WorldWideScience

Sample records for deposition rate surface

  1. Influence of deposition rate on PL spectrum and surface morphology of ZnO nanolayers deposited on Si (100) substrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Zendehnam; M Mirzaee; S Miri

    2014-04-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on Si (100) substrate through sputtering of zinc by DC magnetron, followed by thermal oxidation. Different deposition rates were used in coating films with 100 nm thickness (0.6–4.5 nm/s). Photoluminescence spectra of the produced samples were obtained and it was found that the violet emission peak intensity increases with deposition rate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrograph and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images for the zinc oxide films were obtained. Morphological changes due to various deposition rate are discussed in the light of changes observed in the ZnO crystals. Low coating rates produced smooth surface with small grains while higher deposition rates increased the surface roughness and larger grain size. AFM and SEM results are in good agreement and support the PL results.

  2. Effect of Deposition Rate on Structure and Surface Morphology of Thin Evaporated Al Films on Dielectrics and Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill BORDO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al films with thickness of 100 nm were grown on unheated glass, silicon and mica substrates by electron beam evaporation. The deposition rates were adjusted in the range between 0.1 nm/s and 2 nm/s, the pressure in the vac­uum chamber during deposition was lower than 1·10–3 Pa. The structure and surface morphology of the as-deposited Al films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. SEM imaging of the films showed that the mean grain size of thin Al films on all of the substrates increased from 20 nm – 30 nm to 50 nm – 70 nm with increase of the deposition rate. Quantitative AFM characterization showed that for all substrates the root mean square surface roughness increases monotonically with increasing the deposition rate from 0.1 nm/s to 2 nm/s. The observed effects of the deposition rate on the grain size and surface roughness are explained by the fundamental characteristics of the island growth mode, the influence of the background gases and the surface morphology of the bare substrates.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3088

  3. Effect of Deposition Rate on Structure and Surface Morphology of Thin Evaporated Al Films on Dielectrics and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, K.; Rubahn, H. G.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) films with thickness of 100 nm were grown on unheated glass, silicon and mica substrates by electron beam evaporation. The deposition rates were adjusted in the range between 0.1 nm/s and 2 nm/s, the pressure in the vacuum chamber during deposition was lower than 1.10(-3) Pa...

  4. Surface Passivation of MoO3 Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition Towards High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Bilal

    2015-06-03

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in Lithium (Li) ion batteries at high rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g, on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2 coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li–ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex–situ HRTEM, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and X–ray diffraction was carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  5. Surface Passivation of MoO₃ Nanorods by Atomic Layer Deposition toward High Rate Durable Li Ion Battery Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B; Shahid, Muhammad; Nagaraju, D H; Anjum, D H; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Alshareef, H N

    2015-06-24

    We demonstrate an effective strategy to overcome the degradation of MoO3 nanorod anodes in lithium (Li) ion batteries at high-rate cycling. This is achieved by conformal nanoscale surface passivation of the MoO3 nanorods by HfO2 using atomic layer deposition (ALD). At high current density such as 1500 mA/g, the specific capacity of HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes is 68% higher than that of bare MoO3 electrodes after 50 charge/discharge cycles. After 50 charge/discharge cycles, HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes exhibited specific capacity of 657 mAh/g; on the other hand, bare MoO3 showed only 460 mAh/g. Furthermore, we observed that HfO2-coated MoO3 electrodes tend to stabilize faster than bare MoO3 electrodes because nanoscale HfO2 layer prevents structural degradation of MoO3 nanorods. Additionally, the growth temperature of MoO3 nanorods and the effect of HfO2 layer thickness was studied and found to be important parameters for optimum battery performance. The growth temperature defines the microstructural features and HfO2 layer thickness defines the diffusion coefficient of Li-ions through the passivation layer to the active material. Furthermore, ex situ high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction were carried out to explain the capacity retention mechanism after HfO2 coating.

  6. Very low surface recombination velocity on p-type c-Si by high-rate plasma-deposited aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Cast, Pierre; Kania, Daniel; Hofmann, Marc; Benick, Jan; Rentsch, Jochen; Preu, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    Aluminum oxide layers can provide excellent passivation for lowly and highly doped p-type silicon surfaces. Fixed negative charges induce an accumulation layer at the p-type silicon interface, resulting in very effective field-effect passivation. This paper presents highly negatively charged (Qox=-2.1×1012 cm-2) aluminum oxide layers produced using an inline plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, leading to very low effective recombination velocities (˜10 cm s-1) on low-resistivity p-type substrates. A minimum static deposition rate (100 nm min-1) at least one order of magnitude higher than atomic layer deposition was achieved on a large carrier surfaces (˜1 m2) without significantly reducing the resultant passivation quality.

  7. Deposit Reserve Rate No Panacea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark; A.DeWeaver

    2006-01-01

    To rein in runaway investment, China's central bank, the People's Bank of China (PBOC), took several measures in mid-June, including the most dramatic step of raising the deposit reserve rate by 0.5 percentage point According to Mark A. DeWeaver, who manages Quantrarian Asia Hedge, a fund that invests in Asian equities, the PBOC's measures may lower money supply growth in the short term; that is, the effect of these measures "may be only temporary." He believes that "attempts to slow money supply growth ...

  8. Rising interest rates, bank loans, and deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Hesna Genay; Darrin Halcomb

    2004-01-01

    The authors show how the relationships between interest rate changes, deposit growth rates, and loan growth rates have changed in the last ten years, discuss some possible reasons, and assess the likely impact of rising interest rates on loans and deposits going forward.

  9. VARIATION IN EROSION/DEPOSITION RATES OVER THE LAST FIFTTY YEARS ON ALLUVIAL FAN SURFACES OF L. PLEISTOCENE-MID HOLOCENE AGE, ESTIMATIONS USING 137CS SOIL PROFILE DATA, AMARGOSA VALLEY, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Harrington; R. Kelly; K.T. Ebert

    2005-08-26

    Variations in erosion and deposition for the last fifty years (based on estimates from 137Cs profiles) on surfaces (Late Pleistocene to Late Holocene in age) making up the Fortymile Wash alluvial fan south of Yucca Mountain, is a function of surface age and of desert pavement development or absence. For purposes of comparing erosion and deposition, the surfaces can be examined as three groups: (1) Late Pleistocene surfaces possess areas of desert pavement development with thin Av or sandy A horizons, formed by the trapping capabilities of the pavements. These zones of deposition are complemented by coppice dune formation on similar parts of the surface. Areas on the surface where no pavement development has occurred are erosional in nature with 0.0 +/- 0.0 cm to 1.5 +/- 0.5 cm of erosion occurring primarily by winds blowing across the surface. Overall these surfaces may show either a small net depositional gain or small erosional loss. (2) Early Holocene surfaces have no well-developed desert pavements, but may have residual gravel deposits in small areas on the surfaces. These surfaces show the most consistent erosional surface areas on which it ranges from 1.0 +/-.01 cm to 2.0+/- .01 cm. Fewer depositional forms are found on this age of surface so there is probably a net loss of 1.5 cm across these surfaces. (3) The Late Holocene surfaces show the greatest variability in erosion and deposition. Overbank deposition during floods cover many edges of these surfaces and coppice dune formation also creates depositional features. Erosion rates are highly variable and range from 0.0 +/- 0.0 to a maximum of 2.0+/-.01. Erosion occurs because of the lack of protection of the surface. However, the common areas of deposition probably result in the surface having a small net depositional gain across these surfaces. Thus, the interchannel surfaces of the Fortymile Wash fan show a variety of erosional styles as well as areas of deposition. The fan, therefore, is a dynamic

  10. Surface Modification by Physical Vapour Deposition,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-13

    effect of the rare-earth metals is to form a stable oxide at the surface, or to form stable perovskites such as CaTiO3 or EuTiO3 , and thus prevent...Bunshah, "High Rate Deposition Of Hafnium By Activated Reactive Evaporation", Thin Solid Films, 63, 327, (1979). 5 B.E. Jacobson, R. Nimuagadda, R.F

  11. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  12. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Nanxi [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Massoudieh, Arash [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Liang, Xiaomeng [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hu, Dehong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kamai, Tamir [Agricultural Research Organization, Bet Dagan (Israel); Ginn, Timothy R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Zilles, Julie L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nguyen, Thanh H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  13. Atmospheric Deposition of Phosphorus to the Everglades: Concepts, Constraints, and Published Deposition Rates for Ecosystem Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth W. Redfield

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes concepts underlying the atmospheric input of phosphorus (P to ecosystems, published rates of P deposition, measurement methods, and approaches to future monitoring and research. P conveyed through the atmosphere can be a significant nutrient source for some freshwater and marine ecosystems. Particle sources and sinks at the land-air interface produce variation in P deposition from the atmosphere across temporal and spatial scales. Natural plant canopies can affect deposition rates by changing the physical environment and surface area for particle deposition. Land-use patterns can alter P deposition rates by changing particle concentrations in the atmosphere. The vast majority of P in dry atmospheric deposition is conveyed by coarse (2.5 to 10 μm and giant (10 to 100 μm particles, and yet these size fractions represent a challenge for long-term atmospheric monitoring in the absence of accepted methods for routine sampling. Most information on P deposition is from bulk precipitation collectors and wet/dry bucket sampling, both with questionable precision and accuracy. Most published annual rates of P deposition are gross estimates derived from bulk precipitation sampling in locations around the globe and range from about 5 to well over 100 mg P m–2 year–1, although most inland ecosystems receive between 20 and 80 mg P m–2 year–1. Rates below 30 mg P m–2 year–1 are found in remote areas and near coastlines. Intermediate rates of 30 to 50 mg P m–2 year–1 are associated with forests or mixed land use, and rates of 50 to 100 mg P m–2 year–1 or more are often recorded from urban or agricultural settings. Comparison with other methods suggests that these bulk precipitation estimates provide crude boundaries around actual P deposition rates for various land uses. However, data screening cannot remove all positive bias caused by contamination of bucket or bulk collectors. As a consequence, continued sampling

  14. Hydrogen interactions with polycrystalline and with deposited titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, A. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Shamir, N. [Nuclear Research Center-Negev, PO Box 9001, Beer Sheva (Israel); Fromm, E. [Max-Planck Institute fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Szokefalvi-Nagy, A. [Max-Planck Institute fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Mintz, M.H. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel)]|[Nuclear Research Center-Negev, PO Box 9001, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    1997-02-15

    The room temperature kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption and adsorption on polycrystalline and on deposited (sputter-deposited and evaporation-deposited) titanium surfaces were studied. Measurements of hydrogen surface accumulation were performed in a combined surface analyses system incorporating direct recoils spectrometry and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). There, three different types of surface cleaning procedure were applied: heat-flashing, sputtering and sputter-deposition of titanium on a polycrystalline titanium substrate. The surface chemisorption kinetics obtained for the deposited samples were compared with the total kinetics of the gas phase consumption, performed in a volumetric Wagener system. From this comparison it was possible to distinguish between topmost surface chemisorption and subsurface (or bulk) absorption kinetics. It was concluded that, for all types of surface studied, hydrogen chemisorbed according to a Langmuir-type random two-sites chemisorption model, with high (close to unity) zero-coverage sticking probabilities. The only difference between these surfaces was in their roughness factors, which increased going from the heat-flashed, through the sputtered, to the deposited surfaces. Following the initial stage of a chemisorbed surface layer formation, constant-rate absorption of hydrogen proceeded over a very wide range of exposures (greater than 10{sup 4} Langmuirs). The accommodation probability of hydrogen during this linear stage was about 10{sup -2}. It is possible that this absorption process is controlled by the chemisorption of the H{sub 2} on the surface hydride phase, formed by the earlier hydrogen chemisorption. (orig.)

  15. High-deposition-rate ceramics synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Outka, D.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Parallel experimental and computational investigations are conducted in this project to develop validated numerical models of ceramic synthesis processes. Experiments are conducted in the High-Temperature Materials Synthesis Laboratory in Sandia`s Combustion Research Facility. A high-temperature flow reactor that can accommodate small preforms (1-3 cm diameter) generates conditions under which deposition can be observed, with flexibility to vary both deposition temperature (up to 1500 K) and pressure (as low as 10 torr). Both mass spectrometric and laser diagnostic probes are available to provide measurements of gas-phase compositions. Experiments using surface analytical techniques are also applied to characterize important processes occuring on the deposit surface. Computational tools developed through extensive research in the combustion field are employed to simulate the chemically reacting flows present in typical industrial reactors. These include the CHEMKIN and Surface-CHEMKIN suites of codes, which permit facile development of complex reaction mechanisms and vastly simplify the implementation of multi-component transport and thermodynamics. Quantum chemistry codes are also used to estimate thermodynamic and kinetic data for species and reactions for which this information is unavailable.

  16. Deposition uniformity inspection in IC wafer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Jeng, J. J.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-03-01

    This paper focuses on the task of automatic visual inspection of color uniformity on the surface of integrated circuits (IC) wafers arising from the layering process. The oxide thickness uniformity within a given wafer with a desired target thickness is of great importance for modern semiconductor circuits with small oxide thickness. The non-uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a wafer surface will proceed to fail testing in Wafer Acceptance Test (WAT). Early detection of non-uniform deposition in a wafer surface can reduce material waste and improve production yields. The fastest and most low-priced inspection method is a machine vision-based inspection system. In this paper, the proposed visual inspection system is based on the color representations which were reflected from wafer surface. The regions of non-uniform deposition present different colors from the uniform background in a wafer surface. The proposed inspection technique first learns the color data via color space transformation from uniform deposition of normal wafer surfaces. The individual small region statistical comparison scheme then proceeds to the testing wafers. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively detect the non-uniform deposition regions on the wafer surface. The inspection time of the deposited wafers is quite compatible with the atmospheric pressure CVD time.

  17. Effect of underpotential deposition on the surface enhanced Raman effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kester, J.J.

    1983-06-15

    The first experimental observation of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from benzotriazole (BTA) on Ag as a function of the underpotential deposition of Tl is reported. The complete quenching of SERS before completion of the submonolayer deposition of Tl is attributed primarily to displacement of BTA from the Ag surface. The decrease in intensity of SERS is found to be approximately linear with the number of Tl ions deposited. But the rate of quenching of SERS is dependent on the initial surface topography. Increased electron scattering is proposed as an additional quenching mechanism. Upon Tl deposition, frequency shifts for one of the BTA lines are determined to be three times larger than that expected based on a surface charging mechanism. Mechanisms for SERS based on electronic interactions of the adsorbate and substrate are indicated.

  18. Particle Deposition onto Enclosure Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-20

    3.1 Brownian Diffusion 7 3.2 Turbulent Diffusion 7 3.3 Drag Force 8 3.4 Gravitational Settling 10 3.5 Thermophoresis 10 3.6 Electrostatic...the surface by mechanisms such as Brownian/turbulent diffu- sion, gravitational settling, thermophoresis , inertial drift, and electrostatic...and 3.05 x 10_1 cm/s, respectively. 3.5 Thermophoresis In the presence of a temperature gradient, aerosol particles are driven from the high to low

  19. Underpotential deposition: From planar surfaces to nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, O. A.; Vélez, P.; Macagno, V. A.; Leiva, E. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    An overview is given of selected theoretical, experimental and computer simulation research on thermodynamic modeling applied to the metal underpotential deposition. Focus is made mainly on the last 20 years. The upd-theory on planar surfaces is revisited and the thermodynamic framework is extended to consider underpotential deposition on nanoparticles and to include anion coadsorption, solvation and double layer charging. Results from molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations are shown for systems of experimental interest. At the end some perspectives for further advanced modeling of the present problem are given.

  20. Surface Acoustic Wave Atomizer and Electrostatic Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  1. Designing polymer surfaces via vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Asatekin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD methods significantly augment the capabilities of traditional surface modification techniques for designing polymeric surfaces. In CVD polymerization, the monomer(s are delivered to the surface through the vapor phase and then undergo simultaneous polymerization and thin film formation. By eliminating the need to dissolve macromolecules, CVD enables insoluble polymers to be coated and prevents solvent damage to the substrate. Since de-wetting and surface tension effects are absent, CVD coatings conform to the geometry of the underlying substrate. Hence, CVD polymers can be readily applied to virtually any substrate: organic, inorganic, rigid, flexible, planar, three-dimensional, dense, or porous. CVD methods integrate readily with other vacuum processes used to fabricate patterned surfaces and devices. CVD film growth proceeds from the substrate up, allowing for interfacial engineering, real-time monitoring, thickness control, and the synthesis of films with graded composition. This article focuses on two CVD polymerization methods that closely translate solution chemistry to vapor deposition; initiated CVD and oxidative CVD. The basic concepts underlying these methods and the resultant advantages over other thin film coating techniques are described, along with selected applications where CVD polymers are an enabling technology.

  2. Influence of Gas Flow Rate on the Deposition Rate on Stainless Steel 202 Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Chowdhury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid thin films have been deposited on stainless steel 202 (SS 202 substrates at different flow rates of natural gas using a hot filament thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD reactor. In the experiments, the variations of thin film deposition rate with the variation of gas flow rate have been investigated. The effects of gap between activation heater and substrate on the deposition rate have also been observed. Results show that deposition rate on SS 202 increases with the increase in gas flow rate within the observed range. It is also found that deposition rate increases with the decrease in gap between activation heater and substrate. In addition, friction coefficient and wear rate of SS 202 sliding against SS 304 under different sliding velocities are also investigated before and after deposition. The experimental results reveal that improved friction coefficient and wear rate is obtained after deposition than that of before deposition.

  3. EROSION RATE OF RESERVOIR DEPOSIT AS REVEALED BY LABORATORY EXPERIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Amar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction of dams and reservoirs in a river can give significant impacts on its flow of water and sediment, and can cause long-term morphological changes on the river. Reservoir sedimentation can reduce a reservoir’s effective flood control volume, and in some severe cases can cause overtopping during floods. Sediment deposition against a dam can reduce its stability, and affect the operation of low-level outlet works, gates, and valves. The abrasive action of sediment particles can roughen the surface of release facilities and can cause cavitations and vibration. Sedimentation can also affect a reservoir’s water quality, and reduce its flood control, water supply, hydropower, and recreation benefits. Consequently, taking sedimentation into consideration not only in the planning and design, but also in the operation and maintenance of a dam and reservoir is important. Keywords: Erosion rate, reservoir deposit, shear stress.

  4. Radiative transfer modeling of surface chemical deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote detection of a surface-bound chemical relies on the recognition of a pattern, or "signature," that is distinct from the background. Such signatures are a function of a chemical's fundamental optical properties, but also depend upon its specific morphology. Importantly, the same chemical can exhibit vastly different signatures depending on the size of particles composing the deposit. We present a parameterized model to account for such morphological effects on surface-deposited chemical signatures. This model leverages computational tools developed within the planetary and atmospheric science communities, beginning with T-matrix and ray-tracing approaches for evaluating the scattering and extinction properties of individual particles based on their size and shape, and the complex refractive index of the material itself. These individual-particle properties then serve as input to the Ambartsumian invariant imbedding solution for the reflectance of a particulate surface composed of these particles. The inputs to the model include parameters associated with a functionalized form of the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as parameters associated with the particle packing density and surface roughness. The model is numerically inverted via Sandia's Dakota package, optimizing agreement between modeled and measured reflectance spectra, which we demonstrate on data acquired on five size-selected silica powders over the 4-16 μm wavelength range. Agreements between modeled and measured reflectance spectra are assessed, while the optimized PSDs resulting from the spectral fitting are then compared to PSD data acquired from independent particle size measurements.

  5. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  6. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Deposition on Model Environmental Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deposition of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on model environmental surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Deposition behaviors of MWNTs on positively and negatively charged surfaces were in good agreement with Der...

  7. High-rate diamond deposition by microwave plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin

    In this dissertation, the growth of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The goal of this research is to deposit high quality HOD (Highly Oriented Diamond) films with a growth rate greater than 1 mum/hr. For the (100)-oriented HOD films, the growth rate achieved by the traditional process is only 0.3 mum/hr while the theoretical limit is ˜0.45 mum/hr. This research increases the growth rate up to 5.3 mum/hr (with a theoretical limit of ˜7 mum/hr) while preserving the crystal quality. This work builds a connection between the theoretical study of the CVD process and the experimental research. The study is extended from the growth of regular polycrystalline diamond to highly oriented diamond (HOD) films. For the increase of the growth rate of regular polycrystalline diamond thin films, a scaling growth model developed by Goodwin is introduced in details to assist in the understanding of the MPCVD (Microwave Plasma CVD) process. Within the Goodwin's scaling model, there are only four important sub-processes for the growth of diamond: surface modification, adsorption, desorption, and incorporation. The factors determining the diamond growth rate and film quality are discussed following the description of the experimental setup and process parameters. Growth rate and crystal quality models are reviewed to predict and understand the experimental results. It is shown that the growth rate of diamond can be increased with methane input concentration and the amount of atomic hydrogen (by changing the total pressure). It is crucial to provide enough atomic hydrogen to conserve crystal quality of the deposited diamond film. The experimental results demonstrate that for a fixed methane concentration, there is a minimum pressure for growth of good diamond. Similarly, for a fixed total pressure, there is a maximum methane concentration for growth of good diamond, and this maximum methane concentration increases

  8. USING DEPOSIT INTEREST RATES IN SETTING LOAN INTEREST RATES: EVIDENCE FROM TURKEY

    OpenAIRE

    Önder Kaymaz; Özgür Kaymaz

    2011-01-01

    Bank credit margins are set by two dynamics: loan interest rates and deposit interest rates. The latter is the leading funding cost for the commercial banks. Sampling the period running from the last financial quarter of 2002 to the last financial quarter of 2009, we consider all the listed commercial banks operating in Turkey. We obtain strong evidence of one-way causality between loan interest rates and deposit interest rates. In setting their loan interest rates, banks use deposit interest...

  9. Reaction kinetics of metal deposition via surface limited red-ox replacement of underpotentially deposited metal monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokcen, Dincer; Bae, Sang-Eun [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States); Brankovic, Stanko R., E-mail: Stanko.Brankovic@mail.uh.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States); Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States); Chemistry Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 772004-4005 (United States)

    2011-06-30

    The study of the kinetics of metal deposition via surface limited red-ox replacement of underpotentially deposited metal monolayers is presented. The model system was Pt submonolayer deposition on Au(1 1 1) via red-ox replacement of Pb and Cu UPD monolayers on Au(1 1 1). The kinetics of a single replacement reaction was studied using the formalism of the comprehensive analytical model developed to fit the open circuit potential transients from deposition experiments. The practical reaction kinetics parameters like reaction half life, reaction order and reaction rate constant are determined and discussed with their relevance to design and control of deposition experiments. The effects of transport limitation and the role of the anions/electrolyte on deposition kinetics are investigated and their significance to design of effective deposition process is discussed.

  10. Debris-flow deposits and watershed erosion rates near southern Death Valley, CA, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K.M.; Menges, C.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Debris flows from the steep, granitic hillslopes of the Kingston Range, CA are commensurate in age with nearby fluvial deposits. Quaternary chronostratigraphic differentiation of debris-flow deposits is based upon time-dependent characteristics such as relative boulder strength, derived from Schmidt Hammer measurements, degree of surface desert varnish, pedogenesis, and vertical separation. Rock strength is highest for Holocene-aged boulders and decreases for Pleistocene-aged boulders weathering to grus. Volumes of age-stratified debris-flow deposits, constrained by deposit thickness above bedrock, GPS surveys, and geologic mapping, are greatest for Pleistocene deposits. Shallow landslide susceptibility, derived from a topographically based GIS model, in conjunction with deposit volumes produces watershed-scale erosion rates of ???2-47 mm ka-1, with time-averaged Holocene rates exceeding Pleistocene rates. ?? 2003 Millpress.

  11. Deposit Rate and Lending Rate in Jordan, Which leads Which? A Cointegration Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    D. Sweidan, Osama

    2012-01-01

    This study intends to investigate empirically the long-run relationship between deposit and lending rates in Jordan by utilizing quarterly data over the period (1994-2010). Empirically, we search to identify the dominant interest rate; either deposit rate or lending rate. To achieve the current study goals, we employ the error correction model technique and the asymmetric short-run dynamic model. The empirical evidence of the Jordanian economy illustrates deposit and lending ra...

  12. Optimal bank portfolio choice under fixed-rate deposit insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Anlong Li

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the investment decisions of a bank whose deposits are fully insured under fixed-rate insurance, showing how banks dynamically adjust their investment portfolios in response to market information and how this flexibility affects both investment decisions and the fair cost of deposit insurance.

  13. Fractional Differencing Modeling and Forecasting of Eurocurrency Deposit Rates

    OpenAIRE

    John Barkoulas; Baum, Christopher F

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the low frequency properties of three- and six- month rates for Eurocurrency deposits denominated in eight major currencies with specific emphasis on fractional dynamics. Using the fractional integration testing procedure suggested by Geweke and Porter-Hudak (1983), we find that several of the Eurocurrency deposit rates are fractionally integrated processes with long memory. These findings have important implications for econometric modeling, forecasting, and cointegration test...

  14. Evaluating urban runoff pollution: sediments deposited on a road surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alfonso Zafra Mejía

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The pollution caused by runoff water continues being a great problem in urban areas. Studying the behavior of sediments depo-sited on a road surface serves to determine the characteristics of their build-up during dry times and wash-off during rainy pe-riods. It will also lead to establishing pollution control mechanisms associated with the sediment deposited on particular types of road surfaces. This paper presents data regarding the sediment accumulating on a road surface in the city of Torrelavega in northern Spain during a 65-day period, during which time 132 samples were collected. Two types of sediment collection samples were obtained: vacuumed dry samples (free load and those swept up following vacuuming (fixed load. Sediment loading, particle size distribution and moisture were determined for each type of sample. The data showed that the sediment loading (gm−2 and vacuumed availability of the load which adhered most strongly to the surface (fixed load increased with the number of dry days. Collected sediment particle size distribution tended to be finer with the increase in the number of dry days. <125 μm particle sizes presented the greatest rate of build-up during dry time and those which were <500 μm had the greatest susceptibi-lity to being washed off during rain.

  15. PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON SUPERHYDROPHOBIC SURFACES BY SESSILE DROPLET EVAPORATION

    OpenAIRE

    Dicuangco, Mercy G.

    2014-01-01

    Prediction and active control of the spatial distribution of particulate deposits obtained from sessile droplet evaporation is essential in ink-jet printing, nanostructure assembly, biotechnology, and other applications that require localized deposits. In recent years, sessile droplet evaporation on bio-inspired superhydrophobic surfaces has become an attractive method for depositing materials on a site-specific, localized region, but is less explored compared to evaporative deposition on hyd...

  16. Competitive growth model involving random deposition and random deposition with surface relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Claudio M.; Monetti, Roberto A.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2001-06-01

    A deposition model that considers a mixture of random deposition with surface relaxation and a pure random deposition is proposed and studied. As the system evolves, random deposition with surface relaxation (pure random deposition) take place with probability p and (1{minus}p), respectively. The discrete (microscopic) approach to the model is studied by means of extensive numerical simulations, while continuous equations are used in order to investigate the mesoscopic properties of the model. A dynamic scaling ansatz for the interface width W(L,t,p) as a function of the lattice side L, the time t and p is formulated and tested. Three exponents, which can be linked to the standard growth exponent of random deposition with surface relaxation by means of a scaling relation, are identified. In the continuous limit, the model can be well described by means of a phenomenological stochastic growth equation with a p-dependent effective surface tension.

  17. Effect of superhydrophobic surface morphology on evaporative deposition patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicuangco, Mercy; Dash, Susmita; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2014-05-01

    Prediction and active control of the spatial distribution of particulate deposits obtained from sessile droplet evaporation are vital in printing, nanostructure assembly, biotechnology, and other applications that require localized deposits. This Letter presents surface wettability-based localization of evaporation-driven particulate deposition and the effect of superhydrophobic surface morphology on the distribution of deposits. Sessile water droplets containing suspended latex particles are evaporated on non-wetting textured surfaces with varying microstructure geometry at ambient conditions. The droplets are visualized throughout the evaporation process to track the temporal evolution of contact radius and apparent contact angle. The resulting particle deposits on the substrates are quantitatively characterized. The experimental results show that superhydrophobic surfaces suppress contact-line deposition during droplet evaporation, thereby providing an effective means of localizing the deposition of suspended particles. A correlation between deposit size and surface morphology, explained in terms of the interface pressure balance at the transition between wetting states, reveals an optimum surface morphology for minimizing the deposit coverage area.

  18. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika; Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas-solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin - even non-uniform - atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid.

  19. Effect of thermophoresis and other parameters on the particle deposition on a tilted surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdolzadeh, M., E-mail: abdolzadeh@iauk.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrabian, M.A.; Zahedi, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani Goharrizi, A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    In this study a modified version of v2-f turbulence model ({phi}-{alpha}), is applied to simulate a non-isothermal air-flow. The {phi}-{alpha} model and a two-phase Eulerian approach complement each other to predict the rate of particle deposition on a tilted surface. The {phi}-{alpha} model can accurately calculate the normal fluctuations, which mainly represent the non-isotropic nature of turbulence regime near the wall. The Eulerian model was modified considering the most important mechanism in the particle deposition rate when compared to the experimental data. The model performance is examined by comparing the rate of particle deposition on a vertical surface with the experimental data in a turbulent channel flow available in the literature. The effects of lift force, turbophoretic force, thermophoreric force, electrostatic force, gravitational force and Brownian/turbulent diffusion were examined on the particle deposition rate. The results show that, using the {phi}-{alpha} model predicts the rate of deposition with reasonable accuracy. The results of modified particle model are in good agreement with the experimental data. This study highlights the paramount effect of thermophoretic force on the particle deposition rate and clearly shows that when the temperature difference exceeds a certain limit, the electrostatic force has insignificant effect on the particle deposition rate. Furthermore, it is indicated that even at small temperature differences, the effect of tilt angle on the particle deposition rate for intermediate-size particles is negligible.

  20. Electroreduction of Peroxide on Au(100) Surface Modified with Underpotentially Deposited Bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masanori; Nagahara, Yoshiki; Yoshimoto, Soichiro; Inukai, Junji; Itaya, Kingo

    2004-10-01

    The adlayer structure of Bi underpotentially deposited on Au(100) was investigated in a HClO4 solution using in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy. The underpotential deposition of Bi was found to occur in three steps. The electrochemical reduction rate of H2O2 on the Bi-modified Au(100) surface was the highest for an intermediate coverage of Bi.

  1. Research on depositing Ni45 alloy on titanium alloy surface by electrospark deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Guiqiao

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Taking Ni45 bar as electrode, a strengthened layer of thickness up to 50 μm was built up on BT20 titanium alloy matrix by means of electrospark deposition. Results of phase analysis by using of X-ray diffraction confirmed that the deposition layer was composed mostly of three phases, NiTi, NiTi2 and Ti. The surface microhardness of the deposition layer was up to 910 HV0.05, about 2.7 times as high as that of the matrix. The hardness at the cross-section of the entire deposition layer showed a gradient distribution. The effects of capacitance and deposition time on thickness of deposition layer were also studied, and results showed that with relatively low capacity and short deposition time the deposition layer without cracks can be obtained.

  2. High deposition rate nanocrystalline silicon with enhanced homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verkerk, Arjan; Rath, Jatindra K.; Schropp, Ruud [Section Nanophotonics-Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-03-15

    High rate growth of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) brings additional challenges for the homogeneity in the growth direction, since the start-up effects affect a larger portion of the film, and the very high degree of depletion increases the influence of back diffusion from the inactive region into the plasma zone. It was calculated that back diffusion plays a role in the regime for high deposition rate (4.5 nm/s) via the residence time for particles in the plasma and the corresponding diffusion length for silane from outside the plasma. The stabilization time for back diffusion was derived and found to be on the order of tens of seconds. Experiment showed that the incubation layer for nc-Si:H is very thick in films deposited at a high rate compared to films deposited in a regime of lower deposition rate. The use of a hydrogen plasma start greatly reduced this incubation layer. Further control of the crystalline fraction could be achieved via slight reduction of the degree of depletion via the silane flow. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Experimental study of porosity reduction in high deposition-rate Laser Material Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongliang; Gasser, Andres; Schopphoven, Thomas; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2015-12-01

    For several years, the interest in Additive Manufacturing (AM) is continuously expanding, owing to the paradigm shift that new production processes, such as Laser Material Deposition (LMD), provide over conventional manufacturing technologies. With LMD, three-dimensional, complex components out of a wide range of materials can be manufactured consecutively layer-by-layer. Despite the technological advantages of the LMD process, currently achieved deposition-rates of approx. 0.5 kg/h for Inconel 718 (IN 718) remain a major concern in regards to processing times and economic feasibility. Moreover, processing conditions need to be chosen carefully or else material defects can be systematically formed either at the interface separating two adjacent clad layers, at the bonding zone or within the bulk of the layer. In this respect, the effects of powder humidity, laser power, nominal powder particle size, powder morphology and shielding gas flow rate on the porosity in laser deposited single tracks at an increased deposition-rate of approx. 2 kg/h was investigated through experiments. Based on experimental results, several approaches of reducing porosity in high deposition-rate LMD are proposed in this paper.

  4. Modeling the influence of incident angle and deposition rate on a nanostructure grown by oblique angle deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun-Dar; Dong, Yu-Wei

    2017-02-01

    In this study, numerical approaches were applied to theoretically investigate the influence of process parameters, such as the incident angle and the deposition rate, on the nanostructural formation of thin films by oblique angle deposition (OAD). A continuum model was first developed, and the atomic diffusion, shadowing effect and steering effect were incorporated in the formation mechanisms of the surface morphology and nanostructure of the deposited films. A characteristic morphology of columnar nanorods corresponding to an OAD was well reproduced through this kinetic model. With the increase of the incident angle, the shadowing effect played a significant role in the columnar structures and the ratio of the surface area to volume was raised, implying a high level of voids in the nanostructures. When the deposition rate decreased, the porosity was notably suppressed due to the atomic diffusion in the growth process. These simulation results coincide well with many experimental observations. With the manipulation of the numerical simulations, the underlying mechanisms of the morphological formation during OAD were revealed, which also provided plentiful information to stimulate the process designs for manufacturing advanced materials.

  5. Atomic and molecular layer deposition for surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vähä-Nissi, Mika, E-mail: mika.vaha-nissi@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Sievänen, Jenni; Salo, Erkki; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Kenttä, Eija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko, E-mail: leena-sisko.johansson@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, PO Box 16100, FI‐00076 AALTO (Finland); Koskinen, Jorma T.; Harlin, Ali [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, PO Box 1000, FI‐02044 VTT (Finland)

    2014-06-01

    Atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD and MLD, respectively) techniques are based on repeated cycles of gas–solid surface reactions. A partial monolayer of atoms or molecules is deposited to the surface during a single deposition cycle, enabling tailored film composition in principle down to molecular resolution on ideal surfaces. Typically ALD/MLD has been used for applications where uniform and pinhole free thin film is a necessity even on 3D surfaces. However, thin – even non-uniform – atomic and molecular deposited layers can also be used to tailor the surface characteristics of different non-ideal substrates. For example, print quality of inkjet printing on polymer films and penetration of water into porous nonwovens can be adjusted with low-temperature deposited metal oxide. In addition, adhesion of extrusion coated biopolymer to inorganic oxides can be improved with a hybrid layer based on lactic acid. - Graphical abstract: Print quality of a polylactide film surface modified with atomic layer deposition prior to inkjet printing (360 dpi) with an aqueous ink. Number of printed dots illustrated as a function of 0, 5, 15 and 25 deposition cycles of trimethylaluminum and water. - Highlights: • ALD/MLD can be used to adjust surface characteristics of films and fiber materials. • Hydrophobicity after few deposition cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to e.g. complex formation. • Same effect on cellulosic fabrics observed with low temperature deposited TiO{sub 2}. • Different film growth and oxidation potential with different precursors. • Hybrid layer on inorganic layer can be used to improve adhesion of polymer melt.

  6. Controllable Deposition of Alloy Clusters or Nanoparticles Catalysts on Carbon Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, K.; Ando, Y.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.

    2011-08-15

    We describe a simple method for controllably depositing Pt-Ru alloy nanoparticles on carbon surfaces that is mediated by Pb or Cu adlayers undergoing underpotential deposition and stripping during Pt and Ru codeposition at diffusion-limiting currents. The amount of surface Pt atoms deposited largely reflects the number of potential cycles causing the deposition and stripping of the metal adlayer at underpotentials, the metal species used as a mediator, and the scan rate of the potential cycles. We employed electrochemical methanol oxidation to gain information on the catalyst's activities. The catalysts with large amounts of surface Pt atoms have relatively high methanol-oxidation activity. Catalysts prepared using this method enhance methanol-oxidation activity per electrode surface area, while maintaining catalytic activity per surface Pt atom; thus, the amount of Pt is reduced in comparison with conventional methanol-oxidation catalysts. The method is suitable for efficient synthesizing various bimetallic catalysts.

  7. Surface mining of the uranium deposit of Roussay (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begeot, M.; Marvy, A.

    1986-12-01

    Surface mining of this COGEMA mine started in October 1983. Mine, personnel, deposit geology, prospecting, mining method and equipment, environmental problems (dusts, noise, water treatment, revegetation) are described. 158000 kg of uranium were produced in 1985.

  8. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface-A modeling based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuza, S. M.; Taufique, M. F. N.; Banerjee, Soumik

    2017-02-01

    The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  9. Influence of deposited CNTs on the surface of carbon fiber by ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J. J.; Liu, F.; Deng, C.; Fang, L. C.; Li, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    The surface property of carbon fiber directly affects the interface performance between carbon fiber and matrix. To improve the surface property of carbon fiber, we proposed a simple method to prepare carbon nanotubes /carbon fiber hybrid fiber via ultrasonically assisted electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Surface morphologies and surface functional group of carbon fibers were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), respectively. The results show that the deposition of carbon nanotubes changed the surface morphologies of carbon fibers and introduced polar groups (C=O and C-O) to carbon fiber surface. Comparing the results with EPD-only, ultrasonically assisted EPD increased the uniformity of carbon nanotubes coatings whereas only sparse and not uniformly deposition formed without ultrasonic.

  10. Research on depositing Ni45 alloy on titanium alloy surface by electrospark deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Su Guiqiao; You Tao; Zhang Chunhui

    2008-01-01

    Taking Ni45 bar as electrode, a strengthened layer of thickness up to 50 μm was built up on BT20 titanium alloy matrix by means of electrospark deposition. Results of phase analysis by using of X-ray diffraction confirmed that the deposition layer was composed mostly of three phases, NiTi, NiTi2 and Ti. The surface microhardness of the deposition layer was up to 910 HV0.05, about 2.7 times as high as that of the matrix. The hardness at the cross-section of the entire deposition layer showed a...

  11. Deposition kinetics of MS2 bacteriophages on clay mineral surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Meiping; Shen, Yun; Yang, Haiyan; Kim, Hyunjung

    2012-04-01

    The deposition of bacteriophage MS2 on bare and clay-coated silica surfaces was examined in both monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2) and MgCl(2)) solutions under a wide range of environmentally relevant ionic strength and pH conditions by utilizing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Two types of clay, bentonite and kaolinite, were concerned in this study. To better understand MS2 deposition mechanisms, QCM-D data were complemented by zeta potentials measurements and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction forces calculation. In both monovalent and divalent solutions, deposition efficiencies of MS2 increased with increasing ionic strength both on bare and clay-coated surfaces, which agreed with the trends of interaction forces between MS2 and solid surface and thus was consistent with DLVO theory. The presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) in solutions greatly increased virus deposition on both silica and clay deposited surfaces. Coating silica surfaces with clay minerals, either kaolinite or bentonite, could significantly increase MS2 deposition.

  12. Modelling airborne concentration and deposition rate of maize pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Nathalie; Loubet, Benjamin; Huber, Laurent

    2004-10-01

    The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has reinforced the need to quantify gene flow from crop to crop. This requires predictive tools which take into account meteorological conditions, canopy structure as well as pollen aerodynamic characteristics. A Lagrangian Stochastic (LS) model, called SMOP-2D (Stochastic Mechanistic model for Pollen dispersion and deposition in 2 Dimensions), is presented. It simulates wind dispersion of pollen by calculating individual pollen trajectories from their emission to their deposition. SMOP-2D was validated using two field experiments where airborne concentration and deposition rate of pollen were measured within and downwind from different sized maize (Zea mays) plots together with micrometeorological measurements. SMOP-2D correctly simulated the shapes of the concentration profiles but generally underestimated the deposition rates in the first 10 m downwind from the source. Potential explanations of this discrepancy are discussed. Incorrect parameterisation of turbulence in the transition from the crop to the surroundings is probably the most likely reason. This demonstrates that LS models for particle transfer need to be coupled with air-flow models under complex terrain conditions.

  13. The effect of underpotential deposition on the surface enhanced Raman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, J. J.

    1983-06-01

    The first experimental observation of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from benzotriazole (BTA) on Ag as a function of the underpotential deposition of Tl is reported. The complete quenching of SERS before completion of the submonolayer deposition of Tl is attributed primarily to displacement of BTA from the Ag surface. The decrease in intensity of SERS is found to be approximately linear with the number of Tl ions deposited. But the rate of quenching of SERS is dependent on the initial surface topography. Increased electron scattering is proposed as an additional quenching mechanism. Upon Tl deposition, frequency shifts for one of the BTA lines are determined to be three times larger than that expected based on a surface charging mechanism. Mechanisms for SERS based on electronic interactions of the adsorbate and substrate are indicated.

  14. Surface modification of reverse osmosis desalination membranes by thin-film coatings deposited by initiated chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde, E-mail: gozdeince@sabanciuniv.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Matin, Asif, E-mail: amatin@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khan, Zafarullah, E-mail: zukhan@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Zaidi, S.M. Javaid, E-mail: zaidismj@kfupm.edu.sa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Gleason, Karen K., E-mail: kkgleasn@mit.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-07-31

    Thin-film polymeric reverse osmosis membranes, due to their high permeation rates and good salt rejection capabilities, are widely used for seawater desalination. However, these membranes are prone to biofouling, which affects their performance and efficiency. In this work, we report a method to modify the membrane surface without damaging the active layer or significantly affecting the performance of the membrane. Amphiphilic copolymer films of hydrophilic hydroxyethylmethacrylate and hydrophobic perfluorodecylacrylate (PFA) were synthesized and deposited on commercial RO membranes using an initiated chemical vapor deposition technique which is a polymer deposition technique that involves free-radical polymerization initiated by gas-phase radicals. Relevant surface characteristics such as hydrophilicity and roughness could be systematically controlled by varying the polymer chemistry. Increasing the hydrophobic PFA content in the films leads to an increase in the surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Furthermore, the surface morphology studies performed using the atomic force microscopy show that as the thickness of the coating increases average surface roughness increases. Using this knowledge, the coating thickness and chemistry were optimized to achieve high permeate flux and to reduce cell attachment. Results of the static bacterial adhesion tests show that the attachment of bacterial cells is significantly reduced on the coated membranes. - Highlights: • Thin films are deposited on reverse osmosis membranes. • Amphiphilic thin films are resistant to protein attachment. • The permeation performance of the membranes is not affected by the coating. • The thin film coatings delayed the biofouling.

  15. Deposition of latex colloids at rough mineral surfaces: an analogue study using nanopatterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Darbha, Gopala; Fischer, Cornelius; Michler, Alex; Luetzenkirchen, Johannes; Schäfer, Thorsten; Heberling, Frank; Schild, Dieter

    2012-04-24

    Deposition of latex colloids on a structured silicon surface was investigated. The surface with well-defined roughness and topography pattern served as an analogue for rough mineral surfaces with half-pores in the submicrometer size. The silicon topography consists of a regular pit pattern (pit diameter = 400 nm, pit spacing = 400 nm, pit depth = 100 nm). Effects of hydrodynamics and colloidal interactions in transport and deposition dynamics of a colloidal suspension were investigated in a parallel plate flow chamber. The experiments were conducted at pH ∼ 5.5 under both favorable and unfavorable adsorption conditions using carboxylate functionalized colloids to study the impact of surface topography on particle retention. Vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) was applied for both surface topography characterization and the quantification of colloidal retention over large fields of view. The influence of particle diameter variation (d = 0.3-2 μm) on retention of monodisperse as well as polydisperse suspensions was studied as a function of flow velocity. Despite electrostatically unfavorable conditions, at all flow velocities, an increased retention of colloids was observed at the rough surface compared to a smooth surface without surface pattern. The impact of surface roughness on retention was found to be more significant for smaller colloids (d = 0.3, 0.43 vs. 1, 2 μm). From smooth to rough surfaces, the deposition rate of 0.3 and 0.43 μm colloids increased by a factor of ∼2.7 compared to a factor of 1.2 or 1.8 for 1 and 2 μm colloids, respectively. For a substrate herein, with constant surface topography, the ratio between substrate roughness and radius of colloid, Rq/rc, determined the deposition efficiency. As Rq/rc increased, particle-substrate overall DLVO interaction energy decreased. Larger colloids (1 and 2 μm) beyond a critical velocity (7 × 10(-5) and 3 × 10(-6) m/s) (when drag force exceeds adhesion force) tend to detach from the surface

  16. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe.

  17. 19 CFR 351.107 - Cash deposit rates for nonproducing exporters; rates in antidumping proceedings involving a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cash deposit rates for nonproducing exporters... Scope and Definitions § 351.107 Cash deposit rates for nonproducing exporters; rates in antidumping... of cash deposit rates in situations where the exporter is not the producer of subject...

  18. Particle deposition on superhydrophobic surfaces by sessile droplet evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicuangco, Mercy Grace

    Prediction and active control of the spatial distribution of particulate deposits obtained from sessile droplet evaporation is essential in ink-jet printing, nanostructure assembly, biotechnology, and other applications that require localized deposits. In recent years, sessile droplet evaporation on bio-inspired superhydrophobic surfaces has become an attractive method for depositing materials on a site-specific, localized region, but is less explored compared to evaporative deposition on hydrophilic surfaces. It is therefore of interest to understand particle deposition during droplet evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces to enable accurate prediction and tunable control of localized deposits on such surfaces. The purpose of the present work is to explore the morphology of particles deposited on superhydrophobic surfaces by the evaporation of sessile water droplets containing suspended latex spheres. Droplet evaporation experiments are performed on non-wetting, textured surfaces with varying geometric parameters. The temporal evolution of the droplet contact radius and contact angle throughout the evaporation process are tracked by visualizing the transient droplet shape and wetting behavior. The droplets are observed to exhibit a combination of the following modes of evaporation: the constant contact radius mode, the constant contact angle mode, and the mixed mode in which the contact angle and the contact radius change simultaneously. After complete dry-out, the remaining particulate deposits are qualitatively and quantitatively characterized to describe their spatial distribution. In the first part of the study, the test surfaces are maintained at different temperatures. Experiments are conducted at ambient conditions and at elevated substrate temperatures of approximately 40°C, 50°C, and 60°C. The results show that droplet evaporation on superhydrophobic surfaces, driven by either mass diffusion at ambient conditions or by substrate heating, suppresses

  19. Electrospray deposition of organic molecules on bulk insulator surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinaut, Antoine; Pawlak, Rémy; Meyer, Ernst; Glatzel, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Large organic molecules are of important interest for organic-based devices such as hybrid photovoltaics or molecular electronics. Knowing their adsorption geometries and electronic structures allows to design and predict macroscopic device properties. Fundamental investigations in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) are thus mandatory to analyze and engineer processes in this prospects. With increasing size, complexity or chemical reactivity, depositing molecules by thermal evaporation becomes challenging. A recent way to deposit molecules in clean conditions is Electrospray Ionization (ESI). ESI keeps the possibility to work with large molecules, to introduce them in vacuum, and to deposit them on a large variety of surfaces. Here, ESI has been successfully applied to deposit triply fused porphyrin molecules on an insulating KBr(001) surface in UHV environment. Different deposition coverages have been obtained and characterization of the surface by in-situ atomic force microscopy working in the non-contact mode shows details of the molecular structures adsorbed on the surface. We show that UHV-ESI, can be performed on insulating surfaces in the sub-monolayer regime and to single molecules which opens the possibility to study a variety of complex molecules.

  20. Dry deposition of particulate matter at an urban forest, wetland and lake surface in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiakai; Zhu, Lijuan; Wang, Huihui; Yang, Yilian; Liu, Jiatong; Qiu, Dongdong; Ma, Wu; Zhang, Zhenming; Liu, Jinglan

    2016-01-01

    The dry deposition of particular matters from atmosphere to ecosystems is an undesirable consequence of this pollution while the deposition process is also influenced by different land use types. In current study, concentration of fine particles, coarse particles and meteorological data were collected during the daytime in an artificial forest, wetland and a water surface in the Beijing Olympic Park. Dry deposition velocity, fluxes and vegetation collection were calculated by different models and the results were compared. The results show: (1) the deposition velocity onto the forest canopy was higher than which onto the wetland and the water surface and the velocity varied in different seasons; (2) the fine particles deposited most in the winter while the coarse particles was in the spring; (3) the vegetation collection rates of fine particles were lower than coarse particles, and the forest collected more PMs than the wetland plants.

  1. ELECTROCATALYSIS ON SURFACES MODIFIED BY METAL MONOLAYERS DEPOSITED AT UNDERPOTENTIALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADZIC,R.

    2000-12-01

    The remarkable catalytic properties of electrode surfaces modified by monolayer amounts of metal adatoms obtained by underpotential deposition (UPD) have been the subject of a large number of studies during the last couple of decades. This interest stems from the possibility of implementing strictly surface modifications of electrocatalysts in an elegant, well-controlled way, and these bi-metallic surfaces can serve as models for the design of new catalysts. In addition, some of these systems may have potential for practical applications. The UPD of metals, which in general involves the deposition of up to a monolayer of metal on a foreign substrate at potentials positive to the reversible thermodynamic potential, facilitates this type of surface modification, which can be performed repeatedly by potential control. Recent studies of these surfaces and their catalytic properties by new in situ surface structure sensitive techniques have greatly improved the understanding of these systems.

  2. Disilane as a growth rate catalyst of plasma deposited microcrystalline silicon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrakellis, P.; Amanatides, E., E-mail: lef@plasmatech.gr; Mataras, D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Plasma Technology Laboratory, University of Patras, P.O. Box 140, 26504 Patras (Greece); Kalampounias, A. G. [University of Ioannina, Dep. of Chemistry, 45110, Ioannina (Greece); Spiliopoulos, N. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, P.O. Box 140, 26504 Patras (Greece); Lahootun, V.; Coeuret, F.; Madec, A. [Air Liquide CRCD,1 chemin de la porte des Loges, Les Loges en Josas, 78354 Jouy en Josas (France)

    2016-07-15

    The effect of small disilane addition on the gas phase properties of silane-hydrogen plasmas and the microcrystalline silicon thin films growth is presented. The investigation was conducted in the high pressure regime and for constant power dissipation in the discharge with the support of plasma diagnostics, thin film studies and calculations of discharge microscopic parameters and gas dissociation rates. The experimental data and the calculations show a strong effect of disilane on the electrical properties of the discharge in the pressure window from 2 to 3 Torr that is followed by significant raise of the electron number density and the drop of the sheaths electric field intensity. Deposition rate measurements show an important four to six times increase even for disilane mole fractions as low as 0.3 %. The deposition rate enhancement was followed by a drop of the material crystalline volume fraction but films with crystallinity above 40 % were deposited with different combinations of total gas pressure, disilane and silane molar ratios. The enhancement was partly explained by the increase of the electron impact dissociation rate of silane which rises by 40% even for 0.1% disilane mole fraction. The calculations of the gas usage, the dissociation and the deposition efficiencies show that the beneficial effect on the growth rate is not just the result of the increase of Si-containing molecules density but significant changes on the species participating to the deposition and the mechanism of the film growth are caused by the disilane addition. The enhanced participation of the highly sticking to the surface radical such as disilylene, which is the main product of disilane dissociation, was considered as the most probable reason for the significant raise of the deposition efficiency. The catalytic effect of such type of radical on the surface reactivity of species with lower sticking probability is further discussed, while it is also used to explain the restricted

  3. Effect of strontium tantalate surface texture on nickel nanoparticle dispersion by electroless deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compean-González, C.L. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Civil, Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energía, Av. Universidad s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451 (Mexico); Arredondo-Torres, V.M. [Facultad de Químico Farmacobiología, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Tzintzuntzan #173, Col. Matamoros, Morelia, Michoacán C.P. 58240 (Mexico); Zarazúa-Morin, M.E. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Civil, Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energía, Av. Universidad s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451 (Mexico); Figueroa-Torres, M.Z., E-mail: m.zyzlila@gmail.com [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Civil, Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energía, Av. Universidad s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451 (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Efficient short-time procedure for nickel nanoparticles dispersion by electroless. • Nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average size of 15 nm. • Influence of surface texture on deposition temperature and time was observed. • Nickel deposition can be done below 50 °C. - Abstract: The present work studies the effect of smooth and porous texture of Sr{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7} on its surface modification with nickel nanoparticles through electroless deposition technique. The influence of temperature to control Ni nanoparticles loading amount and dispersion were analyzed. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to examine surface texture characteristics. The morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy (MEB) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometry system (EDS), which was used to determine the amount of deposited Ni. The material with smooth texture (SMT) consists of big agglomerates of semispherical shape particles of 400 nm. Whilst the porous texture (PRT) exhibit a pore-wall formed of needles shape particles of around 200 nm in size. Results indicated that texture characteristics strongly influence the deposition reaction rate; for PRT oxide, Ni deposition can be done from 20 °C while for SMT oxide deposition begins at 40 °C. Analysis of Sr{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7} surface indicated that in both textures, Ni nanoparticles with spherical shape in the range of 10–20 nm were obtained.

  4. Chronostratigraphy and deposition rates in the Okinawa Trough region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李培英; 王永吉; 刘振夏

    1999-01-01

    Six representative cores from Okinawa Trough have been dated using AMS 14C, Standard 14C and ESR methods, and comparatively analysed. Systematic measurements of the oriented samples taken from the cores were conducted for obtaining their remnant magnetic polarity. With the aid of the dates obtained, particularly the AMS 14C ages of planktonic foraminiferal tests, two polarity events and two polar wanderings of the earth magnetic field have been defined. Calculations of the deposition rates for all the six core sites indicate rather high values in the trough plain, at least equivalent to those rates reported for the region of the East China Sea. They commonly range from 10 to 30 cm/ka, and even greater than 40 cm/ka in some localities. The deposition rate varied widely with topography and periods of time. In general, it is greater during the postglacial period than during the last glaciation. The chronostratigraphy in the Okinawa Trough region established through this study argues against the pr

  5. Particle emission rates during electrostatic spray deposition of TiO2 nanoparticle-based photoactive coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivisto, Antti J.; Jensen, Alexander C. Ø.; Kling, Kirsten I.

    2017-01-01

    to 31μm-size particles and volatile organic compounds (VOC), as well as particle deposition onto room surfaces and on the spray gun user hand. The particle emission and deposition rates were quantified using aerosol mass balance modelling. The geometric mean particle number emission rate was 1.9×1010s-1...... and the mean mass emission rate was 381μgs-1. The respirable mass emission-rate was 65% lower than observed for the entire measured size-range. The mass emission rates were linearly scalable (±ca. 20%) to the process duration. The particle deposition rates were up to 15h-1 for......Here, we studied the particle release rate during Electrostatic spray deposition of anatase-(TiO2)-based photoactive coating onto tiles and wallpaper using a commercially available electrostatic spray device. Spraying was performed in a 20.3m3 test chamber while measuring concentrations of 5.6nm...

  6. Control of sediment deposition rates in two mid-Atlantic Coast tidal freshwater wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darke, A. K.; Megonigal, J. P.

    2003-05-01

    Eustatic sea level rise and rapidly increasing coastal development threaten tidal freshwater wetlands. Sediment deposition is one process that affects their ability to maintain surface elevations relative to adjacent rivers. Sediment dynamics in salt marshes have been studied extensively, but little is known about the factors that control sediment deposition rates in tidal freshwater wetlands. We examined geomorphic, hydrological, and biotic factors that may influence sedimentation in two tidal freshwater wetlands that fell at opposite ends of the riverine-estuarine continuum. Our data demonstrate that sediment dynamics are highly variable among tidal freshwater wetlands, and are influenced by the location of the wetland on the continuum. Sediment deposition was up to 10 times higher during the growing season at the downstream site than the upstream site. Plant density and height were highly correlated with sediment deposition rates at the downstream site ( r≥0.92, p≤0.009) but not at the upstream site. Elevation, flood depth, and flood duration were correlated with deposition rates only when each site/season combination was considered separately. River suspended sediment and surficial floodwater suspended sediment concentrations were significantly higher at the downstream site ( p=0.02 and p=0.04, respectively). These data suggest that vegetation is important in determining sediment deposition rates when river suspended sediment is not limiting, which is not always the case. Longer flood duration increased sediment deposition, but was of secondary importance. Land use and proximity to the turbidity maximum (near the forward extent of the salt water intrusion) appear to be critically important in determining river suspended sediment availability in the tidal freshwater zone of the Mattaponi River, VA.

  7. Effects of long-term grazing on sediment deposition and salt-marsh accretion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschot, Kelly; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Temmerman, Stijn; Bakker, Jan P.

    2013-11-01

    Many studies have attempted to predict whether coastal marshes will be able to keep up with future acceleration of sea-level rise by estimating marsh accretion rates. However, there are few studies focussing on the long-term effects of herbivores on vegetation structure and subsequent effects on marsh accretion. Deposition of fine-grained, mineral sediment during tidal inundations, together with organic matter accumulation from the local vegetation, positively affects accretion rates of marsh surfaces. Tall vegetation can enhance sediment deposition by reducing current flow and wave action. Herbivores shorten vegetation height and this could potentially reduce sediment deposition. This study estimated the effects of herbivores on 1) vegetation height, 2) sediment deposition and 3) resulting marsh accretion after long-term (at least 16 years) herbivore exclusion of both small (i.e. hare and goose) and large grazers (i.e. cattle) for marshes of different ages. Our results firstly showed that both small and large herbivores can have a major impact on vegetation height. Secondly, grazing processes did not affect sediment deposition. Finally, trampling by large grazers affected marsh accretion rates by compacting the soil. In many European marshes, grazing is used as a tool in nature management as well as for agricultural purposes. Thus, we propose that soil compaction by large grazers should be taken in account when estimating the ability of coastal systems to cope with an accelerating sea-level rise.

  8. Deposition of fine and ultrafine particles on indoor surface materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Alireza; Reinhold, Claus

    2008-01-01

    -scale test chamber. Experiments took place in a 32 m3 chamber with walls and ceiling made of glass. Prior to each experiment the chamber was flushed with outdoor air to reach an initial particle concentration typical of indoor air in buildings with natural ventilation. The decay of particle concentrations...... The aim of this study was the experimental determination of particle deposition for both different particle size fractions and different indoor surface materials. The selected surface materials were glass, gypsum board, carpet, and curtain. These materials were tested vertically in a full...... was monitored. Seven particle size fractions were studied. These comprised ultrafine and fine particles. Deposition was higher on carpet and curtain than on glass and gypsum board. Particles ranging from 0.3 to 0.5 µm had the lowest deposition. This fraction also has the highest penetration and its indoor...

  9. Does livestock grazing affect sediment deposition and accretion rates in salt marshes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Stefanie; Müller, Frauke; Schuerch, Mark; Wanner, Antonia; Esselink, Peter; Bakker, Jan P.; Jensen, Kai

    2013-12-01

    Accretion rates, defined as the vertical growth of salt marshes measured in mm per year, may be influenced by grazing livestock in two ways: directly, by increasing soil compaction through trampling, and indirectly, by reducing aboveground biomass and thus decreasing sediment deposition rates measured in g/m² per year. Although accretion rates and the resulting surface elevation change largely determine the resilience of salt marshes to sea-level rise (SLR), the effect of livestock grazing on accretion rates has been little studied. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of livestock grazing on salt-marsh accretion rates. We hypothesise that accretion will be lower in grazed compared to ungrazed salt marshes. In four study sites along the mainland coast of the Wadden Sea (in the south-eastern North Sea), accretion rates, sediment deposition rates, and soil compaction of grazed and ungrazed marshes were analysed using the 137Cs radionuclide dating method. Accretion rates were on average 11.6 mm yr-1 during recent decades and thus higher than current and projected rates of SLR. Neither accretion nor sediment deposition rates were significantly different between grazing treatments. Meanwhile, soil compaction was clearly affected by grazing with significantly higher dry bulk density on grazed compared to ungrazed parts. Based on these results, we conclude that other factors influence whether grazing has an effect on accretion and sediment deposition rates and that the effect of grazing on marsh growth does not follow a direct causal chain. It may have a great importance when interacting with other biotic and abiotic processes on the marsh.

  10. Deposit Rate Ceilings as a Tool of Prudential Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Krajewski

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to present one of prudential regulation instruments in an environment that favors to engage in moral hazard behavior. The last decades proved that there is a link between financial liberalization and banking crises. In order to avoid crises and prevent banks engaging in gambling behavior, the system of prudential regulations has been implemented. The emphasis has been placed on the use of capital requirements, typically using the BIS standard developed in the Basel Accord.As the excessive reliance on capital requirements can become costly for the banks and lead to loose their franchise value and undermine incentives for prudent investing. The instrument that can create the franchise value, i.e. earning profits in the current period and in the future, is a policy of deposit rate controls. In the paper was also revealed why the policy of setting interest rate ceiling on deposits had not achieved its intended objectives, especially in the view of the fail of the Regulation Q policy.

  11. Effect of wall shear rate on biofilm deposition and grazing in drinking water flow chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Tony; Skali-Lami, Salaheddine; Block, Jean-Claude

    2007-08-15

    The effect of four-wall shear rates (34.9, 74.8, 142.5, and 194.5 s(-1)) on bacterial deposition on glass slides in drinking water flow chambers was studied. Biofilm image acquisition was performed over a 50-day period. Bacterial accumulation and surface coverage curves were obtained. Microscopic observations allowed us to obtain information about the dynamics and spatial distribution of the biofilm. During the first stage of biofilm formation (210-518 h), bacterial accumulation was a function of the wall shear rate: the higher the wall shear rate, the faster the bacterial deposition (1.1 and 1.9 x 10(4) bacterial cells . cm(-2) for wall shear rates of 34.9 and 142.5 s(-1), respectively). A new similarity relationship characteristic of a non-dimensional time and function of the wall shear rate was proposed to describe initial bacterial deposition. After 50 days of exposure to drinking water, surface coverage was more or less identical under the entire wall shear rates (7.44 +/- 0.9%), suggesting that biofilm bacterial density cannot be controlled using hydrodynamics. However, the spatial distribution of the biofilm was clearly different. Under low wall shear rate, aggregates were composed of bacterial cells able to "vibrate" independently on the surface, whereas, under a high wall shear rate, aggregates were more cohesive. Therefore, susceptibility to the hydraulic discontinuities occurring in drinking water system may not be similar. In all the flow chambers, significant decreases in bacterial biomass (up to 77%) were associated with the presence of amoebae. This grazing preferentially targeted small, isolated cells.

  12. Deposition of wear-resistant steel surfaces by the plasma rotating electrode coating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michael Robert

    A high-deposition rate thermal spray method was investigated for the purpose of coating aluminum cylinder bores with a wear resistant surface. This method, the plasma rotating electrode coating system (PROTEC) utilized transferred-arc melting of a rapidly rotating consumable electrode to create a droplet stream via centrifugal atomization. A cylindrical substrate was placed around the rotating rod, in the flight path of the droplets, to deposit a coating onto the internal surface of the cylinder. Selected coatings of 1045 steel deposited by the PROTEC coating method exhibited lower wear loss in lubricated sliding than wire-arc sprayed carbon steel coatings and gray cast iron. Splat cohesion was shown to be a significant factor in the wear resistance of PROTEC coatings. The relationship between deposition enthalpy and cooling rate of the coating was found to have the greatest effect on coating microstructure, and the coating cohesion. The most rapidly solidified coatings showed inferior splat cohesion in comparison to coatings that cooled more slowly. The increase in splat cohesion with decreased cooling rate was accompanied by the formation of a directionally oriented coating microstructure, likely formed during cellular solidification of the coating. A model describing the thermal state of the deposition process was used to predict the deposition conditions that would result in a cellular structure, and the level of splat cohesion required to produce a wear resistant coating.

  13. A Modified Surface on Titanium Deposited by a Blasting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline O’Sullivan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA coating of hard tissue implants is widely employed for its biocompatible and osteoconductive properties as well as its improved mechanical properties. Plasma technology is the principal deposition process for coating HA on bioactive metals for this application. However, thermal decomposition of HA can occur during the plasma deposition process, resulting in coating variability in terms of purity, uniformity and crystallinity, which can lead to implant failure caused by aseptic loosening. In this study, CoBlastTM, a novel blasting process has been used to successfully modify a titanium (V substrate with a HA treatment using a dopant/abrasive regime. The impact of a series of apatitic abrasives under the trade name MCD, was investigated to determine the effect of abrasive particle size on the surface properties of both microblast (abrasive only and CoBlast (HA/abrasive treatments. The resultant HA treated substrates were compared to substrates treated with abrasive only (microblasted and an untreated Ti. The HA powder, apatitic abrasives and the treated substrates were characterized for chemical composition, coating coverage, crystallinity and topography including surface roughness. The results show that the surface roughness of the HA blasted modification was affected by the particle size of the apatitic abrasives used. The CoBlast process did not alter the chemistry of the crystalline HA during deposition. Cell proliferation on the HA surface was also assessed, which demonstrated enhanced osteo-viability compared to the microblast and blank Ti. This study demonstrates the ability of the CoBlast process to deposit HA coatings with a range of surface properties onto Ti substrates. The ability of the CoBlast technology to offer diversity in modifying surface topography offers exciting new prospects in tailoring the properties of medical devices for applications ranging from dental to orthopedic settings.

  14. High-rate laser metal deposition of Inconel 718 component using low heat-input approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, C. Y.; Scudamore, R. J.; Allen, J.

    Currently many aircraft and aero engine components are machined from billets or oversize forgings. This involves significant cost, material wastage, lead-times and environmental impacts. Methods to add complex features to another component or net-shape surface would offer a substantial cost benefit. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD), currently being applied to the repair of worn or damaged aero engine components, was attempted in this work as an alternative process route, to build features onto a base component, because of its low heat input capability. In this work, low heat input and high-rate deposition was developed to deposit Inconel 718 powder onto thin plates. Using the optimised process parameters, a number of demonstrator components were successfully fabricated.

  15. Effect of oxygen flow rate on the properties of SiOx films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fachun Lai; Ming Li; Haiqian Wang; Yousong Jiang; Yizhou Song

    2005-01-01

    @@ SiOx (x = 0- 2) films were deposited on BK-7 substrates by a low frequency reactive magnetron sputtering system with the oxygen flow rate (OFR) changing from 0 to 30 sccm. The samples were characterized by atomic force microscopy, spectrophotometer, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The extinction coefficient and refractive index decrease, while the optical transmittance increases with the increase of OFR from 0 to 17 sccm. The root mean square surface roughness has a maximum at 10 sccm OFR. The highest deposition rate is at 15 sccm OFR. Our results show that the films deposited at 20 sccm OFR are stoichiometric silica with relatively high deposition rate, low extinction coefficient, and low surface roughness. Therefore, a precise control of OFR is very important to obtain high quality films for optical applications.

  16. Laser surface modification of titanium substrate for pulsed laser deposition of highly adherent hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2011-07-01

    Biomedical implant devices made out of titanium and its alloys are benefited by a modified surface or a bioactive coating to enhance bone bonding ability and to function effectively in vivo for the intended period of time. In this respect hydroxyapatite coating developed through pulsed laser deposition is a promising approach. Since the success of the bioactive ceramic coated implant depends mainly on the substrate-coating strength; an attempt has been made to produce micro patterned surface structure on titanium substrate for adherent hydroxyapatite coating. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser beam (355 nm) with 10 Hz repetition rate was used for surface treatment of titanium as well as hydroxyapatite deposition. The unfocussed laser beam was used to modify the substrate surface with 500-18,000 laser pulses while keeping the polished substrate in water. Hydroxyapatite deposition was done in a vacuum deposition chamber at 400 °C with the focused laser beam under 1 × 10⁻³ mbar oxygen pressure. Deposits were analyzed to understand the physico-chemical, morphological and mechanical characteristics. The obtained substrate and coating surface morphology indicates that laser treatment method can provide controlled micro-topography. Scratch test analysis and microindentation hardness values of coating on laser treated substrate indicate higher mechanical adhesion with respect to coatings on untreated substrates.

  17. High rate deposition of microcrystalline silicon films by high-pressure radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) thin films were prepared by high- pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD) with a screened plasma. The deposition rate and crystallinity varying with the deposition pressure, rf power, hydrogen dilution ratio and electrodes distance were systematically studied. By optimizing the deposition parameters the device quality μc-Si:H films have been achieved with a high deposition rate of 7.8 /s at a high pressure. The Voc of 560 mV and the FF of 0.70 have been achieved for a single-junction μc-Si:H p-i-n solar cell at a deposition rate of 7.8 /s.

  18. Pattern transfer during deposition and fixation of oligomeric bisphenol A on pre-structured copper surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szillat, Florian; Fechner, Renate; Mayr, Stefan G

    2013-09-01

    Pattern transfer during deposition of oligomeric bisphenol A (OBA) on pre-structured Cu surfaces is investigated by means of a combined experimental-computational approach. Aiming for quantitative prediction of experiments, as characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), we explore the capabilities of stochastic rate equations to quantitatively account for the spatio-temporal evolution of surface topography. While surface diffusion and deposition noise constitute the main mechanisms, pattern transfer is affected by the inclusion of retardation in the interface potential, which appears to be necessary beyond a critical initial surface slope. In addition, routes for successful surface fixation by cross-linking are also demonstrated, which may pave the way for further technological use.

  19. Method to grow pure nanocrystalline diamond films at low temperatures and high deposition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, John A.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Auciello, Orlando; Xiao, Xingcheng

    2009-07-07

    A method of depositing nanocrystalline diamond film on a substrate at a rate of not less than about 0.2 microns/hour at a substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. The method includes seeding the substrate surface with nanocrystalline diamond powder to an areal density of not less than about 10.sup.10sites/cm.sup.2, and contacting the seeded substrate surface with a gas of about 99% by volume of an inert gas other than helium and about 1% by volume of methane or hydrogen and one or more of acetylene, fullerene and anthracene in the presence of a microwave induced plasma while maintaining the substrate temperature less than about 500.degree. C. to deposit nanocrystalline diamond on the seeded substrate surface at a rate not less than about 0.2 microns/hour. Coatings of nanocrystalline diamond with average particle diameters of less than about 20 nanometers can be deposited with thermal budgets of 500.degree. C.-4 hours or less onto a variety of substrates such as MEMS devices.

  20. Thin-film preparation by back-surface irradiation pulsed laser deposition using metal powder targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Ohshima, Tamiko; Yagyu, Yoshihito; Ihara, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Makiko; Suda, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Several kinds of functional thin films were deposited using a new thin-film preparation method named the back-surface irradiation pulsed laser deposition (BIPLD) method. In this BIPLD method, powder targets were used as the film source placed on a transparent target holder, and then a visible-wavelength pulsed laser was irradiated from the holder side to the substrate. Using this new method, titanium oxide and boron nitride thin films were deposited on the silicon substrate. Surface scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images suggest that all of the thin films were deposited on the substrate with some large droplets irrespective of the kind of target used. The deposition rate of the films prepared by using this method was calculated from film thickness and deposition time to be much lower than that of the films prepared by conventional PLD. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement results suggest that rutile and anatase TiO2 crystal peaks were formed for the films prepared using the TiO2 rutile powder target. Crystal peaks of hexagonal boron nitride were observed for the films prepared using the boron nitride powder target. The crystallinity of the prepared films was changed by annealing after deposition.

  1. Selective palladium electrochemical deposition onto AFM-scratched silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santinacci, L.; Djenizian, T.; Hildebrand, H.; Ecoffey, S.; Mokdad, H.; Campanella, T.; Schmuki, P

    2003-09-30

    The present work investigates the selective electrochemical deposition of palladium nano-structures into scratches produced through thin oxide layers covering p-Si (1 0 0) surfaces. Using an atomic force microscope equipped with a single-crystalline diamond tip scratches in the 100 nm range were produced through a 10 nm thick dry oxide layer. Pd deposition was carried out in PdCl{sub 2} (0.01 g l{sup -1})+HCl (0.1 M) by cathodic potential steps. Investigation of the palladium nucleation and growth processes onto silicon surfaces is presented. Under optimized conditions sub-100 nm palladium structures can be obtained with a very high selectivity.

  2. Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droppo, James G.

    2006-07-01

    The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and

  3. Deposition Rates of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Physics and Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-11-22

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase of the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes to due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes of the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction of the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits considered.

  4. Deposition of silver nanoparticles on titanium surface for antibacterial effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Juan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Liao Juan1, Zhu Zhimin3, Mo Anchun1,2, Li Lei1, Zhang Jingchao11State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, PR China; 2Department of Dental Implant, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, PR China; 3Department of Prosthodontics, West China Stomatology Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, PR ChinaAbstract: Microbial colonization on implanted devices and biofilm formation is a recurrent complication in implant surgery and may result in loss of implants. The aim of this study was to deposit silver nanoparticles on a titanium surface to obtain antibacterial properties. In the present study, we prepared a silver nanoparticle-modified titanium (Ti-nAg surface using silanization method. The morphology and chemical components of the Ti-nAg surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Two species of bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, were utilized to test the antibacterial effect of the Ti-nAg treated surface. The SEM examination revealed that a small quantity of silver nanoparticles was sparsely deposited on the titanium surface. The diameter of these nanoparticles ranged from ten to several hundred nm. EDS analyses revealed that there was 4.26% of Ag present on the surface. After a 24-hour incubation, 94% of Staphylococcus aureus and over 95% of Escherichia coli had been killed on the Ti-nAg surface, and the SEM examination of anti-adhesive efficacy test showed that there were less bacteria attached to Ti-nAg surface than to a control surface of untreated Titanium. These data suggest that silver nanoparticle-modified titanium is a promising material with an antibacterial property that may be used as an implantable biomaterial.Keywords: nano-silver, titanium, antibacterial activity, silanization method

  5. Silicon nitride at high growth rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) is a widely studied alloy with many commercial applications. This thesis describes the application of SiNx deposited at high deposition rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) for solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). The deposition process of H

  6. Silicon nitride at high growth rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) is a widely studied alloy with many commercial applications. This thesis describes the application of SiNx deposited at high deposition rate using hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) for solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). The deposition process of H

  7. Bank accretion and the development of vegetated depositional surfaces along modified alluvial channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, C.R.; Simon, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the recovery of stable bank form and development of vegetated depositional surfaces along the banks of channelized West Tennessee streams. Most perennial streams in West Tennessee were straightened and dredged since the turn of the century. Patterns of fluvial ecological responses to channelization have previously been described by a six-stage model. Dendrogeomorphic (tree-ring) techniques allowed the determination of location, timing, amount, and rate of bank-sediment deposition. Channel cross sections and ecological analyses made at 101 locations along 12 streams, encompassing bends and straight reaches, show that channel and bank processes initially react vertically to channelization through downcutting. A depositional surface forms on banks once bed-degradation and heightened bank mass wasting processes have eased or slowed. The formation of this depositional surface marks the beginning of bank recovery from channelization. Dominating lateral processes, characteristic of stable or natural channels, return during the formation and expansion of the depositional surface, suggesting a relation with thalweg deflection, point-bar development, and meanderloop extension. Characteristic woody riparian vegetation begins to grow as this depositional surface develops and becomes part of the process and form of restabilizing banks. The depositional surface initially forms low on the bank and tends to maintain a slope of about 24??. Mean accretion rates ranges from 5.9 cm/yr on inside bends to 0 cm/yr on most outside bends; straight reaches have a mean-accretion rate of 4.2 cm/yr. The relatively stable, convex upward, depositional surface expands and ultimately attaches to the flood plain. The time required for the recovery process to reach equilibrium averaged about 50 years. Indicative pioneer speccies of woody riparian vegetation include black willow, river birch, silver maple, and boxelder. Stem densities generally decrease with time after and

  8. Reaction rates, depositional history and sources of indium in sediments from Appalachian and Canadian Shield lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, André; Gobeil, Charles; Laforte, Lucie

    2014-07-01

    Sediment cores were collected at the deepest site of twelve headwater lakes from the Province of Québec, Canada that receive contaminants only from atmospheric deposition, either directly to the lake surface or indirectly from the watershed. Several of the lakes are located within relatively short distance (In2S3(s) do not precipitate in the sediments and that adsorption of In onto sedimentary FeS(s) does not occur. However, similarities in the In and Fe porewater profiles, and the presence of In in the authigenic Fe-rich solids, reveal that part of the In becomes associated with authigenic Fe oxyhydroxides in the perennially oxic lake and is coupled to the Fe redox cycling. Comparison of the In/Corg and In/Fe molar ratios in the authigenic Fe-rich material and in surface sediments (0-0.5 cm) of this lake suggests that most non-lithogenic In was bound to humic substances. From the magnitude of the net In reaction rates, we infer that the post-depositional redistribution of this element is quantitatively not important and that the In sedimentary record represents accurately In deposition at the sampling sites. Reconstructed chronologies of the anthropogenic In deposition and comparison of In inventories among lakes point to non-ferrous metal smelters as a past significant source of atmospheric In contamination and to a significant reduction of industrial In emissions into the North American atmosphere in recent decades.

  9. Surface chemistry of the atomic layer deposition of metals and group III oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David Nathan

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a thin-film growth technique offering precise control of film thickness and the ability to coat high-aspect-ratio features such as trenches and nanopowders. Unlike other film growth techniques, ALD does not require harsh processing conditions and is not limited by line-of-sight deposition. Emerging applications for ALD materials include semiconductor devices, gas sensors, and water-diffusion barriers. The chemistry behind ALD involves understanding how the precursors interact with surfaces to deposit the desired material. All ALD precursors need to be stable on the substrate to ensure self-limiting behavior yet reactive enough to be easily removed with the second reagent. Recent precursor development has provided many volatile organometallic compounds for most of the periodic table. As the number of precursors increases, proper precursor choice becomes crucial. This is because the film properties, growth rates, and growth temperature vary widely between the precursors. Many of the above traits can be predicted with knowledge of the precursor reaction mechanisms. This thesis aims to link surface reaction mechanisms to observed growth and nucleation trends in metal and oxide ALD systems. The first portion of this thesis explores the mechanisms of two ALD oxide systems. First, I examine the mechanism of ALD alumina with ozone. Ozone is used as an oxidant in the semiconductor industry because the deposited Al 2O3 films possess better insulating properties and ozone is easier to purge from a vacuum system. FT-IR analysis reveals a complicated array of surface intermediates such as formate, carbonate, and methoxy groups that form during Al2O3 growth with ozone. Next, a new method to deposit thin films of Ga2O3 is introduced. Gallium oxide is a transparent conducting oxide that needs expensive solid precursors to be deposited by ALD. I show that trimethylgallium is a good high-temperature ALD precursor that deposits films of Ga2O 3 with

  10. The effect of substrate rotation rate on physical properties of cadmium telluride films prepared by a glancing angle deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini Siyanaki, Fatemeh, E-mail: fatemeh.hosseini@gmail.com; Rezagholipour Dizaji, Hamid, E-mail: hrgholipour@semnan.ac.ir; Ehsani, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: mhe_ehsani@yahoo.com; Khorramabadi, Shiva, E-mail: khorramabadi.sh@gmail.com

    2015-02-27

    Physical properties of cadmium telluride thin films, deposited on glass substrates by modified glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique with various substrate rates of rotation, were investigated in this study. In contrast to obliquely columnar thin films fabricated by the conventional GLAD technique, in which higher columnar angle is coupled to higher degree of porosity, this study introduces obliquely deposited thin films which have packed columnar structures despite their highly tilted columns. Structural and optical properties and surface morphology of the CdTe thin films deposited by this technique were studied using X-ray diffraction, UV–visible spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Glancing angle deposition technique was employed to prepare CdTe thin films. • The effect of substrate rate of rotation on optical properties was studied. • Highly tilted and packed columnar structure was fabricated. • A dramatic decline in refractive index in one of the specimens was observed.

  11. Communication: Surface-facilitated softening of ordinary and vapor-deposited glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeta, Ulyana; Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2017-08-01

    A common distinction between the ordinary glasses formed by melt cooling and the stable amorphous films formed by vapor deposition is the apparent mechanism of their devitrification. Using quasi-adiabatic, fast scanning calorimetry that is capable of heating rates in excess of 105 K s-1, we have investigated the softening kinetics of micrometer-scale, ordinary glass films of methylbenzene and 2-propanol. At the limit of high heating rates, the transformation mechanism of ordinary glasses is identical to that of their stable vapor-deposited counterparts. In both cases, softening is likely to begin at the sample surface and progress into its bulk via a transformation front. Furthermore, such a surface-facilitated mechanism complies with zero-order, Arrhenius rate law. The activation energy barriers for the softening transformation imply that the kinetics must be defined, at least in part, by the initial thermodynamic and structural state of the samples.

  12. Screened Thermonuclear Reaction Rates on Magnetar Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-Lin; LUO Zhi-Quan; LIU Jing-Jing; LAI Xiang-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Improving Salpeter's method, we discuss the effect of superstrong magnetic fields (such as those of magnetars) on thermonuclear reaction rates. These most interesting reactions, including the hydrogen burning by the CNO cycle and the helium burning by the triple alpha reaction, are investigated as examples on the magnetar surfaces. The obtained result shows that the superstrong magnetic fields can increase the thermonuclear reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. The enhancement may have significant influence for further study research of the magnetars, especially for the x-ray luminosity observation and the evolution of magnetars.

  13. Deposition of size-selected atomic clusters on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, S J

    1999-01-01

    implant into the surface. For Ag sub 2 sub 0 -Ag sub 2 sub 0 sub 0 clusters, the implantation depth is found to scale linearly with the impact energy and inversely with the cross-sectional area of the cluster, with an offset due to energy lost to the elastic compression of the surface (Paper VI). For smaller (Ag sub 3) clusters the orientation of the cluster with respect to the surface and the precise impact site play an important role; the impact energy has to be 'focused' in order for cluster implantation to occur (Paper VII). The application of deposited clusters for the creation of Si nanostructures by plasma etching is explored in Paper VIII. This dissertation presents technical developments and experimental and computational investigations concerned with the deposition of atomic clusters onto surfaces. It consists of a collection of papers, in which the main body of results are contained, and four chapters presenting a subject review, computational and experimental techniques and a summary of the result...

  14. Surface parameters modification by multilayer coatings deposition for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zykova, A [Institute of Surface Engineering, 4 Zalutinskaya Str., Kharkov (Ukraine); Safonov, V [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 1 Akademicheskaja Str., 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Virva, O; Luk' yanchenko, V [Institute of Spine and Joint Pathologies, 80 Pushkinskaya Str., 61024 Kharkov (Ukraine); Walkowich, J; Rogowska, R [Institute for Sustainable Technologies, National Research Institute, 6/10 K. Pulaskiego Str., Radom (Poland); Yakovin, S [Department of Physical Technologies, Kharkov National University, 31 Kurchatov Ave., Kharkov (Ukraine)], E-mail: zykov@bi.com.ua

    2008-05-01

    Studies are presented of the surface parameters of various multilayer coatings, namely, TiN, CrN, (Ti, Cr)N, TiN/TiC{sub 10}N{sub 90}, TiN/TiC{sub 20}N{sub 80} deposited by means of Arc-PVD on stainless steel (1H18N9), as well as of the same coatings with an additional Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering (RMS). The surface thickness, roughness and topography are estimated. Other parameters, such as the surface free energy (SFE) and fractional polarity are determined by means of the Wu and the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble methods. Experiments are carried out on the in vitro cell/material interaction (in a fibroblasts culture) in order to determine the materials biomedical response. The results show some correlation between the surface properties and cell adhesion. The best biological response parameters (cell number, proliferation function, morphology) are obtained in the case of coatings with the highest values of the polar part component of the SFE and the fractional polarity, such as TiN, TiN/TiC{sub 10}N{sub 90} and oxide coatings.

  15. Particle dry deposition to water surfaces: Processes and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, S.C.; Barthelmie, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    's oceans and seas is most significantly impacted by human activities. More than half of the world's population lives within 100 km of a coast and hence the overwhelming majority of anthropogenic fluxes to aquatic systems occur in the coastal zone. We discuss the particular challenges that arise from...... measurement requirements represent significant barriers to application to measurement of particle dry deposition fluxes although, as discussed, innovative solutions are now becoming available. In the final section, we examine meteorological controls on deposition to the coastal zone. This region of the world...... flux to coastal waters, atmosphere-surface exchange represents a significant component of the total flux and may be particularly critical during the summertime when both the riverine input and ambient nutrient concentrations are often at a minimum. In this chapter, we present an overview...

  16. EVALUATION OF THE GEOLOGICAL RELIABILITY OF SURFACE MINING DEPOSIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩金炎; 孙小彦; 彭世济

    1994-01-01

    The optimal decision theory and exploitation reliability of large scale mining area have heen studied in China since the late 1980′s. Researches have been carried out under the thought of mannature-machine system, and encouraging results have been obtained. The reliability evaluation of mining engineering includes the reliability evaluation of natural resources, mining technology and mine economics etc. And the geological reliability of deposit, as a natural condition, is the basis of all other evaluation works. The paper summarizes the method for evaluating the geological reliability of deposit, discusses the reliability of estimating methods for coal reserves and coal quality, evaluates the natural resources reliability of the Pit 1 of Antaibao, Surface Coal Mine, Pingsuo, Shanxi Province. which was taken as a case study.

  17. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  18. High deposition rate processes for the fabrication of microcrystalline silicon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michard, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research 5 - Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Meier, M., E-mail: ma.meier@fz-juelich.de [Institute of Energy and Climate Research 5 - Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Grootoonk, B.; Astakhov, O.; Gordijn, A.; Finger, F. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research 5 - Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The increase of deposition rate of microcrystalline silicon absorber layers is an essential point for cost reduction in the mass production of thin-film silicon solar cells. In this work we explored a broad range of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) parameters in order to increase the deposition rate of intrinsic microcrystalline silicon layers keeping the industrial relevant material quality standards. We combined plasma excitation frequencies in the VHF band with the high pressure high power depletion regime using new deposition facilities and achieved deposition rates as high as 2.8 nm/s. The material quality evaluated from photosensitivity and electron spin resonance measurements is similar to standard microcrystalline silicon deposited at low growth rates. The influence of the deposition power and the deposition pressure on the electrical and structural film properties was investigated.

  19. Laser textured superhydrophobic surfaces and their applications for homogeneous spot deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the laser surface modification of 304S15 stainless steel to develop superhydrophobic properties and the subsequent application for homogeneous spot deposition. Superhydrophobic surfaces, with steady contact angle of ∼154° and contact angle hysteresis of ∼4°, are fabricated by direct laser texturing. In comparison with common pico-/femto-second lasers employed for this patterning, the nanosecond fiber laser used in this work is more cost-effective, compact and allows higher processing rates. The effect of laser power and scan line separation on surface wettability of textured surfaces are investigated and optimized fabrication parameters are given. Fluid flows and transportations of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles suspension droplets on the processed surfaces and unprocessed wetting substrates are investigated. After evaporation is complete, the coffee-stain effect is observed on the untextured substrates but not on the superhydrophobic surfaces. Uniform deposition of PS particles on the laser textured surfaces is achieved and the deposited material is confined to smaller area.

  20. Effect of surface tension, viscosity, and process conditions on polymer morphology deposited at the liquid-vapor interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Patrick D; Bradley, Laura C; Gupta, Malancha

    2013-09-17

    We have observed that the vapor-phase deposition of polymers onto liquid substrates can result in the formation of polymer films or particles at the liquid-vapor interface. In this study, we demonstrate the relationship between the polymer morphology at the liquid-vapor interface and the surface tension interaction between the liquid and polymer, the liquid viscosity, the deposition rate, and the deposition time. We show that the thermodynamically stable morphology is determined by the surface tension interaction between the liquid and the polymer. Stable polymer films form when it is energetically favorable for the polymer to spread over the surface of the liquid, whereas polymer particles form when it is energetically favorable for the polymer to aggregate. For systems that do not strongly favor spreading or aggregation, we observe that the initial morphology depends on the deposition rate. Particles form at low deposition rates, whereas unstable films form at high deposition rates. We also observe a transition from particle formation to unstable film formation when we increase the viscosity of the liquid or increase the deposition time. Our results provide a fundamental understanding about polymer growth at the liquid-vapor interface and can offer insight into the growth of other materials on liquid surfaces. The ability to systematically tune morphology can enable the production of particles for applications in photonics, electronics, and drug delivery and films for applications in sensing and separations.

  1. Single lipid bilayer deposition on polymer surfaces using bicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Qasim; Zhang, Zhenfu; Petretic, Amy; Gradinaru, Claudiu C; Macdonald, Peter M

    2015-03-09

    A lipid bilayer was deposited on a 3 μm diameter polystyrene (PS) bead via hydrophobic anchoring of bicelles containing oxyamine-bearing cholesteric moieties reacting with the aldehyde functionalized bead surface. Discoidal bicelles were formed by mixing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), dimyristoyltrimethylammonium propane (DMTAP), and the oxyamine-terminated cholesterol derivative, cholest-5-en-3β-oxy-oct-3,6-oxa-an-8-oxyamine (CHOLOA), in the molar ratio DMPC/DHCP/DMTAP/CHOLOA (1/0.5/0.01/0.05) in water. Upon exposure to aldehyde-bearing PS beads, a stable single lipid bilayer coating rapidly formed at the bead surface. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching demonstrated that the deposited lipids fused into an encapsulating lipid bilayer. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed that the short chain lipid DHPC was entirely absent from the PS adherent lipid coating. Fluorescence quenching measurements proved that the coating was a single lipid bilayer. The bicelle coating method is thus simple and robust, can be modified to include membrane-associated species, and can be adapted to coat any number of different surfaces.

  2. Characterisation of DLC films deposited using titanium isopropoxide (TIPOT) at different flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, R; Ali, N; Ghumman, C A A; Teodoro, O M N D; Ahmed, W

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in the search for advanced biomaterials for biomedical applications, such as human implants and surgical cutting tools. It is known that both carbon and titanium exhibit good biocompatibility and have been used as implants in the human body. It is highly desirable to deposit biocompatible thin films onto a range of components in order to impart biocompatibility and to minimise wear in implants. Diamond like carbon (DLC) is a good candidate material for achieving biocompatibility and low wear rates. In this study, thin films of diamond-like-carbon DLC were deposited onto stainless steel (316) substrates using C2H2, argon and titanium isopropoxide (TIPOT) precursors. Argon was used to generate the plasma in the plasma enhanced vapour deposition (PECVD) system. A critical coating feature governing the performance of the component during service is film thickness. The as-grown films were in the thickness range 90-100 nm and were found to be dependent on TIPOT flow rate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterise the surface roughness of the samples. As the flow rate of TIPOT increased the average roughness was found to increase in conjunction with the film thickness. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the chemical structure of amorphous carbon matrix. Surface tension values were calculated using contact angle measurements. In general, the trend of the surface tension results exhibited an opposite trend to that of the contact angle. The elemental composition of the samples was characterised using a VG ToF SIMS (IX23LS) instrument and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surprisingly, SIMS and XPS results showed that the DLC samples did not show evidence of titanium since no peaks representing to titanium appeared on the SIMS/XPS spectra.

  3. "Sticky Business": the Influence of Surface Biofilm on Particle Deposition and Infiltration in Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, N. L.; Hassan, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    Fine particulate matter is an important component of many streambed processes. For example, the deposition and infiltration of fine inorganic sediment has been repeatedly shown to degrade benthic habitat for fish and other organisms (Hynes, 1970). In contrast, fine organic particles are a significant source of carbon to benthic organisms (Webster et al., 1987). The mechanisms and rates of particle entrainment and deposition are highly complex and ill-predicted by simple physical relations. For example, a number of field studies have shown that measured rates of particle deposition often differ from still-water particle settling velocities calculated from particle size and density (e.g. Cushing et al., 1993). Several studies have proposed that adhesion of particles to surface biofilm may explain why deposition rates are faster than predicted, but few have investigated this phenomenon (Battin et al., 2003). In addition, although biofilms have been shown to significantly alter near-bed and interstitial flow velocities (Dodds and Biggs, 2002), the effect of these changes on particle depositionhas not been explored. Biofilm is pervasive in rivers and streams throughout the world, thus it may play an important, and heretofore underestimated, role in the deposition of fine particles to the streambed. This study tests the hypothesis that biofilm amount and structure may alter fine particle deposition, entrainment, and infiltration by either direct adhesion or by changes to near-bed hydraulics. A series of experiments are being conducted in a small recirculating flume to test how the amount and structure of surface biofilm influences the water column distribution, surface deposition, and infiltration of fine particles under two different flow levels ('high' and 'low'). Two types of surface biofilm are being tested: open-weave, filamentous assemblages and low-profile, mucilaginous forms; both are compared to a reference substrate without biofilm. Natural rocks hosting

  4. Modification of platinum surfaces by spontaneous deposition: Methanol oxidation electrocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, J.P.; Gualtieri, B.; Runga, N.; Teliz, E.; Zinola, C.F. [Fundamental Electrochemistry Laboratory, School of Sciences, Universidad de la Republica, Igua Street No. 4225, CP 11400, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2008-12-15

    The presence of a second metal on platinum surfaces affects the performance of methanol oxidation. However, most of the electrocatalytic reactions are studied by using electrochemically deposited platinum alloys, but in the case of spontaneous deposition the situation is not so clear since the surface distribution, stability and morphology are usually not well documented. The formation of surface decorated samples on mono- and poly-crystalline platinum is followed by electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques and analysis of their performance towards methanol adsorption and oxidation compared with that on pure platinum. Pt/Sn and Pt/Ru are of special interest because of their well-known performance in methanol fuel cells. Methanol oxidation on Pt(111)/Ru, Pt(111)/Sn and Pt(111) shows that ruthenium is the only one able to promote the reaction since the simultaneous dissolution of tin occurs and competes with the process of interest. The in situ infrared spectroscopy is used to compare methanol oxidation on Pt(111)/Ru and Pt(111) in acid media using p-polarized light. The formation of bridge bound carbon monoxide is inhibited in the presence of ruthenium ad-species, whereas on Pt(111) the three adsorption configurations are observed. Linear sweep polarization curves and Tafel slopes (calculated from steady state potentiostatic plots) for methanol oxidation are compared on polycrystalline surfaces modified by tin or ruthenium at different coverages. There is almost no change in the Tafel slopes due to the presence of the foreign metal except for Pt/Ru, where a 0.09 V decade{sup -1} slope was calculated below 0.55 V due to hydroxyl adsorbates on ruthenium islands. The anodic stripping of methanol residues on the three surfaces indicates a lower amount of carbon monoxide-type adsorbates on Pt/Ru, and the simultaneous tin dissolution process leading to residues oxidation on Pt/Sn electrodes. (author)

  5. Estimating the value and interest rate risk of demand deposits in concentrated markets

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The purpose of this study is to determine the value and interest rate risk of funds deposited in demand deposit accounts under imperfect competition among banks. The value of a demand deposit is divided into two components, which are rent and liability. The former is defined as the profit bank receives from accepting demand deposits (by paying rates below the short-term market interest rate) and the latter as the nominal value of deposits minus the rent. The interest ...

  6. A framework for modeling the liquidity and interest rate risk of demand deposits

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this report is to carry out a pre-study and develop a framework for how the liquidity and interest rate risk of a bank's demand deposits can be modeled. This is done by first calibrating a Vasicek short rate model and then deriving models for the bank's deposit volume and deposit rate using multiple regression. The volume model and the deposit rate model are used to determine the liquidity and interest rate risk, which is done separately. The liquidity risk is determined by a...

  7. Polyelectrolyte surfactant aggregates and their deposition on macroscopic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisin, David

    2002-07-01

    the CSC have been determined for mixtures of cationically modified guar gums (of varying charge density) with two anionic surfactants: sodium lauryl (or dodecyl) ether sulfate [SLES] and sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS], for various concentrations of the polyelectrolyte and added sodium chloride, at room temperature. The addition of sodium chloride has only a minor net effect on the CFC, but increases the CSC significantly. The interactions between the cationic polyelectrolyte and the surfactant have been studied in the one-phase regions, i.e. below the CFC and above the CSC, using different techniques. Surface tension, electrophoresis, light scattering and viscosimetry have been employed. In the two-phase region, the sedimented floe phase has been analysed and the flocculation has been investigated. Rheology of the floe phase has been studied, after a mild compression by centrifugation. The initial rate of flocculation has been determined, using stop-flow equipment. The growth and the structure of the flocs have been investigated by light scattering. The open-network flocs of polyelectrolyte-surfactant particles grow to {approx}10's {mu}m in size, prior to their eventual settling out. Other colloidal particles can be trapped within these large flocs, and the flocs can be used to transport these particles to a macroscopic surface. The deposition and the removal of such composite flocs on glass surfaces, under flow, have been studied using a flow cell device coupled with an optical microscope. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy have also been employed. (author)

  8. Post-deposition dynamics of multiple cluster aggregation on liquid surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Feng-Min; Xu You-Sheng; Ye Gao-Xiang; Wu Zi-Qin

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive simulation model-deposition, diffusion, rotation and aggregation-is presented to demonstrate the post-deposition phenomena of multiple cluster growth on liquid surfaces, such as post-deposition nucleation, postdeposition growth and post-deposition coalescence. Emphasis is placed on the relaxations of monomer density, dimer density and cluster density as well as combined cluster-plus-monomer density with time after deposition ending. It isshown that post-deposition coalescence largely takes place after deposition due to the large mobility of clusters on liquid surfaces, while the post-deposition nucleation is only possible before the saturation cluster density is reached at the end of the deposition. The deposition flux and the moment of deposition ending play important roles in the post-deposition dynamics.

  9. Deposited nanohelices on smooth surface: morphology and SERS application (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Liu, Wei-Chih; Huang, Yu-Jie; Weng Lin, Yueh

    2016-10-01

    Metal nanohelix arrays have been fabricated using glancing angle deposition. Comparing with method of substrate patterning, nanohelices with average arm width of 32 nm, pitch length of 34 nm and radius of curvature around 12.5 nm grew on a regular seeded layer with period of 79 nm and average seed diameter of 14 nm. In order to mass produce metal nanohelices, smooth substrates were adopted to deposited nanohelix arrays. Due to shadowing effect achieved under substrate cooling, the silver and gold nanohelix arrays could be grown successfully on smooth substrates by well controlling the substrate spin rate with respect to the deposition rate. In this work, the thickness of deposition monitored by quartz monitor was kept at 0.3 nm/s. The substrate was cooled to a low temperature around -10oC. The average arm width, pitch length, radius of curvature and spacer between nanohelices vary with deposition angle are investigated here. The morphology of nanohelix varies with different deposition angles (from 86o to 80o) were also to be investigated. In this work, the average space between adjacent nanohelices and radius of curvature were reduced and increased by increasing the deposition angle, respectively. The average pitch of each nanohelix array was low dependent on the deposition angle. The overlap effect occurs between adjacent nanohelices and the gaps between nanohelices support local field enhancement. The area associated local field enhancement called hot spots. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals from nanostructured thin films were measured and compared with near-field simulations.

  10. Flume experiments of deposition rate on foreset of silty delta relative to hydrographic patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUZUKI Taro; ENDO Noritaka

    2011-01-01

    Foreset profiles of deltaic topography change corresponding to hydraulic conditions, and are influenced by water discharge and change rates of water discharge. To investigate the correlation between the transition of deposition rates on the foreset and the change rate of water discharge of temporary waxing and subsequent waning lfows, we perform experiments on silty deltas that developed under several different hydrographic patterns. The ifndings are as follows: (1) Under lfows with constant discharge, the deposition rate on the foreset was low at high water discharge and high at low water discharge because the separated lfow became vigorous at high water discharge and prevented sediment supply onto the foreset. If the water discharge is not constant, the deposition rate shifted concurrently with water discharge only at extremely low change rate. (2i) In a waxing lfow at low (but not extremely low) increase rate, the deposition rate gradually decreased with some time lag. (2ii) In the case of high increase discharge, intense erosion on the topset caused by rapid waxing made a large amount of silt move onto the foreset and the deposition rate temporary increased. (3) With ample time after waning stage, the deposition rate recovered to that at constant low water discharge in all runs. However, the transitional processes depended on not only waning rate but also waxing rate at before waning stage. (3i) In the case of high decrease rate of water discharge, the deposition rate abruptly decreased regardless of increase rate. (3ii) Even in the case of low decrease rate of water discharge, if the increase rate before waning stage was high, the deposition rate abruptly decreased. (3iii) Only in the case where both the increase rate and the decrease rate were low, deposition rate gradually increased.

  11. Fractal Characteristics of Aerosols Deposition in the Fiber Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hai-ming; ZHU Hui

    2010-01-01

    To study the effects of particle motion mechanism and size distribution on fractal dimension of dust cake structure,the process of aerosol particles deposition in fibrous filtration medium was simulated on basis of Diffusion-Limited Aggregation(DLA)improving model.In this study,effects of inertia movement and diffusion movement on particles depoition would be considered.In the mean while,ratio of inertia movement to diffusion movement was defined as Pe number.The results show that surface curve of dust cake becomes irregular with Pe reducing and fractal dimension of dust cake surface increased with Pe increasing.The more greater particles dispersion,the more greater dust cake porosity,the more uneven the distribution.The porosity,formed by Pulydisperse dust particles,is less than that formed by monodisperse particles.Stronger particle diffusion movement,more uniform the dust cakes was.

  12. Surface ordering during underpotential deposition of lead on copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljevic, Natasa

    Recently there has been an increased fundamental and practical interest in studies of ultra-thin films in systems with large atomic size mismatch. For those systems interesting surface stress-driven phenomena are observed, such as surface-confined alloying resulting in self-assembly and ordering of domain structures. The system of interest in the present study is the electrochemical deposition of lead on copper that has an atomic size mismatch of 37%. This system shows no bulk alloying and has been thoroughly examined in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Electrodeposition of lead on copper starts by formation of one epitaxial monolayer in the potential region positive with respect to the reversible potential of bulk lead deposition, a phenomenon known in electrochemistry as underpotential deposition (UPD). On copper (111), in-situ STM results have shown (4 x 4) Moire structure of the complete lead monolayer, a structure identical to that observed in UHV. Following stripping of the lead monolayer, STM results revealed nano-organization of the topmost copper layer. Depending on the solution pH value, different types of nanoscale organization have been observed: (i) a Moire pattern of anion-induced reconstruction of the top copper layer, and (ii) a star pattern dislocation network. Additional experiments in lead-free aerated and deaerated solutions at different pH values suggest that observed structures are results of lead-assisted oxy-anion adsorption in which lead plays a catalytic role. On copper (100), the lead UPD process features coverage-dependent phase behavior identical to that observed in UHV. As a function of lead coverage, phases corresponding to a dilute random alloy phase and ordered surface alloy phase that appears at a surface coverage ratio of three lead atoms to eight copper atoms are observed. With increasing lead coverage, lead dealloys from this ordered phase resulting in the formation of a c(2 x 2) lead overlayer phase that transforms with increasing lead

  13. Experimental investigation of ash deposits on convection heating surfaces of a circulating fluidized bed municipal solid waste incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhi; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Daoyin; Zhuang, Yaming; Ye, Minghua; Sheng, Hongchan; Xu, Shaojuan

    2016-10-01

    Incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) is a waste treatment method which can be sustainable in terms of waste volume reduction, as well as a source of renewable energy. During MSW combustion, increased formation of deposits on convection heating exchanger surfaces can pose severe operational problems, such as fouling, slagging and corrosion. These problems can cause lower heat transfer efficiency from the hot flue gas to the working fluid inside the tubes. A study was performed where experiments were carried out to examine the ash deposition characteristics in a full-scale MSW circulating fluidized bed (CFB) incinerator, using a newly designed deposit probe that was fitted with six thermocouples and four removable half rings. The influence of probe exposure time and probe surface temperature (500, 560, and 700°C) on ash deposit formation rate was investigated. The results indicate that the deposition mass and collection efficiency achieve a minimum at the probe surface temperature of 560°C. Ash particles are deposited on both the windward and leeward sides of the probe by impacting and thermophoretic/condensation behavior. The major inorganic elements present in the ash deposits are Ca, Al and Si. Compared to ash deposits formed on the leeward side of the probe, windward-side ash deposits contain relatively higher Ca and S concentrations, but lower levels of Al and Si. Among all cases at different surface temperatures, the differences in elemental composition of the ash deposits from the leeward side are insignificant. However, as the surface temperature increases, the concentrations of Al, Si, K and Na in the windward-side ash deposits increase, but the Ca concentration is reduced. Finally, governing mechanisms are proposed on the basis of the experimental data, such as deposit morphology, elemental composition and thermodynamic calculations.

  14. Probe Measurements of Ash Deposit Formation Rate and Shedding in a Biomass Suspension-Fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafique Bashir, Muhammad; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Frandsen, Flemming;

    The aim of this study was to investigate ash deposit formation rate, heat uptake reduction and deposit removal by using advanced online ash deposition and sootblowing probes in a 350 MWth suspension-fired boiler, utilizing wood and straw pellets as fuel. The influence of fuel type (straw share...

  15. Effect of Rare Earth Elements on Depositing Rate of Nickel Alloy Brush Plating Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of four kinds of rare earth elements on the depositing rate of Ni-based alloy brush plating coatings was investigated. The results indicate that all of the selected rare earth elements increase the depositing rate of Ni-based alloy coatings, and Sm increases the depositing rate most obviously. There is an optimum amount of rare earth addition in the plating solution. With the change of plating voltage to a certain extent, the results reveal no differences. The mechanism of the increase of the depositing rate was analyzed.

  16. Surface modification by plasma polymerization: film deposition, tailoring of surface properties and biocompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Os, van, J.

    2000-01-01

    The work described in this thesis concerns the surface modification of materials by thin film deposition in a plasma reactor. In particular, thin polymeric films bearing amine functionalities were synthesized by plasma polymerization of amino group containing monomers. In addition to the synthesis, attention was directed towards the characterization of these films, and the tailoring of their surface properties on a molecular level. Finally, the amino groups introduced by plasma polymerization...

  17. Influence of deposition temperature of thermal ALD deposited Al2O3 films on silicon surface passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Neha; Gope, Jhuma; Vandana, Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Singh, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of deposition temperature (Tdep) and subsequent annealing time (tanl) of atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films on silicon surface passivation (in terms of surface recombination velocity, SRV) is investigated. The pristine samples (as-deposited) show presence of positive fixed charges, QF. The interface defect density (Dit) decreases with increase in Tdep which further decreases with tanl up to 100s. An effective surface passivation (SRV<8 cm/s) is realized for Tdep ≥ 200 °C. The present investigation suggests that low thermal budget processing provides the same quality of passivation as realized by high thermal budget process (tanl between 10 to 30 min).

  18. Surface modification by plasma polymerization: film deposition, tailoring of surface properties and biocompatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van Menno Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The work described in this thesis concerns the surface modification of materials by thin film deposition in a plasma reactor. In particular, thin polymeric films bearing amine functionalities were synthesized by plasma polymerization of amino group containing monomers. In addition to the synthesis,

  19. High-Rate Growth and Nitrogen Distribution in Homoepitaxial Chemical Vapour Deposited Single-crystal Diamond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-Dong; ZOU Guang-Tian; WANG Qi-Liang; CHENG Shao-Heng; LI Bo; L(U) Jian-Nan; L(U) Xian-Yi; JIN Zeng-Sun

    2008-01-01

    High rate (> 50 μm/h) growth of homoepitaxial single-crystal diamond (SCD) is carried out by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) with added nitrogen in the reactant gases of methane and hydrogen,using a polycrystalline-CVD-diamond-film-made seed holder. Photoluminescence results indicate that the nitrogen concentration is spatially inhomogeneous in a large scale,either on the top surface or in the bulk of those as-grown SCDs.The presence of N-distribution is attributed to the facts: (I) a difference in N-incorporation efficiency and (ii) N-diffusion,resulting from the local growth temperatures changed during the high-rate deposition process.In addition,the formed nitrogen-vacancy centres play a crucial role in N-diffusion through the growing crystal.Based on the N-distribution observed in the as-grown crystals,we propose a simple method to distinguish natural diamonds and man-made CVD SCDs.Finally,the disappearance of void defect on the top surface of SCDs is discussed to be related to a filling-in mechanism.

  20. Pulsed Helium Ion Beam Induced Deposition: A Means to High Growth Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkemade, Paul F. A. [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Miro, Hozanna [Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands; Van Veldhoven, Emile [TNO Van Leeuwenhoek Laboratory; Maas, Diederick [TNO Van Leeuwenhoek Laboratory; Smith, Daryl [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    The sub-nanometer beam of a helium ion microscope was used to study and optimize helium-ion beam induced deposition of PtC nanopillars with the (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Pt(CPCH{sub 3}) precursor. The beam current, beam dwell time, precursor refresh time, and beam focus have been independently varied. Continuous beam exposure resulted in narrow but short pillars, while pulsed exposure resulted in thinner and higher ones. Furthermore, at short dwell times the deposition efficiency was very high, especially for a defocused beam. Efficiencies were measured up to 20 times the value for continuous exposure conditions. The interpretation of the experimental data was aided by a Monte Carlo simulation of the deposition. The results indicate that two regimes are operational in ion beam induced deposition (IBID). In the first one, the adsorbed precursor molecules originally present in the beam interaction region decompose. After the original precursor layer is consumed, further depletion is averted and growth continues by the supply of molecules via adsorption and surface diffusion. Depletion around the beam impact site can be distinguished from depletion on the flanges of the growing pillars. The Monte Carlo simulations for low precursor surface coverage reproduce measured growth rates, but predict considerably narrower pillars, especially at short dwell times. Both the experiments and the simulations show that the pillar width rapidly increases with increasing beam diameter. Optimal writing strategy, good beam focusing, and rapid beam positioning are needed for efficient and precise fabrication of extended and complex nanostructures by He-IBID.

  1. Obliquely Deposited Gold Nanohelices on Lithography-Free Prepared Nanoseeded Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Liu, Wei-Chih; Hsiao, Chih-Yung; Lin, Po-Cheng; Yu, Chia-Liang; Chan, Teh-Li

    2017-08-01

    A substrate surface on which gold particles are distributed is prepared by annealing an ultra-thin gold film to enable glancing angle deposition. By cooling the substrate and controlling its spin rate, two spiral-like and one screw-like gold nanohelix arrays are grown upon the seeded surfaces. The mean helix radius and pitch length are reduced to 17 and 55 nm, respectively. The g-factor of the three nanohelix arrays is measured here and associated circular dichroism peak blue shifts occur as the gold helices shrink.

  2. Deposition rate and morphology of carbon nanotubes at different positions in a CVD reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized through the catalytic decomposition of a ferroeene-xylene mixture in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition reactor.The deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction was measured.The morphology of CNTs was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The results showed that the deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction first increased and later decreased,the position achieving the maximum deposition rate was influenced by the operating conditions.The morphologies of CNTs also changed along the axial direction.

  3. Method to control deposition rate instabilities—High power impulse magnetron sputtering deposition of TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossoy, Anna, E-mail: annaeden@hi.is, E-mail: anna.kossoy@gmail.com; Magnusson, Rögnvaldur L.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi K.; Leosson, Kristjan; Olafsson, Sveinn [Physics Division, Science Institute—University of Iceland, Reykjavik 107 (Iceland)

    2015-03-15

    The authors describe how changes in shutter state (open/closed) affect sputter plasma conditions and stability of the deposition rate of Ti and TiO{sub 2} films. The films were grown by high power impulse magnetron sputtering in pure Ar and in Ar/O{sub 2} mixture from a metallic Ti target. The shutter state was found to have an effect on the pulse waveform for both pure Ar and reactive sputtering of Ti also affecting stability of TiO{sub 2} deposition rate. When the shutter opened, the shape of pulse current changed from rectangular to peak-plateau and pulse energy decreased. The authors attribute it to the change in plasma impedance and gas rarefaction originating in geometry change in front of the magnetron. TiO{sub 2} deposition rate was initially found to be high, 1.45 Å/s, and then dropped by ∼40% during the first 5 min, while for Ti the change was less obvious. Instability of deposition rate poses significant challenge for growing multilayer heterostructures. In this work, the authors suggest a way to overcome this by monitoring the integrated average energy involved in the deposition process. It is possible to calibrate and control the film thickness by monitoring the integrated pulse energy and end growth when desired integrated pulse energy level has been reached.

  4. Structural modification of titanium surface by octacalcium phosphate via Pulsed Laser Deposition and chemical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Smirnov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD technique was applied to coat titanium for orthopaedic and dental implant applications. Calcium carbonate (CC was used as starting coating material. The deposited CC films were transformed into octacalcium phosphate (OCP by chemical treatments. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies revealed that the final OCP thin films are formed on the titanium surface. Human myofibroblasts from peripheral vessels and the primary bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSs were cultured on the investigated materials. It was shown that all the investigated samples had no short-term toxic effects on cells. The rate of division of myofibroblast cells growing on the surface and saturated BMMSs concentration for the OCP coating were about two times faster than of cells growing on the CC films.

  5. Atmospheric deposition and storm induced runoff of heavy metals from different impermeable urban surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicke, Daniel; Cochrane, Thomas A; O'Sullivan, Aisling D

    2012-01-01

    Contaminants deposited on impermeable surfaces migrate to stormwater following rainfall events, but accurately quantifying their spatial and temporal yields useful for mitigation purposes is challenging. To overcome limitations in current sampling methods, a system was developed for rapid quantification of contaminant build-up and wash-off dynamics from different impervious surfaces. Thin boards constructed of concrete and two types of asphalt were deployed at different locations of a large carpark to capture spatially distributed contaminants from dry atmospheric deposition over specified periods of time. Following experimental exposure time, the boards were then placed under a rainfall simulator in the laboratory to generate contaminant runoff under controlled conditions. Single parameter effects including surface roughness and material composition, number of antecedent dry days, rain intensity, and water quality on contaminant build-up and wash-off yields could be investigated. The method was applied to quantify spatial differences in deposition rates of contaminants (TSS, zinc, copper and lead) at two locations varying in their distance to vehicle traffic. Results showed that boards exposed at an unused part of the carpark >50 m from vehicular traffic captured similar amounts of contaminants compared with boards that were exposed directly adjacent to the access route, indicating substantial atmospheric contaminant transport. Furthermore, differences in contaminant accumulation as a function of surface composition were observed. Runoff from asphalt boards yielded higher zinc loads compared with concrete surfaces, whereas runoff from concrete surfaces resulted in higher TSS concentrations attributed to its smoother surfaces. The application of this method enables relationships between individual contaminant behaviour and specific catchment characteristics to be investigated and provides a technique to derive site-specific build-up and wash-off functions required

  6. Hydrogenated Silicon Carbide Thin Films Prepared with High Deposition Rate by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Kamble

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural, optical, and electrical properties of hydrogenated silicon carbide (SiC:H films, deposited from silane (SiH4 and methane (CH4 gas mixture by HW-CVD method, were investigated. Film properties are carefully and systematically studied as function of deposition pressure which is varied between 200 mTorr and 500 mTorr. The deposition rate is found to be reasonably high (9.4 nm/s deposition pressure amorphization occurs in SiC:H films. FTIR spectroscopy analysis shows that bond density of C–H decreases while Si–C and Si–H bond densities increase with increasing deposition pressure. Total hydrogen content increases with increasing deposition pressure and was found to be <20 at.%. The absence of band ~1300–1600 cm−1 in the Raman spectra implies negligible C–C bond concentration and formation of nearly stoichiometric SiC:H films. The band gap shows increasing trend with increasing deposition pressure. The high value of Urbach energy suggests increased structural disorder in SiC:H films. Finally, it has been concluded that CH4 can be used as effective carbon source in HW-CVD method to prepare stoichiometric SiC:H films.

  7. Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Lau

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously, Lau (one of the authors pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

  8. Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqian Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO3, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor.

  9. Surface treatment effect on Si (111) substrate for carbon deposition using DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aji, A. S., E-mail: aji.ravazes70@gmail.com; Sahdan, M. F.; Hendra, I. B.; Dinari, P.; Darma, Y. [Quantum Semiconductor and Devices Lab., Physics of Material Electronics Research Division, Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    In this work, we studied the effect of HF treatment in silicon (111) substrate surface for depositing thin layer carbon. We performed the deposition of carbon by using DC Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering with carbon pallet (5% Fe) as target. From SEM characterization results it can be concluded that the carbon layer on HF treated substrate is more uniform than on substrate without treated. Carbon deposition rate is higher as confirmed by AFM results if the silicon substrate is treated by HF solution. EDAX characterization results tell that silicon (111) substrate with HF treatment have more carbon fraction than substrate without treatment. These results confirmed that HF treatment on silicon Si (111) substrates could enhance the carbon deposition by using DC sputtering. Afterward, the carbon atomic arrangement on silicon (111) surface is studied by performing thermal annealing process to 900 °C. From Raman spectroscopy results, thin film carbon is not changing until 600 °C thermal budged. But, when temperature increase to 900 °C, thin film carbon is starting to diffuse to silicon (111) substrates.

  10. Modelling the surface deposition of meteoric smoke particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, James S. A.; Feng, Wuhu; Mann, Graham W.; Dhomse, Sandip S.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    The flux of meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) in Greenland and Antarctica has been measured using Ir and Pt observations in ice cores, by Gabrielli et al. [1,2]. They obtained MSP deposition fluxes of 1.5 ± 0.45 × 10-4 g m-2 yr-1 (209 ± 63 t d-1) in Greenland and 3.9 ± 1.4 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 (55 ± 19 t d-1) in Antarctica, where the values in parentheses are total atmospheric inputs, assuming a uniform global deposition rate. These results show reasonable agreement with those of Lanci et al. [3], who used ice core magnetisation measurements, resulting in MSP fluxes of 1.7 ± 0.23 × 10-4 g m-2 yr-1 (236 ± 50 t d-1) (Greenland) and 2.0 ± 0.52 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 (29 ± 5.0 t d-1) (Antarctica). Atmospheric modelling studies have been performed to assess the transport and deposition of MSPs, using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model), and the CARMA (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model) aerosol microphysics package. An MSP input function totalling 44 t d-1 was added between about 80 and 105 km. Several model runs have been performed in which the aerosol scavenging by precipitation was varied. Wet deposition is expected (and calculated here) to be the main deposition process; however, rain and snow aerosol scavenging coefficients have uncertainties spanning up to two and three orders of magnitude, respectively [4]. The model experiments that we have carried out include simple adjustments of the scavenging coefficients, full inclusion of a parametrisation reported by Wang et al. [4], and a scheme based on aerosol removal where relative humidity > 100 %. The MSP fluxes obtained vary between 1.4 × 10-5 and 2.6 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 for Greenland, and 5.1 × 10-6 and 1.7 × 10-5 g m-2 yr-1 for Antarctica. These values are about an order of magnitude lower than the Greenland observations, but show reasonable agreement for Antarctica. The UM (Unified Model), UKCA (United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols Model), and GLOMAP (GLObal Model of Aerosol Processes) have

  11. Particle emission rates during electrostatic spray deposition of TiO2 nanoparticle-based photoactive coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Antti J; Jensen, Alexander C Ø; Kling, Kirsten I; Kling, Jens; Budtz, Hans Christian; Koponen, Ismo K; Tuinman, Ilse; Hussein, Tareq; Jensen, Keld A; Nørgaard, Asger; Levin, Marcus

    2018-01-05

    Here, we studied the particle release rate during Electrostatic spray deposition of anatase-(TiO2)-based photoactive coating onto tiles and wallpaper using a commercially available electrostatic spray device. Spraying was performed in a 20.3m(3) test chamber while measuring concentrations of 5.6nm to 31μm-size particles and volatile organic compounds (VOC), as well as particle deposition onto room surfaces and on the spray gun user hand. The particle emission and deposition rates were quantified using aerosol mass balance modelling. The geometric mean particle number emission rate was 1.9×10(10)s(-1) and the mean mass emission rate was 381μgs(-1). The respirable mass emission-rate was 65% lower than observed for the entire measured size-range. The mass emission rates were linearly scalable (±ca. 20%) to the process duration. The particle deposition rates were up to 15h(-1) for coated with carbon, and Ag particles with size ranging from 60nm to ca. 5μm. As expected, no significant VOC emissions were observed as a result of spraying. Finally, we provide recommendations for exposure model parameterization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High surface area graphene foams by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieschner, Simon; Weber, Michael; Wohlketzetter, Jörg; Vieten, Josua; Makrygiannis, Evangelos; Blaschke, Benno M.; Morandi, Vittorio; Colombo, Luigi; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based structures combine the unique physical properties of graphene with the opportunity to get high electrochemically available surface area per unit of geometric surface area. Several preparation techniques have been reported to fabricate 3D graphene-based macroscopic structures for energy storage applications such as supercapacitors. Although reaserch has been focused so far on achieving either high specific capacitance or high volumetric capacitance, much less attention has been dedicated to obtain high specific and high volumetric capacitance simultaneously. Here, we present a facile technique to fabricate graphene foams (GF) of high crystal quality with tunable pore size grown by chemical vapor deposition. We exploited porous sacrificial templates prepared by sintering nickel and copper metal powders. Tuning the particle size of the metal powders and the growth temperature allow fine control of the resulting pore size of the 3D graphene-based structures smaller than 1 μm. The as-produced 3D graphene structures provide a high volumetric electric double layer capacitance (165 mF cm-3). High specific capacitance (100 Fg-1) is obtained by lowering the number of layers down to single layer graphene. Furthermore, the small pore size increases the stability of these GFs in contrast to the ones that have been grown so far on commercial metal foams. Electrodes based on the as-prepared GFs can be a boost for the development of supercapacitors, where both low volume and mass are required.

  13. Regional trends in soil acidification and exchangeable metal concentrations in relation to acid deposition rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Carly J; Dise, Nancy B; Gowing, David J

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of high levels of reactive nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S), or the legacy of that deposition, remain among the world's most important environmental problems. Although regional impacts of acid deposition in aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, quantitative evidence of wide-scale impacts on terrestrial ecosystems is not common. In this study we analysed surface and subsoil chemistry of 68 acid grassland sites across the UK along a gradient of acid deposition, and statistically related the concentrations of exchangeable soil metals (1 M KCl extraction) to a range of potential drivers. The deposition of N, S or acid deposition was the primary correlate for 8 of 13 exchangeable metals measured in the topsoil and 5 of 14 exchangeable metals in the subsoil. In particular, exchangeable aluminium and lead both show increased levels above a soil pH threshold of about 4.5, strongly related to the deposition flux of acid compounds.

  14. Silicon Dioxide Coating Deposited by PDPs on PET Films and Influence on Oxygen Transmission Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yun-Jin; FU Ya-Bo; CHEN Qiang; ZHANG Chun-Mei; SANG Li-Jun; ZHANG Yue-Fei

    2008-01-01

    A silicon dioxide film is deposited on the polyethyleneterephtalate (PET) by a penning discharge plasma source at ambient temperature in a high vacuum chamber.Hexamethyldisiloxane and oxygen are adopted as precursor and reactive reagent to grow a nano-scale silicon dioxide layer on polymer surfaces.For the chemical structure analysis x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is performed to demonstrate the content of Si,0 and C elements.It is noticed that a higher silicon concentration is contained if Ar plasma is used for pretreatment.X-ray diffraction analysis shows that a micro-crystal silicon dioxide is formed by peak patterns at 25.84° and 21.8°.The barrier properties examined by oxygen transmission rate show that the permeation parameter of the 12-μm-thick PET film drastically decreases from 135 cc/m2 per day for the control one to 0.713 cc/m2 per day for the as-deposited one after Ar plasma treatment.The surface morphology related to the barrier properties of SiOx-coated polymers os also investigated by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  15. Improvement in Device Performance and Reliability of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes through Deposition Rate Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Wei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated a fabrication technique to reduce the driving voltage, increase the current efficiency, and extend the operating lifetime of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED by simply controlling the deposition rate of bis(10-hydroxybenzo[h]qinolinato beryllium (Bebq2 used as the emitting layer and the electron-transport layer. In our optimized device, 55 nm of Bebq2 was first deposited at a faster deposition rate of 1.3 nm/s, followed by the deposition of a thin Bebq2 (5 nm layer at a slower rate of 0.03 nm/s. The Bebq2 layer with the faster deposition rate exhibited higher photoluminescence efficiency and was suitable for use in light emission. The thin Bebq2 layer with the slower deposition rate was used to modify the interface between the Bebq2 and cathode and hence improve the injection efficiency and lower the driving voltage. The operating lifetime of such a two-step deposition OLED was 1.92 and 4.6 times longer than that of devices with a single deposition rate, that is, 1.3 and 0.03 nm/s cases, respectively.

  16. Mapping of plume deposits and surface composition on Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, T. A.; Scipioni, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Clark, R. N.,; Hand, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    A major result of the Cassini mission was the discovery that the small mid-sized moon Enceladus is presently geological active[Dougherty et al., 2006; Porco et al., 2006; Spencer et al., 2006; Hansen et al., 2008]. This activity results in plumes of water vapor and ice emanating from a series of fractures ("Tiger Stripes") at the moon's South Pole. Some fraction of plume material escapes the moon's gravity and populates the E-ring as well as ultimately providing a source of fresh plasma in the Saturnian magnetosphere [Pontius and Hill, 2006; Kempf et al., 2010]. However, a significant portion of plume material is redeposited on Enceladus and thus provides a source of surface contaminants. By studying the near-infrared spectral signatures of these contaminants we may put new constraints on the composition of the plumes and, ultimately, their source, which is currently believed to be Enceladus's global sub-surface ocean [Iess et al., 2014]. Here we present preliminary results from our analysis of observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) [Brown et al., 2005] onboard Cassini and mapping of plume deposits across the surface of Enceladus. We have investigated the global variation of the water ice Fresnel peak at 3.1 μm, which may be used as an indicator of ice crystallinity [Hansen & McCord, 2004; Jaumann et al., 2008; Newman et al., 2008]. We have also investigated the slope of the 1.11-2.25 μm spectral region, which serves as an indicator of water ice grain size for small grains (< 100 μm) as well as the presence of contaminants [e.g. Filacchione et al., 2010]. Finally, we have identified and mapped an absorption feature centered at 3.25 μm that may be related to organic contaminants, represented by the band depth of the fundamental C-H stretch [e.g. Cruikshank et al., 2014; Scipioni et al., 2014].

  17. Particle deposition to protruding local sinks adhering on a collector surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we measured the local initial deposition rates of streptococci to adhering actinomyces, acting as protruding local sinks on a glass collector, as a function of the actinomyces density in a parallel plate flow chamber. The local initial deposition rates, i.e., deposition in the vicinit

  18. Deposition of polycrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond on graphite: effects of surface pre-treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, I.; John, P.; Porro, S.; Wilson, J. I. B.

    2017-03-01

    The growth of hydrogenated sp3-phase of diamond on the sp2-phase of graphite by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPECVD) is a challenge, primarily because hydrogen etches graphite much faster than the growth rate of diamond. To enhance nucleation of diamond on graphite, we used a plethora of techniques such as plasma etching, ion bombardment, manual scratching, and scratching by ultrasonic agitation. Nanocrystalline and polycrystalline diamond thin-films were grown by MPECVD on the surface of pre-treated or pristine graphite using 1.5, 3.0, and 3.6 kW microwave power. Samples were characterised by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Species in the gas phase during film deposition were monitored by Optical Emission Spectroscopy. We have found that the surface area covered and the morphology of the diamond films are dependent on the surface pre-treatment. The crystallite size of the films depends on the microwave power used during MPECVD growth. The results of this study establish the protocols for diamond deposition by MPECVD on graphite substrates with a desired crystalline quality based on the pre-treatment of the substrate and the microwave power used during MPECVD. These results are important to modern applications, such as plasma facing materials, in which diamond has shown outstanding performance in contrast to that of graphite.

  19. Deposition of Low Stress Silicon Nitride Thin Film and Its Application in Surface Micromachining Device Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beirong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface machining processes are responsible for creating microstructures that reside near the surfaces of a substrate and are characterized by the fabrication of micromechanical structures from deposited thin films. These films can be selectively removed to build three-dimensional structures whose functionality typically requires that they should be freed from the planar substrate. Silicon nitride thin film is one of these important materials. In this paper, by adjusting the SiH2Cl2/NH3 gaseous ratio, low stress silicon nitride (LS SiN is deposited by the low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD process. The internal stress generally in 135 MPa has been detected using an FLX-2320 film stress tester. Based on the wide application in surface micromachining devices, the mechanical properties of LS SiN are measured by nanoindentation, giving the value of Young’s modulus of 224 GPa and the hardness of 22.5 GPa, respectively. Dry etching and wet etching are utilized to fabricate the LS SiN thin film for structural layers. The etching rate compared with normal Si3N4 film by LPCVD is demonstrated for silicon chip manufacture.

  20. Dynamic Deposition of Nanocopper Film on the β-SiCp Surface by Magnetron Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Ming

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The uniform nanocopper film was deposited on the surface of micron β-SiC particle by magnetron sputtering technology successfully. The surface morphology and phase constitution of the β-SiC particle with nanocopper film were analyzed and dynamic deposition behavior was investigated in detail. The concept of dynamic deposition was put forward to interpret formation mechanism of copper nanofilm on the surface of β-SiC particles.

  1. Deposition pressure and rate effects on the microstructure and magnetic properties of sputtered tape media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Jixiong, E-mail: jhan@imation.co [Imation Corp., 1 Imation Place, 304-1A, Oakdale, MN 55128 (United States); Hintz, Mike [Medtronic Energy and Component Center, 6800 Shingle Creek Parkway, Brooklyn Center, MN 55430 (United States); Sexton, Joseph; Skorjanec, Joseph; Lundstrom, Garry [Imation Corp., 1 Imation Place, 304-1A, Oakdale, MN 55128 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Sputtered magnetic tape media were prepared by DC magnetron sputtering on polyimide substrates at different deposition conditions. The structure, texture and magnetic properties of the sputtered films were systematically studied using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and alternating gradient magnetometer. The microstructure of sputtered media is greatly influenced by the deposition conditions, such as deposition pressure and rate. High sputtering pressure and slow deposition rate produced high coercivity and low delta M films. The sputtered tape media have the desired grain segregation structure which is essential for low-noise media fabrication. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the stress of film is closely related to the deposition pressure. The stress of the film stack can be tuned for specific applications and good magnetic properties can be obtained under optimized deposition condition.

  2. Study on Microbial Deposition and Contamination onto Six Surfaces Commonly Used in Chemical and Microbiological Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Elena; Donegà, Valentina; Marchetti, Maria Gabriella; Pedrini, Paola; Monticelli, Cecilia; Balbo, Andrea

    2015-07-17

    The worktops in both chemical and microbiological laboratories are the surfaces most vulnerable to damage and exposure to contamination by indoor pollutants. The rate at which particles are deposited on indoor surfaces is an important parameter to determine human exposure to airborne biological particles. In contrast to what has been established for inorganic pollutants, no limit has been set by law for microbial contamination in indoor air. To our knowledge, a comparative study on the effect of surfaces on the deposition of microbes has not been carried out. An evaluation of the microbial contamination of worktop materials could be of crucial importance, both for safety reasons and for the reliability of tests and experiments that need to be carried out in non-contaminated environments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall microbial contamination (fungi, mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria, staphylococci) on six widely used worktop materials in laboratories (glass, stainless steel, fine porcelain stoneware, post-forming laminate, high-performing laminate and enamel steel) and to correlate it with the characteristics of the surfaces. After cleaning, the kinetics of microbial re-contamination were also evaluated for all surfaces.

  3. Study on Microbial Deposition and Contamination onto Six Surfaces Commonly Used in Chemical and Microbiological Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tamburini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The worktops in both chemical and microbiological laboratories are the surfaces most vulnerable to damage and exposure to contamination by indoor pollutants. The rate at which particles are deposited on indoor surfaces is an important parameter to determine human exposure to airborne biological particles. In contrast to what has been established for inorganic pollutants, no limit has been set by law for microbial contamination in indoor air. To our knowledge, a comparative study on the effect of surfaces on the deposition of microbes has not been carried out. An evaluation of the microbial contamination of worktop materials could be of crucial importance, both for safety reasons and for the reliability of tests and experiments that need to be carried out in non-contaminated environments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall microbial contamination (fungi, mesophilic and psychrophilic bacteria, staphylococci on six widely used worktop materials in laboratories (glass, stainless steel, fine porcelain stoneware, post-forming laminate, high-performing laminate and enamel steel and to correlate it with the characteristics of the surfaces. After cleaning, the kinetics of microbial re-contamination were also evaluated for all surfaces.

  4. Deposit buildup on prosthetic eye material (in vitro and its effect on surface wettability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pine KR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Keith Raymond Pine,1 Brian Sloan,2 KyuYeon Ivy Han,1 Simon Swift,3 Robert John Jacobs11Department of Optometry and Vision Science, New Zealand National Eye Centre, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2New Zealand National Eye Centre, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, School of Medical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New ZealandBackground: The aim of this in-vitro study was to investigate the effect of different polishing standards on prosthetic eye material (poly(methyl methacrylate [PMMA] on surface wettability and the rate of protein and lipid buildup.Methods: Sample disks (12 mm diameter × 1 mm thickness of PMMA were polished to three different standards of surface finish: low, normal, and optical quality contact lens standard. The sample disks were incubated in a protein-rich artificial tear solution (ATS for the following periods of time: 1 second, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 4 hours, 24 hours, and 14 days. Surface wettability was measured with a goniometer before and after protein deposits were removed. One-way analysis of variance and paired-samples t-test were used for the statistical analysis.Results: Between 13.64 and 62.88 µg of protein adhered to the sample disks immediately upon immersion in ATS. Sample disks with the highest polish attracted less protein deposits. The sample disks polished to optical quality contact lens standard were more wettable than those less highly polished, and wettability significantly decreased following removal of protein deposits. The addition of lipids to protein-only ATS made no difference to the amount of protein deposited on the sample disks for any of the standards of surface polish tested.Conclusion: The findings are consistent with the results of the in-vivo investigation reported previously by the authors. Our view that the minimum standard of polish for prosthetic eyes should be optical quality contact

  5. Research on depositing Ni45 alloy on titanium alloy surface by electrospark deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Tao; Zhang Chunhui; Su Guiqiao; Yan Ping

    2008-01-01

    Taking Ni45 bar as electrode, a strengthened layer of thickness up to 50 pm was built up on BT20 titanium alloy matrix by means of electrospark deposition. Results of phase analysis by using of X-ray diffraction confirmed that the deposition layer was composed mostly of three phases, NiTi, NiTi2layer was up to 910 HV0.05, about 2.7 times as high as that of the matrix. The hardness at the cross-section of the entire deposition layer showed a gradient distribution. The effects of capacitance and deposition time on thickness of deposition layer were also studied, and results showed that with relatively low capacity and short deposition time the deposition layer without cracks can be obtained.

  6. Heat and Mass Transfer during Chemical Vapor Deposition on the Particle Surface Subjected to Nanosecond Laser Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Quan; He, Yaling; Mao, Yijin

    2016-01-01

    A thermal model of chemical vapor deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) on the spherical particle surface under irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse is presented in this paper. Heat and mass transfer on a single spherical metal powder particle surface subjected to temporal Gaussian heat flux is investigated analytically. The chemical reaction on the particle surface and the mass transfer in the gas phase are also considered. The surface temperature, thermal penetration depth, and deposited film thickness under different laser fluence, pulse width, initial particle temperature, and particle radius are investigated. The effect of total pressure in the reaction chamber on deposition rate is studied as well. The particle-level model presented in this paper is an important step toward development of multiscale model of LCVI.

  7. Influence of solution deposition rate on properties of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd–Alghafour, N. M., E-mail: na2013bil@gmail.com [Iraqi Ministry of Education, Anbar (Iraq); Ahmed, Naser M.; Hassan, Zai; Mohammad, Sabah M. [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, University Sains Malaysia,11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2016-07-19

    Vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) thin films were deposited on glass substrates by using a cost-efficient spray pyrolysis technique. The films were grown at 350° through thermal decomposition of VCl{sub 3} in deionized water with different solution spray rates. The high resolution X-ray diffraction results revealed the formation of nanocrystalline films having orthorhombic structures with preferential orientation along (101) direction. The spray rate influenced the surface morphology and crystallite size of the films. The crystallite size was found to increase whereas the micro-strain was decreased by increasing the spray deposition rates. The increase in crystallite size and decrease in the macrostrain resulted in an improvement in the films’ crystallinity. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis indicated that the average transmittance of all films lies in the range 75-80 %. The band gap of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film was decreased from 2.65 to 2.46 eV with increase of the spray deposition rate from 5 ml/min to 10 ml/min. first, second, and third level headings (first level heading).

  8. Formation of a deposit on workpiece surface in polishing nonmetallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Yu. D.; Monteil, G.; Sidorko, V. I.; Filatov, O. Y.

    2013-05-01

    During the last decades in the theory of machining nonmetallic materials some serious advances have been achieved in the field of applying fundamental scientific approaches to the grinding and polishing technologies for high-quality precision surfaces of electronic components, optical systems, and decorative articles made of natural and synthetic stone [1-9]. These achievements include a cluster model of material removal in polishing dielectric workpieces [1-3, 6-7] and a physical-statistical model of formation of debris (wear) particles and removal thereof from a workpiece surface [8-10]. The aforesaid models made it possible to calculate, without recourse to Preston's linear law, the removal rate in polishing nonmetallic materials and the wear intensity for bound-abrasive tools. Equally important for the investigation of the workpiece surface generation mechanism and formation of debris particles are the kinetic functions of surface roughness and reflectance of glass and quartz workpiece surfaces, which have been established directly in the course of polishing. During the in situ inspection of a workpiece surface by laser ellipsometry [11] and reflectometry [12] it was found out that the periodic change of the light reflection coefficient of a workpiece surface being polished is attributed to the formation of fragments of a deposit consisting of work material particles (debris particles) and tool wear particles [13, 14]. The subsequent studies of the mechanism of interaction between the debris particles and wear particles in the tool-workpiece contact zone, which were carried out based on classical concepts [15, 16], yielded some unexpected results. It was demonstrated that electrically charged debris and wear particles, which are located in the coolant-filled gap between a tool and a workpiece, move by closed circular trajectories enclosed in spheres measuring less than one fifth of the gap thickness. This implies that the probability of the debris and wear

  9. High-Rate Vapor Deposition of Cadmium Telluride Films for Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasim Akhter

    1992-01-01

    High rate vapor deposition is presently used for large scale low cost deposition of thin films for packaging and other applications. The feasibility of using this technology for low cost deposition of solar cells was explored. After an exhaustive literature survey, the cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cell was found to be most suitable candidate for high rate vapor deposition. The high rate vapor deposition was investigated by sublimation with a short distance between sublimation source and the substrate (Close-Spaced Sublimation, CSS). Cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells were fabricated by depositing CdTe films at different rates on cadmium sulphide (CdS) films deposited by CSS or by evaporation. The CdTe films deposited at higher deposition rates were observed to have open circuit voltages (V_{ rm oc}) comparable to those deposited at lower rates. The effect of CdS film which acts as window layer for the cells were also investigated on the V_ {rm oc} of the solar cells. The results achieved proved the fact that CdS window layer is necessary to achieve higher V_{ rm oc} from solar cells. The substrate temperature during deposition of films by close space sublimation plays a vital role in the performance of solar cell. The increase in the substrate temperature during deposition of CdTe films increased the V_{rm oc} of solar cells. The solar cells with indium tin oxide (ITO) as top conductor, i.e. ITO/CdS/CdTe configuration were fabricated at rates up to 34 mum/minute and with tin oxide (TO) i.e. TO/CdTe configuration fabricated at rates up to 79 mum/minute have shown similar V_{rm oc} compared to those produced at lower rates. Higher CdTe film deposition rates are possible with larger capacity experimental setup. The method of contacting CdTe, used in this study, results in higher series resistance. An improved method of contacting CdTe needs to be developed.

  10. On the Strain Rate Sensitivity of Abs and Abs Plus Fused Deposition Modeling Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairis, A.; Petousis, M.; Vidakis, N.; Savvakis, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this work the effect of strain rate on the tensile strength of fused deposition modeling parts built with Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and ABS plus material is presented. ASTM D638-02a specimens were built with ABS and ABS plus and they were tested on a Schenck Trebel Co. tensile test machine at three different test speeds, equal, lower, and higher to the test speed required by the ASTM D638-02a standard. The experimental tensile strength results were compared and evaluated. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined with a scanning electron microscope, to determine failure mode of the filament strands. It was found that, as the test speed increases, specimens develop higher tensile strength and have higher elastic modulus. Specimens tested in the highest speed of the experiment had on average about 10% higher elastic modulus and developed on average about 11% higher tensile strength.

  11. Substate and evaporation rate dependent orientation and crystalline organization of sexithiophene films vacuum deposited onto Au and HOPG

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ardhaoui, M.; Lang, P.; Garnier, F.; Roger, J. P.

    1998-06-01

    The orientation and the crystalline organization of the films depend largely on the nature of the substrate and the deposition rate. The substrate effect is related to its interactions with the oligomers and also to the molecular mobility at the surface. It depends also largely on the deposition rate. L'orientation et l'organisation structurale des films de sexithiophène évaporés sous vide sont fortement liées à la nature du substrat (Au, HOPG) et à la vitesse de dépôt. L'effet du substrat est lié aux interactions avec les oligomères ainsi qu'à la mobilité de ces derniers sur la surface. Cet effet dépend largement de la vitesse d'évaporation.

  12. High deposition rate nanocrystalline silicon with enhanced homogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, A.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    High rate growth of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) brings additional challenges for the homogeneity in the growth direction, since the start-up effects affect a larger portion of the film, and the very high degree of depletion increases the influence of back diffusion from the inacti

  13. Surface characteristics of a self-polymerized dopamine coating deposited on hydrophobic polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinhong; Zhu, Liping; Zhu, Lijing; Zhu, Baoku; Xu, Youyi

    2011-12-06

    This study aims to explore the fundamental surface characteristics of polydopamine (pDA)-coated hydrophobic polymer films. A poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) film was surface modified by dip coating in an aqueous solution of dopamine on the basis of its self-polymerization and strong adhesion feature. The self-polymerization and deposition rates of dopamine on film surfaces increased with increasing temperature as evaluated by both spectroscopic ellipsometry and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Changes in the surface morphologies of pDA-coated films as well as the size and shape of pDA particles in the solution were also investigated by SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface roughness and surface free energy of pDA-modified films were mainly affected by the reaction temperature and showed only a slight dependence on the reaction time and concentration of the dopamine solution. Additionally, three other typical hydrophobic polymer films of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and polyimide (PI) were also modified by the same procedure. The lyophilicity (liquid affinity) and surface free energy of these polymer films were enhanced significantly after being coated with pDA, as were those of PVDF films. It is indicated that the deposition behavior of pDA is not strongly dependent on the nature of the substrates. This information provides us with not only a better understanding of biologically inspired surface chemistry for pDA coatings but also effective strategies for exploiting the properties of dopamine to create novel functional polymer materials.

  14. Surface modification of battery electrodes via electroless deposition with improved performance for Na-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Abhishek; Olschewski, Mark; Gustus, René; Borisenko, Natalia; Endres, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) are emerging as potential stationary energy storage devices due to the abundance and low cost of sodium. A simple and energy efficient strategy to develop electrodes for SIBs with a high charge/discharge rate is highly desirable. Here we demonstrate that by surface modification of Ge, using electroless deposition in SbCl3/ionic liquids, the stability and performance of the anode can be improved. This is due to the formation of GexSb1-x at the surface leading to better diffusion of Na, and the formation of a stable twin organic and inorganic SEI which protects the electrode. By judicious control of the surface modification, an improvement in the capacity to between 50% and 300% has been achieved at high current densities (0.83-8.4 A g(-1)) in an ionic liquid electrolyte NaFSI-[Py1,4]FSI. The results clearly demonstrate that an electroless deposition based surface modification strategy in ionic liquids offers exciting opportunities in developing superior energy storage devices.

  15. Novel texturing method for sputtered zinc oxide films prepared at high deposition rate from ceramic tube targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüpkes J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Sputtered and wet-chemically texture etched zinc oxide (ZnO films on glass substrates are regularly applied as transparent front contact in silicon based thin film solar cells. In this study, chemical wet etching in diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF and subsequently in diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl on aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al films deposited by magnetron sputtering from ceramic tube targets at high discharge power (~10 kW/m target length is investigated. Films with thickness of around 800 nm were etched in diluted HCl acid and HF acid to achieve rough surface textures. It is found that the etching of the films in both etchants leads to different surface textures. A two steps etching process, which is especially favorable for films prepared at high deposition rate, was systematically studied. By etching first in diluted hydrofluoric acid (HF and subsequently in diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl these films are furnished with a surface texture which is characterized by craters with typical diameter of around 500 − 1000 nm. The resulting surface structure is comparable to etched films sputtered at low deposition rate, which had been demonstrated to be able to achieve high efficiencies in silicon thin film solar cells.

  16. NEMS/CMOS sensor for monitoring deposition rates in stencil lithography

    OpenAIRE

    Sansa, Marc; Arcamone, Julien; Verd, Jaume; Uranga, Arantxa; Abadal, Gabriel; Núria, Barniol; Savu, Veronica; van den Boogaart, Marc; Brugger, Jürgen; Perez-Murano, Francesc

    2009-01-01

    A nanoelectromechanical mass sensor is used to characterize material deposition rates in stencil lithography. The material flux through micron size apertures is mapped with high spatial (below 1 μm) and deposition rate (below 10 pm/s) resolutions by displacing the stencil apertures over the sensor. The sensor is based on a resonating metallic beam (with submicron size width and thickness) monolithically integrated with a CMOS circuit, resulting in a CMOS/NEMS self-oscillator. The sensor is us...

  17. Preservation potential of individual couplet and deposition rates on mudflats in the Changjiang Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范代读; 李从先; 陈美发; 丁平兴; 邓兵; 杨守业; 刘曙光

    2001-01-01

    Non-barrier mudflats in the Changjiang Estuary is examined to obtain preservation potentials and deposition rates over different time scales. The preservation potential of couplet is ca. 46.6% within daily scale and decreases as the time-interval extending, with 9.2% on a semi-lunar scale and 3.7% on a seasonal scale. In the long term, only 1.6% of daily deposition can potentially be preserved in the tidal flat sequence and other 98.4% have been eroded and leave sedimentary discordances, discernable or un-discernable, in the mudflat deposits. A negative log-linear relationship is examined between sedimentation rates and the time spans. The length of sedimentary hiatuses on the mudflat deposition were estimated with considerable uncertainty, but it can provide from an actualistic base some further insights into the nature and origin of ancient mudflat deposits with emphasis on the sedimentary discordances.

  18. Effect of surface deposits on electromagnetic waves propagating in uniform ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element Galerkin formulation was used to study the effect of material surface deposits on the reflective characteristics of straight uniform ducts with PEC (perfectly electric conducting) walls. Over a wide frequency range, the effect of both single and multiple surface deposits on the duct reflection coefficient were examined. The power reflection coefficient was found to be significantly increased by the addition of deposits on the wall.

  19. Effect of rock fragment embedding on the aeolian deposition of dust on stone-covered surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, D.

    2005-01-01

    Many stone-covered surfaces on Earth are subject to aeolian deposition of atmospheric dust. This study investigates how the deposition of dust is affected when rock fragments become gradually more embedded in the ground or, inversely, become more concentrated on the surface. Experiments were execute

  20. Modelling Measured Deposition and Resuspension Rates of Particles in Animal Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lengweiler, P.; Moser, A.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    on the surfaces is shown as a function of time. High contents of organic dust in animal buildings can affect the health of both people and animals. Deposition on indoor surfaces is an important removal mechanism to reduce the airborne particle concentration. As a basis to develop methods to eliminate dust related...

  1. Effect of deposition conditions on the growth rate and electrical properties of ZnO thin films grown by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roro, K.T.; Botha, J.R.; Leitch, A.W.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    ZnO thin films have been grown on glass substrates by MOCVD. The effect of deposition conditions such as VI/II molar ratio, DEZn flow rate and total reactor pressure on the growth rate and electrical properties of the films was studied. It is found that the growth rate decreases with an increase in the VI/II molar ratio. This behaviour is ascribed to the competitive adsorption of reactant species on the growth surface. The growth rate increases with an increase in DEZn flow rate, as expected. It is shown that the carrier concentration is independent of the DEZn flow rate. An increase in the total reactor pressure yields a decrease in growth rate. This phenomenon is attributed to the depletion of the gas phase due to parasitic prereactions between zinc and oxygen species at high pressure. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. High-rate deposition of nano-crystalline silicon thin films on plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marins, E.; Guduru, V.; Cerqueira, F.; Alpuim, P. [Centro de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ribeiro, M. [Centro de Nanotecnologia e Materiais Tecnicos, Funcionais e Inteligentes (CeNTI), 4760-034 Vila Nova de Famalicao (Portugal); Bouattour, A. [Institut fuer Physikalische Elektronik (ipe), Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) is commonly used in the bottom cell of tandem solar cells. With an indirect bandgap, nc-Si:H requires thicker ({proportional_to}1 {mu}m) films for efficient light harvesting than amorphous Si (a-Si:H) does. Therefore, thin-film high deposition rates are crucial for further cost reduction of highly efficient a-Si:H based photovoltaic technology. Plastic substrates allow for further cost reduction by enabling roll-to-roll inline deposition. In this work, high nc-Si:H deposition rates on plastic were achieved at low substrate temperature (150 C) by standard Radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. Focus was on the influence of deposition pressure, inter-electrode distance (1.2 cm) and high power coupled to the plasma, on the hydrogen-to-silane dilution ratios (HD) necessary to achieve the amorphous-to-nanocrystalline phase transition and on the resulting film deposition rate. For each pressure and rf-power, there is a value of HD for which the films start to exhibit a certain amount of crystalline fraction. For constant rf-power, this value increases with pressure. Within the parameter range studied the deposition rate was highest (0.38 nm/s) for nc-Si:H films deposited at 6 Torr, 700 mW/cm{sup 2} using HD of 98.5%. Decreasing the pressure to 3 Torr (1.5 Torr) and rf-power to 350 mW/cm{sup 2} using HD - 98.5% deposition rate is 0.12 nm/s (0.076 nm/s). Raman crystalline fraction of these films is 72, 62 and 53% for the 6, 3 and 1.5 Torr films, respectively (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Surface chemistry of group 11 atomic layer deposition precursors on silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, Peter J.; Barry, Seán T.

    2017-02-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD) as thin film deposition techniques has had a major impact on a number of fields. The deposition of pure, uniform, conformal thin films requires very specific vapour-solid reactivity that is largely unknown for the majority of ALD and CVD precursors. This work examines the initial chemisorption of several thin film vapour deposition precursors on high surface area silica (HSAS) using 13C, 31P, and quantitative 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two copper metal precursors, 1,3-diisopropyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper (I) hexamethyldisilazide (1) and 1,3-diethyl-imidazolin-2-ylidene copper(I) hexamethyldisilazide (2), and one gold metal precursor, trimethylphosphine gold(III) trimethyl (3), are examined. Compounds 1 and 2 were found to chemisorb at the hydroxyl surface-reactive sites to form a ||-O-Cu-NHC surface species and fully methylated silicon (||-SiMe3, due to reactivity of the hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) ligand on the precursor) at 150 °C and 250 °C. From quantitative 29Si solid-state NMR (SS-NMR) spectroscopy measurements, it was found that HMDS preferentially reacts at geminal disilanol surface sites while the copper surface species preferentially chemisorbed to lone silanol surface species. Additionally, the overall coverage was strongly dependent on temperature, with higher overall coverage of 1 at higher temperature but lower overall coverage of 2 at higher temperature. The chemisorption of 3 was found to produce a number of interesting surface species on HSAS. Gold(III) trimethylphosphine, reduced gold phosphine, methylated phosphoxides, and graphitic carbon were all observed as surface species. The overall coverage of 3 on HSAS was only about 10% at 100 °C and, like the copper compounds, had a preference for lone silanol surface reactive sites. The overall coverage and chemisorbed surface species have implications to the overall growth rate and purity of

  4. High energy high rate pulsed power processing of materials by powder consolidation and by railgun deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, C.; Marcus, H. L.; Weldon, W. F.

    1987-03-01

    This exploratory research program was initiated to investigate the potential of using pulse power sources for powder consolidation, deposition and other High Energy High Rate Processing. The characteristics of the High Energy High Rate (1MJ/s) powder consolidation using megampere current pulses from a Homopolar Generator, have been defined. Molybdenum Alloy TZM, A Nickel based metallic glass, Copper graphite composites, and P/M Aluminum Alloy X7091 have been investigated. The powder consolidation process produced high densification rates. Density values of 80% to 99% could be obtained with sub second high temperature exposure. Specific energy input and applied pressure were controlling process parameters. Time Temperature Transformation (TTT) concepts underpin a fundamental understanding of pulsed power processing. Deposition experiments were conducted using an exploding foil device (EFD) providing an armature feed to railgun mounted in a vacuum chamber. The material to be deposited - in plasma, gas, liquid or solid state - was accelerated electromagnetically in the railgun and deposited on a substrate.

  5. Simulating Deposition of Aerosol Particles on Single Fiber Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hai-ming; ZHU Hui

    2009-01-01

    The stochastic simulation method, based on the concept of control window and the numerical solution of the Langevin equation, is applied to solve the deposition problem of particles from the flowing suspensions onto a fiber collector. Using the Kuwabara model to characterize the flow field, the effects of Stokes number, interception parameter, packing density, particle size distribution on the collection efficiency, and the deposition morphology of particles onto a collector areexamined. The morphology of deposit obtained in the simulated results agrees well with experimental observations. The estimation of the initial collection efficiency through the simulations considers that the deposited particles are in good agreement with published experimental data. In addition, the collection efficiency of particles increases in a wider particle size distribution region.

  6. Corrosion and runoff rates of Cu and three Cu-alloys in marine environments with increasing chloride deposition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Zhang, Xian; Goidanich, Sara; Le Bozec, Nathalie; Herting, Gunilla; Leygraf, Christofer

    2014-02-15

    Bare copper sheet and three commercial Cu-based alloys, Cu15Zn, Cu4Sn and Cu5Al5Zn, have been exposed to four test sites in Brest, France, with strongly varying chloride deposition rates. The corrosion rates of all four materials decrease continuously with distance from the coast, i.e. with decreasing chloride load, and in the following order: Cu4Sn>Cu sheet>Cu15Zn>Cu5Al5Zn. The patina on all materials was composed of two main layers, Cu2O as the inner layer and Cu2(OH)3Cl as the outer layer, and with a discontinuous presence of CuCl in between. Additional minor patina constituents are SnO2 (Cu4Sn), Zn5(OH)6(CO3)2 (Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn) and Zn6Al2(OH)16CO3·4H2O/Zn2Al(OH)6Cl·2H2O/Zn5Cl2(OH)8·H2O and Al2O3 (Cu5Al5Zn). The observed Zn- and Zn/Al-containing corrosion products might be important factors for the lower sensitivity of Cu15Zn and Cu5Al5Zn against chloride-induced atmospheric corrosion compared with Cu sheet and Cu4Sn. Decreasing corrosion rates with exposure time were observed for all materials and chloride loads and attributed to an improved adherence with time of the outer patina to the underlying inner oxide. Flaking of the outer patina layer was mainly observed on Cu4Sn and Cu sheet and associated with the gradual transformation of CuCl to Cu2(OH)3Cl of larger volume. After three years only Cu5Al5Zn remains lustrous because of a patina compared with the other materials that appeared brownish-reddish. Significantly lower release rates of metals compared with corresponding corrosion rates were observed for all materials. Very similar release rates of copper from all four materials were observed during the fifth year of marine exposure due to an outer surface patina that with time revealed similar constituents and solubility properties. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sputter deposited bioceramic coatings: surface characterisation and initial protein adsorption studies using surface-MALDI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, A R; Burke, G A; Duffy, H; Holmberg, M; O' Kane, C; Meenan, B J; Kingshott, P

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto calcium phosphate (Ca-P) bioceramics utilised in hard tissue implant applications has been highlighted as one of the key events that influences the subsequent biological response, in vivo. This work reports on the use of surface-matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry (Surface-MALDI-MS) as a technique for the direct detection of foetal bovine serum (FBS) proteins adsorbed to hybrid calcium phosphate/titanium dioxide surfaces produced by a novel radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method incorporating in situ annealing between 500°C and 700°C during deposition. XRD and XPS analysis indicated that the coatings produced at 700°C were hybrid in nature, with the presence of Ca-P and titanium dioxide clearly observed in the outer surface layer. In addition to this, the Ca/P ratio was seen to increase with increasing annealing temperature, with values of between 2.0 and 2.26 obtained for the 700°C samples. After exposure to FBS solution, surface-MALDI-MS indicated that there were significant differences in the protein patterns as shown by unique peaks detected at masses below 23.1 kDa for the different surfaces. These adsorbates were assigned to a combination of growth factors and lipoproteins present in serum. From the data obtained here it is evident that surface-MALDI-MS has significant utility as a tool for studying the dynamic nature of protein adsorption onto the surfaces of bioceramic coatings, which most likely plays a significant role in subsequent bioactivity of the materials.

  8. Solar Flux Deposition And Heating Rates In Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss here the solar downward net flux in the 0.25 - 2.5 µm range in the atmosphere of Jupiter and the associated heating rates under a number of vertical cloud structure scenarios focusing in the effect of clouds and hazes. Our numerical model is based in the doubling-adding technique to solve the radiative transfer equation and it includes gas absorption by CH4, NH3 and H2, in addition to Rayleigh scattering by a mixture of H2 plus He. Four paradigmatic Jovian regions have been considered (hot-spots, belts, zones and Polar Regions). The hot-spots are the most transparent regions with downward net fluxes of 2.5±0.5 Wm-2 at the 6 bar level. The maximum solar heating is 0.04±0.01 K/day and occurs above 1 bar. Belts and zones characterization result in a maximum net downward flux of 0.5 Wm-2 at 2 bar and 0.015 Wm-2 at 6 bar. Heating is concentrated in the stratospheric and tropospheric hazes. Finally, Polar Regions are also explored and the results point to a considerable stratospheric heating of 0.04±0.02 K/day. In all, these calculations suggest that the role of the direct solar forcing in the Jovian atmospheric dynamics is limited to the upper 1 - 2 bar of the atmosphere except in the hot-spot areas. Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  9. 78 FR 64183 - Change to Existing Regulation Concerning the Interest Rate Paid on Cash Deposited To Secure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... to Existing Regulation Concerning the Interest Rate Paid on Cash Deposited To Secure Immigration... rate set by Treasury--3 per centum per annum--has been paid on cash bond deposits received after April... the rate of 3 percent per year on cash deposited by bond obligors to secure immigration bonds....

  10. Very low surface recombination velocities on p- and n-type c-Si by ultrafast spatial atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, F.; Veith, B.; Tiba, V.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Roozeboom, F.; Brendel, R.; Schmidt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using aluminum oxide (Al2 O3) films deposited by high-rate spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD), we achieve very low surface recombination velocities of 6.5 cm/s on p -type and 8.1 cm/s on n -type crystalline silicon wafers. Using spatially separated reaction zones instead of

  11. Visible-light active thin-film WO3 photocatalyst with controlled high-rate deposition by low-damage reactive-gas-flow sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuto Oka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A process based on reactive gas flow sputtering (GFS for depositing visible-light active photocatalytic WO3 films at high deposition rates and with high film quality was successfully demonstrated. The deposition rate for this process was over 10 times higher than that achieved by the conventional sputtering process and the process was highly stable. Furthermore, Pt nanoparticle-loaded WO3 films deposited by the GFS process exhibited much higher photocatalytic activity than those deposited by conventional sputtering, where the photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the extent of decomposition of CH3CHO under visible light irradiation. The decomposition time for 60 ppm of CH3CHO was 7.5 times more rapid on the films deposited by the GFS process than on the films deposited by the conventional process. During GFS deposition, there are no high-energy particles bombarding the growing film surface, whereas the bombardment of the surface with high-energy particles is a key feature of conventional sputtering. Hence, the WO3 films deposited by GFS should be of higher quality, with fewer structural defects, which would lead to a decrease in the number of centers for electron-hole recombination and to the efficient use of photogenerated holes for the decomposition of CH3CHO.

  12. Influence of deposition rate on the structural properties of plasma-enhanced CVD epitaxial silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanghua; Cariou, Romain; Hamon, Gwenaëlle; Léal, Ronan; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i

    2017-01-01

    Solar cells based on epitaxial silicon layers as the absorber attract increasing attention because of the potential cost reduction. In this work, we studied the influence of the deposition rate on the structural properties of epitaxial silicon layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (epi-PECVD) using silane as a precursor and hydrogen as a carrier gas. We found that the crystalline quality of epi-PECVD layers depends on their thickness and deposition rate. Moreover, increasing the deposition rate may lead to epitaxy breakdown. In that case, we observe the formation of embedded amorphous silicon cones in the epi-PECVD layer. To explain this phenomenon, we develop a model based on the coupling of hydrogen and built-in strain. By optimizing the deposition conditions to avoid epitaxy breakdown, including substrate temperatures and plasma potential, we have been able to synthesize epi-PECVD layers up to a deposition rate of 8.3 Å/s. In such case, we found that the incorporation of hydrogen in the hydrogenated crystalline silicon can reach 4 at. % at a substrate temperature of 350 °C. PMID:28262840

  13. Influence of Rough Flow over Sea Surface on Dry Atmospheric Deposition Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Meteorological model and a dry deposition module were used to estimate the effects of sea surface rough flow (SSRF over the sea surface on dry deposition velocities. The dry deposition turbulence resistance, Ra, and sub-layer resistance, Rb, decreased more than 10% and 5% due to SSRF, respectively. For example, for HNO3, the mean dry deposition velocities (Vd were 0.51 cm s-1 in January, 0.58 in April, 0.65 cm s-1 in July and 0.79 cm s-1 in October with only smooth flow over the sea surface. However, the SSRF increased the Vd of HNO3 by 5 - 20% in the east China seas. These results show that SSRF is an important factor in estimating surface roughness to further improve calculation of the dry deposition velocities over the ocean. Improvements in parameterization of sea roughness length will be a worthwhile effort in related future studies.

  14. Extraction of Aerosol-Deposited Yersinia pestis from Indoor Surfaces To Determine Bacterial Environmental Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Gut, Ian M.; Bartlett, Ryan A.; Yeager, John J.; Leroux, Brian; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Dabisch, Paul; Karaolis, David K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Public health and decontamination decisions following an event that causes indoor contamination with a biological agent require knowledge of the environmental persistence of the agent. The goals of this study were to develop methods for experimentally depositing bacteria onto indoor surfaces via aerosol, evaluate methods for sampling and enumerating the agent on surfaces, and use these methods to determine bacterial surface decay. A specialized aerosol deposition chamber was constructed, and ...

  15. Deposition at glancing angle, surface roughness, and protein adsorption: Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Rechendorff, Kristian; Hovgaard, Mads B; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2008-06-19

    To generate rough surfaces in Monte Carlo simulations, we use the 2 + 1 solid-on-solid model of deposition with rapid transient diffusion of newly arrived atoms supplied at glancing angle. The surfaces generated are employed to scrutinize the effect of surface roughness on adsorption of globular and anisotropic rodlike proteins. The obtained results are compared with the available experimental data for Ta deposition at glancing angle and for the bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen uptake on the corresponding Ta films.

  16. Inclusion of Floc Growth in a Simple River Mouth Plume Model and Its Effect on Deposition Rate and Deposit Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, K.

    2014-12-01

    Rivers are the primary conduits for delivery of sediments and organic matter to the sea. This is visually evident when sediment-laden rivers enter coastal waters, producing sediment plumes. The sediment and organic material from such plumes may deposit and be preserved in estuarine and deltaic zones, or may be carried and mixed by ocean currents to deposit elsewhere on the shelf. Both of these outcomes are governed in large part by depositional mechanics that are dependent, at least in part, on the settling velocity of the sediment. This is especially true in modeling, where the settling velocity has been noted to be the primary controlling parameter for accurate prediction of depositional patters from river plumes. Settling velocity is largely controlled by grain size, shape, and density, which for mud can be quite dynamic due to the process of flocculation. Flocculation yields mud aggregates of variable size and density that may be dependent on the turbulent energy and salt levels under which they were formed. Since turbulent energy and salinity both change in river mouth jet/plumes, the dynamic flocculation process may exert significant control on the eventual distribution of sediment in these zones. In this study, two different approaches to floc modeling are integrated into a steady-state river mouth plume integral model. The two floc models are (1) a version of the Winterwerp (1998) model, and (2) a condition-dependent equilibrium floc size model similar to what is typically used in large-scale 2 and 3D hydraulic and sediment transport simulations. Inclusion of these two models into the buoyant river-mouth plume equations allows for the settling velocity of the mud to be functionally tied to the turbulent shear rate and suspended sediment concentration. The concentration and deposition rates are then compared through the plume both without and with the inclusion of the two different floc treatments. The role that entrainment of ambient fluid plays in the

  17. Effect of surface silanol groups on the deposition of apatite onto silica surfaces: a computer simulation study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkhonto, D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available . The researchers’ simulations support the suggestion, that in vivo surface hydroxy groups are first condensed to form O–Si–O bridges before deposition and growth of apatite...

  18. Dry deposition of large, airborne particles onto a surrogate surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Kalman, David; Larson, Timothy

    Simultaneous measurements of particle dry deposition flux and airborne number concentration in the open atmosphere were made using three different types of artificially generated particles in the size range 10-100 μm - perlite, diatomaceous earth and glass beads. A combination of gravimetric analysis, automated microscopy and sonic anemometry provided size-resolved estimates of both the inertial and gravitational components of the quasi-laminar layer particle deposition velocity, ( Vd) b, as a function of size. Eddy inertial deposition efficiency ( ηdI) was determined as a function of dimensionless eddy Stokes number (Stk e). In the range 3PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA), used in several regulatory models, significantly under-predicted (up to seven times) ( Vd) b for large particles ( da>10 μm).

  19. Impact of future land cover changes on HNO3 and O3 surface dry deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Verbeke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dry deposition is a key component of surface–atmosphere exchange of compounds, acting as a sink for several chemical species. Meteorological factors, chemical properties of the trace gas considered and land surface properties are strong drivers of dry deposition efficiency and variability. Under both climatic and anthropogenic pressure, the vegetation distribution over the Earth has been changing a lot over the past centuries, and could be significantly altered in the future. In this study, we perform a modeling investigation of the potential impact of land-cover changes between present-day (2006 and the future (2050 on dry deposition rates, with special interest for ozone (O3 and nitric acid vapor (HNO3, two compounds which are characterized by very different physico-chemical properties. The 3-D chemistry transport model LMDz-INCA is used, considering changes in vegetation distribution based on the three future projections RCPs 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5. The 2050 RCP 8.5 vegetation distribution leads to a rise up to 7 % (+0.02 cm s−1 in VdO3 and a decrease of −0.06 cm s−1 in VdHNO3 relative to the present day values in tropical Africa, and up to +18 and −15 % respectively in Australia. When taking into account the RCP 4.5 scenario, which shows dramatic land cover change in Eurasia, VdHNO3 increases by up to 20 % (annual-mean value and reduces VdO3 by the same magnitude in this region. When analyzing the impact of dry deposition change on atmospheric chemical composition, our model calculates that the effect is lower than 1 ppb on annual mean surface ozone concentration, for both for the RCP8.5 and RCP2.6 scenarios. The impact on HNO3 surface concentrations is more disparate between the two scenarios, regarding the spatial repartition of effects. In the case of the RCP 4.5 scenario, a significant increase of the surface O3 concentration reaching locally up to 5 ppb (+5 % is calculated on average during the June–August period. This scenario

  20. Gold nanoisland arrays by repeated deposition and post-deposition annealing for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Li, Hao

    2013-09-06

    Gold nanoisland arrays with well controlled growth were achieved by repeated sputtering deposition and post-deposition annealing processes. When each deposition was set at 5 nm (nominal thickness based on gold mass), the single deposition and annealing process (single process) yielded gold nanoisland arrays with an average diameter of ~16 nm based on top view scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When the deposition and annealing process was repeated two more times (triple process), top view SEM showed the nanoisland arrays grew to ~38 nm in average diameter. The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) measurement indicated that triple processed nanoisland arrays led to the highest SERS enhancement, suggesting the necessity of pursuing nanoislands with larger sizes. The gold nanoisland arrays after the triple process were further sputtered with a final layer of gold thin film at different nominal thicknesses. An optimal nominal thickness for SERS was determined experimentally at ~40 nm, as a result of the competition between the positive and negative effects of the final gold deposition. Last, the uniformity of the optimized SERS substrate was investigated on a 5 cm x 5 cm platform. SERS measurements demonstrated a relative standard deviation of ~7% in terms of spectral variation over the entire substrate, rendering the process in the present study a promising fabrication approach for large-scale production of SERS substrates.

  1. Cu and Cu(Mn) films deposited layer-by-layer via surface-limited redox replacement and underpotential deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J.S., E-mail: jsfang@nfu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Sun, S.L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Chi-Nan University, Nan-Tou 54561, Taiwan (China); Chen, G.S.; Chin, T.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: The present paper reports Cu and Cu(Mn) films prepared layer-by-layer using an electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) method. The structure and properties of the films were investigated to elucidate their suitability as Cu interconnects for microelectronics. Previous studies have used primarily a vacuum-based atomic layer deposition to form a Cu metallized film. Herein, an entirely wet chemical process was used to fabricate a Cu film using the ECALD process by combining underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR). The experimental results indicated that an inadequate UPD of Pb affected the subsequent SLRR of Cu and lead to the formation of PbSO{sub 4}. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results. Layer-by-layer deposition of Cu(Mn) films was successfully performed by alternating the deposition cycle-ratios of SLRR-Cu and UPD-Mn. The proposed self-limiting growth method offers a layer-by-layer wet chemistry-based deposition capability for fabricating Cu interconnects.

  2. Cu and Cu(Mn) films deposited layer-by-layer via surface-limited redox replacement and underpotential deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, J. S.; Sun, S. L.; Cheng, Y. L.; Chen, G. S.; Chin, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The present paper reports Cu and Cu(Mn) films prepared layer-by-layer using an electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) method. The structure and properties of the films were investigated to elucidate their suitability as Cu interconnects for microelectronics. Previous studies have used primarily a vacuum-based atomic layer deposition to form a Cu metallized film. Herein, an entirely wet chemical process was used to fabricate a Cu film using the ECALD process by combining underpotential deposition (UPD) and surface-limited redox replacement (SLRR). The experimental results indicated that an inadequate UPD of Pb affected the subsequent SLRR of Cu and lead to the formation of PbSO4. A mechanism is proposed to explain the results. Layer-by-layer deposition of Cu(Mn) films was successfully performed by alternating the deposition cycle-ratios of SLRR-Cu and UPD-Mn. The proposed self-limiting growth method offers a layer-by-layer wet chemistry-based deposition capability for fabricating Cu interconnects.

  3. High rate deposition of thin film cadmium sulphide by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisco, F., E-mail: F.Lisco@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Kaminski, P.M.; Abbas, A.; Bowers, J.W.; Claudio, G. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Losurdo, M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Walls, J.M. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) is an important n-type semiconductor widely used as a window layer in thin film photovoltaics Copper Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Gallium (di)Selenide, Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe). Cadmium Sulphide has been deposited using a number of techniques but these techniques can be slow (chemical bath deposition and Radio Frequency sputtering) or the uniformity and the control of thickness can be relatively difficult (close space sublimation). In this paper we report on the development of a process using pulsed Direct Current magnetron sputtering which allows nanometre control of thin film thickness using time only. The CdS thin films deposited in this process are highly uniform and smooth. They exhibit the preferred hexagonal structure at room temperature deposition and they have excellent optical properties. Importantly, the process is highly stable despite the use of a semi-insulating magnetron target. Moreover, the process is very fast. The deposition rate using 1.5 kW of power to a 6-inch circular magnetron was measured to be greater than 8 nm/s. This makes the process suitable for industrial deployment. - Highlights: • Pulsed DC magnetron sputtering of CdS • High deposition rate deposition • Uniform, pinhole free films.

  4. High Heat Flux Surface Coke Deposition and Removal Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    etc. have on coke deposition from RP-1 and RP-2 as well as showing that we can oxidize and remove these deposits using ozone , would be very...Meeting; 29 Apr. - 3 May, Colorado Springs, CO. 10Billingsley, M.C. H.Y. Lyu and R.W. Bates (2007). "Experimental and Numerical Investigations of RP...5th Modeling and Simulation Subcommittee Joint Meeting, Denver, CO, 14-17 May. 11Linne, D.L., M. L. Meyer, T. Edwards, and D. A. Eitman (1997

  5. Large artificial anisotropic growth rate in on-lattice simulation of obliquely deposited nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanto, B.; Doiron, C. F.; Lu, T.-M.

    2011-01-01

    On-lattice particle simulation is one of the most common types of Monte Carlo simulations used in studying the dynamics of film growth. We report the observation of a large artificial anisotropic growth rate variation owing to the fixed arrangement of particles in an on-lattice simulation of oblique angle deposition. This unexpectedly large anisotropy is not reported in previous literatures and substantially affects the simulation outcomes such as column angle and porosity, two of the most essential quantities in obliquely deposited nanostructures. The result of our finding is of interest to all on-lattice simulations in obliquely deposited films or nanostructures.

  6. Amorphous silicon films with high deposition rate prepared using argon and hydrogen diluted silane for stable solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, Purabi; Agarwal, Pratima [Department of Physics, IIT Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Dixit, P.N. [Plasma Processed Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2007-08-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films with high deposition rate (4-5 Aa/s) and reduced Staebler-Wronski effect are prepared using a mixture of silane (SiH{sub 4}), hydrogen and argon. The films show an improvement in short and medium range order. The structural, transport and stability studies on the films are done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman scattering studies, electrical conductivity and diffusion length measurement. Presence of both atomic hydrogen and Ar{sup *} in the plasma causes breaking of weak Si-Si bonds and subsequent reconstruction of strong bonds resulting in improvement of short and medium range order. The improved structural order enhances the stability of these films against light soaking. High deposition rate is due to the lesser etching of growing surface compared to the case of only hydrogen diluted silane. (author)

  7. Strain-Rate Dependency of Strength of Soft Marine Deposits of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    abstract number: 090612-057 Strain-rate dependency of strength of soft marine deposits of the Gulf of Mexico Andrei Abelev and Philip Valent...from the Gulf of Mexico . The vane test may not always be the most accurate method of describing the undrained shear strength, mainly because it...deposits of the Gulf of Mexico 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  8. Si surface passivation by Al2O3 thin films deposited using a low thermal budget atomic layer deposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguini, G.; Cianci, E.; Wiemer, C.; Perego, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza MB (Italy); Saynova, D.; Van Roosmalen, J.A.M. [ECN Solar Energy, Westerduinweg 3, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-05

    High-quality surface passivation of crystalline Si is achieved using 10 nm thick Al2O3 films fabricated by thermal atomic layer deposition at 100C. After a 5 min post deposition annealing at 200C, the effective carrier lifetime is 1 ms, indicating a functional level of surface passivation. The interplay between the chemical and the field effect passivation is investigated monitoring the density of interface traps and the amount of fixed charges with conductance-voltage and capacitance-voltage techniques. The physical mechanisms underlying the surface passivation are described. The combination of low processing temperatures, thin layers, and good passivation properties facilitate a technology for low-temperature solar cells.

  9. Adsorption and revaporisation studies on iodine oxide aerosols deposited on containment surface materials in LWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.R.StJ.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Lamminmaeki, S.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    During a hypothetical severe nuclear accident, the radiation field will be very high in the nuclear reactor containment building. As a result gaseous radiolysis products will be formed. Elemental iodine can react in the gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (iodine oxide). Within the AIAS (Adsorption of Iodine oxide Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of iodine oxide (IOx) aerosols with common containment surface materials were investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS, as well as Pt and Pd surfaces from hydrogen recombiners. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled iodine oxide aerosols were produced with the EXSI CONT facility from elemental iodine and ozone at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. The iodine oxide deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the kind of iodine oxide formed and if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials occurs. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited iodine oxide aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 having a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The revaporisated {sup 131}I species from the surfaces were chemically tested for elemental iodine formation. The parameter dominating the degradation of the produced iodine oxide aerosols was humidity. Cu and Zn surfaces were found to react with iodine from the iodine oxide aerosols to form iodides, while no metal iodides were detected for Al and SS samples. Most of the iodine oxide aerosols are assumed to

  10. TEOS-based SiO{sub 2} chemical vapor deposition: Reaction kinetics and related surface chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartram, M.E.; Moffat, H.K.

    1995-11-01

    We have developed a comprehensive understanding of thermal TEOS (tetracthylorthosificate, Si(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 4}) surface chemistry at CVD (chemical vapor deposition) temperatures and pressures. This was accomplished by examining how TEOS reaction rate are influenced by factors critical to the heterogeneous reaction. This includes determining the TEOS pressure dependence, testing if reaction by-products inhibit TEOS decomposition, identifying reaction sites on the surface, and establishing the reaction sites coverage dependencies. We evaluated the pressure dependencies and by-product inhibition with GCMS. The experiments in a cold-wall research reactor revealed that the TEOS surface reaction at 1000K (1) was first-order with respect to TEOS pressure (0.10 to 1.50Torr) and (2) was not inhibited by surface reaction by-products (ethylene, ethanol, and water). Reactivities of surface sites and their coverage dependencies were compared with FTIR. Our experiments demonstrated that two-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 2}) rings on the SiO{sub 2} surface were consumed almost instantaneously when exposed to TEOS. Our FTIR experiments also revealed that TEOS decomposition was zero-order with respect to coverages of hydroxyl groups and (by indirect evidence) three-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 3}) rings. This type of site-independent reactivity is consistent with TEOS reacting with hydroxyl groups and (Si-O){sub 3} rings via a common rate-determining step at 1000K. With respect to deposition uniformity, our results predict that deposition rates will be insensitive to the relative coverages of (Si-O){sub 3} rings and hydroxyls on SiO{sub 2} as well as the re-adsorbed by-products of the surface reaction. Therefore, it is likely that nonuniform SiO{sub 2} depositions from TEOS reactions are due to depletion of TEOS in the gas-phase and/or thermal gradients.

  11. Using deposition rate as a means to alter the properties of small molecule organic glasses for OLED applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Kenneth; Krzyskowski, Paige; Devereaux, Zachary

    2015-03-01

    Organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices rely on vapor-deposited, small molecule organic glasses. Recent work has shown that deposition condition plays a critical role in altering OLED device performance. Here it will be shown that the deposition rate alters the onset and fictive temperatures measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of the deposited glass. Glasses of the common hole transport materials NPD and TPD were prepared with onset temperatures 17 and 16 K higher, respectively, than the ordinary glass prepared by cooling the supercooled liquid. The thermal stability of glasses in functioning devices can be underestimated due to increases in onset temperature relative to Tg. The fictive temperatures for NPD and TPD were 32 and 27 K lower, respectively, than the Tg of the ordinary glass. These results are consistent with literature reports on other non-OLED glasses where enhanced surface mobility allowed for glasses with similar properties to be made. Ellipsometry studies on NPD showed that the fictive and onset temperatures were consistent with the DSC results. Additionally, the modeled birefringence of the as-deposited NPD glass was non-zero and quickly decreased upon heating above the onset temperature, which has implications for device performance. Formerly at Department of Chemistry, Saginaw Valley State University.

  12. Electron beam deposition for nanofabrication : Insights from surface science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wnuk, J. D.; Rosenberg, S. G.; Gorham, J. M.; van Dorp, W. F.; Hagen, C. W.; Fairbrother, D. H.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam induced deposition (EBID) is a direct-write lithographic technique that utilizes the dissociation of volatile precursors by a focused electron beam in a low vacuum environment to create nanostructures. Notable advantages of EBID over competing lithographic techniques are that it is a s

  13. Lung deposited surface area concentrations in a street canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuluvainen, Heino; Hietikko, Riina; Järvinen, Anssi; Saukko, Erkka; Irjala, Matti; Niemi, Jarkko V.; Timonen, Hilkka; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2017-04-01

    Street canyons are interesting environments with respect to the dispersion of traffic emissions and human exposure. Pedestrians may be exposed to relatively high concentrations of fine particles and the vertical dispersion affects the human exposure above the ground level in buildings. Previously, particle concentrations have been measured in street canyons at a few different heights (Marini et al., 2015). The information on the lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration, which is a relevant metric for the negative health effects, is very limited even at the ground level of street canyons (Kuuluvainen et al., 2016). More information especially on the vertical dispersion and the ground level concentrations is needed, for instance, for the use of urban planning and the design of ventilation systems in buildings. Measurements were carried out in a busy street canyon in Helsinki, Finland, at an urban super-site measurement station (Mäkelänkatu 50). The data included vertical concentration profiles measured in an intensive measurement campaign with a Partector (Naneos GmbH) installed into a drone, long-term measurements with an AQ Urban particle sensor (Pegasor Ltd.), and an extensive comparison measurement in the field with different devices measuring the LDSA. These devices were an AQ Urban, Partector, DiSCmini (Testo AG), NSAM (TSI Inc.), and an ELPI+ (Dekati Ltd.). In addition, continuous measurements of gas phase components, particle size distributions, and meteorology were run at the supersite. The vertical profile measurements were con-ducted in November 2016 during two days. In the measurements, the drone was flown from the ground level to an altitude of 50 or 100 m, which is clearly above the roof level of the buildings. Altogether, 48 up-and-down flights were conducted during the two days. The vertical profiles were supported by continuous measurements at the ground level on both sides of the street canyon. The long-term measurements were conducted

  14. ELECTRIC ARC WELDING DEPOSITION OF METALLIC SURFACES BY VIBRATING ELECTRODE IN PROTECTIVE GAS MEDIUM

    OpenAIRE

    N. Spiridonov; A. Кudina; V. Кurash

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents methods for obtaining qualitative metallic surfaces by electric arc welding deposition while using consumable electrode in a protective gas medium and executing regularized drop transfer of electrode metal. The drop transfer efficiency of electrode metal and productivity of welding deposition are significantly increased due to excitation of lateral vibrations in the consumable electrode with preset amplitude. The paper describes a method and a device for welding deposition ...

  15. Size dependence of thermoelectric power of Au, Pd, Pt nanoclusters deposited onto HOPG surface

    OpenAIRE

    Borisyuk, P. V.; V. I. Troyan; Lebedinskii, Yu Yu; Vasilyev, O S

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the study of tunnel current-voltage characteristics of Au, Pd and Pt nanoclusters deposited onto the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface by pulsed laser deposition. The analysis of tunnel current-voltage characteristics obtained by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) allowed to recover the thermoelectric power value of nanoclusters. It was found that the value of thermoelectric power of pulsed laser deposited nanoclusters depends on nanocluster material and ...

  16. Research of Heating Rates Influence on Layer Coal Gasification of Krasnogorsky And Borodinsky Coal Deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankovskiy Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental research of heating rate influence on coal samples gasification process of Krasnogorsky and Borodinsky coal deposit ranks A and 2B was done to define optimal heating mode in high intensification of dispersal of inflammable gases conditions. Abundance ratio of carbon monoxide and nitrogen monoxide, water vapor, carbon dioxide at four values of heating rate within the range of 5 to 30 K/min. with further definition of optimal heating rate of coals was stated.

  17. Western Pacific atmospheric nutrient deposition fluxes, their impact on surface ocean productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, M.; Hamilton, D.; Baker, A. R.; Jickells, T. D.; Bromley, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Quack, B.; Boyd, P. W.

    2014-07-01

    The atmospheric deposition of both macronutrients and micronutrients plays an important role in driving primary productivity, particularly in the low-latitude ocean. We report aerosol major ion measurements for five ship-based sampling campaigns in the western Pacific from ~25°N to 20°S and compare the results with those from Atlantic meridional transects (~50°N to 50°S) with aerosols collected and analyzed in the same laboratory, allowing full incomparability. We discuss sources of the main nutrient species (nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and iron (Fe)) in the aerosols and their stoichiometry. Striking north-south gradients are evident over both basins with the Northern Hemisphere more impacted by terrestrial dust sources and anthropogenic emissions and the North Atlantic apparently more impacted than the North Pacific. We estimate the atmospheric supply rates of these nutrients and the potential impact of the atmospheric deposition on the tropical western Pacific. Our results suggest that the atmospheric deposition is P deficient relative to the needs of the resident phytoplankton. These findings suggest that atmospheric supply of N, Fe, and P increases primary productivity utilizing some of the residual excess phosphorus (P*) in the surface waters to compensate for aerosol P deficiency. Regional primary productivity is further enhanced via the stimulation of nitrogen fixation fuelled by the residual atmospheric iron and P*. Our stoichiometric calculations reveal that a P* of 0.1 µmol L-1 can offset the P deficiency in atmospheric supply for many months. This study suggests that atmospheric deposition may sustain ~10% of primary production in both the western tropical Pacific.

  18. Silver deposition on stainless steel container surfaces in contact with disinfectant silver aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petala, M.; Tsiridis, V.; Mintsouli, I.; Pliatsikas, N.; Spanos, Th.; Rebeyre, P.; Darakas, E.; Patsalas, P.; Vourlias, G.; Kostoglou, M.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Karapantsios, Th.

    2017-02-01

    Silver is the preservative used on the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prevent microbial proliferation within potable water supplies. Yet, in the frame of the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) missions to ISS, silver depletion from water has been detected during ground transportation of this water to launch site, thereby indicating a degradation of water quality. This study investigates the silver loss from water when in contact with stainless steel surfaces. Experiments are conducted with several types of stainless steel surfaces being exposed to water containing 10 or 0.5 mg/L silver ions. Results show that silver deposits on stainless steel surfaces even when a passivation layer protects the metallic surface. The highest protection to silver deposition is offered by acid passivated and electropolished SS 316L. SEM and XPS experiments were carried out at several locations of the sample area that was in contact with the Ag solution and found similar morphological (SEM) and compositional (sputter-etch XPS) results. The results reveal that silver deposits uniformly across the wetted surface to a thickness larger than 3 nm. Moreover, evidence is provided that silver deposits in its metallic form on all stainless steel surfaces, in line with a galvanic deposition mechanism. Combination of ICP-MS and XPS results suggests a mechanism for Ag deposition/reduction with simultaneous substrate oxidation resulting in oxide growth at the exposed stainless steel surface.

  19. Determination of the deposition rate of DC magnetron sputtering in fabrication of X-ray supermirrors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengli Wang; Zhanshan Wang; Jingtao Zhu; Zhong Zhang; Wenjuan Wu; Shumin Zhang; Lingyan Chen

    2006-01-01

    @@ X-ray supermirror is a non-periodic multilayer structure,whose optical performance is greatly affected by the stability and accuracy of the deposition rate in the fabrication using the direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering.By considering the location-setting time of the substrate positioning above the sputtering target,the deposition rate can be accurately determined.Experimental results show that the optical performance of the supermirror is in agreement with the design aim,which indicates that the layer thickness is well controlled and coincides with the desired ones.

  20. Inkwells for on-demand deposition rate measurement in aerosol-jet based 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Gutierrez, David; Das, Siddhartha; Hines, D. R.

    2017-09-01

    Aerosol-jet printing (AJP) is an important direct-write printing technology based on additive manufacturing methods. Numerous research groups have utilized AJP for the fabrication of electronic circuits and devices. However, there has not been any real-time or even any on-demand method for quantitatively measuring and/or setting the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream. In this paper, we present a method for measuring the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream by printing into an array of inkwells that were fabricated using photolithography and were characterized using x-ray tomography and optical profilometry. These inkwell arrays were then used to establish a set of deposition rates namely 0.0011, 0.0024, 0.0035, 0.0046 and 0.0059 mm3 s-1 that were subsequently compared with independently-measured deposition rates obtained by printing the ink stream into a weighing pan for a specified time and calculating the resulting deposition rate from the weight of the printed sample. From this comparison, it is observed that, for a human operator, the error in setting a specific deposition rate is less for inkwell fill times greater than 3 s and greater for fill times less than 3 s. This observation indicates that the average volume of an inkwell array should be at least three times the desired deposition rate (V inkwell  >  3R). It was also observed that when the diameter of the inkwell was only slightly larger than the ink stream diameter, the ink uniformly wets the sidewall of the inkwell and results in a well filled inkwell for which the point at which it is just fully filled is easily observable. Finally, the interactions of the ink with both ‘philic’ and ‘phobic’ inkwells were studied illustrating the ability to use inkwells of various materials for setting the desired deposition rates for a variety of AJ printable inks.

  1. The Effect of Deposition Rate on Electrical, Optical and Structural Properties of ITO Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Raghupathi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Indium tin oxide (ITO thin films have been prepared using the reactive evaporation technique on glass substrates in an oxygen atmosphere. It is found that the deposition rate plays prominent role in controlling the electrical and optical properties of the ITO thin films. Resistivity, electrical conductivity, activation energy, optical transmission and band gap energy were investigated. A transmittance value of more than 90% in the visible region of the spectrum and an electrical conductivity of 3x10–6 Ωm has been obtained with a deposition rate of 2 nm/min. XRD studies showed that the films are polycrystalline.

  2. Effect of technique parameters on characteristics of hydrogen-free DLC films deposited by surface wave-sustained plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu; Diao, Dongfeng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by a new-type surface wave-sustained plasma physical vapor deposition (SWP-PVD) system under various technique conditions. Electron density was measured by a Langmuir probe, while the film thickness and hardness were characterized using a surface profilometer and a nanoindenter, respectively. Surface morphology was investigated by an atomic force microscope (AFM). It was found that the electron density and deposition rate increased following the increase in microwave power, target voltage, or gas pressure. The typical electron density and deposition rate were about 1.87-2.04×10 11 cm -3 and 1.61-14.32 nm/min respectively. AFM images indicated that the grains of films changes as the technique parameters vary. The optical constants, refractive index n and extinction coefficient k, were obtained using an optical ellipsometry. With the increase in microwave power from 150 to 270 W, the extinction coefficient of DLC films increased from 0.05 to 0.27 while the refractive index decreased from 2.31 to 2.18.

  3. Surface electronic and structural properties of nanostructured titanium oxide grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusi, M.; Maccallini, E.; Caruso, T.; Casari, C. S.; Bassi, A. Li; Bottani, C. E.; Rudolf, P.; Prince, K. C.; Agostino, R. G.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium oxide nanostructured thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) were here characterized with a multi-technique approach to investigate the relation between surface electronic, structural and morphological properties. Depending on the growth parameters, these films present chara

  4. Thermal and Physical Properties and Deposit Structure of Power Equipment Heating Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Nerezko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows influence of heating surface material, design peculiarities, operational conditions of heat exchangers and water-chemical regime on chemical and structural composition of deposits, their heat conduction and porosity.

  5. Surface Structure and Growth Mode of Pd Deposited on Mo(110) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehara, Y.; Kawanowa, H.; Gotoh, Y.

    The surface structure and growth mode of Pd/Mo(110) have been studied using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The surface diagram of Pd on the Mo(110) substrate for deposition thickness versus substrate temperature was obtained. Four kinds of surface structures, namely α1, α2, β and γ, were observed. At less than 1 ML, α2 appeared in temperatures ranging from 400 to 1050°C and α1 appeared from RT to 400°C. α2 has a structure intermediate between those of Pd(111) and Mo(110), in which the dense direction of the layer is parallel to the [111]Mo orientation and their atomic row distances are coincident, resulting in formation of a long-period structure with a Mo surface, namely a coincident site lattice. The α1 structure is similar to the 1 × 1 structure. At more than 1.0 ML, β and γ structures appeared simultaneously in the temperature region from 500 to 950°C. However, at a high temperature region from 950 to 1050°C, the α2 structure was observed. β shows a one-dimensional ordered structure, in which Pd atoms line along [111]Mo. γ exhibits a 3 × 1 structure with the same atomic arrangement as the Mo(110) plane rotated at 70.5°. At greater than 2.0 ML, the Pd film grows in the Frank van der Merwe growth mode at a low temperature with accumulation of a Pd(111) layer, and in the Stranski Krastanov growth mode at a high temperature with two-dimensional growth of the γ structure followed by formation of flat crystallites.

  6. Determination of weathering rate of the Morro do Ferro Th-REEs deposit, Brazil using U-isotope method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonotto, D.M. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Campus de Rio Claro, Avnue 24-A No.1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: dbonotto@rc.unesp.br; Fujimori, K. [In Memoriam, Departamento de Geofisica, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas (IAG-USP), Rua do Matao No. 1226, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Moreira-Nordemann, L.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE-MCT-CNPq), Av. dos Astronautas No. 1758, CEP 12227-010, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-05-15

    The weathering rate was estimated by changes in {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio (AR) and U content of rocks, borehole spoil and surface water samples at the Morro do Ferro Th-REEs deposit. The deposit is situated in the Pocos de Caldas alkaline massif, Brazil. The south stream basin investigated in this paper has not been significantly affected by anthropogenic inputs of pollutants as compared to the Corumbatai River basin in Sao Paulo State, where the method was previously applied. The weathering rate derived utilizing the U-isotopes modeling corresponded to 0.015 mm/yr (67,000 years to weather 1 m of rock under the actual climatic conditions). The estimated rate is very reasonable in comparison with the range of 0.015-0.05 mm/yr of land surface lowering within the entire caldera. It is also compatible with a rate of 0.013 mm/yr determined for the Salgado River basin in a semi-arid region in Bahia State, Brazil. The value generated is reliable and increases the potential use of the method for other different areas in Brazil and elsewhere, because it may be used in regions with different climatic conditions and (un)polluted basins.

  7. Surface Analysis of Hexagonal Boron Nitride Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Zachary; Hite, J. K.; Eddy, C. R., Jr.; Bermudez, V. M.; Feigelson, B. N.

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is an important material for development of 2-dimensional heterostructures. Chemical vapor deposition of hBN on Cu-foil substrates is one possible route towards large-scale production of hBN films with low defect density. Therefore, studying the growth kinetics of hBN on different orientations of Cu is an important first step towards understanding and controlling the growth process. In this work, hBN was simultaneously grown on Cu(111), Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu-foil in order to investigate how the different substrate orientations affect the hBN overlayer. The post-growth crystallographic orientations were measured with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and film coverages we measured with XPS. In addition, a grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) technique was developed to quickly characterize each hBN film. It was found that the growth rate was inversely proportional to the surface free energy of the Cu surface, with Cu(111) having the most h-BN surface coverage. The Cu foil predominately crystallized with a (100) surface orientation, and had a film coverage very close to the Cu(100).

  8. Glass surface metal deposition with high-power femtosecond fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Deng, Cheng; Bai, Shuang

    2016-12-01

    Using femtosecond fiber laser-based additive manufacturing (AM), metal powder is deposited on glass surface for the first time to change its surface reflection and diffuse its transmission beam. The challenge, due to mismatch between metal and glass on melting temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, brittleness, is resolved by controlling AM parameters such as power, scan speed, hatching, and powder thickness. Metal powder such as iron is successfully deposited and demonstrated functions such as diffusion of light and blackening effects.

  9. Environmental and geochemical assessment of surface sediments on irshansk ilmenite deposit area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталия Олеговна Крюченко

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is revealed the problem of pollution of surface sediments of Irshansk ilmenite deposit area of various chemical elements hazard class (Mn, V, Ba, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn. It is determined its average content in surface sediments of various functional areas (forest and agricultural land, flood deposits, reclaimed land, calculated geochemical criteria, so given ecological and geochemical assessment of area

  10. Pyrolytic deposition of nanostructured titanium carbide coatings on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremlev, K. V.; Ob"edkov, A. M.; Ketkov, S. Yu.; Kaverin, B. S.; Semenov, N. M.; Gusev, S. A.; Tatarskii, D. A.; Yunin, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured titanium carbide coatings have been deposited on the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by the MOCVD method with bis(cyclopentadienyl)titanium dichloride precursor. The obtained TiC/MWCNT hybrid materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is established that a TiC coating deposits onto the MWCNT surface with the formation of a core-shell (MWSNT-TiC) type structure.

  11. CAMELS-based Determinants for the Credit Rating of Turkish Deposit Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Yuksel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the relationship between CAMELS ratios and credit ratings of deposit banks in Turkey. Annual data was used for the period between 2004 and 2014 in this study. Moreover, 20 deposit banks of Turkey were analyzed and 21 different ratios of CAMELS components were used. In addition to that, credit ratings of these banks were provided from Moody’s corporation or annual activity reports of the banks. After that, we created multi nominal logistic regression analysis in order to illustrate the relationship. The major finding in this study is that three components (Asset Quality, Management Quality, and Sensitivity to Market Risk of CAMELS have effects on credit ratings whereas the ratios related to Capital Adequacy and Earnings are not effective. As a result, it was recommended that Turkish deposit banks should concentrate on the percentage of fixed assets and interest income to have a better rating. Moreover, having high market share with respect to total assets and lower interest expense are also other important points for this purpose. On the other hand, Turkish deposit banks should control the proportion of financial assets and increase the amount of FX liquid assets to prevent credit ratings to decrease. Additionally, market share of banks for loans should not reach at high level for this objective.

  12. A note of caution on the use of boulders for exposure dating of depositional surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S.; Hetzel, R.; Kuhlmann, J.; Ramos, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    Exposure dating of boulders has been widely applied to determine the age of depositional surfaces under the assumption that the pre-depositional nuclide component in most boulders is negligible (e.g. Bierman et al., 1995; van der Woerd et al., 2006). Here we present a case study on fluvial terraces at the active mountain front of the eastern Andes, where this assumption is clearly invalid, because sandstone boulders (n = 13) at two sites contain a highly variable inherited 10Be component and have apparent 10Be ages that exceed the age of the respective surface by up to 93 ka. Likewise, boulders from active stream channels (n = 5) contain a substantial inherited 10Be component, equivalent to 5-48 ka of exposure. The age of the fluvial terraces is well determined by 10Be depth profiles on sand samples, which allow to correct for the pre-depositional nuclide component. At site 1, three terraces have 10Be ages of 3.20 ± 0.42 ka (T2), 11.11 ± 0.87 ka (T3), and 16.0 ± 1.1 ka (T4). The age of T3 is furthermore confirmed by a calibrated 14C age of 12.61 ± 0.20 ka BP. At site 2, terrace T3 has an age of 13.5 ± 2.1 ka (derived on a 10Be depth profile), while boulders indicate apparent ages from 14 to 31 ka. The average inherited 10Be concentration of sand grains - determined from depth profiles and stream sediments - is small and equivalent to 1-3 ka of exposure, whereas the mean inheritance of the boulders is an order of magnitude higher. This causes great caution by determining erosion rates. The huge contrast is related to the different provenance and transport history of sand and boulders. While the sand is derived from rapidly eroding Miocene sediments exposed near the mountain front, the boulders originate from Triassic sandstones in the internal part of the fold-and-thrust belt. On their way to the mountain front the boulders were temporarily stored and irradiated in alluvial fans that are currently reworked. Sediment deposition in intramontane basins and

  13. Electrophoretic Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes on 3-Amino-Propyl-Triethoxysilane (APTES Surface Functionalized Silicon Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theda Daniels-Race

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of uniform thin coatings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by electrophoretic deposition (EPD on semiconductor (silicon substrates with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES surface functionalization has been studied extensively in this report. The gradual deposition and eventual film formation of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs is greatly assisted by the Coulombic force of attraction existing between the positively charged –NH2 surface groups of APTES and the acid treated, negatively charged nanotubes migrating towards the deposition surfaces. The remarkable deposition characteristics of the CNT coatings by EPD in comparison to the dip coating method and the influence of isopropyl (IPA-based CNT suspension in the fabricated film quality has also been revealed in this study. The effect of varying APTES concentration (5%–100% on the Raman spectroscopy and thickness of the deposited CNT film has been discussed in details, as well. The deposition approach has eliminated the need of metal deposition in the electrophoretic deposition approach and, therefore, establishes a cost-effective, fast and entirely room temperature-based fabrication strategy of CNT thin films for a wide range of next generation electronic applications.

  14. A general correlation for deposition of suspended particles from turbulent gases to completely rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schack, Carl J.; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.; Friedlander, S. K.

    A general correlation has been developed for particle deposition from turbulent gas flows to completely rough surfaces. The correlation is based on experimental data taken from the literature, and the theory of particle deposition by diffusion and interception from boundary layer flows. The surfaces include artificial grass, rye grass, water and gravel. Two empirical factors which depend on the structure of the roughness layer appear in the correlation. These factors have been evaluated for various rough surfaces based on a reference surface, the sticky artificial grass of Chamberlain (1966, 1967).

  15. Improvement and protection of niobium surface superconductivity by atomic layer deposition and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proslier, T.; /IIT, Chicago /Argonne; Zasadzinski, J.; /IIT, Chicago; Moore, J.; Pellin, M.; Elam, J.; /Argonne; Cooley, L.; /Fermilab; Antoine, C.; /Saclay

    2008-11-01

    A method to treat the surface of Nb is described, which potentially can improve the performance of superconducting rf cavities. We present tunneling and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements at the surface of cavity-grade niobium samples coated with a 3 nm alumina overlayer deposited by atomic layer deposition. The coated samples baked in ultrahigh vacuum at low temperature degraded superconducting surface. However, at temperatures above 450 C, the tunneling conductance curves show significant improvements in the superconducting density of states compared with untreated surfaces.

  16. ELECTRIC ARC WELDING DEPOSITION OF METALLIC SURFACES BY VIBRATING ELECTRODE IN PROTECTIVE GAS MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Spiridonov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methods for obtaining qualitative metallic surfaces by electric arc welding deposition while using consumable electrode in a protective gas medium and executing regularized drop transfer of electrode metal. The drop transfer efficiency of electrode metal and productivity of welding deposition are significantly increased due to excitation of lateral vibrations in the consumable electrode with preset amplitude. The paper describes a method and a device for welding deposition of metallic surfaces by vibrating  electrode where vibrations are excited by ultrasound.

  17. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy Studies on The Surface Morphologies of Chemical Bath Deposited Cus Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Soonmin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, copper sulphide thin films were deposited onto microscope glass slide by chemical bath deposition technique. The tartaric acid was served as complexing agent to chelate with Cu2+ to obtain complex solution. The influence of pH value on the surface morphologies of the films has been particularly investigated using the atomic force microscopy technique. The atomic force microscopy results indicate that the CuS films deposited at pH 1 were uniform, compact and pinhole free. However, the incomplete surface coverage observed for the films prepared at high pH (pH 2 and 2.5 values.

  19. Laser deposition rates of thin films of selected metals and alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzaniga, Andrea Carlo; Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen

    . The experiments have been carried out at a laser wavelength of 355 nm in vacuum with a PLD chamber at DTU Fotonik, Risø Campus. The deposition rates have been measured by a quartz crystal microbalance. At a laser fluence of 2 J/cm2 the total ablated yield of copper is about 1x1015 atoms per pulse. The film...

  20. An electroplating topography model based on layout-dependent variation of copper deposition rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qiang; Chen Lan; Li Zhigang; Ruan Wenbiao

    2011-01-01

    A layout-pattern-dependent electroplating model is developed based on the physical mechanism of the electroplating process.Our proposed electroplating model has an advantage over former ones due to a consideration of the variation of copper deposition rate with different layout parameters during the process.The simulation results compared with silicon data demonstrate the improvement in accuracy.

  1. 76 FR 37030 - Financial Derivatives Transactions To Offset Interest Rate Risk; Investment and Deposit Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... ADMINISTRATION 12 CFR Part 703 Financial Derivatives Transactions To Offset Interest Rate Risk; Investment and... Administration (``NCUA'') requests public comments on whether and how to modify its rule on investment and deposit activities to permit a natural person credit union to engage in the purchase and sale of financial...

  2. LDA and molecular dynamics determination of Ag deposition onto (1 0 0) surfaces in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzone, A.M

    2003-03-20

    This study analyzes the effects of the surface morphology on the deposition of Ag onto Si using LDA and isothermal molecular dynamics. The (1 0 0) silicon surface has either a bulk termination or the dimerization pattern experimentally observed. Small clusters representing a section of these surfaces have been used in LDA calculations to find preferred adsorption sites. Isothermal molecular dynamics describe the motions of the diffusing adatoms in a temperature range from T=10 to 1000 K. Both calculations indicate that Ag and Si do not mix and the deposited structure is formed by linear chains located in the trench between surface atoms. However, MD calculations show that, due to the relaxation of the surface and to thermal lattice vibrations, the stable state of the deposited atoms may considerably differ from the one calculated from LDA. This result has both a practical and a methodological significance.

  3. Constraints on the Martian cratering rate imposed by the SNC meteorites and Vallis Marineris layered deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    Following two independent lines of evidence -- estimates of the age and formation time of a portion of the Martian geologic column exposed in the layered deposits and the crystallization and ejection ages of the SNC meteorites -- it appears that the Martian cratering rate must be double the lunar rate or even higher. This means models such as NHII or NHIII (Neukum and Hiller models II and III), which estimate the Martian cratering rate as being several times lunar are probably far closer to reality on Mars than lunar rates. The effect of such a shift is profound: Mars is transformed from a rather Moon-like place into a planet with vigorous dynamics, multiple large impacts, erosion, floods, and volcanism throughout its history. A strong shift upward in cratering rates on Mars apparently solves some glaring problems; however, it creates others. The period of time during which Earth-like atmospheric conditions existed, the liquid water era on Mars, persists in NHIII up to only 0.5 b.y. ago. Scenarios of extended Earth-like conditions on Mars have been discounted in the past because they would have removed many of the craters from the early bombardment era found in the south. It does appear that some process of crater removal was quite vigorous in the north during Mars' past. Evidence exists that the northern plains may have been the home of long-lived seas or perhaps even a paleo-ocean, so models exist for highly localized destruction of craters in the north. However, the question of how the ancient crater population could be preserved in the south under a long liquid-water era found in any high-cratering-rate models is a serious question that must be addressed. It does appear to be a higher-order problem because it involves low-energy dynamics acting in localized areas, i.e., erosion of craters in the south of Mars, whereas the two problems with the low-cratering-rate models involve high-energy events acting over large areas: the formation of the Vallis Marineris

  4. Constraints on the Martian cratering rate imposed by the SNC meteorites and Vallis Marineris layered deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Following two independent lines of evidence -- estimates of the age and formation time of a portion of the Martian geologic column exposed in the layered deposits and the crystallization and ejection ages of the SNC meteorites -- it appears that the Martian cratering rate must be double the lunar rate or even higher. This means models such as NHII or NHIII (Neukum and Hiller models II and III), which estimate the Martian cratering rate as being several times lunar are probably far closer to reality on Mars than lunar rates. The effect of such a shift is profound: Mars is transformed from a rather Moon-like place into a planet with vigorous dynamics, multiple large impacts, erosion, floods, and volcanism throughout its history. A strong shift upward in cratering rates on Mars apparently solves some glaring problems; however, it creates others. The period of time during which Earth-like atmospheric conditions existed, the liquid water era on Mars, persists in NHIII up to only 0.5 b.y. ago. Scenarios of extended Earth-like conditions on Mars have been discounted in the past because they would have removed many of the craters from the early bombardment era found in the south. It does appear that some process of crater removal was quite vigorous in the north during Mars' past. Evidence exists that the northern plains may have been the home of long-lived seas or perhaps even a paleo-ocean, so models exist for highly localized destruction of craters in the north. However, the question of how the ancient crater population could be preserved in the south under a long liquid-water era found in any high-cratering-rate models is a serious question that must be addressed. It does appear to be a higher-order problem because it involves low-energy dynamics acting in localized areas, i.e., erosion of craters in the south of Mars, whereas the two problems with the low-cratering-rate models involve high-energy events acting over large areas: the formation of the Vallis Marineris

  5. Effects of long-term grazing on sediment deposition and salt-marsh accretion rates

    OpenAIRE

    Elschot, K.; Bouma, T.J.; Temmerman, S.; J. P. Bakker

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have attempted to predict whether coastal marshes will be able to keep up with future acceleration of sea-level rise by estimating marsh accretion rates. However, there are few studies focussing on the long-term effects of herbivores on vegetation structure and subsequent effects on marsh accretion. Deposition of fine-grained, mineral sediment during tidal inundations, together with organic matter accumulation from the local vegetation, positively affects accretion rates of marsh...

  6. Wear Resistance of Deposited Layer Using Nickel-Based Composite Powders by Plasma-Arc Surfacing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-hong; ZHU Sheng; XU Bin-shi; DU Ze-yu

    2004-01-01

    Nickel-based composite alloy powders were deposited on the surface of Q235 steel by plasma-arc surfacing in this work. Optimal proportions of elements intensifying the composite powders were ascertained by orthogonal design of three factors and three levels and orthogonal polynomial regression analysis , which Cr , Mn , W were 10% ,4% and 7 % respectively.Phase and structure of deposited materials were characterized by optical microscope and X- ray diffraction. Hardness tests and wear resistance tests were carried out to determine the performance of the deposited layers. The results show that the microstructure of deposited layers of composite powders mainly consist of γ-( Ni, Fe ) , γ- Ni, WC, W2 C, Mn31Si12, Cr23 C6,Cr7 C3, Cr, NiB, Ni2B etc. Wear resistance and hardness of the surface increased evidently.

  7. Empirical-Statistical Study on the Relationship between Deposition Parameters, Process Variables, Deposition Rate and Mechanical Properties of a-C:H:W Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Hetzner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-modified hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings (a-C:H:W were deposited on high speed steel by reactive magnetron sputtering of a tungsten carbide target in an argon-ethine atmosphere. The deposition parameters, sputtering power, bias voltage, argon and ethine flow rate, were varied according to a central composite design comprising 25 different parameter combinations. For comparison, a tungsten carbide coating was deposited, as well. During coating deposition, the process variables, total pressure, sputtering voltage and bias current, were measured as process characteristics. The thickness of the deposited coatings was determined using the crater grinding method, and the deposition rate was calculated. Young’s modulus E and indentation hardness HIT were characterized by means of nanoindentation. With E = 80

  8. Surface chemical studies of chemical vapour deposited diamond thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Proffitt, S

    2001-01-01

    could not easily be correlated to the bulk film properties. It is suggested that electron emission arises from the graphite component of graphite- diamond grain boundaries that are present in the nanocrystalline films. species. The adsorbed O and Cl species are more strongly bound to the K layer than they are to the diamond substrate, so thermal desorption of K from the K/CI/diamond or K/O/diamond surface results also in the simultaneous loss ofO and Cl. The phosphorus precursor trisdimethylaminophosphine (TDMAP) has a negligible reactive sticking probability on the clean diamond surface. This can be increased by thermal cracking of the gas phase precursor by a heated filament, resulting in non-activated adsorption to produce an adlayer containing a mixture of surface-bound ligands and phosphorus containing species. The ligands were readily lost upon heating, leaving P, some of which was lost from the surface at higher temperatures. Pre-hydrogenation of the diamond surface inhibited the uptake of cracked TDMA...

  9. XPS and AFM Investigations of Ti-Al-N Coatings Fabricated Using DC Magnetron Sputtering at Various Nitrogen Flow Rates and Deposition Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei Obrosov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ti-Al-N coatings were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS onto IN 718 at different nitrogen flow rates and deposition temperatures. The coatings’ properties were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS as well as nanoindentation. It was found that higher deposition temperature leads to higher surface roughness and nitrogen flux influences the shape of grains. According to XPS, the bonding structure of all coatings exhibited the (Ti,AlN phase. Mechanical properties depend on the Al content within the films. The coating with the best mechanical properties (deposited at 500 °C and 20 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm was further deposited onto tungsten carbide (WC cutting tools for cylindrical turning experiments. A quasi-constant flank wear was observed until a machining volume of 23,500 mm3.

  10. Surface Characteristics of Silicon Nanowires/Nanowalls Subjected to Octadecyltrichlorosilane Deposition and n-octadecane Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Salhi, Billel; Yousaf, Muhammad Rizwan; Al-Sulaiman, Fahad; Ali, Haider; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser

    2016-12-09

    In this study, nanowires/nanowalls were generated on a silicon wafer through a chemical etching method. Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) was deposited onto the nanowire/nanowall surfaces to alter their hydrophobicity. The hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces were further modified via a 1.5-μm-thick layer of n-octadecane coating on the OTS-deposited surface. The hydrophobic characteristics of the resulting surfaces were assessed using the sessile water droplet method. Scratch and ultraviolet (UV)-visible reflectivity tests were conducted to measure the friction coefficient and reflectivity of the surfaces. The nanowires formed were normal to the surface and uniformly extended 10.5 μm to the wafer surface. The OTS coating enhanced the hydrophobic state of the surface, and the water contact angle increased from 27° to 165°. The n-octadecane coating formed on the OTS-deposited nanowires/nanowalls altered the hydrophobic state of the surface. This study provides the first demonstration that the surface wetting characteristics change from hydrophobic to hydrophilic after melting of the n-octadecane coating. In addition, this change is reversible; i.e., the hydrophilic surface becomes hydrophobic after the n-octadecane coating solidifies at the surface, and the process again occurs in the opposite direction after the n-octadecane coating melts.

  11. The Characterization of Al Bond Pad Surface Treatment in Electroless Nickel Immersion Gold (ENIG Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. M. Arshad

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a number of experiments that were designed to characterize aluminum bond pad surfaces prior to electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG. In the ENIG process, aluminum bond pads need special treatment to achieve successful nickel deposition and provide reliable interconnection of under bump metallurgy in advanced packaging. During this treatment process, the aluminum pad was cleaned, activated and then coated with a layer of zinc. Systematic study was carried out to determine the best parameters, through multiple and various exposure times of the zincation process and zincation solution concentration effect on the Ni/Au surface roughness and aluminum dissolution rate on the bond pad during multiple zincation process. The ball shear strength was evaluated between eutectic 37Pb/63Sn solder ball and under bump metallurgy (UBM interfaces across multiple zincation process. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, Focused Ion Beam (FIB and ball shear tester were used as analytical tools. The results suggest that the multiple zincation process consistently produces a smoother surface of ENIG UBM and consequently provides a better shear strength.

  12. Extraction of Aerosol-Deposited Yersinia pestis from Indoor Surfaces To Determine Bacterial Environmental Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Ryan A.; Yeager, John J.; Leroux, Brian; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Dabisch, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Public health and decontamination decisions following an event that causes indoor contamination with a biological agent require knowledge of the environmental persistence of the agent. The goals of this study were to develop methods for experimentally depositing bacteria onto indoor surfaces via aerosol, evaluate methods for sampling and enumerating the agent on surfaces, and use these methods to determine bacterial surface decay. A specialized aerosol deposition chamber was constructed, and methods were established for reproducible and uniform aerosol deposition of bacteria onto four coupon types. The deposition chamber facilitated the control of relative humidity (RH; 10 to 70%) following particle deposition to mimic the conditions of indoor environments, as RH is not controlled by standard heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Extraction and culture-based enumeration methods to quantify the viable bacteria on coupons were shown to be highly sensitive and reproducible. To demonstrate the usefulness of the system for decay studies, Yersinia pestis persistence as a function of surface type at 21°C and 40% RH was determined to be >40%/min for all surfaces. Based upon these results, at typical indoor temperature and RH, a 6-log reduction in titer would expected to be achieved within 1 h as the result of environmental decay on surfaces without active decontamination. The developed approach will facilitate future persistence and decontamination studies with a broad range of biological agents and surfaces, providing agent decay data to inform both assessments of risk to personnel entering a contaminated site and decontamination decisions following biological contamination of an indoor environment. IMPORTANCE Public health and decontamination decisions following contamination of an indoor environment with a biological agent require knowledge of the environmental persistence of the agent. Previous studies on Y. pestis persistence have

  13. A high power impulse magnetron sputtering model to explain high deposition rate magnetic field configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Priya; Weberski, Justin; Cheng, Matthew; Shchelkanov, Ivan; Ruzic, David N.

    2016-10-01

    High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) is one of the recent developments in the field of magnetron sputtering technology that is capable of producing high performance, high quality thin films. Commercial implementation of HiPIMS technology has been a huge challenge due to its lower deposition rates compared to direct current Magnetron Sputtering. The cylindrically symmetric "TriPack" magnet pack for a 10 cm sputter magnetron that was developed at the Center for Plasma Material Interactions was able to produce higher deposition rates in HiPIMS compared to conventional pack HiPIMS for the same average power. The "TriPack" magnet pack in HiPIMS produces superior substrate uniformity without the need of substrate rotation in addition to producing higher metal ion fraction to the substrate when compared to the conventional pack HiPIMS [Raman et al., Surf. Coat. Technol. 293, 10 (2016)]. The films that are deposited using the "TriPack" magnet pack have much smaller grains compared to conventional pack DC and HiPIMS films. In this paper, the reasons behind the observed increase in HiPIMS deposition rates from the TriPack magnet pack along with a modified particle flux model is discussed.

  14. Effect of PbI2 deposition rate on two-step PVD/CVD all-vacuum prepared perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioakeimidis, Apostolos; Christodoulou, Christos; Lux-Steiner, Martha; Fostiropoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-12-01

    In this work we fabricate all-vacuum processed methyl ammonium lead halide perovskite by a sequence of physical vapour deposition of PbI2 and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of CH3NH3I under a static atmosphere. We demonstrate that for higher deposition rate the (001) planes of PbI2 film show a higher degree of alignment parallel to the sample's surface. From X-ray diffraction data of the resulted perovskite film we derive that the intercalation rate of CH3NH3I is fostered for PbI2 films with higher degree of (001) planes alignment. The stoichiometry of the produced perovskite film is also studied by Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Complete all-vacuum perovskite solar cells were fabricated on glass/ITO substrates coated by an ultra-thin (5 nm) Zn-phthalocyanine film as hole selective layer. A dependence of residual PbI2 on the solar cells performance is displayed, while photovoltaic devices with efficiency up to η=11.6% were achieved.

  15. Ion Beam Induced Surface Modulations from Nano to Pico: Optimizing Deposition During Erosion and Erosion During Deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MoberlyChan, W J; Schalek, R

    2007-11-08

    Ion beams of sufficient energy to erode a surface can lead to surface modulations that depend on the ion beam, the material surface it impinges, and extrinsic parameters such as temperature and geometric boundary conditions. Focused Ion Beam technology both enables site-specific placement of these modulations and expedites research through fast, high dose and small efficient use of material. The DualBeam (FIB/SEM) enables in situ metrology, with movies observing ripple formation, wave motion, and the influence of line defects. Nanostructures (ripples of >400nm wavelength to dots spaced <40nm) naturally grow from atomically flat surfaces during erosion, however, a steady state size may or may not be achieved as a consequence of numerous controlled parameters: temperature, angle, energy, crystallography. Geometric factors, which can be easily invoked using a FIB, enable a controlled component of deposition (and/or redeposition) to occur during erosion, and conversely allow a component of etching to be incurred during (ion-beam assisted) deposition. High angles of ion beam inclination commonly lead to 'rougher' surfaces, however, the extreme case of 90.0{sup o} etching enables deposition of organized structures 1000 times smaller than the aforementioned, video-recorded nanostructures. Orientation and position of these picostructures (naturally quantized by their atomic spacings) may be controlled by the same parameters as for nanostructures (e.g. ion inclination and imposed boundary conditions, which are flexibly regulated by FIB). Judicious control of angles during FIB-CVD growth stimulates erosion with directionality that produces surface modulations akin to those observed for sputtering. Just as a diamond surface roughens from 1-D ripples to 2-D steps with increasing angle of ion sputtering, so do ripples and steps appear on carbon-grown surfaces with increase in angle of FIB-CVD. Ion beam processing has been a stalwart of the microelectronics industry

  16. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

  17. Stratigraphy, depositional rates, and other DSDP Leg 96 conclusions: Mississippi fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.M.; Bouma, A.H.

    1984-04-01

    The Quaternary Mississippi fan consists of at least seven seismically mappable fan lobes. Eight sites were drilled into the youngest fan lobe during DSDP Leg 96. The Holocene (Ericson Zone Z) is capped by a marly foraminiferal ooze. Assuming an age of 12,000 yr for the Holocene/Pleistocene boundary, a minimum accumulation rate of 3-30 cm/1000 yr (1-12 in/1000 yr) is computed for the Holocene. The youngest fan lobe was deposited during the upper part of Ericson Zone Y (late Wisconsin glacial, 12,000-85,000 y.B.P.). Deposition rates for the Y Zone are extremely high for the middle fan sites, averaging 12 m/1000 yr (39 ft/1000 yr). Lower fan accumulation rates are 7 m/1000 yr (23 ft/1000 yr) for the channel sites and 6 m/1000 yr (20 ft/1000 yr) for the channel-mouth depositional lobes. These rates are not corrected for compaction. Foraminifera are scarce; the occurrence of shallow-water benthic species indicates a displaced inner and middle neritic origin for the sediments. Drilling on the youngest fan lobe shows that most of the silts and sands were transported through the upper and middle fan channel onto the lower fan, producing a 6 to 10-km (4 to 6-mi) wide, 135-m (443-ft) thick aggradational channel deposit. Much of the fine-grained sediment spilled out of the channel onto the adjacent overbank areas, constructing broad marginal plain. The channels on the lower fans are smaller and shift position frequently. Channel-mount depositional lobes are constructed at the end of the active channels and are composed of more than 50% net sand.

  18. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Hosseini, S. H. R., E-mail: hosseini@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Institute of Pulsed Power Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Akiyama, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Lukeš, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, AS CR, Prague, Prague 18200 (Czech Republic)

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  19. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Juan, E-mail: doctorxue@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China) and Stomatological Hospital, Urumqi, Xinjiang (China); Ding Gang [Department of Stomatology, Yidu Central Hospital, Weifang, Shandong (China); Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Li Jinlu; Yang Shenhui; Fang Bisong [Capital Medical University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Sun Hongchen, E-mail: hcsun@jlu.edu.cn [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China); Zhou Yanmin, E-mail: zhouym62@126.com [Implant Center, School of Stomatology Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin (China)

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased (p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  20. Surface treatment of polyimide film for metal magnetron deposition in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, V.; Vertyanov, D.; Timoshenkov, S.; Nikolaev, V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper brings forward a solution for acquisition of good quality metallization layers on the polyimide substrate by magnetron deposition in vacuum environment. Different film type structures have been analyzed after refining and activation surface treatment operations. Positive effect was shown after the application of polyimide lacquer for surface dielectric film planarization and for structural defects elimination.

  1. Preparation of lanthanum fluoride nanolayers by depositing ionic layers on silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuchkov, B.S.; Tolstoi, V.P.; Murin, I.V.; Kirillov, S.N. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-10

    The kinetics of growth of LaF{sub 3} nanolayers on silicon surface was studied. Influences due to preparation conditions (the concentration and the pH values of the solution, the time of surface treatment, the number of cycles of ionic layer deposition) were evaluated.

  2. Deposition of dairy protein-containing fluids on heat exchange surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakes, P A; Swartzel, K R; Jones, V A

    1986-12-01

    The deposition behavior of milk and dairy protein model systems under turbulent flow conditions (Re > 66,700) was observed in the heating sections of a tubular ultra-high temperature processing unit. This phenomenon was monitored via thermal resistance of the deposit in four segments in each of two shell-and-tube heat exchangers. Model systems were comprised of mixtures of sodium caseinate, whey proteins, salts, lactose, and fat. Fouling rates varied with type of milk protein, heater wall temperature, and location in the heat exchangers. The relationship between deposition rate in the heat exchanger and protein denaturation kinetics was also examined.

  3. Preparation of Dispersed Platinum Nanoparticles on a Carbon Nanostructured Surface Using Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Hiramatsu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method of forming platinum (Pt nanoparticles using a metal organic chemical fluid deposition (MOCFD process employing a supercritical fluid (SCF, and have demonstrated the synthesis of dispersed Pt nanoparticles on the surfaces of carbon nanowalls (CNWs, two-dimensional carbon nanostructures, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. By using SCF-MOCFD with supercritical carbon dioxide as a solvent of metal-organic compounds, highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles of 2 nm diameter were deposited on the entire surface of CNWs and CNTs. The SCF-MOCFD process proved to be effective for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on the entire surface of intricate carbon nanostructures with narrow interspaces.

  4. Alternative mechanism for coffee-ring deposition based on active role of free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Kang, Saeed; Vandadi, Vahid; Felske, James D.; Masoud, Hassan

    2016-12-01

    When a colloidal sessile droplet dries on a substrate, the particles suspended in it usually deposit in a ringlike pattern. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as the "coffee-ring" effect. One paradigm for why this occurs is as a consequence of the solutes being transported towards the pinned contact line by the flow inside the drop, which is induced by surface evaporation. From this perspective, the role of the liquid-gas interface in shaping the deposition pattern is somewhat minimized. Here, we propose an alternative mechanism for the coffee-ring deposition. It is based on the bulk flow within the drop transporting particles to the interface where they are captured by the receding free surface and subsequently transported along the interface until they are deposited near the contact line. That the interface captures the solutes as the evaporation proceeds is supported by a Lagrangian tracing of particles advected by the flow field within the droplet. We model the interfacial adsorption and transport of particles as a one-dimensional advection-generation process in toroidal coordinates and show that the theory reproduces ring-shaped depositions. Using this model, deposition patterns on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces are examined in which the evaporation is modeled as being either diffusive or uniform over the surface.

  5. Scaling behavior of the surface roughness of platinum films grown by oblique angle deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Rechendorff, K.; Chevallier, J.; Foss, M.; Besenbacher, F.

    2008-03-01

    Thin platinum films with well-controlled rough surface morphologies are grown by e-gun evaporation at an oblique angle of incidence between the deposition flux and the substrate normal. Atomic force microscopy is used to determine the root-mean-square value w of the surface roughness on the respective surfaces. From the scaling behavior of w , we find that while the roughness exponent α remains nearly unchanged at about 0.90, the growth exponent β changes from 0.49±0.04 to 0.26±0.01 as the deposition angle approaches grazing incidence. The values of the growth exponent β indicate that the film growth is influenced by both surface diffusion and shadowing effects, while the observed change from 0.49 to 0.26 can be attributed to differences in the relative importance of diffusion and shadowing with the deposition angle.

  6. Surface modification of acetaminophen particles by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääriäinen, Tommi O; Kemell, Marianna; Vehkamäki, Marko; Kääriäinen, Marja-Leena; Correia, Alexandra; Santos, Hélder A; Bimbo, Luis M; Hirvonen, Jouni; Hoppu, Pekka; George, Steven M; Cameron, David C; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2017-06-15

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are predominantly organic solid powders. Due to their bulk properties many APIs require processing to improve pharmaceutical formulation and manufacturing in the preparation for various drug dosage forms. Improved powder flow and protection of the APIs are often anticipated characteristics in pharmaceutical manufacturing. In this work, we have modified acetaminophen particles with atomic layer deposition (ALD) by conformal nanometer scale coatings in a one-step coating process. According to the results, ALD, utilizing common chemistries for Al2O3, TiO2 and ZnO, is shown to be a promising coating method for solid pharmaceutical powders. Acetaminophen does not undergo degradation during the ALD coating process and maintains its stable polymorphic structure. Acetaminophen with nanometer scale ALD coatings shows slowed drug release. ALD TiO2 coated acetaminophen particles show cytocompatibility whereas those coated with thicker ZnO coatings exhibit the most cytotoxicity among the ALD materials under study when assessed in vitro by their effect on intestinal Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical rate model for the surface pyrolysis of tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium to form titanium nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprac, Anthony J.; Iacoponi, John A.; Littau, Karl A.

    1998-09-01

    A chemical kinetic rate model for the deposition of titanium nitride films from the surface reaction of tetrakis(dimethyl-amido)titanium (TDMAT) was developed. Without ammonia addition, TDMAT forms a titanium nitride film by pyrolyzing on the hot substrate surface. Experimental data from the applied materials 5000 deposition tool was modeled using a CSTR formulation. With the parameters of the surface reaction model regressed to fit portions of the experimental results, reasonably accurate model predictions over the entire domain of experimental data were obtained.

  8. Speciated particle dry deposition to the sea surface: Results from ASEPS '97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, S.C.; Barthelmie, R.J.; Geernaert, L.L.S.

    1999-01-01

    It has been postulated that atmospheric pathways may comprise a significant source of nitrogen for aquatic ecosystems and excess atmospheric deposition to coastal areas may be a major cause of eutrophication. Dry deposition of nitrogen containing particles is a potential, but poorly quantified...... on Precipitation Scavenging and Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Processes. AMS, Richland, Washington, USA, 12pp.) model to calculate size-segregated dry deposition of particle inorganic nitrogen compounds to the western Baltic during the late Spring of 1997 based on data collected as part of the Air-Sea Exchange...... Process Study (ASEPS). The results show that over a 15 d period in April and May dry deposition fluxes varied between 30 and 400 mu g m(-2) d(-1) for nitrate and 1 and 120 mu g m(-2) d(-1) for ammonium. Sensitivity analyses run to assess the potential bounds on actual dry deposition indicate that...

  9. Effect of incident deposition angle on optical properties and surface roughness of TiO2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yongqiang; Yang, Chen

    2016-10-01

    Optical properties, surface roughness and packing density of TiO2 thin films are studied by obliquely deposited on K9 glass by electron beam evaporation. The surface roughness of TiO2 thin films with different incident deposition angle is compared. The experimental results show that the transmittance increases and transmittance peak shifts to short wavelength with increasing incident deposition angle, the packing density of TiO2 thin films decrease from 0.80 to 0.34 with incident deposition angle increasing from 0° to 75°. The surface roughness of TiO2 thin films increase with increasing incident deposition angle. The surface roughness of TiO2 thin films is slightly bigger than the surface roughness of K9 substrate when the incident deposition angle is 75°. When the incident deposition angle is constant, TiO2 thin films surface roughness decrease with increase of film thickness.

  10. Highly conducting phosphorous doped Nc-Si:H thin films deposited at high deposition rate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waman, V S; Kamble, M M; Ghosh, S S; Mayabadi, Azam; Sathe, V G; Amalnekar, D P; Pathan, H M; Jadkar, S R

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of highly conducting phosphorous doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) films at substantially low substrate temperature (200 degrees C) by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) method using pure silane (SiH4) and phosphine (PH3) gas mixture without hydrogen dilution. Structural, optical and electrical properties of these films were investigated as a function of PH3 gas-phase ratio. The characterization of these films by low-angle X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed that, the incorporation of phosphorous in nc-Si:H induces an amorphization in the nc-Si:H film structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicates that hydrogen predominately incorporated in phosphorous doped n-type nc-Si:H films mainly in di-hydrogen species (Si-H2) and poly-hydrogen (Si-H2)n bonded species signifying that the films become porous, and micro-void rich. We have observed high band gap (1.97-2.37 eV) in the films, though the hydrogen content is low (< 1.4 at.%) over the entire range of PH3 gas-phase ratio studied. Under the optimum deposition conditions, phosphorous doped nc-Si:H films with high dark conductivity (sigma Dark -5.3 S/cm), low charge-carrier activation energy (E(act) - 132 meV) and high band gap (- 2.01 eV), low hydrogen content (- 0.74 at.%) were obtained at high deposition rate (12.9 angstroms/s).

  11. Strain and Cohesive Energy of TiN Deposit on Al(001) Surface: Density Functional Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuan; Liu, Xuejie

    2016-07-01

    To apply the high hardness of TiN film to soft and hard multilayer composite sheets, we constructed a new type of composite structural material with ultra-high strength. The strain of crystal and cohesive energy between the atoms in the eight structures of N atom, Ti atom, 2N2Ti island and TiN rock salt deposited on the Al(001) surface were calculated with the first-principle ultra-soft pseudopotential approach of the plane wave based on the density functional theory. The calculations of the cohesive energy showed that N atoms could be deposited in the face-centered-cubic vacancy position of the Al(001) surface and results in a cubic structure AlN surface. The TiN film could be deposited on the interface of β-AlN. The calculations of the strains showed that the strain in the TiN film deposited on the Al(001) surface was less than that in the 2N2Ti island deposited on the Al(001) surface. The diffusion behavior of interface atom N was investigated by a nudged elastic band method. Diffusion energy calculation showed that the N atom hardly diffused to the substrate Al layer.

  12. Effects of Shear Rate and Inhibitors on Wax Deposition of Malaysian Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ridzuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wax deposition can cause a serious problem in crude oil flow assurance, especially in deep water operation due to the long chain of n-paraffin. This paper examines the effects of two factors on the deposition process, which are shear rate and different types of inhibitors. 10 mL of four different types of wax inhibitors (cocamide diethanolamine (C-DEA, diethanolamine (DEA, poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA and poly (maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene (MEA were injected into a crude oil vessel where the temperature of cold finger and water bath were set at 5°C and 50°C, respectively. The rotation speed was operated at different ranges between 0 and 600 rpm. From the result, it was found that the amount of total wax deposit decreased when shear rate increased. EVA showed a strong effect to inhibit wax formation with 33.33% reduction of wax deposit at 400 rpm as compared to other inhibitors.

  13. Criteria for significance of simultaneous presence of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles on mass transfer (deposition) rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    The simultaneous presence of aerosol particles and condensible vapors in a saturated boundary layer which may affect deposition rates to subcooled surfaces because of vapor-particle interactions is discussed. Scavenging of condensible vapors by aerosol particles may lead to increased particle size and decreased vapor mass fraction, which alters both vapor and particle deposition rates. Particles, if sufficiently concentrated, may also coagulate. Criteria are provided to assess the significance of such phenomena when particles are already present in the mainstream and are not created inside the boundary layer via homogeneous nucleation. It is determined that there is direct proportionality with: (1) the mass concentration of both condensible vapors and aerosol particles; and (2) the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio (delta d sub p) square. Inverse proportionality was found for mainstream to surface temperature difference if thermophoresis dominates particle transport. It is concluded that the square of the boundary layer thickness to particle diameter ratio is the most critical factor to consider in deciding when to neglect vapor-particle interactions.

  14. 210Pb mass accumulation rates in the depositional area of the Magra River (Mediterranean Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbono, I.; Barsanti, M.; Schirone, A.; Conte, F.; Delfanti, R.

    2016-08-01

    Nine sediment cores were collected between 2009 and 2012 in the inner continental shelf (Mediterranean Sea, Italy) mainly influenced by the Magra River, at water depths ranging from 11 to 64 m. Mass Accumulation Rates (MARs) were calculated through 210Pb analysed by Gamma spectrometry. Three different dating models (single and two-layer CF-CS, CRS) were applied to clay normalised 210Pbxs profiles and 137Cs was used to validate the 210Pb geochronology. The maximum MAR values (>2 g cm-2 yr-1) were found in the region adjacent to the Magra River mouth and outside the Gulf of La Spezia (0.9±0.1 g cm-2 yr-1 at St. 3-C6 and 4-C4). Results from 137Cs/210Pbxs ratios calculated in Surface Mixed Layers (SMLs) evidenced the coastal boundaries of the Magra River depositional area, which is very limited towards south. Differently, in the north-west sector, fine sediments are generally driven by the Ligurian Current and move towards north-west: at the deepest and most distant station from the River mouth, the MAR value is the lowest one in the study area. Few major Magra River floods occurred during the sediment core sampling period. By using the short-lived radioisotope 7Be as a tracer of river floods, a clear 7Be signature of 2009 flood is present at St. 1-SA1C. Finally, by analyzing the clay normalised 210Pbxs profiles, a decrease of its activity dating the years 1999 and 2000 is observed in four cores, corresponding to two major Magra River floods occurring in those years.

  15. Surface energy evaluation of unhydrogenated DLC thin film deposited by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladoiu, R.; Dinca, V.; Musa, G.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this paper is concerned with the surface energy evaluation by contact angle measurements of DLC films deposited by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) on different substrates: glass plate, zinc foil, stainless steel and alumina foil. TVA is an original method based on a combination of the evaporation by electron bombardment and anodic arc. The evaluation of the surface free energy has been carried out by surface energy evaluation system (SEE System). The influence of the experimental conditions is also investigated.

  16. Adsorption and revaporisation studies of thin iodine oxide and CsI aerosol deposits from containment surface materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    During a severe nuclear accident released fission and radiolysis products can react with each other to form new species which might contribute to the volatile source term. Iodine will be released from UO2 fuel mainly in form as CsI aerosol particles and elemental iodine. Elemental iodine can react in gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (IOx). Within the AIAS-2 (Adsorption of Iodine Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of IOx and CsI aerosols with common containment surface materials was investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled aerosols were produced from a KI solution and ozone with a new facility designed and built at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. CsI aerosols were produced from a CsI solution with the same facility. A monolayer of the aerosols was deposited on the surfaces. The deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the chemical form of the deposits on the surfaces to identify if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials had occured. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 with a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The decomposition effect of the radiolysis product carbon monoxide was tested on IOx aerosols deposited on a glass fibre filter. Iodine oxide particles were produced at 50 deg. C, 100 deg. C and 120 deg. C and deposited on filter samples in order to study the chemical

  17. Mechanistic Details of Surface Reactions in Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Menno; Bouman; Christopher; Clark; Hugo; Tiznado; Francisco; Zaera

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The reaction mechanisms of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes used for thin-film growth have been characterized by a combination of surface sensitive techniques. Our early studies focused on the deposition of TiN films from TiCl4 and ammonia,starting with the independent characterization of each of the two half steps comprising the ALD process. It was found that exposure of the substrate to TiCl4 leads to the initial deposition of titanium in the +3 oxidation state; only at a later st...

  18. Flame spray deposition of porous catalysts on surfaces and in microsystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Susanne; Jensen, Søren; Johansen, Johnny;

    2004-01-01

    . With shadow masks, porous catalyst layers can be deposited selectively into microchannels. Using Au/TiO$_2$ as test catalyst and CO-oxidation as test reaction, it is found that the apparent activation energy of the deposited catalyst is similar to what is normally seen for supported gold catalysts...... in the literature. The surface area of the deposited material is more than twice as large as when the flame-produced material is collected on a filter at the outlet of the flame reactor unit....

  19. Nucleation and growth of copper phthalocyanine aggregates deposited from solution on planar surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Fatemeh [Department of Theory & Bio-Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1 Golm, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Gojzewski, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.gojzewski@put.poznan.pl [Department of Theory & Bio-Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1 Golm, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Physics, Poznan University of Technology, Piotrowo 3, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Riegler, Hans [Department of Theory & Bio-Systems, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg 1 Golm, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Copper phthalocyanine deposited on planar surfaces by 3 solution process methods. • Aggregate morphology examined for coverage extending over 3 orders of magnitude. • Morphologies vary from small individual domains to mesh-like multilayers. • Nucleation and growth model explains the observed deposit morphologies. - Abstract: Copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) dissolved in trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is deposited on solid SiO{sub 2} surfaces by solvent evaporation. The deposited CuPc aggregates are investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The CuPc deposits were prepared by spin casting, dip coating, and spray deposition. Depending on the amount of deposited CuPc the aggregate morphology ranges from small individual domains to mesh-like multilayers. Each domain/layer consists of many parallel stacks of CuPc molecules with the square, plate-like molecules piled face-wise within each stack. The parallel stacks are attached sideways (i.e., edgewise attachment molecularly) to the substrate forming “nanoribbons” with uniform thickness of about 1 nm and varying width. The thickness reflects the length of a molecular edge, the width the number of stacks. A nucleation and growth model is presented that explains the observed aggregate and multilayer morphologies as result of the combination of nucleation, transport processes and a consequence of the anisotropic intermolecular interactions due to the shape of the CuPc molecule.

  20. Build-up dynamics of heavy metals deposited on impermeable urban surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicke, D; Cochrane, T A; O'Sullivan, A

    2012-12-30

    A method using thin boards (3 cm thick, 0.56 m(2)) comprising different paving materials typically used in urban environments (2 asphalt types and concrete) was employed to specifically investigate air-borne deposition dynamics of TSS, zinc, copper and lead. Boards were exposed at an urban car park near vehicular traffic to determine the rate of contaminant build-up over a 13-day dry period. Concentration profiles from simulated rainfall wash-off were used to determine contaminant yields at different antecedent dry days. Maximum contaminant yields after 13 days of exposure were 2.7 kg ha(-1) for TSS, 35 g ha(-1) zinc, 2.3 g ha(-1) copper and 0.4 g ha(-1) lead. Accumulation of all contaminants increased over the first week and levelled off thereafter, supporting theoretical assumptions that contaminant accumulation on impervious surfaces asymptotically approaches a maximum. Comparison of different surface types showed approximately four times higher zinc concentrations in runoff from asphalt surfaces and two times higher TSS concentrations in runoff from concrete, which is attributed to different physical and chemical compositions of the pavement types. Contaminant build-up and wash-off behaviours were modelled using exponential and saturation functions commonly applied in the US EPA's Stormwater Management Model (SWMM) showing good correlation between measured and modelled concentrations. Maximum build-up, half-saturation time, build-up rate constants and wash-off coefficients, necessary for stormwater contaminant modelling, were determined for the four contaminants studied. These parameters are required to model contaminant concentrations in urban runoff assisting in stormwater management decisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms and rates of atmospheric deposition of selected trace elements and sulfate to a deciduous forest watershed. [Roles of dry and wet deposition concentrations measured in Walker Branch Watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, S.E.; Harriss, R.C.; Turner, R.R.; Shriner, D.S.; Huff, D.D.

    1979-06-01

    The critical links between anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere and their effects on ecosystems are the mechanisms and rates of atmospheric deposition. The atmospheric input of several trace elements and sulfate to a deciduous forest canopy is quantified and the major mechanisms of deposition are determined. The study area was Walker Branch Watershed (WBW) in eastern Tennessee. The presence of a significant quantity of fly ash and dispersed soil particles on upward-facing leaf and flat surfaces suggested sedimentation to be a major mechanism of dry deposition to upper canopy elements. The agreement for deposition rates measured to inert, flat surfaces and to leaves was good for Cd, SO/sub 4//sup =/, Zn, and Mn but poor for Pb. The precipitation concentrations of H/sup +/, Pb, Mn, and SO/sub 4//sup =/ reached maximum values during the summer months. About 90% of the wet deposition of Pb and SO/sub 4//sup =/ was attributed to scavenging by in-cloud processes while for Cd and Mn, removal by in-cloud scavenging accounted for 60 to 70% of the deposition. The interception of incoming rain by the forest canopy resulted in a net increase in the concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, Zn, and SO/sub 4//sup =/ but a net decrease in the concentration of H/sup +/. The source of these elements in the forest canopy was primarily dry deposited aerosols for Pb, primarily internal plant leaching for Mn, Cd, and Zn, and an approximately equal combination of the two for SO/sub 4//sup =/. Significant fractions of the total annual elemental flux to the forest floor in a representative chestnut oak stand were attributable to external sources for Pb (99%), Zn (44%), Cd (42%), SO/sub 4//sup =/ (39%), and Mn (14%), the remainder being related to internal element cycling mechanisms. On an annual scale the dry deposition process constituted a significant fraction of the total atmospheric input. (ERB)

  2. Summertime surface O3 behavior and deposition to tundra in the Alaskan Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Brie; Helmig, Detlev; Doskey, Paul V.; Oltmans, Samuel J.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric turbulence quantities, boundary layer ozone (O3) levels, and O3 deposition to the tundra surface were investigated at Toolik Lake, AK, during the 2011 summer season. Beginning immediately after snowmelt, a diurnal cycle of O3 in the atmospheric surface layer developed with daytime O3 maxima, and minima during low-light hours, resulting in a mean amplitude of 13 ppbv. This diurnal O3 cycle is far larger than observed at other high Arctic locations during the snow-free season. During the snow-free months of June, July, and August, O3 deposition velocities were ˜3 to 5 times faster than during May, when snow covered the ground most of the month. The overall mean O3 deposition velocity between June and August was 0.10 cm s-1. The month of June had the highest diurnal variation, with a median O3 deposition velocity of 0.2 cm s-1 during the daytime and 0.08 cm s-1 during low-light conditions. These values are slightly lower than previously reported summertime deposition velocities in northern latitudes over tundra or fen. O3 loss during low-light periods was attributed to a combination of surface deposition to the tundra and stable boundary layer conditions. We also hypothesize that emissions of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds into the shallow boundary layer may contribute to nighttime O3 loss.

  3. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Ding, Gang; Li, Jinlu; Yang, Shenhui; Fang, Bisong; Sun, Hongchen; Zhou, Yanmin

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased ( p S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  4. Purification of carbon nanotubes from cathode deposit by means of different oxidation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikazaki, Fumikazu; Uchida, Kunio; Ohshima, Satoshi; Kuriki, Yasunori [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Two purification methods of nanotubes from a cathode deposit by an arc plasma were conducted by means of different oxidation rates of various graphites. One was chemical and the other physical method. Both could purify nanotubes at their optimum conditions. In the former, the catalytic oxidation was used of graphitic materials by copper. Copper supported graphite was prepared by the intercalation of copper chloride and by the reduction to metal copper. The catalytic oxidation decomposed the graphite at 773 K. The temperature was 200 K lower than the oxidation temperature of graphite, which enabled purification. In the latter, dispersion, comminution and filtration of a cathode deposit in ethanol were used to separate coarse graphite. The rate of weight loss by oxidation increased with the decrease of size of the graphite. Nanotubes were more slowly oxidized from the edges than the graphite of the same size. This could purify nanotubes.

  5. Purification of carbon nanotubes from cathode deposit by means of different oxidation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikazaki, F.; Uchida, K.; Ohshima, S. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Two purification methods of nanotubes from a cathode deposit by an arc plasma were conducted by means of different oxidation rates of various graphites. One was chemical and the other physical method. Both could purify nanotubes at their optimum conditions. In the former, the catalytic oxidation was used of graphite materials by copper. Copper supported graphite was prepared by the intercalation of copper chloride and by the reduction to metal copper. The catalytic oxidation decomposed the graphite at 773 K and less. The temperature was significantly lower than the oxidation temperature former reported of graphite, which enabled purification. In the latter, dispersion, comminution and filtration of a cathode deposit in ethanol were used to separate coarse graphite. The rate of weight loss by oxidation increased with the decrease of size of the graphite. Nanotubes were more slowly oxidized from the edges than the graphite of the same size. This could purify nanotubes.

  6. Surface modification of biomaterials by pulsed laser ablation deposition and plasma/gamma polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Kaustubh R.

    Surface modification of stainless-steel was carried out by two different methods: pulsed laser ablation deposition (PLAD) and a combined plasma/gamma process. A potential application was the surface modification of endovascular stents, to enhance biocompatibility. The pulsed laser ablation deposition process, had not been previously reported for modifying stents and represented a unique and potentially important method for surface modification of biomaterials. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elatomer was studied using the PLAD technique. Cross- linked PDMS was deemed important because of its general use for biomedical implants and devices as well as in other fields. Furthermore, PDMS deposition using PLAD had not been previously studied and any information gained on its ablation characteristics could be important scientifically and technologically. The studies reported here showed that the deposited silicone film properties had a dependence on the laser energy density incident on the target. Smooth, hydrophobic, silicone-like films were deposited at low energy densities (100-150 mJ/cm2). At high energy densities (>200 mJ/cm2), the films had an higher oxygen content than PDMS, were hydrophilic and tended to show a more particulate morphology. It was also determined that (1)the deposited films were stable and extremely adherent to the substrate, (2)silicone deposition exhibited an `incubation effect' which led to the film properties changing with laser pulse number and (3)films deposited under high vacuum were similar to films deposited at low vacuum levels. The mechanical properties of the PLAD films were determined by nanomechanical measurements which are based on the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). From these measurements, it was possible to determine the modulus of the films and also study their scratch resistance. Such measurement techniques represent a significant advance over current state-of-the-art thin film characterization methods. An empirical model for

  7. Influence of deposition rate on the properties of ZrO2 thin films prepared in electron beam evaporation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongping Zhang(张东平); Meiqiong Zhan(占美琼); Ming Fang(方明); Hongbo He(贺洪波); Jianda Shao(邵建达); Zhengxiu Fan(范正修)

    2004-01-01

    ZrO2 thin films were prepared in electron beam thermal evaporation method. And the deposition rate changed from 1.3 to 6.3 nm/s in our study. X-ray diffractometer and spectrophotometer were employed to characterize the films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra pattern shows that films structure changed from amorphous to polycrystalline with deposition rate increasing. The results indicate that internal stresses of the films are compressive in most case. Thin films deposited in our study are inhomogeneous, and the inhomogeneity is enhanced with the deposition rate increasing.

  8. Responses of surface ozone air quality to anthropogenic nitrogen deposition in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanhong; Zhang, Lin; Tai, Amos P. K.; Chen, Youfan; Pan, Yuepeng

    2017-08-01

    Human activities have substantially increased atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen to the Earth's surface, inducing unintentional effects on ecosystems with complex environmental and climate consequences. One consequence remaining unexplored is how surface air quality might respond to the enhanced nitrogen deposition through surface-atmosphere exchange. Here we combine a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and a global land model (Community Land Model, CLM) to address this issue with a focus on ozone pollution in the Northern Hemisphere. We consider three processes that are important for surface ozone and can be perturbed by the addition of atmospheric deposited nitrogen - namely, emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone dry deposition, and soil nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. We find that present-day anthropogenic nitrogen deposition (65 Tg N a-1 to the land), through enhancing plant growth (represented as increases in vegetation leaf area index, LAI, in the model), could increase surface ozone from increased biogenic VOC emissions (e.g., a 6.6 Tg increase in isoprene emission), but it could also decrease ozone due to higher ozone dry deposition velocities (up to 0.02-0.04 cm s-1 increases). Meanwhile, deposited anthropogenic nitrogen to soil enhances soil NOx emissions. The overall effect on summer mean surface ozone concentrations shows general increases over the globe (up to 1.5-2.3 ppbv over the western US and South Asia), except for some regions with high anthropogenic NOx emissions (0.5-1.0 ppbv decreases over the eastern US, western Europe, and North China). We compare the surface ozone changes with those driven by the past 20-year climate and historical land use changes. We find that the impacts from anthropogenic nitrogen deposition can be comparable to the climate- and land-use-driven surface ozone changes at regional scales and partly offset the surface ozone reductions due to land use changes reported in previous studies

  9. Silicon surface passivation using thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gope, Jhuma; Vandana; Batra, Neha; Panigrahi, Jagannath; Singh, Rajbir; Maurya, K. K.; Srivastava, Ritu; Singh, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is a potential material for equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) scaling in microelectronics; however, its surface passivation properties particularly on silicon are not well explored. This paper reports investigation on passivation properties of thermally deposited thin HfO2 films by atomic layer deposition system (ALD) on silicon surface. As-deposited pristine film (∼8 nm) shows better passivation with <100 cm/s surface recombination velocity (SRV) vis-à-vis thicker films. Further improvement in passivation quality is achieved with annealing at 400 °C for 10 min where the SRV reduces to ∼20 cm/s. Conductance measurements show that the interface defect density (Dit) increases with film thickness whereas its value decreases after annealing. XRR data corroborate with the observations made by FTIR and SRV data.

  10. Detection of land surface memory by correlations between thickness of colluvial deposits and morphometric variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitusov, A. V.; Dreibrodt, S.; Mitusova, O. E.; Khamnueva, S. V.; Bork, H.-R.

    2013-06-01

    Some morphometric variables store information about past land surfaces longer than others. This property of morphometric variables is recognised as land surface memory. Slope deposits, soils, and vegetation also have this memory. In this study, a memory effect was quantitatively detected by Spearman correlations between thickness of colluvium and morphometric variables of the modern land surface. During long-term sedimentation, the sign of horizontal curvature (kh) may be inverted from minus to plus, suggesting that locations with positive kh values are not accumulation zones. However, the thickness of colluvial deposits at such locations in our study area indicates sediment accumulation. The sign of minimal curvature (kmin) tends to be more stable and remains negative. This difference provides the stronger correlation of colluvial layer thickness with kmin than with kh. The strongest correlation was found for total thickness of the colluvial deposits of the Neolithic and Iron Age with kmin (- 0.84); the correlation with kh was weaker (- 0.71).

  11. Technique for the estimation of surface temperatures from embedded temperature sensing for rapid, high energy surface deposition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Tyson R.; Schunk, Peter Randall; Roberts, Scott Alan

    2014-07-01

    Temperature histories on the surface of a body that has been subjected to a rapid, highenergy surface deposition process can be di cult to determine, especially if it is impossible to directly observe the surface or attach a temperature sensor to it. In this report, we explore two methods for estimating the temperature history of the surface through the use of a sensor embedded within the body very near to the surface. First, the maximum sensor temperature is directly correlated with the peak surface temperature. However, it is observed that the sensor data is both delayed in time and greatly attenuated in magnitude, making this approach unfeasible. Secondly, we propose an algorithm that involves tting the solution to a one-dimensional instantaneous energy solution problem to both the sensor data and to the results of a one-dimensional CVFEM code. This algorithm is shown to be able to estimate the surface temperature 20 C.

  12. Effect of Deposition Rate and Annealing on Physical Properties of In2O3 Thin Films Prepared by Spray Pyrolysis: Ultraviolet (UV) Photoconductivity Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddini, Khadijeh; Eshghi, Hosein

    2017-07-01

    As-grown and annealed indium oxide thin films deposited by spray pyrolysis at various rates (2 mL/min, 3.5 mL/min, and 5 mL/min) on glass substrate have been studied. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy images and x-ray diffraction analysis of the samples revealed that the deposition spray rate and annealing process affected both the surface morphology and preferred orientation of the polycrystalline cubic phase of the layers. Electrical investigations confirmed presence of oxygen vacancy ( V O) defects related to band tail, having minimum width in the sample deposited at the highest spray rate (5 mL/min). Ultraviolet photoconductivity results indicated that, although this sample had the highest light sensitivity, its sensitivity decreased after annealing due to increased V O defects.

  13. Risk Management Model in Surface Exploitation of Mineral Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, Cvjetko

    2016-06-01

    Risk management is an integrative part of all types of project management. One of the main tasks of pre-investment studies and other project documentation is the tendency to protect investment projects as much as possible against investment risks. Therefore, the provision and regulation of risk information ensure the identification of the probability of the emergence of adverse events, their forms, causes and consequences, and provides a timely measures of protection against risks. This means that risk management involves a set of management methods and techniques used to reduce the possibility of realizing the adverse events and consequences and thus increase the possibilities of achieving the planned results with minimal losses. Investment in mining projects are of capital importance because they are very complex projects, therefore being very risky, because of the influence of internal and external factors and limitations arising from the socio-economic environment. Due to the lack of a risk management system, numerous organizations worldwide have suffered significant financial losses. Therefore, it is necessary for any organization to establish a risk management system as a structural element of system management system as a whole. This paper presents an approach to a Risk management model in the project of opening a surface coal mine, developed based on studies of extensive scientific literature and personal experiences of the author, and which, with certain modifications, may find use for any investment project, both in the mining industry as well as in investment projects in other areas.

  14. Impact of aerosol composition and foliage characteristics on forest canopy deposition rates: A laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are a major sink for atmospheric aerosols. Hence it has been suggested that (i) increased tree planting in urban areas might lead to a reduction in aerosol particle concentrations and thus a reduction in respiratory conditions and heart complications, and (ii) forests may be responsible for removing a disproportionately large fraction of potentially climate-relevant fine and ultra-fine aerosol particles from the atmosphere. However, larger uncertainties remain with respect to controls on uptake rates for forests. E.g. the deposition flux partitioning between foliage and non-foliage elements, the influence of particle size and composition, the role of leaf surface morphology and stomatal aperture in surface uptake. Improved understanding of the relative importance of these factors and the variability across different tree species should help determine how much of a sink naturally occurring and planted forests can provide downstream of fine particle production. In this study, a sample of trees native to southern Indiana were exposed to ultra-fine aerosol particle populations in a 1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.5 m Teflon chamber. Stable particle size distributions (PSD) with geometric mean diameters (GMD) ranging from 40 to 80 nm were generated from sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and sodium sulfite solutions using a TSI model 3940 Aerosol Generation System (AGS). The aerosol stream was diluted using scrubbed and dried zero air to allow a variation of total number concentration across two orders of magnitude. PSD in the chamber are continuously measured using a TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) comprising an Electrostatic Classifier (EC model 3080) attached to a Long DMA (LDMA model 3081) and a TSI model 3025A Butanol Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) operated with both the internal diffusion loss and multiple charge corrections turned on. The composition of the chamber air was also monitored for carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor

  15. Evaluation of the surface roughness effect on suspended particle deposition near unpaved roads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Dongzi; Gillies, J. A.; Etyemezian, V.; Nikolich, G.; Shaw, William J.

    2015-11-11

    The downwind transport and deposition of suspended dust raised by a vehicle driving on unpaved roads was studied for four differently vegetated surfaces in the USA states of Kansas and Washington, and one barren surface in Nevada. A 10 m high tower adjacent to the source (z10 m downwind) and an array of multi-channel optical particle counters at three positions downwind of the source measured the flux of particles and the particle size distribution in the advecting dust plumes in the horizontal and vertical directions. Aerodynamic parameters such as friction velocity (u*) and surface roughness length (z0) were calculated from wind speed measurements made on the tower. Particle number concentration, PM10 mass exhibited an exponential decay along the direction of transport. Coarse particles accounted for z95% of the PM10 mass, at least to a downwind distance of 200 m from the source. PM10 removed by deposition was found to increase with increasing particle size and increasing surface roughness under similar moderate wind speed conditions. The surface of dense, long grass (1.2 m high and complete surface cover) had the greatest reduction of PM10 among the five surfaces tested due to deposition induced by turbulence effects created by the rougher surface and by enhanced particle impaction/ interception effects to the grass blades.

  16. Silver nanoparticles deposited on porous silicon as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiri, Leila; Rechav, Katya; Porat, Ze'ev; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2012-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles were deposited spontaneously from their aqueous solution on a porous silicon (PS) layer. The PS acts both as a reducing agent and as the substrate on which the nanoparticles nucleate. At higher silver ion concentrations, layers of nanoparticle aggregates were formed on the PS surface. The morphology of the metallic layers and their SERS activity were influenced by the concentrations of the silver ion solutions used for deposition. Raman measurements of rhodamine 6G (R6G) and crystal violet (CV) adsorbed on these surfaces showed remarkable enhancement of up to about 10 orders of magnitude.

  17. Large molecules on surfaces: deposition and intramolecular STM manipulation by directional forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Leonhard

    2010-03-01

    Intramolecular manipulation of single molecules on a surface with a scanning tunnelling microscope enables the controlled modification of their structure and, consequently, their physical and chemical properties. This review presents examples of intramolecular manipulation experiments with rather large molecules, driven by directional, i.e. chemical or electrostatic, forces between tip and molecule. It is shown how various regimes of forces can be explored and characterized with one and the same manipulation of a single molecule by changing the tip-surface distance. Furthermore, different deposition techniques under ultrahigh vacuum conditions are discussed because the increasing functionality of such molecules can lead to fragmentation during the heating step, making their clean deposition difficult.

  18. Cigarette smoke toxins deposited on surfaces: implications for human health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Martins-Green

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking remains a significant health threat for smokers and nonsmokers alike. Secondhand smoke (SHS is intrinsically more toxic than directly inhaled smoke. Recently, a new threat has been discovered - Thirdhand smoke (THS - the accumulation of SHS on surfaces that ages with time, becoming progressively more toxic. THS is a potential health threat to children, spouses of smokers and workers in environments where smoking is or has been allowed. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of THS on liver, lung, skin healing, and behavior, using an animal model exposed to THS under conditions that mimic exposure of humans. THS-exposed mice show alterations in multiple organ systems and excrete levels of NNAL (a tobacco-specific carcinogen biomarker similar to those found in children exposed to SHS (and consequently to THS. In liver, THS leads to increased lipid levels and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a precursor to cirrhosis and cancer and a potential contributor to cardiovascular disease. In lung, THS stimulates excess collagen production and high levels of inflammatory cytokines, suggesting propensity for fibrosis with implications for inflammation-induced diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. In wounded skin, healing in THS-exposed mice has many characteristics of the poor healing of surgical incisions observed in human smokers. Lastly, behavioral tests show that THS-exposed mice become hyperactive. The latter data, combined with emerging associated behavioral problems in children exposed to SHS/THS, suggest that, with prolonged exposure, they may be at significant risk for developing more severe neurological disorders. These results provide a basis for studies on the toxic effects of THS in humans and inform potential regulatory policies to prevent involuntary exposure to THS.

  19. Deposition rates of fungal spores in indoor environments, factors effecting them and comparison with non-biological aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaani, Hussein; Hargreaves, Megan; Ristovski, Zoran; Morawska, Lidia

    Particle deposition indoors is one of the most important factors that determine the effect of particle exposure on human health. While many studies have investigated the particle deposition of non-biological aerosols, few have investigated biological aerosols and even fewer have studied fungal spore deposition indoors. The purpose of this study was, for the first time, to investigate the deposition rates of fungal particles in a chamber of 20.4 m 3 simulating indoor environments by: (1) releasing fungal particles into the chamber, in sufficient concentrations so the particle deposition rates can be statistically analysed; (2) comparing the obtained deposition rates with non-bioaerosol particles of similar sizes, investigated under the same conditions; and (3) investigating the effects of ventilation on the particle deposition rates. The study was conducted for a wide size range of particle sizes (0.54-6.24 μm), at three different air exchange rates (0.009, 1.75 and 2.5 h -1). An Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer Spectrometer (UVAPS) was used to monitor the particle concentration decay rate. The study showed that the deposition rates of fungal spores ( Aspergillus niger and Penicillium species) and the other aerosols (canola oil and talcum powder) were similar, especially at very low air exchange rates (in the order of 0.009). Both the aerosol and the bioaerosol deposition rates were found to be a function of particle size. The results also showed increasing deposition rates with increasing ventilation rates, for all particles under investigation. These conclusions are important in understanding the dynamics of fungal spores in the air.

  20. Use of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane deposited from aqueous solution for surface modification of III-V materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Daniel B., Jr.; Williams, Kristen S.; Baril, Neil F.; Weiland, Conan; Andzelm, Jan W.; Lenhart, Joseph L.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Tidrow, Meimei Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Henry, Nathan C.

    2014-11-01

    Focal plane arrays of strained layer superlattices (SLSs) composed of InAs/GaSb are excellent candidates for infrared imaging, but one key factor limiting their utility is the lack of a surface passivation technique capable of protecting the mesa sidewall from degradation. Along these lines, we demonstrate the use of aqueous 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) deposited as a surface functionalizing agent for subsequent polymer passivation on InAs and GaSb surfaces following a HCl/citric acid procedure to remove the conductive oxide In2O3. Using atomic force microscopy, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and modeling with density functional theory (DFT), we demonstrate that APTES films can successfully be deposited on III-V substrates by spin coating and directly compare these films to those deposited on silicon substrates. The HCl/citric acid surface preparation treatment is particularly effective at removing In2O3 without the surface segregation of In oxides observed from use of HCl alone. However, HCl/citric acid surface treatment method does result in heavy oxidation of both Ga and Sb, accompanied by segregation of Ga oxide to the surface. Deposited APTES layer thickness did not depend on the substrate choice, and thicknesses between 1 and 20 nm were obtained for APTES solution concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 vol %. XPS results for the N1s band of APTES showed that the content of ionic nitrogen was high (∼50%) for the thinnest films (∼1 nm), and decreased with increasing film thickness. These results indicate that APTES can indeed be used to form a silane surface layer to cover III-V materials substrates. Such APTES silane layers may prove useful in surface passivation of these materials alone, or as surface functionalizing agents for subsequent covalent binding with polymer overlayers like polyimide.

  1. Electrochemically induced sol-gel deposition of ZnO films on Pt-nanoparticle modified FTO surfaces for enhanced photoelectrocatalytic energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutkowski, Ramona; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-28

    The low conductivity of transparent conductive oxides such as fluorine-doped tin oxides (FTO) has a high impact on the electrochemically induced deposition of semiconductor films for photoelectrocatalytic investigations. Furthermore, the often high recombination rate of photogenerated electron-hole pairs influences the photoelectrochemical performance of semiconductor films. In order to improve the semiconductor deposition process as well as to decrease electron-hole pair recombination, we propose modification of FTO by electrochemically induced deposition of Pt nanoparticles. The deposited Pt nanoparticles improve on the one hand the conductivity of the FTO and on the other hand they create nuclei at which the sol-gel semiconductor deposition starts. We use ZnO as a well-characterised material to evaluate the effect of the influencing parameters during electrochemically induced sol-gel deposition with respect to the incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) derived from wavelength dependent photocurrent spectroscopy. Using optimised deposition parameters a substantially decreased recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers is demonstrated, if Pt-nanoparticles are first deposited on the FTO surface. By improving the diffusion of photogenerated electrons to the Pt nanoparticles and hence to the back contact the photoelectrochemical performance of the deposited ZnO films is substantially increased.

  2. Electrochemical properties and Li deposition morphologies of surface modified graphite after grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honbo, H.; Takei, K.; Ishii, Y.; Nishida, T.

    Electrochemical properties and Li deposition morphologies of several kinds of carbon with different surfaces were studied. The surface conditions and Li deposition morphologies were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It appeared that the disordered carbon surface suppressed the Li dendrite deposition. Grinding methods with different clearances were adopted to modify the graphite into a desirable surface. The R-value increased from 0.10 to 0.63 after grinding to 40 μm, though a significant change in d 0 0 2 did not occur. These results suggest that disordered carbon was created on the surface without a significant change in bulk crystallinity. Thus, the reversible capacity, which is about 350 mAh g -1, was the same before and after grinding. However, the Li deposition morphologies significantly changed before and after grinding. The pristine graphite had a dendritic morphology, but the ground graphite had a granular morphology. It is believed that the defects on the disordered carbon act as electrodeposition nuclei and prevent the formation of Li dendrites.

  3. Effect of adatom deposition on surface magnetism and exchange coupling parameter in (0001) SmCo{sub 5} slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P., E-mail: murugan@cecri.res.in [CSIR Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630 003 (India); Saravanan, P.; Kamat, S. V. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 058 (India)

    2015-04-07

    First principles calculations are performed on 3d-transition metal atom deposited (0001) surface of SmCo{sub 5} to understand the magnetic properties and the improvement of Curie temperature (T{sub c}). Various atomic sites are examined to identify the energetically feasible adsorption of adatom and it is found that the void site of Co-rich (0001) SmCo{sub 5} surface is the most favourable one to deposit. The surface magnetic moments of various adatom deposited SmCo{sub 5} surfaces are larger than the clean surface except for Cu and Zn. Eventually, the surface exchange coupling of clean and adatom deposited surface is found to increase for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu deposited surfaces and this improvement results in the increase in T{sub c} of SmCo{sub 5} slab.

  4. An Artificial Turf-Based Surrogate Surface Collector for the Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Mercury Dry Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes the development of a new artificial turf surrogate surface (ATSS) sampler for use in the measurement of mercury (Hg) dry deposition. In contrast to many existing surrogate surface designs, the ATSS utilizes a three-dimensional deposition surface that may more...

  5. The impact of atmospheric dry deposition associated microbes on the southeastern Mediterranean Sea surface water following an intense dust storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal Rahav

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the potential impacts of microbes deposited into the surface seawater of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea (SEMS along with atmospheric particles on marine autotrophic and heterotrophic production. We compared in situ changes in autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial abundance and production rates before and during an intense dust storm event in early September 2015. Additionally, we measured the activity of microbes associated with atmospheric dry deposition (also referred to as airborne microbes in sterile SEMS water using the same particles collected during the dust storm. A high diversity of prokaryotes and a low diversity of autotrophic eukaryotic algae were delivered to surface SEMS waters by the storm. Autotrophic airborne microbial abundance and activity were low, contributing ~1% of natural abundance in SEMS water and accounting for 1-4% to primary production. Airborne heterotrophic bacteria comprised 30-50% of the cells and accounted for 13-42% of bacterial production. Our results demonstrate that atmospheric dry deposition may supply not only chemical constitutes but also microbes that can affect ambient microbial populations and their activity in the surface ocean. Airborne microbes may play a greater role in ocean biogeochemistry in the future in light of the expected enhancement of dust storm durations and frequencies due to climate change and desertification processes.

  6. Surface properties of Mars' polar layered deposits and polar landing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Paige, David A.; Herkenhoff, Ken E.; Bridges, Nathan T.; Greeley, Ronald; Murray, Bruce C.; Bass, Deborah S.; McBride, Karen S.

    2000-03-01

    On December 3, 1999, the Mars Polar Lander and Mars Microprobes will land on the planet's south polar layered deposits near (76°S, 195°W) and conduct the first in situ studies of the planet's polar regions. The scientific goals of these missions address several poorly understood and globally significant issues, such as polar meteorology, the composition and volatile content of the layered deposits, the erosional state and mass balance of their surface, their possible relationship to climate cycles, and the nature of bright and dark aeolian material. Derived thermal inertias of the southern layered deposits are very low (50-100 Jm-2s-1/2K-1), suggesting that the surface down to a depth of a few centimeters is generally fine grained or porous and free of an appreciable amount of rock or ice. The landing site region is smoother than typical cratered terrain on ~1 kmpixel-1 Viking Orbiter images but contains low-relief texture on ~5 to 100 mpixel-1 Mariner 9 and Mars Global Surveyor images. The surface of the southern deposits is older than that of the northern deposits and appears to be modified by aeolian erosion or ablation of ground ice.

  7. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    CERN Document Server

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, voltage-current measurement, microphotography and numerical simulation. On the basis of observed plasma parameters, the kinetics of the film deposition process is discussed.

  8. Potential Dependent Structural Changes of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Iodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by Surface EXAFS and Its Polarization Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-25

    of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Iodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by Surface EXAFS and Its Polarization Dependence G.M...fiCAtson) Potential Dependent Structural Changes of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on an Irodine Treated Platinum Surface Determined In Situ by...necessary and identify by block number) An in situ structural investigation of the underpotential deposition of copper on an iodine covered platinum

  9. Adsorption and revaporisation studies of thin iodine oxide and CsI aerosol deposits from containment surface materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, S.; Foreman, M.; Ekberg, C. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A.; Tapper, U.; Jokiniemi, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    During a severe nuclear accident released fission and radiolysis products can react with each other to form new species which might contribute to the volatile source term. Iodine will be released from UO2 fuel mainly in form as CsI aerosol particles and elemental iodine. Elemental iodine can react in gaseous phase with ozone to form solid iodine oxide aerosol particles (IOx). Within the AIAS-2 (Adsorption of Iodine Aerosols on Surfaces) project the interactions of IOx and CsI aerosols with common containment surface materials was investigated. Common surface materials in Swedish and Finnish LWRs are Teknopox Aqua V A paint films and metal surfaces such as Cu, Zn, Al and SS. Non-radioactive and {sup 131}I labelled aerosols were produced from a KI solution and ozone with a new facility designed and built at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. CsI aerosols were produced from a CsI solution with the same facility. A monolayer of the aerosols was deposited on the surfaces. The deposits were analysed with microscopic and spectroscopic measurement techniques to identify the chemical form of the deposits on the surfaces to identify if a chemical conversion on the different surface materials had occured. The revaporisation behaviour of the deposited aerosol particles from the different surface materials was studied under the influence of heat, humidity and gamma irradiation at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. Studies on the effects of humidity were performed using the FOMICAG facility, while heat and irradiation experiments were performed in a thermostated heating block and with a gammacell 22 with a dose rate of 14 kGy/h. The revaporisation losses were measured using a HPGe detector. The decomposition effect of the radiolysis product carbon monoxide was tested on IOx aerosols deposited on a glass fibre filter. Iodine oxide particles were produced at 50 deg. C, 100 deg. C and 120 deg. C and deposited on filter samples in order to study the chemical

  10. Bismuth nanowire growth under low deposition rate and its ohmic contact free of interface damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High quality bismuth (Bi nanowire and its ohmic contact free of interface damage are quite desired for its research and application. In this paper, we propose one new way to prepare high-quality single crystal Bi nanowires at a low deposition rate, by magnetron sputtering method without the assistance of template or catalyst. The slow deposition growth mechanism of Bi nanowire is successfully explained by an anisotropic corner crossing effect, which is very different from existing explanations. A novel approach free of interface damage to ohmic contact of Bi nanowire is proposed and its good electrical conductivity is confirmed by I-V characteristic measurement. Our method provides a quick and convenient way to produce high-quality Bi nanowires and construct ohmic contact for desirable devices.

  11. Influence of Deposition Parameters on Surface Evolution of Sputtered Tantalum Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiang-dong; LUO Chong-tai

    2008-01-01

    Tantalum thin films with different thicknesses varying from 50 nm to 600 nm were deposited on Si substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering as functions of deposition temperature(Ts) and bias voltage(Ub). Surface roughness and its dynamic evolution behavior were quantitatively investigated by using atomic force microscopy(AFM). With increasing Ts from 300 K to 600 K, surface roughness Rrms and dynamic exponent β decreases gradually. With the increase of Ub from 0 V to -150 V, Rrms and β first decrease and then increase. The dependence of Ts and Ub on the film surface evolution has been discussed in terms of surface diffusion, mound growth, and ion impinging effect.

  12. Atomic-layer electroless deposition: a scalable approach to surface-modified metal powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappillino, Patrick J; Sugar, Joshua D; El Gabaly, Farid; Cai, Trevor Y; Liu, Zhi; Stickney, John L; Robinson, David B

    2014-04-29

    Palladium has a number of important applications in energy and catalysis in which there is evidence that surface modification leads to enhanced properties. A strategy for preparing such materials is needed that combines the properties of (i) scalability (especially on high-surface-area substrates, e.g. powders); (ii) uniform deposition, even on substrates with complex, three-dimensional features; and (iii) low-temperature processing conditions that preserve nanopores and other nanostructures. Presented herein is a method that exhibits these properties and makes use of benign reagents without the use of specialized equipment. By exposing Pd powder to dilute hydrogen in nitrogen gas, sacrificial surface PdH is formed along with a controlled amount of dilute interstitial hydride. The lattice expansion that occurs in Pd under higher H2 partial pressures is avoided. Once the flow of reagent gas is terminated, addition of metal salts facilitates controlled, electroless deposition of an overlayer of subnanometer thickness. This process can be cycled to create thicker layers. The approach is carried out under ambient processing conditions, which is an advantage over some forms of atomic layer deposition. The hydride-mediated reaction is electroless in that it has no need for connection to an external source of electrical current and is thus amenable to deposition on high-surface-area substrates having rich, nanoscale topography as well as on insulator-supported catalyst particles. STEM-EDS measurements show that conformal Rh and Pt surface layers can be formed on Pd powder with this method. A growth model based on energy-resolved XPS depth profiling of Rh-modified Pd powder is in general agreement. After two cycles, deposits are consistent with 70-80% coverage and a surface layer with a thickness from 4 to 8 Å.

  13. Metallization of bacterial surface layer by cross-beam pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompe, Wolfgang; Mertig, Michael; Kirsch, Remo; Gorbunov, Andre A.; Sewing, Andreas; Engelhardt, Harald; Mensch, Axel

    1996-04-01

    We present first results on thin film metal deposition on the regular bacterial surface layer of Sporsarcina urea by pulsed laser deposition. To prevent structural damage of the biological specimen a recently developed cross beam technique is applied providing an effective filtering of the most energetic plasma particles. The deposited films are examined by low voltage scanning electron microscopy. The surface profile of the S-layer adsorbed onto mica substrate was investigated by atomic force microscopy. A lattice constant of 13.2 nm has been measured. The lattice parameters and the structural appearance of the protein layer is in reasonable agreement with the results of an electron microscopical 3D structural analysis.

  14. Electronic structure and chemical reaction of Ca deposition on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; GUO YuXian; FENG XueFei; ZHANG Liang; ZHANG WenHua; ZHU JunFa

    2009-01-01

    Conjugated polymer, regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rr-P3HT), films were prepared by spin-coating the rr-P3HT chloroform solution onto clean silicon wafer surfaces. The chemical re-action and electronic structure of Ca deposition on rr-P3HT surfaces were in situ investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES) and X-ray photoemission spectros-copy (XPS). Upon Ca deposition, Ca-induced band bending of rr-P3HT is observed. In addition, Ca atoms preferentially react with S atoms of rr-P3HT. No obvious reaction between Ca and C atoms can be found. Through the investigation of the evolution of valence band spectra and secondary electron cut-off of rr-P3HT during the process of Ca deposition, an energy level alignment diagram at the Ca/rr-P3HT interface is derived.

  15. Comparison of deposited surface area of airborne ultrafine particles generated from two welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Albuquerque, P C; Miranda, Rosa M; Santos, Telmo G; Vieira, M T

    2012-09-01

    This article describes work performed on the assessment of the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in two welding processes metal-active gas (MAG) of carbon steel and friction-stir welding (FSW) of aluminium in terms of deposited area in alveolar tract of the lung using a nanoparticle surface area monitor analyser. The obtained results showed the dependence from process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and clearly demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles, when compared with background levels. The obtained results showed that the process that results on the lower levels of alveolar-deposited surface area is FSW, unlike MAG. Nevertheless, all the tested processes resulted in important doses of ultrafine particles that are to be deposited in the human lung of exposed workers.

  16. Surface hydrophobic modification of cellulose membranes by plasma-assisted deposition of hydrocarbon films

    OpenAIRE

    Mudtorlep Nisoa; Pikul Wanichapichart

    2010-01-01

    Surface modification by plasma polymerization is an efficient method to change the surface properties of a membrane. Desirable functionality such as hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity can be obtained, depending on plasma chemistry of gas precursors and discharge conditions. In this work, RF magnetron plasma is produced using acetylene and nitrogen as precursor gases. Variations of RF power, particle flux, deposited time and pressure of the precursor gases have been made to observe coating effec...

  17. Sb Surface Modification of Pd by Mimetic Underpotential Deposition for Formic Acid Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Long-Long Wang; Xiao-Lu Cao; Ya-Jun Wang; Qiao-Xia Li

    2015-01-01

    The newly proposed mimetic underpotential deposition (MUPD) technique was extended to modify Pd surfaces with Sb through immersing a Pd film electrode or dispersing Pd/C powder in a Sb(III)-containing solution blended with ascorbic acid (AA). The introduction of AA shifts down the open circuit potential of Pd substrate available to achieve suitable Sb modification. The electrocatalytic activity and long-term stability towards HCOOH electrooxidation of the Sb modified Pd surfaces (film elect...

  18. Spontaneous magnetization of aluminum nanowires deposited on the NaCl(100) surface

    OpenAIRE

    Ayuela, A.; Räbiger, H.; Puska, M. J.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate electronic structures of Al quantum wires, both unsupported and supported on the (100) NaCl surface, using the density-functional theory. We confirm that unsupported nanowires, constrained to be linear, show magnetization when elongated beyond the equilibrium length. Allowing ions to relax, the wires deform to zig-zag structures with lower magnetization but no dimerization occurs. When an Al wire is deposited on the NaCl surface, a zig-zag geometry emerges again. The magnetizat...

  19. Aerosol-assisted plasma deposition of hydrophobic polycations makes surfaces highly antimicrobial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Harris; Kim, Yoojeong; Mello, Kerrianne; Lovaasen, John; Shah, Apoorva; Rice, Norman; Yim, Jacqueline H; Pappas, Daphne; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2014-02-01

    The currently used multistep chemical synthesis for making surfaces antimicrobial by attaching to them hydrophobic polycations is replaced herein by an aerosol-assisted plasma deposition procedure. To this end, N,N-hexyl,methyl-PEI (HMPEI) is directly plasma-coated onto a glass surface. The resultant immobilized HMPEI coating has been thoroughly characterized and shown to be robust, bactericidal against Escherichia coli, and virucidal against human influenza virus.

  20. Use of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane deposited from aqueous solution for surface modification of III-V materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr Jr, Daniel B., E-mail: daniel.knorr.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005, United States of America (United States); Williams, Kristen S. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005, United States of America (United States); Baril, Neil F. [U.S. Army, RDECOM, CERDEC, NVSED, Ft. Belvoir, VA 22060, United States of America (United States); Weiland, Conan [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, United States of America (United States); Andzelm, Jan W. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005, United States of America (United States); Lenhart, Joseph L., E-mail: joseph.l.lenhart.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005, United States of America (United States); Woicik, Joseph C.; Fischer, Daniel A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, United States of America (United States); Tidrow, Meimei Z.; Bandara, Sumith V. [U.S. Army, RDECOM, CERDEC, NVSED, Ft. Belvoir, VA 22060, United States of America (United States); Henry, Nathan C. [U.S. Army, RDECOM, CERDEC, NVSED, Ft. Belvoir, VA 22060, United States of America (United States); Corbin Company, Alexandria, VA 22314, United States of America (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • HCl and citric acid showed excellent oxide removal on III/V surfaces. • Aminosilane (APTES) passivation coatings were deposited at 1–20 nm on InAs and GaSb. • These coatings showed high ionic nitrogen levels near the interface via XPS. • DFT was used to find adsorption energies of APTES with and without -OH groups. • DFT modeling showed APTES–NH{sub 3}{sup +} hydrogen abstraction to form surface -OH groups. - Abstract: Focal plane arrays of strained layer superlattices (SLSs) composed of InAs/GaSb are excellent candidates for infrared imaging, but one key factor limiting their utility is the lack of a surface passivation technique capable of protecting the mesa sidewall from degradation. Along these lines, we demonstrate the use of aqueous 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) deposited as a surface functionalizing agent for subsequent polymer passivation on InAs and GaSb surfaces following a HCl/citric acid procedure to remove the conductive oxide In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Using atomic force microscopy, variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and modeling with density functional theory (DFT), we demonstrate that APTES films can successfully be deposited on III-V substrates by spin coating and directly compare these films to those deposited on silicon substrates. The HCl/citric acid surface preparation treatment is particularly effective at removing In{sub 2}O{sub 3} without the surface segregation of In oxides observed from use of HCl alone. However, HCl/citric acid surface treatment method does result in heavy oxidation of both Ga and Sb, accompanied by segregation of Ga oxide to the surface. Deposited APTES layer thickness did not depend on the substrate choice, and thicknesses between 1 and 20 nm were obtained for APTES solution concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 vol %. XPS results for the N1s band of APTES showed that

  1. Modelling land surface fluxes of CO2 in response to climate change and nitrogen deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Ambelas Skjøth, Carsten; Geels, Camilla

    Climate change, land use variations, and impacts of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition represent uncertainties for the prediction of future greenhouse gas exchange between land surfaces and the atmosphere as the mechanisms describing nutritional effects are not well developed in climate...... climate feedback mechanisms of CO2 between changes in management, land use practise, and climate change....

  2. Crystalline inverted membranes grown on surfaces by electrospray ion beam deposition in vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, Stephan; Rinke, Gordon; Malinowski, Nikola; Weitz, R Thomas; Dinnebier, Robert; Thontasen, Nicha; Deng, Zhitao; Lutz, Theresa; de Almeida Rollo, Pedro Martins; Costantini, Giovanni; Harnau, Ludger; Kern, Klaus

    2012-05-22

    Crystalline inverted membranes of the nonvolatile surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate are found on solid surfaces after electrospray ion beam deposition (ES-IBD) of large SDS clusters in vacuum. This demonstrates the equivalence of ES-IBD to conventional molecular beam epitaxy.

  3. Symmetry Control of Polymer Colloidal Monolayers and Crystals by Electrophoretic Deposition on Patterned Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziomkina, Nina V.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal crystals with body-centered cubic packing (see Figure) can be fabricated by electrophoretic deposition of charged latex particles onto patterned surfaces. Laser-interference lithography produces SiO2 layers patterned with controlled symmetry that can then be used to control the orientation

  4. Combining Theory and Experiment to Characterize the Atomic Structures of Surface-Deposited Au309 Clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curley, B.C.; Johnston, R.L.; Young, N.P.; Li, Z.; Di Vece, M.; Palmer, R.E.; Bleloch, A.l.

    2007-01-01

    Gold clusters with icosahedral, decahedral, and cuboctahedral shell structures, have been studied using the Gupta many-body potential, to aid in the structural characterization of surface-deposited Au309 clusters using high-angle annular dark field-scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-ST

  5. Crack resistance of pvd coatings : Influence of surface treatment prior to deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoestbergen, E; De Hosson, JTM

    2002-01-01

    The crack resistance of three different PVD coatings, TiN, Ti(C,N), and a multilayer system of alternating TiN and TiAlN, have been investigated. The three coating systems were deposited onto substrates with a different surface roughness to study the influence of this pretreatment on the crack resis

  6. Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yoonyoung; Desta, Yohannes; Goettert, Jost; Lee, G. S.; Ajmera, P. K.

    2005-07-01

    Surface modification of silicon-containing fluorocarbon (SiCF) films achieved by wet chemical treatments and through x-ray irradiation is examined. The SiCF films were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using gas precursors of tetrafluoromethane and disilane. As-deposited SiCF film composition was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Surface modification of SiCF films utilizing n-lithiodiaminoethane wet chemical treatment is discussed. Sessile water-drop contact angle changed from 95°+/-2° before treatment to 32°+/-2° after treatment, indicating a change in the film surface characteristics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. For x-ray irradiation on the SiCF film with a dose of 27.4 kJ/cm3, the contact angle of the sessile water drop changed from 95°+/-2° before radiation to 39°+/-3° after x-ray exposure. The effect of x-ray exposure on chemical bond structure of SiCF films is studied using Fourier transform infrared measurements. Electroless Cu deposition was performed to test the applicability of the surface modified films. The x-ray irradiation method offers a unique advantage in making possible surface modification in a localized area of high-aspect-ratio microstructures. Fabrication of a Ti-membrane x-ray mask is introduced here for selective surface modification using x-ray irradiation.

  7. Preparation and frictional investigation of the two-components silanes deposited on alumina surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kośla, K.; Grobelny, J.; Cichomski, M., E-mail: mcichom@uni.lodz.pl

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The two-component silane films on the alumina surface were obtained by a combination of soft lithography and vapor phase deposition method. • The effectiveness of modification procedure was monitored by AFM topography images. • By using gas phase deposition method succeeded in obtaining a good reproduction of pattern. • Silane films with low surface free energy and coefficient of friction values were obtained. • The frictional performance in milli-Newton load range of one- and two-component films was investigated by microtribometry. - Abstract: Functionalization and pattering technique that permits two-component pattern-specific modification of alumina surface with silanes molecules are reported. The method relies on a two-component molecular system that simultaneously decreases coefficient of friction of the alumina surface and provides uniform chemical functionality suitable for further elaboration. Pattern/two-component modification is achieved via gas-phase deposition of the silanes using polydimethylsiloxane stamp. The frictional behaviors of the two-component films of the silane molecules with different chain length covalently absorbed on alumina surfaces, were characterized by the ball-disk (microtribometer) tester. The surfaces of the substrate modified by two-component molecular films were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The measured tribological results showed that the mixing of the fluoroalkylsilane and alkylsilane enhance the lubrication and decrease the friction compared to the one-component thin films.

  8. Complex interaction of subsequent surface streamers via deposited charge: a high-resolution experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoder, T.; Synek, P.; Chorvát, D.; Ráhel', J.; Brandenburg, R.; Černák, M.

    2017-07-01

    The coplanar barrier discharge in synthetic air at 30 kPa pressure was studied by time-correlated single photon counting enhanced optical emission spectroscopy, far-field microscopy enhanced intensified CCD camera and sensitive current measurements. The discharge operated in a regime where two subsequent microdischarges appeared within the same voltage half-period. The electrical analysis of the barrier discharge setup enabled us to quantify charge transfer and the effective electric field development. During the second microdischarge the positive surface streamers follow the interface (triple-line) between the area of deposited charge from the previous one and the area of uncharged dielectric surface. It is shown that additional branching and flashes of surface streamers are responsible for the increased spatial complexity of the deposited surface charges at high overvoltage. A suppressed streamer propagating over the area of deposited surface charge was tracked and the evidence of surface streamer reconnection is presented. A spatiotemporal distribution (resolution of 120 ps and 100 μm) of the reduced electric field strength was obtained for both microdischarges from the recorded luminosities of the molecular nitrogen. The reduced electric field of positive streamers in the first microdischarge reached 1200 Td. For the second one, the electric field values for the streamer at the triple-line are slightly lower than that, while for the suppressed streamers are even higher.

  9. Dependence of the deposition conditions on ZnO surface morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moenkemoeller, Viola; Luekermann, Florian; Sacher, Marc; Brechling, Armin; Heinzmann, Ulrich [Molecular and Surface Physics, Bielefeld University (Germany); Kurz, Henning; Hamelmann, Frank; Stiebig, Helmut [Malibu GmbH, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Boron doped ZnO films deposited by Low Pressure Chemical Vapour Deposition are used as transparent conductive oxide (TCO) for thin film solar cells. The films show an interesting surface morphology composed of pyramidal grains, which are formed due to a pronounced orientation of the [11 anti 20] crystallographic axis perpendicular to the surface. We performed AFM measurements on ZnO films to investigate the change in surface morphology with respect to the depostion conditions such as deposition time, temperature and the boron doping concentration. We found that the thicker the films, the larger the pyramids and in contrast the higher the boron doping, the smaller the pyramids. For a varied depostion temperature we observed a change in crystallographic orientation by XRD measurements around 160 C from a pronounced [0002] to a [11 anti 20] axis growth. This change was also detected by AFM measurements due to a drastic change in surface morphology. Films below 160 C show a nearly flat surface whereas films above that temperature show a rough surface of pyramidal structures.

  10. Amyloid-β deposition and regional grey matter atrophy rates in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarro, Lidia; Senjem, Matthew L; Lundt, Emily S; Przybelski, Scott A; Lesnick, Timothy G; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F; Lowe, Val J; Ferman, Tanis J; Knopman, David S; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Kantarci, Kejal

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease pathology frequently coexists with Lewy body disease at autopsy in patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies. More than half of patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies have high amyloid-β deposition as measured with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B binding on positron emission tomography. Biomarkers of amyloid-β deposition precede neurodegeneration on magnetic resonance imaging during the progression of Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about how amyloid-β deposition relates to longitudinal progression of atrophy in patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies. We investigated the associations between baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B binding on positron emission tomography and the longitudinal rates of grey matter atrophy in a cohort of clinically diagnosed patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 20), who were consecutively recruited to the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Centre. All patients underwent (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examinations at baseline. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging was performed after a mean (standard deviation) interval of 2.5 (1.1) years. Regional grey matter loss was determined on three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with the tensor-based morphometry-symmetric normalization technique. Linear regression was performed between baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B standard unit value ratio and longitudinal change in regional grey matter volumes from an in-house modified atlas. We identified significant associations between greater baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B standard unit value ratio and greater grey matter loss over time in the posterior cingulate gyrus, lateral and medial temporal lobe, and occipital lobe as well as caudate and putamen nuclei, after adjusting for age (P < 0.05). Greater baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B standard unit value ratio was also associated with greater

  11. Surface roughness analysis after machining of direct laser deposited tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Chwalczuk, T.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental surface roughness analysis in machining of tungsten carbide is presented. The tungsten carbide was received using direct laser deposition technology (DLD). Experiments carried out included milling of tungsten carbide samples using monolithic torus cubic boron nitride (CBN) tool and grinding with the diamond cup wheel. The effect of machining method on the generated surface topography was analysed. The 3D surface topographies were measured using optical surface profiler. The research revealed, that surface roughness generated after the machining of tungsten carbide is affected by feed per tooth (fz) value related to kinematic-geometric projection only in a minor extent. The main factor affecting machined surface roughness is the occurrence of micro grooves and protuberances on the machined surface, as well as other phenomena connected, inter alia, with the mechanism for material removal.

  12. Dry Deposition, Surface Production and Dynamics of Aerosols in the Marine Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fairall, C.W.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    1984-01-01

    A model of downward aerosol panicle flux characterized by dry deposition velocity, Vd, due to Slinn and Slinn (1980) is generalized to the case of nonzero surface concentration (absorbing surface with a surface source). A more general expression for the flux at some reference height is developed...... which includes Vd and an effective surface source strength, Si, which is a function of the true surface source strength, Si, and the particle transport properties below the reference height. The general expression for the surface flux is incorporated into a dynamic mixed layer model of the type...... developed by Davidson et al. (1983). This three layer model (diffusion sublayer, turbulent surface layer and mixed layer) is applied to an open ocean marine regime where boundary layer advection is ignored. The aerosol concentration in the boundary layer is considered to consist of sea salt particles...

  13. Plasma-enhanced deposition of antifouling layers on silicone rubber surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongquan

    In food processing and medical environments, biofilms serve as potential sources of contamination, and lead to food spoilage, transmission of diseases or infections. Because of its ubiquitous and recalcitrant nature, Listeria monocytogenes biofilm is especially hard to control. Generating antimicrobial surfaces provide a method to control the bacterial attachment. The difficulty of silver deposition on polymeric surfaces has been overcome by using a unique two-step plasma-mediated method. First silicone rubber surfaces were plasma-functionalized to generate aldehyde groups. Then thin silver layers were deposited onto the functionalized surfaces according to Tollen's reaction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that silver particles were deposited. By exposing the silver coated surfaces to L. monocytogenes, it was demonstrated that they were bactericidal to L. monocytogenes. No viable bacteria were detected after 12 to 18 h on silver-coated silicone rubber surfaces. Another antifouling approach is to generate polyethylene glycol (PEG) thin layer instead of silver on polymer surfaces. Covalent bond of PEG structures of various molecular weights to cold-plasma-functionalized polymer surfaces, such as silicone rubber, opens up a novel way for the generation of PEG brush-like or PEG branch-like anti-fouling layers. In this study, plasma-generated surface free radicals can react efficiently with dichlorosilane right after plasma treatment. With the generation of halo-silane groups, this enables PEG molecules to be grafted onto the modified surfaces. XPS data clearly demonstrated the presence of PEG molecules on plasma-functionalized silicone rubber surfaces. AFM images showed the changed surface morphologies as a result of covalent attachment to the surface of PEG molecules. Biofilm experiment results suggest that the PEG brush-like films have the potential ability to be the next

  14. Deposit interest rate ceilings as credit supply shifters: bank level evidence on the effects of Regulation Q

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Christoffer

    2014-01-01

    Shocks emanating from and propagating through the banking system have recently gained interest in the macroeconomics literature, yet they are not a feature unique to the 2008/09 financial crisis. Banking disintermediation shocks occured frequently during the Great Inflation era due to fixed deposit rate ceilings. I estimate the effect of deposit rate ceilings inscribed in Regulation Q on the transmission of federal funds rate changes to bank level credit growth using a historic bank level dat...

  15. Advances in Laser Surface Engineering : Tackling the Cracking Problem in Laser-Deposited Ni-Cr-B-Si-C Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmati, I.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    Laser-deposition technologies are being increasingly used for surface modification and three-dimensional manufacturing applications. The biggest technical obstacle to a wider usage of these technologies especially for deposition of hard alloys is cracking of the deposited samples. In this work, the

  16. Advances in Laser Surface Engineering : Tackling the Cracking Problem in Laser-Deposited Ni-Cr-B-Si-C Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmati, I.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-deposition technologies are being increasingly used for surface modification and three-dimensional manufacturing applications. The biggest technical obstacle to a wider usage of these technologies especially for deposition of hard alloys is cracking of the deposited samples. In this work, the

  17. Computational study of platinum nanoparticle deposition on the surfaces of crevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, H.F., E-mail: guhaifeng@hrbeu.edu.cn [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 150001 Harbin (China); Niceno, B. [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Grundler, P.V. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sharabi, M. [Laboratory for Thermal-Hydraulics, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt); Veleva, L. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hot Laboratory Division, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ritter, S. [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Nano-particle deposition on the surface of crevices is studied using RANS simulation. • Model results are validated by comparing with experimental data. • Behaviours and mechanisms of particle deposition in different crevices are analyzed. • RANS models with Lagrangian particle tracking method are evaluated and discussed. - Abstract: A well-known issue in boiling water reactors (BWR), which can threaten their structural integrity, is stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of reactor internals and recirculation pipes due to the accumulation of oxidizing radiolysis products of water. Currently, many operators of BWRs use combined platinum particle and hydrogen injection into the reactor water to mitigate SCC by lowering the electrochemical corrosion potential. It is essential for efficient mitigation that Pt particles reach all water-wetted surfaces, including crevices and cracks, which are also reached by the oxidizing species. In this study, a set of crevices with different widths and orientations with respect to the fluid flow are investigated using numerical simulation tools and compared against experimental findings. The Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes models are used to compute the mean turbulent flow quantities in three-dimensional crevices, and the discrete random walk model is used to evaluate the effect of velocity fluctuations on particle movement. The Lagrangian particle tracking analysis is performed and the average concentration of deposited particles on the surface of crevices is evaluated and compared with experimental results. The results show that Reynolds stress model combined with enhanced wall treatment provides a more accurate prediction of particle concentration and distribution on the surface of crevices than SST k–ω turbulence model, which was expected, owing to the anisotropic nature of the Reynolds stress model. Furthermore, analyses on the particle deposition shows that three different mechanisms play important roles in

  18. Deposition of SiOx on Metal Surface with a DBD Plasma Gun at Atmospheric Pressure for Corrosion Prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Erli; CHEN Qiang; ZHANG Yuefei; CHEN Fei; GE Yuanjing

    2007-01-01

    In this study,SiOx films were deposited by a dielectric barrier discharge(DBD)plasma gun at an atmospheric pressure.The relationship of the film structures with plasma powers Was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR),and scanning electron microscope(SEM).It was shown that an uniform and cross-linking structure film was formed by the DBD gun.As an application,the SiOx films were deposited on a carbon steel surface for the anti-corrosion purpose.The experiment was carried out in a 0.1 M NaC1 solution.It Was found that a very good anti-corrosive property was obtained,i.e.,the corrosion rate Was decreased c.a.15 times in 5% NaC1 solution compared to the non-SiOx coated steel,as detected by the potentiodynamic polarization measurement.

  19. Electrophoretic deposition of nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy implants with different surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojaee, Ramin; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-11-01

    Bio-absorbable magnesium (Mg) based alloys have been introduced as innovative orthopedic implants during recent years. It has been specified that rapid degradation of Mg based alloys in physiological environment should be restrained in order to be utilized in orthopedic trauma fixation and vascular intervention. In this developing field of healthcare materials, micro-arc oxidation (MAO), and MgF2 conversion coating were exploited as surface pre-treatment of AZ91 magnesium alloy to generate a nanostructured hydroxyapatite (n-HAp) coating via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to characterize the obtained powder and coatings. The potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens, and in vitro bioactivity evaluation were performed in simulated body fluid. Results revealed that the MAO/n-HAp coated AZ91 Mg alloy samples with a rough topography and lower corrosion current density leads to a lower Mg degradation rate accompanied by high bioactivity.

  20. Super-Eddington Stellar Winds Driven by Near-Surface Energy Deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Quataert, Eliot; Kasen, Daniel; Klion, Hannah; Paxton, Bill

    2015-01-01

    We develop analytic and numerical models of the properties of super-Eddington stellar winds, motivated by phases in stellar evolution when super-Eddington energy deposition (via, e.g., unstable fusion, wave heating, or a binary companion) heats a region near the stellar surface. This appears to occur in luminous blue variables (LBVs), Type IIn supernovae progenitors, classical novae, and X-ray bursts. We show that when the wind kinetic power exceeds Eddington, the photons are trapped and behave like a fluid. Convection does not play a significant role in the wind energy transport. The wind properties depend on the ratio of a characteristic speed in the problem vc ~ (Edot G)^{1/5} (where Edot is the heating rate) to the stellar escape speed near the heating region vesc(r_h). For vc > vesc(r_h) the wind kinetic power at large radii Edot_w ~ Edot. For vc < vesc(r_h), most of the energy is used to unbind the wind material and thus Edot_w < Edot. Multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations without radiation di...

  1. Electrophoretic deposition of nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy implants with different surface treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojaee, Ramin, E-mail: raminrojaee@aim.com [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, Mohammadhossein [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Raeissi, Keyvan [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Bio-absorbable magnesium (Mg) based alloys have been introduced as innovative orthopedic implants during recent years. It has been specified that rapid degradation of Mg based alloys in physiological environment should be restrained in order to be utilized in orthopedic trauma fixation and vascular intervention. In this developing field of healthcare materials, micro-arc oxidation (MAO), and MgF{sub 2} conversion coating were exploited as surface pre-treatment of AZ91 magnesium alloy to generate a nanostructured hydroxyapatite (n-HAp) coating via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to characterize the obtained powder and coatings. The potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens, and in vitro bioactivity evaluation were performed in simulated body fluid. Results revealed that the MAO/n-HAp coated AZ91 Mg alloy samples with a rough topography and lower corrosion current density leads to a lower Mg degradation rate accompanied by high bioactivity.

  2. Evaluating the rate of migration of an uranium deposition front within the Uitenhage Aquifer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vogel, JC

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available of Geochemical Exploration 66 (1999) 269?276 www.elsevier.com/locate/jgeoexp Evaluating the rate of migration of an uranium deposition front within the Uitenhage Aquifer J.C. Vogel a,A.S.Talmaa, T.H.E. Heaton b, J. Kronfeld c,* a Quaternary Dating Research Unit... to this will be a significant rise in the 234U=238U activity ratio as the 234U isotope se- lectively is injected from the accumulating U source into the water by alpha-recoil processes (Kigoshi, 1971; Kronfeld, 1974). Though reducing zones have been often encoun...

  3. Electrochemical Deposition of Niobium onto the Surface of Copper Using a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wixtroma, Alex I. [Christopher Newport U.; Buhlera, Jessica E. [Christopher Newport U.; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M. [Christopher Newport U.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride-based solutions can be used to replace acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. In this study niobium metal was successfully deposited on the surface of copper substrate via electrochemical deposition using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. The niobium metal used for deposition on the Cu had been dissolved in the solution from electrochemical polishing of a solid niobium piece prior to the deposition. The visible coating on the surface of the Cu was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing.

  4. Surface Passivation of ZrO2 Artificial Dentures by Magnetized Coaxial Plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Soya; Kurumi, Satoshi; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hara, Katsuya; Kato, Tatsuya; Asai, Tomohiko; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki; Nihon University Team

    2015-09-01

    Recent growth and fabrication technologies for functional materials have been greatly contributed to drastic development of oral surgery field. Zirconia based ceramics is expected to utilize artificial dentures because these ceramics have good biocompatibility, high hardness and aesthetic attractively. However, to apply these ceramics to artificial dentures, this denture is removed from a dental plate because of weakly bond. For improving this problem, synthesis an Al passivation-layer on the ceramics for bonding with these dental items is suitable. In order to deposit the passivation layer, we focused on a magnetized coaxial plasma deposition (MCPD). The greatest characteristic of MCPD is that high-melting point metal can be deposited on various substrates. Additionally, adhesion force between substrate and films deposited by the MCPD is superior to it of general deposition methods. In this study, we have reported on the growth techniques of Al films on ZrO2 for contributing to oral surgery by the MCPD. Surface of deposited films shows there were some droplets and thickness of it is about 200 nm. Thickness is increased to 500 nm with increasing applied voltage.

  5. Uniform-sized silicone oil microemulsions: preparation, investigation of stability and deposition on hair surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Habiba; Lv, Piping; Wang, Lianyan; Lian, Guoping; Zhu, Shiping; Ma, Guanghui

    2011-12-01

    Emulsions are commonly used in foods, pharmaceuticals and home-personal-care products. For emulsion based products, it is highly desirable to control the droplet size distribution to improve storage stability, appearance and in-use property. We report preparation of uniform-sized silicone oil microemulsions with different droplets diameters (1.4-40.0 μm) using SPG membrane emulsification technique. These microemulsions were then added into model shampoos and conditioners to investigate the effects of size, uniformity, and storage stability on silicone oil deposition on hair surface. We observed much improved storage stability of uniform-sized microemulsions when the droplets diameter was ≤22.7 μm. The uniform-sized microemulsion of 40.0 μm was less stable but still more stable than non-uniform sized microemulsions prepared by conventional homogenizer. The results clearly indicated that uniform-sized droplets enhanced the deposition of silicone oil on hair and deposition increased with decreasing droplet size. Hair switches washed with small uniform-sized droplets had lower values of coefficient of friction compared with those washed with larger uniform and non-uniform droplets. Moreover the addition of alginate thickener in the shampoos and conditioners further enhanced the deposition of silicone oil on hair. The good correlation between silicone oil droplets stability, deposition on hair and resultant friction of hair support that droplet size and uniformity are important factors for controlling the stability and deposition property of emulsion based products such as shampoo and conditioner.

  6. Enhancing of catalytic properties of vanadia via surface doping with phosphorus using atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strempel, Verena E.; Naumann d' Alnoncourt, Raoul, E-mail: r.naumann@bascat.tu-berlin.de [BasCat - UniCat BASF JointLab, Technische Universität Berlin, Sekr. EW K 01, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Löffler, Daniel [Process Research and Chemical Engineering, BASF SE, Carl-Bosch-Straße 38, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Kröhnert, Jutta; Skorupska, Katarzyna; Johnson, Benjamin [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Driess, Matthias [BasCat - UniCat BASF JointLab, Technische Universität Berlin, Sekr. EW K 01, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin, Germany and Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Chemie, Sekr. C2, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Rosowski, Frank [BasCat - UniCat BASF JointLab, Technische Universität Berlin, Sekr. EW K 01, Hardenbergstraße 36, 10623 Berlin, Germany and Process Research and Chemical Engineering, BASF SE, Carl-Bosch-Straße 38, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Atomic layer deposition is mainly used to deposit thin films on flat substrates. Here, the authors deposit a submonolayer of phosphorus on V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in the form of catalyst powder. The goal is to prepare a model catalyst related to the vanadyl pyrophosphate catalyst (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} industrially used for the oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride. The oxidation state of vanadium in vanadyl pyrophosphate is 4+. In literature, it was shown that the surface of vanadyl pyrophosphate contains V{sup 5+} and is enriched in phosphorus under reaction conditions. On account of this, V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with the oxidation state of 5+ for vanadium partially covered with phosphorus can be regarded as a suitable model catalyst. The catalytic performance of the model catalyst prepared via atomic layer deposition was measured and compared to the performance of catalysts prepared via incipient wetness impregnation and the original V{sub 2}O{sub 5} substrate. It could be clearly shown that the dedicated deposition of phosphorus by atomic layer deposition enhances the catalytic performance of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} by suppression of total oxidation reactions, thereby increasing the selectivity to maleic anhydride.

  7. Rate and extent of aqueous perchlorate removal by iron surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Angela M; De Leon, Corinne H; Young, Thomas M

    2003-07-15

    The rate and extent of perchlorate reduction on several types of iron metal was studied in batch and column reactors. Mass balances performed on the batch experiments indicate that perchlorate is initially sorbed to the iron surface, followed by a reduction to chloride. Perchlorate removal was proportional to the iron dosage in the batch reactors, with up to 66% removal in 336 h in the highest dosage system (1.25 g mL(-1)). Surface-normalized reaction rates among three commercial sources of iron filings were similar for acid-washed samples. The most significant perchlorate removal occurred in solutions with slightly acidic or near-neutral initial pH values. Surface mediation of the reaction is supported by the absence of reduction in batch experiments with soluble Fe2+ and also by the similarity in specific reaction rate constants (kSA) determined for three different iron types. Elevated soluble chloride concentrations significantly inhibited perchlorate reduction, and lower removal rates were observed for iron samples with higher amounts of background chloride contamination. Perchlorate reduction was not observed on electrolytic sources of iron or on a mixed-phase oxide (Fe3O4), suggesting that the reactive iron phase is neither pure zerovalent iron nor the mixed oxide alone. A mixed valence iron hydr(oxide) coating or a sorbed Fe2+ surface complex represent the most likely sites for the reaction. The observed reaction rates are too slow for immediate use in remediation system design, but the findings may provide a basis for future development of cost-effective abiotic perchlorate removal techniques.

  8. Auger neutralization rates of multiply charged ions near metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeljkovic, N.N.; Janev, R.K.; Lazur, V.Y.

    1988-08-15

    Transition rates for the Auger neutralization processes of multiply charged ions on metal surfaces are calculated in closed analytical form. The core potential of a multiply charged ion is represented by a pseudopotential, which accounts for the electron screening effects and allows transition to the pure Coulomb case (fully stripped ions). The relative importance of various neutralization channels in slow-ion--surface collisions is discussed for the examples of He/sup 2+/+Mo(100) and C/sup 3+/+Mo(100) collisional systems.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition of metallic films on the surface of diamond particles for diamond saw blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Chao [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, Hubei 430074 (China); Luo Fei [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, HuBei 430074 (China); Long Hua [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Hu Shaoliu [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Li Bo [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wang Youqing [State Key Laboratory of Laser Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)]. E-mail: lchwan@hust.edu.cn

    2005-06-15

    Ti or Ni films have been deposited on the diamond particle surfaces by pulsed laser deposition. Compressive resistance of the uncoated and coated diamond particles was measured, respectively, in the experiments. The compressive resistance of the Ti-coated diamonds particles was found much higher than that of the uncoated ones. It increased by 39%. The surface morphology is observed by the metallography microscope. The surface of the uncoated diamonds particles had many hollows and flaws, while the surface of Ni-coated diamond particles was flat and smooth, and the surface of Ti-coated diamond particles had some metal masses that stood out of the surface of the Ti-coated film. The components of the metallic films of diamond particles were examined by X-ray diffractometry (XRD). TiC was found formed on the Ti-coated diamond surface, which resulted in increased surface bonding strength between the diamond particles and the Ti films. Meanwhile, TiC also favored improving the bonding strength between the coated diamond particles and the binding materials. Moreover, the bending resistance of the diamond saw blade made of Ti-coated diamond was drastically higher than that of other diamond saw blades, which also played an important role in improving the blade's cutting ability and lifetime. Therefore, it was most appropriate that the diamond saw blade was made of Ti-coated diamond particles rather than other materials.

  10. Experimental investigation on the energy deposition and expansion rate under the electrical explosion of aluminum wire in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Shi, Yuanjie; Wu, Jian; Han, Ruoyu [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-12-28

    Experimental investigations on the electrical explosion of aluminum wire using negative polarity current in vacuum are presented. Current pulses with rise rates of 40 A/ns, 80 A/ns, and 120 A/ns are generated for investigating the influence of current rise rate on energy deposition. Experimental results show a significant increase of energy deposition into the wire before the voltage breakdown with the increase of current rise rate. The influence of wire dimension on energy deposition is investigated as well. Decreasing the wire length allows more energy to be deposited into the wire. The energy deposition of a 0.5 cm-long wire explosion is ∼2.5 times higher than the energy deposition of a 2 cm-long wire explosion. The dependence of the energy deposition on wire diameter demonstrates a maximum energy deposition of 2.7 eV/atom with a diameter of ∼18 μm. Substantial increase in energy deposition is observed in the electrical explosion of aluminum wire with polyimide coating. A laser probe is applied to construct the shadowgraphy, schlieren, and interferometry diagnostics. The morphology and expansion trajectory of exploding products are analyzed based on the shadowgram. The interference phase shift is reconstructed from the interferogram. Parallel dual wires are exploded to estimate the expansion velocity of the plasma shell.

  11. Dense CdS thin films on fluorine-doped tin oxide coated glass by high-rate microreactor-assisted solution deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yu-Wei, E-mail: suyuweiwayne@gmail.com [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States); Ramprasad, Sudhir [Energy Processes and Materials Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Corvallis, OR 9730 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States); Han, Seung-Yeol; Wang, Wei [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States); Ryu, Si-Ok [School of Display and Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, 214-1 Dae-dong, Gyeonsan, Gyeongbuk 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Palo, Daniel R. [Barr Engineering Co., Hibbing, MN 55747 (United States); Paul, Brian K. [School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States); Chang, Chih-hung [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States); Microproducts Breakthrough Institute and Oregon Process Innovation Center, Corvallis, Oregon 97330 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Continuous microreactor-assisted solution deposition is demonstrated for the deposition of CdS thin films on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass. The continuous flow system consists of a microscale T-junction micromixer with the co-axial water circulation heat exchanger to control the reacting chemical flux and optimize the heterogeneous surface reaction. Dense, high quality nanocrystallite CdS thin films were deposited at an average rate of 25.2 nm/min, which is significantly higher than the reported growth rate from typical batch chemical bath deposition process. Focused-ion-beam was used for transmission electron microscopy specimen preparation to characterize the interfacial microstructure of CdS and FTO layers. The band gap was determined at 2.44 eV by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. X-ray photon spectroscopy shows the binding energies of Cd 3d{sub 3/2}, Cd 3d{sub 5/2}, S 2P{sub 3/2} and S 2P{sub 1/2} at 411.7 eV, 404.8 eV, 162.1 eV and 163.4 eV, respectively. - Highlights: ► CdS films deposited using continuous microreactor-assisted solution deposition (MASD) ► Dense nanocrystallite CdS films can be reached at a rate of 25.2 [nm/min]. ► MASD can approach higher film growth rate than conventional chemical bath deposition.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability in sedimentation rates associated with cutoff channel infill deposits: Ain River, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegay, H.; Hupp, C.R.; Citterio, A.; Dufour, S.; Moulin, B.; Walling, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Floodplain development is associated with lateral accretion along stable channel geometry. Along shifting rivers, the floodplain sedimentation is more complex because of changes in channel position but also cutoff channel presence, which exhibit specific overflow patterns. In this contribution, the spatial and temporal variability of sedimentation rates in cutoff channel infill deposits is related to channel changes of a shifting gravel bed river (Ain River, France). The sedimentation rates estimated from dendrogeomorphic analysis are compared between and within 14 cutoff channel infills. Detailed analyses along a single channel infill are performed to assess changes in the sedimentation rates through time by analyzing activity profiles of the fallout radionuclides 137Cs and unsupported 210Pb. Sedimentation rates are also compared within the channel infills with rates in other plots located in the adjacent floodplain. Sedimentation rates range between 0.65 and 2.4 cm a -1 over a period of 10 to 40 years. The data provide additional information on the role of distance from the bank, overbank flow frequency, and channel geometry in controlling the sedimentation rate. Channel infills, lower than adjacent floodplains, exhibit higher sedimentation rates and convey overbank sediment farther away within the floodplain. Additionally, channel degradation, aggradation, and bank erosion, which reduce or increase the distance between the main channel and the cutoff channel aquatic zone, affect local overbank flow magnitude and frequency and therefore sedimentation rates, thereby creating a complex mosaic of sedimentation zones within the floodplain and along the cutoff channel infills. Last, the dendrogeomorphic and 137Cs approaches are cross validated for estimating the sedimentation rate within a channel infill. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Posteruptive impacts of pyroclastic deposits from basaltic andesite stratovolcanoes on surface water composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genareau, K.; Cronin, S. J.; Stewart, C.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Donahoe, R.

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic ash deposition following explosive eruptions can pose significant hazards for water quality, human health, agriculture, and infrastructure functionality. Many studies have examined how fresh ash deposition may lower the pH of, and introduce a range of potentially toxic elements into, exposed surface waters. However, no study has yet determined the effects on water composition as a result of mechanical pyroclast disaggregation and production of new fresh particle surfaces and increasingly fine grained particles. Such disaggregation could result from natural posteruptive processes such as debris avalanches, lahars, or fluvial/aeolian transport and human activities such as cleanup efforts or mining of pyroclastic deposits. The posteruption time scales of pyroclast disaggregation may vary from months in moist tropical or temperate environments to years or decades in arid settings. Here we show, for the first time in experimental studies, that mechanical milling of pyroclasts will introduce a range of elements into exposed waters, including Al, which can be toxic at elevated levels, and Na, which increases the electrical conductivity of solutions. The pH of leaching solutions also increases by several log units. Such dramatic changes on the experimental scale may have implications for surface water composition in posteruptive settings, necessitating longer-term risk assessments for ecosystem health and consideration of the role of pyroclastic deposits in element cycling in volcanically active regions.

  14. Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Marc D; Vohra, Yogesh K [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2002-10-21

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60{+-}5 GPa averaged over three samples. (rapid communication)

  15. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc D.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2002-10-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60+/-5 GPa averaged over three samples.

  16. Verification of Methodology for Determination of Deposit Thickness on Heat Transfer Surface of Natural Gas Coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav PŘÍHODA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes briefly an original methodology for the determination of the deposit thickness on the inside heat transfer surface of natural gas cooler and a procedure of its verification at the cooler CH_R of the booster station KS01 in Velké Kapušany. The methodology is based on the measurement of the degree of the gas cooling. It has the universal validity and can be used to determine the thickness of the deposits of all types of coolers working on any booster station.

  17. Platelets interact with tissue factor immobilized on surfaces: effects of shear rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonda, R; Lopez-Vilchez, I; Navalon, F; Pino, M; Hernandez, M R; Escolar, G; Galan, A M

    2008-01-01

    While procoagulant activities of Tissue Factor (TF) have been widely investigated, its possible pro-adhesive properties towards platelets have not been studied in detail. We explored the interaction of platelets with human Tissue Factor (hTF) firmly adsorbed on a synthetic surface of polyvinilidene difluoride (PVDF) using different shear rates. For studies at 250 and 600 s(-1), TF firmly adsorbed was exposed to flowing anticoagulated blood in flat perfusion devices. Deposition of platelets and fibrin were evaluated by morphometric, immunocytochemical and ultrastructural methods. Prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) levels were also measured. Experiments at 5000 s(-1), were performed on the Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA-100) with experimental cartridges with collagen (COL) or collagen-hTF (COL + TF). Haemostatic effect of recombinant activated FVIIa (rFVIIa) was assessed in the same experimental settings. Platelet deposition on hTF reached 19.8 +/- 1.3% and 26.1 +/- 3.4% of the total surface, at 250 and 600 s(-1), respectively. Fibrin formation was significantly higher at 250 s(-1) than at 600 s(-1) (P hTF (154.09 +/- 14.69 s vs. 191.45 +/- 16.09 s COL alone; P hTF is an adhesive substrate for platelets and suggest that the von Willebrand factor could mediate these interactions. At low and intermediate shear rates, rFVIIa enhanced the procoagulant action of hTF, but this effect was not observed at very high shear rates.

  18. Effective surface modification by chemical solution deposition for flexible metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Bai, Yue-Ling; Wang, Jing; Fang, Jianhui; Fan, Feng; Liu, Zhiyong; Guo, Yanqun; Bai, Chuanyi; Cai, Chuanbing

    2017-03-01

    Solution deposition planarization (SDP) was used to modify the flexible metal substrates for high temperature superconductor (HTS) tapes to ensure an available and effective surface for subsequent growth of buffer films. The surface morphologies with different tape speeds and coating layers were systematically investigated. 16 layers SDP-films decreased the surface roughness (RMS) from 11.74 to 0.788 nm for Hastelloy C-276 and 12 layers SDP-films decreased the RMS from 20.93 to 0.903 nm for SUS 304. Follow-up study confirmed that the low value of RMS (coated conductor, which further reduced the cost of raw materials.

  19. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: The effect on the initial electroless copper deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubroeck, David; Mader, Lothar; De Geyter, Nathalie; Morent, Rino; Dubruel, Peter; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the influence of polydopamine and polyamine surface modifications of an etched epoxy cresol novolak (ECN) resin on the initial electroless copper deposition. Three different strategies to introduce polyamines on a surface in aqueous environment are applied: via polyethyleneimine adsorption (PEI), via polydopamine and via polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next, the influence of these surface modifications on the catalytic palladium activation is investigated through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Finally, the initial electroless copper deposition on modified epoxy surfaces is evaluated using SEM and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Grafted polyamines on polydopamine surface modifications result in a large increase of the initial deposited copper.

  20. Super-Hydrophobic Surface Prepared by Lanthanide Oxide Ceramic Deposition Through PS-PVD Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Cheng-Xin; Chen, Qing-Yu; Gao, Jiu-Tao; Wang, Jun; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-02-01

    Super-hydrophobic surface has received widespread attention in recent years. Both the surface morphology and chemical composition have significant impact on hydrophobic performance. A novel super-hydrophobic surface based on plasma spray-vapor deposition was introduced in the present paper. Samaria-doped ceria, which has been proved as an intrinsic hydrophobic material, was used as feedstock material. Additionally, in order to investigate the influence of surface free energy on the hydrophobicity, chemical modification by low surface free energy materials including stearic acid and 1,1,2,2-tetrahydroperfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (FAS) was used on coating surface. Scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were employed to characterize the coating surface. The results show that the obtained surface has a hierarchical structure composed by island-like structures agglomerated with angular-like sub-micrometer-sized particles. Moreover, with the surface free energy decreases, the hydrophobic property of the surface improves gradually. The water contact angle of the as-sprayed coating surface increases from 110° to 148° after modification by stearic acid and up to 154° by FAS. Furthermore, the resultant surface with super-hydrophobicity exhibits an excellent stability.

  1. Effect of lactic acid on nucleation morphology and surface roughness of electroless Ni–P deposition in nanoscale

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Babanejhad; M Hashemi; Y Rahmatallahpur; Sh A Nozad

    2012-08-01

    The present work aims to study effect of lactic acid concentration as complexing agent on surface roughness and nucleation morphology of electroless N–P deposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been used to study nucleation morphology and surface roughness of deposition. Deposition process started at some initial priority growing centres independently distributed on the substrate. We found that the morphology and surface roughness of deposition strongly depends on the complexing agent concentration. Morphology of initial deposited centres with no concentration of lactic acid was in coniform structure. By increasing the complexing agent concentration, the structure of initial growing centres changed from coniform to nodular shape and the surface roughness of depositions decreased.

  2. Deposition of Ultrathin Nano-Hydroxyapatite Films on Laser Micro-Textured Titanium Surfaces to Prepare a Multiscale Surface Topography for Improved Surface Wettability/Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Surmeneva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this study was to analyse the correlation between topographical features and chemical composition with the changes in wettability and the surface free energy of microstructured titanium (Ti surfaces. Periodic microscale structures on the surface of Ti substrates were fabricated via direct laser interference patterning (DLIP. Radio-frequency magnetron sputter deposition of ultrathin nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HA films was used to form an additional nanoscale grain morphology on the microscale-structured Ti surfaces to generate multiscale surface structures. The surface characteristics were evaluated using atomic force microscopy and contact angle and surface free energy measurements. The structure and phase composition of the HA films were investigated using X-ray diffraction. The HA-coated periodic microscale structured Ti substrates exhibited a significantly lower water contact angle and a larger surface free energy compared with the uncoated Ti substrates. Control over the wettability and surface free energy was achieved using Ti substrates structured via the DLIP technique followed by the deposition of a nanostructured HA coating, which resulted in the changes in surface chemistry and the formation of multiscale surface topography on the nano- and microscale.

  3. Dropwise condensation rate of water breath figures on polymer surfaces having similar surface free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yildirim

    2012-10-01

    This study investigates the effect of surface roughness, wettability, water contact angle hysteresis (CAH) and wetting hysteresis (WH) of polymeric substrates to the water drop condensation rate. We used five polyolefin coatings whose surface free energies were in a close range of 30-37 mJ/m2 but having different surface roughness and CAH. The formation of water breath figures was monitored at a temperature just below the dew point. The initial number of the condensed droplets per unit area (N0) and droplet surface coverage were determined during the early stage of drop condensation where the droplet coalescence was negligible. It was found that the mean drop diameter of condensed droplets on these polymer surfaces grow according to a power law with exponent 1/3 of time, similar to the previous reports given in the literature. It was determined that surface roughness and corresponding CAH and WH properties of polymers have important effects on the number of nucleation sites and growth rate of the condensed water droplets. N0 values and the surface coverage increased with the increase in surface roughness, CAH and WH of the polymer surfaces. The total condensed water drop volume also increased with the increase in surface roughness in accordance with the increase of the number of nucleated droplets.

  4. Toward understanding the rates of reactions at mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, W.H. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Land, Air and Water Resources and Dept. of Geology; Ludwig, C. [EAWAG, Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technolgy, Dubendorf (Switzerland). Dept. of Resources and Waste management; Holmen, B. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Land, Air and Water Resources

    1998-12-31

    Environmental geo chemists are commonly called upon to make predictions over long scales of time and distance. In many cases, these predictions involve disequilibrium reactions, such as the decomposition of ozone-depleting gases or the migration rates of groundwater contaminants. These groundwater contaminants interact with mineral surfaces in a complicated fashion that is not understood quantitatively. However, in a real sense, mineral dissolution studies are to the aqueous geo chemists what Escherichia coli are to microbiologists: an inexpensive model system to map out important kinetic relations that can then be extended qualitatively to other settings. This chapter explains that is enormously useful to draw analogies between reactions at mineral surfaces and at dissolved metal-ligand complexes. In this approach, the reactivities of bond between a metal and a water molecule or ligand in the inner-coordination-sphere of the dissolved complex are proxies for bonds between a metal and oxygen at the mineral surface, which cannot be studied directly.

  5. The minimum detection limits of RDX and TNT deposited on various surfaces as determined by ion mobility spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodacy, P.

    1993-08-01

    An Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) was used to determine the detection limits of RDX and TNT on six different substrates. The preparation of the explosive deposits on the surfaces is examined as well as effects due to the size, uniformity, method of application, and time that a deposit has been on a surface. Sampling methods are discussed along with effects of the surface topology. The transfer of explosives from a hand to a surface, and methods to reduce the detection limits are presented.

  6. Deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of in vitro thrombi prevents platelet adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owaynat, Hadil; Yermolenko, Ivan S; Turaga, Ramya; Lishko, Valeryi K; Sheller, Michael R; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2015-12-01

    The initial accumulation of platelets after vessel injury is followed by thrombin-mediated generation of fibrin which is deposited around the plug. While numerous in vitro studies have shown that fibrin is highly adhesive for platelets, the surface of experimental thrombi in vivo contains very few platelets suggesting the existence of natural anti-adhesive mechanisms protecting stabilized thrombi from platelet accumulation and continuous thrombus propagation. We previously showed that adsorption of fibrinogen on pure fibrin clots results in the formation of a nonadhesive matrix, highlighting a possible role of this process in surface-mediated control of thrombus growth. However, the deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of blood clots has not been examined. In this study, we investigated the presence of intact fibrinogen on the surface of fibrin-rich thrombi generated from flowing blood and determined whether deposited fibrinogen is nonadhesive for platelets. Stabilized fibrin-rich thrombi were generated using a flow chamber and the time that platelets spend on the surface of thrombi was determined by video recording. The presence of fibrinogen and fibrin on the surface of thrombi was analyzed by confocal microscopy using specific antibodies. Examination of the spatial distribution of two proteins revealed the presence of intact fibrinogen on the surface of stabilized thrombi. By manipulating the surface of thrombi to display either fibrin or intact fibrinogen, we found that platelets adhere to fibrin- but not to fibrinogen-coated thrombi. These results indicate that the fibrinogen matrix assembled on the outer layer of stabilized in vitro thrombi protects them from platelet adhesion.

  7. Results from studies of surface deposits on the claddings of fuel rods used in RBMK-1000 reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, I. M.; Markov, D. V.

    2010-07-01

    The results of studies on analyzing the element composition of deposits on the cladding surfaces of fuel rods used in a fuel assembly at the Leningrad nuclear power station are presented. The distribution of elements in deposits over the fuel rod height is analyzed, and the zones of their concentration are revealed. It is shown that deposits of copper penetrating into cracks in the surface layer of zirconium oxide introduce an essential contribution in the development of nodular corrosion of fuel rod claddings.

  8. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme.

  9. Endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of closed-face cassettes during bioaerosol sampling: a field investigation at composting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquenne, Philippe; Simon, Xavier; Demange, Valérie; Harper, Martin; Wild, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    A set of 270 bioaerosol samples was taken from 15 composting facilities using polystyrene closed-face filter cassettes (CFCs). The objective was to measure the quantity of endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of the cassettes (sometimes referred to as 'wall deposits'). The results show that endotoxins are deposited on the inner surfaces of the CFCs through sampling and/or handling of samples. The quantity of endotoxins measured on inner surfaces range between 0.05 (the limit of detection of the method) and 3100 endotoxin units per cassette. The deposits can represent a large and variable percentage of the endotoxins sampled. More than a third of the samples presented a percentage of inner surface deposits >40% of the total quantity of endotoxins collected (filter + inner surfaces). Omitting these inner surface deposits in the analytical process lead to measurement errors relative to sampling all particles entering the CFC sampler, corresponding to a developing consensus on matching the inhalable particulate sampling convention. The result would be underestimated exposures and could affect the decision as to whether or not a result is acceptable in comparison to airborne concentration limits defined in terms of the inhalability convention. The results of this study suggest including the endotoxins deposited on the inner surfaces of CFCs during analysis. Further researches are necessary to investigate endotoxin deposits on the inner cassette surfaces in other working sectors.

  10. Diagnosis of gas phase near the substrate surface in diamond film deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuyuan Zhou; Guangchao Chen; Bin Li; Weizhong Tang; Fanxiu Lv

    2007-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to study the gas phase composition near the substrate surface during diamond deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (CVD). C2 radical was determined as the main carbon radical in this plasma atmosphere. The deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature, anode-substrate distance, methane concentration, and gas flow rate, were inspected to find out the influence on the gas phase. A strong dependence of the concentrations and distribution of radicals on substrate temperature was confirmed by the design of experiments (DOE). An explanation for this dependence could be that radicals near the substrate surface may have additional ionization or dissociation and also have recombination,or are consumed on the substrate surface where chemical reactions occur.

  11. Differential Deposition to Correct Surface Figure Deviations in Astronomical Grazing-Incidence X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2011-01-01

    A coating technique is being developed to correct the surface figure deviations in reflective-grazing-incidence X-ray optics. These optics are typically designed to have precise conic profiles, and any deviation in this profile, as a result of fabrication, results in a degradation of the imaging performance. To correct the mirror profiles, physical vapor deposition has been utilized to selectively deposit a filler material inside the mirror shell. The technique, termed differential deposition, has been implemented as a proof of concept on miniature X-ray optics developed at MSFC for medical-imaging applications. The technique is now being transferred to larger grazing-incidence optics suitable for astronomy and progress to date is reported.

  12. The fate of 5N-nitrate in mesocosms from five European peatlands differing in long-term nitrogen deposition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zając, K.; Blodau, C.

    2015-10-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition changes the retention, transformation, and fluxes of N in ombrotrophic peatlands. To evaluate such effects we applied a 15N tracer (NH415NO3) at a rate of 2.3 g N m-2 yr-1 to mesocosms of five European peatlands with differing long-term N deposition rates for a period of 76 days of dry and 90 days of wet conditions. We determined background N content and moss length growth, and recovered the 15N tracer from the mosses, graminoids, shrubs, the peat, and dissolved N. Background N contents in Sphagnum mosses increased from 5.5 (Degerö Stormyr, deposition mosses (down to 5 cm below surface) generally intercepted large amounts of 15N (0.2-0.35 mg g-1) and retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Similar quantities of the 15N were recovered from the peat, followed by shrubs, graminoids and the dissolved pool. At the most polluted sites we recovered more 15N from shrubs (up to 12.4 %) and from nitrate and ammonium (up to 0.7 %). However, no impact of N deposition on 15N retention by Sphagnum could be identified and their length growth was highest under high N background deposition. Our experiment suggests that the decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, is likely more modest than previously thought. This conclusion is related to the finding that Sphagnum species can apparently thrive at elevated long-term N deposition rates in European peatlands.

  13. The fate of 15N-nitrate in mesocosms from five European peatlands differing in long-term nitrogen deposition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zając, K.; Blodau, C.

    2016-02-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition changes the retention, transformation, and fluxes of N in ombrotrophic peatlands. To evaluate such effects we applied a 15N tracer (NH4 15NO3) at a rate of 2.3 g N m-2 yr-1 to mesocosms of five European peatlands with differing long-term N deposition rates for a period of 76 days of dry and 90 days of wet conditions. We determined background N content and moss length growth, and recovered the 15N tracer from the mosses, graminoids, shrubs, the peat, and dissolved N. Background N contents in Sphagnum mosses increased from 5.5 (Degerö Stormyr, deposition mosses (down to 5 cm below surface) generally intercepted large amounts of 15N (0.2-0.35 mg g-1) and retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Similar quantities of the 15N were recovered from the peat, followed by shrubs, graminoids, and the dissolved pool. At the most polluted sites we recovered more 15N from shrubs (up to 12.4 %) and from nitrate and ammonium (up to 0.7 %). However, no impact of N deposition on 15N retention by Sphagnum could be identified and their length growth was highest under high N background deposition. Our experiment suggests that the decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m-2 yr-1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, is likely more modest than previously thought. This conclusion is related to the finding that Sphagnum species can apparently thrive at elevated long-term N deposition rates in European peatlands.

  14. Spatial resolution in thin film deposition on silicon surfaces by combining silylation and UV/ozonolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Zaera, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    A simple procedure has been developed for the processing of silicon wafers in order to facilitate the spatially resolved growth of thin solid films on their surfaces. Specifically, a combination of silylation and UV/ozonolysis was tested as a way to control the concentration of the surface hydroxo groups required for subsequent atomic layer deposition (ALD) of metals or oxides. Water contact angle measurements were used to evaluate the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of the surface, a proxy for OH surface coverage, and to optimize the UV/ozonolysis treatment. Silylation with hexamethyldisilazane, trichloro(octadecyl)silane, or trimethylchlorosilane was found to be an efficient way to block the hydroxo sites and to passivate the underlying surface, and UV/O3 treatments were shown to effectively remove the silylation layer and to regain the surface reactivity. Both O3 and 185 nm UV radiation were determined necessary for the removal of the silylation layer, and additional 254 nm radiation was found to enhance the process. Attenuated total reflection-infrared absorption spectroscopy was employed to assess the success of the silylation and UV/O3 removal steps, and atomic force microscopy data provided evidence for the retention of the original smoothness of the surface. Selective growth of HfO2 films via TDMAHf + H2O ALD was seen only on the UV/O3 treated surfaces; total inhibition of the deposition was observed on the untreated silylated surfaces (as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry). Residual film growth was still detected on the latter if the ALD was carried out at high temperatures (250 °C), because the silylation layer deteriorates under such harsh conditions and forms surface defects that act as nucleation sites for the growth of oxide grains (as identified by electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). We believe that the silylation-UV/O3 procedure advanced here could be easily implemented for the patterning of surfaces

  15. Structural and electrical properties of an Au film system deposited on silicone oil surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Bo; Jin Jin Sheng; Ye Quan Lin; Lao Yan Feng; Jiao Zheng Kuan; Ye Gao Xiang

    2002-01-01

    An Au thin film system, deposited on silicone oil surfaces by the thermal deposition method, has been fabricated and its structure as well as electrical properties has been studied. A web-shaped characteristic surface morphology of the films is observed. The dc sheet resistance R of the metal films on the liquid surfaces is measured during and after deposition in situ by the four-probe method. The time dependence of the sheet resistance can be explained in terms of the film growth mechanism on the oil surface. The anomalous I-V characteristics of the film system can be interpreted as a competition among the local Joule heating, hopping and tunnelling effects. It is found that the dc third-harmonic coefficient B sub 0 and the zero-power resistance R sub 0 satisfy the power-law relation B sub 0 propor to R sub 0 sup 2 sup + sup w and the exponent w is close to zero. This result indicates that the hopping and tunnelling effects in the samples are much stronger than those of the other film systems. We also find I...

  16. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaubroeck, David, E-mail: David.Schaubroeck@elis.ugent.be [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Mader, Lothar [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium); Dubruel, Peter [Polymer Chemistry and Biomaterials Research Group, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S4 bis, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vanfleteren, Jan [Center for Microsystems Technology (CMST), IMEC and Ghent University, Technologiepark 914A, B-9052 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Surface modifications of epoxy resins with polydopamine and grafted polyamines can significantly increase the adhesion toward electroless deposited copper. • A clear characterization of the copper/epoxy interphase is provided by SEM analyses of cross sections. • Tailored conditions such as etching time (roughness) and electroless deposition temperature are needed to increase the adhesion of the modified surfaces. - Abstract: In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  17. The Measurement of Dry Deposition and Surface Runoff to Quantify Urban Road Pollution in Taipei, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Yang Lin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pollutants deposited on road surfaces and distributed in the environment are a source of nonpoint pollution. Field data are traditionally hard to collect from roads because of constant traffic. In this study, in cooperation with the traffic administration, the dry deposition on and road runoff from urban roads was measured in Taipei City and New Taipei City, Taiwan. The results showed that the dry deposition is 2.01–5.14 g/m2·day and 78–87% of these solids are in the 75–300 µm size range. The heavy metals in the dry deposited particles are mainly Fe, Zn, and Na, with average concentrations of 34,978, 1,519 and 1,502 ppm, respectively. Elevated express roads show the highest heavy metal concentrations. Not only the number of vehicles, but also the speed of the traffic should be considered as factors that influence road pollution, as high speeds may accelerate vehicle wear and deposit more heavy metals on road surfaces. In addition to dry deposition, the runoff and water quality was analyzed every five minutes during the first two hours of storm events to capture the properties of the first flush road runoff. The sample mean concentration (SMC from three roads demonstrated that the first flush runoff had a high pollution content, notably for suspended solid (SS, chemical oxygen demand (COD, oil and grease, Pb, and Zn. Regular sweeping and onsite water treatment facilities are suggested to minimize the pollution from urban roads.

  18. Deposition of copper from Cu(i) and Cu(ii) precursors onto HOPG surface: Role of surface defects and choice of a precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yichen; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2017-02-01

    The surface reactivity of two copper-containing precursors, (Cu(hfac)2 and Cu(hfac)VTMS, where hfac is hexafluoroacetyloacetonate and VTMS is vinyltrimethylsilane), was investigated by dosing the precursors onto a surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at room temperature. The behavior of these precursors on a pristine HOPG was compared to that on a surface activated by ion sputtering and subsequent oxidation to induce controlled surface defects. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to confirm copper deposition and its surface distribution, and to compare with the results of scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy investigations. As expected, surface defects promote copper deposition; however, the specific structures deposited depend on the deposition precursor. Density functional theory was used to mimic the reactions of each precursor molecule on this surface and to determine the origins of this different reactivity.

  19. High Growth Rate Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films and Devices Using ECR-PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium films (a-SiGe:H) and devices have been extensively studied because of the tunable band gap for matching the solar spectrum and mature the fabrication techniques. a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells have great potential for commercial manufacture because of very low cost and adaptability to large-scale manufacturing. Although it has been demonstrated that a-SiGe:H thin films and devices with good quality can be produced successfully, some issues regarding growth chemistry have remained yet unexplored, such as the hydrogen and inert-gas dilution, bombardment effect, and chemical annealing, to name a few. The alloying of the SiGe introduces above an order-of-magnitude higher defect density, which degrades the performance of the a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. This degradation becomes worse when high growth-rate deposition is required. Preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon, clustering of Ge and Si, and columnar structure and buried dihydride radicals make the film intolerably bad. The work presented here uses the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECR-PECVD) technique to fabricate a-SiGe:H films and devices with high growth rates. Helium gas, together with a small amount of H2, was used as the plasma species. Thickness, optical band gap, conductivity, Urbach energy, mobility-lifetime product, I-V curve, and quantum efficiency were characterized during the process of pursuing good materials. The microstructure of the a-(Si,Ge):H material was probed by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. They found that the advantages of using helium as the main plasma species are: (1) high growth rate--the energetic helium ions break the reactive gas more efficiently than hydrogen ions; (2) homogeneous growth--heavy helium ions impinging on the surface promote the surface mobility of the reactive radicals, so that heteroepitaxy growth as clustering of Ge and Si, columnar structure are

  20. Sputter deposited bioceramic coatings: surface characterisation and initial protein adsorption studies using surface-MALDI-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, A. R.; Burke, G. A.; Duffy, H.

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto calcium phosphate (Ca–P) bioceramics utilised in hard tissue implant applications has been highlighted as one of the key events that influences the subsequent biological response, in vivo. This work reports on the use of surface-matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation...... to a combination of growth factors and lipoproteins present in serum. From the data obtained here it is evident that surface-MALDI-MS has significant utility as a tool for studying the dynamic nature of protein adsorption onto the surfaces of bioceramic coatings, which most likely plays a significant role...

  1. A perspective of microplasma oxidation (MPO) and vapor deposition coatings in surface engineering of aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AWAD Samir Hamid; QIAN Han-cheng

    2004-01-01

    Over the past years, great achievements have been made in the development of coating technologies for surface improvement of aluminum alloys. Despite these achievements, the role in the market strongly depends on the ability of surface coating technology under technical and economic considerations to meet the increased demands for heavy tribological applications of aluminum alloys. Microplasma oxidation (MPO) technology has recently been studied as a novel and effective means to provide thick and hard ceramic coating with improved properties such as excellent load-bearing and wear resistance properties on aluminum alloys. The present work covers the evaluation of the performances of current single and duplex coatings combining MPO, physical vapor deposition (PVD), and plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) coatings on aluminum alloys. It suggests that the MPO coating is a promising candidate for design engineers to apply aluminum alloys to heavy load-bearing applications. The prospective future for the research on MPO coatings is introduced as well.

  2. Crystalline silicon surface passivation by thermal ALD deposited Al doped ZnO thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath Panigrahi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The evidence of good quality silicon surface passivation using thermal ALD deposited Al doped zinc oxide (AZO thin films is demonstrated. AZO films are prepared by introducing aluminium precursor in between zinc and oxygen precursors during the deposition. The formation of AZO is confirmed by ellipsometry, XRD and Hall measurements. Effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff greater than 1.5ms at intermediate bulk injection levels is realized for symmetrically passivated p-type silicon surfaces under optimised annealing conditions of temperature and time in hydrogen ambient. The best results are realised at 450°C annealing for >15min. Such a layer may lead to implied open circuit voltage gain of 80mV.

  3. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  4. Surface properties and biocompatibility of nanostructured TiO2 film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Asif; He, Jie; Jiao, Lingrui; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Sheng, Zhengming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 films are deposited on a silicon substrate using 150-W power from the RF magnetron sputtering at working pressures of 3 to 5 Pa, with no substrate bias, and at 3 Pa with a substrate bias of -50 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that TiO2 films deposited on unbiased as well as biased substrates are all amorphous. Surface properties such as surface roughness and wettability of TiO2 films, grown in a plasma environment, under biased and unbiased substrate conditions are reported according to the said parameters of RF power and the working pressures. Primary rat osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) cells have been cultured on nanostructured TiO2 films fabricated at different conditions of substrate bias and working pressures. The effects of roughness and hydrophilicity of nanostructured TiO2 films on cell density and cell spreading have been discussed.

  5. Influence of surface preparation on atomic layer deposition of Pt films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Liang; Hu Cheng; Zhu Zhiwei; Zhang Wei; Wu Dongping; Zhang Shili

    2012-01-01

    We report Pt deposition on a Si substrate by means of atomic layer deposition (ALD) using (methylcyclopentadienyl) trimethylplatinum (CH3CsH4Pt(CH3)3) and O2.Silicon substrates with both HF-last and oxidelast surface treatments are employed to investigate the influence of surface preparation on Pt-ALD.A significantlylonger incubation time and less homogeneity are observed for Pt growth on the HF-last substrate compared to the oxide-last substrate.An interfacial oxide layer at the Pt-Si interface is found inevitable even with HF treatment of the Si substrate immediately prior to ALD processing.A plausible explanation to the observed difference of Pt-ALD is discussed.

  6. Identification of Dimeric Methylalumina Surface Species during Atomic Layer Deposition Using Operando Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, Ryan A; McAnally, Michael O; Schatz, George C; Stair, Peter C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2017-02-15

    Operando surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to successfully identify hitherto unknown dimeric methylalumina surface species during atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a silver surface. Vibrational modes associated with the bridging moieties of both trimethylaluminum (TMA) and dimethylaluminum chloride (DMACl) surface species were found during ALD. The appropriate monomer vibrational modes were found to be absent as a result of the selective nature of SERS. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were also performed to locate and identify the expected vibrational modes. An operando localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectrometer was utilized to account for changes in SER signal as a function of the number of ALD cycles. DMACl surface species were unable to be measured after multiple ALD cycles as a result of a loss in SERS enhancement and shift in LSPR. This work highlights how operando optical spectroscopy by SERS and LSPR scattering are useful for probing the identity and structure of the surface species involved in ALD and, ultimately, catalytic reactions on these support materials.

  7. Fabrication and surface passivation of porous 6H-SiC by atomic layer deposited films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    photoluminescence was observed and the etching process was optimized in terms of etching time and thickness. Enormous enhancement as well as redshift and broadening of photoluminescence spectra were observed after the passivation by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and TiO2 films. No obvious luminescence was observed...... above the 6H-SiC crystal band gap, which suggests that the strong photoluminescence is ascribed to surface state produced during the anodic etching....

  8. Deposition of device quality silicon nitride with ultra high deposition rate (> 7 nm/s) using hot-wire CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.; Houweling, Z.S.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Romijn, I.G.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Goldbach, H.D.

    2008-01-01

    The application of hot-wire (HW) CVD deposited silicon nitride (SiNx) as passivating anti-reflection coating on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells is investigated. The highest efficiency reached is 15.7% for SiNx layers with an N/Si ratio of 1.20 and a high mass density of 2.9 g/cm3. These

  9. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclei on the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tie-Kuang; Yun, Su-Jun; Ma, Tao; Chang, Jin; Dong, Wu-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Long; Ren, Zhong-Zhou

    2014-07-01

    A physical model for Geant4-based simulation of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles' interaction with the lunar surface matter has been developed to investigate the production rates of cosmogenic nuclei. In this model the GCRs, mainly very high energy protons and α particles, bombard the surface of the Moon and produce many secondary particles, such as protons and neutrons. The energies of protons and neutrons at different depths are recorded and saved as ROOT files, and the analytical expressions for the differential proton and neutron fluxes are obtained through the best-fit procedure using ROOT software. To test the validity of this model, we calculate the production rates of the long-lived nuclei 10Be and 26Al in the Apollo 15 long drill core by combining the above differential fluxes and the newly evaluated spallation reaction cross sections. Our numerical results show that the theoretical production rates agree quite well with the measured data, which means that this model works well. Therefore, it can be expected that this model can be used to investigate the cosmogenic nuclei in future lunar samples returned by the Chinese lunar exploration program and can be extended to study other objects, such as meteorites and the Earth's atmosphere.

  10. Cosmogenic Nuclei Production Rate on the Lunar Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Tie-Kuang; Ma, Tao; Chang, Jin; Dong, Wu-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Long; Ren, Zhong-Zhou

    2013-01-01

    A physical model of Geant4-based simulation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interaction with the lunar surface matter has been developed to investigate the production rate of cosmogenic nuclei. In this model the GCRs, mainly very high energy protons and $\\alpha$ particles, bombard the surface of the Moon and produce many secondary particles such as protons and neutrons. The energies of proton and neutron at different depths are recorded and saved into ROOT files, and the analytical expressions for the differential proton and neutron fluxes are obtained through the best-fit procedure under the ROOT software. To test the validity of this model, we calculate the production rates of long-lived nuclei $^{10}$Be and $^{26}$Al in the Apollo 15 long drill core by combining the above differential fluxes and the newly evaluated spallation reaction cross sections. Numerical results show that the theoretical production rates agree quite well with the measured data. It means that this model works well. Therefore, i...

  11. Predicting the Effects of Powder Feeding Rates on Particle Impact Conditions and Cold Spray Deposited Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ozan C.; Widener, Christian A.; Carter, Michael J.; Johnson, Kyle W.

    2017-08-01

    As the industrial application of the cold spray technology grows, the need to optimize both the cost and the quality of the process grows with it. Parameter selection techniques available today require the use of a coupled system of equations to be solved to involve the losses due to particle loading in the gas stream. Such analyses cause a significant increase in the computational time in comparison with calculations with isentropic flow assumptions. In cold spray operations, engineers and operators may, therefore, neglect the effects of particle loading to simplify the multiparameter optimization process. In this study, two-way coupled (particle-fluid) quasi-one-dimensional fluid dynamics simulations are used to test the particle loading effects under many potential cold spray scenarios. Output of the simulations is statistically analyzed to build regression models that estimate the changes in particle impact velocity and temperature due to particle loading. This approach eases particle loading optimization for more complete analysis on deposition cost and time. The model was validated both numerically and experimentally. Further numerical analyses were completed to test the particle loading capacity and limitations of a nozzle with a commonly used throat size. Additional experimentation helped document the physical limitations to high-rate deposition.

  12. Lacustrine responses to decreasing wet mercury deposition rates: results from a case study in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Mark E.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Gay, David A.; Maki, Ryan P.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Wiener, James G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a case study comparing metrics of methylmercury (MeHg) contamination for four undeveloped lakes in Voyageurs National Park to wet atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg), sulfate (SO4–2), and hydrogen ion (H+) in northern Minnesota. Annual wet Hg, SO4–2, and H+ deposition rates at two nearby precipitation monitoring sites indicate considerable decreases from 1998 to 2012 (mean decreases of 32, 48, and 66%, respectively). Consistent with decreases in the atmospheric pollutants, epilimnetic aqueous methylmercury (MeHgaq) and mercury in small yellow perch (Hgfish) decreased in two of four lakes (mean decreases of 46.5% and 34.5%, respectively, between 2001 and 2012). Counter to decreases in the atmospheric pollutants, MeHgaq increased by 85% in a third lake, whereas Hgfish increased by 80%. The fourth lake had two disturbances in its watershed during the study period (forest fire; changes in shoreline inundation due to beaver activity); this lake lacked overall trends in MeHgaq and Hgfish. The diverging responses among the study lakes exemplify the complexity of ecosystem responses to decreased loads of atmospheric pollutants.

  13. Standard Practice for Selecting, Preparing, Exposing, and Analyzing Witness Surfaces for Measuring Particle Deposition in Cleanrooms and Associated Controlled Environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This practice is intended to assist in the selection, preparation, exposure, and analysis of witness surfaces for the purpose of characterizing particle deposition rates in cleanrooms and associated controlled environments, particularly for aerospace applications. 1.2 Requirements may be defined in terms of particle size distribution and count, percent area coverage, or product performance criteria such as optical transmission or scatter. Several choices for witness surfaces are provided. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard.

  14. Surface hydrophobic modification of cellulose membranes by plasma-assisted deposition of hydrocarbon films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudtorlep Nisoa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification by plasma polymerization is an efficient method to change the surface properties of a membrane. Desirable functionality such as hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity can be obtained, depending on plasma chemistry of gas precursors and discharge conditions. In this work, RF magnetron plasma is produced using acetylene and nitrogen as precursor gases. Variations of RF power, particle flux, deposited time and pressure of the precursor gases have been made to observe coating effects on the cellulose membranes. When appropriated conditions are used, a thin brownish film of hydrocarbon was formed on the membrane, and the water contact angle increased from 35 to 130 degrees.

  15. Characterization of thiol-functionalised silica films deposited on electrode surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Cesarino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiol-functionalised silica films were deposited on various electrode surfaces (gold, platinum, glassy carbon by spin-coating sol-gel mixtures in the presence of a surfactant template. Film formation occurred by evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA involving the hydrolysis and (cocondensation of silane and organosilane precursors on the electrode surface. The characterization of such material was performed by IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG, elemental analysis (EA, atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and cyclic voltammetry (CV.

  16. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines and polydopamine: Adhesion toward electroless deposited copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubroeck, David; Mader, Lothar; Dubruel, Peter; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper the influence of the epoxy roughness, surface modifications and ELD (electroless copper deposition) temperatures on the adhesive strength of the copper is studied. Good adhesion at low roughness values is targeted due to their applicability in high density electronic circuits. Roughened epoxy surfaces are modified with adsorbed polyamines, polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine. Next the, adhesive strength of ELD copper is determined with peel strength measurements and the interphases are examined with SEM (scanning electron microscopy). Polydopamine and polyamines grafted to polydopamine can lead to increased adhesive strength at lower roughness values compared to the non-modified samples at specific plating temperatures.

  17. Thickness of Lipid Deposition on Oral Surfaces Depending on Oil Content and Its Influence on Mouthfeel Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Pivk Kupirovič

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid content in food strongly influences food perception on the level of textural properties. Lipids in contact with the tongue and palate are substantially responsible for the sensory impact of a product. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of oil content on the thickness of lipid deposition on oral surface as well as on the mouthfeel perception. The fluorescent probe method was used to study the thickness of lipid deposition on oral surface. We observed an increase in the thickness of lipid deposition depending on the increase of oil content in oil/water dispersions. Clear correlation was shown between the thickness of lipid deposition on oral surfaces and the perception of mouthfeel. A direct measure of undisrupted deposition of food components on oral surface contributes to the understanding of the behaviour of food components in the mouth and their influence on mouthfeel perception.

  18. Surface characteristics of hydroxyapatite films deposited on anodized titanium by an electrochemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang [Research Institute, Kuwotech, 970–88, Wolchul-dong, Buk-ku, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Brantley, William A. [Division of Restorative, Prosthetic and Primary Care Dentistry, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State, University, Columbus, OH (United States); Choe, Han-Cheol, E-mail: hcchoe@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials and Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    The biocompatibility of anodized titanium (Ti) was improved by an electrochemically deposited calcium phosphate (CaP) layer. The CaP layer was grown on the anodized Ti surface in modified simulated body fluid (M-SBF) at 85 °C. The phases and morphologies for the CaP layers were influenced by the electrolyte concentration. Nano flake-like precipitates that formed under low M-SBF concentrations were identified as hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals orientated in the c-axis direction. In high M-SBF concentrations, the CaP layer formed micro plate-like precipitates on anodized Ti, and micropores were covered with HAp. Proliferation of murine preosteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) on the HAp/anodized Ti surfaces was significantly higher than for untreated Ti and anodized Ti surfaces. - Highlights: • CaP layers were grown on anodized Ti surfaces by an electrochemical deposition process. • Phases and morphologies of layers were influenced by the electrolyte concentration. • Superior cell proliferation was observed on hydroxyapatite-coated anodized surfaces.

  19. Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

    2013-10-29

    Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue.

  20. Laser Surface Treatment of Stellite 6 Coating Deposited by HVOF on 316L Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja-Razavi, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research aimed to study the effects of laser glazing treatment on microstructure, hardness, and oxidation behavior of Stellite 6 coating deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. The as-sprayed Stellite 6 coating (ST-HVOF) was subjected to single-pass and multiple-pass laser treatments to achieve the optimum glazing parameters. Microstructural characterizations were performed by x-ray diffractometry and field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Two-step optimization showed that laser treatment at the power of 200 W with a scan rate of 4 mm/s causes a surface layer with a thickness of 208 ± 32 µm to be remelted, while the underlying layers retain the original ST-HVOF coating structure. The obtained sample (ST-Glazing) exhibited a highly dense and uniform structure with an extremely low porosity of ~0.3%, much lower than that of ST-HVOF coating (2.3%). The average microhardness of ST-Glazing was measured to be 519 Hv0.3 indicating a 17% decrease compared to ST-HVOF (625 Hv0.3) due to the residual stress relief and dendrite coarsening from submicron size to ~3.4 µm after laser treatment. The lowest oxidation mass gain was obtained for ST-Glazing by 2 mg/cm2 after 8 cycles at 900 °C indicating 52 and 84% improvement in oxidation resistance in comparison to ST-HVOF and bare 316L steel substrates, respectively.

  1. Super-Eddington stellar winds driven by near-surface energy deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quataert, Eliot; Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel; Klion, Hannah; Paxton, Bill

    2016-05-01

    We develop analytic and numerical models of the properties of super-Eddington stellar winds, motivated by phases in stellar evolution when super-Eddington energy deposition (via, e.g. unstable fusion, wave heating, or a binary companion) heats a region near the stellar surface. This appears to occur in the giant eruptions of luminous blue variables (LBVs), Type IIn supernovae progenitors, classical novae, and X-ray bursts. We show that when the wind kinetic power exceeds Eddington, the photons are trapped and behave like a fluid. Convection does not play a significant role in the wind energy transport. The wind properties depend on the ratio of a characteristic speed in the problem v_crit˜ (dot{E} G)^{1/5} (where dot{E} is the heating rate) to the stellar escape speed near the heating region vesc(rh). For vcrit ≳ vesc(rh), the wind kinetic power at large radii dot{E}_w ˜ dot{E}. For vcrit ≲ vesc(rh), most of the energy is used to unbind the wind material and thus dot{E}_w ≲ dot{E}. Multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations without radiation diffusion using FLASH and one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations with radiation diffusion using MESA are in good agreement with the analytic predictions. The photon luminosity from the wind is itself super-Eddington but in many cases the photon luminosity is likely dominated by `internal shocks' in the wind. We discuss the application of our models to eruptive mass-loss from massive stars and argue that the wind models described here can account for the broad properties of LBV outflows and the enhanced mass-loss in the years prior to Type IIn core-collapse supernovae.

  2. Indexing Glomerular Filtration Rate to Body Surface Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redal-Baigorri, Belén; Rasmussen, Knud; Heaf, James Goya

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kidney function is mostly expressed in terms of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A common feature is the expression as ml/min per 1.73 m(2) , which represents the adjustment of the individual kidney function to a standard body surface area (BSA) to allow comparison between individuals....... We investigated the impact of indexing GFR to BSA in cancer patients, as this BSA indexation might affect the reported individual kidney function. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 895 adults who had their kidney function measured with (51) chrome ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. Mean values of BSA...

  3. Highly Sensitive Local Surface Plasmon Resonance in Anisotropic Au Nanoparticles Deposited on Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanari Saigusa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the facile and high-throughput fabrication method of anisotropic Au nanoparticles with a highly sensitive local surface plasmon resonance (LPR using cylindrical nanofibers as substrates. The substrates consisting of nanofibers were prepared by the electrospinning of poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF. The Au nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of electrospun nanofibers by vacuum evaporation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a curved Au island structure on the surface of cylindrical nanofibers. Polarized UV-visible extinction spectroscopy showed anisotropy in their LPR arising from the high surface curvature of the nanofiber. The LPR of the Au nanoparticles on the thinnest nanofiber with a diameter of ~100 nm showed maximum refractive index (RI sensitivity over 500 nm/RI unit (RIU. The close correlation between the fiber diameter dependence of the RI sensitivity and polarization dependence of the LPR suggests that anisotropic Au nanoparticles improve RI sensitivity.

  4. Structure and Surface Characterization of Nanostructured Tio2 Coatings Deposited Via HVOF Thermal Spray Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryamossadat Bozorgtabar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying (HVOF with the use of agglomerated P25/20 nano-powder and different spraying parameters (e.g. fuel/flow ratio to determine their influence on the microstructure, crystalline structure and surface feature of the coatings. The microstructure of as-sprayed TiO2 coatings was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Surface features were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The results showed that the fuel and oxygen flow ratio have an important influence on the microstructure, anatase content, surface chemical state and surface feature of the TiO2 coatings

  5. A macroscale mixture theory analysis of deposition and sublimation rates during heat and mass transfer in dry snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Hansen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of a dry alpine snowpack is a dynamic environment where microstructural evolution is driven by seasonal density profiles and weather conditions. Notably, temperature gradients on the order of 10–20 K m−1, or larger, are known to produce a faceted snow microstructure exhibiting little strength. However, while strong temperature gradients are widely accepted as the primary driver for kinetic growth, they do not fully account for the range of experimental observations. An additional factor influencing snow metamorphism is believed to be the rate of mass transfer at the macroscale. We develop a mixture theory capable of predicting macroscale deposition and/or sublimation in a snow cover under temperature gradient conditions. Temperature gradients and mass exchange are tracked over periods ranging from 1 to 10 days. Interesting heat and mass transfer behavior is observed near the ground, near the surface, as well as immediately above and below dense ice crusts. Information about deposition (condensation and sublimation rates may help explain snow metamorphism phenomena that cannot be accounted for by temperature gradients alone. The macroscale heat and mass transfer analysis requires accurate representations of the effective thermal conductivity and the effective mass diffusion coefficient for snow. We develop analytical models for these parameters based on first principles at the microscale. The expressions derived contain no empirical adjustments, and further, provide self consistent values for effective thermal conductivity and the effective diffusion coefficient for the limiting cases of air and solid ice. The predicted values for these macroscale material parameters are also in excellent agreement with numerical results based on microscale finite element analyses of representative volume elements generated from X-ray tomography.

  6. A macroscale mixture theory analysis of deposition and sublimation rates during heat and mass transfer in snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Hansen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of a dry alpine snowpack is a dynamic environment where microstructural evolution is driven by seasonal density profiles and weather conditions. Notably, temperature gradients on the order of 10–20 K m−1, or larger, are known to produce a faceted snow microstructure exhibiting little strength. However, while strong temperature gradients are widely accepted as the primary driver for kinetic growth, they do not fully account for the range of experimental observations. An additional factor influencing snow metamorphism is believed to be the rate of mass transfer at the macroscale. We develop a mixture theory capable of predicting macroscale deposition and/or sublimation in a snow cover under temperature gradient conditions. Temperature gradients and mass exchange are tracked over periods ranging from 1 to 10 days. Interesting heat and mass transfer behavior is observed near the ground, near the surface, as well as immediately above and below dense ice crusts. Information about deposition (condensation and sublimation rates may help explain snow metamorphism phenomena that cannot be accounted for by temperature gradients alone. The macroscale heat and mass transfer analysis requires accurate representations of the thermal conductivity and the effective mass diffusion coefficient for snow. We develop analytical models for these parameters based on first principles at the microscale. The expressions derived contain no empirical adjustments, and further, provide self consistent values for thermal conductivity and the effective diffusion coefficient for the limiting cases of air and solid ice. The predicted values for these macroscale material parameters are also in excellent agreement with numerical results based on microscale finite element analyses of representative volume elements generated from X-ray tomography.

  7. CONVERSION RATES OF SURFACE HOx RADICALS IN BEIJING CITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xin-rong; WANG Li-xin; WANG Hui-xiang; MIAO Guo-fang

    2004-01-01

    Surface OH radical concentration in Beijing City was measured by impregnated filter trapping technique-high performance liquid chromatography (IFT-HPLC). The observed concentration of OH radical showed obvious diurnal and seasonal variations, with maximum readings at noon or afternoon, ~80×106OH/cm3 in summer and ~20×106-40×106OH/cm3 in fall. On the basis of measured data, the reaction rates related to the photochemical process of Hox (OH+HO2) were derived and characteristics of atmospheric chemical processes in the city were analyzed. The results showed that conversion rates of atmospheric OH and HO2 in the summer of Beijing City were air of the city mainly originated from the photolysis of the gaseous HNO2, and the main sink of OH were the photochemical reactions with VOCs, NO2, HCHO and CO. It was different from the clean area.

  8. Impact ejecta-induced melting of surface ice deposits on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, David K.; Head, James W.

    2016-12-01

    Fluvial features present around impact craters on Mars can offer insight into the ancient martian climate and its relationship to the impact cratering process. The widespread spatial and temporal distribution of surface ice on Mars suggests that the interaction between impact cratering and surface ice could have been a relatively frequent occurrence. We explore the thermal and melting effects on regional surface ice sheets in this case, where an impact event occurs in regional surface ice deposits overlying a regolith/bedrock target. We provide an estimate for the post-impact temperature of martian ejecta as a function of crater diameter, and conduct thermal modeling to assess the degree to which contact melting of hot ejecta superposed on surface ice deposits can produce meltwater and carve fluvial features. We also evaluate whether fluvial features could form as a result of basal melting of the ice deposits in response to the thermal insulation provided by the overlying impact ejecta. Contact melting is predicted to occur immediately following ejecta emplacement over the course of hundreds of years to tens of kyr. Basal melting initiates when the 273 K isotherm rises through the crust and reaches the base of the ice sheet ∼0.1 to ∼1 Myr following the impact. We assess the range of crater diameters predicted to produce contact and basal melting of surface ice sheets, as well as the melt fluxes, volumes, timescales, predicted locations of melting (relative to the crater), and the associated hydraulic and hydrologic consequences. We find that the heat flux and surface temperature conditions required to produce contact melting are met throughout martian history, whereas the heat flux and surface temperature conditions to produce basal melting are met only under currently understood ancient martian thermal conditions. For an impact into a regional ice sheet, the contact and basal melting mechanisms are predicted to generate melt volumes between ∼10-1 and 105 km3

  9. Metals in bulk deposition and surface waters at two upland locations in northern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, A J; Tipping, E

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of aluminium and minor metals (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Ba, Pb) were measured in precipitation and surface water at two upland locations (Upper Duddon Valley, UDV; Great Dun Fell, GDF) in northern England for 1 year commencing April 1998. At both locations, the loads in bulk precipitation were at the lower ends of ranges reported for other rural and remote sites, for the period 1985-1995. The deposited metals were mostly in the dissolved form, and their concentrations tended to be greatest when rainfall volumes were low. The concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb in deposition were correlated (r2 > or = 0.40) with concentrations of non-marine sulphate. Three streams, ranging in mean pH from 5.07 to 7.07, and with mean concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) waters at each location, and temporal variations in individual waters, can be explained qualitatively in terms of sorption to solid-phase soil organic matter and mineral surfaces, complexation and transport by DOC, and chemical weathering. The UDV catchments are sinks for Pb and sources of Al, Mn, Sr, Cd and Ba. The GDF catchments are sources of Al, Mn, Ni, Zn, Sr, Cd and Ba. Other metals measured at the two locations are approximately in balance. Comparison of metal:silicon ratios in the surface waters with values for silicate rocks indicates enrichment of Ni and Cu, and substantial enrichment of Zn, Cd and Pb. These enrichments, together with high metal deposition in the past, make it likely that concentrations of the metals in the surface waters are governed by release from catchment pools of atmospherically-deposited metal. The catchments appear to be responding on a time scale of decades, possibly centuries, to changes in metal deposition. For the more acid waters at UDV, the calculated free-ion concentrations of Al are similar to published LC50 values for acute toxicity towards fish. The free-ion concentrations of Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd in all the surface waters are one-to-four orders of

  10. Quartz in coal dust deposited on internal surface of respirable size selective samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Taekhee; Kashon, Michael; Kusti, Mohannad; Harper, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to quantify quartz mass in coal dust deposited on the internal cassette surface of respirable size-selective samplers. Coal dust was collected with four different respirable size-selective samplers (10 mm Dorr-Oliver nylon [Sensidyne, St. Petersburg, Fla.], SKC Aluminum [SKC Inc., Eighty Four, Pa.], BGI4L [BGI USA Inc., Waltham, Mass.], and GK2.69 cyclones [BGI USA Inc.]) with two different cassette types (polystyrene and static-dissipative polypropylene cassettes). The coal dust was aerosolized in a calm air chamber by using a fluidized bed aerosol generator without neutralization under the assumption that the procedure is similar to field sampling conditions. The mass of coal dust was measured gravimetrically and quartz mass was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Manual of Analytical Methods, Method 7603. The mass fractions of the total quartz sample on the internal cassette surface are significantly different between polystyrene and static-dissipative cassettes for all cyclones (p quartz mass on cassette internal surface and coal dust filter mass was observed. The BGI4L cyclone showed a higher (but not significantly) and the GK2.69 cyclone showed a significantly lower (p quartz mass fraction for polystyrene cassettes compared to other cyclones. This study confirms previous observations that the interior surface deposits in polystyrene cassettes attached to cyclone pre-selectors can be a substantial part of the sample, and therefore need to be included in any analysis for accurate exposure assessment. On the other hand, the research presented here supports the position that the internal surface deposits in static-dissipative cassettes used with size-selective cyclones are negligible and that it is only necessary to analyze the filter catch.

  11. Age, distribution, and significance within a sediment budget, of in-channel depositional surfaces in the Normanby River, Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, T. J.; Brooks, A. P.; Spencer, J.; Olley, J. M.; Borombovits, D.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of investigations into alluvial deposition in the catchment of the Normanby River, which flows into Princess Charlotte Bay (PCB) in the northern part of the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon. Our focus is on the fine fraction (expansive flat surface generally referred to as the floodplain. Variously described as benches, bank attached bars or inset or inner floodplains, these more or less flat-lying surfaces within the macro-channel have hitherto received little attention in sediment budgeting models. We use high resolution LiDAR based mapping combined with optical dating of exposures cut into these in-channel deposits to compare their aggradation rates with those found in other depositional zones in the catchment, namely the floodplain and coastal plain. In total 59 single grain OSL dates were produced across 21 stratigraphic profiles at 14 sites distributed though the 24 226 km2 catchment. In-channel storage in these inset features is a significant component of the contemporary fine sediment budget (i.e. recent decades/last century), annually equivalent to more than 50% of the volume entering the channel network from hillslopes and subsoil sources. Therefore, at the very least, in-channel storage of fine material needs to be incorporated into sediment budgeting exercises. Furthermore, deposition within the channel has occurred in multiple locations coincident in time with accelerated sediment production following European settlement. Generally, this has occurred on a subset of the features we have examined here, namely linear bench features low in the channel. This suggests that accelerated aggradation on in-channel depositional surfaces has been in part a response to accelerated erosion within the catchment. The entire contribution of ~ 370 kilotonnes per annum of fine sediment estimated to have been produced by alluvial gully erosion over the last ~ 100 years can be accounted for by that stored as in-channel alluvium. These features therefore can

  12. Ion beam induced chemical and morphological changes in TiO{sub 2} films deposited on Si(1 1 1) surface by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanta, R.R. [Department of Chemistry, Krupajal Engineering College, Bhubaneswar 751002 (India); Medicherla, V.R.R., E-mail: mvramarao1@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha ‘O’ Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar 751030 (India); Mohanta, K.L. [Department of Physics, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha ‘O’ Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar 751030 (India); Nayak, Nimai C. [Department of Chemistry, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha ‘O’ Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar 751030 (India); Majumder, S.; Solanki, V.; Varma, Shikha [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Bapna, Komal; Phase, D.M.; Sathe, V. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser deposition of TiO{sub 2} films on Si(1 1 1) surface. • XPS and AFM study of TiO{sub 2} surface. • Ion beam treatment induced morphology. • Chemical reduction of TiO{sub 2} on the surface. • A-ray induced Auger transition of Ti LMM. - Abstract: We have investigated TiO{sub 2} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition method on Si(1 1 1) surface using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and ion beam sputtering techniques. Our XRD data along with Raman indicated that the deposited TiO{sub 2} is in anatase phase. The binding energy position of Ti 2p also supports the anatase phase formation. AFM topography of as deposited film indicates the formation of non uniform TiO{sub 2} growth with the formation of voids on Si(1 1 1) substrate. After sputtering with argon ion beam, surface erosion occurs and voids have disappeared. The Ti 2p core level of sputtered TiO{sub 2} exhibits the formation of Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO and pure Ti on the surface. High binding energy shoulder of O 1s peak becomes sharp after sputtering. Ti LMM Auger peaks become broader after sputtering but no shift in kinetic energy is observed.

  13. Enabling organosilicon chemistries on inert polymer surfaces with a vapor-deposited silica layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A; Ashurst, W R

    2009-10-06

    Given the large surface area-to-volume ratios commonly encountered in microfluidics applications, the ability to engineer the chemical properties of surfaces encountered in these applications is critically important. However, as various polymers are rapidly replacing glass and silicon as the chosen materials for microfluidics devices, the ability to easily modify the surface chemistry has been diminished by the relatively inert nature of some commonly employed polymer surfaces, such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This paper describes the low-temperature, vapor-phase deposition of robust silica layers to PMMA, polystyrene, and PDMS surfaces, which enables the functionalization of these surfaces by standard organosilane chemistries. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy are used to characterize the silica layers that form on these surfaces. Aqueous immersion experiments indicate that the silica layer has excellent stability in aqueous environments, which is a prerequisite for microfluidics applications, but for PMMA surfaces, low adhesion of the silica layer to the underlying substrate is problematic. For PDMS substrates, the presence of the silica layer helps to slow the process of hydrophobic recovery, which is an additional advantage.

  14. Controlling Surface Roughness to Enhance Mass Flow Rates in Nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimon, Malgorzata; Emerson, David; Reese, Jason

    2012-11-01

    A very active field of research in fluid mechanics and material science is predicting the behavior of Newtonian fluids flowing over porous media with different wettabilities. Opposite effects have been observed: some state that wall roughness always suppresses fluid-slip, whereas others show that for some cases roughness may reduce the surface friction. In this work, MD simulations were carried out to further investigate physical mechanisms for liquid slip, and factors affecting it. A rough wall was formed by either periodically spaced rectangular protrusions or was represented by a cosine wave. The MD simulations were conducted to study Poiseuille and Couette flow of liquid argon in a nanochannel with hydrophilic kryptonian walls. The effect of wall roughness and interface wettability on the streaming velocity, and the slip-length at the walls, is observed to be significant. Our results show a dependency of mass flow rate on the type of flow and topography of the channel walls. For a fixed magnitude of the driving force, an increase in the mass flow rate, compared to the smooth surface, was observed for the wavy roughness, whereas the opposite effect was observed for Couette flow where a higher slip was obtained for rectangular gaps. The study is funded in the UK by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

  15. Electrochemically assisted deposition of strontium modified magnesium phosphate on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meininger, M. [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, D-97070 Würzburg (Germany); Wolf-Brandstetter, C. [Max Bergmann Center for Biomaterials, Technical University of Dresden, Budapester Straße 27, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Zerweck, J.; Wenninger, F.; Gbureck, U.; Groll, J. [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, D-97070 Würzburg (Germany); Moseke, C., E-mail: claus.moseke@fmz.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department for Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, D-97070 Würzburg (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Electrochemically assisted deposition was utilized to produce ceramic coatings on the basis of magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite) on corundum-blasted titanium surfaces. By the addition of defined concentrations of strontium nitrate to the coating electrolyte Sr{sup 2+} ions were successfully incorporated into the struvite matrix. By variation of deposition parameters it was possible to fabricate coatings with different kinetics of Sr{sup 2+} into physiological media, whereas the release of therapeutically relevant strontium doses could be sustained over several weeks. Morphological and crystallographic examinations of the immersed coatings revealed that the degradation of struvite and the release of Sr{sup 2+} ions were accompanied by a transformation of the coating to a calcium phosphate based phase similar to low-crystalline hydroxyapatite. These findings showed that strontium doped struvite coatings may provide a promising degradable coating system for the local application of strontium or other biologically active metal ions in the implant–bone interface. - Highlights: • Sr-doped struvite coatings have been deposited on titanium by electrochemically assisted deposition. • Sr content can be adjusted by means of process time, current density and pulse mode. • Sr-doped coatings release therapeutically relevant Sr doses in physiological media for several weeks. • During immersion in physiological media Sr-doped struvite coatings transform into a low crystalline calcium phosphate phase.

  16. Laser cleaning of silicon surface with deposition of different liquid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. F.; Zhang, Y.; Wan, Y. H.; Song, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    Laser cleaning can efficiently remove tiny particles from a silicon surface on which a liquid film has been previously deposited when the laser fluence is large enough. The cleaning force is due to the high pressure of stress wave generated through the rapid growth of vapor bubbles inside the superheated liquid. The behaviors of this type of laser cleaning are theoretically described with deposition of two kinds of liquid film: acetone and ethanol. The cleaning threshold of laser fluence is different for these two kinds of liquids for some differences in their thermodynamic properties. For removal of alumina particles with a size of 1 μm, the lower cleaning threshold of laser fluence is obtained with deposition of acetone because of its lower boiling point and volume heat capacity. The theoretical result also indicates that the cleaning force with deposition of ethanol increases more quickly along with laser fluence than with acetone. This phenomenon is much useful for removal of smaller particles and can lead to high cleaning efficiency.

  17. Spectral Analysis of Surface Features of Subaquaeous Pyroclastic Flow Deposits Around Santorini Volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croff, K. L.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Alexandri, M.; Sakellariou, D.; Nomikou, P.

    2006-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetry mapping and seismic airgun surveys of the submarine region around the Santorini volcanic field in the Hellenic Arc (Greece) have revealed regions of terraced or step-like topography. These features may be related to the transport and deposition of submarine pyroclastic flows from the last major eruption of this volcano (~3600yrs. B.P.). The uppermost sediment sequence identified in seismic records has an average thickness of approximately 29 meters and may represent the pyroclastic flow deposits from this eruption. These terraced or step-like features are mainly located in areas that are approximately five kilometers offshore and at depths in the range of 200 to 800 meters. The seafloor in these areas has slope ratios on the order of 1:20. Profiles of the seafloor topography were sampled from seismic profiles that radiate from the Sanotrini caldera in five regions of interest. Spectral analysis of seafloor topography has been carried out to determine spectral characteristics of these features, including power spectrum, periodicity and amplitude of the waveforms, variance, and roughness of topography. The results are compared to surface features of the subaqueous pyroclastic deposits from the 1883 explosive eruption of Krakatau (Indonesia) and other areas with similar environments, to determine the parameters that are characteristic of this new feature of submarine volcaniclastic deposits.

  18. Melatonin plus porcine bone on discrete calcium deposit implant surface stimulates osteointegration in dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Barone, Antonio; Cutando, Antonio; Alcaraz-Baños, Miguel; Chiva, Fernando; López-Marí, Laura; Guardia, Javier

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the topical application of melatonin mixed with collagenized porcine bone to accelerate the osteointegration on the rough discrete calcium deposit (DCD) surface implants in Beagle dogs 3 months after their insertion. In preparation for subsequent insertion of dental implants, lower premolars and molars were extracted from 12 Beagle dogs. Each mandible received three parallel wall implants with discrete calcium deposit (DCD) surface of 4 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length. The implants were randomly assigned to the distal sites on each side of the mandible in three groups: group I implants alone, group II implants with melatonin and group III implants with melatonin and porcine bone. Prior to implanting, 5 mg lyophylized powdered melatonin was applied to one bone hole at each side of the mandible. None was applied at the control sites. Ten histological sections per implant were obtained for histomorphometric studies. After a 4-wk treatment period, melatonin significantly increased the perimeter of bone that was in direct contact with the treated implants (P implants. Topical application of melatonin on DCD surface may act as a biomimetic agent in the placement of endo-osseous dental implants and enhance the osteointegration. Melatonin combined with porcine bone on DCD implants reveals more bone to implant contact at 12 wk (84.5 +/- 1.5%) compared with melatonin treated (75.1 +/- 1.4%) and nonmelatonin treated surface implants (64 +/- 1.4%).

  19. Fabrication of nanoelectromechanical systems via the integration of high surface area glancing angle deposition thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, J. N.; Sauer, V. T. K.; Kwan, J. K.; Hiebert, W. K.; Sit, J. C.

    2014-06-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) coated with a high surface area thin film are fabricated. Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) is used to uniformly deposit high surface area, nanostructured SiO2 films on top of released NEMS. The resonance frequencies and quality factors are measured to assess the potential of the high surface area NEMS for sensing experiments. Resonance frequencies of coated cantilevers, although reduced by mass loading, can be predicted accurately using our derived model. Compressive stress makes the resonance frequencies of coated doubly-clamped beams difficult to predict. The quality factors of the coated NEMS are reduced by one order of magnitude by a quasi-continuous layer at the base of the GLAD film, which also introduces an estimated compressive stress of 5.3-9.3 MPa. The limit of detection is demonstrated to be ˜2 pg cm-2. With this successful proof-of-concept demonstration, we anticipate the future use of these devices as high surface area gravimetric mass sensors for applications such as gas chromatography.

  20. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Chi, Dongzhi; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiOx) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiOx films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiOx films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiOx films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiOx has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiOx in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  1. Bacterial adherence on fluorinated carbon based coatings deposited on polyethylene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terriza, A; Del Prado, G; Perez, A Ortiz; Martinez, M J; Puertolas, J A; Manso, D Molina; Gonzalez-Elipe, A R; Yubero, F; Barrena, E Gomez; Esteban, J, E-mail: antonia.terriza@icmse.csic.es

    2010-11-01

    Development of intrinsically antibacterial surfaces is of key importance in the context of prostheses used in orthopaedic surgery. In this work we present a thorough study of several plasma based coatings that may be used with this functionality: diamond like carbon (DLC), fluorine doped DLC (F-DLC) and a high fluorine content carbon-fluor polymer (CF{sub X}). The study correlates the surface chemistry and hydrophobicity of the coating surfaces with their antibacterial performance. The coatings were deposited by RF-plasma assisted deposition at room temperature on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) samples. Fluorine content and relative amount of C-C and C-F bond types was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hydrophobicity by water contact angle measurements. Adherence of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to non-coated and coated UHMWPE samples was evaluated. Comparisons of the adherence performance were evaluated using a paired t test (two materials) and a Kruskall Wallis test (all the materials). S. aureus was statistically significant (p< 0.001) less adherent to DLC and F-DLC surfaces than S. epidermidis. Both bacteria showed reduction of adherence on DLC/UHMWPE. For S. aureus, reduction of bacterial adherence on F-DLC/UHMWPE was statistically significant respect to all other materials.

  2. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Baochen, E-mail: liaobaochen@nus.edu.sg [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Hoex, Bram [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Aberle, Armin G.; Bhatia, Charanjit S., E-mail: elebcs@nus.edu.sg [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Chi, Dongzhi [A*STAR Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2014-06-23

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiO{sub x}) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiO{sub x} films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiO{sub x} films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiO{sub x} films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiO{sub x} has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiO{sub x} in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  3. Surface Modification of Conventional Polymers by Depositing Plasma Polymers of Trimethylsilane and of Trimethylsilane + O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikart; Miyama; Yasuda

    1999-03-01

    The static wetting properties of TMS (trimethylsilane) and TMS + O2 plasma deposited films on eleven low energy conventional polymers were investigated using the sessile droplet method. The static advancing contact angle is an excellent indication of the change in surface state properties from plasma surface modification. However, traditional contact angle measuring techniques possess a methodological limitation, which can leave a water droplet on the substrate surface for up to 3 min before a measurement is obtained. The static "advancing" contact angles of different size water droplets on teflon and nylon surfaces were observed to change significantly in 2 min while equilibrating with the surface and surroundings. A new quick image-capturing device enables static contact angle measurement 2 to 4 s after contact with the substrate. This technique virtually eliminates the time dependent effects of evaporation and surface state change, which are believed to be responsible for the change in static advancing contact angles. Furthermore, static contact angles independent of droplet volume and contact time may be taken as a surface characteristic property, which is denoted as the intrinsic static contact angle, θS. The static "advancing" contact angle, measured in this fashion, indicated that the wetting properties of TMS and TMS + O2 plasma polymer deposition on 10 conventional polymers were modified virtually independent of the underlying substrate. The average advancing contact angles on TMS and TMS + O2 modified polymers are θS = 94 +/- 2.2 (cos θS = -0.0645) and θS = 32 +/- 6.9 (cos θS = 0.8452), respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Use of surface plasmon resonance to investigate lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of polydopamine films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Cui, Dafu; Cai, Haoyuan; Zhang, Lulu; Chen, Xing; Sun, Jianhai; Chao, Yapeng

    2013-03-15

    Dopamine (DA) is a particularly important neurotransmitter. Polydopamine (pDA) films have been demonstrated to be important materials for the immobilization of biomolecules onto almost any type of solid substrate. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based sensor system with the sensor chip surface parallel to the direction of gravity was used to investigate the lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of pDA films. The deposition kinetics of pDA Films are limited by the oxidation process. The pDA film could not be removed from the sensor chip completely by a strongly alkaline solution, indicating that the pDA film was heterogeneous in the direction of deposition. The pDA film formed near the interior of the solution was less stable than the film formed near the gold-solution interface. Adsorption of proteins on pDA film was studied compared with that on bare gold and dextran sensor chip. The reduction of Au(111) cations by the pDA film, forming a layer of gold particles, was monitored using SPR.

  5. Excellent Silicon Surface Passivation Achieved by Industrial Inductively Coupled Plasma Deposited Hydrogenated Intrinsic Amorphous Silicon Suboxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an alternative method of depositing a high-quality passivation film for heterojunction silicon wafer solar cells, in this paper. The deposition of hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon suboxide is accomplished by decomposing hydrogen, silane, and carbon dioxide in an industrial remote inductively coupled plasma platform. Through the investigation on CO2 partial pressure and process temperature, excellent surface passivation quality and optical properties are achieved. It is found that the hydrogen content in the film is much higher than what is commonly reported in intrinsic amorphous silicon due to oxygen incorporation. The observed slow depletion of hydrogen with increasing temperature greatly enhances its process window as well. The effective lifetime of symmetrically passivated samples under the optimal condition exceeds 4.7 ms on planar n-type Czochralski silicon wafers with a resistivity of 1 Ωcm, which is equivalent to an effective surface recombination velocity of less than 1.7 cms−1 and an implied open-circuit voltage (Voc of 741 mV. A comparison with several high quality passivation schemes for solar cells reveals that the developed inductively coupled plasma deposited films show excellent passivation quality. The excellent optical property and resistance to degradation make it an excellent substitute for industrial heterojunction silicon solar cell production.

  6. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  7. Preparation of gallium nitride surfaces for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A J; Chagarov, E; Gu, S; Kaufman-Osborn, T; Madisetti, S; Wu, J; Asbeck, P M; Oktyabrsky, S; Kummel, A C

    2014-09-14

    A combined wet and dry cleaning process for GaN(0001) has been investigated with XPS and DFT-MD modeling to determine the molecular-level mechanisms for cleaning and the subsequent nucleation of gate oxide atomic layer deposition (ALD). In situ XPS studies show that for the wet sulfur treatment on GaN(0001), sulfur desorbs at room temperature in vacuum prior to gate oxide deposition. Angle resolved depth profiling XPS post-ALD deposition shows that the a-Al2O3 gate oxide bonds directly to the GaN substrate leaving both the gallium surface atoms and the oxide interfacial atoms with XPS chemical shifts consistent with bulk-like charge. These results are in agreement with DFT calculations that predict the oxide/GaN(0001) interface will have bulk-like charges and a low density of band gap states. This passivation is consistent with the oxide restoring the surface gallium atoms to tetrahedral bonding by eliminating the gallium empty dangling bonds on bulk terminated GaN(0001).

  8. Apatite deposition on titanium surfaces--the role of albumin adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serro, A P; Fernandes, A C; Saramago, B; Lima, J; Barbosa, M A

    1997-07-01

    Titanium implant surfaces are known to spontaneously nucleate apatite layers when in contact with simulated body fluids. However, adsorption of proteins may influence the process of apatite layer formation. In this study the role of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption in the process of apatite deposition on titanium substrates is investigated. Deposition of calcium phosphate was induced by immersing titanium substrates in a Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) for times ranging from 1 to 23 days. The resulting substrates were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), wettability measurements and electrochemical impedance determinations. All these methods indicate the presence of a calcium phosphate layer. The same procedure was repeated substituting HBSS with a solution of BSA in HBSS. Although SEM, EDS and electrochemical impedance spectra do not reveal the presence of an apatite layer, XPS analysis strongly indicates that the inhibition of apatite formation by BSA is only partial. The competition between BSA adsorption and apatite deposition seems to lead to a mixed film where the protein co-exists with calcium phosphate. Wettability studies suggest that this surface film is heterogeneous and porous, similar to the thicker films formed in albumin-free HBSS.

  9. Simulation of Cooling Rate Effects on Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb Crack Formation in Direct Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Li, Wei; Chen, Xueyang; Zhang, Yunlu; Newkirk, Joe; Liou, Frank; Dietrich, David

    2016-12-01

    Transient temperature history is vital in direct laser deposition (DLD) as it reveals the cooling rate at specific temperatures. Cooling rate directly relates to phase transformation and types of microstructure formed in deposits. In this paper, finite element analysis simulation was employed to study the transient temperature history and cooling rate at different experimental setups in the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb DLD process. An innovative prediction strategy was developed to model with a moving Gaussian distribution heat source and element birth and death technology in ANSYS®, and fabricate crack-free deposits. This approach helps to understand and analyze the impact of cooling rate and also explain phase information gathered from x-ray diffraction.

  10. Simulation of Cooling Rate Effects on Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb Crack Formation in Direct Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Li, Wei; Chen, Xueyang; Zhang, Yunlu; Newkirk, Joe; Liou, Frank; Dietrich, David

    2017-03-01

    Transient temperature history is vital in direct laser deposition (DLD) as it reveals the cooling rate at specific temperatures. Cooling rate directly relates to phase transformation and types of microstructure formed in deposits. In this paper, finite element analysis simulation was employed to study the transient temperature history and cooling rate at different experimental setups in the Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb DLD process. An innovative prediction strategy was developed to model with a moving Gaussian distribution heat source and element birth and death technology in ANSYS®, and fabricate crack-free deposits. This approach helps to understand and analyze the impact of cooling rate and also explain phase information gathered from x-ray diffraction.

  11. Assessing the Role of Sewers and Atmospheric Deposition as Nitrate Contamination Sources to Urban Surface Waters using Stable Nitrate Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, M. T.; Elliott, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Excess nitrate (NO3-) contributes to the overall degraded quality of streams in many urban areas. These systems are often dominated by impervious surfaces and storm sewers that can route atmospherically deposited nitrogen, from both wet and dry deposition, to waterways. Moreover, in densely populated watersheds there is the potential for interaction between urban waterways and sewer systems. The affects of accumulated nitrate in riverine and estuary systems include low dissolved oxygen, loss of species diversity, increased mortality of aquatic species, and general eutrophication of the waterbody. However, the dynamics of nitrate pollution from each source and it’s affect on urban waterways is poorly constrained. The isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate have been proven effective in helping to distinguish contamination sources to ground and surface waters. In order to improve our understanding of urban nitrate pollution sources and dynamics, we examined nitrate isotopes (δ15N and δ18O) in base- and stormflow samples collected over a two-year period from a restored urban stream in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). Nine Mile Run drains a 1,600 hectare urban watershed characterized by 38% impervious surface cover. Prior work has documented high nitrate export from the watershed (~19 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). Potential nitrate sources to the watershed include observed sewer overflows draining directly to the stream, as well as atmospheric deposition (~23 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). In this and other urban systems with high percentages of impervious surfaces, there is likely minimal input from nitrate derived from soil or fertilizer. In this presentation, we examine spatial and temporal patterns in nitrate isotopic composition collected at five locations along Nine Mile Run characterized by both sanitary and combined-sewer cross-connections. Preliminary isotopic analysis of low-flow winter streamwater samples suggest nitrate export from Nine Mile Run is primarily influenced by

  12. Numerical analysis of the effect of electrode spacing on deposition rate profiles in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-12-01

    The effect of reactor dimension on deposition rate profiles is analyzed with a two-dimensional (2D) fluid simulation of a capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) reactor to deposit a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN x H y ) film with a SiH4/NH3/N2/He gas mixture. We focus on the complex function of electrode spacing to reveal the physical relation between reactor geometry and deposition rate profiles. The simulation demonstrates that the localization of electron density is concentrated close to the powered electrode periphery for electrode spacing of 9 mm. However, the plasma distribution becomes bulk dominated with electrode spacing of 15 mm by relaxing the localization. As a result, the increase in the electrode spacing creates a more uniform electron power density profile, and the deposition rate profile of SiN x H y film changes from convex to concave in a radial direction. The change in the deposition rate profile is validated through comparison with the experimental observation, which agrees well with the simulation results with errors of less than 5%. The deposition rate profile with electrode spacing of 9 mm is very sensitive to the non-uniform gas density condition applied to the showerhead inlet. However, the deposition rate profile with electrode spacing of 15 mm is not sensitive to the inlet gas profile because of the increasing residence time. The increase of the electrode spacing promotes molecule-molecule gas phase reactions and consequently weakens the effect of the inlet boundary condition.

  13. Use of a foam spatula for sampling surfaces after bioaerosol deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Rafal; Kozlowska, Krystyna; Szpakowska, Malgorzata; Stepinska, Malgorzata; Trafny, Elzbieta A

    2010-02-01

    The present study had three goals: (i) to evaluate the relative quantities of aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus spores deposited on the vertical, horizontal top, and horizontal bottom surfaces in a chamber; (ii) to assess the relative recoveries of the aerosolized spores from glass and stainless steel surfaces with a polyester swab and a macrofoam sponge wipe; and (iii) to estimate the relative recovery efficiencies of aerosolized B. atrophaeus spores and Pantoea agglomerans using a foam spatula at several different bacterial loads by aerosol distribution on glass surfaces. The majority of spores were collected from the bottom horizontal surface regardless of which swab type and extraction protocol were used. Swabbing with a macrofoam sponge wipe was more efficient in recovering spores from surfaces contaminated with high bioaerosol concentrations than swabbing with a polyester swab. B. atrophaeus spores and P. agglomerans culturable cells were detected on glass surfaces using foam spatulas when the theoretical surface bacterial loads were 2.88 x 10(4) CFU and 8.09 x 10(6) CFU per 100-cm(2) area, respectively. The median recovery efficiency from the surfaces using foam spatulas was equal to 9.9% for B. atrophaeus spores when the recovery was calculated relative to the theoretical surface spore load. Using a foam spatula permits reliable sampling of spores on the bioaerosol-exposed surfaces in a wide measuring range. The culturable P. agglomerans cells were recovered with a median efficiency of 0.001%, but staining the swab extracts with fluorescent dyes allowed us to observe that the viable cell numbers were higher by 1.83 log units than culturable organisms. However, additional work is needed to improve the analysis of the foam extracts in order to decrease the limit of detection of Bacillus spores and Gram-negative bacteria on contaminated surfaces.

  14. Validation of dentine deposition rates in beluga whales by interspecies cross dating of temporal δ13C trends in teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory JD Matthews

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Isotopic time series from sequentially sampled growth layer groups (GLGs in marine mammal teeth can be combined to build chronologies allowing assessment of isotopic variation in marine ecosystems. Synchronous recording of baseline isotopic variation across dentinal GLGs of species with temporal and spatial overlap in foraging offers a unique opportunity for validation of marine mammal age estimation procedures through calibration of GLG deposition rates in one species against another whose GLG deposition has been independently determined. In this study, we compare trends in stable carbon isotope ratios (d13C across dentinal GLGs of three eastern Canadian Arctic (ECA beluga (Delphinapterus leucas populations through the 1960s-2000s with a d13C time series measured across dentinal GLGs of ECA/Northwest Atlantic killer whales (Orcinus orca from 1944-1999. We use confirmed annual GLG deposition in killer whales as a means to assess beluga GLG deposition, and show linear d13C declines across chronologies of both species were statistically indistinguishable when based on annual GLG deposition in beluga whales, but differed when based on biannual deposition. We suggest d13C declines reflect the oceanic 13C Suess effect, and provide additional support for annual GLG deposition in beluga whales by comparing rates of d13C declines across beluga GLGs with published annual d13C declines attributed to the oceanic 13C Suess effect in the North Atlantic.

  15. Designing Single Chamber Hwcvd System for High Deposition Rate Device Quality A-Si:h Thin Films and Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Wadibhasme

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new single chamber HWCVD with vertically mounted substrates and filaments has been designed for depositing device quality a-Si:H films with high deposition rate. Optimization studies on films deposited in this chamber under a variety of deposition conditions yielded uniform films at more than 7Å/sec deposition rate and with very low oxygen content. These films show a photoconductivity gain of more than 105. The working pressure has been kept quite low at 15 mtorr compared to earlier studies. i-layers of a p-i-n single junction solar cells were deposited on the TCO (Asahi-U type glass in this reactor. The initial p-layer and the final n-layer were deposited in another system with separate chambers for these doped layers thus exposing the p-layer as well as the i-layer to the atmosphere during the transfer. Using this optimized intrinsic layer, a-Si:H based p-i-n solar cell showed a conversion efficiency of 4.7 %.

  16. Pleistocene terrace deposition related to tectonically controlled surface uplift: An example of the Kyrenia Range lineament in the northern part of Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamakumbura, Romesh N.; Robertson, Alastair H. F.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we consider how surface uplift of a narrow mountain range has interacted with glacial-related sea-level cyclicity and climatic change to produce a series of marine and non-marine terrace systems. The terrace deposits of the Kyrenia Range record rapid surface uplift of a long-lived tectonic lineament during the early Pleistocene, followed by continued surface uplift at a reduced rate during mid-late Pleistocene. Six terrace depositional systems are distinguished and correlated along the northern and southern flanks of the range, termed K0 to K5. The oldest and highest (K0 terrace system) is present only within the central part of the range. The K2-K5 terrace systems formed later, at sequentially lower levels away from the range. The earliest stage of surface uplift (K0 terrace system) comprises lacustrine carbonates interbedded with mass-flow facies (early Pleistocene?). The subsequent terrace system (K1) is made up of colluvial conglomerate and aeolian dune facies on both flanks of the range. The later terrace systems (K2 to K5) each begin with a basal marine deposit, interpreted as a marine transgression. Deltaic conglomerates prograded during inferred global interglacial stages. Overlying aeolian dune facies represent marine regressions, probably related to global glacial stages. Each terrace depositional system was uplifted and preserved, followed by subsequent deposits at progressively lower topographic levels. Climatic variation during interglacial-glacial cycles and autocyclic processes also exerted an influence on deposition, particularly on short-period fluvial and aeolian deposition.

  17. Effect of trichloroethylene enhancement on deposition rate of low-temperature silicon oxide films by silicone oil and ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Susumu; Jain, Puneet

    2017-08-01

    A low-temperature silcon oxide film was deposited at 160 to 220 °C using an atmospheric pressure CVD system with silicone oil vapor and ozone gases. It was found that the deposition rate is markedly increased by adding trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor, which is generated by bubbling TCE solution with N2 gas flow. The increase is more than 3 times that observed without TCE, and any contamination due to TCE is hardly observed in the deposited Si oxide films from Fourier transform infrared spectra.

  18. Are The Profit Rates of the Islamic Investment Deposit Accounts Truly Performance Based? A Case Study of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this study we were motivated to ascertain whether the profit rates of the investment deposit accounts based on the profit and loss sharing contracts offered by the Islamic banks are truly based on the performance of the underlying assets or otherwise, by taking Malaysia as our case study. Given the facts that Islamic investment deposits are interest free in nature and that they are supposedly used in real economic activities, one would naturally expect that their returns are directly relat...

  19. Effect of additional sample bias in Meshed Plasma Immersion Ion Deposition (MPIID) on microstructural, surface and mechanical properties of Si-DLC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Mingzhong [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding & Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Materials Science & Engineering, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi 154007 (China); Tian, Xiubo, E-mail: xiubotian@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding & Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Muqin [School of Materials Science & Engineering, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi 154007 (China); Gong, Chunzhi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding & Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wei, Ronghua [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • A novel Meshed Plasma Immersion Ion Deposition is proposed. • The deposited Si-DLC films possess denser structures and high deposition rate. • It is attributed to ion bombardment of the deposited films. • The ion energy can be independently controlled by an additional bias (novel set up). - Abstract: Meshed Plasma Immersion Ion Deposition (MPIID) using cage-like hollow cathode discharge is a modified process of conventional PIID, but it allows the deposition of thick diamond-like carbon (DLC) films (up to 50 μm) at a high deposition rate (up to 6.5 μm/h). To further improve the DLC film properties, a new approach to the MPIID process is proposed, in which the energy of ions incident to the sample surface can be independently controlled by an additional voltage applied between the samples and the metal meshed cage. In this study, the meshed cage was biased with a pulsed DC power supply at −1350 V peak voltage for the plasma generation, while the samples inside the cage were biased with a DC voltage from 0 V to −500 V with respect to the cage to study its effect. Si-DLC films were synthesized with a mixture of Ar, C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and tetramethylsilane (TMS). After the depositions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectrons spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to study the morphology, surface roughness, chemical bonding and structure, and the surface hardness as well as the modulus of elasticity of the Si-DLC films. It was observed that the intense ion bombardment significantly densified the films, reduced the surface roughness, reduced the H and Si contents, and increased the nanohardness (H) and modulus of elasticity (E), whereas the deposition rate decreased slightly. Using the H and E data, high values of H{sup 3}/E{sup 2} and H/E were obtained on the biased films, indicating the potential excellent mechanical and tribological properties of the films. In this

  20. Surface modification of titanium membrane by chemical vapor deposition and its electrochemical self-cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. W.; Li, J. X.; Gao, C. Y.; Chang, M.

    2011-10-01

    Membrane separation is applied widely in many fields, while concentration polarization and membrane fouling, limiting its promotion and application greatly, are the bottlenecks in membrane application. Among which, membrane fouling is irreversible, membrane must be periodically cleaned or even replaced to restore permeability. Membrane cleaning has become one of the key issues in membrane separation areas. Considering incomparable electrochemical advantages of boron-doped diamond (BDD) film electrode over conventional electrode, a new composite membrane Ti/BDD, made by depositing CVD (chemical vapor deposition) boron-doped diamond film on titanium(Ti) membrane to modify porous titanium surface, that can be cleaned electrochemically is proposed. Feasibility of its preparation and application is discussed in this paper. Results shows that based on the unique electrochemical properties of diamond, cleaning level of this composite Ti/BDD membrane is significantly increased, making membrane life and efficiency improved prominently.

  1. Surface air concentration and deposition of lead-210 in French Guiana: two years of continuous monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melieres, Marie-Antoinette E-mail: melieres@glaciog.ujf-grenoble.fr; Pourchet, Michel; Richard, Sandrine

    2003-07-01

    To make up for the lack of data on {sup 210}Pb aerosol deposition in tropical regions and to use this radionuclide as an aerosol tracer,a monitoring station was run for two years at Petit-Saut, French Guiana. Lead-210 concentration in air at ground level was monitored continuously together with atmospheric total deposition. The air concentration has a mean value of 0.23{+-}0.02 mBq m{sup -3} during both wet and dry seasons, and it is only weakly affected by the precipitation mechanism. This result was unexpected in a wet tropical region, with a high precipitation rate. In contrast, deposition clearly correlates with precipitation for low/moderate rainfall (<15 cm per 15-day), while this correlation is masked by strong fluctuations at high rainfall. The estimated mean annual deposition over the last ten years is 163{+-}75 Bq m{sup -2} y{sup -1}. This provides a procedure fo estimating this mean flux at other sites in French Guiana.

  2. Effect of tellurium deposition rate on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mise, Takahiro; Nakada, Tokio

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of tellurium (Te) deposition rate on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films (Cu/In=0.30-0.31), the films were grown on both bare and Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrates at 200 °C by co-evaporation using a molecular beam epitaxy system. The microstructural properties were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystalline quality of the films was improved with increase in the deposition rate of Te, and exhibited a single CuIn 3Te 5 phase with a highly preferred (1 1 2) orientation. Te-deficient film (Te/(Cu+In)=1.07) grown with a low Te deposition rate showed a narrow bandgap of 0.99 eV at room temperature. The solar cell performance was affected by the deposition rate of Te. The best solar cell fabricated using CuIn 3Te 5 thin films grown with the highest deposition rate of Te (2.6 nm/s) yielded a total area (0.50 cm 2) efficiency of 4.4% ( Voc=309 mV, Jsc=28.0 mA/cm 2, and FF=0.509) without light soaking.

  3. Crystal deposition patterns from evaporating sessile drops on superhydrophobic and liquid impregnated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Samantha; Dash, Susmita; Varanasi, Kripa; Varanasi Group Team

    2016-11-01

    Accelerated corrosion and scale buildup near oceans is partially due to deposition of salty sea mist onto ships, cars, and building structures. Many corrosion preventative measures are expensive, time intensive, and/or have negative impacts on the environment. One solution is the use of specific surfaces that are engineered for scale resistance. In this work, we show that we can delay crystallization and reduce scale adhesion on specifically engineered liquid impregnated surfaces (LIS). The low contact angle hysteresis of the LIS results in a sliding contact line of the saline droplet during evaporation, and the elevated energy barrier of the smooth liquid interface delays crystallization. Experiments conducted on surfaces with different wettability also demonstrate the corresponding influence in controlling salt crystal polymorphism.

  4. Sb Surface Modification of Pd by Mimetic Underpotential Deposition for Formic Acid Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Long Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The newly proposed mimetic underpotential deposition (MUPD technique was extended to modify Pd surfaces with Sb through immersing a Pd film electrode or dispersing Pd/C powder in a Sb(III-containing solution blended with ascorbic acid (AA. The introduction of AA shifts down the open circuit potential of Pd substrate available to achieve suitable Sb modification. The electrocatalytic activity and long-term stability towards HCOOH electrooxidation of the Sb modified Pd surfaces (film electrode or powder catalyst by MUPD is superior than that of unmodified Pd and Sb modified Pd surfaces by conventional UPD method. The enhancement of electrocatalytic performance is due to the third body effect and electronic effect, as well as bi-functional mechanism induced by Sb modification which result in increased resistance against CO poisoning.

  5. An operando surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) study of carbon deposition on SOFC anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Lee, Jung-pil; Ding, Dong; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Park, Soojin; Liu, Meilin

    2015-09-07

    Thermally robust and chemically inert Ag@SiO2 nanoprobes are employed to provide the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect for an in situ/operando study of the early stage of carbon deposition on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. The enhanced sensitivity to carbon enables the detection of different stages of coking, offering insights into intrinsic coking tolerance of material surfaces. Application of a thin coating of gadolinium doped ceria (GDC) enhances the resistance to coking of nickel surfaces. The electrochemically active Ni-YSZ interface appears to be more active for hydrocarbon reforming, resulting in the accumulation of different hydrocarbon molecules, which can be readily removed upon the application of an anodic current. Operando SERS is a powerful tool for the mechanistic study of coking in SOFC systems. It is also applicable to the study of other catalytic and electrochemical processes in a wide range of conditions.

  6. Surface Structure of GaN(0001) in the Chemical Vapor Deposition Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munkholm, A. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Stephenson, G.B.; Eastman, J.A.; Thompson, C.; Auciello, O. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Thompson, C. [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States); Fini, P.; Speck, J.S.; DenBaars, S.P. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Fuoss, P.H. [ATT Laboratories---Research, Florham Park, New Jersey 07932 (United States)

    1999-07-01

    We report the first observation of the atomic-scale structure of the GaN(0001) surface in the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition environment. Measurements were performed using {ital in situ} grazing-incidence x-ray scattering. We determined the surface equilibrium phase diagram as a function of temperature and ammonia partial pressure, which contains two phases with 1{times}1 and ({radical} (3) {times}2{radical} (3) )R30{degree} symmetries. The ({radical} (3) {times}2{radical} (3) )R30{degree} phase is found to have a novel {open_quotes}missing row{close_quotes} structure with 1/3 of the surface Ga atoms absent. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  7. Layer-by-layer deposition of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on the surface of condensed DNA particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Loomis, A; Hagstrom, J E; Budker, V G; Wolff, J A

    1999-08-01

    DNA can be condensed with an excess of poly-cations in aqueous solutions forming stable particles of submicron size with positive surface charge. This charge surplus can be used to deposit alternating layers of polyanions and polycations on the surface surrounding the core of condensed DNA. Using poly-L-lysine (PLL) and succinylated PLL (SPLL) as polycation and polyanion, respectively, we demonstrated layer-by-layer architecture of the particles. Polyanions with a shorter carboxyl/backbone distance tend to disassemble binary DNA/PLL complexes by displacing DNA while polyanions with a longer carboxyl/backbone distance effectively formed a tertiary complex. The zeta potential of such complexes became negative, indicating effective surface recharging. The charge stoichiometry of the DNA/PLL/SPLL complex was found to be close to 1:1:1, resembling poly-electrolyte complexes layered on macrosurfaces. Recharged particles containing condensed plasmid DNA may find applications as non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  8. Surface chemistry for molecular layer deposition of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Steven M; Yoon, Byunghoon; Dameron, Arrelaine A

    2009-04-21

    The fabrication of many devices in modern technology requires techniques for growing thin films. As devices miniaturize, manufacturers will need to control thin film growth at the atomic level. Because many devices have challenging morphologies, thin films must be able to coat conformally on structures with high aspect ratios. Techniques based on atomic layer deposition (ALD), a special type of chemical vapor deposition, allow for the growth of ultra-thin and conformal films of inorganic materials using sequential, self-limiting reactions. Molecular layer deposition (MLD) methods extend this strategy to include organic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymeric materials. In this Account, we provide an overview of the surface chemistry for the MLD of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymers and examine a variety of surface chemistry strategies for growing polymer thin films. Previously, surface chemistry for the MLD of organic polymers such as polyamides and polyimides has used two-step AB reaction cycles using homo-bifunctional reactants. However, these reagents can react twice and eliminate active sites on the growing polymer surface. To avoid this problem, we can employ alternative precursors for MLD based on hetero-bifunctional reactants and ring-opening reactions. We can also use surface activation or protected chemical functional groups. In addition, we can combine the reactants for ALD and MLD to grow hybrid organic-inorganic polymers that should display interesting properties. For example, using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and various diols as reactants, we can achieve the MLD of alucone organic-inorganic polymers. We can alter the chemical and physical properties of these organic-inorganic polymers by varying the organic constituent in the diol or blending the alucone MLD films with purely inorganic ALD films to build a nanocomposite or nanolaminate. The combination of ALD and MLD reactants enlarges the number of possible sequential self-limiting surface

  9. Can We Trust Real Time Measurements of Lung Deposited Surface Area Concentrations in Dust from Powder Nanomaterials?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Marcus; Witschger, Olivier; Bau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    A comparison between various methods for real-time measurements of lung deposited surface area (LDSA) using spherical particles and powder dust with specific surface area ranging from 0.03 to 112 m2 g-1 was conducted. LDSA concentrations measured directly using Nanoparticle Surface Area Monitor (...

  10. The water outgassing rate of internal surfaces of vacuum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, L. N.

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of experimental adsorption isotherm the ratio between the real and geometrical surfaces was calculated and the amount of gas required to form a monolayer was defined. Simultaneous usage of Henry and Frendlih equations allowed to determine the dependence of the heat of adsorption on the logarithm of the absorbed gas amount A mathematical model of pumping of the vacuum systems with adsorbing walls is presented. This model uses the parameters of the vacuum system and the dependence of the adsorption heat on the amount of the adsorbed gas .The conditions of the existence of regular pumping regime are discussed. The structure database vacuum adsorption properties of materials was proposed. The experimental data on the determination of the adsorption outgassing rate were released.

  11. Hydrostatic pressure effect on micro air bubbles deposited on surfaces with a retreating tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, So Hung; Wang, Jingming; Yu, Yang; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2014-06-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on 6 μL air bubbles formed on micropillar structured PDMS and silicone surfaces using a 2 mm diameter stainless steel tip retreated at 1 mm/s was investigated. Dimensional analysis of the tip retraction process showed the experiments to be conducted in the condition where fluid inertial forces are comparable in magnitude with surface tension forces, while viscous forces were lower. Larger bubbles could be left behind on the structured PDMS surface. For hydrostatic pressures in excess of 20 mm H2O (196 Pa), the volume of bubble deposited was found to decrease progressively with pressure increase. The differences in width of the deposited bubbles (in contact with the substrate) were significant at any particular pressure but marginal in height. The attainable height before rupture reduced with pressure increase, thereby accounting for the reducing dispensed volume characteristic. On structured PDMS, the gaseous bridge width (in contact with the substrate) was invariant with tip retraction, while on silicone it was initially reducing before becoming invariant in the lead up to rupture. With silicone, hence, reductions in the contact width and height were both responsible for reduced volumes with pressure increase. Increased hydrostatic pressure was also found to restrict the growth in contact width on silicone during the stage when air was injected in through the tip. The ability to effect bubble size in such a simple manner may already be harnessed in nature and suggests possibilities in technological applications.

  12. Dynamic Characterization of Dendrite Deposition and Growth in Li-Surface by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Maya, R; Rosas, O; Saunders, J; Castaneda, H

    2015-01-13

    The evolution of dendrite formation is characterized by DC and AC electrochemical techniques. Interfacial mechanisms for lithium deposition are described and quantified by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) between a lithium electrode and a graphite electrode. The initiation and growth of dendrites in the lithium surface due to the cathodic polarization conditions following anodic dissolution emulate long term cycling process occurring in the lithium electrodes. The dendrite initiation at the lithium/organic electrolyte interface is proposed to be performed through a combination of layering and interfacial reactions during different cathodic conditions. The growth is proposed to be performed by surface geometrical deposition. In this work, we use EIS in galvanostatic mode to assess the initiation and growth stages of dendrites by the accumulation of precipitates formed under different current conditions. The lithium/organic solvent experimental system using frequency domain techniques is validated by the theoretical approach using a deterministic model that accounts for the faradaic processes at the interface assuming a coverage fraction of the electrodic surface affected by the dendritic growth. (C) 2015 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Elemental and compound semiconductor surface chemistry: Intelligent interfacial design facilitated through novel functionalization and deposition strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Lon Alan, Jr.

    The fundamental understanding of silicon surface chemistry is an essential tool for silicon's continued dominance of the semiconductor industry in the years to come. By tapping into the vast library of organic functionalities, the synthesis of organic monolayers may be utilized to prepare interfaces, tailored to a myriad of applications ranging from silicon VLSI device optimization and MEMS to physiological implants and chemical sensors. Efforts in our lab to form stable organic monolayers on porous silicon through direct silicon-carbon linkages have resulted in several efficient functionalization methods. In the first chapter of this thesis a comprehensive review of these methods, and many others is presented. The following chapter and the appendix serve to demonstrate both potential applications and studies aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of the chemistry behind the organic functionalization of silicon surfaces. The remainder of this thesis attempts to demonstrate new methods of metal deposition onto both elemental and compound semiconductor surfaces. Currently, there is considerable interest in producing patterned metallic structures with reduced dimensions for use in technologies such as ULSI device fabrication, MEMS, and arrayed nanosensors, without sacrificing throughput or cost effectiveness. Research in our laboratory has focused on the preparation of precious metal thin films on semiconductor substrates via electroless deposition. Continuous metallic films form spontaneously under ambient conditions, in the absence of a fluoride source or an externally applied current. In order to apply this metallization method toward the development of useful technologies, patterning utilizing photolithography, microcontact printing, and scanning probe nanolithography has been demonstrated.

  14. Surface Preparation and Deposited Gate Oxides for Gallium Nitride Based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. McIntyre

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The literature on polar Gallium Nitride (GaN surfaces, surface treatments and gate dielectrics relevant to metal oxide semiconductor devices is reviewed. The significance of the GaN growth technique and growth parameters on the properties of GaN epilayers, the ability to modify GaN surface properties using in situ and ex situ processes and progress on the understanding and performance of GaN metal oxide semiconductor (MOS devices are presented and discussed. Although a reasonably consistent picture is emerging from focused studies on issues covered in each of these topics, future research can achieve a better understanding of the critical oxide-semiconductor interface by probing the connections between these topics. The challenges in analyzing defect concentrations and energies in GaN MOS gate stacks are discussed. Promising gate dielectric deposition techniques such as atomic layer deposition, which is already accepted by the semiconductor industry for silicon CMOS device fabrication, coupled with more advanced physical and electrical characterization methods will likely accelerate the pace of learning required to develop future GaN-based MOS technology.

  15. Deposition of substituted apatites with anticolonizing properties onto titanium surfaces using a novel blasting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, C; O'Hare, P; O'Leary, N D; Crean, A M; Ryan, K; Dobson, A D W; O'Neill, L

    2010-10-01

    A series of doped apatites have been deposited onto titanium (V) substrates using a novel ambient temperature blasting process. The potential of these deposited doped apatites as non-colonizing osteoconductive coatings has been evaluated in vitro. XPS, EDX, and gravimetric analysis demonstrated that a high degree of coating incorporation was observed for each material. The modified surfaces were found to produce osteoblast proliferation comparable to, or better than, a hydroxyapatite finish. Promising levels of initial microbial inhibition were observed from the Sr- and Ag-doped surfaces, with the strontium showing prolonged ability to reduce bacteria numbers over a 30-day period. Ion elution profiles have been characterized and linked to the microbial response and based on the results obtained, mechanisms of kill have been suggested. In this study, the direct contact of coated substrate surfaces with microbes was observed to be a significant contributing factor to the antimicrobial performance and the anticolonizing activity. The silver substituted apatite was observed to out-perform both the SrA and ZnA in terms of biofilm inhibition.

  16. Analysis of reaction rates of single molecules on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueba, H.

    2017-10-01

    The experimental results of the action spectra i.e., reaction rate R(V) as a function of a bias voltage V are analyzed for rotation of a single CCH (D) molecule on a Cu (100) surface [5] and hopping of a single H(D)2O molecule on Pd(111) surface [6]. In the former system it is identified that rotation occurs if enough energy stored in the C-H (D) in-plane bending (IPB) mode excited by tunneling electron is transferred to the C-H (D) out of plane bending (OPB) mode (reaction coordinate mode) via the anharmonic mode coupling in a single electron process. The calculated R(V) shows an excellent agreement with the experimental results except at the low bias voltages below V ≃ 60 mV where no experimental data is available for the nonlinear current I dependence of R(I). A reproduction of the experimental R(V) at the higher voltage region allows us to determine the vibrational density of states of the C-H IPB mode and its coupling rate to the C-H (D) OPB mode as well as the inelastic tunneling current to excite IPB mode. A change of a conductance upon excitation of the C-H IPB mode enables us to evaluate the electron-vibration coupling strength inducing the rotation motion of CCH molecule. In the latter system investigated at a high temperature of about 40 K, the constant R(V) due to thermal hopping followed by the rapid increase is satisfactory explained by anharmonic inter-mode coupling between the scissor mode excited by tunneling electrons and the frustrated translation mode for H(D)2O molecule on Pd(111).

  17. Surface modification of stainless steel by plasma-based fluorine and silver dual ion implantation and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinonaga, Yukari; Arita, Kenji

    2009-11-01

    The aims of this study were to modify dental device surface with fluorine and silver and to examine the effectiveness of this new surface modification method. Stainless steel plates were modified by plasma-based fluorine and silver ion implantation-deposition method. The surface characteristics and brushing abrasion resistance were evaluated by XPS, contact angle and brushing abrasion test. XPS spectra of modified specimens showed the peaks of fluoride and silver. These peaks were detected even after brushing abrasion test. Water contact angle significantly increased due to implantation-deposition of both fluorine and silver ions. Moreover, the contact angle of the modified specimen was significantly higher than that of fluorine only deposited specimen with the same number of brushing strokes. This study indicates that this new surface modification method of fluorine and silver ion implantation-deposition improved the brushing abrasion resistance and hydrophobic property making it a potential antimicrobial device.

  18. Underpotential deposition of a copper monolayer on a gold film sensed by integrated optical surface plasmon resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Abanulo, J.C.; Harris, R.D.; Bartlett, P.N.; Wilkinson, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    An integrated optical surface plasmon resonance sensor combined with electrochemical control is used to monitor the underpotential deposition of a copper monolayer onto a gold film from 1 mM Cu2+ in 0.1 M perchloric acid.

  19. Growth, intermixing, and surface phase formation for zinc tin oxide nanolaminates produced by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hägglund, Carl, E-mail: carl.hagglund@angstrom.uu.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Engineering Sciences, Division of Solid State Electronics, Uppsala University, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Grehl, Thomas; Brongersma, Hidde H. [ION-TOF GmbH, Heisenbergstraße 15, 48149 Münster (Germany); Tanskanen, Jukka T.; Mullings, Marja N.; Mackus, Adriaan J. M.; MacIsaac, Callisto; Bent, Stacey Francine, E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yee, Ye Sheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Clemens, Bruce M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A broad and expanding range of materials can be produced by atomic layer deposition at relatively low temperatures, including both oxides and metals. For many applications of interest, however, it is desirable to grow more tailored and complex materials such as semiconductors with a certain doping, mixed oxides, and metallic alloys. How well such mixed materials can be accomplished with atomic layer deposition requires knowledge of the conditions under which the resulting films will be mixed, solid solutions, or laminated. The growth and lamination of zinc oxide and tin oxide is studied here by means of the extremely surface sensitive technique of low energy ion scattering, combined with bulk composition and thickness determination, and x-ray diffraction. At the low temperatures used for deposition (150 °C), there is little evidence for atomic scale mixing even with the smallest possible bilayer period, and instead a morphology with small ZnO inclusions in a SnO{sub x} matrix is deduced. Postannealing of such laminates above 400 °C however produces a stable surface phase with a 30% increased density. From the surface stoichiometry, this is likely the inverted spinel of zinc stannate, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}. Annealing to 800 °C results in films containing crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, or multilayered films of crystalline ZnO, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, and SnO{sub 2} phases, depending on the bilayer period.

  20. 提高焊丝熔敷率的试验研究%STUDY ON ENHANCING WIRE DEPOSITION RATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐鲁宁; 殷树言; 卢振洋; 黄继强; 曹光健

    2001-01-01

    在理论分析的基础上,对干伸长、焊接电压、混合保护气体的配比成分等因素与熔敷率之间的关系作了大量系统试验,确定了影响熔敷率提高的主要因素,指出阻碍熔敷率提高的核心问题。%In this paper studieol the effects of stick-out, welding voltage, and shielding mixed gas on deposition rates.The major factor affecting deposition rates is ascertained. The key problem restraining deposition rates and solution are presented.

  1. Chemical surface deposition of cds thin films from CdI2 aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Il’chuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time using CdI2 solution CdS films on glass and ITO coated glass substrates were produced by the method of layerwise chemical surface deposition (ChSD. CdS thin films with the widths from 40 nm to 100 nm were obtained for windows in solar cells based on CdS/CdTe heterojunctions. Changes of the structural and optical properties of CdS films due to air annealing are shown.

  2. Experimental evidence of total absorption by a thin absorbing layer deposited on a patterned metallic surface

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the experimental demonstration of total absorption by a metal-dielectric metasurface. Following the theoretical proposal [A. D\\'iaz-Rubio et al. Phys. Rev. B 89, 245123 (2014)], we fabricated a metasurface consisting of a low absorbing dielectric layer (made of FR4) deposited on top of a metallic surface patterned with a square distribution of coaxial cavities. For P-polarized waves, it is observed a low frequency peak with perfect absorption. The behavior of this peak has been experimentally characterized for different dielectric layer thicknesses, coaxial cavity lengths and incidence angles. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with numerical simulation and support the previous theoretical findings.

  3. Non-collinear magnetism induced by frustration in transition-metal nanostructures deposited on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounis, S

    2014-07-01

    How does magnetism behave when the physical dimension is reduced to the size of nanostructures? The multiplicity of magnetic states in these systems can be very rich, in that their properties depend on the atomic species, the cluster size, shape and symmetry or choice of the substrate. Small variations of the cluster parameters may change the properties dramatically. Research in this field has gained much by the many novel experimental methods and techniques exhibiting atomic resolution. Here we review the ab-initio approach, focusing on recent calculations on magnetic frustration and occurrence of non-collinear magnetism in antiferromagnetic nanostructures deposited on surfaces.

  4. The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füri, Evelyn; Deloule, Etienne; Trappitsch, Reto

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratio is a key tracer for the source of planetary water. However, secondary processes such as solar wind implantation and cosmic ray induced spallation reactions have modified the primordial D/H signature of 'water' in all rocks and soils recovered on the Moon. Here, we re-evaluate the production rate of cosmogenic deuterium (D) at the Moon's surface through ion microprobe analyses of hydrogen isotopes in olivines from eight Apollo 12 and 15 mare basalts. These in situ measurements are complemented by CO2 laser extraction-static mass spectrometry analyses of cosmogenic noble gas nuclides (3He, 21Ne, 38Ar). Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of the mare basalts, derived from their cosmogenic 21Ne content, range from 60 to 422 Ma. These CRE ages are 35% higher, on average, than the published values for the same samples. The amount of D detected in the olivines increases linearly with increasing CRE ages, consistent with a production rate of (2.17 ± 0.11) ×10-12 mol(g rock)-1 Ma-1. This value is more than twice as high as previous estimates for the production of D by galactic cosmic rays, indicating that for water-poor lunar samples, i.e., samples with water concentrations ≤50 ppm, corrected D/H ratios have been severely overestimated.

  5. ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgeway, R G; Hegedus, S S; Podraza, N J

    2012-08-31

    Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both CSi and Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

  6. Complex Wind-Induced Variations of Surface Snow Accumulation Rates over East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, I.; Scambos, T. A.; Koenig, L.; van den Broeke, M.; Lenaerts, J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow-accumulation over Antarctica is important for mass balance estimates and climate studies based on ice core records. Using airborne radar, lidar and thresholds of surface slope, modeled surface mass balance (SMB) and wind fields, we have predicted continent-wide distribution of wind-scour zones over Antarctica. These zones are located over relatively steep ice surfaces formed by ice flow over bedrock topography. Near-surface winds accelerate over these steeper slopes and erode and sublimate the snow. This results in numerous localized regions (typically ≤ 200 km2) with reduced or negative surface accumulation. Although small zones of re-deposition occur at the base of the steeper slope areas, the redeposited mass is small relative to the ablation loss. Total losses from wind-scour and wind-glaze areas amounts to tens of gigatons annually. Near the coast, winds often blow significant amounts of surface snow from these zones into the ocean. Large uncertainties remain in SMB estimates over East Antarctica as climate models do not adequately represent the small-scale physical processes that lead to mass loss or redistribution over the wind-scour zones. In this study, we also use Operation IceBridge's snow radar data to provide evidence for a gradual ablation of ~16-18 m of firn (~200 years of accumulation) from wind-scour zones over the upper Recovery Ice Stream catchment. The maximum ablation rates observed in this region are ~ -54 kg m-2 a-1 (-54 mm water equivalent a-1). Our airborne radio echo-sounding analysis show snow redeposition downslope of the wind-scour zones is <10% of the cumulative mass loss. Our study shows that the local mass loss is dominated by sublimation to water vapor rather than wind-transport of snow.

  7. Ion beam deposition and surface characterization of thin multi-component oxide films during growth.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, A.R.; Im, J.; Smentkowski, V.; Schultz, J.A.; Auciello, O.; Gruen, D.M.; Holocek, J.; Chang, R.P.H.

    1998-01-13

    Ion beam deposition of either elemental targets in a chemically active gas such as oxygen or nitrogen, or of the appropriate oxide or nitride target, usually with an additional amount of ambient oxygen or nitrogen present, is an effective means of depositing high quality oxide and nitride films. However, there are a number of phenomena which can occur, especially during the production of multicomponent films such as the ferroelectric perovskites or high temperature superconducting oxides, which make it desirable to monitor the composition and structure of the growing film in situ. These phenomena include thermodynamic (Gibbsian), and oxidation or nitridation-driven segregation, enhanced oxidation or nitridation through production of a highly reactive gas phase species such as atomic oxygen or ozone via interaction of the ion beam with the target, and changes in the film composition due to preferential sputtering of the substrate via primary ion backscattering and secondary sputtering of the film. Ion beam deposition provides a relatively low background pressure of the sputtering gas, but the ambient oxygen or nitrogen required to produce the desired phase, along with the gas burden produced by the ion source, result in a background pressure which is too high by several orders of magnitude to perform in situ surface analysis by conventional means. Similarly, diamond is normally grown in the presence of a hydrogen atmosphere to inhibit the formation of the graphitic phase.

  8. Surface-Enhanced Infrared Absorption of o-Nitroaniline on Nickel Nanoparticles Synthesized by Electrochemical Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufang Niu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel nanoparticles were electrochemically deposited on indium-tin oxide (ITO coated glass plate in a modified Watt’s electrolyte. The surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA effect of the nanoparticles was evaluated by attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR using o-nitroaniline as a probe molecule. Electrodeposition parameters such as deposition time, pH value, and the type of surfactants were investigated. The morphology and the microstructure of the deposits were characterized by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and the atomic force microscope (AFM, respectively. The results indicate that the optimum parameters were potential of 1.3 V, time of 30 s, and pH of 8.92 in the solution of 0.3756 mol/L diethanolamine, 0.1 mol/L nickel sulfate, 0.01 mol/L nickel chloride, and 0.05 mol/L boric acid. The FESEM observation shows that the morphology of nickel nanoparticles with best enhancement effect is spherical and narrowly distributed particles with the average size of 50 nm. SEIRA enhancement factor is about 68.

  9. Atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to water surfaces: A mass balance approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeety, Bruce D.; Hites, Ronald A.

    A mass balance model was developed to explain the movement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into and out of Siskiwit Lake, which is located on a wilderness island in northern Lake Superior. Because of its location, the PAH found in this lake must have originated exclusively from atmospheric sources. Using gas Chromatographie mass spectrometry, 11 PAH were quantified in rain, snow, air, lake water, sediment core and sediment trap samples. From the dry deposition fluxes, an aerosol deposition velocity of 0.99 ± 0.15 cm s -1 was calculated for indeno[1,2,3- cd]pyrene and benzo[ ghi]perylene, two high molecular weight PAH which are not found in the gas phase. The dry aerosol deposition was found to dominate the wet removal mechanism by an average ratio of 9:1. The dry gas flux was negative, indicating that surface volatilization was taking place; it accounted for 10-80 % of the total output flux depending on the volatility of the PAH. The remaining PAH were lost to sedimentation. From the dry gas flux, an overall mass transfer coefficient for PAH was calculated to be 0.18 ± 0.06 m d -1. In this case, the overall mass transfer is dominated by the liquid phase resistance.

  10. Surface Water-Ice Deposits in the Northern Shadowed Regions of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Schorghofer, N.; Preusker, F.; Mazarico, E.; Schroeder, S. E.; Byrne, S.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Combe, J.-P.; Schaefer, M.; Thangjam, G. S.; Hoffmann, M.; Gutierrez-Marques, P.; Landis, M. E.; Dietrich, W.; Ripken, J.; Matz, K. D.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Ceres, a dwarf planet located in the main asteroid belt, has a low bulk density, and models predict that a substantial amount of water ice is present in its mantle and outer shell. The Herschel telescope and the Dawn spacecraft have observed the release of water vapor from Ceres, and exposed water ice has been detected by Dawn on its surface at mid-latitudes. Water molecules from endogenic and exogenic sources can also be cold-trapped in permanent shadows at high latitudes, as happens on the Moon and Mercury. Here we present the first image-based survey of Ceres's northern permanent shadows and report the discovery of bright deposits in cold traps. We identify a minimum of 634 permanently shadowed craters. Bright deposits are detected on the floors of just 10 of these craters in multiscattered light. We spectroscopically identify one of the bright deposits as water ice. This detection strengthens the evidence that permanently shadowed areas have preserved water ice on airless planetary bodies.

  11. a-C:H/a-C:H(N) thin film deposition using 2.45 GHz expanding surface wave sustained plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Suk-Ho; Douai, David; Berndt, Johannes; Winter, Jörg

    2005-08-01

    Thin film properties such as homogeneity (radial profiles), optical constants, carbon density in the film, and the surface structures are strongly dependent on deposition conditions. We have investigated a-C:H/a-C:H(N) thin film deposition by expanding Ar-CH4 and Ar/N2-CH4 surface wave sustained plasmas at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. The influence of the plasma parameters such as pressure, input power, gas mixture rate, and an external bias voltage on the change of the film properties is systematically studied. An external bias applied to the substrate leads to more dense and harder a-C:H films, i.e. change from soft polymer-like to hard diamond-like. Rutherford backscattering and atomic force microscope surface topology confirm the densification of the films.

  12. Rapid deposition of transparent super-hydrophobic layers on various surfaces using microwave plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irzh, Alexander; Ghindes, Lee; Gedanken, Aharon

    2011-12-01

    We report herein on a very fast and simple process for the fabrication of transparent superhydrophobic surfaces by using microwave (MW) plasma. It was found that the reaction of various organic liquids in MW argon plasma yields hydrophobic polymeric layers on a large assortment of surfaces, including glass, polymeric surfaces, ceramics, metals, and even paper. In most cases, these polymers are deposited as a rough layer composed of 10-15 nm nanoparticles (NPs). This roughness, together with the chemical hydrophobic nature of the coated materials, is responsible for the superhydrophobic nature of the surface. The typical reaction time of the coating procedure was 1-10 s. The stability of these superhydrophobic surfaces was examined outdoors, and was found to last 2-5 days under direct exposure to the environment and to last 2 months when the sample was protected by a quartz cover. A detailed characterization study of the chemical composition of the layers followed using XPS, solid-state NMR, and IR measurements. Modifications were introduced in the products leading to a substantial improvement in the stability of the products outdoors.

  13. Filamentous Biopolymers on Surfaces: Atomic Force Microscopy Images Compared with Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Filament Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, Norbert; Klenin, Konstantin; Kirmse, Robert; Bussiek, Malte; Herrmann, Harald; Hafner, Mathias; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarly on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i) For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii) For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a ‘trapping’ mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these ‘ideal’ adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica (‘ideal’ trapping) and on glass (‘ideal’ equilibrated) with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions. PMID:19888472

  14. Filamentous biopolymers on surfaces: atomic force microscopy images compared with Brownian dynamics simulation of filament deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Mücke

    Full Text Available Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarily on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a 'trapping' mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these 'ideal' adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica ('ideal' trapping and on glass ('ideal' equilibrated with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions.

  15. Fibrinogen matrix deposited on the surface of biomaterials acts as a natural anti-adhesive coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiullin, Roman; Christenson, Wayne; Owaynat, Hadil; Yermolenko, Ivan S; Kadirov, Marsil K; Ros, Robert; Ugarova, Tatiana P

    2015-10-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen on the luminal surface of biomaterials is a critical early event during the interaction of blood with implanted vascular graft prostheses which determines their thrombogenicity. We have recently identified a nanoscale process by which fibrinogen modifies the adhesive properties of various surfaces for platelets and leukocytes. In particular, adsorption of fibrinogen at low density promotes cell adhesion while its adsorption at high density results in the formation of an extensible multilayer matrix, which dramatically reduces cell adhesion. It remains unknown whether deposition of fibrinogen on the surface of vascular graft materials produces this anti-adhesive effect. Using atomic force spectroscopy, single cell force spectroscopy, and standard adhesion assays with platelets and leukocytes, we have characterized the adhesive and physical properties of the contemporary biomaterials, before and after coating with fibrinogen. We found that uncoated PET, PTFE and ePTFE exhibited high adhesion forces developed between the AFM tip or cells and the surfaces. Adsorption of fibrinogen at the increasing concentrations progressively reduced adhesion forces, and at ≥2 μg/ml all surfaces were virtually nonadhesive. Standard adhesion assays performed with platelets and leukocytes confirmed this dependence. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular events underlying thrombogenicity of vascular grafts.

  16. Nanotechnology based surface treatments for corrosion protection and deposit control of power plant equipment. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-05-15

    Nanotechnology can provide possibilities for obtaining new valuable information regarding performance and corrosion protection in power plants. In general the desired performance of the contact surfaces is an easy-to-release effect. This is in order to prolong the time interval between cleaning periods or make the cleaning procedures easier and less expensive. Corrosion protection is also desired in order to extend the life time of various parts in the power plants and thus optimize the energy output and overall efficiency of the plant. Functional sol-gel coating based on nanotechnology is tested in a variety of conditions. Applications of functional sol-gel coatings were performed in the condenser and on seven air preheaters at Fynsvaerket, Odense, with corrosion protection as the main issue. Coatings with easy-to-clean effects were tested in the Flue Gas Desulphurization plant at Nordjyllandsvaerket, Aalborg, with the aim of reducing gipsum deposit. Thermo stabilized coatings were tested on tube bundles between in the passage from the 1st to 2end pass and on the wall between 1st and 2end pass at Amagervaerket, Copenhagen, and in the boiler at Haderslev CHP plant. The objective of this test were reducing deposits and increasing corrosion protection. The tested coatings were commercial available coatings and coatings developed in this project. Visual inspections have been performed of all applications except at Nordjyllandsvaerket. Corrosion assessment has been done at DTU - Mechanical Engineering. The results range from no difference between coated and uncoated areas to some improvements. At Amagervaerket the visual assessment showed in general a positive effect with a sol-gel hybrid system and a commercial system regarding removal of deposits. The visual assessment of the air preheaters at Fynsvaerket indicates reduced deposits on a sol-gel nanocomposite coated air preheater compared to an uncoated air preheater. (Author)

  17. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  18. Thermomechanical response of 3D laser-deposited Ti–6Al–4V alloy over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng-Hui [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Guo, Wei-Guo, E-mail: weiguo@nwpu.edu.cn [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Huang, Wei-Dong [The State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Su, Yu [Department of Mechanics, School of Aerospace Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Lin, Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Yuan, Kang-Bo [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)

    2015-10-28

    To understand and evaluate the thermomechanical property of Ti–6Al–4V alloy prepared by the 3D laser deposition technology, an uniaxial compression test was performed on cylindrical samples using an electronic universal testing machine and enhanced Hopkinson technique, over the range of strain rate from 0.001/s to 5000/s, and at initial temperatures from the room temperature to 1173 K. The microstructure of the undeformed and deformed samples was examined through optical microscopy and the use of scanning electron microscope (SEM). The experimental results show the followings: (1) the anisotropy of the mechanical property of this alloy is not significant despite the visible stratification at the exterior surfaces; (2) initial defects, such as the initial voids and lack of fusion, are found in the microstructure and in the crack surfaces of the deformed samples, and they are considered as a major source of crack initiation and propagation; (3) adiabatic shear bands and shearing can easily develop at all selected temperatures for samples under compression; (4) the yield and ultimate strengths of this laser-deposited Ti–6Al–4V alloy are both lower than those of the Ti–6Al–4V alloy prepared by forging and electron beam melting, whereas both of its strengths are higher than those of a conventional grade Ti–6Al–4V alloy at high strain rate only. In addition to compression tests we also conducted tensile loading tests on the laser-deposited alloy at both low and high strain rates (0.1/s and 1000/s). There is significant tension/compression asymmetry in the mechanical response under high-strain-rate loading. It was found that the quasi-static tensile fracturing exhibits typical composite fracture characteristic with quasi-cleavages and dimples, while the high-strain-rate fracturing is characterized by ductile fracture behavior.

  19. Characterization and Electrochemical Performance at High Discharge Rates of Tin Dioxide Thin Films Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, M. Yu.; Novikov, P. A.; Nazarov, D. V.; Rymyantsev, A. M.; Silin, A. O.; Zhang, Y.; Popovich, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, thin films of tin dioxide have been synthesized on substrates of silicon and stainless steel by atomic layer deposition (ALD) with tetraethyl tin and by inductively coupled remote oxygen plasma as precursors. Studies of the surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy show a strong dependence on synthesis temperature. According to the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, the samples contain tin in the oxidation state +4. The thickness of the thin films for electrochemical performance was approximately 80 nm. Electrochemical cycling in the voltage range of 0.01-0.8 V have shown that tin oxide has a stable discharge capacity of approximately 650 mAh/g during 400 charge/discharge cycles with an efficiency of approximately 99.5%. The decrease in capacity after 400 charge/discharge cycles was around 5-7%. Synthesized SnO2 thin films have fast kinetics of lithium ions intercalation and excellent discharge efficiency at high C-rates, up to 40C, with a small decrease in capacity of less than 20%. Specific capacity and cyclic stability of thin films of SnO2 synthesized by ALD exceed the values mentioned in the literature for pure tin dioxide thin films.

  20. Competition between surface relaxation and ballistic deposition models in scale free networks

    CERN Document Server

    La Rocca, Cristian E; Braunstein, Lidia A

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the scaling behavior of the fluctuations in the steady state $W_S$ with the system size $N$ for a surface growth process given by the competition between the surface relaxation (SRM) and the Ballistic Deposition (BD) models on degree uncorrelated Scale Free networks (SF), characterized by a degree distribution $P(k)\\sim k^{-\\lambda}$, where $k$ is the degree of a node. It is known that the fluctuations of the SRM model above the critical dimension ($d_c=2$) scales logarithmically with $N$ on euclidean lattices. However, Pastore y Piontti {\\it et. al.} [A. L. Pastore y Piontti {\\it et. al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 76}, 046117 (2007)] found that the fluctuations of the SRM model in SF networks scale logarithmically with $N$ for $\\lambda <3$ and as a constant for $\\lambda \\geq 3$. In this letter we found that for a pure ballistic deposition model on SF networks $W_S$ scales as a power law with an exponent that depends on $\\lambda$. On the other hand when both processes are in competition, we...

  1. Effect of microbial treatment on the prevention and removal of paraffin deposits on stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Li, Wen-Hong; Lu, Mang; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi; Luo, Yi-Jing; Qiao, Wei; Sun, Shan-Shan; Zhong, Wei-Zhang; Zhang, Min

    2012-11-01

    In this study, biosurfactant-producing strain N2 and non-biosurfactant producing stain KB18 were used to investigate the effects of microbial treatment on the prevention and removal of paraffin deposits on stainless steel surfaces. Strain N2, with a biosurfactant production capacity, reduced the contact angle of stainless steel to 40.04°, and the corresponding adhesion work of aqueous phase was decreased by 26.5 mJ/m(2). By contrast, KB18 could only reduce the contact angle to 50.83°, with a corresponding 7.6 mJ/m(2) decrease in the aqueous phase work adhesion. The paraffin removal test showed that the paraffin removal efficiencies of strain N2 and KB18 were 79.0% and 61.2%, respectively. Interestingly, the N2 cells could attach on the surface of the oil droplets to inhibit droplets coalescence. These results indicate that biosurfactant-producing strains can alter the wettability of stainless steel and thus eliminate paraffin deposition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering dendritic substrates fabricated by deposition of gold and silver on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mingfei; Fang, Jinghuai; Cao, Min; Jin, Yonglong

    2010-11-01

    This paper reports a study on the preparation of gold nanoparticles and silver dendrites on silicon substrates by immersion plating. Firstly, gold was deposited onto silicon wafer from HF aqueous solution containing HAuCl4. Then, the silicon wafer deposited gold was dipped into HF aqueous solution of AgNO3 to form silver coating gold film. Scanning electron microscopy reveals a uniform gold film consisted of gold nanoparticles and rough silver coating gold film containing uniform dendritic structures on silicon surface. By SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering) measurements, the fabricated gold and silver coating gold substrates activity toward SERS is assessed. The SERS spectra of crystal violet on the fabricated substrates reflect the different SERS activities on gold nanoparticles film and silver coating gold dendrites film. Compared with pure gold film on silicon, the film of silver coating gold dendrites film significantly increased the SERS intensity. As the fabrication process is very simple, cost-effective and reproducible, and the fabricated silver coating gold substrate is of excellent enhancement ability, spatial uniformity and good stability.

  3. Surface passivation of efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells using thermal atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Che-Wei; Chen, Hsin-Jui; Chang, Che-Wei; Huang, Jhih-Jie; Yang, Ming-Jui; Tjahjono, Budi; Huang, Jian-Jia; Hsu, Wen-Ching; Chen, Miin-Jang

    2013-10-09

    Efficient nanotextured black silicon solar cells passivated by an Al2O3 layer are demonstrated. The broadband antireflection of the nanotextured black silicon solar cells was provided by fabricating vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays on the n(+) emitter. A highly conformal Al2O3 layer was deposited upon the SiNW arrays by the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) based on the multiple pulses scheme. The nanotextured black silicon wafer covered with the Al2O3 layer exhibited a low total reflectance of ∼1.5% in a broad spectrum from 400 to 800 nm. The Al2O3 passivation layer also contributes to the suppressed surface recombination, which was explored in terms of the chemical and field-effect passivation effects. An 8% increment of short-circuit current density and 10.3% enhancement of efficiency were achieved due to the ALD Al2O3 surface passivation and forming gas annealing. A high efficiency up to 18.2% was realized in the ALD Al2O3-passivated nanotextured black silicon solar cells.

  4. Surface structure characterization of ultra-thin films of Au deposited on Pd(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancotti, A.; de Siervo, A.; Nascente, P. A. P.; Landers, R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-thin films of Au were deposited on the Pd(111) surface and then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) generated by synchrotron radiation. The Au films were deposited at room temperature (300 K) and subsequently annealed at 400 °C (673 K) and 610 °C (883 K). XPD analyses indicated that the gold films were 7 and 6 ML thick, for the annealing temperatures of 400 °C and 610 °C, respectively. The film interlayer distances exhibited an oscillatory behavior, with a 5% contraction between the top and the second layers, a 3% expansion between the second and the third layers, for the film annealed at 400 °C, and a 2% expansion in the interlayer distance between the top and the second layers and a 4% contraction between the second and the third layers, for the film annealed at 610 °C. For both annealing temperatures, the interlayer distances between the third and the fourth layers and between the fourth and the fifth layers exhibited a 1% expansion and a 2% contraction. For the film annealed at 610 °C, XPD results revealed that the Pd(111) surface was covered by Au islands, with some bare patches exposed.

  5. Effect of additional sample bias in Meshed Plasma Immersion Ion Deposition (MPIID) on microstructural, surface and mechanical properties of Si-DLC films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingzhong; Tian, Xiubo; Li, Muqin; Gong, Chunzhi; Wei, Ronghua

    2016-07-01

    Meshed Plasma Immersion Ion Deposition (MPIID) using cage-like hollow cathode discharge is a modified process of conventional PIID, but it allows the deposition of thick diamond-like carbon (DLC) films (up to 50 μm) at a high deposition rate (up to 6.5 μm/h). To further improve the DLC film properties, a new approach to the MPIID process is proposed, in which the energy of ions incident to the sample surface can be independently controlled by an additional voltage applied between the samples and the metal meshed cage. In this study, the meshed cage was biased with a pulsed DC power supply at -1350 V peak voltage for the plasma generation, while the samples inside the cage were biased with a DC voltage from 0 V to -500 V with respect to the cage to study its effect. Si-DLC films were synthesized with a mixture of Ar, C2H2 and tetramethylsilane (TMS). After the depositions, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectrons spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were used to study the morphology, surface roughness, chemical bonding and structure, and the surface hardness as well as the modulus of elasticity of the Si-DLC films. It was observed that the intense ion bombardment significantly densified the films, reduced the surface roughness, reduced the H and Si contents, and increased the nanohardness (H) and modulus of elasticity (E), whereas the deposition rate decreased slightly. Using the H and E data, high values of H3/E2 and H/E were obtained on the biased films, indicating the potential excellent mechanical and tribological properties of the films. In this paper, the effects of the sample bias voltage on the film properties are discussed in detail and the optimal bias voltage is presented.

  6. Surface passivation of nano-textured fluorescent SiC by atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    Nano-textured surfaces have played a key role in optoelectronic materials to enhance the light extraction efficiency. In this work, morphology and optical properties of nano-textured SiC covered with atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 were investigated. In order to obtain a high quality surface...... for TiO2 deposition, a three-step cleaning procedure was introduced after RIE etching. The morphology of anatase TiO2 indicates that the nano-textured substrate has a much higher surface nucleated grain density than a flat substrate at the beginning of the deposition process. The corresponding...... reflectance increases with TiO2 thickness due to increased surface diffuse reflection. The passivation effect of ALD TiO2 thin film on the nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC sample was also investigated and a PL intensity improvement of 8.05% was obtained due to the surface passivation....

  7. FE-SEM, FIB and TEM Study of Surface Deposits of Apollo 15 Green Glass Volcanic Spherules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Daniel K.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Rahman, Z.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.

    2011-01-01

    Surface deposits on lunar pyroclastic green (Apollo 15) and orange (Apollo 17) glass spherules have been attributed to condensation from the gas clouds that accompanied fire-fountain eruptions. The fire fountains cast molten lava high above the lunar surface and the silicate melt droplets quenched before landing producing the glass beads. Early investigations showed that these deposits are rich in sulfur and zinc. The deposits are extremely fine-grained and thin, so that it was never possible to determine their chemical compositions cleanly by SEM/EDX or electron probe x-ray analysis because most of the excited volume was in the under-lying silicate glass. We are investigating the surface deposits by TEM, using focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy to extract and thin the surface deposits. Here we report on chemical mapping of a FIB section of surface deposits of an Apollo green glass bead 15401using the ultra-high resolution JEOL 2500 STEM located at NASA Johnson Space Center.

  8. Enhanced Sensitivity of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors Incorporating Metallic Dot Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A new surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s−1 and good linearity were observed.

  9. Enhanced sensitivity of surface acoustic wave-based rate sensors incorporating metallic dot arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liu, Jiuling; He, Shitang

    2014-02-26

    A new surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor pattern incorporating metallic dot arrays was developed in this paper. Two parallel SAW delay lines with a reverse direction and an operation frequency of 80 MHz on a same X-112°Y LiTaO3 wafer are fabricated as the feedback of two SAW oscillators, and mixed oscillation frequency was used to characterize the external rotation. To enhance the Coriolis force effect acting on the SAW propagation, a copper (Cu) dot array was deposited along the SAW propagation path of the SAW devices. The approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media was referred to analyze the response mechanisms of the SAW based rate sensor, resulting in determination of the optimal design parameters. To improve the frequency stability of the oscillator, the single phase unidirectional transducers (SPUDTs) and combed transducer were used to form the SAW device to minimize the insertion loss and accomplish the single mode selection, respectively. Excellent long-term (measured in hours) frequency stability of 0.1 ppm/h was obtained. Using the rate table with high precision, the performance of the developed SAW rate sensor was evaluated experimentally; satisfactory detection sensitivity (16.7 Hz∙deg∙s(-1)) and good linearity were observed.

  10. Dark Material at the Surface of Polar Crater Deposits on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Sun, Xiaoli; Mazarico, Erwan; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.; Paige, Daid A.

    2012-01-01

    Earth-based radar measurements [1-3] have yielded images of radar-bright material at the poles of Mercury postulated to be near-surface water ice residing in cold traps on the permanently shadowed floors of polar impact craters. The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on board the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has now mapped much of the north polar region of Mercury [4] (Fig. 1). Radar-bright zones lie within polar craters or along poleward-facing scarps lying mainly in shadow. Calculations of illumination with respect to solid-body motion [5] show that at least 0.5% of the surface area north of 75deg N lies in permanent shadow, and that most such permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) coincide with radar-bright regions. MLA transmits a 1064-nm-wavelength laser pulse at 8 Hz, timing the leading and trailing edges of the return pulse. MLA can in some cases infer energy and thereby surface reflectance at the laser wavelength from the returned pulses. Surficial exposures of water ice would be optically brighter than the surroundings, but persistent surface water ice would require temperatures over all seasons to remain extremely low ( 1 Gy. We describe measurements of reflectivity derived from MLA pulse returns. These reflectivity data show that surface materials in the shadowed regions are darker than their surroundings, enough to strongly attenuate or extinguish laser returns. Such measurements appear to rule out widespread surface exposures of water ice. We consider explanations for the apparent low reflectivity of these regions involving other types of volatile deposit.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2 on surface modified nanoporous low-k films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrau, Elisabeth; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Dendooven, Jolien; Ludwig, Karl F; Verdonck, Patrick; Meersschaut, Johan; Baklanov, Mikhail R; Detavernier, Christophe

    2013-10-01

    This paper explores the effects of different plasma treatments on low dielectric constant (low-k) materials and the consequences for the growth behavior of atomic layer deposition (ALD) on these modified substrates. An O2 and a He/H2 plasma treatment were performed on SiCOH low-k films to modify their chemical surface groups. Transmission FTIR and water contact angle (WCA) analysis showed that the O2 plasma changed the hydrophobic surface completely into a hydrophilic surface, while the He/H2 plasma changed it only partially. In a next step, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF), ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used to characterize ALD growth of TiO2 on these substrates. The initial growth of TiO2 was found to be inhibited in the original low-k film containing only Si-CH3 surface groups, while immediate growth was observed in the hydrophilic O2 plasma treated film. The latter film was uniformly filled with TiO2 after 8 ALD cycles, while pore filling was delayed to 17 ALD cycles in the hydrophobic film. For the He/H2 plasma treated film, containing both Si-OH and Si-CH3 groups, the in situ XRF data showed that TiO2 could no longer be deposited in the He/H2 plasma treated film after 8 ALD cycles, while EP measurements revealed a remaining porosity. This can be explained by the faster deposition of TiO2 in the hydrophilic top part of the film than in the hydrophobic bulk which leaves the bulk porous, as confirmed by RBS depth profiling. The outcome of this research is not only of interest for the development of advanced interconnects in ULSI technology, but also demonstrates that ALD combined with RBS analysis is a handy approach to analyze the modifications induced by a plasma treatment on a nanoporous thin film.

  12. Plasma properties of a new-type surface wave-sustained plasma source under the conditions of depositing DLC films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Umehara, Noritsugu; Diao, Dongfeng

    2006-01-01

    Surface wave-sustained plasma (SWP) is one of the low-pressure, high- density plasma. Applying this technique, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films with excellent characteristics can be prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method. However, the films' application is restricted in some degree, because it is difficult to control the film properties. In this paper, SWP was excited along a conductive rod at a frequency of 2.45 GHz without magnetic fields around the chamber wall. The fundamental theories of plasma diagnostic were presented and plasma properties were studied with a Langmuir probe under the conditions of depositing DLC films by PVD method with a graphite target. Plasma density, electron temperature, plasma potential and target current were measured at difference technique parameters such as gas pressure, microwave power, and so on. As a result, it was proved that plasma properties are greatly affected by microwave power, target voltage and argon gas pressure in chamber. The gas mass flow rate had almost no effect on plasma characters. At the same time, the results indicated that electron density is up to 10 11-10 12cm -3 even at the low pressure of 1 Pa.

  13. Metallic nanocone array photonic substrate for high-uniformity surface deposition and optical detection of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Xu, Zhida; Chen, Yi; Logan Liu, G.

    2011-06-01

    Molecular probe arrays printed on solid surfaces such as DNA, peptide, and protein microarrays are widely used in chemical and biomedical applications especially genomic and proteomic studies (Pollack et al 1999 Nat. Genet. 23 41-6, Houseman et al 2002 Nat. Biotechnol. 20 270-4, Sauer et al 2005 Nat. Rev. Genet. 6 465-76) as well as surface imaging and spectroscopy (Mori et al 2008 Anal. Biochem. 375 223-31, Liu et al 2006 Nat. Nanotechnol. 1 47-52, Liu 2010 IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 16 662-71). Unfortunately the printed molecular spots on solid surfaces often suffer low distribution uniformity due to the lingering 'coffee stain' (Deegan et al 1997 Nature 389 827-9) problem of molecular accumulations and blotches, especially around the edge of deposition spots caused by solvent evaporation and convection processes. Here we present, without any surface chemistry modification, a unique solid surface of high-aspect-ratio silver-coated silicon nanocone arrays that allows highly uniform molecular deposition and thus subsequent uniform optical imaging and spectroscopic molecular detection. Both fluorescent Rhodamine dye molecules and unlabeled oligopeptides are printed on the metallic nanocone photonic substrate surface as circular spot arrays. In comparison with the printed results on ordinary glass slides and silver-coated glass slides, not only high printing density but uniform molecular distribution in every deposited spot is achieved. The high-uniformity and repeatability of molecular depositions on the 'coffee stain'-free nanocone surface is confirmed by laser scanning fluorescence imaging and surface enhanced Raman imaging experiments. The physical mechanism for the uniform molecular deposition is attributed to the superhydrophobicity and localized pinned liquid-solid-air interface on the silver-coated silicon nanocone surface. The unique surface properties of the presented nanocone surface enabled high-density, high-uniformity probe spotting beneficial

  14. Metallic nanocone array photonic substrate for high-uniformity surface deposition and optical detection of small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppe, Jean-Philippe [Kinogea Inc., 2168 Shattuck Ave, Berkeley, CA 94704 (United States); Xu Zhida; Chen Yi; Logan Liu, G, E-mail: loganliu@illinois.edu [Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2011-06-17

    Molecular probe arrays printed on solid surfaces such as DNA, peptide, and protein microarrays are widely used in chemical and biomedical applications especially genomic and proteomic studies (Pollack et al 1999 Nat. Genet. 23 41-6, Houseman et al 2002 Nat. Biotechnol. 20 270-4, Sauer et al 2005 Nat. Rev. Genet. 6 465-76) as well as surface imaging and spectroscopy (Mori et al 2008 Anal. Biochem. 375 223-31, Liu et al 2006 Nat. Nanotechnol. 1 47-52, Liu 2010 IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 16 662-71). Unfortunately the printed molecular spots on solid surfaces often suffer low distribution uniformity due to the lingering 'coffee stain' (Deegan et al 1997 Nature 389 827-9) problem of molecular accumulations and blotches, especially around the edge of deposition spots caused by solvent evaporation and convection processes. Here we present, without any surface chemistry modification, a unique solid surface of high-aspect-ratio silver-coated silicon nanocone arrays that allows highly uniform molecular deposition and thus subsequent uniform optical imaging and spectroscopic molecular detection. Both fluorescent Rhodamine dye molecules and unlabeled oligopeptides are printed on the metallic nanocone photonic substrate surface as circular spot arrays. In comparison with the printed results on ordinary glass slides and silver-coated glass slides, not only high printing density but uniform molecular distribution in every deposited spot is achieved. The high-uniformity and repeatability of molecular depositions on the 'coffee stain'-free nanocone surface is confirmed by laser scanning fluorescence imaging and surface enhanced Raman imaging experiments. The physical mechanism for the uniform molecular deposition is attributed to the superhydrophobicity and localized pinned liquid-solid-air interface on the silver-coated silicon nanocone surface. The unique surface properties of the presented nanocone surface enabled high-density, high-uniformity probe

  15. Rational Design of Hyperbranched Nanowire Systems for Tunable Superomniphobic Surfaces Enabled by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielinski, Ashley R.; Boban, Mathew; He, Yang; Kazyak, Eric; Lee, Duck Hyun; Wang, Chongmin; Tuteja, Anish; Dasgupta, Neil P.

    2017-01-24

    A method for tunable control of geometry in hyperbranched ZnO nanowire (NW) systems is reported, which enables the rational design and fabrication of superomniphobic surfaces. Branched NWs with tunable density and orientation were grown via a sequential hydrothermal process, in which atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used for NW seeding, disruption of epitaxy, and selective blocking of NW nucleation. This approach allows for the rational design and optimization of three-level hierarchical structures, in which the geometric parameters of each level of hierarchy can be individually controlled. We demonstrate the coupled relationships between geometry and contact angle for a variety of liquids, which is supported by mathematical models of structural superomniphobicity. The highest performing superomniphobic surface was designed with three levels of hierarchy and achieved the following advancing/receding contact angles, water: 172°/170°, hexadecane: 166°/156°, octane: 162°/145°, and heptane: 160°/130°. Low surface tension liquids were shown to bounce off the surface from a height of 7 cm without breaking through and wetting. This approach demonstrates the power of ALD as an enabling technique for hierarchical materials by design, spanning the macro, micro, and nano length scales.

  16. Atmospheric aerosol deposition influences marine microbial communities in oligotrophic surface waters of the western Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Teruya; Ishikawa, Akira; Mastunaga, Tomoki; Pointing, Stephen B.; Saito, Yuuki; Kasai, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Koichi; Aoki, Kazuma; Horiuchi, Amane; Lee, Kevin C.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols contain particulates that are deposited to oceanic surface waters. These can represent a major source of nutrients, trace metals, and organic compounds for the marine environment. The Japan Sea and the western Pacific Ocean are particularly affected by aerosols due to the transport of desert dust and industrially derived particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) from continental Asia. We hypothesized that supplementing seawater with aerosol particulates would lead to measurable changes in surface water nutrient composition as well as shifts in the marine microbial community. Shipboard experiments in the Pacific Ocean involved the recovery of oligotrophic oceanic surface water and subsequent supplementation with aerosol particulates obtained from the nearby coastal mountains, to simulate marine particulate input in this region. Initial increases in nitrates due to the addition of aerosol particulates were followed by a decrease correlated with the increase in phytoplankton biomass, which was composed largely of Bacillariophyta (diatoms), including Pseudo-nitzschia and Chaetoceros species. This shift was accompanied by changes in the bacterial community, with apparent increases in the relative abundance of heterotrophic Rhodobacteraceae and Colwelliaceae in aerosol particulate treated seawater. Our findings provide empirical evidence revealing the impact of aerosol particulates on oceanic surface water microbiology by alleviating nitrogen limitation in the organisms.

  17. Deposition temperature dependence of material and Si surface passivation properties of O{sub 3}-based atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based films and stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordihn, Stefan, E-mail: s.bordihn2@q-cells.com [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands and Hanwha Q CELLS GmbH, Sonnenallee 17-21, 06766 Bitterfeld-Wolfen (Germany); Mertens, Verena; Müller, Jörg W. [Hanwha Q CELLS GmbH, Sonnenallee 17-21, 06766 Bitterfeld-Wolfen (Germany); Kessels, W. M. M., E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    The material composition and the Si surface passivation of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films prepared by atomic layer deposition using Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} and O{sub 3} as precursors were investigated for deposition temperatures (T{sub Dep}) between 200 °C and 500 °C. The growth per cycle decreased with increasing deposition temperature due to a lower Al deposition rate. In contrast the material composition was hardly affected except for the hydrogen concentration, which decreased from [H] = 3 at. % at 200 °C to [H] < 0.5 at. % at 400 °C and 500 °C. The surface passivation performance was investigated after annealing at 300 °C–450 °C and also after firing steps in the typical temperature range of 800 °C–925 °C. A similar high level of the surface passivation performance, i.e., surface recombination velocity values <10 cm/s, was obtained after annealing and firing. Investigations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks complemented the work and revealed similar levels of surface passivation as single-layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, both for the chemical and field-effect passivation. The fixed charge density in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks, reflecting the field-effect passivation, was reduced by one order of magnitude from 3·10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} to 3·10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} when T{sub Dep} was increased from 300 °C to 500 °C. The level of the chemical passivation changed as well, but the total level of the surface passivation was hardly affected by the value of T{sub Dep}. When firing films prepared at of low T{sub Dep}, blistering of the films occurred and this strongly reduced the surface passivation. These results presented in this work demonstrate that a high level of surface passivation can be achieved for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based films and stacks over a wide range of conditions when the combination of deposition temperature and annealing or firing temperature is carefully chosen.

  18. Protein and lipid deposition rates in male broiler chickens : separate responses to amino acids and protein-free energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eits, R.M.; Kwakkel, R.P.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Stoutjesdijk, P.; Greef, de K.H.

    2002-01-01

    Two experiments of similar design were conducted with male broiler chickens over two body weight ranges, 200 to 800 g in Experiment 1 and 800 to 1,600 g in Experiment 2. The data were used to test the hypothesis that protein deposition rate increases (linearly) with increasing amino acid intake, unt

  19. Turbulence Measurement in the Benthic Boundary Layer Following a Storm: Influence on Sediment Resuspension and Rate of Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-30

    bed micromorphology and the rate of scour and deposition of sediments. The influence of significant sea states on a stratified bottom boundary layer...techniques, so that sidescan sonar information on bottom topography is available. Independent information on bottom micromorphology will also be

  20. New oxygen radical source using selective sputtering of oxygen atoms for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoji; Lei, Hao; Hoshi, Yoichi [Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Surface Engineering of Materials Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    We have developed a new oxygen radical source based on the reactive sputtering phenomena of a titanium target for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films. In this oxygen radical source, oxygen radicals are mainly produced by two mechanisms: selective sputter-emission of oxygen atoms from the target surface covered with a titanium oxide layer, and production of high-density oxygen plasma in the space near the magnetron-sputtering cathode. Compared with molecular oxygen ions, the amount of atomic oxygen radicals increased significantly with an increase in discharge current so that atomic oxygen radicals were mainly produced by this radical source. It should be noted that oxygen atoms were selectively sputtered from the target surface, and titanium atoms sputter-emitted from the target cathode were negligibly small. The amount of oxygen radicals supplied from this radical source increased linearly with increasing discharge current, and oxygen radicals of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/s/cm{sup 2} were supplied to the substrate surface at a discharge current of 1.2 A. We conclude that our newly developed oxygen radical source can be a good tool to achieve high rate deposition and to control the structure of TiO{sub 2} films for many industrial design applications.

  1. The fate of 5N-nitrate in mesocosms from five European peatlands differing in long-term nitrogen deposition rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zając

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Elevated nitrogen (N deposition changes the retention, transformation, and fluxes of N in ombrotrophic peatlands. To evaluate such effects we applied a 15N tracer (NH415NO3 at a rate of 2.3 g N m−2 yr−1 to mesocosms of five European peatlands with differing long-term N deposition rates for a period of 76 days of dry and 90 days of wet conditions. We determined background N content and moss length growth, and recovered the 15N tracer from the mosses, graminoids, shrubs, the peat, and dissolved N. Background N contents in Sphagnum mosses increased from 5.5 (Degerö Stormyr, deposition −2 yr−1 up to 12.2 mg g−1 (Frölichshaier Sattelmoor, 4.7–6.0 g N m−2 yr−1. In peat from Degerö nitrate and ammonium concentrations were below 3 mg L−1, whereas up to 30 mg L−1 (nitrate and 11 mg L−1 (ammonium was found in peat from Frölichshaier Sattelmoor. Sphagnum mosses (down to 5 cm below surface generally intercepted large amounts of 15N (0.2–0.35 mg g−1 and retained the tracer most effectively relative to their biomass. Similar quantities of the 15N were recovered from the peat, followed by shrubs, graminoids and the dissolved pool. At the most polluted sites we recovered more 15N from shrubs (up to 12.4 % and from nitrate and ammonium (up to 0.7 %. However, no impact of N deposition on 15N retention by Sphagnum could be identified and their length growth was highest under high N background deposition. Our experiment suggests that the decline in N retention at levels above ca. 1.5 g m−2 yr−1, as expressed by elevated near-surface peat N content and increased dissolved N concentrations, is likely more modest than previously thought. This conclusion is related to the finding that Sphagnum species can apparently thrive at elevated long-term N deposition rates in European peatlands.

  2. Optical monitoring of surface processes relevant to thin film growth by chemical vapour deposition Oxidation; Surface degradation

    CERN Document Server

    Simcock, M N

    2002-01-01

    This thesis reports on the investigation of the use of reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) as an in-situ monitor for the preparation and oxidation of GaAs(100) c(4x4) surfaces using a CVD 2000 MOCVD reactor. These surfaces were oxidised using air. It was found that it was possible to follow surface degradation using RA transients at 2.6eV and 4eV. From this data it was possible to speculate on the nature of the surface oxidation process. A study was performed into the rate of surface degradation under different concentrations of air, it was found that the relation between the air concentration and the surface degradation was complicated but that the behaviour of the first third of the degradation approximated a first order behaviour. An estimation of the activation energy of the process was