with Lagrangian particle tracking method are evaluated and discussed. - Abstract: A well-known issue in boiling water reactors (BWR), which can threaten their structural integrity, is stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of reactor internals and recirculation pipes due to the accumulation of oxidizing radiolysis products of water. Currently, many operators of BWRs use combined platinum particle and hydrogen injection into the reactor water to mitigate SCC by lowering the electrochemical corrosion potential. It is essential for efficient mitigation that Pt particles reach all water-wetted surfaces, including crevices and cracks, which are also reached by the oxidizing species. In this study, a set of crevices with different widths and orientations with respect to the fluid flow are investigated using numerical simulation tools and compared against experimental findings. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes models are used to compute the mean turbulent flow quantities in three-dimensional crevices, and the discrete random walk model is used to evaluate the effect of velocity fluctuations on particle movement. The Lagrangian particle tracking analysis is performed and the average concentration of deposited particles on the surface of crevices is evaluated and compared with experimental results. The results show that Reynolds stress model combined with enhanced wall treatment provides a more accurate prediction of particle concentration and distribution on the surface of crevices than SST k–ω turbulence model, which was expected, owing to the anisotropic nature of the Reynolds stress model. Furthermore, analyses on the particle deposition shows that three different mechanisms play important roles in

  14. Nitrogen limited biobarriers remove atrazine from contaminated water: Laboratory studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William J.; Shaner, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    Atrazine is one of the most frequently used herbicides. This usage coupled with its mobility and recalcitrant nature in deeper soils and aquifers makes it a frequently encountered groundwater contaminant. We formed biobarriers in sand filled columns by coating the sand with soybean oil; after which, we inoculated the barriers with a consortium of atrazine-degrading microorganisms and evaluated the ability of the barriers to remove atrazine from a simulated groundwater containing 1 mg L - 1 atrazine. The soybean oil provided a carbon rich and nitrogen poor substrate to the microbial consortium. Under these nitrogen-limiting conditions it was hypothesized that bacteria capable of using atrazine as a source of nitrogen would remove atrazine from the flowing water. Our hypothesis proved correct and the biobarriers were effective at removing atrazine when the nitrogen content of the influent water was low. Levels of atrazine in the biobarrier effluents declined with time and by the 24th week of the study no detectable atrazine was present (limit of detection atrazine were also removed by the biobarriers; when biobarriers were fed 16.3 mg L - 1 atrazine 97% was degraded. When nitrate (5 mg L - 1 N), an alternate source of nitrogen, was added to the influent water the atrazine removal efficiency of the barriers was reduced by almost 60%. This result supports the hypothesis that atrazine was degraded as a source of nitrogen. Poisoning of the biobarriers with mercury chloride resulted in an immediate and large increase in the amount of atrazine in the barrier effluents confirming that biological activity and not abiotic factors were responsible for most of the atrazine degradation. The presence of hydroxyatrazine in the barrier effluents indicated that dehalogenation was one of the pathways of atrazine degradation. Permeable barriers might be formed in-situ by the injection of innocuous vegetable oil emulsions into an aquifer or sandy soil and used to remove atrazine from a

  15. Laboratory study of avalanches in a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Compernolle, Bart

    2015-11-01

    Results of a basic heat transport experiment [] involving an off-axis heat source are presented. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. A ring-shaped electron beam source injects low energy electrons (below ionization energy) along a strong magnetic field into a preexisting, large and cold plasma. The injected electrons are thermalized by Coulomb collisions within a short distance and provide an off-axis heat source that results in a long, hollow, cylindrical region of elevated electron temperature embedded in a colder plasma, and far from the machine walls. It is demonstrated that this heating configuration provides an ideal environment to study avalanche phenomena under controlled conditions. The avalanches are identified as sudden rearrangements of the pressure profile following the growth of fluctuations from ambient noise. The intermittent collapses of the plasma pressure profile are associated with unstable drift-Alfvén waves and exhibit both radial and azimuthal dynamics. After each collapse the plasma enters a quiescent phase in which the pressure profile slowly recovers and steepens until a threshold is exceeded, and the process repeats. The use of reference probes as time markers allows for the visualization of the 2D spatio-temporal evolution of the avalanche events. Avalanches are only observed for a limited combination of heating powers and magnetic fields. At higher heating powers the system transitions from the avalanche regime into a regime dominated by sustained drift-Alfvén wave activity. The pressure profile then transitions to a near steady-state in which anomalous transport balances the external pressure source. Performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA, supported jointly by DOE and NSF.

  16. Nitrogen limited biobarriers remove atrazine from contaminated water: laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William J; Shaner, Dale L

    2009-01-07

    Atrazine is one of the most frequently used herbicides. This usage coupled with its mobility and recalcitrant nature in deeper soils and aquifers makes it a frequently encountered groundwater contaminant. We formed biobarriers in sand filled columns by coating the sand with soybean oil; after which, we inoculated the barriers with a consortium of atrazine-degrading microorganisms and evaluated the ability of the barriers to remove atrazine from a simulated groundwater containing 1 mg L(-1) atrazine. The soybean oil provided a carbon rich and nitrogen poor substrate to the microbial consortium. Under these nitrogen-limiting conditions it was hypothesized that bacteria capable of using atrazine as a source of nitrogen would remove atrazine from the flowing water. Our hypothesis proved correct and the biobarriers were effective at removing atrazine when the nitrogen content of the influent water was low. Levels of atrazine in the biobarrier effluents declined with time and by the 24th week of the study no detectable atrazine was present (limit of detectionwater the atrazine removal efficiency of the barriers was reduced by almost 60%. This result supports the hypothesis that atrazine was degraded as a source of nitrogen. Poisoning of the biobarriers with mercury chloride resulted in an immediate and large increase in the amount of atrazine in the barrier effluents confirming that biological activity and not abiotic factors were responsible for most of the atrazine degradation. The presence of hydroxyatrazine in the barrier effluents indicated that dehalogenation was one of the pathways of atrazine degradation. Permeable barriers might be formed in-situ by the injection of innocuous vegetable oil emulsions into an aquifer or sandy soil and used to remove atrazine from a contaminated groundwater or to protect groundwater from an atrazine spill.

  17. The Study Of Clinical And Laboratory Finding In Wheat Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhoodi. A

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is affecting 6-8 percent of infants. Wheat is major source of carbohydrate and protein in the people's nutrition in all worlds and also account for one of six main food allergens in children. The goal of this study is diagnosis of wheat allergic patients and description of its importance for better recognition of this disease."nMaterials and Methods: Among children with different symptoms of allergy (dermatologic - Gastro intestinal and respiratory symptoms referred to Immunology and allergy Department of Markaz Tebbi Kodakan, during one year, 35 cases was suspected to have wheat allergy. Skin prick test and IgE specific with wheat for all of them and open food challenge test with wheat for 11 patients without history of anaphylaxy were done. The criteria for diagnosis was based on a convincing history of anaphylaxis after ingestion of wheat or the positive result in food challenge with wheat in addition to positive skin prick test ( SPT or specific IgE ( Eliza with wheat."nResults: In 35 suspected cases to wheat allergy, SPT in 85/1 percent, specific IgE in 90/3 percent were positive. Food challenge test were done in 11 cases and was positive in 27/2 percent of patients. 24 patients were definitely diagnosed as wheat allergic ones. Anaphylaxis was the predominant clinical feature, accounted for 87 percent of acute symptoms which were repeated for two or more episode in 91 percent of the cases with anaphylaxis. In 50 percent of patients chronic symptoms like asthma and atopic dermatitis were also observed."nConclusion: The mean age of symptom was compatible with time of onset of complementary foods. Therefore, were proposed exclusive breastfeeding without maternal avoidance and not to be introducing wheat in infant regimen until 12 mouth of age. Anaphylaxis was occurred, repeatedly in these patients which demonstrate, in one part, severity of the reactions in our patients and in other part the probable existence of more cases

  18. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Development for the Study of Atmospheric Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidovits, Paul

    2011-12-10

    Soot particles are generated by incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels. Through direct effects clear air aerosols containing black carbon (BC) such as soot aerosols, absorb incoming light heating the atmosphere, while most other aerosols scatter light and produce cooling. Even though BC represents only 1-2% of the total annual emissions of particulate mass to the atmosphere, it has been estimated that the direct radiative effect of BC is the second-most important contributor to global warming after absorption by CO2. Ongoing studies continue to underscore the climate forcing importance of black carbon. However, estimates of the radiative effects of black carbon on climate remain highly uncertain due to the complexity of particles containing black carbon. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically fractal hydrophobic aggregates. The aggregates consist of black carbon spherules with diameters typically in the range of about 15-40 nm, and they are usually coated by adsorbed polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced during combustion. Diesel-generated soot particles are often emitted with an organic coating composed primarily of lubricating oil and unburned fuel, as well as well as PAH compounds. Sulfuric acid has also been detected in diesel and aircraft-emitted soot particles. In the course of aging, these particle coatings may be substantially altered by chemical reactions and/or the deposition of other materials. Such processes transform the optical and CCN properties of the soot aerosols in ways that are not yet well understood. Our work over the past seven years consisted of laboratory research, instrument development and characterization, and field studies with the central focus of improving our understanding of the black carbon aerosol climate impacts. During the sixth year as well as during this seventh year (no

  19. Study on the Microstructure and Electrical Properties of Boron and Sulfur Codoped Diamond Films Deposited Using Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic-scale microstructure and electron emission properties of boron and sulfur (denoted as B-S codoped diamond films grown on high-temperature and high-pressure (HTHP diamond and Si substrates were investigated using atom force microscopy (AFM, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, and current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS measurement techniques. The films grown on Si consisted of large grains with secondary nucleation, whereas those on HTHP diamond are composed of well-developed polycrystalline facets with an average size of 10–50 nm. SIMS analyses confirmed that sulfur was successfully introduced into diamond films, and a small amount of boron facilitated sulfur incorporation into diamond. Large tunneling currents were observed at some grain boundaries, and the emission character was better at the grain boundaries than that at the center of the crystal. The films grown on HTHP diamond substrates were much more perfect with higher quality than the films deposited on Si substrates. The local I-V characteristics for films deposited on Si or HTHP diamond substrates indicate n-type conduction.

  20. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  1. Results from studies of surface deposits on the claddings of fuel rods used in RBMK-1000 reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, I. M.; Markov, D. V.

    2010-07-01

    The results of studies on analyzing the element composition of deposits on the cladding surfaces of fuel rods used in a fuel assembly at the Leningrad nuclear power station are presented. The distribution of elements in deposits over the fuel rod height is analyzed, and the zones of their concentration are revealed. It is shown that deposits of copper penetrating into cracks in the surface layer of zirconium oxide introduce an essential contribution in the development of nodular corrosion of fuel rod claddings.

  2. Study on absorbance and laser damage threshold of HfO2 films prepared by ion-assisted reaction deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei Zhang(张大伟); Shuhai Fan(范树海); Weidong Gao(高卫东); Hongbo He(贺洪波); Yingjian Wang(王英剑); Jianda Shao(邵建达); Zhengxiu Fan(范正修); Haojie Sun(孙浩杰)

    2004-01-01

    Using a new kind of EH1000 ion source, hafnium dioxide (HfO2) films are deposited with different deposition techniques and different conditions. The absorbance and the laser damage threshold of these films have been measured and studied. By comparing these characteristics, one can conclude that under right conditions, such as high partial pressure of oxygen and right kind of ion source, the ion-assisted reaction deposition can prepare HfO2 films with higher laser induced damage threshold.

  3. Enhanced dry deposition of nitrogen pollution near coastlines: A case study covering the Chesapeake Bay estuary and Atlantic Ocean coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Shroder, Shulamit; Pickering, Kenneth E.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen pollution is one of the major sources of nitrogen to many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, worldwide. This modeling study suggests that coastlines frequently experience disproportionally high dry deposition of reactive nitrogen. High concentrations of air pollution from coastal cities often accumulate over adjacent estuaries and coastal waters due to low dry deposition rates over the water and a shallow marine boundary layer trapping marine emissions. As high concentrations of pollutants over the water are transported inland, enhanced dry deposition occurs onshore along the coastlines. Large spatial gradients in air pollutants and deposition totals are simulated along the coastline with decreasing concentrations/deposition as the distance from the water increases. As pollutants are transported onshore, air pollution mixing ratios near the surface decrease due to removal by dry deposition, vertical dilution due to deeper mixing layer heights, and decrease in friction velocity as a function of distance inland from the coastline. Ammonium nitrate formation near agricultural ammonia sources, sodium nitrate formation near coastal areas with atmospheric sea-salt loadings, and particulate growth via water uptake also contribute to large nitrate dry deposition totals at the coastline. Gradients in dry N deposition are evident over a monthly time scale and are enhanced during sea and bay breeze events. Current existing N-deposition monitoring networks do not capture the large spatial gradients of ammonium, nitrate, and nitric acid concentrations near coastlines predicted by the model due to the coarse spatial density distribution of monitoring sites.

  4. Biomagnetic monitoring of heavy metals contamination in deposited atmospheric dust, a case study from Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Samira; Khademi, Hossein; Cano, Angel Faz; Acosta, Jose A

    2016-05-15

    Tree leaves are considered as one of the best biogenic dust collectors due to their ability to trap and retain particulate matter on their surfaces. In this study, the magnetic susceptibility (MS) and the concentration of selected heavy metals of plane tree (Platanus orientalis L.) leaves and deposited atmospheric dust, sampled by an indirect and a direct method, respectively, were determined to investigate the relationships between leaf magnetic parameters and the concentration of heavy metals in deposited atmospheric dust. The objective was to develop a biomagnetic method as an alternative to the common ones used for determining atmospheric heavy metal contaminations. Plane tree leaves were monthly sampled on the 19th of May to November, 2012 (T1-T7), for seven months from 21 different sites in the city of Isfahan, central Iran. Deposited atmospheric dust samples were also collected using flat glass surfaces from the same sites on the same dates, except for T1. MS (χlf, χhf) values in washed (WL) and unwashed leaves (UL) as well as Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in UL and deposited atmospheric dust samples were determined. The results showed that the MS content with a biogenic source was low with almost no significant change during the sampling period, while an increasing trend was observed in the MS content of UL samples due to the deposition of heavy metals and magnetic particles on leaf surfaces throughout the plant growth. The latter type of MS content could be reduced through washing off by rain. Most heavy metals examined, as well as the Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) in UL, showed statistically significant correlations with MS values. The correlation between heavy metals content in atmospheric dust deposited on glass surfaces and leaf MS values was significant for Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn. Moreover, the similarity observed between the spatial distribution maps of leaf MS and deposited atmospheric dust PLI provided convincing evidence regarding

  5. The fate of SOC during the processes of water erosion and subsequent deposition: a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hemelryck, H.; Govers, G.; van Oost, K.; Merckx, R.

    2009-04-01

    Globally soils are the largest terrestrial pool of carbon (C). A relatively small increase or decrease in soil carbon content due to changes in land use or management practices could therefore result in a significant net exchange of C between the soil C reservoir and the atmosphere. As such, the geomorphic processes of water and tillage erosion have been identified to significantly impact on this large pool of soil organic carbon (SOC). Soil erosion, transport and deposition not only result in redistribution of sediments and associated carbon within a landscape, but also affect the exchange of C between the pedosphere and the atmosphere. The direction and magnitude of an erosion-induced change in the global C balance is however a topic of much debate as opposing processes interact: i) At eroding sites a net uptake of C could be the result of reduced respiration rates and continued inputs of newly produced carbon. ii) Colluvial deposition of eroded sediment and SOC leads to the burial of the original topsoil and this may constrain the decomposition of its containing SOC. iii) Eroded sediment could be transported to distal depositional environments or fluvial systems where it will either be conserved or become rapidly mineralized. iv) Increased emission of CO2 due to erosion may result from the disruptive energy of erosive forces causing the breakdown of aggregates and exposing previously protected SOC to microbial decomposition. The above-mentioned processes show a large spatial and temporal variability and assessing their impact requires an integrated modeling approach. However uncertainties about the basic processes that accompany SOC displacement are still large. This study focuses on one of these large information gaps: the fate of eroded and subsequently deposited SOC. A preceding experimental study (Van Hemelryck et al., 2008) was used to identify controlling factors (erosional intensity, changes in soil structure,…). However this experimental research

  6. Revealing fibrinogen monolayer conformations at different pHs: electrokinetic and colloid deposition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Wasilewska, Monika; Sadowska, Marta

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption mechanism of human fibrinogen on mica at different pHs is studied using the streaming potential and colloid deposition measurements. The fibrinogen monolayers are produced by a controlled adsorption under diffusion transport at pH of 3.5 and 7.4. Initially, the electrokinetic properties of these monolayers and their stability for various ionic strength are determined. It is shown that at pH 3.5 fibrinogen adsorbs irreversibly on mica for ionic strength range of 4×10(-4) to 0.15 M. At pH 7.4, a partial desorption is observed for ionic strength below 10(-2) M. This is attributed to the desorption of the end-on oriented molecules whereas the side-on adsorbed molecules remain irreversibly bound at all ionic strengths. The orientation of molecules and monolayer structure is evaluated by the colloid deposition measurements involving negatively charged polystyrene latex microspheres, 820 nm in diameter. An anomalous deposition of negative latex particles on substrates exhibiting a negative zeta potential is observed. At pH 3.5 measurable deposition of latex is observed even at low ionic strength where the approach distance of latex particles exceeded 70 nm. At pH 7.4 this critical distance is 23 nm. This confirms that fibrinogen monolayers formed at both pHs are characterized by the presence of the side-on and end-on oriented molecules that prevail at higher coverage range. It is also shown that positive charge is located at the end parts of the αA chains of the adsorbed fibrinogen molecules. Therefore, it is concluded that the colloid deposition method is an efficient tool for revealing protein adsorption mechanisms at solid/electrolyte interfaces.

  7. Metagenomic Study of Iron Homeostasis in Iron Depositing Hot Spring Cyanobacterial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, I.; Franklin H.; Tringe, S. G.; Klatt, C. G.; Bryant, D. A.; Sarkisova, S. A.; Guevara, M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: It is not clear how an iron-rich thermal hydrosphere could be hospitable to cyanobacteria, since reduced iron appears to stimulate oxidative stress in all domains of life and particularly in oxygenic phototrophs. Therefore, metagenomic study of cyanobacterial community in iron-depositing hot springs may help elucidate how oxygenic prokaryotes can withstand the extremely high concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by interaction between environmental Fe2+ and O2. Method: Anchor proteins from various species of cyanobacteria and some anoxygenic phototrophs were selected on the basis of their hypothetical role in Fe homeostasis and the suppression of oxidative stress and were BLASTed against the metagenomes of iron-depositing Chocolate Pots and freshwater Mushroom hot springs. Results: BLASTing proteins hypothesized to be involved in Fe homeostasis against the microbiomes from the two springs revealed that iron-depositing hot spring has a greater abundance of defensive proteins such as bacterioferritin comigratory protein (Bcp) and DNA-binding Ferritin like protein (Dps) than a fresh-water hot spring. One may speculate that the abundance of Bcp and Dps in an iron-depositing hot spring is connected to the need to suppress oxidative stress in bacteria inhabiting environments with high Fe2+ concnetration. In both springs, Bcp and Dps are concentrated within the cyanobacterial fractions of the microbial community (regardless of abundance). Fe3+ siderophore transport (from the transport system permease protein query) may be less essential to the microbial community of CP because of the high [Fe]. Conclusion: Further research is needed to confirm that these proteins are unique to photoautotrophs such as those living in iron-depositing hot spring.

  8. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    During the current report experimental studies of upper respiratory deposition of radon progeny aerosols and stimulant aerosols were carried out in replicate casts of nasal and oral passages of adults and children. Additionally, preliminary studies of nasal passage deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles was carried out in four human subjects. Data on nasal inspiratory deposition in replicate models of adults and infants from three collaborating laboratories were compared and a best-fit curve of deposition efficiency for both attached and unattached particles was obtained, showing excellent inter-laboratory agreement. This curve demonstrates that nasal inspiratory deposition of radon progeny is weakly dependent upon flow rate over physiologically realistic ranges of flow, does not show a significant age effect, and is relatively independent of nasal passage dimensions for a given age range. Improved replicate models of the human adult oral passage extending to the mid-trachea were constructed for medium and higher flow mouth breathing states; these models were used to assess the deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles during oronasal breathing in the oral passage and demonstrated lower deposition efficiency than the nasal passage. Measurements of both Po{sup 218} particle and attached fraction particle size deposition were performed in replicate nasal passage of a four week old infant. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Comparison of microbiological diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young children by routine health service laboratories and a research laboratory: Diagnostic cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, Kate; Hay, Alastair D.; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; MacGowan, Alasdair; Whiting, Penny; Lawton, Michael; Delaney, Brendan; Downing, Harriet; Dudley, Jan; Hollingworth, William; Lisles, Catherine; Little, Paul; O’Brien, Kathryn; Pickles, Timothy; Rumsby, Kate; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Van der Voort, Judith; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Harman, Kim; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the validity of diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) through urine culture between samples processed in routine health service laboratories and those processed in a research laboratory. Population and methods We conducted a prospective diagnostic cohort study in 4808 acutely ill children aged <5 years attending UK primary health care. UTI, defined as pure/predominant growth ≥105 CFU/mL of a uropathogen (the reference standard), was diagnosed at routine health service laboratories and a central research laboratory by culture of urine samples. We calculated areas under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) for UTI predicted by pre-specified symptoms, signs and dipstick test results (the “index test”), separately according to whether samples were obtained by clean catch or nappy (diaper) pads. Results 251 (5.2%) and 88 (1.8%) children were classified as UTI positive by health service and research laboratories respectively. Agreement between laboratories was moderate (kappa = 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29, 0.43), and better for clean catch (0.54; 0.45, 0.63) than nappy pad samples (0.20; 0.12, 0.28). In clean catch samples, the AUC was lower for health service laboratories (AUC = 0.75; 95% CI 0.69, 0.80) than the research laboratory (0.86; 0.79, 0.92). Values of AUC were lower in nappy pad samples (0.65 [0.61, 0.70] and 0.79 [0.70, 0.88] for health service and research laboratory positivity, respectively) than clean catch samples. Conclusions The agreement of microbiological diagnosis of UTI comparing routine health service laboratories with a research laboratory was moderate for clean catch samples and poor for nappy pad samples and reliability is lower for nappy pad than for clean catch samples. Positive results from the research laboratory appear more likely to reflect real UTIs than those from routine health service laboratories, many of which (particularly from nappy pad samples) could be due to contamination. Health service

  10. Energy deposition study of low-energy cosmic radiation at sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Pushpa

    In this dissertation work, a computer simulation model based on the Geant4 simulation package has been designed and developed to study the energy deposition and track structures of cosmic muons and their secondary electrons in tissue-like materials. The particle interactions in a cubic water volume were first simulated. To analyze the energy deposition and tracks in small structures, with the intention of studying the energy localization in nanometric structures such as DNA, the chamber was sliced in three dimentions. Validation studies have been performed by comparing the results with experimental, theoretical, and other simulation results to test the accuracy of the simulation model. A human body phantom in sea-level muon environment was modeled to measure the yearly dose to a human from cosmic muons. The yearly dose in this phantom is about 22 millirems. This is close to the accepted value for the yearly dose from cosmic radiation at sea level. Shielding cosmic muons with a concrete slab from 0 to 2 meters increased the dose received by the body. This dissertation presents an extensive study on the interactions of secondary electrons created by muons in water. Index words. Radiation Dosimetry Simulation, Track Structures, Sea-Level muon Flux, Energy Deposition

  11. A parametric simulation study for solvent co-injection process in bitumen deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A.; Alvestad, J.; Kjonsvik, D.; Gilje, E.; Kowalewski, E. [Statoil Canada (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The extraction of very large Canadian extra heavy oil and bitumen deposits is facing major challenges, such as energy requirements and access to sustainable water resources. Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is the most common commercial in-situ recovery process used for the extraction but it has many associated economic and environmental challenges. Moreover, current knowledge of the fundamental physics and mechanics involved in the process is not satisfactory. This paper presents a parametric simulation study for a solvent co-injection (SCI) process in bitumen deposits. This process has the potential to improve the efficiency of steam processes as well as to reduce energy use and CO2 emissions. The study contributes to further understanding of the development process. Several operational and geological parameters were evaluated to assess their impact on SAGD operations. The results demonstrated that the basis for selecting the optimum solvent should not only be mobility improvement capability but should also include other operational and geological conditions.

  12. Effects of urban particulate deposition on microbial communities living in bryophytes: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Bernard, N; Moskura, M; Toussaint, M L; Denayer, F; Gilbert, D

    2010-10-01

    Our previous in situ study showed that bryophyte-microorganism complexes were affected by particulate atmospheric pollution. Here, the effect of urban particulate wet deposits on microbial communities living in bryophytes was studied under controlled conditions. An urban particulate solution was prepared with particles extracted from analyzer' filters and nebulized on bryophytes in treatments differing in frequency and quantity. The bryophytes did not accumulate metallic trace elements, which were present in very weak concentrations. However, in treated microcosms the total microbial biomass and the biomasses of cyanobacteria, active testate amoebae and fungi significantly decreased in response to the deposition of particles. These results confirm that microbial communities living in terrestrial bryophytes could be more sensitive indicators of atmospheric pollution than bryophytes. Moreover, they suggest that unicellular predators--such as testate amoebae--could be especially useful microbial indicators, since they seem to be both directly and indirectly affected by pollution.

  13. Fe-isotope fractionation in magmatic-hydrothermal mineral deposits: A case study from the Renison Sn-W deposit, Tasmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawryk, Christine M.; Foden, John D.

    2015-02-01

    We present 50 new iron isotopic analyses of source granite and mineral separates from the Renison tin deposit in western Tasmania. The aim of the study is to characterise the composition of minerals within a tin deposit associated with a reduced, S-type magma. We have analysed bulk samples of granite, and separates of pyrrhotite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, magnetite, chalcopyrite and siderite by multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The isotopic compositions of mineral separates are consistent with theoretical predictions of equilibrium fractionation based on Mössbauer spectroscopy and other parametric calculations. Mineral-mineral pairs yield temperatures of formation that are in agreement with prior detailed fluid inclusion studies, but are spatially inconsistent with declining fluid temperatures with distance from the causative intrusion, limiting the use of Fe isotopes as a potential geothermometer, at least in this case. Comparison of our data with published data from other deposits clearly demonstrates that pyrite, magnetite and chalcopyrite from the hottest ore fluids (>300-400 °C) at Renison are isotopically heavier than minerals sampled from a deposit formed at similar temperatures, but associated with a more oxidised and less differentiated intrusion.

  14. Morphological and Electrochemical Study of Sulfide/Nitride Nanostructure Deposited Through Pulsed Plasma Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, H.; Sobhani, M.

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of coating a steel St12 substrate with a sulfide/nitride layer. The coating process was conducted through a plasma electrolysis technique with a pulsed regime applied at frequencies of 100, 500, and 1000 Hz. It was found that the use of higher frequencies in the mentioned process provides better control over workpiece surface temperature and leads to reduced extent of voltage variations required to achieve a fixed temperature. The coating deposited at the frequency of 1000 Hz and voltage of about 235 V exhibited a nanostructure composed of 50 nm particles. The deposited coating consisted of an outer porous layer and an inner relatively dense layer. The x-ray studies identified the phases of the coating as γ'-Fe4N, Fe2-3N and FeS. The presence of FeS phase reduces the friction coefficient of the surface to about half the value obtainable in its absence. Studying the electrochemical impedance of the layer revealed that using a higher frequency in the deposition process increases the stability of resulting layer against seven days of immersion in the corrosive solution.

  15. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  16. Burial of Zostera marina seeds in sediment inhabited by three polychaetes: laboratory and field studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delefosse, Matthieu; Kristensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The large number of seeds produced by eelgrass, Zostera marina, provides this plant with a potential to disperse widely and colonise newareas. After dispersal, seedsmust be buried into sediment for assuring long-term survival, successful germination and safe seedling development. Seedsmay be buried......–3200 ind m −2), Arenicola marina (20–80 ind m−2), and the invasive Marenzelleria viridis (400–1600 ind m −2). The obtained results were subsequently compared with burial rates of seed mimics in experimental field plots (1m2) dominated by the respective polychaetes. High recovery of seeds in the laboratory...... (97–100%) suggested that none of these polychaetes species feed on eelgrass seeds. N. diversicolor transported seeds rapidly (marina and M. viridis buried seeds by depositing their faeces on top of the sediment...

  17. Uncertainty and perspectives in studies of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in China: A response to Liu et al. (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nianpeng; Zhu, Jianxing; Wang, Qiufeng

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we have formally responded to the speculation in "Liu et al. suspect that Zhu et al. (2015) may have underestimated dissolved organic N but overestimated total particulate N in wet deposition in China" by Liu et al. (2015). Here, we first discussed the uncertainty and plausible reasons of atmospheric deposition in China, which have been reported in different studies. We disagree with their interpretation on some points. Firstly, the difficulties in quality control from sampling to analyzing are common to all studies regarding atmospheric deposition, including the studies cited by Liu et al. (2015). More importantly, their discussion did not fully consider the apparent influence of different scaling-up methods (from an observation site scale to a national scale) on estimations of atmospheric N deposition in China. Furthermore, we provided the optimal approaches to resolve these challenges discussed in order to promote the related studies of atmospheric N deposition in China in the future.

  18. Maintaining turbidity and current flow in laboratory aquarium studies, a case study using Sabellaria spinulosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Andrew J.; S. Last, Kim; Attard, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms rely on the suspension of particulate matter for food or for building materials, yet these conditions are difficult to replicate in laboratory mesocosms. Consequently, husbandry and experimental conditions may often be sub-optimal. The Vortex Resuspension Tank (Vo......RT) is a simple and reliable system for the resuspension of food or sediments using an enclosed airlift. The particle rain from the lift is mixed in the tank by two water inputs that provide directional current flow across the study organism(s). The vortex mixing creates a turbulent lateral water flow that allows...... whereas under intermediate and high sediment rates there was consistent cumulative growth throughout a 15 d experiment. This highlights the importance of suspended sediment for S. spinulosa and also the suitability of the VoRT system for maintaining organisms with suspended matter requirements....

  19. Studying Human Disease Genes in "Caenorhabditis Elegans": A Molecular Genetics Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Paulson, Elisabeth A.; Grana, Theresa M.; Harris, Michelle A.; Batzli, Janet M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists routinely integrate information from various channels to explore topics under study. We designed a 4-wk undergraduate laboratory module that used a multifaceted approach to study a question in molecular genetics. Specifically, students investigated whether "Caenorhabditis elegans" can be a useful model system for studying genes…

  20. Studying Human Disease Genes in "Caenorhabditis Elegans": A Molecular Genetics Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Paulson, Elisabeth A.; Grana, Theresa M.; Harris, Michelle A.; Batzli, Janet M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists routinely integrate information from various channels to explore topics under study. We designed a 4-wk undergraduate laboratory module that used a multifaceted approach to study a question in molecular genetics. Specifically, students investigated whether "Caenorhabditis elegans" can be a useful model system for studying genes…

  1. Variability of Creatinine Measurements in Clinical Laboratories: Results from the CRIC Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Marshall; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Feldman, Harold I.; Weir, Matthew; Landis, J.R.; Hamm, L. Lee

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Estimating equations using serum creatinine (SCr) are often used to assess glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Such creatinine (Cr)-based formulae may produce biased estimates of GFR when using Cr measurements that have not been calibrated to reference laboratories. In this paper, we sought to examine the degree of this variation in Cr assays in several laboratories associated with academic medical centers affiliated with the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study; to consider how best to correct for this variation, and to quantify the impact of such corrections on eligibility for participation in CRIC. Variability of Cr is of particular concern in the conduct of CRIC, a large multicenter study of subjects with chronic renal disease, because eligibility for the study depends on Cr-based assessment of GFR. Methods A library of 5 large volume plasma specimens from apheresis patients was assembled, representing levels of plasma Cr from 0.8 to 2.4 mg/dl. Samples from this library were used for measurement of Cr at each of the 14 CRIC laboratories repetitively over time. We used graphical displays and linear regression methods to examine the variability in Cr, and used linear regression to develop calibration equations. We also examined the impact of the various calibration equations on the proportion of subjects screened as potential participants who were actually eligible for the study. Results There was substantial variability in Cr assays across laboratories and over time. We developed calibration equations for each laboratory; these equations varied substantially among laboratories and somewhat over time in some laboratories. The laboratory site contributed the most to variability (51% of the variance unexplained by the specimen) and variation with time accounted for another 15%. In some laboratories, calibration equations resulted in differences in eligibility for CRIC of as much as 20%. Conclusions The substantial variability in SCr assays

  2. Organic molecular beam deposition system and initial studies of organic layer growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasson, M [Applied Semiconductor Physics, Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Ilver, L [Department of Experimental Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Kanski, J [Department of Experimental Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden); Andersson, T G [Applied Semiconductor Physics, Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, S-41296 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2006-09-01

    This work describes an organic molecular beam deposition system with substrate entry/exit chamber, buffer chamber and with the possibility to transfer substrate from a III-V molecular beam deposition system. Flux calibrations of organic molecules and the initial growth of organic layers are described. For this purpose, the molecules 3,4,9,10 perylene tetra carboxylic dianhydride and copper phtalocyanine were used. Layers were grown on oxidized and hydrogen passivated Si(100), Indium tin oxide and glass respectively. The growth was investigated with atomic force microscopy, reflection high energy electron diffraction and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy. An investigation with x-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopy on the effect of atmospheric exposure is also included, showing little effect of surface pollution when the samples were handled carefully. The initial formation (monolayers) of copper phtalocyanine thin films was studied by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy.

  3. AFM Study on Reliability of Nanoscale DLC Films Deposited by ECR-MPCVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shou-xing; ZHU Shi-gen; DING Jian-ning

    2004-01-01

    Nanoindentation, scratch and wear tests based on an atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried out to study the reliability of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, deposited by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-MPCVD). The predictors for film reliability were given to investigate the resistance of DLC films to indent, scratch, and wear. Experimental results showed that the films at 64.9nm and 12.07nm exhibited better reliability than thin one at 2.78nm, 4.48nm. In addition, the reliability strength of films above 12.07nm went stable, and the films showed good performance of anti-indentation, anti-scratch and anti-wear. Finally, size effect of nanoscale monolayer film was introduced to explain the reliability of nanoscale DLC films.

  4. Biomolecular papain thin films grown by matrix assisted and conventional pulsed laser deposition: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    György, E.; Pérez del Pino, A.; Sauthier, G.; Figueras, A.

    2009-12-01

    Biomolecular papain thin films were grown both by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) techniques with the aid of an UV KrF∗ (λ =248 nm, τFWHM≅20 ns) excimer laser source. For the MAPLE experiments the targets submitted to laser radiation consisted on frozen composites obtained by dissolving the biomaterial powder in distilled water at 10 wt % concentration. Conventional pressed biomaterial powder targets were used in the PLD experiments. The surface morphology of the obtained thin films was studied by atomic force microscopy and their structure and composition were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The possible physical mechanisms implied in the ablation processes of the two techniques, under comparable experimental conditions were identified. The results showed that the growth mode, surface morphology as well as structure of the deposited biomaterial thin films are determined both by the incident laser fluence value as well as target preparation procedure.

  5. Laser annealing study of PECVD deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, U.; Ambrosone, G.; Gesuele, F.; Grossi, V.; Parisi, V.; Schutzmann, S.; Basa, D. K.

    2007-12-01

    The influence of carbon content on the crystallization process has been investigated for the excimer laser annealed hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon alloy films deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) technique, using silane methane gas mixture diluted in helium, as well as for the hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon carbon alloy films prepared by PECVD from silane methane gas mixture highly diluted in hydrogen, for comparison. The study demonstrates clearly that the increase in the carbon content prevents the crystallization process in the hydrogen diluted samples while the crystallization process is enhanced in the laser annealing of amorphous samples because of the increase in the absorbed laser energy density that occurs for the amorphous films with the higher carbon content. This, in turn, facilitates the crystallization for the laser annealed samples with higher carbon content, resulting in the formation of SiC crystallites along with Si crystallites.

  6. Background and Energy Deposition Studies for the CLIC Post-Collision Line

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B; Deacon, L C; Gschwendtner, E

    2011-01-01

    After the interaction point, the 1.5 TeV, 14MW CLIC electron/positron beams must be transported safely to the main beam dump. In designing the CLIC post-collision line detailed simulations must be carried out in order to ensure that losses are kept within reasonable limits. Results for back-scattered photon flux arriving at the detector are recalculated after updates and enhancements to the geometry description used in the study presented in [1]. Initial results of neutron fluxes are presented. Additionally, energy deposition calculations are carried out, showing that, when the full electromagnetic showers are included, in the current design the standard magnet coils would have a short lifetime due to radiation damage to conventional insulation material. Changing the magnet mask material from graphite to iron and lengthening the intermediate dump by 2m of iron are shown to substantially lessen the energy deposition in the magnet coils and thereby extend magnet lifetimes.

  7. Coupling thermogravimetric and acoustic emission measurements: its application to study the inhibition of catalytic coke deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropital, Francois; Dascotte, Philippe; Marchand, Pierre [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1 Avenue Bois Preau, 92952 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Faure, Thierry; Lenain, Jean-Claude; Proust, Alain [Euro Physical Acoustics, 27 Rue Magellan, 94373 Sucy-en-Brie Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In order to improve the knowledge on the high temperature behaviour of metallic materials, the coupling of several in situ physical analysis methods is a promising way. For this purpose a thermogravimetric balance has been equipped with a specific acoustic emission device in order to continuously measure the mass variation of the corrosion sample and the acoustic emission transient under experimental conditions of temperature and gas phase compositions that are representative of the industrial environments. The catalytic coke deposition condition that is a major problem for the refinery and petrochemical industries, has been studied with such a device. The carbon deposition on reactor walls can induce localised disruption in the process such as heat-transfer reduction and pressure drops. To prevent these perturbations, proper selections of the metallurgical or internal coating compositions of the equipment, or the injection of accurate amount of inhibitors have to be decided. The feasibility of the coupling at high temperature of thermogravimetric and acoustic emission has been demonstrated. This new technique has been applied to study the inhibition of the catalytic coke deposition on pure iron by sulphur additives in the temperature range of 650 deg. C and under different mixed atmospheres of hydrocarbon and hydrogen contents. Good correlation has been obtained between the coking rates measured by thermogravimetric measurements and the intensities of the acoustic emission parameters. (authors)

  8. Kinetic study of solid phase crystallisation of expanding thermal plasma deposited a-Si:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, F., E-mail: felixlaw@nus.edu.sg [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Hoex, B. [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore); Wang, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Luther, J. [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Sharma, K.; Creatore, M.; Van de Sanden, M.C.M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-06-30

    In-situ X-ray diffraction was used to study the dynamics of the solid phase crystallisation (SPC) of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films deposited by expanding thermal plasma technique. The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model was used for the analysis of the dynamic data and the activation energy associated with the SPC process was 2.9 eV, which was lower than a-Si:H films deposited by other techniques. Relationships between the Avrami exponent n, the SPC process stability and the subsequent grain structure were demonstrated. Under certain conditions, the films exhibited columnar grain structure with indications of good grain quality, suggesting that these films are suitable to be further developed into solar cell devices. Structure of the grains and the SPC dynamics in this work lend support to prior work that vacancies decorated by hydrogen clusters are related to nucleation sites. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystallisation of expanding thermal plasma (ETP) deposited a-Si:H was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model was used to model the crystallisation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation energy of the solid phase crystallisation process was 2.9 eV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vacancies decorated by hydrogen clusters are suggested nucleation sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ETP is promising in the fabrication process of pc-Si thin film solar cells.

  9. The Dynamic Scaling Study of Vapor Deposition Polymerization: A Monte Carlo Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tangirala, Sairam; Zhao, Y -P; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.011605

    2010-01-01

    The morphological scaling properties of linear polymer films grown by vapor deposition polymerization (VDP) are studied by 1+1D Monte Carlo simulations. The model implements the basic processes of random angle ballistic deposition ($F$), free-monomer diffusion ($D$) and monomer adsorption along with the dynamical processes of polymer chain initiation, extension, and merger. The ratio $G=D/F$ is found to have a strong influence on the polymer film morphology. Spatial and temporal behavior of kinetic roughening has been extensively studied using finite-length scaling and height-height correlations $H(r,t)$. The scaling analysis has been performed within the no-overhang approximation and the scaling behaviors at local and global length scales were found to be very different. The global and local scaling exponents for morphological evolution have been evaluated for varying free-monomer diffusion by growing the films at $G$ = $10$, $10^2$, $10^3$, and $10^4$ and fixing the deposition flux $F$. With an increase in ...

  10. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  11. Structural studies of ZnO nanostructures by varying the deposition parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, S. H. A.; Sahdan, M. Z.; Ichimura, M.; Supee, A.; Rahim, S.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin film on the growth of ZnO nanorods (NRs) was investigated. The structures of ZnO NRs were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method in aqueous solution of N2O6Zn.6H2O and C6H12N4 at 90°C of deposition temperature. One of the ZnO NRs samples was deposited on a ZnO seed layer coated on a glass substrate to investigate the properties of ZnO NRs without receiving effect of other materials. Next, for diode application, the ZnO NRs was deposited on tin monosulfide (SnS) coated on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate (SnS/ITO). The next, the ZnO structural properties were studied from surface morphology, X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectra, and chemical composition by using field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), XRD and energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The growth of ZnO NRs on ZnO seed layer was investigated by ZnO seed layer condition while the growth of ZnO NRs on SnS/ITO was investigated by deposition time and deposition temperature parameters. From FESEM images, aligned ZnO NRs were obtained, and the diameters of ZnO NRs were 0.024-3.94 µm. The SnS thin film was affected by the diameter of ZnO NRs which are the ZnO NRs grow on SnS thin films has a larger diameter compared to ZnO NRs grow on ZnO seed layer. Besides that, all of ZnO peaks observed from XRD corresponding to the wurzite structure and preferentially oriented along the c-axis. In addition, EDX shows a high composition of zinc (Zn) and oxygen (O) signals, which indicated that the NRs are indeed made up of Zn and O.

  12. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Large Carbon Molecules and Ions in Support of Space Missions. A New Generation of Laboratory & Space Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Tan, Xiaofeng; Cami, Jan; Biennier, Ludovic; Remy, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of carbon-bearing materials in space. A long-standing and major challenge for laboratory astrophysics has been to measure the spectra of large carbon molecules in laboratory environments that mimic (in a realistic way) the physical conditions that are associated with the interstellar emission and absorption regions [1]. This objective has been identified as one of the critical Laboratory Astrophysics objectives to optimize the data return from space missions [2]. An extensive laboratory program has been developed to assess the properties of PAHs in such environments and to describe how they influence the radiation and energy balance in space. We present and discuss the gas-phase electronic absorption spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs measured in the UV-Visible-NIR range in astrophysically relevant environments and discuss the implications for astrophysics [1]. The harsh physical conditions of the interstellar medium characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - have been simulated in the laboratory by associating a pulsed cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) with a supersonic slit jet seeded with PAHs and an ionizing, penning-type, electronic discharge. We have measured for the {\\it first time} the spectra of a series of neutral [3,4] and ionized [5,6] interstellar PAHs analogs in the laboratory. An effort has also been attempted to quantify the mechanisms of ion and carbon nanoparticles production in the free jet expansion and to model our simulation of the diffuse interstellar medium in the laboratory [7]. These experiments provide {\\it unique} information on the spectra of free, large carbon-containing molecules and ions in the gas phase. We are now, for the first time, in the position to directly compare laboratory spectral data on free, cold, PAH ions and carbon nano-sized carbon particles with astronomical observations in the

  13. FCC-hh final-focus for flat-beams: parameters and energy deposition studies

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira, Jose; Seryi, Andrei; Van Riesen-Haupt, Leon; Besana, Maria Ilaria

    2017-01-01

    The international Future Circular Collider (FCC) study comprises the study of a new scientific structure in a tunnel of 100 km. This will allow the installation of two accelerators, a 45.6–175 GeV lepton collider and a 100-TeV hadron collider. An optimized design of a final-focus system for the hadron collider is presented here. The new design is more compact and enables unequal ${\\beta}$$^{∗}$ in both planes, whose choice is justified here. This is followed by energy deposition studies, where the total dose in the magnets as a consequence of the collision debris is evaluated.

  14. Water quality laboratories in Colombia: a GIS-based study of urban and rural accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jim; Liu, Jing; Bain, Robert; Perez, Andrea; Crocker, Jonny; Bartram, Jamie; Gundry, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify sample transportation times associated with mandated microbiological monitoring of drinking-water in Colombia. World Health Organization Guidelines for Drinking-Water Quality recommend that samples spend no more than 6h between collection and analysis in a laboratory. Census data were used to estimate the minimum number of operational and surveillance samples required from piped water supplies under national regulations. Drive-times were then computed from each supply system to the nearest accredited laboratory and translated into sample holding times based on likely daily monitoring patterns. Of 62,502 surveillance samples required annually, 5694 (9.1%) were found to be more than 6 h from the nearest of 278 accredited laboratories. 612 samples (1.0%) were more than 24 hours' drive from the nearest accredited laboratory, the maximum sample holding time recommended by the World Health Organization. An estimated 30% of required rural samples would have to be stored for more than 6 h before reaching a laboratory. The analysis demonstrates the difficulty of undertaking microbiological monitoring in rural areas and small towns from a fixed laboratory network. Our GIS-based approach could be adapted to optimise monitoring strategies and support planning of testing and transportation infra-structure development. It could also be used to estimate sample transport and holding times in other countries.

  15. Addressing the key communication barriers between microbiology laboratories and clinical units: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodvin, Brita; Aase, Karina; Brekken, Anita Løvås; Charani, Esmita; Lindemann, Paul Christoffer; Smith, Ingrid

    2017-09-01

    Many countries are on the brink of establishing antibiotic stewardship programmes in hospitals nationwide. In a previous study we found that communication between microbiology laboratories and clinical units is a barrier to implementing efficient antibiotic stewardship programmes in Norway. We have now addressed the key communication barriers between microbiology laboratories and clinical units from a laboratory point of view. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 employees (managers, doctors and technicians) from six diverse Norwegian microbiological laboratories, representing all four regional health authorities. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was applied, identifying emergent themes, subthemes and corresponding descriptions. The main barrier to communication is disruption involving specimen logistics, information on request forms, verbal reporting of test results and information transfer between poorly integrated IT systems. Furthermore, communication is challenged by lack of insight into each other's area of expertise and limited provision of laboratory services, leading to prolonged turnaround time, limited advisory services and restricted opening hours. Communication between microbiology laboratories and clinical units can be improved by a review of testing processes, educational programmes to increase insights into the other's area of expertise, an evaluation of work tasks and expansion of rapid and point-of-care test services. Antibiotic stewardship programmes may serve as a valuable framework to establish these measures.

  16. A cross-laboratory preclinical study on the effectiveness of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maysami, Samaneh; Wong, Raymond; Pradillo, Jesus M; Denes, Adam; Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari; Orset, Cyrille; Rahman, Mahbubur; Rubio, Marina; Schwaninger, Markus; Vivien, Denis; Bath, Philip M; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M

    2016-03-01

    Stroke represents a global challenge and is a leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Despite much effort, translation of research findings to clinical benefit has not yet been successful. Failure of neuroprotection trials is considered, in part, due to the low quality of preclinical studies, low level of reproducibility across different laboratories and that stroke co-morbidities have not been fully considered in experimental models. More rigorous testing of new drug candidates in different experimental models of stroke and initiation of preclinical cross-laboratory studies have been suggested as ways to improve translation. However, to our knowledge, no drugs currently in clinical stroke trials have been investigated in preclinical cross-laboratory studies. The cytokine interleukin 1 is a key mediator of neuronal injury, and the naturally occurring interleukin 1 receptor antagonist has been reported as beneficial in experimental studies of stroke. In the present paper, we report on a preclinical cross-laboratory stroke trial designed to investigate the efficacy of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in different research laboratories across Europe. Our results strongly support the therapeutic potential of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in experimental stroke and provide further evidence that interleukin 1 receptor antagonist should be evaluated in more extensive clinical stroke trials.

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  18. Studies of CdS/CdTe interface: Comparison of CdS films deposited by close space sublimation and chemical bath deposition techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jun-feng, E-mail: pkuhjf@bit.edu.cn [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6502, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Fu, Gan-hua; Krishnakumar, V.; Schimper, Hermann-Josef [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Liao, Cheng [Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jaegermann, Wolfram [Institute of Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, Petersenstr. 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Besland, M.P. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Université de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6502, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2015-05-01

    The CdS layers were deposited by two different methods, close space sublimation (CSS) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The CdS/CdTe interface properties were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TEM images showed a large CSS-CdS grain size in the range of 70-80 nm. The interface between CSS-CdS and CdTe were clear and sharp, indicating an abrupt hetero-junction. On the other hand, CBD-CdS layer had much smaller grain size in the 5-10 nm range. The interface between CBD-CdS and CdTe was not as clear as CSS-CdS. With the stepwise coverage of CdTe layer, the XPS core levels of Cd 3d and S 2p in CSS-CdS had a sudden shift to lower binding energies, while those core levels shifted gradually in CBD-CdS. In addition, XPS depth profile analyses indicated a strong diffusion in the interface between CBD-CdS and CdTe. The solar cells prepared using CSS-CdS yielded better device performance than the CBD-CdS layer. The relationships between the solar cell performances and properties of CdS/CdTe interfaces were discussed. - Highlights: • Studies of CdS deposited by close space sublimation and chemical bath deposition • An observation of CdS/CdTe interface by transmission electron microscope • A careful investigation of CdS/CdTe interface by X ray photoelectron spectra • An easier diffusion at the chemical bath deposition CdS and CdTe interface.

  19. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2007 and March 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The experiment has been designed to simulate a disposal tunnel in a real deep repository environment for storage of high-level radioactive waste. The test consists of a 90 m long, 5 m diameter subhorizontal tunnel excavated in dioritic granite. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing.

  20. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2007 and March 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The experiment has been designed to simulate a disposal tunnel in a real deep repository environment for storage of high-level radioactive waste. The test consists of a 90 m long, 5 m diameter subhorizontal tunnel excavated in dioritic granite. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing.

  1. How relevant is the deposition of mercury onto snowpacks? – Part 2: A modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Durnford

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An unknown fraction of mercury that is deposited onto snowpacks is revolatilized to the atmosphere. Determining the revolatilized fraction is important since mercury that enters the snowpack meltwater may be converted to highly toxic bioaccumulating methylmercury. In this study, we present a new dynamic physically-based snowpack/meltwater model for mercury that is suitable for large-scale atmospheric models for mercury. It represents the primary physical and chemical processes that determine the fate of mercury deposited onto snowpacks. The snowpack/meltwater model was implemented in Environment Canada's atmospheric mercury model GRAHM. For the first time, observed snowpack-related mercury concentrations are used to evaluate and constrain an atmospheric mercury model. We find that simulated concentrations of mercury in both snowpacks and the atmosphere's surface layer agree closely with observations. The simulated concentration of mercury in both in the top 30 cm and the top 150 cm of the snowpack, averaged over 2005–2009, is predominantly below 6 ng l−1 over land south of 66.5° N but exceeds 18 ng l−1 over sea ice in extensive areas of the Arctic Ocean and Hudson Bay. The average simulated concentration of mercury in snowpack meltwater runoff tends to be higher on the Russian/European side (>20 ng l−1 of the Arctic Ocean than on the Canadian side (<10 ng l−1. The correlation coefficient between observed and simulated monthly mean atmospheric surface-level GEM concentrations increased significantly with the inclusion of the new snowpack/meltwater model at two of the three stations (midlatitude, subarctic studied and remained constant at the third (arctic. Oceanic emissions are postulated to produce the observed summertime maximum in concentrations of surface-level atmospheric GEM at Alert in the Canadian Arctic and to generate the summertime volatility observed in these concentrations at

  2. How relevant is the deposition of mercury onto snowpacks? – Part 2: A modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Durnford

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An unknown fraction of mercury that is deposited onto snowpacks is revolatilized to the atmosphere. Determining the revolatilized fraction is important since mercury that enters the snowpack meltwater may be converted to highly toxic bioaccumulating methylmercury. In this study, we present a new dynamic physically-based snowpack/meltwater model for mercury that is suitable for large-scale atmospheric models for mercury. It represents the primary physical and chemical processes that determine the fate of mercury deposited onto snowpacks. The snowpack/meltwater model was implemented in Environment Canada's atmospheric mercury model GRAHM. For the first time, observed snowpack-related mercury concentrations are used to evaluate and constrain an atmospheric mercury model. We find that simulated concentrations of mercury in both snowpacks and the atmosphere's surface layer agree closely with observations. The simulated concentration of mercury in both in the top 30 cm and the top 150 cm of the snowpack, averaged over 2005–2009, is predominantly below 6 ng L−1 over land south of 66.5° N but exceeds 18 ng L−1 over sea ice in extensive areas of the Arctic Ocean and Hudson Bay. The average simulated concentration of mercury in snowpack meltwater runoff tends to be higher on the Russian/European side (>20 ng L−1 of the Arctic Ocean than on the Canadian side (<10 ng L−1. The correlation coefficient between observed and simulated monthly mean atmospheric surface-level gaseous elemental mercury (GEM concentrations increased significantly with the inclusion of the new snowpack/meltwater model at two of the three stations (midlatitude, subarctic studied and remained constant at the third (arctic. Oceanic emissions are postulated to produce the observed summertime maximum in concentrations of surface-level atmospheric GEM at Alert in the Canadian Arctic and to generate the summertime volatility observed in

  3. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Geet, O.

    2010-04-01

    As a Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) partner, NREL set aggressive goals for energy savings, daylighting, and achieving a LEED Gold rating (through the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program) for its S&TF building.

  4. Study on the structural change and heat transfer characteristics of ash deposit layers in the coal gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazuyoshi Ichikawa; Yuso Oki; Jun Inumaru [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CREIPI) (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Ash deposition is often observed in the coal gasifier. As it may interfere the operation of gasifier, in case of excessive deposition, a study is needed to evaluate the ash deposition characteristics on the gasifier wall, its ability to grow after deposition, and influence of the formation of deposition layers on the heat transfer capability in advance. CRIEPI has conducted a study of the basic gasification process and operational technology using a 2T/D air-blown pressurized entrained-flow coal gasifier (2 T/D gasifier) since 1983. In a previous work, the authors calculated the ash liquid phase ratio as an index of the ash melting characteristics in correspondence to continuous temperature change, and established the relationship with the ash deposition characteristics. We also proposed as the technique to predict ash deposition characteristics in the gasifier by construction of a model based upon the correlation and introduction into the numerical analysis code. In this report, the relationship between the sintering structure and the heat transfer characteristics of deposition layer is studied. The heat transfer mechanism in the layer was also pursued. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Time-resolved neutron reflectometry and photovoltaic device studies on sequentially deposited PCDTBT-fullerene layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clulow, Andrew J; Tao, Chen; Lee, Kwan H; Velusamy, Marappan; McEwan, Jake A; Shaw, Paul E; Yamada, Norifumi L; James, Michael; Burn, Paul L; Gentle, Ian R; Meredith, Paul

    2014-09-30

    We have used steady-state and time-resolved neutron reflectometry to study the diffusion of fullerene derivatives into the narrow optical gap polymer poly[N-9″-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) to explore the sequential processing of the donor and acceptor for the preparation of efficient organic solar cells. It was found that when [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (60-PCBM) was deposited onto a thin film of PCDTBT from dichloromethane (DCM), a three-layer structure was formed that was stable below the glass-transition temperature of the polymer. When good solvents for the polymer were used in conjunction with DCM, both 60-PCBM and [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric-acid-methyl-ester (70-PCBM) were seen to form films that had a thick fullerene layer containing little polymer and a PCDTBT-rich layer near the interface with the substrate. Devices composed of films prepared by sequential deposition of the polymer and fullerene had efficiencies of up to 5.3%, with those based on 60-PCBM close to optimized bulk heterojunction (BHJ) cells processed in the conventional manner. Sequential deposition of pure components to form the active layer is attractive for large-area device fabrication, and the results demonstrate that this processing method can give efficient solar cells.

  6. Emission characters of particulate concentrations and dry deposition studies for incense burning at a Taiwanese temple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chu, Chia-Chium; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Fu, Peter Pi-Cheng

    2002-05-01

    Suspended particulate concentrations were measured at the Tzu Yun Yen temple in the Taichung region of Taiwan. The temple performs traditional incense burning. A universal sampler and a micro-orifice uniform deposited impactor (MOUDI) sampler with a dry deposition plate were used to measure the particulate concentrations. The results show that the average PM2.5/PM10 ratio was 74% during the incense burning period at this temple. In addition, the average suspended particulate (PM10) element concentration of anthropogenic element Zn (495 ng/m3) was higher than the other anthropogenic elements (Pb, Mn, Ni, and Cd). Furthermore, the average mass size distribution was bimodal with major peaks occurring at 0.32-0.56 microm and 5.6-10 microm during the incense burning period. The dry deposition velocities of Cd used fine particulates (PM2.5) and suspended particulate (PM10) mode were 1.86 and 0.99 cm/s in this study, respectively.

  7. Complex interaction of subsequent surface streamers via deposited charge: a high-resolution experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoder, T.; Synek, P.; Chorvát, D.; Ráhel', J.; Brandenburg, R.; Černák, M.

    2017-07-01

    The coplanar barrier discharge in synthetic air at 30 kPa pressure was studied by time-correlated single photon counting enhanced optical emission spectroscopy, far-field microscopy enhanced intensified CCD camera and sensitive current measurements. The discharge operated in a regime where two subsequent microdischarges appeared within the same voltage half-period. The electrical analysis of the barrier discharge setup enabled us to quantify charge transfer and the effective electric field development. During the second microdischarge the positive surface streamers follow the interface (triple-line) between the area of deposited charge from the previous one and the area of uncharged dielectric surface. It is shown that additional branching and flashes of surface streamers are responsible for the increased spatial complexity of the deposited surface charges at high overvoltage. A suppressed streamer propagating over the area of deposited surface charge was tracked and the evidence of surface streamer reconnection is presented. A spatiotemporal distribution (resolution of 120 ps and 100 μm) of the reduced electric field strength was obtained for both microdischarges from the recorded luminosities of the molecular nitrogen. The reduced electric field of positive streamers in the first microdischarge reached 1200 Td. For the second one, the electric field values for the streamer at the triple-line are slightly lower than that, while for the suppressed streamers are even higher.

  8. Study on engineering geological stability of rock mass at Shanmen silver deposit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming FENG; Li LIU; Yu ZHANG; Xigang REN; Chengke XU

    2006-01-01

    The natural balance conditions will be disturbed and produce a series of problems when mineral deposit has mined. This paper has researched the engineering rock masses have been researched in this study, structural planes, the distribution characteristics of tectonic geological factors and the stability of engineering structures according to the theory and research methods of rock mechanics, it will provide the engineering geological evidence for mining area exploited, meanwhile pledge the safety production. Shanmen silver deposit is a large epithermal deposit,it is controlled by NE to NNE strike faults. The stability of rock mass is acted on the tectonic movement and hot metalliferous brine in long-term. Especially,strength of rock mass becomes softened, muddy and loosed under the action of water,so the lower stability of rock mass is,the easier it can take place for harm of disaster threatening production safe of mining. For this reason,it is very important that drawing up a plan to lower harm for mine and protect.

  9. Damage layer study of the overcoat deposited on the top magnetic layer of hard disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, R.H. [Department of Photonics and Communication Engineering, Asia University, Taichung 41354, Taiwan (China); Chao, T.M. [Department of Applied Geomatics, Chien-Hsin University, JungLi 32097, Taiwan (China); Tan, A.H., E-mail: ahtan@uch.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chien-Hsin University, JungLi 32097, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents the effect of nanoscale damage layer on magnetic results obtained from the optimization of media overcoat deposition parameters on the top magnetic layer on magnetic hard disks. We have investigated the effects of interface interaction between the overcoat deposition parameters on the top magnetic layer on the media by using a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on next generation hard disks. The goal is to achieve a reduced damage layer, lower head media spacing (HMS) and a higher spectrum of signal to noise ratio (SpSNR) optimized by using Taguchi experimental design with a four-factor three-level (L9) orthogonal array. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to interpret the measured coercivity (Hc), HMS and SpSNR. It was found that source gas type is the most significant factor with a percentage contribution effect of 59.8% on HMS and 51.7% on SpSNR. The bias voltage is the second most significant factor with its percentage contribution being 24.2% on HMS and 31.0% on SpSNR. Overall, the optimum SpSNR was obtained using a C{sub 2}H{sub 2} source gas, −100 V bias voltage, 50 V anode voltage and 20 sccm gas flow rate, respectively. - Highlights: • Taguchi method and analysis of variance (ANOVA) are used in this study. • The optimal DLC deposition parameters are C{sub 2}H{sub 2} source gas, −100 V bias voltage, 50 V anode voltage and 20 sccm gas flow rate. • Compared with current design, optimum design can achieve a 0.56 nm lower HMS, a 0.51 dB higher SpSNR and better wear resistance. • The source gas type is the most significant factor with a percentage contribution effect of 59.8% on HMS and 51.7% on SpSNR.

  10. Studies on Electrochemical Deposition and Characterization of Co3o4 Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.N. Shelke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Co3O4 films are prepared using two steps method. Initially, the films are electrochemically deposited on stainless steel and copper substrates from the solution containing CoSO4 and H3BO3 at various molar concentrations (0.05, 0.09, 0.13, 0.17, 0.21, 0.25 and 0.28 M of CoCl2 in deposition bath. These as-deposited films are transformed into Co3O4 phase by heating them at 350 °C / 2 hr. These as-heated films are characterized by using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. From the characterization studies, the as-heated films are found to be containing single cubic spinel Co3O4 phase with high purity. The variation in molar concentration of CoCl2 in electrochemical deposition bath showed the profound effect on optical properties of Co3O4 films. The better optical properties, (i absorptance (α = 0.945, emittance (ε = 0.071 and (ii absorptance (α = 0.950, emittance (ε = 0.070 are obtained for the Co3O4 films prepared on stainless steel and copper substrates respectively at 0.28 M concentration of CoCl2 as compared to the data reported in literature. The strength and adhesion of as-heated films on both the substrates are found to be good for the molar concentrations of CoCl2 < 0.28 M.

  11. LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE STABILITY AND TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stability and transport of radio-labeled Fe2O3 particles were studied using laboratory batch and column techniques. Core material collected from shallow sand and gravel aquifer was used as the immobile column matrix material. Variables in the study included flow rate, pH, i...

  12. Out of the Laboratory and Down to the Bay: Writing in Science and Technology Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Greg

    1996-01-01

    Offers a personal view of some developments in science and technology studies. Argues that the field has emerged from laboratory studies to engagement with broader issues of power and change. Explains that frameworks developed in the sociology of scientific knowledge have been applied to the analysis of things, of social boundaries, and of…

  13. Use of the LITEE Lorn Manufacturing Case Study in a Senior Chemical Engineering Unit Operations Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Abulencia, James Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the effectiveness of incorporating the Laboratory for Innovative Technology and Engineering Education (LITEE) Lorn Manufacturing case into a senior level chemical engineering unit operations course at Manhattan College. The purpose of using the case study is to demonstrate the relevance of ethics to chemical engineering…

  14. Studies on preparation and characterization of indium doped zinc oxide films by chemical spray deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Benny Joseph; P K Manoj; V K Vaidyan

    2005-08-01

    The preparation of indium doped zinc oxide films is discussed. Variation of structural, electrical and optical properties of the films with zinc acetate concentration and indium concentration in the solution are investigated. XRD studies have shown a change in preferential orientation from (002) to (101) crystal plane with increase in indium dopant concentration. Films deposited at optimum conditions have a low resistivity of 1.33 × 10-4 m with 94% transmittance at 550 nm. SEM studies have shown smooth polycrystalline morphology of the films. Figure of merit is evaluated from electrical resistivity and transmittance data.

  15. Design of a mobile laboratory for ventilation studies and indoor air pollution monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, J.V.; Hollowell, C.D.; Lin, C.I.; Pepper, J.H.

    1978-04-01

    The design and fabrication of a mobile laboratory for research and development studies of ventilation requirements and energy utilization in residential and commercial buildings are described. Functionality, flexibility, and versatility have been stressed without sacrificing appearance and operator convenience. It is believed that modifications of and additions to the mobile laboratory (such as adding the capability to monitor building energy flow) can be made with a minimum of inconvenience. The studies being performed will provide data needed for the establishment of energy efficient ventilation standards.

  16. Large excavations and multi-disciplinary studies in deep underground laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Joseph S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2013, we have gathered some information on excavations recently completed, renovated, or planned in Asia, Europe, North and South America. In this review, we presented what we learned on both the large excavations and on multi-disciplinary studies. Large excavations in physics laboratories are driven by the needs associated with designing next generation of experiments to detect rare events. Some existing physics laboratories are interested to use available spaces for geo-sciences studies, including microbiological research for deep life. Summary of recent progress will be discussed.

  17. Geotechnical mapping for alluvial fan deposits controlled by active faults: a case study in the Erzurum, NE Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbasi, Necmi; Kalkan, Ekrem

    2009-08-01

    Erzurum, the biggest city of Eastern Anatolia Region in the Turkey, is located in Karasu Plain. Karasu Plain, located on the central segment of the Erzurum Fault Zone, is an intermountain sedimentary basin with a Miocene-Quaternary volcanic basement, andesitic-basaltic lava flows and fissure eruptions of basaltic lava. It was filled in the early Quaternary by lacustrine fan-delta deposits. The basin is characterized by NNE-SSW trending sinistral wrench faults on its eastern margin and ENE-WSW trending reverse faults on its southern margin. Both systems of active faults intersect very near to Erzurum, which is considered to be the most likely site for the epicenter of a probable future large earthquake. Historical records of destructive earthquakes, morphotectonic features formed by paleo-seismic events and instrument seismic data of region indicate to a very high regional seismicity. The residential areas of Erzurum are located on thick alluvial fan deposits forming under the control of faults on the central segment of the Erzurum Fault Zone, which is one of the most active fault belts of the East Anatolian Region. Over time, the housing estates of city such as Yenisehir and Yildizkent have been expanded toward to the west and southwest part of Erzurum as a consequence of rapid and massive construction during the last 30 years. Geotechnical investigation has therefore been undertaken the residential areas of city in order to characterize geotechnical properties over the varied lithologies examine the potential for geotechnical mapping and assess the foundation conditions of the present and future settlement areas. The geological field observations and operations have been performed to make the soil sampling and characterize the lateral and vertical changes in thickness of the alluvial deposits in trenches, excavations and deep holes with 6-12 m sections. The soil samples have been subjected to a series of tests under laboratory conditions to obtain physical and

  18. Developing an Attitude Scale towards Physics Laboratory: A Study on Validity and Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülşah TANRIVERDİ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to reveal the results of a validity and reliability study for the attitude scale which is developed to assess the attitudes of first-year undergraduates in Teacher Training in Sciences department towards physics laboratories. At the first step of the study, students who attended Physics Laboratory-I course were asked for their views about physics laboratories. The first items of the scale on attitude were created in parallel to the teacher candidates’ views. The experimental group of the study consists of 118 primary school teacher candidate students at Faculty of Education in Kırıkkale University. As a result of the study on validity and reliability 27 attitude scale items were created 21 of which were positive and 6 of which were negative. This resulting attitude scale with 27 items was called "Attitude Scale Towards Physics Laboratories" (ASCTPL. Having made the factor analysis it was seen that the ASCTPL had 6 factors at total. The dimensions of these 6 factors were "Methods and Techniques Applied during the Course","Teacher's Attitude towards the Course", "Technical Opportunities in the Laboratories", "Associating the Course with Daily Life", "Students' Personal Attitudes towards the Course" and "Field Knowledge". The variant that the whole of the scale expressed was 59,143%, and Cornbach-Alpha coefficient of internal consistency was estimated α = 0,90. Considering the results, it can be concluded that the scale is both valid and reliable. Also, this five point Likert-type scale can be used to determine the attitudes of students at Teacher Training in Sciences department towards the physics laboratories.

  19. INDICATORS OF UNCERTAINTY FOR THE DECISIONS OF ARCHITECTURE TO LABORATORIES NB3 – STUDY OF CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Michielin VIEIRA

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the design of biological research laboratories that deal with pathogens, the architect must incorporate aspects related to other disciplines, considering that the quality of those environments is related to biosafety concept. In order to meet the biosafety guidelines, the project coordinator must attempt to the compatibility among different requirements which are associated to the performance level expected in this kind of facility. Aiming to examine how biosafety guidelines have been incorporated in the design of laboratories that require biosafety level three (BSL3 it was developed a study of cases of facilities using post-occupancy evaluation methods. Through the post-occupancy evaluation it was possible to establish the state of the art of BSL3 laboratories in use in Brazil. The search for indicators of laboratories design proved that some architecture decisions are not constrained by biosafety guidelines. The study was conducted with the intention to contribute for the development of future projects. Key words: biosafety, post-occupancy evaluation, laboratories design.

  20. XPS study of thermal and electron-induced decomposition of Ni and Co acetylacetonate thin films for metal deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Theodor; Warneke, Jonas; Zielasek, Volkmar, E-mail: zielasek@uni-bremen.de; Swiderek, Petra; Bäumer, Marcus [Institut für Angewandte und Physikalische Chemie, Universität Bremen, Postfach 330440, D-28334 Bremen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Optimizing thin metal film deposition techniques from metal-organic precursors such as atomic layer deposition, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), or electron beam-induced deposition (EBID) with the help of surface science analysis tools in ultrahigh vacuum requires a contamination-free precursor delivery technique, especially in the case of the less volatile precursors. For this purpose, the preparation of layers of undecomposed Ni(acac){sub 2} and Co(acac){sub 2} was tried via pulsed spray evaporation of a liquid solution of the precursors in ethanol into a flow of nitrogen on a CVD reactor. Solvent-free layers of intact precursor molecules were obtained when the substrate was held at a temperature of 115 °C. A qualitative comparison of thermally initiated and electron-induced precursor decomposition and metal center reduction was carried out. All deposited films were analyzed with respect to chemical composition quasi in situ by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Thermally initiated decomposition yielded higher metal-to-metal oxide ratios in the deposit than the electron-induced process for which ratios of 60:40 and 20:80 were achieved for Ni and Co, resp. Compared to continuous EBID processes, all deposits showed low levels of carbon impurities of ∼10 at. %. Therefore, postdeposition irradiation of metal acetylacetonate layers by a focused electron beam and subsequent removal of intact precursor by dissolution in ethanol or by heating is proposed as electron beam lithography technique on the laboratory scale for the production of the metal nanostructures.

  1. The Genesis of tectonically and hydrothermally controlled industry mineral deposits: A geochemical and structural study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfler, Anke; Prochaska, Walter; Henjes-Kunst, Friedhelm; Fritz, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The study aims to investigate the role of hydrothermal fluids in the formation of talc and magnesite deposits. These deposits occur in manifold geological and tectonical settings such as stockworks and veins within ultramafite hostrocks and monomineralic lenses within marine platform sediments. Along shear zones talc mineralizations may occur as a result of tectonical and hydrothermal activity. To understand the role of the fluids for the genesis of the mineralization, deposits in different geological and tectonical settings are investigated: Talc mineralization within in magnesite in low-grade palaeozoic nappe complexes (Gemerska Poloma, Slovakia): The magnesite body lies within the Gemer unit of the Inner Carpathians consisting of Middle Triassic metacarbonates and Upper Triassic pelagic limestones and radiolarites. The talc mineralization is bound to crosscutting veins. Two metamorphic events can be distinguished, one during Variscan orogeny and one related to the Alpine orogeny leading to the formation of talc along faults in an Mg carbonate body (Radvanec et al, 2004).The origin of the fluids as well as the tectonic events leading to the mineralization is still widely unknown. Talc mineralization in shearzones within Palaeozoic meta sedimentary rocks (Sa Matta, Sardinia): Variscan granitoids intruded Palaeozoic meta sedimentary rocks and were overprinted be NE striking tectonic structures that host talc mineralizations. The origin of Mg and fluids leading to the mineralization is still not answered satisfactorily (Grillo and Prochaska, 2007) and thus a tectonic model for the genesis of the talc deposit is missing. Talc mineralization within UHP pre-Alpine continental crust (Val Chisone, Italy): The talc deposit forms part of the Dora-Maira Massif. Geologicaly the massif derived from a Variscan basement that includes post-Variscan intrusions. The talc mineralization occurs as a sheetlike, conformable body. A possible tectonic emplacement of talc along shear

  2. Variability in baseline laboratory measurements of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladwig, R; Vigo, A; Fedeli, L M G; Chambless, L E; Bensenor, I; Schmidt, M I; Vidigal, P G; Castilhos, C D; Duncan, B B

    2016-08-01

    Multi-center epidemiological studies must ascertain that their measurements are accurate and reliable. For laboratory measurements, reliability can be assessed through investigation of reproducibility of measurements in the same individual. In this paper, we present results from the quality control analysis of the baseline laboratory measurements from the ELSA-Brasil study. The study enrolled 15,105 civil servants at 6 research centers in 3 regions of Brazil between 2008-2010, with multiple biochemical analytes being measured at a central laboratory. Quality control was ascertained through standard laboratory evaluation of intra- and inter-assay variability and test-retest analysis in a subset of randomly chosen participants. An additional sample of urine or blood was collected from these participants, and these samples were handled in the same manner as the original ones, locally and at the central laboratory. Reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), estimated through a random effects model. Coefficients of variation (CV) and Bland-Altman plots were additionally used to assess measurement variability. Laboratory intra and inter-assay CVs varied from 0.86% to 7.77%. From test-retest analyses, the ICCs were high for the majority of the analytes. Notably lower ICCs were observed for serum sodium (ICC=0.50; 95%CI=0.31-0.65) and serum potassium (ICC=0.73; 95%CI=0.60-0.83), due to the small biological range of these analytes. The CVs ranged from 1 to 14%. The Bland-Altman plots confirmed these results. The quality control analyses showed that the collection, processing and measurement protocols utilized in the ELSA-Brasil produced reliable biochemical measurements.

  3. A scanning electron microscopy study of ash, char, deposits and fuels from straw combustion and co-combustion of coal and straw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sund Soerensen, H.

    1998-07-01

    The SEM-study of samples from straw combustion and co-combustion of straw and coal have yielded a reference selection of representative images that will be useful for future comparison. The sample material encompassed potential fuels (wheat straw and grain), bottom ash, fly ash and deposits from straw combustion as well as fuels (coal and wheat straw), chars, bottom ash, fly ash and deposits from straw + coal co-combustion. Additionally, a variety of laboratory ashes were studied. SEM and CCSEM analysis of the samples have given a broad view of the inorganic components of straw and of the distribution of elements between individual ash particles and deposits. The CCSEM technique does, however, not detect dispersed inorganic elements in biomass, so to get a more complete visualization of the distribution of inorganic elements additional analyses must be performed, for example progressive leaching. In contrast, the CCSEM technique is efficient in characterizing the distribution of elements in ash particles and between ash fractions and deposits. The data for bottom ashes and fly ashes have indicated that binding of potassium to silicates occurs to a significant extent. The silicates can either be in the form of alumino-silicates or quartz (in co-combustion) or be present as straw-derived amorphous silica (in straw combustion). This process is important for two reasons. One is that potasium lowers the melting point of silica in the fly ash, potentially leading to troublesome deposits by particle impaction and sticking to heat transfer surfaces. The other is that the reaction between potassium and silica in the bottom ash binds part of the potassium meaning that it is not available for reaction with chlorine or sulphur to form KCl or K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Both phases are potentially troublesome because they can condense of surfaces to form a sticky layer onto which fly ash particles can adhere and by inducing corrosion beneath the deposit. It appears that in the studied

  4. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  5. Physical and electrochemical study of platinum thin films deposited by sputtering and electrochemical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinones, C. [Universidad de Cartagena, Cartagena de Indias (Colombia); Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Cra. 30 No 45-03, Bogota (Colombia); Vallejo, W., E-mail: wavallejol@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Cra. 30 No 45-03, Bogota (Colombia); Mesa, F. [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Libre, Carrera 70 No 53-40, Bogota (Colombia)

    2011-06-15

    In this work platinum thin films deposited by sputtering and electrochemical methods were characterized through physical and electrochemical analysis. The as-grown platinum thin films were characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM); scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. Structural studies indicated that platinum thin films were polycrystalline. Morphological characteristics were significantly affected by the substrate type and synthesis method. Finally the EIS analysis indicated that platinum films were electrochemically stable and present both low resistance of charge transfer and low series resistance; the equivalent circuit of platinum interface has been proposed.

  6. Underpotential deposition of Cd on Ag(1 1 1): an in situ STM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, S. G.; Salinas, D. R.; Staikov, G.

    2005-02-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of Cd underpotential deposition (UPD) and involved surface alloy formation processes in the system Ag(1 1 1)/Cd 2+, SO42-, are studied by means of combined electrochemical measurements and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The results show that the UPD process starts with a formation of an expanded (diluted) adlayer with a superlattice structure Ag(1 1 1)- (√{3}×√{19})R23.4°. In the underpotential range 50 mV underpotentials (Δ E underpotentials (Δ E > 550 mV) indicating a high mobility of surface Ag atoms.

  7. Interface behavior study of WC92-Co8 coating produced by electrospark deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪瑞军; 钱乙余; 刘军

    2004-01-01

    ESD (electrospark deposition) is a promising process to produce hard and wear-resisting coatings on metallic substrates. In this paper microstructure and interfacial characteristics of the WC92-Co8 coated on titanium and carbon steel are presented. A metallurgical bonding between the coating and substrate is obtained. The Ti element was found to distribute in WC92-Co8 at the metal pool, as well as the interface by diffusion. Some new phases were produced in the coating layer due to the chemical reaction during the ESD process. Experimental observation and thermodynamic analysis were utilized to study the mechanism of ESD.

  8. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110947 Chen Xinglong(Guizhou Bureau of Nonferrous Metal and Nuclear Geology,Guiyang 550005,China);Gong Heqiang Endowment Factors and Development & Utilization Strategy of Bauxite Resource in North Guizhou Province(Guizhou Geology,ISSN1000-5943,CN52-1059/P,27(2),2010,p.106-110,6 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:bauxite deposit,Guizhou Province20110948 Dang Yanxia(Mineral Resource & Reservoir Evaluation Center,Urumiq 830000,China);Fan Wenjun Geological Features and a Primary Study of Metallogenesis of the Wucaiwang Zeolite Deposit,Fuyun County(Xinjiang Geology,ISSN1000-8845,CN65-1092/P,28(2),2010,p.167-170,2 illus.,1 table,5 refs.)Key words:zeolite deposit,Xinjiang Nearly all zeolite deposits in the world result from low-temperature-alteration of glass-bearing volcanic rocks.The southern slope of the Kalamali Mountain is one of the regions where medium to acid volcanics are major lithological type,thus it is a preferred area to look for zeolite deposit.The Wucaiwang zeolite ore district consists of mainly acid volcanic-clastic rocks.

  9. The study of the thermal neutron flux in the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilyuk, Yu M; Gezhaev, A M; Kazalov, V V; Kuzminov, V V; Panasenko, S I; Ratkevich, S S; Tekueva, D A; Yakimenko, S P

    2015-01-01

    We report on the study of thermal neutron flux using monitors based on mixture of ZnS(Ag) and LiF enriched with a lithium-6 isotope at the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900 at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory. An annual modulation of thermal neutron flux in DULB-4900 is observed. Experimental evidences were obtained of correlation between the long-term thermal neutron flux variations and the absolute humidity of the air in laboratory. The amplitude of the modulation exceed 5\\% of total neutron flux flux.

  10. Subjective interpretation, laboratory error and the value of forensic DNA evidence: three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W C

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses two factors that may profoundly affect the value of DNA evidence for proving that two samples have a common source: uncertainty about the interpretation of test results and the possibility of laboratory error. Three case studies are presented to illustrate the importance of the analyst's subjective judgments in interpreting some RFLP-based forensic DNA tests. In each case, the likelihood ratio describing the value of DNA evidence is shown to be dramatically reduced by uncertainty about the scoring of bands and the possibility of laboratory error. The article concludes that statistical estimates of the frequency of matching genotypes can be a misleading index of the value of DNA evidence, and that more adequate indices are needed. It also argues that forensic laboratories should comply with the National Research Council's recommendation that forensic test results be scored in a blind or objective manner.

  11. A FMEA clinical laboratory case study: how to make problems and improvements measurable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capunzo, Mario; Cavallo, Pierpaolo; Boccia, Giovanni; Brunetti, Luigi; Pizzuti, Sante

    2004-01-01

    The authors have experimented the application of the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) technique in a clinical laboratory. FMEA technique allows: a) to evaluate and measure the hazards of a process malfunction, b) to decide where to execute improvement actions, and c) to measure the outcome of those actions. A small sample of analytes has been studied: there have been determined the causes of the possible malfunctions of the analytical process, calculating the risk probability index (RPI), with a value between 1 and 1,000. Only for the cases of RPI > 400, improvement actions have been implemented that allowed a reduction of RPI values between 25% to 70% with a costs increment of FMEA technique can be applied to the processes of a clinical laboratory, even if of small dimensions, and offers a high potential of improvement. Nevertheless, such activity needs a thorough planning because it is complex, even if the laboratory already operates an ISO 9000 Quality Management System.

  12. Disordered Silicates in Space: a Study of Laboratory Spectra of "Amorphous" Silicates

    CERN Document Server

    Speck, Angela K; Hofmeister, Anne M

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory study of silicate glasses of astrophysically relevant compositions including olivines, pyroxenes and melilites. With emphasis on the classic Si-O stretching feature near 10 microns, we compare infrared spectra of our new samples with laboratory spectra on ostensibly similar compositions, and also with synthetic silicate spectral data commonly used in dust modeling. Several different factors affect spectral features including sample chemistry (e.g., polymerization, Mg/Fe ratio, oxidation state and Al-content) and different sample preparation techniques lead to variations in porosity, density and water content. The convolution of chemical and physical effects makes it difficult to attribute changes in spectral parameters to any given variable. It is important that detailed chemical and structural characterization be provided along with laboratory spectra. In addition to composition and density, we measured the glass transition temperatures for the samples which place upper limits on the ...

  13. Fire vs. Metal: A Laboratory Study Demonstrating Microbial Responses to Soil Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberger, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Incubation studies are traditionally used in soil microbiology laboratory classes to demonstrate microbial respiration and N mineralization-immobilization processes. Sometimes these exercises are done to calculate a N balance in N fertilizer-amended soils. However, examining microbial responses to environmental perturbations would appeal to soil…

  14. Particle in a Disk: A Spectroscopic and Computational Laboratory Exercise Studying the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Corannulene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, E. Ramsey; Sygula, Andrzej; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces undergraduate chemistry majors to the spectroscopic and theoretical study of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), corannulene. Students explore the spectroscopic properties of corannulene using UV-vis and Raman vibrational spectroscopies. They compare their experimental results to simulated vibrational…

  15. Laboratory animal allergy : allergen exposure assessment and epidemiological study of risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of the study presented in this thesis was to estimate the prevalence rate of laboratory animal allergy and to determine its association with risk factors, like allergen exposure level, atopy, gender and other host factors. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken among 540

  16. Cardiopulmonary imaging, functional and laboratory studies in sickle cell disease associated pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beers, Eduard J.; Nur, Erfan; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Mac Gillavry, Melvin R.; van Esser, Joost W. J.; Brandjes, Dees P. M.; Kappers-Klunne, Maria C.; Duits, Ashley J.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; Schnog, John-John B.; Biemond, Bart J.

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PHT) occurs in approximately 30% of adults with sickle cell disease (SCD) and is an independent risk factor for early death. In this study, we aimed to determine the value of general laboratory testing, plain chest radiography, electrocardiography (ECG), high-resolution compu

  17. Particle in a Disk: A Spectroscopic and Computational Laboratory Exercise Studying the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Corannulene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, E. Ramsey; Sygula, Andrzej; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces undergraduate chemistry majors to the spectroscopic and theoretical study of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), corannulene. Students explore the spectroscopic properties of corannulene using UV-vis and Raman vibrational spectroscopies. They compare their experimental results to simulated vibrational…

  18. An Evaluation of Outcomes Following the Replacement of Traditional Histology Laboratories with Self-Study Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew R.; Lowrie, Donald J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in medical school curricula often require educators to develop teaching strategies that decrease contact hours while maintaining effective pedagogical methods. When faced with this challenge, faculty at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine converted the majority of in-person histology laboratory sessions to self-study modules…

  19. On the atmospheric chemistry of NO2 - O3 systems; a laboratory study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, P.W.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this dissertation a laboratory study dealing with the atmospheric chemistry of NO 2 -O 3 systems is described. Knowledge of this system is relevant for a better understanding of a number of air pollution problems, particularly th

  20. Experimental Study of Drag Resistance using a Laboratory Scale Rotary Set-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinell, Claus Erik; Olsen, Kenneth N.; Christoffersen, Martin W.;

    2003-01-01

    This work covers an experimental study of the drag resistance of different painted surfaces and simulated large-scale irregularities, viz. dry spraying, weld seams, barnacle fouling and paint remains. A laboratory scale rotary set-up was used to determine the drag resistance, and the surface...

  1. An ECVAG inter-laboratory validation study of the comet assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersson, Clara; Møller, Peter; Forchhammer, Lykke

    2013-01-01

    The alkaline comet assay is an established, sensitive method extensively used in biomonitoring studies. This method can be modified to measure a range of different types of DNA damage. However, considerable differences in the protocols used by different research groups affect the inter-laboratory...

  2. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091594 Bao Yafan(The Third Geologic Survey of Jilin Province,Siping 136000,China);Liu Yanjun Relations between Bashenerxi Granite,West Dongkunlun and Baiganhu Tungsten-Tin Deposit(Jilin Geology,ISSN1001-2427,CN22-1099/P,27(3),2008,p.56-59,67,5 illus.,2 tables,7 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:tungsten ores,tin ores,monzogranite,Kunlun Mountains20091595 Chen Fuwen(Yichang Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources,China Geological Survey,Yichang 443003,China);Dai Pingyun Metallogenetic and Isotopic Chronological Study on the Shenjiaya Gold Deposit in Xuefeng Mountains,Hunan Province(Acta Geologica Sinica,ISSN0001-5717,CN11-1951/P,82(7),2008,p.906-911,3 illus.,2 tables,30 refs.)Key words:gold ores,HunanThe Shenjiaya gold deposit is a representative one

  3. Preparation and characterization of ALD deposited ZnO thin films studied for gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyadjiev, S.I., E-mail: boiajiev@gmail.com [MTA-BME Technical Analytical Chemistry Research Group, Szent Gellért tér 4, Budapest, H-1111 (Hungary); Georgi Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Georgieva, V. [Georgi Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Yordanov, R. [Department of Microelectronics, Technical University of Sofia, 8 Kliment Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Raicheva, Z. [Georgi Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Szilágyi, I.M. [MTA-BME Technical Analytical Chemistry Research Group, Szent Gellért tér 4, Budapest, H-1111 (Hungary); Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Szent Gellért tér 4, Budapest, H-1111 (Hungary)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • For the first time the gas sensing towards NO{sub 2} of very thin ALD ZnO films is studied. • The very thin ALD ZnO films showed excellent sensitivity to NO{sub 2} at room temperature. • These very thin film ZnO-based QCM sensors very well register even low concentrations. • The sensors have fully reversible sorption and are able to be recovered in short time. • Described fast and cost-effective ALD deposition of ZnO thin films for QCM gas sensor. - Abstract: Applying atomic layer deposition (ALD), very thin zinc oxide (ZnO) films were deposited on quartz resonators, and their gas sensing properties were studied using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method. The gas sensing of the ZnO films to NO{sub 2} was tested in the concentration interval between 10 and 5000 ppm. On the basis of registered frequency change of the QCM, for each concentration the sorbed mass was calculated. Further characterization of the films was carried out by various techniques, i.e. by SEM-EDS, XRD, ellipsometry, and FTIR spectroscopy. Although being very thin, the films were gas sensitive to NO{sub 2} already at room temperature and could register very well as low concentrations as 100 ppm, while the sorption was fully reversible. Our results for very thin ALD ZnO films show that the described fast, simple and cost-effective technology could be implemented for producing gas sensors working at room temperature and being capable to detect in real time low concentrations of NO{sub 2}.

  4. Sources, transport and deposition of terrestrial organic material: A case study from southwestern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Nicole; Boom, Arnoud; Carr, Andrew S.; Chase, Brian M.; Granger, Robyn; Hahn, Annette; Zabel, Matthias; Schefuß, Enno

    2016-10-01

    Southwestern Africa's coastal marine mudbelt, a prominent Holocene sediment package, provides a valuable archive for reconstructing terrestrial palaeoclimates on the adjacent continent. While the origin of terrestrial inorganic material has been intensively studied, the sources of terrigenous organic material deposited in the mudbelt are yet unclear. In this study, plant wax derived n-alkanes and their compound-specific δ13C in soils, flood deposits and suspension loads from regional fluvial systems and marine sediments are analysed to characterize the origin of terrestrial organic material in the southwest African mudbelt. Soils from different biomes in the catchments of the Orange River and small west coast rivers show on average distinct n-alkane distributions and compound-specific δ13C values reflecting biome-specific vegetation types, most notably the winter rainfall associated Fynbos Biome of the southwestern Cape. In the fluvial sediment samples from the Orange River, changes in the n-alkane distributions and compound-specific δ13C compositions reveal an overprint by local vegetation along the river's course. The smaller west coast rivers show distinct signals, reflecting their small catchment areas and particular vegetation communities. Marine surface sediments spanning a transect from the northern mudbelt (29°S) to St. Helena Bay (33°S) reveal subtle, but spatially coherent, changes in n-alkane distributions and compound-specific δ13C, indicating the influence of Orange River sediments in the northern mudbelt, the increasing importance of terrigenous input from the adjacent western coastal biomes in the central mudbelt, and contributions from the Fynbos Biome to the southern mudbelt. These findings indicate the different sources of terrestrial organic material deposited in the mudbelt, and highlight the potential the mudbelt has to preserve evidence of environmental change from the adjacent continent.

  5. Study of Nanocrystalline Diamond Film Deposited Rapidly by 500 W Excimer Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Hongyan; SHEN Jiajing; YANG Guilong

    2000-01-01

    High quality nanocrystalline diamond film deposited rapidly by an XeCl excimer laser operated at high laser power (500 W) and repetition rate (300~500 Hz) is presented. A high deposition rate, 250 nm/thousand pulses, was obtained. The effects of laser energy fluence and repetition rate on the deposition of diamond film were investigated.

  6. An ECVAG inter-laboratory validation study of the comet assay: inter-laboratory and intra-laboratory variations of DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites in human mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersson, Clara; Møller, Peter; Forchhammer, Lykke; Loft, Steffen; Azqueta, Amaya; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan; Jones, George D D; Higgins, Jennifer A; Cooke, Marcus S; Mistry, Vilas; Karbaschi, Mahsa; Phillips, David H; Sozeri, Osman; Routledge, Michael N; Nelson-Smith, Kirsty; Riso, Patrizia; Porrini, Marisa; Matullo, Giuseppe; Allione, Alessandra; Stepnik, Maciej; Ferlińska, Magdalena; Teixeira, João Paulo; Costa, Solange; Corcuera, Laura-Ana; López de Cerain, Adela; Laffon, Blanca; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Collins, Andrew R; Möller, Lennart

    2013-05-01

    The alkaline comet assay is an established, sensitive method extensively used in biomonitoring studies. This method can be modified to measure a range of different types of DNA damage. However, considerable differences in the protocols used by different research groups affect the inter-laboratory comparisons of results. The aim of this study was to assess the inter-laboratory, intra-laboratory, sample and residual (unexplained) variations in DNA strand breaks and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites measured by the comet assay by using a balanced Latin square design. Fourteen participating laboratories used their own comet assay protocols to measure the level of DNA strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites in coded samples containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the level of DNA strand breaks in coded calibration curve samples (cells exposed to different doses of ionising radiation) on three different days of analysis. Eleven laboratories found dose-response relationships in the coded calibration curve samples on two or three days of analysis, whereas three laboratories had technical problems in their assay. In the coded calibration curve samples, the dose of ionising radiation, inter-laboratory variation, intra-laboratory variation and residual variation contributed to 60.9, 19.4, 0.1 and 19.5%, respectively, of the total variation. In the coded PBMC samples, the inter-laboratory variation explained the largest fraction of the overall variation of DNA strand breaks (79.2%) and the residual variation (19.9%) was much larger than the intra-laboratory (0.3%) and inter-subject (0.5%) variation. The same partitioning of the overall variation of FPG-sensitive sites in the PBMC samples indicated that the inter-laboratory variation was the strongest contributor (56.7%), whereas the residual (42.9%), intra-laboratory (0.2%) and inter-subject (0.3%) variations again contributed less to the overall variation. The results suggest that the

  7. Analysis and Methane Gas Separations Studies for City of Marsing, Idaho An Idaho National Laboratory Technical Assistance Program Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Orme

    2012-08-01

    Introduction and Background Large amounts of methane in well water is a wide spread problem in North America. Methane gas from decaying biomass and oil and gas deposits escape into water wells typically through cracks or faults in otherwise non-porous rock strata producing saturated water systems. This methane saturated water can pose several problems in the delivery of drinking water. The problems range from pumps vapor locking (cavitating), to pump houses exploding. The City of Marsing requested Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assist with some water analyses as well as to provide some engineering approaches to methane capture through the INL Technical Assistance Program (TAP). There are several engineering approaches to the removal of methane and natural gas from water sources that include gas stripping followed by compression and/or dehydration; membrane gas separators coupled with dehydration processes, membrane water contactors with dehydration processes.

  8. Experimental Study of Dispersion and Deposition of Expiratory Aerosols in Aircraft Cabins and Impact on Infectious Disease Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    To, G.N.S.; Wan, M.P.; Chao, C.Y.H.

    2009-01-01

    The dispersion and deposition characteristics of polydispersed expiratory aerosols were investigated in an aircraft cabin mockup to study the transmission of infectious diseases. The airflow was characterized by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Aerosol dispersionwas measured...

  9. Studies on Nanostructure Aluminium Thin Film Coatings Deposited using DC magnetron Sputtering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh M, Muralidhar; G, Vijaya; MS, Krupashankara; Sridhara, B. K.; Shridhar, T. N.

    2016-09-01

    Nanostructured thin film metallic coatings has become an area of intense research particularly in applications related solar, sensor technologies and many other optical applications such as laser windows, mirrors and reflectors. Thin film metallic coatings were deposited using DC magnetron sputtering process. The deposition rate was varied to study its influence on optical behavior of Aluminum thin films at a different argon flow rate. Studies on the optical response of these nanostructure thin film coatings were characterized using UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer with integrating sphere in the wavelength range of (250-2500nm) and Surface morphology were carried out using atomic force microscope with roughness ranging from 2 to 20nm and thickness was measured using Dektak measuring instrument. The reflection behavior of aluminium coatings on polycarbonate substrates has been evaluated. UV-VIS-NIR Spectrophotometer analysis indicates higher reflectance of 96% for all the films in the wavelength range of 250 nm to 2500 nm. Nano indentation study revealed that there was a considerable change in hardness values of the films prepared at different conditions.

  10. Lacustrine responses to decreasing wet mercury deposition rates: results from a case study in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Mark E.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Gay, David A.; Maki, Ryan P.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Wiener, James G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a case study comparing metrics of methylmercury (MeHg) contamination for four undeveloped lakes in Voyageurs National Park to wet atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg), sulfate (SO4–2), and hydrogen ion (H+) in northern Minnesota. Annual wet Hg, SO4–2, and H+ deposition rates at two nearby precipitation monitoring sites indicate considerable decreases from 1998 to 2012 (mean decreases of 32, 48, and 66%, respectively). Consistent with decreases in the atmospheric pollutants, epilimnetic aqueous methylmercury (MeHgaq) and mercury in small yellow perch (Hgfish) decreased in two of four lakes (mean decreases of 46.5% and 34.5%, respectively, between 2001 and 2012). Counter to decreases in the atmospheric pollutants, MeHgaq increased by 85% in a third lake, whereas Hgfish increased by 80%. The fourth lake had two disturbances in its watershed during the study period (forest fire; changes in shoreline inundation due to beaver activity); this lake lacked overall trends in MeHgaq and Hgfish. The diverging responses among the study lakes exemplify the complexity of ecosystem responses to decreased loads of atmospheric pollutants.

  11. Experimental study of flow and heat transfer in a rotating chemical vapor deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sun

    An experimental model was set up to study the rotating vertical impinging chemical vapor deposition reactor. Deposition occurs only when the system has enough thermal energy. Therefore, understanding the fluid characteristic and heat transfer of the system will provide a good basis to understand the full model. Growth rate and the uniformity of the film are the two most important factors in CVD process and it is depended on the flow and thermal characteristic within the system. Optimizing the operating parameters will result in better growth rate and uniformity. Operating parameters such as inflow velocity, inflow diameter and rotational speed are used to create different design simulations. Fluid velocities and various temperatures are recorded to see the effects of the different operating parameters. Velocities are recorded by using flow meter and hot wire anemometer. Temperatures are recorded by using various thermocouples and infrared thermometer. The result should provide a quantitative basis for the prediction, design and optimization of the system and process for design and fabrication of future CVD reactors. Further assessment of the system results will be discuss in detail such as effects of buoyancy and effects of rotation. The experimental study also coupled with a numerical study for further validation of both model. Comparisons between the two models are also presented.

  12. Numerical analysis of synthetic granulate deposition in a physical model study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriele HARB; Stefan HAUN; Josef SCHNEIDER; Nils Reidar B. OLSEN

    2014-01-01

    The current study focuses on the application of a three-dimensional numerical model for the prediction of morphological bed changes. The sediment deposition in a reservoir during a 10-year-flood was investigated and the results of the simulation were validated with data derived from a physical model study. Because of the small grain sizes in the prototype, synthetic granulate was used in the physical model. The numerical computation domain was a reproduction of the physical model, including the grain sizes and the density of the particles, in order to ensure comparability. The CFD code SSIIM, which solves the RANS-equations in three-dimensions, was used for the simulations. The sediment transport in SSIIM is divided into suspended sediment transport, computed by solving the convection-diffusion equation, and bed-load transport, calculated by an empirical formula. The results of the numerical simulation correspond well to the results of the physical model study. The simulated location and the pattern of the sediment deposition in the reservoir are an accurate representation of the observed distribution in the physical model.

  13. The Reproducibility of Changes in Diagnostic Figures of Merit Across Laboratory and Clinical Imaging Reader Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Frank W; Abbey, Craig K

    2017-06-27

    In this paper we examine which comparisons of reading performance between diagnostic imaging systems made in controlled retrospective laboratory studies may be representative of what we observe in later clinical studies. The change in a meaningful diagnostic figure of merit between two diagnostic modalities should be qualitatively or quantitatively comparable across all kinds of studies. In this meta-study we examine the reproducibility of relative measures of sensitivity, false positive fraction (FPF), area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and expected utility across laboratory and observational clinical studies for several different breast imaging modalities, including screen film mammography, digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and ultrasound. Across studies of all types, the changes in the FPFs yielded very small probabilities of having a common mean value. The probabilities of relative sensitivity being the same across ultrasound and tomosynthesis studies were low. No evidence was found for different mean values of relative area under the ROC curve or relative expected utility within any of the study sets. The comparison demonstrates that the ratios of areas under the ROC curve and expected utilities are reproducible across laboratory and clinical studies, whereas sensitivity and FPF are not. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Are The Profit Rates of the Islamic Investment Deposit Accounts Truly Performance Based? A Case Study of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this study we were motivated to ascertain whether the profit rates of the investment deposit accounts based on the profit and loss sharing contracts offered by the Islamic banks are truly based on the performance of the underlying assets or otherwise, by taking Malaysia as our case study. Given the facts that Islamic investment deposits are interest free in nature and that they are supposedly used in real economic activities, one would naturally expect that their returns are directly relat...

  15. Atmospheric deposition studies of heavy metals in Arctic by comparative analysis of lichens and cryoconite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shiv Mohan; Sharma, Jagdev; Gawas-Sakhalkar, Puja; Upadhyay, Ajay K; Naik, Simantini; Pedneker, Shailesh M; Ravindra, Rasik

    2013-02-01

    Lichens and cryoconite (rounded or granular, brownish-black debris occurring in holes on the glacier surface) from Ny-Ålesund were used for understanding the elemental deposition pattern in the area. Lichen samples collected from low-lying coastal region and cryoconite samples from high altitudinal glacier area were processed and analysed for elements such as aluminium (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), cesium (Cs), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), vanadium (V) and zinc (Zn) through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results showed that heavy metals, Al and Fe, are present in high concentration in the cryoconite samples. Al was also present in high amounts in seven of the eight lichen samples studied. The general scheme of elements in the decreasing order of their concentrations for most of the cryoconite samples was Al > Fe > Mn > Zn > V > Pb > Cr > Ni > Cu > Co > As > Cs > Cd while that for the lichen samples was Al > Fe > Zn > Mn > Pb > Cu > Cs > Cr > Ni > V > Co > As > Cd. Similarity in trends in the two sample types confirms that the environment indeed contains these elements in that order of concentration which overtime got accumulated in the samples. Overall comparison showed most elements to be present in high concentrations in the cryoconite samples as compared to the lichen samples. Within the lichens, elemental accumulation data suggests that the low-lying site (L-2) from where Cladonia mediterranea sample was collected was the most polluted accumulating a number of elements at high concentrations. The probable reasons for such deposition patterns in the region could be natural (crustal contribution and sea salt spray) and anthropogenic (local and long-distance transmission of dust particles). In the future, this data can form a baseline for monitoring quantum of atmospheric heavy metal deposition in lichens and cryoconite of Svalbard, Arctic.

  16. Rock Magnetic and Oxide Microscopy Studies of two South American Iron-Ore Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2005-05-01

    Microscopy and rock-magnetic studies of the iron oxide-ore and host rocks in the Cristales-Pleito Melon (Chile) and Jacupiranga (Brazil) deposits were carried out to characterize and compare the magnetic mineralogy and the processes that affected the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) during emplacement and evolution of the iron-ore deposits. The microscopy study under reflected light shows that magnetic carriers are mainly magnetites, with minor amounts of ilmenite-hematite minerals. Titanomagnetite, shows trellis texture, which is compatible with high temperature oxy-exsolution processes. Grain sizes range from a few microns to >100 µm, and dominant magnetic state pseudo-single-domain, in agreement with hysteresis measurements. Thermal spectra, continuous susceptibility measurements, and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition suggest a predominance of some spinels (titanomagnetite or titanomaghemite) with low-Ti content as magnetic carriers. These data help to investigate the magnetic domain states and the remanence acquisition processes, and to assess their significance as a source of magnetic anomalies.

  17. Heavy metal levels and esterase variations between metal-exposed and unexposed duckweed Lemna minor: field and laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Suman; Mukherjee, Swati; Bhattacharyya, P; Duttagupta, A K

    2004-08-01

    Environmental homogeneity is being continuously disturbed and affected by artificially introduced loads of chemical toxicants that also include heavy metals. The Tiljala wetlands of the eastern fringe of Calcutta, West Bengal (India) are a virtual sink for the deposition of urban and industrial wastes that get admixed with the aquatic environment. We have selected Lemna minor (duckweed), as a representative of the biota surviving therein for the present study. Concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, zinc, copper and mercury in the fronds of Lemna were measured to peep into the range of input of heavy metals in the duckweed subjects. Natural unexposed population of duckweed from a domestic pond in Batanagar area, 24 Parganas, West Bengal (India) was also found to accumulate similar concentrations of these metals when cultured in artificially contaminated water in the laboratory. The exposed individuals also exhibited polymorphism with respect to the loci of esterase, as compared to an unexposed control plants. Therefore, the present study suggests EST variations of L. minor to be a potential biomarker of heavy metal pollution.

  18. The role of low-energy electrons in focused electron beam induced deposition: four case studies of representative precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Thorman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID is a single-step, direct-write nanofabrication technique capable of writing three-dimensional metal-containing nanoscale structures on surfaces using electron-induced reactions of organometallic precursors. Currently FEBID is, however, limited in resolution due to deposition outside the area of the primary electron beam and in metal purity due to incomplete precursor decomposition. Both limitations are likely in part caused by reactions of precursor molecules with low-energy (3, Pt(PF34, Co(CO3NO, and W(CO6. Through these case studies, it is evident that this combination of studies can provide valuable insight into potential mechanisms governing deposit formation in FEBID. Although further experiments and new approaches are needed, these studies are an important stepping-stone toward better understanding the fundamental physics behind the deposition process and establishing design criteria for optimized FEBID precursors.

  19. The study of major, trace and rare earth elements geochemistry in Shahrestanak Mn deposit, south of Qom: Implications for genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Maanijou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Shahrestanak Mn deposit is located in southern Qom province, 12 km southwest of the city of Kahak. Based on geological-structural divisions of Iran, the deposit belongs to central volcanic belt or Urumieh-Dokhtar zone. The Venarch deposit is one the most important known manganese deposits in Iran. The Sharestanak and Venarch deposits are spatially and temporally related to each other, and have similar geology, mineral texture and structure, host rocks, relationships with faults, and depositional environment. So, their magmatism and deposition conditions can be related to each other. Since no systematic study on the Shahrestanak deposit had been performed before discussing its geological and geochemical characteristics, here it is being attempted to study the geology, petrography, geochemistry of major, minor and trace elements, and Rare Earth Elements (REE of ore, to distinguish the depositional environments and genesis of this deposit and to compare REE of ore in this deposit with other deposits. Sampling and method of study Fourteen samples of manganese ore were selected for geochemical study and analyzing of major, minor, trace elements and REE by ICP-AES and ICP-MS and were sent to SGS Co., Toronto. Detection limits for major elements and trace elements are 0.01% and 0.05ppm, respectively. Result and discussion The deposit is characterized by various lithology and stratigraphy units, consist of: 1 Middle to -Upper Eocene volcano-sedimentary rocks, 2 Oligocene lower red conglomerate and sandstone, 3 Oligo-Miocene limestone and marl (Qom Formation, and 4 Eocene and Lower Miocene basic to intermediate dykes. The most abundant minerals of the deposit are braunite, hausmannite, pyrolusite, and manganite. Evidences such as high Mn/Fe (11.33 and Si/Al (4.86 ratios, low contents of trace elements specially Co (11.40 ppm, Ni (24 ppm, Cu (81.85 ppm, and Ce, with high amounts of SiO2, Mn, Fe, Ba, Zn, As and Sr, all represent

  20. In situ structural study on underpotential deposition of Ag on Au(111) electrode using surface X-ray scattering technique

    OpenAIRE

    KONDO, Toshihiro; Morita, Jun; Okamura, Masayuki; Saito, Toshiya; Uosaki, Kohei

    2002-01-01

    In situ surface X-ray scattering (SXS) measurements were carried out to study the structure of a Ag layer on a Au(111) electrode formed by underpotential deposition (upd) in sulfuric acid solution. Specular rod profiles showed that a monolayer of Ag was formed at a potential between the second and third upd peaks, and a bilayer of Ag was formed at a potential between the third upd peak and bulk deposition. Non-specular rod profiles demonstrated that electrochemically deposited Ag atoms both i...

  1. Tailoring precursors for deposition: synthesis, structure, and thermal studies of cyclopentadienylcopper(i) isocyanide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, A M; Pugh, T; Cosham, S D; Hamilton, J; Sung, S L; Heil, T; Chalker, P R; Williams, P A; Kociok-Köhn, G; Johnson, A L

    2015-05-18

    We report here the synthesis and characterization of a family of copper(I) metal precursors based around cyclopentadienyl and isocyanide ligands. The molecular structures of several cyclopentadienylcopper(I) isocyanide complexes have been unambiguously determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis of the complexes highlighted the isopropyl isocyanide complex [(η(5)-C5H5)Cu(CN(i)Pr)] (2a) and the tert-butyl isocyanide complex [(η(5)-C5H5)Cu(CN(t)Bu)] (2b) as possible copper metal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) precursors. Further modification of the precursors with variation of the substituents on the cyclopentadienyl ligand system (varying between H, Me, Et, and (i)Pr) has allowed the affect that these changes would have on features such as stability, volatility, and decomposition to be investigated. As part of this study, the vapor pressures of the complexes 2b, [(η(5)-MeC5H4)Cu(CN(t)Bu)] (3b), [(η(5)-EtC5H4)Cu(CN(t)Bu)] (4b), and [(η(5)-(i)PrC5H4)Cu(CN(t)Bu)] (5b) over a 40-65 °C temperature range have been determined. Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LP-CVD) was employed using precursors 2a and 2b to synthesize thin films of metallic copper on silicon, gold, and platinum substrates under a H2 atmosphere. Analysis of the thin films deposited onto both silicon and gold substrates at substrate temperatures of 180 and 300 °C by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveals temperature-dependent growth features: Films grown at 300 °C are continuous and pinhole-free, whereas films grown at 180 °C consist of highly crystalline nanoparticles. In contrast, deposition onto platinum substrates at 180 °C shows a high degree of surface coverage with the formation of high-density, continuous, and pinhole-free thin films. Powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) both show the films to be high-purity metallic copper.

  2. An operando surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) study of carbon deposition on SOFC anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Lee, Jung-pil; Ding, Dong; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Park, Soojin; Liu, Meilin

    2015-09-07

    Thermally robust and chemically inert Ag@SiO2 nanoprobes are employed to provide the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect for an in situ/operando study of the early stage of carbon deposition on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. The enhanced sensitivity to carbon enables the detection of different stages of coking, offering insights into intrinsic coking tolerance of material surfaces. Application of a thin coating of gadolinium doped ceria (GDC) enhances the resistance to coking of nickel surfaces. The electrochemically active Ni-YSZ interface appears to be more active for hydrocarbon reforming, resulting in the accumulation of different hydrocarbon molecules, which can be readily removed upon the application of an anodic current. Operando SERS is a powerful tool for the mechanistic study of coking in SOFC systems. It is also applicable to the study of other catalytic and electrochemical processes in a wide range of conditions.

  3. A Study on Reactive Spray Deposition Technology Processing Parameters in the Context of Pt Nanoparticle Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, Justin M.; Maric, Radenka

    2015-12-01

    Catalytic materials are complex systems in which achieving the desired properties (i.e., activity, selectivity and stability) depends on exploiting the many degrees of freedom in surface and bulk composition, geometry, and defects. Flame aerosol synthesis is a process for producing nanoparticles with ample processing parameter space to tune the desired properties. Flame dynamics inside the reactor are determined by the input process variables such as solubility of precursor in the fuel; solvent boiling point; reactant flow rate and concentration; flow rates of air, fuel and the carrier gas; and the burner geometry. In this study, the processing parameters for reactive spray deposition technology, a flame-based synthesis method, are systematically evaluated to understand the residence times, reactant mixing, and temperature profiles of flames used in the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. This provides a framework for further study and modeling. The flame temperature and length are also studied as a function of O2 and fuel flow rates.

  4. Understanding the Migratory Orientation Program of Birds: Extending Laboratory Studies to Study Free-Flying Migrants in a Natural Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Kasper; Holland, R.A.; Tøttrup, Anders Peter Them;

    2010-01-01

    orient during migration. Despite the difficulties associated with following free-flying birds over long distances, a number of possibilities currently exist for tracking the long distance, sometimes even globe-spanning, journeys undertaken by migrating birds. Birds fitted with radio transmitters can...... behaviors that are otherwise very difficult to study. Here, we focus on the progress in understanding certain components of the migration-orientation system. Comparably exciting results can be expected in the future from tracking free-flying migrants in the wild. Use of orientation cues has been studied......For many years, orientation in migratory birds has primarily been studied in the laboratory. Although a laboratory-based setting enables greater control over environmental cues, the laboratory-based findings must be confirmed in the wild in free-flying birds to be able to fully understand how birds...

  5. The Itataia phosphate-uranium deposit (Ceará, Brazil) new petrographic, geochemistry and isotope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veríssimo, César Ulisses Vieira; Santos, Roberto Ventura; Parente, Clóvis Vaz; Oliveira, Claudinei Gouveia de; Cavalcanti, José Adilson Dias; Nogueira Neto, José de Araújo

    2016-10-01

    The Itataia phosphate-uranium deposit is located in Santa Quitéria, in central Ceará State, northeastern Brazil. Mineralization has occurred in different stages and involves quartz leaching (episyenitization), brecciation and microcrystalline phase formation of concretionary apatite. The last constitutes the main mineral of Itatiaia uranium ore, namely collophane. Collophanite ore occurs in massive bodies, lenses, breccia zones, veins or episyenite in marble layers, calc-silicate rocks and gneisses of the Itataia Group. There are two accepted theories on the origin of the earliest mineralization phase of Itataia ore: syngenetic (primary) - where the ore is derived from a continental source and then deposited in marine and coastal environments; and epigenetic (secondary) - whereby the fluids are of magmatic, metamorphic and meteoric origin. The characterization of pre- or post-deformational mineralization is controversial, since the features of the ore are interpreted as deformation. This investigation conducted isotopic studies and chemical analyses of minerals in marbles and calc-silicate rocks of the Alcantil and Barrigas Formations (Itataia Group), as well as petrographic and structural studies. Analysis of the thin sections shows at least three phosphate mineral phases associated with uranium mineralizaton: (1) A prismatic fluorapatite phase associated with chess-board albite, arfvedsonite and ferro-eckermannite; (2) a second fluorapatite phase with fibrous radial or colloform habits that replaces calcium carbonate in marble, especially along fractures, with minerals such as quartz, chlorite and zeolite also identified in calc-silicate rocks; and (3) an younger phosphate phase of botryoidal apatite (fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite) related with clay minerals and probably others calcium and aluminum phosphates. Detailed isotopic analysis carried out perpendicularly to the mineralized levels and veins in the marble revealed significant variation in isotopic

  6. Secular variation study from non-welded pyroclastic deposits from Montagne Pelée volcano, Martinique (West Indies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevey, A.; Gallet, Y.; Boudon, G.

    2002-07-01

    We present palaeomagnetic data obtained from large clasts collected in non-welded pyroclastic deposits from Montagne Pelée volcano (Martinique Island, West Indies). These deposits, dated by the 14C method from 5000 yr BP to the present, comprise block- and ash-flows, ash- and pumice-flows and pumice fallouts. Alternating fields treatment was as a routine chosen to demagnetise large samples for which the magnetisation was measured with a specially designed inductometer. The mean directions obtained from block- and ash-flow deposits of the 1902 and 1929 eruptions are in good agreement with the expected geomagnetic directions at these times in Martinique. The so-called P1 eruption (˜1345 AD), which is characterised by a rarely observed transition from a Peléean to a Plinian eruptive style, allows a direct comparison of the palaeomagnetic directions obtained from the three types of pyroclastic deposits. All deposits provide identical mean directions, which further demonstrates the suitability of the non-welded pyroclastic deposits for geomagnetic secular variation study with a very good accuracy and precision. The possibility of using pyroclastic deposits is promising for obtaining a wider distribution of sampling sites, which may better allow us to constrain our knowledge on the geomagnetic secular variation. We find that large geomagnetic changes occurred in Martinique during the last millennium, while the variations appear more limited prior to this period.

  7. M(o)ssbauer study of the field induced uniaxial anisotropy in electro-deposited FeCo alloy films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-Wei; Yang Xu; Wang Hai-Bo; Liu Xin; Li Fa-Shen

    2009-01-01

    Thin ferromagnetic films with in-plane magnetic anisotropy are promising materials for obtaining high microwave permeability. The paper reports a M(o)ssbauer study of the field induced in-plane uniaxial anisotropy in electro-deposited FeCo alloy films. The FeCo alloy films were prepared by the electro-deposition method with and without an external magnetic field applied parallel to the film plane during deposition, Vibrating sample magnetometry and M(o)ssbauer spectroscopy measurements at room temperature indicate that the film deposited in external field shows an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy with an easy direction coinciding with the external field direction and a hard direction perpendicular to the field direction, whereas the film deposited without external field does not show any in-plane anisotropy. M(o)ssbauer spectra taken in three geometric arrangements show that the magnetic moments are almost constrained in the film plane for the film deposited with applied magnetic field. Also, the magnetic moments tend to align in the direction of the applied external magnetic field during deposition, indicating that the observed anisotropy should be attributed to directional ordering of atomic pairs.

  8. Mass Deposition Fluxes of Asian Dust to the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea from Geostationary Satellite MTSAT: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianguang Tu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Windblown dust aerosol plays an important role in marine ecosystems once they are deposited and dissolved. At present, methods for estimating the deposition flux are mainly limited to direct measurements or model outputs. Additionally, satellite remote sensing was often used to estimate the integral dust column concentration (DCC. In this paper, an algorithm is developed to estimate the mass deposition fluxes of Asian dust by satellite. The dust aerosol is identified firstly and then the DCC is derived based on the relationships between the pre-calculated lookup table (LUT and observations from Japanese geostationary Multi-functional Transport Satellites (MTSAT. The LUT is built on the dust cloud and surface parameters by a radiation transfer model Streamer. The average change rate of deposition is derived, which shows an exponential decay dependence on transport time along the pathway. Thus, the deposition flux is acquired via integrating the hourly deposition. This simple algorithm is applied to a dust storm that occurred in the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea from 1 to 3 March 2008. Results indicate that the properties of the dust cloud over the study area changed rapidly and the mass deposition flux is estimated to be 2.59 Mt.

  9. Microtextural analysis of quartz grains of tsunami and non-tsunami deposits - A case study from Tirúa (Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanova, Piero; Bahlburg, Heinrich; Nentwig, Vanessa; Spiske, Michaela

    2016-08-01

    In order to estimate the tsunami hazard it is essential to reliably identify and differentiate tsunami deposits from other high-energy events like storms. Recently, the microtextural analysis of quartz grain surfaces was introduced as a method to differentiate between tsunami and other deposits. Using tsunami deposits sampled from a bank profile of the Tirúa river (central Chile), an area that was significantly affected by the 2010 and 1960 Chile tsunamis, we tested the microtextural analysis method for its capability to identify tsunami deposits. A total of 815 quartz grain surfaces of two tsunami layers, two non-tsunami marsh sediment samples, and three reference samples from nearby beach, dune and river were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We grouped the detected microtexture features into five microtextural families: angularity, fresh surfaces, percussion marks, adhering particles and dissolution features. Both the tsunami deposits and reference samples reveal high numbers of fresh surfaces and percussion marks. Thus, there are no statistically significant differences between tsunami, beach, dune and river deposits in characteristics and abundances in all microtextural families. Our study indicates that the microtextural analysis of quartz grains may not be a suitable method to identify tsunami deposits in Tirúa (Chile), due to local factors such as high numbers of inherited microtextures and the possible effects of the high amount of heavy minerals.

  10. Ash transformation and deposit build-up during biomass suspension and grate firing: Full-scale experimental studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    of this study was to investigate ash transformation and deposition behavior in two biomass-fired boilers, firing wheat straw and/or wood. The influence of strawfiring technology (grate and suspension) on the ash transformation, deposit formation rate and deposit characteristics has been investigated. Bulk...... on similar levels. This was observed even though the concentration of fly ash in the flue gas was significantly higher during straw suspension firing. The influence of co-combustion of wood with straw on deposit formation rate, probe heat uptake and deposit characteristicswas also investigated during...... suspension firing conditions. Data from 35% straw suspension firing with wood showed a deposit formation rate of 33 g/m2/h for the first 12 h. The deposit formation rate increased to 41 g/m2/h with 100% strawfiring. The probe heat uptake reduction up to 40 h of exposure time was 3.0, 7.3, 8.4 and 16.5 kW/m2...

  11. Experimental study of direct laser deposition of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 by using pulsed parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kamran; Izhar Ul Haq; Shah, Shaukat Ali; Khan, Farid Ullah; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Khan, Sikander

    2014-01-01

    Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD) has developed from a prototyping to a single metal manufacturing tool. Its potential for creating multimaterial and functionally graded structures is now beginning to be explored. This work is a first part of a study in which a single layer of Inconel 718 is deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Single layer tracks were built at a range of powder mass flow rates using a coaxial nozzle and 1.5 kW diode laser operating in both continuous and pulsed beam modes. This part of the study focused on the experimental findings during the deposition of Inconel 718 powder on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed for characterization and phase identification. Residual stress measurement had been carried out to ascertain the effects of laser pulse parameters on the crack development during the deposition process.

  12. Electrodeposition of zinc-cobalt alloys. Tapping mode AFM technique applied to study the initial stages of deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, E.; Valles, E.; Gorostiza, P.; Servat, J.; Sanz, F. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Fisica

    1995-12-01

    The first stages of electrodeposition of zinc-cobalt alloys on highly oriented pyro-graphite are studied by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy, and electrochemical analysis. Low Zn(II)/Co(II) ratio (1/9) solutions are selected for this study. Potentiostatic deposition begins through the formation of randomly distributed zinc-rich nuclei on the surface, showing exclusion areas around the larger nuclei and preferential nucleation at the kink sites. At long deposition times an incipient dendritic growth, related to the initiation of pure cobalt deposition is observed. A simple AFM tip deconvolution model is used to obtain the actual dimensions of both the tip itself and the deposited nuclei. The nuclei growth mechanism observes lateral diffusion and aggregation and the formation of emerging nuclei on top of yet consolidated nuclei.

  13. Experimental Study of Direct Laser Deposition of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718 by Using Pulsed Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD has developed from a prototyping to a single metal manufacturing tool. Its potential for creating multimaterial and functionally graded structures is now beginning to be explored. This work is a first part of a study in which a single layer of Inconel 718 is deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Single layer tracks were built at a range of powder mass flow rates using a coaxial nozzle and 1.5 kW diode laser operating in both continuous and pulsed beam modes. This part of the study focused on the experimental findings during the deposition of Inconel 718 powder on Ti-6Al-4V substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed for characterization and phase identification. Residual stress measurement had been carried out to ascertain the effects of laser pulse parameters on the crack development during the deposition process.

  14. Numerical Studies of Radioactive Sediment Deposition on Reservoirs in Fukushima Coastal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Susumu; Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiro

    2014-05-01

    The transportation of radioactive Cs is mainly brought about by movement of silt- and clay-sized particles in rivers. Therefore, predicting such a fine sediment flow and deposition in rivers has been one of central issues toward environmental recovery after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. For the purpose of the Cs transport prediction, we concentrate on a few reservoirs in Fukushima costal area, since they are temporal destinations for contaminated silt and clay transported by rivers. We numerically study how the river water together with floating silt and clays penetrate into the reservoirs and where the sediments settle on the bottom surface of the reservoirs by using 2D river simulation framework named iRIC developed by Shimizu et al. In this presentation, we reveal the typical deposition pattern in the target reservoirs and compare the results with direct sampling data for the sediments on the reservoir bottom surfaces. We believe that the obtained information is useful in planning the water supply and treatment for highly-contaminated districts in Fukushima costal area.

  15. Sediments as tracers for transport and deposition processes in peri-alpine lakes: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, Maurizio; Toffolon, Marco; Lucarelli, Corrado; Serafini, Michele

    2011-12-01

    SummaryThe benthic sediment fingerprint is analysed in the small peri-alpine lake Levico (Trentino, Italy) to identify the causes of recurrent phenomena of turbidity peaks, particularly evident in a littoral region of the water body. In order to study the sediment transport processes, we exploit the fact that the sediment supply from the major tributary has a specific chemical composition, which differs from that of the nearby lake basin. Three elements (Fe, Al, K) have been used as tracers to identify the source and the deposition patterns of tributary sediments, and another typical element, Si, has been critically analysed because of its dual (allochthonous and autochthonous) origin. Several samples of the benthic material have been analysed using SEM-EDS, and the results of the sedimentological characterisation have been compared with the patterns of sediment accumulation at the bed of the lake obtained using a three-dimensional numerical model, in response to the tributary supply under different external forcing and stratification conditions. The coupled use of field measurements and numerical results suggests that the turbidity phenomena are strongly related to the deposition of the sediments supplied by the tributary stream, and shows that it is possible to reconstruct the process of local transport when the tributary inflow is chemically specific.

  16. Development of buccal adhesive tablet with prolonged antifungal activity: Optimization and ex vivo deposition studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madgulkar A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work was to prepare buccal adhesive tablets of miconazole nitrate. The simplex centroid experimental design was used to arrive at optimum ratio of carbopol 934P, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose K4M and polyvinylpyrollidone, which will provide desired drug release and mucoadhesion. Swelling index, mucoadhesive strength and in vitro drug release of the prepared tablet was determined. The drug release and bioadhesion was dependent on type and relative amounts of the polymers. The optimized combination was subjected to in vitro antifungal activity, transmucosal permeation, drug deposition in mucosa, residence time and bioadhesion studies. IR spectroscopy was used to investigate any interaction between drug and excipients. Dissolution of miconazole from tablets was sustained for 6 h. based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the prepared slow release buccoadhesive tablets of miconazole would markedly prolong the duration of antifungal activity. Comparison of in vitro antifungal activity of tablet with marketed gel showed that drug concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration were achieved immediately from both formulations but release from tablet was sustained up to 6 h, while the gel showed initially fast drug release, which did not sustain later. Drug permeation across buccal mucosa was minimum from the tablet as well as marketed gel; the deposition of drug in mucosa was higher in case of tablet. In vitro residence time and bioadhesive strength of tablet was higher than gel. Thus the buccoadhesive tablet of miconazole nitrate may offer better control of antifungal activity as compared to the gel formulation.

  17. Development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for studying erosion, deposition, and fuel retention in ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paris, Peeter; Piip, Kaarel [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Tartu (Estonia); Hakola, Antti [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Laan, Matti, E-mail: matti.laan@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Tartu (Estonia); Aints, Märt [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Tartu (Estonia); Koivuranta, Seppo; Likonen, Jari [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Lissovski, Aleksandr [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Tartu (Estonia); Mayer, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Technische Universität München, Fachgebt Plasma-Material-Wechelwirkung, Garching (Germany); Rohde, Volker; Sugiyama, Kazuyoshi [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • LIBS development for in situ monitoring of first walls of fusion reactors. • Testing of samples extracted from the divertor tiles of ASDEX Upgrade. • Reliable detection of deuterium depth profiles. • A method of LIBS data processing which allows to find the elemental depth profiles. • Comparison of LIBS results with those of other surface characterization methods. - Abstract: The paper deals with the development of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) into an in situ method for studying erosion/deposition processes at the first walls of fusion reactors. To this end, samples extracted from the divertor tiles of ASDEX Upgrade after the 2009 plasma operations were analyzed using LIBS for their composition and the results were compared with other post mortem deposition data. Quantitative depth profiles for the elemental concentrations were extracted from LIBS spectra by applying a novel data processing method. In addition, both multiline and multispot averaging procedures were applied to reduce fluctuations in the data. The LIBS concentration profiles matched qualitatively with those given by secondary ion mass spectrometry and quantitatively with the ion-beam data. The deuterium content of the samples could be reliably determined if the surface densities were >10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Structural and magnetic studies of thin Fe57 films formed by ion beam assisted deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyadov, N. M.; Bazarov, V. V.; Vagizov, F. G.; Vakhitov, I. R.; Dulov, E. N.; Kashapov, R. N.; Noskov, A. I.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Shustov, V. A.; Faizrakhmanov, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Thin Fe57 films with the thickness of 120 nm have been prepared on glass substrates by using the ion-beam-assisted deposition technique. X-ray diffraction, electron microdiffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies have shown that as-deposited films are in a stressful nanostructured state containing the nanoscaled inclusions of α-phase iron with the size of ∼10 nm. Room temperature in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization measurements confirmed the presence of the magnetic α-phase in the iron film and indicated the strong effect of residual stresses on magnetic properties of the film as well. Subsequent thermal annealing of iron films in vacuum at the temperature of 450 °C stimulates the growth of α-phase Fe crystallites with the size of up to 20 nm. However, electron microdiffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopic data have shown the partial oxidation and carbonization of the iron film during annealing. The stress disappeared after annealing of the film. The magnetic behaviour of the annealed samples was characterized by the magnetic hysteresis loop with the coercive field of ∼10 mT and the saturation magnetization decreased slightly in comparison with the α-phase Fe magnetization due to small oxidation of the film.

  19. Comparative study of ice nucleating efficiency of K-feldspar in immersion and deposition freezing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiron, T.; Hoffmann, N.; Peckhaus, A.; Kiselev, A. A.; Leisner, T.; Flossmann, A. I.

    2016-12-01

    One of the main challenges in understanding the evolution of Earth's climate resides in the understanding the role of ice nucleation on the development of tropospheric clouds as well as its initiation. K-feldspar is known to be a very active ice nucleating particle and this study focuses on the characterization of its activity in two heterogeneous nucleation modes, immersion and deposition freezing.We use a newly built humidity-controlled cold stage allowing the simultaneous observation of up to 2000 identical 0.6-nanoliter droplets containing suspension of mineral dust particles. The droplets are first cooled down to observe immersion freezing, the obtained ice crystals are then evaporated and finally, the residual particles are exposed to the water vapor supersaturated with respect to ice.The ice nucleation abilities for the individual residual particles are then compared for the different freezing modes and correlation between immersion ice nuclei and deposition ice nuclei is investigated.Based on the electron microscopy analysis of the residual particles, we discuss the possible relationship between the ice nucleation properties of feldspar and its microstructure. Finally, we discuss the atmospheric implications of our experimental results, using DESCAM, a 1.5D bin-resolved microphysics model.

  20. A Heavy Metal Atmospheric Deposition Study in the South Ural Mountains

    CERN Document Server

    Frontasyeva, M V; Steinnes, E; Lyapunov, S M; Cherchintsev, V D

    2002-01-01

    Samples of the mosses Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi, collected in the summer of 1998, were used to study the atmospheric deposition of heavy metals and other toxic elements in the Chelyabinsk Region situated in the South Ural, one of the most heavily polluted industrial areas of the Russian Federation. Samples of natural soils were collected simultaneously with moss at the same 30 sites in order to investigate surface accumulation of heavy metals and to examine the correlation of elements in moss and soil samples in order to separate contributions from atmospheric deposition and from soil minerals. A total of 38 elements (Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Th, U) in soil and 33 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Ag, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Sm, Tb, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Th, U) in mosses were determined by epithermal neutron activation analysis. The elem...

  1. Studies on high electronic energy deposition in transparent conducting indium tin oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, N G [Thin Film and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad-431004 (MS) (India); Gudage, Y G [Thin Film and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad-431004 (MS) (India); Ghosh, A [Thin Film and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad-431004 (MS) (India); Vyas, J C [Technical and Prototype Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (MS) (India); Singh, F [Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Tripathi, A [Inter-University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sharma, Ramphal [Thin Film and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Physics, Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad-431004 (MS) (India)

    2008-02-07

    We have examined the effect of swift heavy ions using 100 MeV Au{sup 8+} ions on the electrical properties of transparent, conducting indium tin oxide polycrystalline films with resistivity of 0.58 x 10{sup -4} {omega} cm and optical transmission greater than 78% (pristine). We report on the modifications occurring after high electronic energy deposition. With the increase in fluency, x-ray line intensity of the peaks corresponding to the planes (1 1 0), (4 0 0), (4 4 1) increased, while (3 3 1) remained constant. Surface morphological studies showed a pomegranate structure of pristine samples, which was highly disturbed with a high dose of irradiation. For the high dose, there was a formation of small spherical domes uniformly distributed over the entire surface. The transmittance was seen to be decreasing with the increase in ion fluency. At higher doses, the resistivity and photoluminescence intensity was seen to be decreased. In addition, the carrier concentration was seen to be increased, which was in accordance with the decrease in resistivity. The observed modifications after high electronic energy deposition in these films may lead to fruitful device applications.

  2. Initial studies of Bremsstrahlung energy deposition in small-bore superconducting undulator structures in linac environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, T.; Tatchyn, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    One of the more promising technologies for developing minimal-length insertion devices for linac-driven, single-pass Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the x-ray range is based on the use of superconducting (SC) materials. In recent FEL simulations, for example, a bifilar helical SC device with a 2 cm period and 1.8 T field was found to require a 30 m saturation length for operation at 1.5{Angstrom} on a 15 GeV linac, more than 40% shorter than an alternative hybrid/permanent magnet (hybrid/PM) undulator. AT the same time, however, SC technology is known to present characteristic difficulties for insertion device design, both in engineering detail and in operation. Perhaps the most critical problem, as observed, e.g., by Madey and co-workers in their initial FEL experiments, was the frequent quenching induced by scattered electrons upstream of their (bifilar) device. Postulating that this quenching was precipitated by directly-scattered or bremsstrahlung-induced particle energy deposited into the SC material or into material contiguous with it, the importance of numerical and experimental characterizations of this phenomenon for linac-based, user-facility SC undulator design becomes evident. In this paper we discuss selected prior experimental results and report on initial EGS4 code studies of scattered and bremsstrahlung induced particle energy deposition into SC structures with geometries comparable to a small-bore bifilar helical undulator.

  3. Acid rock drainage and metal leaching from mine waste material (tailings) of a Pb-Zn-Ag skarn deposit: environmental assessment through static and kinetic laboratory tests

    OpenAIRE

    Blanca Adriana Méndez Ortiz; Alejandro Carrillo Chávez; Marcos Gustavo Monroy Fernández

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the processes and products involved in the generation of acid rock drainage – metal leaching (ARD-ML) from mine waste material (tailings) derived from the exploitation of an ore type Pb- Zn-Ag skarn were characterized. Laboratory tests (static and kinetic) of historic and recent tailings were conducted along with the mineralogical characterization of solids, and chemical analyses of solids and leachates. Pyrite (FeS2) is the most abundant sulfi de phase, and one of the main mine...

  4. Deposition of latex colloids at rough mineral surfaces: an analogue study using nanopatterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Darbha, Gopala; Fischer, Cornelius; Michler, Alex; Luetzenkirchen, Johannes; Schäfer, Thorsten; Heberling, Frank; Schild, Dieter

    2012-04-24

    Deposition of latex colloids on a structured silicon surface was investigated. The surface with well-defined roughness and topography pattern served as an analogue for rough mineral surfaces with half-pores in the submicrometer size. The silicon topography consists of a regular pit pattern (pit diameter = 400 nm, pit spacing = 400 nm, pit depth = 100 nm). Effects of hydrodynamics and colloidal interactions in transport and deposition dynamics of a colloidal suspension were investigated in a parallel plate flow chamber. The experiments were conducted at pH ∼ 5.5 under both favorable and unfavorable adsorption conditions using carboxylate functionalized colloids to study the impact of surface topography on particle retention. Vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) was applied for both surface topography characterization and the quantification of colloidal retention over large fields of view. The influence of particle diameter variation (d = 0.3-2 μm) on retention of monodisperse as well as polydisperse suspensions was studied as a function of flow velocity. Despite electrostatically unfavorable conditions, at all flow velocities, an increased retention of colloids was observed at the rough surface compared to a smooth surface without surface pattern. The impact of surface roughness on retention was found to be more significant for smaller colloids (d = 0.3, 0.43 vs. 1, 2 μm). From smooth to rough surfaces, the deposition rate of 0.3 and 0.43 μm colloids increased by a factor of ∼2.7 compared to a factor of 1.2 or 1.8 for 1 and 2 μm colloids, respectively. For a substrate herein, with constant surface topography, the ratio between substrate roughness and radius of colloid, Rq/rc, determined the deposition efficiency. As Rq/rc increased, particle-substrate overall DLVO interaction energy decreased. Larger colloids (1 and 2 μm) beyond a critical velocity (7 × 10(-5) and 3 × 10(-6) m/s) (when drag force exceeds adhesion force) tend to detach from the surface

  5. Electromagnetic Investigations and Power Converter Efficiency Studies on a Laboratory Made Induction Heating Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper electromagnetic analysis and power converter efficiency has been studied on a laboratory prototype induction heating coil. An electromagnetic field based study was first done for the induction heating coil used in the experimental set-up using available Finite Element Analysis package software (FEMM 4.2). The results of the FEM based study are also used in the choice of the operating frequency depending on the applications. Thereafter verifications are done experimentally on a small-scale laboratory developed setup. The approach to be adopted for choice of induction heating operating frequency and the choice of converter type, based on the efficiency and performance, are also briefly presented here. Oscilloscope traces uphold the accuracy of the practical tests conducted.

  6. The study of Zn–Co alloy coatings electrochemically deposited by pulse current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Milorad V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical deposition by pulse current of Zn-Co alloy coatings on steel was examined, with the aim to find out whether pulse plating could produce alloys that could offer a better corrosion protection. The influence of on-time and the average current density on the cathodic current efficiency, coating morphology, surface roughness and corrosion stability in 3% NaCl was examined. At the same Ton/Toff ratio the current efficiency was insignificantly smaller for deposition at higher average current density. It was shown that, depending on the on-time, pulse plating could produce more homogenous alloy coatings with finer morphology, as compared to deposits obtained by direct current. The surface roughness was the greatest for Zn-Co alloy coatings deposited with direct current, as compared with alloy coatings deposited with pulse current, for both examined average current densities. It was also shown that Zn-Co alloy coatings deposited by pulse current could increase the corrosion stability of Zn-Co alloy coatings on steel. Namely, alloy coatings deposited with pulse current showed higher corrosion stability, as compared with alloy coatings deposited with direct current, for almost all examined cathodic times, Ton. Alloy coatings deposited at higher average current density showed greater corrosion stability as compared with coatings deposited by pulse current at smaller average current density. It was shown that deposits obtained with pulse current and cathodic time of 10 ms had the poorest corrosion stability, for both investigated average deposition current density. Among all investigated alloy coatings the highest corrosion stability was obtained for Zn-Co alloy coatings deposited with pulsed current at higher average current density (jav = 4 A dm-2.

  7. Laboratory Astrophysics Studies with the COSmIC Facility: Interstellar and Planetary Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar S.; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2015-08-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory astrophysics results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [3] and planetary atmospheres [4]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References:[1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Cesar Contreras and Farid Salama, The

  8. Brain iron deposition in essential tremor: a quantitative 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novellino, Fabiana; Cherubini, Andrea; Chiriaco, Carmelina; Morelli, Maurizio; Salsone, Maria; Arabia, Gennarina; Quattrone, Aldo

    2013-02-01

    Studies have demonstrated brain iron deposition in neurodegenerative disease and in normal aging. Data on this topic are lacking in essential tremor (ET). The aim of our study was to investigate brain iron content in patients with ET, using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2*-relaxometry. We enrolled 24 patients with ET and 25 age-matched healthy controls. Subjects were examined using a 3T MRI scanner. The protocol included conventional MRI sequences and quantitative T2*-relaxometry. Whole-brain voxel-based analyses showed significant differences in T2* values in bilateral globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and in right dentate nucleus (P motor systems outside of the cerebellum/cerebellar pathway and, more specifically, of the globus pallidus. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorders Society.

  9. Crystalomorphological Characteristics of Pyrite in Hydrothermal Gold Deposit--An Experimental Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡元吉; 周茂

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of the geological characteristics of primary gold deposits, with an experiment on modelling the environment of gold mineralization , the evolutionary array and growth mechanism and their relationship with gold mineralization of the crystal forms of pyrite, i. e. pentagonal dodecahedron, octahedron and cube, formed under the different values of fo2, fs2, T (℃), P(Pa) and C (salinity) in the hy-drothermal system are studied. The results show that the crystal form of pyrite is not only related to the temperature L, but also affected by the geochemistry of iron and sulfur which formed pyrite and other physicochemical conditions.Our results promote the study of gold mineralization, genetic and prospecting mineralogy.

  10. Martian Cryogenic Carbonate Formation: Stable Isotope Variations Observed in Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Sun, Tao; Fu, Qi; Romanek, Christopher S.; Gibson, Everett K. Jr.

    2014-01-01

    The history of water on Mars is tied to the formation of carbonates through atmospheric CO2 and its control of the climate history of the planet. Carbonate mineral formation under modern martian atmospheric conditions could be a critical factor in controlling the martian climate in a means similar to the rock weathering cycle on Earth. The combination of evidence for liquid water on the martian surface and cold surface conditions suggest fluid freezing could be very common on the surface of Mars. Cryogenic calcite forms easily from freezing solutions when carbon dioxide degasses quickly from Ca-bicarbonate-rich water, a process that has been observed in some terrestrial settings such as arctic permafrost cave deposits, lake beds of the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, and in aufeis (river icings) from rivers of N.E. Alaska. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted that simulated cryogenic carbonate formation on Mars in order to understand their isotopic systematics. The results indicate that carbonates grown under martian conditions show variable enrichments from starting bicarbonate fluids in both carbon and oxygen isotopes beyond equilibrium values.

  11. Neutronics calculations for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tokamak Reactor Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.T.; Baker, V.C.; Barnes, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Neutronics calculations have been carried out to analyze the nuclear performance of conceptual blanket and shield designs for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) and the Tokamak Demonstration Reactor Plant (DRP) being considered at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These reactor designs represent a sequence in the commercialization of fusion-generated electrical power. All of the calculations were carried out using the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN and the latest available ENDF/B-IV coupled neutron-gamma-ray transport cross-section data, fluence-to-kerma conversion factors, and radiation damage cross-section data. The calculations include spatial and integral heating-rate estimates in the reactor with emphasis on the recovery of fusion neutron energy in the blanket and limiting the heat-deposition rate in the superconducting toroidal field coils. Radiation damage due to atomic displacements and gas production produced in the reactor structural material and in the toroidal field coil windings were also estimated. The tritium-breeding ratio when natural lithium is used as the fertile material in the DRP blanket and in the experimental breeding modules in the EPR is also given.

  12. The Management of Silica in Los Alamos National Laboratory Tap Water - A Study of Silica Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlberg, C.; Worland, V.P.; Kozubal, M.A.; Erickson, G.F.; Jacobson, H.M.; McCarthy, K.T.

    1999-07-01

    Well water at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a silica (SiO{sub 2}) content of 60 to 100 mg/L, with 4 mg/L of magnesium, 13 mg/L calcium and lesser concentrations of other ions. On evaporation in cooling towers, when the silica concentration reaches 150 to 220 mg/L, silica deposits on heat transfer surfaces. When the high silica well water is used in the reprocessing of plutonium, silica remains in solution at the end of the process and creates a problem of removal from the effluent prior to discharge or evaporation. The work described in this Report is divided into two major parts. The first part describes the behavior of silica when the water is evaporated at various conditions of pH and in the presence of different classes of anions: inorganic and organic. In the second part of this work it was found that precipitation (floccing) of silica was a function of solution pH and mole ratio of metal to silica.

  13. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory: a natural laboratory for studying basaltic volcanism: Chapter 1 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, Robert I.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Brantley, Steven R.; Neal, Christina A.; Poland, Michael P.; Takahashi, T. Jane; Landowski, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    In the beginning of the 20th century, geologist Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., argued that, to fully understand volcanic and associated hazards, the expeditionary mode of studying eruptions only after they occurred was inadequate. Instead, he fervently advocated the use of permanent observatories to record and measure volcanic phenomena—at and below the surface—before, during, and after eruptions to obtain the basic scientific information needed to protect people and property from volcanic hazards. With the crucial early help of American volcanologist Frank Alvord Perret and the Hawaiian business community, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established in 1912, and Jaggar’s vision became reality. From its inception, HVO’s mission has centered on several goals: (1) measuring and documenting the seismic, eruptive, and geodetic processes of active Hawaiian volcanoes (principally Kīlauea and Mauna Loa); (2) geological mapping and dating of deposits to reconstruct volcanic histories, understand island evolution, and determine eruptive frequencies and volcanic hazards; (3) systematically collecting eruptive products, including gases, for laboratory analysis; and (4) widely disseminating observatory-acquired data and analysis, reports, and hazard warnings to the global scientific community, emergency-management authorities, news media, and the public. The long-term focus on these goals by HVO scientists, in collaboration with investigators from many other organizations, continues to fulfill Jaggar’s career-long vision of reducing risks from volcanic and earthquake hazards across the globe.

  14. Lab-Scale Study of the Calcium Carbonate Dissolution and Deposition by Marine Cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakis, S. G.; Dragoeva, E. G.; Lavrenyuk, T. I.; Rogochiy, A.; Gerasimenko, L. M.; McKay, D. S.; Brown, I. I.

    2006-01-01

    Suggestions that calcification in marine organisms changes in response to global variations in seawater chemistry continue to be advanced (Wilkinson, 1979; Degens et al. 1985; Kazmierczak et al. 1986; R. Riding 1992). However, the effect of [Na+] on calcification in marine cyanobacteria has not been discussed in detail although [Na+] fluctuations reflect both temperature and sea-level fluctuations. The goal of these lab-scale studies therefore was to study the effect of environmental pH and [Na+] on CaCO3 deposition and dissolution by marine cyanobacterium Phormidium subcapitatum. Marine cyanobacterium P. subcapitatum has been cultivated in ASN-III medium. [Ca2+] fluctuations were monitored with Ca(2+) probe. Na(+) concentrations were determined by the initial solution chemistry. It was found that the balance between CaCO3 dissolution and precipitation induced by P. subcapitatum grown in neutral ASN III medium is very close to zero. No CaCO3 precipitation induced by cyanobacterial growth occurred. Growth of P. subcapitatum in alkaline ASN III medium, however, was accompanied by significant oscillations in free Ca(2+) concentration within a Na(+) concentration range of 50-400 mM. Calcium carbonate precipitation occurred during the log phase of P. subcapitatum growth while carbonate dissolution was typical for the stationary phase of P. subcapitatum growth. The highest CaCO3 deposition was observed in the range of Na(+) concentrations between 200-400 mM. Alkaline pH also induced the clamping of P. subcapitatum filaments, which appeared to have a strong affinity to envelop particles of chemically deposited CaCO3 followed by enlargement of those particles size. EDS analysis revealed the presence of Mg-rich carbonate (or magnesium calcite) in the solution containing 10-100 mM Na(+); calcite in the solution containing 200 mM Na(+); and aragonite in the solution containing with 400 mM Na(+). Typical present-day seawater contains xxmM Na(+). Early (Archean) seawater was

  15. Time study of clinical and nonclinical workload in pathology and laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Martin J; Larsen, Erik T; Tait, Nicholas; Wright, James R

    2009-06-01

    We describe a detailed, cross-sectional, self-report time study of laboratory physician tasks in a regionalized, multisite academic setting, using custom data collection templates programmed into personal digital assistants (PDAs). The 7-week study was completed by 56 medical and scientific staff (86% participation rate). Participants recorded 12,781 PDA entries of specific tasks completed during the study period. The mean number of entries per worked day per participant was 8.14 (range, 1.96-14.33). Study results demonstrated that professional staff worked, on average, 53.5 hours per week. Percentage work time spent in each activity area was as follows: clinical, direct, 50.6%; administration, 18.5%; clinical, indirect, 9.5%; research, 8.2%; learning/continuing education, 5.3%; teaching, 4.9%; and quality assurance, 3.1%. These percentages varied significantly by laboratory medicine subspecialty and by type of academic appointment. The findings confirm that activities not directly involved with patient care, such as administration, quality assurance, teaching, research, and professional development, typically occupy 40% to 50% of a laboratory physician's time.

  16. Hydrothermal Fluid evolution in the Dalli porphyry Cu-Au Deposit: Fluid Inclusion microthermometry studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zarasvandi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A wide variety of world-class porphyry Cu deposits occur in the Urumieh-Dohktar magmatic arc (UDMA of Iran.The arc is composed of calc-alkaline granitoid rocks, and the ore-hosting porphyry intrusions are dominantly granodiorite to quartz-monzonite (Zarasvandi et al., 2015. It is believed that faults played an important role in the emplacement of intrusions and subsequentporphyry-copper type mineralization (Shahabpour, 1999. Three main centers host the porphyry copper mineralization in the UDMA: (1 Ardestan-SarCheshmeh-Kharestan zone, (2 Saveh-Ardestan district; in the central parts of the UDMA, hosting the Dalli porphyry Cu-Au deposit, and (3 Takab-Mianeh-Qharahdagh-Sabalan zone. Mineralized porphyry coppersystems in the UDMA are restricted to Oligocene to Mioceneintrusions and show potassic, sericitic, argillic, propylitic and locally skarn alteration (Zarasvandi et al., 2005; Zarasvandi et al., 2015. In the Dalli porphyry deposit, four hydrothermal alteration zones, includingpotassic, sericitic, propylitic, and argillic types have been described in the two discrete mineralized areas, namely, northern and southern stocks. Hypogenemineralization includes chalcopyrite, pyrite, and magnetite, with minor occurrences of bornite.Supergene activity has produced gossan, oxidized minerals and enrichment zones. The supergene enrichment zone contains chalcocite and covellite with a 10-20 m thickness. Mineralization in the northern stock is mainly composed of pyrite and chalcopyrite. The aim of this study is the investigation and classification of hydrothermal veins and the constraining of physicochemical compositions of ore-forming fluids using systematic investigation of fluid inclusions. Materials and methods Twenty samples were collected from drill holes. Thin and polished sections were prepared from hydrothermal veins of thepotassic, sericitic and propylitic alteration zones. Samples used for fluid inclusion measurements were collected

  17. Geological and geotechnical characterization of the debris avalanche and pyroclastic deposits of Cotopaxi Volcano (Ecuador). A contribute to instability-related hazard studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, L.; Apuani, T.; Corazzato, C.; Uttini, A.

    2017-02-01

    The huge volcanic debris avalanche occurred at 4.5 ka is a major event in the evolution of the Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador. The present volcanic hazard in the Cotopaxi region is related to lahars generated by volcanic eruptions and concurrent ice melting. This paper presents the geological and geotechnical field and laboratory characterization of the 4.5 ka Cotopaxi debris avalanche deposit and of the younger unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits, representing the probable source of future shallow landslides. The debris avalanche formed a deposit with a well-developed hummocky topography, and climbed a difference in height of about 260 m along the slopes of the adjacent Sincholagua volcano. The debris avalanche deposit includes four lithofacies (megablock, block, mixed, and sheared facies) that represent different flow regimes and degrees of substratum involvement. The facies distribution suggests that, in the proximal area, the debris avalanche slid predominantly confined to the valleys along the N and NE flank of the volcanic cone, emplacing a stack of megablocks. When the flow reached the break in slope at the base of the edifice, it became unconfined and spread laterally over most of the area of the Rio Pita valley. A dynamic block fragmentation and dilation occurred during the debris avalanche transport, emplacing the block facies. The incorporation of the older Chalupas Ignimbrite is responsible for the mixed facies and the sheared facies. Geotechnical results include a full-range grain size characterization, which enabled to make broader considerations on possible variability among the sampled facies. Consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, carried out on the fine fraction Failure surfaces are always well developed, indicating that the poorly consolidated pyroclastic cover could undergo failure leading to the formation of a gravity driven instability phenomena, like granular or debris flows, which are mainly controlled by the fine fraction. This work

  18. Study of the structure and electrical properties of the copper nitride thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo-Vega, C. [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, A. Postal 2732, 22860, Ensenada B.C. (Mexico)]. E-mail: gallardo@ccmc.unam.mx; Cruz, W. de la [Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, UNAM, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, A. Postal 2681, 22860, Ensenada B.C. (Mexico)

    2006-09-15

    Copper nitride thin films were prepared on glass and silicon substrates by ablating a copper target at different pressure of nitrogen. The films were characterized in situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and ex situ by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The nitrogen content in the samples, x = [N]/[Cu], changed between 0 and 0.33 for a corresponding variation in nitrogen pressure of 9 x 10{sup -2} to 1.3 x 10{sup -1} Torr. Using this methodology, it is possible to achieve sub-, over- and stoichiometric films by controlling the nitrogen pressure. The XPS results show that is possible to obtain copper nitride with x = 0.33 (Cu{sub 3}N) and x = 0.25 (Cu{sub 4}N) when the nitrogen pressure is 1.3 x 10{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup -2} Torr, respectively. The lattice constants obtained from XRD results for copper nitride with x = 0.25 is of 3.850 A and with x = 0.33 have values between 3.810 and 3.830 A. The electrical properties of the films were studied as a function of the lattice constant. These results show that the electrical resistivity increases when the lattice parameter is decreasing. The electrical resistivity of copper nitride with x = 0.25 was smaller than samples with x = 0.33.

  19. Studies of high energy density physics and laboratory astrophysics driven by intense lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.

    2016-10-01

    Laser plasmas are capable of creating unique physical conditions with extreme high energy density, which are not only closely relevant to inertial fusion energy studies, but also to laboratory simulation of some astrophysical processes. In this paper, we highlight some recent progress made by our research teams. The first part is about directional hot electron beam generation and transport for fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion, as well as a new scheme of fast ignition by use of a strong external DC magnetic field. The second part concerns laboratory modeling of some astrophysical phenomena, including 1) studies of the topological structure of magnetic reconnection/annihilation that relates closely to geomagnetic substorms, loop-top X-ray source and mass ejection in solar flares, and 2) magnetic field generation and evolution in collisionless shock formation.

  20. Study of embryotoxic effects of intranasally administred desloratadine on laboratory animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alekhina Т.А.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to detect possible changes in embryogenesis and negative effects of third generation antihistamine – desloratadine – after intranasal administration of 1.3 mg/m3 and 13.0 mg/m3 of the substance to laboratory animals during their prenatal period. In these circumstances, desloratadine does not cause any significant changes of embryogenesis parameters. Macroscopic examination of the fetus and placenta in animals of experimental groups did not reveal any pathology or physiological deviations from the norm. 13.0 mg/m3 concentration of the drug caused a decrease in the weight of embryos in comparison with control group of animals and physiological data, despite a well developed, without visible pathology, placenta. This neces­sitates an in-depth study of possible teratogenic effects of intranasally administred desloratadine to laboratory animals.

  1. Using ecology to inform physiology studies: implications of high population density in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Amy E M; Edmunds, Nicholas B; Ferraro, Shannon; Heffell, Quentin; Merritt, Gillian M; Pakkala, Jesse J; Schilling, Cory R; Schorno, Sarah

    2015-03-15

    Conspecific density is widely recognized as an important ecological factor across the animal kingdom; however, the physiological impacts are less thoroughly described. In fact, population density is rarely mentioned as a factor in physiological studies on captive animals and, when it is infrequently addressed, the animals used are reared and housed at densities far above those in nature, making the translation of results from the laboratory to natural systems difficult. We survey the literature to highlight this important ecophysiological gap and bring attention to the possibility that conspecific density prior to experimentation may be a critical factor influencing results. Across three taxa: mammals, birds, and fish, we present evidence from ecology that density influences glucocorticoid levels, immune function, and body condition with the intention of stimulating discussion and increasing consideration of population density in physiology studies. We conclude with several directives to improve the applicability of insights gained in the laboratory to organisms in the natural environment.

  2. The Role of Heterogeneous Chemistry of Volatile ORganic Compounds: A Modeling and Laboratory Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory R. Carmichael; Vicki H. Grassian

    2007-03-01

    Overview The outputs of this research have been reported annually via the RIMS system. This report serves as an update and final report. The focus of our DOE BES funded project is on the importance of heterogeneous reactions in the troposphere. The primary objectives of our study were to: (i) Evaluate the extent to which heterogeneous chemistry affects the photochemical oxidant cycle, particularly, sources and sinks of tropospheric ozone; and (ii) Conduct laboratory studies on heterogeneous reactions involving NOy, O3 and VOCs on aerosol surfaces. These objectives were pursued through a multidisciplinary approach that combines modeling and laboratory components as discussed in more detail below. In addition, in response to the reconfiguring of the Atmospheric Science Program to focus on aerosol radiative forcing of climate, we also began to investigate the radiative properties of atmospheric aerosol.

  3. Photochemical Activity of Aldrin and Dieldrin in Liquid and Frozen Aqueous Systems: Field and Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, A. R.; Rowland, G. A.; Grannas, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    The phenomenon of global distillation generates significant accumulation of volatile, anthropogenic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in polar regions. Bioaccumulation presents serious concerns for human health within Arctic subsistence communities. In the recent past, the photochemical processes of POPs have been observed in the laboratory. Despite some established knowledge regarding photochemical processes in reactive frozen media, little published literature exists regarding the chemical transformations and fate of POPs in the Arctic. Here, we consider the photochemical transformations of aldrin and dieldrin, two structurally similar organochlorine pollutants whose presence has been confirmed in the Arctic. Their photochemical transformation, resulting from ultraviolet exposure, was investigated by both field studies in Barrow, AK and controlled laboratory experiments. Pollutant degradation and photoproduct formation were monitored by GC-ECD analysis. Based on kinetic studies of liquid and frozen samples and identification of photoproducts, we will propose potential reaction mechanisms for the transformations of aldrin and dieldrin. Further implications for environmental processes will be discussed.

  4. Laboratory study of fracture healing in Topopah Spring tuff: Implications for near field hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wunan; Daily, W.D.

    1989-09-01

    Seven Topopah Spring tuff samples were studied to determine water permeability in this rock under pressure and temperature conditions similar to those expected in the near field of a nuclear waste package. Six of the seven samples were studied under isothermal condition; the other was subjected to a thermal gradient. Four of the six fractured samples contained a reopened, healed, natural fracture; one contained an induced tensile fracture and the other contained a saw-cut. The fracture surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after the experiments and the water that flowed through the samples was sampled for chemical analysis. The experimental durations ranged from about 3 months to almost 6 months. Water permeability of the fractured samples was found to decrease by more than three orders of magnitude when the sample temperature increased to 150{degree}C. The sharpest decrease in permeability occurred when the temperature was increased above 90{degree}C. Permeability of the intact sample did not change significantly under the similar experimental conditions. When the temperature returned to room conditions, the water permeability did not recover. The mechanical strength of one healed sample was about half that of the intact rock. SEM studies of the fracture surfaces and water chemical analysis of the water suggested that both dissolution and deposition occurred on the fracture surfaces. Smoothing of fracture asperities because of dissolution and deposition was probably the main cause of the permeability decrease. Deposition of dissolved silica was probably the main cause of fracture healing. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Parametric study of self-forming ZnO Nanowall network with honeycomb structure by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    El Zein, B.

    2014-02-01

    The successful synthesis of catalyst free zinc oxide (ZnO) Nanowall networks with honeycomb like structure by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) is demonstrated in this paper. The synthesis was conducted directly on Silicon (Si) (1 0 0) and Glass-ITO substrates without the intermediate of metal catalyst, template or chemical etching. Kinetic of growth and effects of gas pressure and substrate temperature were studied by depositing ZnO films on P type Si (1 0 0) substrates with different deposition parameters. The optimized growth parameters were found as: 10 mTorr oxygen pressure, 600 C substrate temperature, and deposition duration equal or higher than 10 min. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to investigate structural, microstructural and optical properties of ZnO Nanowall networks produced. They exhibit a non-uniform size high quality honeycomb structure with low deep level defects. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Study of laser deposited W/Si multilayers for high-resolution transmission X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberl, Christian; Doering, Florian; Liese, Tobias; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich [Institut fuer Materialphysik, Georg-August-University, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    High quality non-periodic W/Si multilayers were pulsed laser deposited (PLD) at 248 nm for the use as high-resolution transmission X-ray optics (multilayer Laue lenses) and studied by thickness monitoring, SEM, TEM, and X-ray reflectometry (XRR). Due to the large difference in melting point, the ablation threshold, deposition rate as well as droplet formation of the both components W and Si strongly differ. Furthermore, during deposition of W/Si multilayers thickness deficits up to 2 nm due to resputtering and WSi{sub 2} interlayers occur. Thus, in order to ensure a defined deposition of high-quality multilayers, two distinct element specific sets of optimized preparation conditions had to be worked out. In this contribution, this process of optimization is described in detail and the underlying mechanisms are discussed, also in comparison with SRIM simulations.

  7. Structural and optical studies on hot wire chemical vapour deposited hydrogenated silicon films at low substrate temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, Purabi; Agarwal, Pratima [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781 039, Assam (India)

    2009-02-15

    Thin films of hydrogenated silicon are deposited by hot wire chemical vapour deposition technique, as an alternative of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique. By varying the hydrogen and silane flow rate, we deposited the films ranging from pure amorphous to nanocrystallite-embedded amorphous in nature. In this paper we report extensively studied structural and optical properties of these films. It is observed that the rms bond angle deviation decreases with increase in hydrogen flow rate, which is an indication of improved order in the films. We discuss this under the light of breaking of weak Si-Si bonds and subsequent formation of strong Si-Si bonds and coverage of the growing surface by atomic hydrogen. (author)

  8. Titanium dioxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition and integration in radio frequency devices: Study of structure, optical and dielectric properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlianges, Jean-Christophe, E-mail: jean-christophe.orlianges@unilim.fr [SPCTS, UMR 7315, Universite de Limoges/CNRS, 12 rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges Cedex (France); Crunteanu, Aurelian; Pothier, Arnaud [XLIM, UMR 7252, Universite de Limoges/CNRS, 123, avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Merle-Mejean, Therese [SPCTS, UMR 7315, Universite de Limoges/CNRS, 12 rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges Cedex (France); Blondy, Pierre [XLIM, UMR 7252, Universite de Limoges/CNRS, 123, avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Champeaux, Corinne [SPCTS, UMR 7315, Universite de Limoges/CNRS, 12 rue Atlantis, 87068 Limoges Cedex (France)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have grown TiO{sub 2} thin films by PLD on c-sapphire substrate with pre-patterned out-plane capacitor structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman and XRD analyses indicate an evolution from 'amorphous' to anatase and rutile phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films optical properties are investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry and transmission measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Permittivity measurements reveal high dielectric constant {epsilon}{sub r} = 120 of 600 Degree-Sign C-grown TiO{sub 2} thin films. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide presents a wide range of technological application possibilities due to its dielectric, electrochemical, photocatalytic and optical properties. The three TiO{sub 2} allotropic forms: anatase, rutile and brookite are also interesting, since they exhibit different properties, stabilities and growth modes. For instance, rutile has a high dielectric permittivity, of particular interest for the integration as dielectric in components such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for radio frequency (RF) devices. In this study, titanium dioxide thin films are deposited by pulsed laser deposition. Characterizations by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction show the evolution of the structural properties. Thin films optical properties are investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry and transmission measurements from UV to IR range. Co-planar waveguide (CPW) devices are fabricated based on these films. Their performances are measured in the RF domain and compared to simulation, leading to relative permittivity values in the range 30-120, showing the potentialities of the deposited material for capacitive switches applications.

  9. Laboratory experiments in the study of the chemistry of the outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattergood, T. W.

    It is shown that much information about planetary chemistry and physics can be gained through laboratory work. The types of experiments relevant to planetary research concern fundamental properties, spectral/optical properties, 'Miller-Urey' syntheses, and detailed syntheses. Specific examples of studies of the chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan are described with attention given to gas phase chemistry in the troposphere and the composition of model Titan aerosols. A list of work that still needs to be done is provided.

  10. A cross-laboratory preclinical study on the effectiveness of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stroke

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Stroke represents a global challenge and is a leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Despite much effort, translation of research findings to clinical benefit has not yet been successful. Failure of neuroprotection trials is considered, in part, due to the low quality of preclinical studies, low level of reproducibility across different laboratories and that stroke co-morbidities have not been fully considered in experimental models. More rigorous testing of new drug candidates in d...

  11. Modeling of asphaltene particle deposition from turbulent oil flow in tubing: Model validation and a parametric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Kor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The deposition of asphaltenes on the inner wall of oil wells and pipelines causes flow blockage and significant production loss in these conduits. The major underlying mechanism(s for the deposition of asphaltene particles from the oil stream are still under investigation as an active research topic in the literature. In this work, a new deposition model considering both diffusional and inertial transport of asphaltene toward the tubing surface was developed. Model predictions were compared and verified with two sound experimental data available in the literature to evaluate the model's performance. A parametric study was done using the validated model in order to investigate the effect of the asphaltene particle size, flow velocity and oil viscosity on the magnitude of asphaltene deposition rate. Results of the study revealed that increasing the oil velocity causes more drag force on wall's inner surface; consequently, particles tend to transport away from the surface and the rate of asphaltene deposition is decreased. In addition, the developed model predicts that at low fluid velocity (∼0.7 m/s, the less viscous oil is more prone to asphaltene deposition problem.

  12. A comparison of a biological sciences curriculum study (BSCS) laboratory and a traditional laboratory on student achievement at two private liberal arts colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Donald A.; McCurdy, Donald W.

    The purpose of this experiment was to compare an inquiry-oriented Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) style laboratory approach with a more directive traditional approach on student outcomes in the cognitive and affective domains of learning at two private, midwestern liberal-arts colleges. The BSCS approach emphasized basic and integrated science processes, concept development through extensive questioning, and increased student discretion, while the traditional approach contained highly structured, more prescriptive, teacher-oriented activities. Intact laboratory sections of students enrolled in introductory general biology at two private liberal-arts colleges were randomly selected into two treatment groups. Pretest and posttest measures were taken on three dependent variables: (1) biological content achievement, measured with a researcher-generated Test on Biology Laboratory Concepts, (2) reasoning ability, measured with the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking, and (3) attitude toward biology, measured with the Biology Student Behavior Inventory. Analysis of covariance indicated the experimental group (n = 60) using the BSCS-style laboratory approach scored significantly higher than the comparison group (n = 59) in levels of performance on biology content achievement, F(1, 114) = 4.07, p attitude toward biology or on reasoning ability. However, both groups experienced a 15-percent increase in the number of formal thinkers as indicated by pretest-posttest gain scores on the reasoning ability test. These results lend support to the hypothesis that a BSCS-style laboratory approach fosters desired learner outcomes at the postsecondary level. In addition, these findings support the notion that the science laboratory may be used as a primary vehicle to promote formal reasoning skills.

  13. Geochemical Studies on Dachang Antimony Ore Deposit in Qinglong,Guizhou Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张启厚

    1999-01-01

    The Dachang antimony deposit in Qinglong,Guizhou Province,is strictly controlled by the “Dachang Layer” which is a complex altered rock occurring at unconformity between the Permian Emeishan basalt and the Maokou limestone.Based on the studies of the hanging-and foot-wall rocks,the trace elements and REE contents of the rocks and ores and heavy placer minerals in the basalt,this paper is focused on the relations between these data and the “Dachang Layer”and its hanging- and oot-wall rocks.The author pointed out that the “Dachang Layer” and basalt are the source-beds of antimony;ilmenite and magnetite are the major mineral carriers of antimony.In the processes of halmyrosis and burial metamorphism of the “Dachang Layer” an basalt,antimony was mobilized along with the mobilization of iron and was preliminarily concentrated in the“ Dachang Layer”.

  14. Energy Deposition Studies for the LHC Insertion Region Upgrade Phase-I

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Mereghetti, A; Wildner, E

    2010-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is starting operation with beam, aiming to achieve nominal performance in the shortest term, the upgrade of the LHC interaction regions is actively pursued in order to enhance the physics reach of the machine. Its first phase, with the target of increasing the LHC luminosity to 2-3 1034cm-2s-1, relies on the mature Nb-Ti superconducting magnet technology and is intended to maximize the use of the existing infrastructure. The impact of the increased power of the collision debris has been investigated through detailed energy deposition studies, considering the new aperture requirements for the low-ß quadrupoles and a number of other elements in the insertions. Effective solutions in terms of shielding options and design/layout optimization have been envisaged and the crucial factors have been pointed out.

  15. Study of the Electroless Deposition of Ni for Betavoltaic Battery Using PN Junction without Seed Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Joo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The method and conditions of Ni plating were optimized to maximize the output of a betavoltaic battery using radioactive 63Ni. The difference of the short circuit currents between the pre- and postdeposition of 63Ni on the PN junction was 90 nA at the I-V characteristics. It is suspected that the beta rays emitted from 63Ni did not deeply penetrate into the PN junction due to a Ni seed layer with a thickness of 500 Å. To increase the penetration of the beta rays, electroless Ni plating was carried out on the PN junction without a seed layer. To establish the electroless coating conditions for 63Ni, nonradioactive Ni was deposited onto a Si wafer without flaws on the surface. This process can be applied for electroless Ni plating on a PN junction semiconductor using radioactive 63Ni in further studies.

  16. Nanoindentation study on Gd-deposited YBaCuO superconductor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Yilmaz; O Uzun; U Kolemen; M F Kilicaslan; N Basman; S Ergen; K Ozturk; E Yanmaz

    2013-12-01

    Nanoindentation technique was used to characterize the mechanical properties of Gd-deposited bulk YBaCuO superconductors fabricated by solid-state reaction method. In order to determine the hardness and reduced modulus of the samples, load-displacement data were analysed by using the Oliver–Pharr method. The hardness values exhibited significant peak load-dependence especially at lower peak loads, while the reduced modulus values were found to be nearly constant at studied loading range. In order to find true hardness of the samples, the peak load-dependency of hardness was analysed by using Meyer’s law,minimum resistance model, elastic/plastic deformation model, energy balance model, Nix–Gao model and Mukhopadhyay approach. Of the aforementioned models, energy balance model and Mukhopadhyay approach were found to be the most effective models to explain the load-dependency of hardness.

  17. Benchmark study for charge deposition by high energy electrons in thick slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, I.

    2002-01-01

    The charge deposition profiles created when highenergy (1, 10, and 100 MeV) electrons impinge ona thick slab of elemental aluminum, copper, andtungsten are presented in this paper. The chargedeposition profiles were computed using existing representative Monte Carlo codes: TIGER3.0 (1D module of ITS3.0) and MCNP version 4B. The results showed that TIGER3.0 and MCNP4B agree very well (within 20% of each other) in the majority of the problem geometry. The TIGER results were considered to be accurate based on previous studies. Thus, it was demonstrated that MCNP, with its powerful geometry capability and flexible source and tally options, could be used in calculations of electron charging in high energy electron-rich space radiation environments.

  18. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2008 and September 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2009-03-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation [Pettitt et al., 1999], and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation [Haycox et al., 2005a and 2005b; Haycox et al., 2006a and 2006b; Zolezzi et al., 2007 and Duckworth et al., 2008]. Further information on this monitoring can be found in Appendix I. This report covers the period between 1st April 2008 and 30th September 2008 and is the seventh instalment of the 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  19. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2008 and September 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2009-03-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation [Pettitt et al., 1999], and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation [Haycox et al., 2005a and 2005b; Haycox et al., 2006a and 2006b; Zolezzi et al., 2007 and Duckworth et al., 2008]. Further information on this monitoring can be found in Appendix I. This report covers the period between 1st April 2008 and 30th September 2008 and is the seventh instalment of the 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  20. Anatomical study of superficial fascia and localized fat deposits of abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The development of liposuction and abdominoplasty has renewed interest in the anatomy of the localized fat deposits (LFD areas of the abdomen. This study aims at ascertaining the gross anatomy of superficial fascia and the localized fat deposits of abdomen. Materials and Methods: Eight adult cadavers (four males and four females were dissected. Attachments, number of layers of fascia and colour, shape and maximum size of the fat lobules in loin, and upper and lower abdomen were noted. Thickness of deep membranous layer of superficial fascia of upper abdomen and lower abdomen were measured by metal casing electronic digital calipers, with resolution being 10 μm. The independent sample t-test, ANOVA for comparison and Pearson coefficient for correlation were used. Results: Superficial fascia of the abdomen was multilayered in the midline and number of layers reduced laterally. The shape, size, color, and arrangement of fat lobules were different in different locations. The thickness of the fascia of the lower abdomen in males (mean 528.336 ± SE38.48 was significantly (P < 0.041 more than that in females. (Mean 390.822 ± SE36.24. Pearson correlation between thickness of the membranous layer of the upper and lower abdomen revealed moderately positive correlation (r=0.718; P<0.045. Conclusions: The LFD in the central region of the abdomen corresponds to the area of multilayered fascia with smaller fat lobules. The relatively thinner supporting fascia of the lower abdomen in females may be responsible for excessive bulges of the lower abdomen. The fat lobule anatomy at different sites under study was different.

  1. A DFT study of volatile organic compounds adsorption on transition metal deposited graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunaseth, Manaschai; Poldorn, Preeyaporn; Junkeaw, Anchalee; Meeprasert, Jittima; Rungnim, Chompoonut; Namuangruk, Supawadee; Kungwan, Nawee; Inntam, Chan; Jungsuttiwong, Siriporn

    2017-02-01

    Recently, elevated global emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was associated to the acceleration and increasing severity of climate change worldwide. In this work, we investigated the performance of VOCs removal via modified carbon-based adsorbent using density functional theory. Here, four transition metals (TMs) including Pd, Pt, Ag, and Au were deposited onto single-vacancy defective graphene (SDG) surface to increase the adsorption efficiency. Five prototypical VOCs including benzene, furan, pyrrole, pyridine, and thiophene were used to study the adsorption capability of metal-deposited graphene adsorbent. Calculation results revealed that Pd, Pt, Au, and Ag atoms and nanoclusters bind strongly onto the SDG surface. In this study, benzene, furan and pyrrole bind in the π-interaction mode using delocalized π-electron in aromatic ring, while pyridine and thiophene favor X- interaction mode, donating lone pair electron from heteroatom. In terms of adsorption, pyridine VOC adsorption strengths to the TM-cluster doped SDG surfaces are Pt4 (-2.11 eV) > Pd4 (-2.05 eV) > Ag4 (-1.53 eV) > Au4 (-1.87 eV). Our findings indicate that TM-doped SDG is a suitable adsorbent material for VOC removal. In addition, partial density of states analysis suggests that benzene, furan, and pyrrole interactions with TM cluster are based on p-orbitals of carbon atoms, while pyridine and thiophene interactions are facilitated by hybridized sp2-orbitals of heteroatoms. This work provides a key insight into the fundamentals of VOCs adsorption on carbon-based adsorbent.

  2. Spectroscopic study of barite from the Kremikovtsi Deposit (Bulgaria with implication for its origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimova Maya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Different genetic types (endogene and supergene of barite from the Kremikovtsi deposit (Bulgaria were studied by Laser-induced time-resolved luminescence (LITRL, Infrared (IR and Raman spectroscopy. The IR spectra of the endogene barites are quite similar to those reported in the literature and do not show appreciable differences among them. The IR spectra of the supergene barites are almost identical to those of the endogene ones in respect to the positions of the vibrational modes ν1, ν2 and ν4 of SO4 2 except for a shift of 3 cm-1 for the ν 3 band. They displayed a presence of additional bands, which are close to the ν3 and ν1 modes of CO3 2- in calcite. The Raman studies support the suggestion that the supergene barite contains traces of calcite. The modern LITRL technique allowed the detection of several luminescent centers in the endogene barite. Eu3+ luminescence was identified for the first time in barite. The different emission spectra at 266 and 532 nm excitations suggest there are at least 2 structural positions for Eu3+ in the barite crystal lattice. The luminescent spectra also revealed a rather unusual violet-blue Nd3+ emission, which usually occurs in the IR spectral range, as well as emissions of Ce3+, Eu2+, Tb3+, Ag+, Sn2+(? and UO2 2+. The oxidation state of cations isomorphically present in the barite crystal lattice suggests the endogene barite in the Kremikovtsi deposit precipitated from reduced fluids supposedly subjected to cooling (conductive/convective and oxidation (mixing with seawater.

  3. Pre-operative laboratory testing: A prospective study on comparison and cost analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh H Keshavan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims : Pre-operative investigations are performed before any surgical intervention under anaesthesia. Many are considered as routine. However, there are no clear guidelines regarding these in India. We aim to look at the relevance of the laboratory investigations ordered routinely and their cost implications compared with the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE guidelines. Methods: This prospective study was carried out at a tertiary care hospital. A total of 163 patients scheduled for elective surgical procedures were included in this study. Neither the surgeons nor anaesthesiologists involved in the case were aware of the study. The laboratory investigations of the patients who underwent surgery were noted. All values were categorised as normal or abnormal and they were assessed as indicated or unindicated based on NICE guidelines. Results: One hundred and sixty-three patients were subjected to a total of 984 tests. Forty three patients (26% were subjected to tests as per NICE guidelines. Of the 984 tests, 515 tests were unindicated (52%. Out of the 515 unindicated tests, 7 (1.3% were abnormal. None of these seven tests required any intervention or change of anaesthetic plan. The most common unindicated tests done were cardiac echocardiography and chest X-ray (92.5% and 93% respectively. The additional cost incurred towards unindicated tests was 63% of the total cost for the tests. Conclusion: Pre-operative laboratory investigations add to cost significantly. Patient premorbid conditions and surgical grade should guide the clinician to request for the relevant laboratory tests.

  4. Service Quality and Patient Satisfaction: An Exploratory Study of Pathology Laboratories in Jaipur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anuradha; Singh, Maithili R P

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important parts of healthcare system is diagnostics. Nowadays, Indians have become more aware of their health, due to improved and better availability of health related information, increase in medical tourism, and expanding health insurance. The demand for better diagnostic facilities have increased with the increase in lifestyle related diseases, excesses use of chemicals in agriculture practices and change in food habits. It is expected that the Indian diagnostic market will grow from USD $5 billion in the year 2012 to USD $32 billion by the year 2020 with 20% CAGR (India Brand Equity Foundation 2015 ). Today patients have easy access of information regarding the health services and they have become more concerned about it as they look forward to receiving the maximum value for their money. To win the confidence of the patients and to maintain that trust, it is required to deliver the right services to the right person at the right time. The purpose of this study was to develop a scale to measure the service quality at pathology laboratory. A thorough review of literature revealed that there are studies related to healthcare service quality but there is no such established scale to measure service quality of pathology laboratory. Thus, the authors strived to develop a reliable and valid instrument to measure the patients' perception toward pathology laboratory service quality. For this exploratory study was conducted on the sample of 80 patients of the laboratories in Jaipur city. The reliability and factor structures were tested to purify the scale. The findings revealed 13 items, comprising of three dimensions of service quality: responsiveness, tangibility, and reliability.

  5. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  6. Numerical study on morphology and solidification characteristics of successive droplet depositions on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaikalanathan, Vimalan

    Successive droplet impingement finds extensive applications in additive manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing, Liquid Metal Jetting and Net Form Manufacturing. Deposition, deformation and solidification of droplets are the constitutive stages in the process which determine the final outcome. Detailed knowledge about the flow behaviour, phase transformation and free surface deformation is required to have a complete understanding and optimization of the process parameters. Experimental research in this field is only limited to imaging techniques and post solidification analysis which only provide superficial information while overlooking most of the governing phenomenon. Knowledge of the physics governing the fluid and thermal behaviours can be applied to study the process with real time data pertaining to flow field, temperature profiles and solidification. However, free surface tracking, surface tension modelling, non-isothermal solidification and convection dominant heat transfer pose mathematical challenges in the solution of the governing equations. Moreover, deposition of droplets on pre-solidified splats or non-flat surfaces requires accurate special attention. The objective of the present work is to model the successive droplet impacts and simultaneous solidification and deformation. The highly non-linear flow field governed by the Navier Stokes equation is solved using a Two Step Projection method. The surface tension effects are accounted for through a Continuum Surface Force technique. One of the crucial elements in the study is the interface tracking algorithm. A Coupled Level Set Volume of Fluid (CLSVOF) method is formulated to give an accurate orientation of the drastically deforming interface and also facilitates generation of multiple droplets in a fixed domain at a user defined frequency, thereby conserving computational resources. The phase change is modelled using an enthalpy formulation of the energy equation with an implicit source term

  7. Tsunami Evidence in South Coast Java, Case Study: Tsunami Deposit along South Coast of Cilacap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Yan; Aswan; Zaim, Yahdi; Dwijo Santoso, Wahyu; Rochim, Nur; Daryono; Dewi Anugrah, Suci; Wijayanto; Gunawan, Indra; Yatimantoro, Tatok; Hidayanti; Herdiyani Rahayu, Resti; Priyobudi

    2017-06-01

    Cilacap Area is situated in coastal area of Southern Java and directly affected by tsunami hazard in 2006. This event was triggered by active subduction in Java Trench which active since long time ago. To detect tsunami and active tectonic in Southern Java, paleo-tsunami study is performed which is targeted paleo-tsunami deposit older than fifty years ago. During 2011 - 2016, 16 locations which suspected as paleo-tsunami location were visited and the test-pits were performed to obtain characteristic and stratigraphy of paleo-tsunami layers. Paleo-tsunami layer was identified by the presence of light-sand in the upper part of paleo-soil, liquefaction fine grain sandstone, and many rip-up clast of mudstone. The systematic samples were taken and analysis (micro-fauna, grainsize and dating analysis). Micro-fauna result shows that paleo-tsunami layer consist of benthonic foraminifera assemblages from different bathymetry and mixing in one layer. Moreover, grainsize shows random grain distribution which characterized as turbulence and strong wave deposit. Paleo-tsunami layers in Cilacap area are correlated using paleo-soil as marker. There are three paleo-tsunami layers and the distribution can be identified as PS-A, PS-B and PS-C. The samples which were taken in Glempang Pasir layer are being dated using Pb - Zn (Lead-Zinc) method. The result of Pb - Zn (Lead-Zinc) dating shows that PS-A was deposited in 139 years ago, PS-B in 21 years ago, and PS C in 10 years ago. This result indicates that PS -1 occurred in 1883 earthquake activity while PS B formed in 1982 earthquake and PS-C was formed by 2006 earthquake. For ongoing research, the older paleo-tsunami layers were determined in the Gua Nagaraja, close to Selok location and 6 layers of Paleo-tsunami suspect found which shown a similar characteristic with the layers from another location. The three layers deeper approximately have an older age than another location in Cilacap.

  8. DHM and serious games: a case-study oil and gas laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, V; Zamberlan, M; Streit, P; Oliveira, J; Guimarães, C; Pastura, F; Cid, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim in this paper is to present a research on the application of serious games for the design of laboratories in the oil and gas industries. The focus is in human virtual representation acquired from 3D scanning, human interaction, workspace layout and equipment designed considering ergonomics standards. The laboratory studies were simulated in Unity3D platform, which allows the users to control the DHM1 on the dynamic virtual scenario, in order to simulate work activities. This methodology can change the design process by improving the level of interaction between final users, managers and human factor teams. That helps to better visualize future work settings and improve the level of participation between all stakeholders.

  9. The Study of Indicatrices of Space Object Coatings in a Controlled Laboratory Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkin, N.; Burlak, N.; Petrov, M.; Strakhova, S.

    The indicatrices of light scattering by radiation balance coatings used on space objects (SO) were determined in the laboratory experiment in a controlled condition. The laboratory device for the physical simulation of photometric observations of space objects in orbit, which was used in this case to study optical properties of coating samples, is described. The features of light reflection off plane coating samples, including multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, metal surfaces coated with several layers of enamel EP-140, special polyacrylate enamel AK-512 and matte finish Tp-CO-2, were determined. The indicated coatings are compound reflectors which exhibit both diffuse and specular reflections. The data obtained are to be used in the development of computer optical-geometric models of space objects or their fragments (space debris) to interpret the photometry results for real space objects.

  10. Inside Solomon's house: an archaeological study of the Old Ashmolean chymical laboratory in Oxford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, Marcos

    2012-03-01

    This paper is based on the archaeological and analytical study of the laboratory remains from the Officina Chimica of the Old Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. Following a contextualisation of this laboratory, founded in the wake of Bacon's utopian idea of Solomon's Temple, it is argued that the assemblage is likely to date from the late seventeenth century and thus be connected to the work of Robert Plot, Christopher White, and, indirectly, Robert Boyle. The analytical study of the equipment reveals that the chymists at the Old Ashmolean obtained crucibles from the best manufacturers in Europe, and that they used these and other utensils for experiments involving mercury, sulphur, zinc, lead glass, manganese, and antimony. The importance of these elements for early modern chymistry is discussed in the light of relevant historical sources, including some of Boyle's chymical texts. Altogether, these finds illustrate some of the rich diversity of experiments that took place in one of the most prominent laboratories of the period, showing strong connections with longstanding alchemical concerns as well as with cutting-edge research and development ventures.

  11. Biofilm resilience to desiccation in groundwater aquifers: a laboratory and field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, L; Webber, J B; Hickson, A C; Abraham, P M; Close, M E

    2015-05-01

    Groundwater is used as a precious resource for drinking water worldwide. Increasing anthropogenic activity is putting increasing pressure on groundwater resources. One impact of increased groundwater abstraction coupled with increasing dry weather events is the lowering of groundwater levels within aquifers. Biofilms within groundwater aquifers offer protection to the groundwater by removing contaminants entering the aquifer systems from land use activities. The study