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Sample records for deposition cvd sic

  1. Growth and Characterization of Silicon Carbide (SiC) Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) for Electronic Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karina

    In recent years nanowires have gained a generous amount of interest because of the possible application of nanowires within electronic devices. A nanowire is a one dimensional semiconductor nanostructure with a diameter less than 100 nm. Nanowires have the potential to be a replacement for the present day complimentary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology; it is believed by 2020, a 5--6 nm gate length within field effect transistors (FET) would be realized and cease further miniaturization of electronic devices. SiC processes several unique chemical and physical properties that make it an attractive alternative to Si as a semiconductor material. Silicon carbide's properties make it a perfect candidate for applications such as high temperature sensors, x-ray emitters and high radiation sensors. The main objective of this thesis is to successfully grow silicon carbide nanowires on silicon substrates with the assistance of a metal catalyst, by the process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The contributions made by the work carried out in this thesis are broad. This is the first study that has carried out a comprehensive investigation into a wide range of metal catalyst for the growth of SiC nanowires by the process of chemical vapor deposition. The study proved that the surface tension interactions between the silicon substrate and the metal catalyst are the controlling factor in the determination of the diameter of the nanowires grown. This study also proved that the silicon substrate orientation has no impact on the growth of the nanowires, similar growth patterns occurred on both Si and Si substrates. The nanowires grown were characterized by a variety of different methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and raman spectroscopy. The effect of temperature, growth temperature, growth time and the catalyst type used are investigated to determine the most suitable conditions necessary for SiC nanowire

  2. Epitaxial Growth of beta-Silicon Carbide (SiC) on a Compliant Substrate via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharanda L.

    1996-01-01

    Many lattice defects have been attributed to the lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal coefficient of expansion between SiC and silicon (Si). Stacking faults, twins and antiphase boundaries are some of the lattice defects found in these SiC films. These defects may be a partial cause of the disappointing performance reported for the prototype devices fabricated from beta-SiC films. The objective of this research is to relieve some of the thermal stress due to lattice mismatch when SiC is epitaxially grown on Si. The compliant substrate is a silicon membrane 2-4 microns thick. The CVD process includes the buffer layer which is grown at 1360 C followed by a very thin epitaxial growth of SiC. Then the temperature is raised to 1500 C for the subsequent growth of SiC. Since silicon melts at 1415 C, the SiC will be grown on molten Silicon which is absorbed by a porous graphite susceptor eliminating the SiC/Si interface. We suspect that this buffer layer will yield less stressed material to help in the epitaxial growth of SiC.

  3. Deposition of low stress, high transmittance SiC as an x-ray mask membrane using ECR plasma CVD

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S Y; Lim, S T; Ahn, J H

    1998-01-01

    SiC for x-ray mask membrane is deposited by Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition from SiH sub 4 /CH sub 4 Ar mixtures. Stoichiometric SiC is deposited at SiH sub 4 /CH sub 4 ratio of 0.4, deposition temperature of 600.deg.C and microwave power of 500 W with +- 5% thickness uniformity, As-deposited film has compressive residual stress, very smooth surface (31 A rms) and high optical transmittance of 90% at 633 nm wavelength. The microstructure of this film consists of the nanocrystalline particle (100 A approx 200A) embedded in amorphous matrix. Residual stress can be turned to tensile stress via Rapid Thermal Annealing in N sub 2 atmosphere, while suppressing structural change during annealing, As a result, smooth (37 A rms) SiC film with moderate tensile stress and high optical transmittance (85% at 633 nm wavelength) is obtained.

  4. Development of CVD Mullite Coatings for SiC Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarin, V.K.; Varadarajan, S.

    2000-03-15

    A process for depositing CVD mullite coatings on SiC fibers for enhanced oxidation and corrosion, and/or act as an interfacial protective barrier has been developed. Process optimization via systematic investigation of system parameters yielded uniform crystalline mullite coatings on SiC fibers. Structural characterization has allowed for tailoring of coating structure and therefore properties. High temperature oxidation/corrosion testing of the optimized coatings has shown that the coatings remain adherent and protective for extended periods. However, preliminary tests of coated fibers showed considerable degradation in tensile strength.

  5. A Study on Fretting Wear Property of CVD SiC and Sintered SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Hyun-Jin; Jang, Ki-Nam; An, Ji-Hyeong; Kim, Kyu-Tae [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Silicon Carbide is broadly used as high temperature structure material because of its high temperature tolerance and superior mechanical properties. After the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, SiC proposed as one of the alternative materials for LWR fuel cladding to provide enhanced safety margin. Grid-to-rod fretting wear-induced fuel failure is known to occur due to flow-induced vibration of the reactor core and grid to- rod gap. In this paper, wear tests for CVD SiC plate and sintered SiC tube were performed with two types of spacer grids. Wear test of corroded and non-corroded CVD SiC plates indicate that wear resistance of corroded specimen is lower than one of non-corroded specimen in contrast with zirconium alloy cladding tube. It may be affected by rough surface of corroded specimen caused by grain boundary attack.

  6. Chemical reactivity of CVC and CVD SiC with UO{sub 2} at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Chinthaka M., E-mail: silvagw@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Voit, Stewart L. [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Two types of silicon carbide (SiC) synthesized using two different vapor deposition processes were embedded in UO{sub 2} pellets and evaluated for their potential chemical reaction with UO{sub 2}. While minor reactivity between chemical-vapor-composited (CVC) SiC and UO{sub 2} was observed at comparatively low temperatures of 1100 and 1300 °C, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC did not show any such reactivity. However, both CVD and CVC SiCs showed some reaction with UO{sub 2} at a higher temperature (1500 °C). Elemental maps supported by phase maps obtained using electron backscatter diffraction indicated that CVC SiC was more reactive than CVD SiC at 1500 °C. Furthermore, this investigation indicated the formation of uranium carbides and uranium silicide chemical phases such as UC, USi{sub 2}, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as a result of SiC reaction with UO{sub 2}.

  7. Deposition and Coating Properties on CVD Tungsten

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Ji-hong; LI Zheng-xiang; LIU Gao-jian; ZHOU Hui-Huang; CHUN liang

    2004-01-01

    Surface characterization and microstructure studies are performed on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten coating. There is about 2 μm thickness diffusion layer of tungsten in the molybdenum substrate. The thermal shock test shows tungsten coating has good adhesion with molybdenum substrate, but the elements of oxygen and carbon in the tungsten coating have the bad affection to the adhesion. The result of high-temperature diffusion experiment is the diffusion rate from molybdenum substrate to tungsten coating is faster.

  8. High-rate diamond deposition by microwave plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianglin

    In this dissertation, the growth of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The goal of this research is to deposit high quality HOD (Highly Oriented Diamond) films with a growth rate greater than 1 mum/hr. For the (100)-oriented HOD films, the growth rate achieved by the traditional process is only 0.3 mum/hr while the theoretical limit is ˜0.45 mum/hr. This research increases the growth rate up to 5.3 mum/hr (with a theoretical limit of ˜7 mum/hr) while preserving the crystal quality. This work builds a connection between the theoretical study of the CVD process and the experimental research. The study is extended from the growth of regular polycrystalline diamond to highly oriented diamond (HOD) films. For the increase of the growth rate of regular polycrystalline diamond thin films, a scaling growth model developed by Goodwin is introduced in details to assist in the understanding of the MPCVD (Microwave Plasma CVD) process. Within the Goodwin's scaling model, there are only four important sub-processes for the growth of diamond: surface modification, adsorption, desorption, and incorporation. The factors determining the diamond growth rate and film quality are discussed following the description of the experimental setup and process parameters. Growth rate and crystal quality models are reviewed to predict and understand the experimental results. It is shown that the growth rate of diamond can be increased with methane input concentration and the amount of atomic hydrogen (by changing the total pressure). It is crucial to provide enough atomic hydrogen to conserve crystal quality of the deposited diamond film. The experimental results demonstrate that for a fixed methane concentration, there is a minimum pressure for growth of good diamond. Similarly, for a fixed total pressure, there is a maximum methane concentration for growth of good diamond, and this maximum methane concentration increases

  9. Laser CVD Process for the Preparation of Ultrafine SiC Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGQitu; XIAODifan

    2000-01-01

    The CW-CO2 laser driven gas reaction was applied to prepare nano-sized SiC powder,SiH4 and C2H4 of high purties,as starting materials,were mixed t a certain ration and introduced into the resaction cell.The gases flew across the laser beam orthogonally and thus were heated by laser beam.The nano-sized SiC ultrafine powderws were formed through thermic gas reation.The final productivity of this process was 97%,The obtained powders were characterized and analyzed.Chemical analysis revealed that the SiC content was 95.38 wt%,Oxygen ,the primary impurity,weighted 1.32% while trace impurities,such as calcium ,magnesium and other metals,were only 0.03%,XRD,XPS and TEM indicated that th powder particles were nearly spherical and not agglomerated.The particle size ranged from 10nm to 25nm with an average of 15 nm ,The particles tred to be noncrystalline.

  10. EFFECTS OF OPERATING CONDITIONS ON THE DEPOSITION OF GaAs IN A VERTICAL CVD REACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    JAE-SANG BAEK; JIN-HYO BOO; YOUN-JEA KIM

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study is needed to gain insight into the growth mechanism and improve the reactor design or optimize the deposition condition in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this study, we have performed a numerical analysis of the deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) from trimethyl gallium (TMG) and arsine in a vertical CVD reactor. The effects of operating parameters, such as the rotation velocity of susceptor, inlet velocity, and inlet TMG fraction, are investigated and presented. The ...

  11. Rare earth-doped alumina thin films deposited by liquid source CVD processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschanvres, J.L.; Meffre, W.; Joubert, J.C.; Senateur, J.P. [Ecole Nat. Superieure de Phys. de Grenoble, St. Martin d`Heres (France). Lab. des Materiaux et du Genie Phys.; Robaut, F. [Consortium des Moyens Technologiques Communs, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, BP 75, 38402 St Martin d`Heres (France); Broquin, J.E.; Rimet, R. [Laboratoire d`Electromagnetisme, Microondes et Optoelectronique, CNRS-Ecole Nationale Superieure d`Electronique et Radioelectricite de Grenoble, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble, Cedex (France)

    1998-07-24

    Two types of liquid-source CVD processes are proposed for the growth of rare earth-doped alumina thin films suitable as amplifying media for integrated optic applications. Amorphous, transparent, pure and erbium- or neodymium-doped alumina films were deposited between 573 and 833 K by atmospheric pressure aerosol CVD. The rare earth doping concentration increases by decreasing the deposition temperature. The refractive index of the alumina films increases as a function of the deposition temperature from 1.53 at 573 K to 1.61 at 813 K. Neodymium-doped films were also obtained at low pressure by liquid source injection CVD. (orig.) 7 refs.

  12. Tantalum Coating of Steel, Copper, Aluminum, and Titanium by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Bjerrum, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Tantalum coatings ranging from 0.5 to 120 mm has been deposited by CVD at 625-1000 C using tantalum pentachloride as precursor. Deposition rates range from 1 to 80mm/h and an activation energy of 103 kJ/mole is calculated. Well adhering deposits has been obtained on stainless steel, carbon steels...

  13. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of uranium for alpha spectrometry; Deposicion quimica de vapor (CVD) de uranio para espectrometria alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez V, M. L.; Rios M, C.; Ramirez O, J.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: luisalawliet@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The uranium determination through radiometric techniques as alpha spectrometry requires for its proper analysis, preparation methods of the source to analyze and procedures for the deposit of this on a surface or substrate. Given the characteristics of alpha particles (small penetration distance and great loss of energy during their journey or its interaction with the matter), is important to ensure that the prepared sources are thin, to avoid problems of self-absorption. The routine methods used for this are the cathodic electro deposition and the direct evaporation, among others. In this paper the use of technique of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the preparation of uranium sources is investigated; because by this, is possible to obtain thin films (much thinner than those resulting from electro deposition or evaporation) on a substrate and comprises reacting a precursor with a gas, which in turn serves as a carrier of the reaction products to achieve deposition. Preliminary results of the chemical vapor deposition of uranium are presented, synthesizing and using as precursor molecule the uranyl acetylacetonate, using oxygen as carrier gas for the deposition reaction on a glass substrate. The uranium films obtained were found suitable for alpha spectrometry. The variables taken into account were the precursor sublimation temperatures and deposition temperature, the reaction time and the type and flow of carrier gas. Of the investigated conditions, two depositions with encouraging results that can serve as reference for further work to improve the technique presented here were selected. Alpha spectra obtained for these depositions and the characterization of the representative samples by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction are also presented. (Author)

  14. Purification of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A procedure for purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes(SWNTs) grown by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of carbon monooxide has been developed. Based on the result from TGA/DTA of as-prepared sample, the oxidation temperature was determined. The process included sonication, oxidation and acid washing steps. The purity and yield after purification were determined and estimated by TEM. Moreover, for the first time, a loop structure for CVD SWNTs has been observed.

  15. Deposition of thin ultrafiltration membranes on commercial SiC microfiltration tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Facciotti, Marco; Boffa, Vittorio; Magnacca, Giuliana;

    2014-01-01

    Porous SiC based materials present high mechanical, chemical and thermal robustness, and thus have been largely applied to water-filtration technologies. In this study, commercial SiC microfiltration tubes with nominal pore size of 0.04 m were used as carrier for depositing thin aluminium oxide...

  16. Improved CVD Techniques for Depositing Passivation Layers of ICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    went into compressive stress of 1.3 x 10 dynes/cm2. Results NX • thus show that room-temperature stress in CVD films can be reduced to nearly 35 -4 0...fluorescence working curves. X-ray fluorescence radiation measurements were carried out using a Siemens Crystalloflex 4 x-ray generator with a chromium target x...ray tube (2000 W) and a Siemens Vacuum X-Ray Spectrometer Model VRS. Sample area of measurement was usually 0.50 cm2 . 2= Experimental results will be

  17. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ceramic coatings. The influence of several process steps on the deposition rate and surface morphology is discussed. The deposition of SiO2 at atmospheric pressure is kinetically limited below 833 K ...

  18. A Study on Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) Technology and Super Coating Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian; LI Jian-ping; ZENG Xiang-cai; MA Wen-cun

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the dense and columnar crystalline TiCN coating layers with very good bonding strength between a layer and another layer was deposited using Medium Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition (MT-CVD) where CH3CN organic composite with C/N atomic clusters etc. was utilized at 700 ~ 900 ℃. Effect of coating processing parameters, such as coating temperature, pressure and different gas flow quantity on structures and properties of TiCN coating layers were investigated. The super coating mechanis mand structures were analyzed. The new coating processing parameters and properties of carbide inserts with super coating layers were gained by using the improved high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD) equipment and HT-CVD, in combination with MT-CVD technology.

  19. Thin alumina and silica films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Morssinkhof, R.W.J.; Fransen, T.; Westheim, J.G.F.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Alumina and silica coatings have been deposited by MOCVD (Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition) on alloys to protect them against high temperature corrosion. Aluminium Tri-lsopropoxide (ATI) and DiAcetoxyDitertiaryButoxySilane (DAOBS) have been used as metal organic precursors to prepare these ce

  20. Laser annealing of sputter-deposited -SiC and -SiCN films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Fraga; M Massi; I C Oliveira; F D Origo; W Miyakawa

    2011-12-01

    This work describes the laser annealing of -SiC and -SiCN films deposited on (100) Si and quartz substrates by RF magnetron sputtering. Two samples of -SiCN thin films were produced under different N2/Ar flow ratios. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), Raman analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) techniques were used to investigate the composition and bonding structure of as-deposited and laser annealed SiC and SiCN films.

  1. SiC fibre by chemical vapour deposition on tungsten filament

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Krishnarao; J Subrahmanyam; S Subbarao

    2001-06-01

    A CVD system for the production of continuous SiC fibre was set up. The process of SiC coating on 19 m diameter tungsten substrate was studied. Methyl trichloro silane (CH3SiCl3) and hydrogen reactants were used. Effect of substrate temperature (1300–1500°C) and concentration of reactants on the formation of SiC coating were studied. SiC coatings of negligible thickness were formed at very low flow rates of hydrogen (5 × 10–5 m3/min) and CH3SiCl3 (1.0 × 10–4 m3/min of Ar). Uneven coatings and brittle fibres were formed at very high concentrations of CH3SiCl3 (6 × 10–4 m3/min of Ar). The flow rates of CH3SiCl3 and hydrogen were adjusted to get SiC fibre with smooth surface. The structure and morphology of SiC fibres were evaluated.

  2. Oxidation Resistance of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    carbonaceous residuoe were overcome, and dense, iadherent, coat-ings which :ýtop oxidat-ion Of the substrate art! reliably produced. The iridium deposition...flow, pressure and geometry within the reaction chamber, and substrate material. For the coating to have high integrity and adhesion to the substrate...entirely produced by Ultramet using chemical vapor deposition and a novel integrated fabrication technique. Coating the inside of a long chamber presents

  3. Thin film zinc oxide deposited by CVD and PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelmann, Frank U.

    2016-10-01

    Zinc oxide is known as a mineral since 1810, but it came to scientific interest after its optoelectronic properties found to be tuneable by p-type doping. Since the late 1980’s the number of publications increased exponentially. All thin film deposition technologies, including sol-gel and spray pyrolysis, are able to produce ZnO films. However, for outstanding properties and specific doping, only chemical vapor deposition and physical vapor deposition have shown so far satisfying results in terms of high conductivity and high transparency. In this paper the different possibilities for doping will be discussed, some important applications of doped ZnO thin films will be presented. The deposition technologies used for industrial applications are shown in this paper. Especially sputtering of aluminium doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:Al or AZO) and LPCVD of boron doped Zinc Oxide (ZnO:B or BZO) are used for the commercial production of transparent conductive oxide films on glass used for thin film photovoltaic cells. For this special application the typical process development for large area deposition is presented, with the important trade-off between optical properties (transparency and ability for light scattering) and electrical properties (conductivity). Also, the long term stability of doped ZnO films is important for applications, humidity in the ambient is often the reason for degradation of the films. The differences between the mentioned materials are presented.

  4. Synthesis of crystalline Ge nanoclusters in PE-CVD-deposited SiO2 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leervad Pedersen, T.P.; Skov Jensen, J.; Chevallier, J.

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis of evenly distributed Ge nanoclusters in plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour-deposited (PE-CVD) SiO2 thin films containing 8 at. % Ge is reported. This is of importance for the application of nanoclusters in semiconductor technology. The average diameter of the Ge nanoclusters can...

  5. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  6. Numerical modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a horizontal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Jasinski, T.; Fretz, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    In the present numerical prediction of the deposition rate of silicon from silane in a CVD process, the conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species are solved on a staggered grid using the SIMPLE algorithm, while the rate of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the susceptor surface is obtained from an Arrhenius rate equation. Predicted deposition rates as a function of position along the susceptor with and without the gas phase chemical reaction are compared with the available experimental and numerical data; agreement is excellent except at the leading edge of the susceptor, where the deposition rate is overpredicted.

  7. Abnormal Crystallization of Silicon Thin Films Deposited by ICP-CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-Shuai; YIN Min; WANG Jin-Xiao; HE De-Yan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Silicon thin films are deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) at a low temperature of 350℃ using a mixture of SiH4 and H2. The structures of the films are characterized by x-ray diffraction and Raman spectra. Under the optimum experimental conditions, we observe that the crystallinity of Si films becomes more excellent and the preferred orientation changes from (111) to (220) with the decreasing dilution of SiH4 in H2. Such an abnormal crystallization is tentatively interpreted in term of the high density,low electron temperature and spatial confinement of the plasma in the process of ICP-CVD.

  8. Deposition of device quality silicon nitride with ultra high deposition rate (> 7 nm/s) using hot-wire CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, V.; Houweling, Z.S.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Romijn, I.G.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Goldbach, H.D.

    2008-01-01

    The application of hot-wire (HW) CVD deposited silicon nitride (SiNx) as passivating anti-reflection coating on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells is investigated. The highest efficiency reached is 15.7% for SiNx layers with an N/Si ratio of 1.20 and a high mass density of 2.9 g/cm3. These

  9. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kundrát

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42 substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo – tungsten (W interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  10. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundrát, Vojtěch; Sullivan, John; Ye, Haitao, E-mail: h.ye@aston.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham, B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Zhang, Xiaoling; Cooke, Kevin; Sun, Hailin [Miba Coating Group: Teer Coatings Ltd, West-Stone-House, West-Stone, Berry-Hill-Industrial-Estate, WR9 9AS, Droitwich (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42) substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo) – tungsten (W) interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  11. FTIR monitoring of industrial scale CVD processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfe, V.; Mosebach, H.; Meyer, M.; Sheel, D.; Grählert, W.; Throl, O.; Dresler, B.

    1998-06-01

    The goal is to improve chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and infiltration (CVI) process control by a multipurpose, knowledge based feedback system. For monitoring the CVD/CVI process in-situ FTIR spectroscopic data has been identified as input information. In the presentation, three commonly used, and distinctly different, types of industrial CVD/CVI processes are taken as test cases: (i) a thermal high capacity CVI batch process for manufacturing carbon fibre reinforced SiC composites for high temperature applications, (ii) a continuously driven CVD thermal process for coating float glass for energy protection, and (iii) a laser stimulated CVD process for continuously coating bundles of thin ceramic fibers. The feasibility of the concept with FTIR in-situ monitoring as a core technology has been demonstrated. FTIR monitoring sensibly reflects process conditions.

  12. Stable dropwise condensation for enhancing heat transfer via the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of grafted polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Adam T; Yagüe, Jose L; Gleason, Karen K; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2014-01-22

    Ultra-thin copolymer films are deposited by initiated chemical deposition (iCVD) to investigate their performance under the condensation of water vapor. By forming a grafted interface between the coating and the substrate, the films exhibit stable dropwise condensation even when subjected to 100 °C steam. The applicability of the iCVD to complex substrate geometries is demonstrated on a copper condenser coil.

  13. Effect of substrate bias on deposition behaviour of charged silicon nanoparticles in ICP-CVD process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung-Wan; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Seong, Dae-Jin; Seo, Byong-Hoon; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a substrate bias on the deposition behaviour of crystalline silicon films during inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD) was analysed by consideration of non-classical crystallization, in which the building block is a nanoparticle rather than an individual atom or molecule. The coexistence of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles in the plasma and their role in Si film deposition are confirmed by applying bias voltages to the substrate, which is sufficiently small as not to affect the plasma potential. The sizes of positively and negatively charged nanoparticles captured on a carbon membrane and imaged using TEM are, respectively, 2.7-5.5 nm and 6-13 nm. The film deposited by positively charged nanoparticles has a typical columnar structure. In contrast, the film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has a structure like a powdery compact with the deposition rate about three times higher than that for positively charged nanoparticles. All the films exhibit crystallinity even though the substrate is at room temperature, which is attributed to the deposition of crystalline nanoparticles formed in the plasma. The film deposited by negatively charged nanoparticles has the highest crystalline fraction of 0.84.

  14. Zirconium influence on microstructure of aluminide coatings deposited on nickel substrate by CVD method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jolanta Romanowska; Maryana Zagula-Yavorska; Jan Sieniawski

    2013-11-01

    Influence of Zr on the microstructure and phase characteristics of aluminide diffusion coatings deposited on the nickel substrate has been investigated in this study. The coatings with and without zirconium were deposited by CVD method. The cross-section chemical composition investigations revealed that during the coatings formation, there is an inward aluminum diffusion and outward nickel diffusion in both types of coatings (with and without zirconium), whereas zirconium is located far below the coating surface, at a depth of ∼17 m, between -NiAl phase and '-Ni3Al phase. XRD examinations showed that -NiAl, -NiAl and '-Ni3Al were the main components of the deposited coatings. -NiAl phase is on the surface of the coatings, whereas -NiAl and '-Ni3Al form deeper parts of the coatings. Zirconium is dissolved in NiAl on the border between -NiAl and '-Ni3Al.

  15. Optical and mechanical properties of diamond like carbon films deposited by microwave ECR plasma CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Singh; M Pandey; N Chand; A Biswas; D Bhattacharya; S Dash; A K Tyagi; R M Dey; S K Kulkarni; D S Patil

    2008-10-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on Si (111) substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process using plasma of argon and methane gases. During deposition, a d.c. self-bias was applied to the substrates by application of 13.56 MHz rf power. DLC films deposited at three different bias voltages (–60 V, –100 V and –150 V) were characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to study the variation in the bonding and optical properties of the deposited coatings with process parameters. The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus were measured by load depth sensing indentation technique. The DLC film deposited at –100 V bias exhibit high hardness (∼ 19 GPa), high elastic modulus (∼ 160 GPa) and high refractive index (∼ 2.16–2.26) as compared to films deposited at –60 V and –150 V substrate bias. This study clearly shows the significance of substrate bias in controlling the optical and mechanical properties of DLC films.

  16. Deposition of ZnO Films on Freestanding CVD Thick Diamond Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian; BAI Yi-Zhen; YANG Tian-Peng; XU Yi-Bin; WANG Xin-Sheng; DU Guo-Tong; WU Han-Hua

    2006-01-01

    @@ For ZnO/diamond structured surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters, performance is sensitively dependent on the quality of the ZnO films. In this paper, we prepare highly-oriented and fine grained polycrystalline ZnO thin films with excellent surface smoothness on the smooth nucleation surfaces of freestanding CVD diamond films by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The properties of the ZnO films are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. The influences of the deposition conditions on the quality of ZnO films are discussed briefly. ZnO/freestanding thick-diamond-film layered SAW devices with high response frequencies are expected to be developed.

  17. An economic CVD technique for pure SnO2 thin films deposition: Temperature effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Maleki; S M Rozati

    2013-04-01

    A modified new method of CVD for formation of pure layers of tin oxide films was developed. This method is very simple and inexpensive and produces films with good electrical properties. The effect of substrate temperature on the sheet resistance, resistivity, mobility, carrier concentration and transparency of the films has been studied. The best sheet resistance obtained at substrate temperature of 500 ◦C was about 27 /cm2. X-ray diffraction showed that the structure of deposited films was polycrystalline with a grain size between 150–300 Å. The preferred orientation was (211) for films deposited at substrate temperature of about 500 °C. FESEM micrographs revealed that substrate temperature is an important factor for increasing grain size and modifies electrical parameters. UV-visible measurement showed reduction of transparency and bandgap of the layers with increasing substrate temperature.

  18. Field emission from carbon films deposited by VHF CVD on difference substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, A A; Andronov, A N; Felter, T E; Ioffe, A F; Kosarev, A I; Shotov, M V; Vinogradov, A J

    1999-04-01

    As previously demonstrated, non-diamond carbon (NDC) films deposited at low temperatures 200-300 C on silicon tips reduced the threshold of field emission. In this paper we will present the results of the study of field emission from flat NDC films prepared by VHF CVD. Emission measurements were performed in a diode configuration at approximately 10{sup {minus}10} Torr. NDC films were deposited on ceramic and on c-Si substrates sputter coated with layers of Ti, Cu, Ni and Pt. The back contact material influences the emission characteristics but not as a direct correlation to work function. A model of field emission from metal-NDC film structures will be discussed.

  19. Simultaneous synthesis of nanodiamonds and graphene via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW PE-CVD) on copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Steven; Wöhrl, Nicolas; Schulz, Stephan; Buck, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous growth of both nanodiamonds and graphene on copper samples is described for the first time. A PE-CVD process is used to synthesize graphene layers and nanodiamond clusters from a hydrogen/methane gas mixture as it is typically done successfully in thermal CVD processes for graphene synthesis. However, the standard thermal CVD process is not without problems since the deposition of graphene is affected by the evaporation of a notable amount of copper caused by the slow temperature increase typical for thermal CVD resulting in a long process time. In sharp contrast, the synthesis of graphene by PE-CVD can circumvent this problem by substantially shortening the process time at holding out the prospect of a lower substrate temperature. The reduced thermal load and the possibility to industrially scale-up the PE-CVD process makes it a very attractive alternative to the thermal CVD process with respect to the graphene production in the future. Nanodiamonds are synthesized in PE-CVD reactors for a long time because these processes offer a high degree of control over the film's nanostructure and simultaneously providing a significant high deposition rate. To model the co-deposition process, the three relevant macroscopic parameters (pressure, gas mixture and microwave power) are correlated with three relevant process properties (plasma ball size, substrate temperature and C2/Hα-ratio) and the influence on the quality of the deposited carbon allotropes is investigated. For the evaluation of the graphene as well as the nanodiamond quality, Raman spectroscopy used whereas the plasma properties are measured by optical methods. It is found that the diamond nucleation can be influenced by the C2/Hα-ratio in the plasma, while the graphene quality remains mostly unchanged by this parameter. Moreover it is derived from the experimental data that the direct plasma contact with the copper surface is beneficial for the nucleation of the diamond while the growth and

  20. Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) Polymer Thin Films: Structure-Property Effects on Thermal Degradation and Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharamaiah Jeevendrakumar, Vijay Jain

    Opportunities and challenges for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polymer thin films stems from their applications in electronics, sensors, and adhesives with demands for control over film composition, conformity and stability. Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a subset of the CVD technique that conjoins bulk free-radical polymerization chemistry with gas-phase processing. The novelty of iCVD technique stems from the use of an initiator that can be activated at low energies (150 -- 300 °C) to react with surface adsorbed monomer to form a polymer film. This reduces risk for potential unwarranted side-reactions. Until recently, majority of iCVD research was limited to understanding the deposition kinetics with monomer properties being the principal parameters. However, there is a lack of study on the properties of deposited films which is critical for utilizing the technique in any real-world applications. The work presented here aims to advance investigation in this direction by characterizing the thermal properties of iCVD polymer films with primary focus on the initiators. A detailed characterization of custom-built iCVD system served as ground work for following investigations. Poly(neopentyl methacrylate) (PnPMA) thin films were deposited with tert-butyl peroxide (TBPO) initiators and their Tg, CTE and thermal degradation properties were investigated. iCVD PnPMA films presented low-temperature degradation peaks attributed to weak linkages from H-abstraction and beta-scission reactions of TBPO. To test this hypothesis, PnPMA films were deposited with tert-butyl peroxybenzoate (TBPOB) which is selective towards vinyl addition. Contrary to expected results, TBPOB initiated films showed degradation at lower temperatures compared to TBPO initiated films. It is postulated that with TBPOB, the surface initiator concentration is higher and consequently small oligomeric molecules were formed that degraded easily. Following these investigations, poly

  1. Photoluminescence enhancement in porous SiC passivated by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu

    2016-01-01

    Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved.......Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved....

  2. Photoluminescence enhancement in porous SiC passivated by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu;

    2016-01-01

    Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved.......Porous SiC co-doped with B and N was passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 films to enhance the photoluminescence. After optimizing the deposition conditions, as high as 14.9 times photoluminescence enhancement has been achieved....

  3. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yansheng [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tu, Rong, E-mail: turong@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Goto, Takashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakis (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.

  4. Properties of amorphous SiC coatings deposited on WC-Co substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Costa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, silicon carbide films were deposited onto tungsten carbide from a sintered SiC target on a r.f. magnetron sputtering system. Based on previous results about the influence of r.f. power and argon pressure upon the properties of films deposited on silicon substrates, suitable conditions were chosen to produce high quality films on WC-Co pieces. Deposition parameters were chosen in order to obtain high deposition rates (about 30 nm/min at 400 W rf power and acceptable residual stresses (1.5 GPa. Argon pressure affects the energy of particles so that films with higher hardness (30 GPa were obtained at low pressures (0.05 Pa. Wear rates of the coated pieces against a chromium steel ball in a diamond suspension medium were found to be about half of the uncoated ones. Hardness and wear resistance measurements were done also in thermally annealed (200-800 °C samples revealing the effectiveness of SiC coatings to protect tool material against severe mechanical degradation resulting of high temperature (above 500 °C oxidation.

  5. The optoelectronic properties of silicon films deposited by inductively coupled plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin Yanli; Yan Hengqing; Li Fei; Qiao Li; Liu Qiming [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); He Deyan, E-mail: hedy@lzu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films were deposited by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) at low substrate temperatures using H{sub 2}-diluted SiH{sub 4} as a source gas. High-density plasma generated by inductively coupled excitation facilitates the crystallization of silicon films at low temperatures, and microcrystalline silicon films were obtained at the substrate temperature as low as 180 deg. C. The columnar structure of the films becomes more and more compact with an increase of their crystallinity. The reduction of hydrogen content in the films causes a narrowing of the optical bandgap and an enhancement of the absorption with increasing the substrate temperature. The microcrystalline silicon films show two electronic transport mechanisms: one is related to the density of state distribution in the temperature region near room temperature and the other is the variable range hopping between localized electronic states close to the Fermi level below 170 K. A reasonable explanation is presented for the dependence of the optoelectronic properties on the microstructure of the silicon films. The films prepared at a substrate temperature of 300 deg. C have highly crystalline and compact columnar structure, high optical absorption coefficient and electrical conductivity, and a low hydrogen content of 3.8%.

  6. SiC coatings grown by liquid injection chemical vapor deposition using single source metal-organic precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Boisselier, Guilhaume; Maury, Francis; Schuster, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    International audience; SiC coatings have been grown by direct liquid injection of organosilanes in a hot-wall chemical vapor depositionreactor (DLICVD). 1,3-disilabutane (DSB) and polysilaethylene (PSE) were used as single-source precursors. Amorphous and stoichiometric SiC coatings were deposited under low pressure on various substrates in the temperature range of 923–1073 K. Thickness gradients due to the temperature profiles and the precursor depletion were observed along the reactor axis...

  7. Hot wire CVD deposition of nanocrystalline silicon solar cells on rough substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongbo B.T., E-mail: h.li@uu.n [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Werf, Karine H.M. van der; Rath, Jatin K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-04-30

    In silicon thin film solar cell technology, frequently rough or textured substrates are used to scatter the light and enhance its absorption. The important issue of the influence of substrate roughness on silicon nanocrystal growth has been investigated through a series of nc-Si:H single junction p-i-n solar cells containing i-layers deposited with Hot-wire CVD. It is shown that silicon grown on the surface of an unoptimized rough substrate contains structural defects, which deteriorate solar cell performance. By introducing parameter v, voids/substrate area ratio, we could define a criterion for the morphology of light trapping substrates for thin film silicon solar cells: a preferred substrate should have a v value of less than around 1 x 10{sup -6}, correlated to a substrate surface rms value of lower than around 50 nm. Our Ag/ZnO substrates with rms roughness less than this value typically do not contain microvalleys with opening angles smaller than {approx} 110{sup o}, resulting in solar cells with improved output performance. We suggest a void-formation model based on selective etching of strained Si-Si atoms due to the collision of growing silicon film surface near the valleys of the substrate.

  8. Properties of Boron-dopedμc-Ge:H Films Deposited by Hot-wire CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Haibin; SHEN Honglie; WU Tianru; LU Linfeng; TANG Zhengxia; SHEN Jiancang

    2015-01-01

    Boron-doped hydrogenated microcrystalline Germanium (μc-Ge:H)fi lms were deposited by hot-wire CVD. H2 diluted GeH4 and B2H6 were used as precursors and the substrate temperature was kept at 300ć. The properties of the samples were analyzed by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and Hall Effect measurement with Van der Pauw method. It is found that thefi lms are partially crystallized, with crystalline fractions larger than 45% and grain sizes smaller than 50 nm. The B-doping can enhance the crystallization but reduce the grain sizes, and also enhance the preferential growth of Ge (220). The conductivity of thefi lms increases and tends to be saturated with increasingdiborane-to-germane ratio . All the Hall mobilities of the samples are larger than 3.8 cm2·V-1·s-1. A high conductivity of 41.3Ω-1ίcm-1 is gained at=6.7%.

  9. Simulation and experimental study of CVD process for low temperature nanocrystalline silicon carbide coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushal, Amit; Prakash, Jyoti, E-mail: jprakash@barc.gov.in; Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Chakravartty, Jayanta K.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Parametric simulation was carried out for specially designed CVD reactor. • Effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration were studied in CVD reactor. • Coating study carried out using low temperature and environmental safe CVD process. • Dense and uniform nanocrystalline SiC film was coated on zircaloy substrate. - Abstract: There is a huge requirement for development of a coating technique in nuclear industry, which is environmentally safe, economical and applicable to large scale components. In this view, simulation of gas-phase behavior in specially designed CVD reactor was carried out using computational tool, COMSOL. There were two important zones in CVD reactor first one is precursor vaporization zone and second one is coating zone. Optimized parameters for coating were derived from the simulation of gas phase dynamics in both zone of CVD reactor. The overall effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration profile showed that Re = 54 is the optimum reaction condition for uniform coating in CVD system. In CVD coating experiments a synthesized halogen free, non-toxic and non-corrosive silicon carbide precursor was used. Uniform coating of SiC was obtained on zircaloy substrate at 900 °C using as synthesized organosilicon precursor. The X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis show that dense nano crystalline SiC film was deposited on zircaloy substrate.

  10. The Effect of Excess Carbon on the Crystallographic, Microstructural, and Mechanical Properties of CVD Silicon Carbide Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzik, J V; Croft, W J; Staples, R J; MoberlyChan, W J

    2006-12-05

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fibers made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are of interest for organic, ceramic, and metal matrix composite materials due their high strength, high elastic modulus, and retention of mechanical properties at elevated processing and operating temperatures. The properties of SCS-6{trademark} silicon carbide fibers, which are made by a commercial process and consist largely of stoichiometric SiC, were compared with an experimental carbon-rich CVD SiC fiber, to which excess carbon was added during the CVD process. The concentration, homogeneity, and distribution of carbon were measured using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The effect of excess carbon on the tensile strength, elastic modulus, and the crystallographic and microstructural properties of CVD silicon carbide fibers was investigated using tensile testing, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  11. Evaluating electrically insulating films deposited on V-4% Cr-4% Ti by reactive CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.H.; Cho, W.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Previous CaO coatings on V-4%Cr-4%Ti exhibited high-ohmic insulator behavior even though a small amount of vanadium from the alloy was incorporated in the coating. However, when the vanadium concentration in the coatings is > 15 wt%, the coating becomes conductive. When the vanadium concentration is high in localized areas, a calcium vanadate phase that exhibits semiconductor behavior can form. To explore this situation, CaO and Ca-V-O coatings were produced on vanadium alloys by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and by a metallic-vapor process to investigate the electrical resistance of the coatings. Initially, the vanadium alloy specimens were either charged with oxygen in argon that contained trace levels of oxygen, or oxidized for 1.5-3 h in a 1% CO-CO{sub 2} gas mixture or in air to form vanadium oxide at 625-650{degrees}C. Most of the specimens were exposed to calcium vapor at 800-850{degrees}C. Initial and final weights were obtained to monitor each step, and surveillance samples were removed for examination by optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron-energy-dispersive and X-ray diffraction analysis; the electrical resistivity was also measured. The authors found that Ca-V-O films exhibited insulator behavior when the ratio of calcium concentration to vanadium concentration R in the film was > 0.9, and semiconductor or conductor behavior for R < 0.8. However, in some cases, semiconductor behavior was observed when CaO-coated samples with R > 0.98 were exposed in liquid lithium. Based on these studies, the authors conclude that semiconductor behavior occurs if a conductive calcium vanadate phase is present in localized regions in the CaO coating.

  12. Residual stress in thick low-pressure chemical-vapor deposited polycrystalline SiC coatings on Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D.; Shinavski, R. J.; Steffier, W. S.; Spearing, S. M.

    2005-04-01

    Residual stress in thick coatings of polycrystalline chemical-vapor deposited SiC on Si substrates is a key variable that must be controlled if SiC is to be used in microelectromechanical systems. Studies have been conducted to characterize the residual stress level as a function of deposition temperature, Si wafer and SiC coating thickness, and the ratios of methyltrichlorosilane to hydrogen and hydrogen chloride. Wafer curvature was used to monitor residual stress in combination with a laminated plate analysis. Compressive intrinsic (growth) stresses were measured with magnitudes in the range of 200-300MPa; however, these can be balanced with the tensile stress due to the thermal-expansion mismatch to leave near-zero stress at room temperature. The magnitude of the compressive intrinsic stress is consistent with previously reported values of surface stress in combination with the competition between grain-boundary energy and elastic strain energy.

  13. Deposition of TiC film on titanium for abrasion resistant implant material by ion-enhanced triode plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Yuhe, E-mail: zyh1120@hotmail.co.jp [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Wang Wei; Jia Xingya [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Akasaka, Tsukasa [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Liao, Susan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Watari, Fumio [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of Titanium Carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. - Abstract: Deposition of titanium carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a TiCl{sub 4} + CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} gas mixture. Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the specimen was consisted of TiC and Ti. Carbide layer of about 6 {mu}m thickness was observed on the cross section of the specimen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance.

  14. An improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer by fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongzheng; Liu, Malin; Chang, Jiaxing; Shao, Youlin; Liu, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle has been successful in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR), but an improved design is required for future development. In this paper, the coating layers are reconsidered, and an improved design of TRISO particle with porous SiC inner layer is proposed. Three methods of preparing the porous SiC layer, called high methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentration method, high Ar concentration method and hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) method, are experimentally studied. It is indicated that porous SiC layer can be successfully prepared and the density of SiC layer can be adjusted by tuning the preparation parameters. Microstructure and characterization of the improved TRISO coated particle are given based on scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. It can be found that the improved TRISO coated particle with porous SiC layer can be mass produced successfully. The formation mechanisms of porous SiC layer are also discussed based on the fluidized bed-chemical vapor deposition principle.

  15. Investigation of Microstructure of CVD Carbon Coating on SiC Fiber by Raman Spectrometer%CVD法SiC纤维表面碳涂层结构的拉曼光谱研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘帅; 杨延清; 罗贤; 张荣军; 赵光明; 金娜; 肖志远

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure and fracture morphology of carbon coatings were investigated by means of Raman spectrometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on the surface of SiC fiber with Q H2 + H2 and C2 H2 +C3 H8 + Ar as the reactants. The results show that the spectra of the carbon coating contain characteristicD, D" and G peaks around 1 350, 1 400~l 500 and 1 600 cm ' respectively, indicating a disordered-graphite structure with a small amount of amorphous carbon. The size of microcrystallite increased with the increase in temperature, and the degree of order, together with the uniformity in the carbon coating was improved simultaneously. It was observed on the fracture surface that coatings prepared by C2H2+H2 are flat and dense, whereas those prepared by QHz+GHa+Ar exhibit a flexural lamellar structure, which should be attributed to the relatively low degree of order and the non-uniformity in the microstructure.%采用激光拉曼光谱仪和扫描电子显微镜对以C2H2+H2和C2H2+C3H8 +Ar为反应气体,通过直流加热化学气相沉积工艺在SiC纤维表面制备的碳涂层的微观结构及断口形貌进行了研究.结果表明,两种碳涂层的拉曼光谱中1 350,1 400~1 500和1 600 cm-1附近均观察到D,D”和G特征峰的存在.碳涂层具有类似石墨的片层结构,结构中微晶的排列显示出一定的无序性,并含有少量非晶态碳.随着沉积温度的升高,微晶尺寸有所增加,结构中的均匀性和有序度也得到改善.断口观察发现,采用C2H2+H2制备的碳涂层平整、致密;而由C2H2+C3H8+Ar得到的碳涂层呈曲折的层片状.分析表明,这主要与结构中的有序度和均匀性有关.

  16. Low temperature back-surface-field contacts deposited by hot-wire CVD for heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, D. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)], E-mail: delfina@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C.; Martin, I.; Orpella, A.; Alcubilla, R. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Villar, F.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J. [CeRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Roca-i-Cabarrocas, P. [LPICM-Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2008-08-30

    The growing interest in using thinner wafers (< 200 {mu}m) requires the development of low temperature passivation strategies for the back contact of heterojunction solar cells. In this work, we investigate low temperature deposited back contacts based on boron-doped amorphous silicon films obtained by Hot-Wire CVD. The influence of the deposition parameters and the use of an intrinsic buffer layer have been considered. The microstructure of the deposited thin films has been comprehensively studied by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry in the UV-visible range. The effective recombination velocity at the back surface has been measured by the Quasi-Steady-State Photoconductance technique. Complete double-side heterojunction solar cells (1 cm{sup 2}) have been fabricated and characterized by External Quantum Efficiency and current-voltage measurements. Total-area conversion efficiencies up to 14.5% were achieved in a fully low temperature process (< 200 deg. C)

  17. Effect of high temperature annealing on the grain size of CVD-grown SiC and experimental PBMR TRISO coated particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mokoduwe, SM

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available -Isotropic (TRISO) Coated Particles (CPs) in a graphite matrix with the SiC layer being the main barrier to fission and transmutation products. The integrity of the CP three layer system namely, Inner Pyrolytic Carbon- Silicon carbide- Outer Pyrolytic Carbon (IPy...

  18. Large-scale synthesis of monodisperse SiC nanoparticles with adjustable size, stoichiometric ratio and properties by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongzheng; Liu, Malin; Chang, Jiaxing

    2017-02-01

    A facile fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition method was proposed for the synthesis of monodisperse SiC nanoparticles by using the single precursor of hexamethyldisilane (HMDS). SiC nanoparticles with average particle size from 10 to 200 nm were obtained by controlling the temperature and the gas ratio. An experimental chemical vapor deposition phase diagram of SiC in the HMDS-Ar-H2 system was obtained and three regions of SiC-Si, SiC and SiC-C can be distinguished. The BET surface area and the photoluminescence properties of the SiC nanoparticles can be adjusted by changing the nanoparticle size. For the SiC nanospheres with free carbon, a novel hierarchical structure with 5 8 nm SiC nanoparticles embedded into the graphite matrix was obtained. The advantages of fluidized bed technology for the preparation of SiC nanoparticles were proposed based on the features of homogenous reaction zone, narrow temperature distribution, ultra-short reactant residence time and mass production.

  19. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Mengdi, E-mail: M.Yang@utwente.nl; Aarnink, Antonius A. I.; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J.; Wolters, Rob A. M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 °C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), which reacted with WF{sub 6} at the substrate to deposit W. The growth behavior was monitored in real time by an in situ spectroscopic ellipsometer. In this work, the authors compare samples with tungsten grown by either HWALD or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in terms of growth kinetics and properties. For CVD, the samples were made in a mixture of WF{sub 6} and molecular or atomic hydrogen. Resistivity of the WF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} CVD layers was 20 μΩ·cm, whereas for the WF{sub 6}-at-H-CVD layers, it was 28 μΩ·cm. Interestingly, the resistivity was as high as 100 μΩ·cm for the HWALD films, although the tungsten films were 99% pure according to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction reveals that the HWALD W was crystallized as β-W, whereas both CVD films were in the α-W phase.

  20. Deposition rate and morphology of carbon nanotubes at different positions in a CVD reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized through the catalytic decomposition of a ferroeene-xylene mixture in a horizontal chemical vapor deposition reactor.The deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction was measured.The morphology of CNTs was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The results showed that the deposition rate of CNTs along the axial direction first increased and later decreased,the position achieving the maximum deposition rate was influenced by the operating conditions.The morphologies of CNTs also changed along the axial direction.

  1. Structure and extreme ultraviolet performance of Si/C multilayers deposited under different working pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qiang; Huang, Qiushi; Wang, Xiangmei; Yang, Yang; Yang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhong; Wang, Zhanshan; Xu, Rongkun; Peng, Taiping; Zhou, Hongjun; Huo, Tonglin

    2017-02-01

    Narrow bandwidth Si/C multilayer mirrors are fabricated and characterized for the Z-pinch plasma diagnostic at a wavelength of 16.5 nm. To reduce the large stress of the multilayer and maintain a practical reflectivity, different working pressures, from 0.13 Pa to 0.52 Pa, are optimized during the deposition. The grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry (GIXR) measurement and the fitting results indicate that an interlayer was formed at the interfaces, while both the interlayer thickness and interface widths increase with larger working pressure. The surface roughness of the multilayers also increases from 0.13 nm at 0.13 Pa to 0.29 nm at 0.52 Pa, as revealed by the atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. The multilayer stress decreases from -682 MPa to -384  MPa as the working pressure increases from 0.13 Pa to 0.52 Pa, respectively. The experimental extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflectivity of the samples with 20 bilayers gradually decreased from 26.3% to 18.9% with increased working pressure. The bandwidth of the reflection peak remains similar for the different samples with a full width half-maximum (FWHM) value of around 0.87 nm. A maximum EUV reflectivity of 33.2% and a bandwidth of 0.64 nm were achieved by the sample with 50 bilayers fabricated under a working pressure of 0.13 Pa.

  2. Filament poisoning at typical carbon nanotube deposition conditions by hot-filament CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the poisoning of tungsten filaments during the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process at typical carbon nanotube (CNT) deposition conditions and filament temperatures ranging from 1400 to 2000 °C. The morphological...

  3. Field emissions of graphene films deposited on different substrates by CVD system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Ping; Liu Xiao-Fei; Liu Xin-Xin; Wang Li-Jun; Yang Can; Jing Long-Wei; Li Song-Kun; Pan Xiu-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Graphene films are deposited on copper (Cu) and aluminum (A1) substrates,respectively,by using a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition technique.Furthermore,these graphene films are characterized by a field emission type scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM),Raman spectra,and field emission (FE) I-V measurements.It is found that the surface morphologies of the films deposited on Cu and Al substrates are different:the field emission property of graphene film deposited on the Cu substrate is better than that on the Al substrate,and the lowest turn-on field of 2.4 V/μm is obtained for graphene film deposited on the Cu substrate.The macroscopic areas of the graphene samples are all above 400 mm2.

  4. Structural and optical characterization of thick and thin polycrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma activated CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Pradhan; B Satpati; B P Bag; T Sharda

    2012-02-01

    Preliminary results of growth of thin diamond film in a recently installed 3 kW capacity microwave plasma activated CVD (MW-PACVD) system are being reported. The films were deposited on Si (100) substrate at 850°C using methane and hydrogen mixture at 1.5 kW MW power. The grown polycrystalline films were characterized by micro-Raman, transmission electron microscope (TEM), spectrophotometer and atomic force microscope (AFM). The results were compared with that of a thicker diamond film grown elsewhere in a same make MWPACVD system at relatively higher power densities. The presence of a sharp Raman peak at 1332 cm-1 confirmed the growth of diamond, and transmission spectra showed typical diamond film characteristics in both the samples. Typical twin bands and also a quintuplet twinned crystal were observed in TEM, further it was found that the twinned region in thin sample composed of very fine platelet like structure.

  5. Development Status of a CVD System to Deposit Tungsten onto UO2 Powder via the WCI6 Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, O. R.; Kimberlin, A.; Broadway, J.; Hickman, R.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is under development for deep space exploration. NTP's high specific impulse (> 850 second) enables a large range of destinations, shorter trip durations, and improved reliability. W-60vol%UO2 CERMET fuel development efforts emphasize fabrication, performance testing and process optimization to meet service life requirements. Fuel elements must be able to survive operation in excess of 2850 K, exposure to flowing hydrogen (H2), vibration, acoustic, and radiation conditions. CTE mismatch between W and UO2 result in high thermal stresses and lead to mechanical failure as a result UO2 reduction by hot hydrogen (H2) [1]. Improved powder metallurgy fabrication process control and mitigated fuel loss can be attained by coating UO2 starting powders within a layer of high density tungsten [2]. This paper discusses the advances of a fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system that utilizes the H2-WCl6 reduction process.

  6. Effect of surface irradiation during the photo-CVD deposition of a-Si:H thin films. Hikari CVD ho ni yoru amorphous silicon sakuseiji no kiban hikari reiki koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasaka, K.; Doering, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Fujishima, A. (The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-06

    This paper shows the impact of the irradiation from an additional light source during the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by photo-CVD deposition. Using a mercury sensitized photo-CVD process from Disilan (Si {sub 2} H {sub 6}) and hydrogen, silicon was deposited. A 40W low pressure mercury lamp was applied as the light source. A portion of the substrate was in addition irradiated using an Xg-He lamp through a thermal filter. Irradiation of the substrate using only Xg-He lamp produced no deposition, since this light has a wavelength which is too long to produce the SiH {sub 3}-radicals needed for Si deposition. The additional Xg-He light source was discovered to cause an increased thickness of deposited a-Si:H film and a transmission of the band structure. The reasons of these are considered that the influence of irradiation is not limited to film thickness, but that irradiation also impacts the composition of the a-Si:H film so as to cause a reduction in the hydrogen content. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Effect of PbI2 deposition rate on two-step PVD/CVD all-vacuum prepared perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioakeimidis, Apostolos; Christodoulou, Christos; Lux-Steiner, Martha; Fostiropoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-12-01

    In this work we fabricate all-vacuum processed methyl ammonium lead halide perovskite by a sequence of physical vapour deposition of PbI2 and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of CH3NH3I under a static atmosphere. We demonstrate that for higher deposition rate the (001) planes of PbI2 film show a higher degree of alignment parallel to the sample's surface. From X-ray diffraction data of the resulted perovskite film we derive that the intercalation rate of CH3NH3I is fostered for PbI2 films with higher degree of (001) planes alignment. The stoichiometry of the produced perovskite film is also studied by Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Complete all-vacuum perovskite solar cells were fabricated on glass/ITO substrates coated by an ultra-thin (5 nm) Zn-phthalocyanine film as hole selective layer. A dependence of residual PbI2 on the solar cells performance is displayed, while photovoltaic devices with efficiency up to η=11.6% were achieved.

  8. Silicon-Germanium Films Deposited by Low Frequency PE CVD: Effect of H2 and Ar Dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosarev, A; Torres, A; Hernandez, Y; Ambrosio, R; Zuniga, C; Felter, T E; Asomoza, R R; Kudriavtsev, Y; Silva-Gonzalez, R; Gomez-Barojas, E; Ilinski, A; Abramov, A S

    2005-09-22

    We have studied structure and electrical properties of Si{sub 1-Y}Ge{sub Y}:H films deposited by low frequency PE CVD over the entire composition range from Y=0 to Y=1. The deposition rate of the films and their structural and electrical properties were measured for various ratios of the germane/silane feed gases and with and without dilution by Ar and by H{sub 2}. Structure and composition was studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Surface morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found: (1) The deposition rate increased with Y maximizing at Y=1 without dilution. (2) The relative rate of Ge and Si incorporation is affected by dilution. (3) Hydrogen preferentially bonds to silicon. (4) Hydrogen content decreases for increasing Y. In addition, optical measurements showed that as Y goes for 0 to 1, the Fermi level moves from mid gap to the conduction band edge, i.e. the films become more n-type. No correlation was found between the pre-exponential and the activation energy of conductivity. The behavior of the conductivity {gamma}-factor suggests a local minimum in the density of states at E {approx} 0.33 eV for the films grown with or without H-dilution and E {approx} 0.25 eV for the films with Ar dilution.

  9. Influence of deposition rate on the structural properties of plasma-enhanced CVD epitaxial silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanghua; Cariou, Romain; Hamon, Gwenaëlle; Léal, Ronan; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i

    2017-01-01

    Solar cells based on epitaxial silicon layers as the absorber attract increasing attention because of the potential cost reduction. In this work, we studied the influence of the deposition rate on the structural properties of epitaxial silicon layers produced by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (epi-PECVD) using silane as a precursor and hydrogen as a carrier gas. We found that the crystalline quality of epi-PECVD layers depends on their thickness and deposition rate. Moreover, increasing the deposition rate may lead to epitaxy breakdown. In that case, we observe the formation of embedded amorphous silicon cones in the epi-PECVD layer. To explain this phenomenon, we develop a model based on the coupling of hydrogen and built-in strain. By optimizing the deposition conditions to avoid epitaxy breakdown, including substrate temperatures and plasma potential, we have been able to synthesize epi-PECVD layers up to a deposition rate of 8.3 Å/s. In such case, we found that the incorporation of hydrogen in the hydrogenated crystalline silicon can reach 4 at. % at a substrate temperature of 350 °C. PMID:28262840

  10. Mechanical alloying and sintering of aluminum reinforced with SiC nanopowders produced by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, J.; Fort, J.; Roura, P. [GRM, Dept. de Enginyeria Industrial, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Froyen, L. [MTM Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium); Viera, G.; Bertran, E. [FEMAN, Dept. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Nanometric powders of stoichiometric SiC have been synthesised by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapour deposition. These are constituted by amorphous particles with diameters ranging from 10 to 100 nm. Due to their high hydrogen content, a heat treatment at 900 C was needed to prevent spontaneous oxidation. The stabilized SiC powder was mechanically alloyed with aluminum particles of 40 {mu}m in diameter and the alloy was formed by hot isostatic sintering. The SiC content ranged from 0 to 5% in weight. A detailed analysis of the alloyed powder microstructure is presented as well as preliminary results concerning the mechanical properties after sintering. (orig.)

  11. The effects of flow multiplicity on GaN deposition in a rotating disk CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkinis, P. A.; Aviziotis, I. G.; Koronaki, E. D.; Gakis, G. P.; Boudouvis, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of gas flow multiplicity, i.e. the possibility of two very different flow regimes prevailing at random in a rotating disk metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, on the deposited GaN film is investigated. A transport model coupled with a system of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the wafer where the film is formed, is implemented in the parameter regions where multiple flows are possible. In the region of multiplicity where either plug flow, imposed by forced convection, or buoyancy-dominated flow is possible, the results in the latter case indicate high deposition rate and decreased uniformity. In the former case, increasing the pressure and the rotation rate has a favorable effect on the deposition rate without sacrificing uniformity. In the parameter window of multiplicity where either rotation or combined rotation/buoyancy may prevail, the effects of buoyancy lead to higher deposition rate at the center of the wafer and reduced uniformity. The Arrhenius plots in the regions of multiplicity for exactly the same operating conditions reveal that the system operates in a diffusion-limited regime in the plug flow and in the rotation-dominated flow, in the first and second region of multiplicity respectively. In contrast, in the buoyancy-dominated flow and the combined rotation/buoyancy flow (first and second region of multiplicity respectively) the process shifts into the kinetics-limited regime.

  12. The effect of deposition RF power on the SiC passivation layer synthesized by an RF magnetron sputtering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keun Seo, Jae; Ko, Ki-han; Seok Choi, Won; Park, Mungi; Hwan Lee, Jong; Yi, Jun-Sin

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) film as an alternative material to silicon nitride (SiN) and silicon oxide (SiO 2) for the passivation layer of solar cells. The a-SiC films were deposited on the p-type silicon (1 0 0) and glass substrates by a RF magnetron sputtering method using a-SiC (99%) target. We investigated the properties according to the deposition RF power (150, 200, 250 and 300 W). The optical properties were investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy and an ellipsometer. The performance of SiC passivation layer was investigated by carrier lifetime measurement. We could obtain the lowest refractive index of 3.22 and the carrier lifetime was the highest, 7 μs at the deposition RF power of 150 W.

  13. Surface passivation of nano-textured fluorescent SiC by atomic layer deposited TiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    Nano-textured surfaces have played a key role in optoelectronic materials to enhance the light extraction efficiency. In this work, morphology and optical properties of nano-textured SiC covered with atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 were investigated. In order to obtain a high quality surface...... for TiO2 deposition, a three-step cleaning procedure was introduced after RIE etching. The morphology of anatase TiO2 indicates that the nano-textured substrate has a much higher surface nucleated grain density than a flat substrate at the beginning of the deposition process. The corresponding...... reflectance increases with TiO2 thickness due to increased surface diffuse reflection. The passivation effect of ALD TiO2 thin film on the nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC sample was also investigated and a PL intensity improvement of 8.05% was obtained due to the surface passivation....

  14. TiAlN and TiAlCN deposition in an industrial PaCVD-plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heim, D.; Hochreiter, R. [Ruebig GmbH, Co., Wels (Austria)

    1998-01-01

    An industrial PaCVD-plant was equipped with an AlCl{sub 3}-generator. By using Ar, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, TiCl{sub 4} and AlCl{sub 3}, TiAlN- and TiAlCN-films could be deposited on hard metal and steel substrates. The plasma was generated by a DC-pulse power supply with frequencies up to 50 kHz. The reactor size was 350 mm in diameter and 900 mm in height. During one batch 1200 indexable inserts could be coated. The growth rates were about 1-3 {mu}m h{sup -1}. The deposited films show a fine structure and Cl-concentrations below 3%. The measured critical loads were between 30 and 40 N. Wear test results show an increase in tool life up to several 100% compared with uncoated or TiN-coated tools. (orig.) 7 refs.

  15. Diamond like carbon coatings deposited by microwave plasma CVD: XPS and ellipsometric studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R M Dey; M Pandey; D Bhattacharyya; D S Patil; S K Kulkarni

    2007-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited by microwave assisted chemical vapour deposition system using d.c. bias voltage ranging from –100 V to –300 V. These films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry techniques for estimating 3/2 ratio. The 3/2 ratio obtained by XPS is found to have an opposite trend to that obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. These results are explained using sub-plantation picture of DLC growth. Our results clearly indicate that the film is composed of two different layers, having entirely different properties in terms of void percentage and 3/2 ratio. The upper layer is relatively thinner as compared to the bottom layer.

  16. The Formation of Nanocrystalline Diamond Coating on WC Deposited by Microwave Assisted Plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toff, M. R. M.; Hamzah, E.; Purniawan, A.

    2010-03-01

    Diamond is one form of carbon structure. The extreme hardness and high chemical resistant of diamond coatings determined that many works on this area relate to coated materials for tribological applications in biomedicine, as mechanical seals or cutting tools for hard machining operations. In the work, nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coated tungsten carbide (WC) have been deposited by microwave assisted plasma chemical vapor deposition (MAPCVD) from CH4/H2 mixtures. Morphology of NCD was investigated by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The quality of NCD is defined as ratio between diamond and non diamond and also full width at half maximum (FWHM) was determined using Raman spectra. The result found that the NCD structure can be deposited on WC surface using CH4/H2 gas mixture with grain size ˜20 nm to 100 nm. Increase %CH4 concentration due to increase the nucleation of NCD whereas decrease the quality of diamond. Based on Raman spectra, the quality of NCD is in the range ˜98.82-99.01% and 99.56-99.75% for NCD and microcrystalline (MCD), respectively. In addition, FWHM of NCD is high than MCD in the range of 8.664-62.24 cm-1 and 4.24-5.05 cm-1 for NCD and MCD respectively that indicate the crystallineity of NCD is smaller than MCD.

  17. Room-Temperature Growth of SiC Thin Films by Dual-Ion-Beam Sputtering Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Jin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC films were prepared by single and dual-ion-beamsputtering deposition at room temperature. An assisted Ar+ ion beam (ion energy Ei = 150 eV was directed to bombard the substrate surface to be helpful for forming SiC films. The microstructure and optical properties of nonirradicated and assisted ion-beam irradicated films have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and Raman spectra. TEM result shows that the films are amorphous. The films exposed to a low-energy assisted ion-beam irradicated during sputtering from a-SiC target have exhibited smoother and compacter surface topography than which deposited with nonirradicated. The ion-beam irradicated improves the adhesion between film and substrate and releases the stress between film and substrate. With assisted ion-beam irradicated, the density of the Si–C bond in the film has increased. At the same time, the excess C atoms or the size of the sp2 bonded clusters reduces, and the a-Si phase decreases. These results indicate that the composition of the film is mainly Si–C bond.

  18. Structural and optical properties of tellurium films obtained by chemical vapor deposition(CVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yu-tian; GONG Zhu-Qing; XU Wei-Hong; HUANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    Tellurium thin films were prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, surface morphology and optical properties of the Te thin films were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FTIR transmission,UV/VIS/NIR transmission and reflectance. The results show that the films structural and optical properties are influenced by many factors such as film thickness, crystallite size and substrate temperature. The films as thick as 111-133 nm have high IR transmission across the full 8-13 μm band and highly blocking in the solar spectral region elsewhere, which indicates that Te films thickness in this region can be used as good solar radiation shields in radiative cooling devices.

  19. Effects of Fiber Content on Mechanical Properties of CVD SiC Fiber-Reinforced Strontium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1996-01-01

    Unidirectional CVD SiC(f)(SCS-6) fiber-reinforced strontium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass-ceramic matrix composites containing various volume fractions, approximately 16 to 40 volume %, of fibers were fabricated by hot pressing at 1400 C for 2 h under 27.6 MPa. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase formed, with complete absence of the undesired hexacelsian phase, in the matrix. Room temperature mechanical properties were measured in 3-point flexure. The matrix microcracking stress and the ultimate strength increased with increase in fiber volume fraction, reached maximum values for V(sub f) approximately equal to 0.35, and degraded at higher fiber loadings. This degradation in mechanical properties is related to the change in failure mode, from tensile at lower V(sub f) to interlaminar shear at higher fiber contents. The extent of fiber loading did not have noticeable effect on either fiber-matrix debonding stress, or frictional sliding stress at the interface. The applicability of micromechanical models in predicting the mechanical properties of the composites was also examined. The currently available theoretical models do not appear to be useful in predicting the values of the first matrix cracking stress, and the ultimate strength of the SCS-6/SAS composites.

  20. The effectiveness of Ti implants as barriers to carbon diffusion in Ti implanted steel under CVD diamond deposition conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Hoffman, A. [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Dept. of Chemistry; Evan, P.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Paterson, P.J.K. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    The growth of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond onto iron based substrates complicated by preferential soot formation and carbon diffusion into the substrate [1], leading to poor quality films and poor adhesion. In the initial stages of exposure to a microwave plasma, a layer of graphite is rapidly formed on an untreated Fe based substrate. Once this graphite layer reaches a certain thickness, reasonable quality diamond nucleates and grows upon it. However, the diamond film easily delaminates from the substrate, the weak link being the graphitic layer. Following an initial success in using a TiN barrier layer to inhibit the formation of such a graphitic layer the authors report on attempts to use an implanted Ti layer for the same purpose. This work was prompted by observation that, although the TiN proved to be an extremely effective diffusion barrier, adhesion may be further enhanced by the formation of a TiC interface layer between the diamond film and the Fe substrate. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Investigation of phonon modes in gallium nitride nanowires deposited by thermal CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizal, Umesh, E-mail: umeshrizal680@gmail.com; Swain, Bibhu P., E-mail: bibhu.s@smit.smu.edu.in [Nano Processing Laboratory, Centre for Material Science and Nanotechnology, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East Sikkim, India-737136 (India); Swain, Bhabani S., E-mail: bsswain@kookmin.ac.kr [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Sungbuk-gu, Jeongnung-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-13

    Gallium nitride nanowires (GaN-NWs) of diameters ranging from 20 to 80 nm were grown on the p-type Si substrate by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (TCVD) using Iron (Fe) catalyst via VLS mechanism. Raman and FTIR spectra reveal the presence of broad transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) phonon peak spreads over 500-600 cm{sup −1} and 720 cm{sup −1} respectively. The detail deconvolution of integrated transverse and longitudinal phonon analysis reveals phonon confinement brought out by incorporation of hydrogen atom. The red shifts of TO and LO phonon peak position indicates nanosized effect. I{sub A1(LO)}/I{sub A1(TO)} increases from 0.073 to 1.0 and their respective fwhm{sub A1(LO)}/fwhm{sub A1(TO)} also increases from 0.71 to 1.31 with increasing H{sub 2} flow rate. E{sub 1}(LO) - E{sub 1}(TO) and A{sub 1}(LO) - A{sub 1}(TO) increases from 173.83 to 190.73 and 184.89 to 193.22 respectively. Apart from this usual TO and LO phonon, we have found Surface Optic (SO) phonon at 671 cm{sup −1} in FTIR spectra. The intensity of PL peak increases with increasing H{sub 2} dilution reveals efficient passivation of defect centre at surface of GaN-NWs.

  2. The deposition characteristics of copper(I) compounds for CVD by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, F.D.; Peden, C.H.F.; Omstead, T.R.; Blewer, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Farkas, J.; Hampden-Smith, M.J.; Kodas, T.T. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to investigate the adsorption and thermally-induced decomposition of copper (I) {beta}-diketonate precursors of the type (hfac)CuL, where hfac is the hexafluoroacetylacetonate bidentate ligand and L is trimethylphosphine or 1,5-cyclooctadiene. The (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} precursor desorbs from the surface at very low temperatures whereas the (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD) dissociates on adsorption, liberating 1,5-COD and leaving a surface(hfac)Cu complex which can subsequently disproportionate. Evidence is provided for hydrogen-bonding between the hfac ligand and the surface silanols for (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3}, but not for (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD). These results are consistent with the selective behavior of these precursors for copper deposition and suggest that the selectivity of the (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} and (hfac)Cu(1, 5-COD) precursors may be due to the ability of the hfac ligand to hydrogen bond to the surface silanol groups.

  3. The deposition characteristics of copper(I) compounds for CVD by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, F.D.; Peden, C.H.F.; Omstead, T.R.; Blewer, R.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Farkas, J.; Hampden-Smith, M.J.; Kodas, T.T. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was used to investigate the adsorption and thermally-induced decomposition of copper (I) {beta}-diketonate precursors of the type (hfac)CuL, where hfac is the hexafluoroacetylacetonate bidentate ligand and L is trimethylphosphine or 1,5-cyclooctadiene. The (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} precursor desorbs from the surface at very low temperatures whereas the (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD) dissociates on adsorption, liberating 1,5-COD and leaving a surface(hfac)Cu complex which can subsequently disproportionate. Evidence is provided for hydrogen-bonding between the hfac ligand and the surface silanols for (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3}, but not for (hfac)Cu(1,5-COD). These results are consistent with the selective behavior of these precursors for copper deposition and suggest that the selectivity of the (hfac)CuPMe{sub 3} and (hfac)Cu(1, 5-COD) precursors may be due to the ability of the hfac ligand to hydrogen bond to the surface silanol groups.

  4. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarin, V.; Mulpuri, R.; Auger, M. [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States) Manufacturing Engineering

    1996-04-20

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can withstand the rigorous requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being developed as a potential solution. Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}- SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  5. Structure and electronic properties of SiC thin-films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ji-cheng; ZHENG Xu-qiang

    2007-01-01

    SiC thin-films were prepared by RF-magnetron sputtering technique(RMS) with the target of single crystalline SiC and then annealed. The surface morphology of thin-films was characterized by AFM. The result shows that the surface of the thin-films is smooth and compact; XRD analysis reveals that the thin-films are amorphous. The thickness, square-resistance and curves of resistance-temperature were measured. The results show that the curves of lnR versus 1/kT both before and after annealing satisfy the expression of lnR∝△W/kT, where △W is electron excitation energy in the range of 0.014 2-0.018 5 eV, and it has a trend of increasing when the temperature is increased. After synthetical analysis we get the conclusion that the electronic mechanism of the thin-films is short distance transition between the localized states in the temperature range of 25-250 ℃. The resistivity is in the range of 2.4×10-3-4.4×10-3 Ω·cm and it has the same trend as electron excitation energy when annealing temperature is increased, which further confirms the electronic mechanism of thin-films and the trend of electron excitation energy versus annealing temperature.

  6. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PE-CVD) yields better Hydrolytical Stability of Biocompatible SiOx Thin Films on Implant Alumina Ceramics compared to Rapid Thermal Evaporation Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böke, Frederik; Giner, Ignacio; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Fischer, Horst

    2016-07-20

    Densely sintered aluminum oxide (α-Al2O3) is chemically and biologically inert. To improve the interaction with biomolecules and cells, its surface has to be modified prior to use in biomedical applications. In this study, we compared two deposition techniques for adhesion promoting SiOx films to facilitate the coupling of stable organosilane monolayers on monolithic α-alumina; physical vapor deposition (PVD) by thermal evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD). We also investigated the influence of etching on the formation of silanol surface groups using hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid solutions. The film characteristics, that is, surface morphology and surface chemistry, as well as the film stability and its adhesion properties under accelerated aging conditions were characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and tensile strength tests. Differences in surface functionalization were investigated via two model organosilanes as well as the cell-cytotoxicity and viability on murine fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC). We found that both SiOx interfaces did not affect the cell viability of both cell types. No significant differences between both films with regard to their interfacial tensile strength were detected, although failure mode analyses revealed a higher interfacial stability of the PE-CVD films compared to the PVD films. Twenty-eight day exposure to simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C revealed a partial delamination of the thermally deposited PVD films whereas the PE-CVD films stayed largely intact. SiOx layers deposited by both PVD and PE-CVD may thus serve as viable adhesion-promoters for subsequent organosilane coupling agent binding to α-alumina. However, PE-CVD appears to be favorable for long-term direct film exposure to aqueous

  7. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide for large area mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilman, R. L.; Maguire, E. A.

    1982-05-01

    CVD-SiC has been identified as the leading mirror material for high energy synchrotron radiation because of its high K/alpha ratio and its ability to be super-polished to less than or equal to 10 A rms roughness. Technology already exists for depositing SiC over large areas (approximately 70 cm x 20 cm). The CVD process, substrate selection, and mirror design considerations are discussed.

  8. Diagnosis of gas phase near the substrate surface in diamond film deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuyuan Zhou; Guangchao Chen; Bin Li; Weizhong Tang; Fanxiu Lv

    2007-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to study the gas phase composition near the substrate surface during diamond deposition by high-power DC arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (CVD). C2 radical was determined as the main carbon radical in this plasma atmosphere. The deposition parameters, such as substrate temperature, anode-substrate distance, methane concentration, and gas flow rate, were inspected to find out the influence on the gas phase. A strong dependence of the concentrations and distribution of radicals on substrate temperature was confirmed by the design of experiments (DOE). An explanation for this dependence could be that radicals near the substrate surface may have additional ionization or dissociation and also have recombination,or are consumed on the substrate surface where chemical reactions occur.

  9. Synthesis of few-layer graphene on a Ni substrate by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Hyuk; Castro, Edward Joseph; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun [Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In this work, few-layer graphene (FLG) was successfully grown on polycrystalline Ni a large scale by using DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (DC PE-CVD), which may serve as an alternative route in large-scale graphene synthesis. The synthesis time had an effect on the quality of the graphene produced. The applied DC voltage, on the other hand, influenced the minimization of the defect densities in the graphene grown. We also present a method of producing a free-standing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)/graphene membrane on a FeCl{sub 3(aq)} solution, which could then be transferred to the desired substrate.

  10. Formation of patterned arrays of Au nanoparticles on SiC surface by template confined dewetting of normal and oblique deposited nanoscale films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F., E-mail: francesco.ruffino@ct.infn.it; Grimaldi, M.G.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the formation of patterned arrays of Au nanoparticles (NPs) on 6H SiC surface. To this end, we exploit the thermal-induced dewetting properties of a template confined deposited nanoscale Au film. In this approach, the Au surface pattern order, on the SiC substrate, is established by a template confined deposition using a micrometric template. Then, a dewetting process of the patterned Au film is induced by thermal processes. We compare the results, about the patterns formation, obtained for normal and oblique deposited Au films. We show that the normal and oblique depositions, through the same template, originate different patterns of the Au film. As a consequence of these different starting patterns, after the thermal processes, different patterns for the arrays of NPs originating from the dewetting mechanisms are obtained. For each fixed deposition angle α, the pattern evolution is analyzed, by scanning electron microscopy, as a function of the annealing time at 1173 K (900 °C). From these analyses, quantitative evaluations on the NPs size evolution are drawn. - Highlights: • Micrometric template-confined nanoscale gold films are deposited on silicon carbide. • The dewetting process of template-confined gold films on silicon carbide is studied. • Comparison of dewetting process of normal and oblique deposited gold films is drawn. • Patterned arrays of gold nanoparticles on silicon carbide surface are produced.

  11. AFM Morphology Study of Si1-Y GeY:H Films Deposited by LF PE CVD from Silane-Germane with Different

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, L; Kosarev, A

    2005-03-28

    The morphology of Si{sub 1-Y} Ge{sub Y}:H films in the range of Y=0.23 to 0.9 has been studied by AFM. The films were deposited by Low Frequency (LF) PE CVD at substrate temperature T{sub s}=300 C and discharge frequency f=110 kHz from silane+germane mixture with and without, Ar and H{sub 2} dilution. The films were deposited on silicon and glass substrates. AFM images were taken and analyzed for 2 x 2 mm{sup 2} area. All the images demonstrated ''grain'' like structure, which was characterized by the height distribution function F(H) average roughness , standard height deviation Rq, lateral correlation length L{sub c} area distribution function F(s), mean grain area , diameter distribution function F(d), and mean grain diameter . The roughness of the films monotonically increases with Y for all dilutions, but more significantly in the films deposited without dilution. L{sub c} continuously grows with Y in the films deposited without dilution, while more complex behavior L{sub c}(Y) is observed in the films deposited with H- or Ar dilution. The sharpness of F(H) characterized by curtosis {gamma} depends on dilution and the sharpest F(H) are for the films deposited with Ar ({gamma}=5.30,Y=0.23) and without dilution ({gamma}=4.3, Y=0.45). Isothermal annealing caused increase of , L{sub c} in the films deposited with H- and Ar dilutions, while in the films prepared without dilution the behavior was more complex, depending on the substrates. Significant narrowing of the height distribution was observed in the films deposited with H dilution or without dilution.

  12. Initiated Chemical Vapor Deposition (iCVD) of Highly Cross-Linked Polymer Films for Advanced Lithium-Ion Battery Separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Youngmin; Kim, Byung Gon; Pak, Kwanyong; Han, Sung Jae; Song, Heon-Sik; Choi, Jang Wook; Im, Sung Gap

    2015-08-26

    We report an initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process to coat polyethylene (PE) separators in Li-ion batteries with a highly cross-linked, mechanically strong polymer, namely, polyhexavinyldisiloxane (pHVDS). The highly cross-linked but ultrathin pHVDS films can only be obtained by a vapor-phase process, because the pHVDS is insoluble in most solvents and thus infeasible with conventional solution-based methods. Moreover, even after the pHVDS coating, the initial porous structure of the separator is well preserved owing to the conformal vapor-phase deposition. The coating thickness is delicately controlled by deposition time to the level that the pore size decreases to below 7% compared to the original dimension. The pHVDS-coated PE shows substantially improved thermal stability and electrolyte wettability. After incubation at 140 °C for 30 min, the pHVDS-coated PE causes only a 12% areal shrinkage (versus 90% of the pristine separator). The superior wettability results in increased electrolyte uptake and ionic conductivity, leading to significantly improved rate performance. The current approach is applicable to a wide range of porous polymeric separators that suffer from thermal shrinkage and poor electrolyte wetting.

  13. Enhancing the oxidation resistance of graphite by applying an SiC coat with crack healing at an elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Jae-Un; Kim, Yootaek; Windes, William E.

    2016-08-01

    The potential of reducing the oxidation of the supporting graphite components during normal and/or accident conditions in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design has been studied. In this work efforts have been made to slow the oxidation process of the graphite with a thin SiC coating (∼ 10 μm). Upon heating at ≥ 1173 K in air, the spallations and cracks were formed in the dense columnar structured SiC coating layer grown on the graphite with a functionally gradient electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD. In accordance with the formations of these defects, the sample was vigorously oxidized, leaving only the SiC coating layer. Then, efforts were made to heal the surface defects using additional EB-PVD with ion beam bombardment and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The EB-PVD did not effectively heal the cracks. But, the CVD was more appropriate for crack healing, likely due to its excellent crack line filling capability with a high density and high aspect ratio. It took ∼ 34 min for the 20% weight loss of the CVD crack healed sample in the oxidation test with annealing at 1173 K, while it took ∼ 8 min for the EB-PVD coated sample, which means it took ∼4 times longer at 1173 K for the same weight reduction in this experimental set-up.

  14. On the development of single and multijunction solar cells with hot-wire CVD deposited active layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; Schuttauf, J.A.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of the scientific challenges and achievements during the development of thin film silicon based single and multijunction solar cells with hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of the active silicon layers. The highlights discussed include the development of Ag/ZnO coating

  15. Interlayer utilization (including metal borides) for subsequent deposition of NSD films via microwave plasma CVD on 316 and 440C stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Jared

    . Surface boriding was implemented using the novel method of microwave plasma CVD with a mixture of hydrogen and diborane gases. On 440C bearings, dual phase boride layers of Fe2B and FeB were formed which supported adhered nanostructured diamond films. Continuity of the films was not seamless with limited regions remaining uncoated potentially corresponding to delamination of the film as evidenced by the presence of tubular structures presumably composed of sp2 bonded carbon. Surface boriding of 316 stainless steel discs was conducted at various powers and pressures to achieve temperatures ranging from 550-800 °C. The substrate boriding temperature was found to substantially influence the resultant interlayer by altering the metal boride(s) present. The lowest temperatures produced an interlayer where CrB was the single detected phase, higher temperatures yielded the presence of only Fe2B, and a combination of the two phases resulted from an intermediate boriding temperature. Compared with the more common, commercialized boriding methods, this a profound result given the problems posed by the FeB phase in addition to other advantages offered by CVD processes and microwave generated plasmas in general. Indentation testing of the boride layers revealed excellent adhesion strength for all borided interlayers, and above all, no evidence of cracking was observed for a sole Fe2B phase. As with boriding of 440C bearings, subsequent diamond deposition was achieved on these interlayers with substantially improved adhesion strength relative to diamond coated TiN interlayers. Both XRD and Raman spectroscopy confirmed a nanostructured diamond film with interfacial chromium carbides responsible for enhanced adhesion strength. Interlayers consisting solely of Fe2B have displayed an ability to support fully continuous nanostructured diamond films, yet additional study is required for consistent reproduction. This is in good agreement with initial work on pack borided high alloy steels

  16. Evaluation of Fracture Stress for the SiC Layer of TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles by A Modified Crush Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Kim, Jin Weon [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Fracture stress data for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC coatings of tri-isotropic (TRISO) carbon/silicon carbide coated fuel particles were obtained using a newly developed testing and evaluation method, and their relationship with microstructure investigated. A crush testing technique using a blanket foil at load-transferring contact has been developed for hemispherical shell SiC specimens based on finite element (FE) analysis results. Mean fracture stress varied with test material in the range of 330 650 MPa, and was connected to the combined characteristics of inner surface roughness and porosity.

  17. Microcrystalline silicon from very high frequency plasma deposition and hot-wire CVD for ``micromorph`` tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brummack, H.; Brueggemann, R.; Wanka, H.N.; Hierzenberger, A.; Schubert, M.B. [Univ. Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Elektronik

    1997-12-31

    The authors have grown microcrystalline silicon from a glow discharge at very high frequencies of 55 MHz and 170 MHz with high hydrogen dilution, and also, at more than 10 times higher growth rates, similar films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. Both kinds of materials have extensively been characterized and compared in terms of structural, optical and electronic properties, which greatly improve by deposition in a multi- instead of a single-chamber system. Incorporation of these different materials into pin solar cells results in open circuit voltages of about 400 mV as long as the doped layers are microcrystalline and rise to more than 870 mV if amorphous p- and n-layers are used. Quantum efficiencies and fill factors are still poor but leave room for further improvement, as clearly demonstrated by a remarkable reverse bias quantum efficiency gain.

  18. Optical spectroscopic analyses of CVD plasmas used in the deposition of transparent and conductive ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Espinos, J.P.; Yubero, F.; Barranco, A.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R. [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Cotrino, J. [Universidad de Sevilla, Facultad de Fisica, Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Transparent conducting ZnO:A1 thin films have been prepared by remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Emission line profiles were recorded as a function of different plasma gas composition (oxygen and hydrogen mixtures) and different rates of precursors (Zn(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2} and A1(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) in the downstream zone of the plasma reactor. Optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the oxygen/hydrogen plasma as a function of hydrogen flow rate. The variation of plasma hydrogen content has an important influence in the resistivity of the films. (authors)

  19. Thermally Induced Nano-Structural and Optical Changes of nc-Si:H Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller TFG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the thermally induced changes of the nano-structural and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon in the temperature range 200–700 °C. The as-deposited sample has a high crystalline volume fraction of 53% with an average crystallite size of ~3.9 nm, where 66% of the total hydrogen is bonded as ≡Si–H monohydrides on the nano-crystallite surface. A growth in the native crystallite size and crystalline volume fraction occurs at annealing temperatures ≥400 °C, where hydrogen is initially removed from the crystallite grain boundaries followed by its removal from the amorphous network. The nucleation of smaller nano-crystallites at higher temperatures accounts for the enhanced porous structure and the increase in the optical band gap and average gap.

  20. Thermally Induced Nano-Structural and Optical Changes of nc-Si:H Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendse, C J; Malgas, G F; Muller, T F G; Knoesen, D; Oliphant, C J; Motaung, D E; Halindintwali, S; Mwakikunga, B W

    2009-01-21

    We report on the thermally induced changes of the nano-structural and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon in the temperature range 200-700 degrees C. The as-deposited sample has a high crystalline volume fraction of 53% with an average crystallite size of ~3.9 nm, where 66% of the total hydrogen is bonded as identical withSi-H monohydrides on the nano-crystallite surface. A growth in the native crystallite size and crystalline volume fraction occurs at annealing temperatures >/=400 degrees C, where hydrogen is initially removed from the crystallite grain boundaries followed by its removal from the amorphous network. The nucleation of smaller nano-crystallites at higher temperatures accounts for the enhanced porous structure and the increase in the optical band gap and average gap.

  1. Molecular fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic initiated chemically vapor-deposited (iCVD) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R; Goktekin, E; Wang, MH; Gleason, KK

    2014-08-08

    Biofouling is a universal problem in various applications ranging from water purification to implantable biomedical devices. Recent advances in surface modification have created a rich library of antifouling surface chemistries, many of which can be categorized into one of the two groups: hydrophilic surfaces or amphiphilic surfaces. We report the straightforward preparation of antifouling thin film coatings in both categories via initiated chemical vapor deposition. A molecular force spectroscopy-based method is demonstrated as a rapid and quantitative assessment tool for comparing the differences in antifouling characteristics. The fouling propensity of single molecules, as opposed to bulk protein solution or bacterial culture, is assessed. This method allows for the interrogation of molecular interaction without the complication resulted from protein conformational change or micro-organism group interactions. The molecular interaction follows the same trend as bacterial adhesion results obtained previously, demonstrating that molecular force probe is a valid method for the quantification and mechanistic examination of fouling. In addition, the molecular force spectroscopy-based method is able to distinguish differences in antifouling capability that is not resolvable by traditional static protein adsorption tests. To lend further insight into the intrinsic fouling resistance of zwitterionic and amphiphilic surface chemistries, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, advancing and receding water contact angles, and atomic force microscopy are used to elucidate the film properties that are relevant to their antifouling capabilities.

  2. Preparation of Single- and Few-Layer Graphene Sheets Using Co Deposition on SiC Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cun Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Single- and few-layer graphene sheets were fabricated by selective chemical reactions between Co film and SiC substrate. A rapid cooling process was employed. The number of layers and crystallinity of graphene sheets were controlled by process parameters. The formation mechanism of graphene was highly sensitive to carbon diffusion. Free carbon precipitated and then moved across the product layer that was composed mainly of cobalt-silicides. The graphene layer formed homogeneously on the surface and then transferred to the other substrate. This could provide a method for high-quality fabrication of wafer-sized graphene sheets.

  3. Pulsed-laser-deposited AlN films for high-temperature SiC MIS devices[Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vispute, R.D.; Patel, A.; Baynes, K. [and others

    2000-07-01

    The authors report on the fabrication of device-quality AlN heterostructures grown on SiC for high-temperature electronic devices. The AlN films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at substrate temperatures ranging from 25 C (room temperature) to 1000 C. The as-grown films were investigated using x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, ion channeling, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The AlN films grown above 700 C were highly c-axis oriented with rocking curve FWHM of 5 to 6 arc-min. The ion channeling minimum yields near the surface region for the AlN films were {approximately}2 to 4%, indicating their high degree of crystallinity. TEM studies indicated that AlN films were epitaxial and single crystalline in nature with a large number of stacking faults as a result of lattice mismatch and growth induced defects. The surface roughness for the films was about 0.5 nm, which is close to the unit cell height of the AlN. Epitaxial TiN ohmic contacts were also developed on SiC, GaN, and AlN by in-situ PLD. Epitaxial TiN/AlN/SiC MIS capacitors with gate areas of 4 {sup {minus}} 10{sup {minus}4} cm{sup 2} were fabricated, and high-temperature current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were studied up to 450 C. The authors have measured leakage current densities of low 10{sup {minus}8} A/cm{sup 2} at room temperature, and have mid 10{sup {minus}3} A/cm{sup 2} at 450 C under a field of 2 MV/cm.

  4. Investigation on the Luminescent Properties of SiC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; LI Yu-guo; SHI Li-wei; SHUN Hai-bo; XUE Cheng-shan

    2003-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is an excellent microelectronic material used to fabricate high frequency, high temperature,high power and non-volatile memory devices.But due to its indirect band gap,SiC based LED can't emit light so efficiently as GaN based LED, so people are eager to seek effective means to improve its luminescence efficiency. Amorphous SiC, porous crystalline SiC, nanometer SiC produced by CVD methods and porous SiC formed by ion implantation are investigated, and great progresses have been gained during the latest few years,which make SiC a promising material for developing OEIC.

  5. The Effect of Annealing at 1500 C on Migration and Release of Ion Implanted Silver in CVD Silicon Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HJ MacLean; RG Ballinger; LE Kolaya; SA Simonson; N Lewis; M Hanson

    2004-10-07

    The transport of silver in CVD {beta}-SiC has been studied using ion implantation. Silver ions were implanted in {beta}-SiC using the ATLAS accelerator facility at the Argonne National Laboratory. Ion beams with energies of 93 and 161 MeV were used to achieve deposition with peak concentrations at depths of approximately 9 and 13 {micro}m, respectively. As-implanted samples were then annealed at 1500 C for 210 or 480 hours. XPS, SEM, TEM, STEM, and optical methods were used to analyze the material before and after annealing. Silver concentration profiles were determined using XPS before and after annealing. STEM and SEM equipped with quantitative chemical analysis capability were used to more fully characterize the location and morphology of the silver before and after annealing. The results show that, within the uncertainty of measurement techniques, there is no silver migration, via either inter- or intragrannular paths, for the times and temperature studied. Additionally, the silver was observed to phase separate within the SiC after annealing. The irradiation damage from the implantation process resulted in a three-layer morphology in the as-implanted condition: (1) a layer of unaltered SiC, followed by (2) a layer of crystallized SiC, followed by (3) an amorphized layer which contained essentially all of the implanted silver. After annealing the layer structure changed. Layer 1 was unaltered. The grains in layer 2 recrystallized to form an epitaxial (columnar) layer. Layer 3 recrystallized to form a fine grain equiaxed layer. The results of this work do not support the long held assumption that silver release from CVD SiC, used for gas-reactor coated particle fuel, is dominated by grain boundary diffusion.

  6. Photoluminescence Enhancement in Nanotextured Fluorescent SiC Passivated by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    The influence of thickness of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 films on nano-textured fluorescent 6H-SiC passivation is investigated. The passivation effect on the light emission has been characterized by photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence at room temperature. The results show...... that 20nm thickness of Al2O3 layer is favorable to observe a large photoluminescence enhancement (25.9%) and long carrier lifetime (0.86ms). This is a strong indication for an interface hydrogenation that takes place during post-thermal annealing. These results show that an Al2O3 layer could serve...

  7. Influence of CH3SiCl3 Consistency on Growth Process of SiC Film by Kinetic Monte Carlo Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cuixia; YANG Yanqing; LUO Xian

    2012-01-01

    CH3SiCl3 (MTS)-H2-Ar system has been applied to prepare SiC film with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method in this paper.For three facets of SiC film,some significant influence on growth rate,surface roughness,thickness and relative density brought by MTS consistency has been mainly discussed with kinetic monte carlo (KMC) method.The simulation results show that there is a certain scale for mol ratio of H2 to MTS (H2/MTS) with different deposition temperature.When MTS consistency increases,growth rate and surface roughness of three facets all increase,which manifests approximate linearity relationship.Thickness of three facets also increases while increasing trend of three facets thickness is different obviously.Although relative density of three facets all increases,increasing trend shows a little difference with MTS consistency increasing.

  8. Comparison of tungsten films grown by CVD and hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition in a cold-wall reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi; Aarnink, Antonius A.I.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    In this work, the authors developed hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition (HWALD) to deposit tungsten (W) with a tungsten filament heated up to 1700–2000 C. Atomic hydrogen (at-H) was generated by dissociation of molecular hydrogen (H2), which reacted with WF6 at the substrate to deposit W. The

  9. Effect of irradiation damage on hydrothermal corrosion of SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Sosuke, E-mail: kondo@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Lee, Moonhee; Hinoki, Tatsuya [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hyodo, Yoshihiro; Kano, Fumihisa [Power and Industrial Systems Research and Development Center, Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa 235-8523 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The hydrothermal corrosion behavior (320 °C, 20 MPa, 168 h) of high-purity chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC pre-irradiated with 5.1-MeV Si ions at 400 and 800 °C and 0.1–2.6 dpa was studied in order to clarify the effects of irradiation damage on SiC corrosion. Regardless of the pre-irradiation conditions, selective corrosion was observed at the grain boundaries and stacking faults even at the unirradiated regions. In contrast to the complete loss of the irradiated regions observed in the specimens irradiated at 400 °C during the autoclave test, a number of large grains survived in the case of the specimens irradiated at 800 °C. The corrosion rates at the irradiated regions increased with increasing irradiation fluence, with a significant dependence in the lower dpa regime similar to that observed in the point-defect swelling. SiO{sub 2} formation was not detected in any case. Cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analyses of the surfaces of the surviving grains revealed oxygen diffusion to a depth of 3.0 nm from the surface. A significant reduction of the oxygen diffusion barrier at the surface was implicated as one of the key mechanisms of the acceleration of the ion-irradiated SiC corrosion rates.

  10. Re-evaluation of SiC permeation coefficients at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yasushi, E-mail: yama3707@kansai-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai Univ., Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Murakami, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Hirosato; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Yonetsu, Daigo [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai Univ., Yamate-cho, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Noborio, Kazuyuki [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, Univ. of Toyama, Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto Univ., Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The deuterium permeation coefficients of CVD-SiC at 600–950 °C were evaluated. • The wraparound flow was reduced to less than 1/100th of the permeation flow. • CVD-SiC materials are very effective as hydrogen isotope permeation barriers. - Abstract: Since 2007, our group has studied the deuterium permeation and diffusion coefficients for SiC materials at temperatures above 600 °C as a means of evaluating the tritium inventory and permeation in fusion blankets. During such measurements, control and evaluation of the wraparound flow through the sample holder are important, and so the heated sample holder is enclosed by a glass tube and kept under vacuum during experimental trials. However, detailed studies regarding the required degree of vacuum based on model calculations have shown that the wraparound flow is much larger than expected, and so can affect measurements at high temperatures. We therefore modified the measurement apparatus based on calculations involving reduced pressure in the glass tube, and are now confident that the measurement error is only several percent, even at 950 °C. In this paper, recent experimental results obtained with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC sample over the temperature range of 600–950 °C are presented, showing that the permeation coefficient for CVD-SiC is more than three orders of magnitude smaller than that for stainless steel (SS316) at 600 °C, and that at 950 °C, the coefficient for CVD-SiC is almost equal to that for SUS316 at 550 °C.

  11. Heat transfer model of an iCVD reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.; Verlaan, V.; Verkerk, A.D.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; van Dijk, L.; Rudolph, H.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    Contrary to conventional HWCVD, the power consumption in the iCVD process is dominated by heat conduction rather than radiation. This is due to the fact that while the typical wire temperature for HWCVD is about 1750–2200 °C, for iCVD the temperature is only 250–500 °C. Typical deposition pressures

  12. Deposition of silicon nitride thin films by hot-wire CVD at 100 {sup o}C and 250 {sup o}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpuim, P., E-mail: palpuim@fisica.uminho.p [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Goncalves, L.M. [Departamento de Electronica Industrial, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Marins, E.S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Viseu, T.M.R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ferdov, S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Bouree, J.E. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS UMR 7647, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2009-04-30

    Silicon nitride thin films for use as passivation layers in solar cells and organic electronics or as gate dielectrics in thin-film transistors were deposited by the Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique at a high deposition rate (1-3 A/s) and at low substrate temperature. Films were deposited using NH{sub 3}/SiH{sub 4} flow rate ratios between 1 and 70 and substrate temperatures of 100 {sup o}C and 250 {sup o}C. For NH{sub 3}/SiH{sub 4} ratios between 40 and 70, highly transparent (T {approx} 90%), dense films (2.56-2.74 g/cm{sup 3}) with good dielectric properties and refractive index between 1.93 and 2.08 were deposited on glass substrates. Etch rates in BHF of 2.7 A/s and < 0.5 A/s were obtained for films deposited at 100 {sup o}C and 250 {sup o}C, respectively. Films deposited at both substrate temperatures showed electrical conductivity {approx} 10{sup -14} {Omega}{sup -1} cm{sup -1} and breakdown fields > 10 MV cm{sup -1}.

  13. Atmospheric pressure plasma-initiated chemical vapor deposition (AP-PiCVD) of poly(diethylallylphosphate) coating: a char-forming protective coating for cellulosic textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, Florian; Boscher, Nicolas D; Duday, David; Desbenoit, Nicolas; Levalois-Grützmacher, Joëlle; Choquet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An innovative atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition method toward the deposition of polymeric layers has been developed. This latter involves the use of a nanopulsed plasma discharge to initiate the free-radical polymerization of an allyl monomer containing phosphorus (diethylallylphosphate, DEAP) at atmospheric pressure. The polymeric structure of the film is evidence by mass spectrometry. The method, highly suitable for the treatment of natural biopolymer substrate, has been carried out on cotton textile to perform the deposition of an efficient and conformal protective coating.

  14. Hot Wire CVD for thin film triple junction cells and for ultrafast deposition of the SiN passivation layer on polycrystalline Si solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; Franken, R.H.; Goldbach, H.D.; Houweling, Z.S.; Li, H. B. T.; Rath, J.K.; Schuttauf, J.A.; Stolk, R.L.; Verlaan, V.; van der Werf, C.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    We present recent progress on hot-wire deposited thin film solar cells and applications of silicon nitride. The cell efficiency reached for μc-Si:H n–i–p solar cells on textured Ag/ZnO presently is 8.5%, in line with the state-of-the-art level for μc-Si:H n–i–p's for any method of deposition. Such c

  15. X-Ray structural and gas phase studies of silver(i) perfluorinated carboxylate complexes with 2,2'-bipyridyl as potential precursors for chemical vapour deposition (CVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szłyk, Edward; Szczesny, Robert; Wojtczak, Andrzej

    2010-02-21

    [Ag(CF(3)COO)(bpy)] (), [Ag(2)(C(2)F(5)COO)(2)(bpy)] () and [Ag(2)(C(3)F(7)COO)(2)(bpy)] () were prepared and characterized by MS-EI, (1)H, (13)C NMR, variable-temperature IR (VT-IR) spectroscopy (solid sample and evolved volatile species) and thermal analysis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed the polymeric structure for [Ag(2)(C(2)F(5)COO)(2)(bpy)] and [Ag(6)(C(3)F(7)COO)(6)(bpy)(4)], with bridging bpy ligand, whereas for [Ag(CF(3)COO)(bpy)] the dimeric system with monodentately linked carboxylate was noted. Mass spectra analysis of () over 30-300 degrees C indicates the presence of binuclear ions [(RCOO)Ag(2)](+) as a main volatile particles, which can be transported in CVD process. VT-IR studies of gases evolved during the thermal decomposition process, demonstrate the presence of fluorocarbon species and CO(2) as the most abundant molecules. Thermal analysis of () revealed a multi-stage decomposition mechanism resulting in Ag(0) formation below 290 degrees C. Compounds were tested for silver metal spray pyrolysis and obtained layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDX) and XRD.

  16. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  17. Metallic Tungsten Nanostructures and Highly Nanostructured Thin Films by Deposition of Tungsten Oxide and Subsequent Reduction in a Single Hot-Wire CVD Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harks, P.P.R.M.L.; Houweling, Z.S.; de Jong, M.M.; Kuang, Y; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metallic tungsten nanostructures and highly nanostructured thin films is presented. Crystalline tungsten oxide nanostructures are deposited on glassy carbon substrates kept at 700 100 8C by oxidizing resistively heated tungsten filaments in an air flow under subatmospheric pressures

  18. Influence of hydrogen dilution on structural, electrical and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PE-CVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funde, A.M.; Bakr, Nabeel Ali; Kamble, D.K. [School of Energy Studies, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Hawaldar, R.R.; Amalnerkar, D.P. [Center for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchawati, Pune 411 008 (India); Jadkar, S.R. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind Road, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2008-10-15

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films were deposited from pure silane (SiH{sub 4}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas mixture by conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PE-CVD) method at low temperature (200 C) using high rf power. The structural, optical and electrical properties of these films are carefully and systematically investigated as a function of hydrogen dilution of silane (R). Characterization of these films with low angle X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the crystallite size in the films tends to decrease and at same time the volume fraction of crystallites increases with increase in R. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis showed at low values of R, the hydrogen is predominantly incorporated in the nc-Si:H films in the mono-hydrogen (Si-H) bonding configuration. However, with increasing R the hydrogen bonding in nc-Si:H films shifts from mono-hydrogen (Si-H) to di-hydrogen (Si-H{sub 2}) and (Si-H{sub 2}){sub n} complexes. The hydrogen content in the nc-Si:H films decreases with increase in R and was found less than 10 at% over the entire studied range of R. On the other hand, the Tauc's optical band gap remains as high as 2 eV or much higher. The quantum size effect may responsible for higher band gap in nc-Si:H films. A correlation between electrical and structural properties has been found. For optimized deposition conditions, nc-Si:H films with crystallite size {proportional_to}7.67 nm having good degree of crystallinity ({proportional_to}84%) and high band gap (2.25 eV) were obtained with a low hydrogen content (6.5 at%). However, for these optimized conditions, the deposition rate was quite small (1.6 Aa/s). (author)

  19. PENGARUH TEMPERATUR DEPOSISI PADA PENUMBUHAN FILM TIPIS SILIKON KARBIDA DENGAN METODE HOMEMADE HOT-MESH CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Astuti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Film tipis silikon karbida (SiC telah ditumbuhkan di atas substrate graphene/SiO2/Si dengan metode Homemade Hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (Hot-Mesh CVD. Pengaruh dari temperature deposisi pada struktur dan morfologi film tipis SiC telah dipelajari dengan menggunakan X-Ray diffractometer (XRD, FESEM dan EDX, dan spektroskopi Raman. Karakterisasi XRD menunjukkan bahwa film tipis SiC memiliki struktur polikristal tipe kubik dengan orientasi (111. Kualitas film tipis SiC, dan ukuran butir kristal dari morfologi film yang dihasilkan meningkat dengan peningkatan temperatur deposisi. Dari karakterisasi spektroskopi Raman, dapati terdapat dua puncak pergeseran Raman yang dominan pada daerah sekitar 780 - 800 cm-1 dan  950 – 980 cm-1 yang merupakan mode fonon SiC-TO dan SiC-LO. Puncak pergeseran Raman tersebut bergeser ke bilangan gelombang yang lebih pendek dengan peningkatan temperature deposisi.Silicon carbide (SiC thin film grown on graphene/SiO2/Si substrate using homemade hot mesh chemical vapor deposition (Hot-Mesh SVD method has been done. Effect of  deposition temperature on structure and morphology of the thin film was studied by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD, FESEM and EDX, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD characteristics shows that SiC thin film has cubic polycrystalline structure with (111 orientation. Quality of the SiC thin film, and crystallite grain size from the film morphology was resulted increases with the increase of the deposition temperature. Based on the characterization of Raman spectroscopy, shows that two peak Raman shift in the range of 780 - 800 cm-1 and  950 – 980 cm-1 was attributed to SiC-TO and SiC-LO phonon mode.  The Raman shift peak was shifted toward the lower wavenumber with the increase of deposition temperature.

  20. PENGARUH TEMPERATUR DEPOSISI PADA PENUMBUHAN FILM TIPIS SILIKON KARBIDA DENGAN METODE HOMEMADE HOT-MESH CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Astuti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Film tipis silikon karbida (SiC telah ditumbuhkan di atas substrate graphene/SiO2/Si dengan metode Homemade Hot-mesh chemical vapor deposition (Hot-Mesh CVD. Pengaruh dari temperature deposisi pada struktur dan morfologi film tipis SiC telah dipelajari dengan menggunakan X-Ray diffractometer (XRD, FESEM dan EDX, dan spektroskopi Raman. Karakterisasi XRD menunjukkan bahwa film tipis SiC memiliki struktur polikristal tipe kubik dengan orientasi (111. Kualitas film tipis SiC, dan ukuran butir kristal dari morfologi film yang dihasilkan meningkat dengan peningkatan temperatur deposisi. Dari karakterisasi spektroskopi Raman, dapati terdapat dua puncak pergeseran Raman yang dominan pada daerah sekitar 780 - 800 cm-1 dan  950 – 980 cm-1 yang merupakan mode fonon SiC-TO dan SiC-LO. Puncak pergeseran Raman tersebut bergeser ke bilangan gelombang yang lebih pendek dengan peningkatan temperature deposisi.Silicon carbide (SiC thin film grown on graphene/SiO2/Si substrate using homemade hot mesh chemical vapor deposition (Hot-Mesh SVD method has been done. Effect of  deposition temperature on structure and morphology of the thin film was studied by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD, FESEM and EDX, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD characteristics shows that SiC thin film has cubic polycrystalline structure with (111 orientation. Quality of the SiC thin film, and crystallite grain size from the film morphology was resulted increases with the increase of the deposition temperature. Based on the characterization of Raman spectroscopy, shows that two peak Raman shift in the range of 780 - 800 cm-1 and  950 – 980 cm-1 was attributed to SiC-TO and SiC-LO phonon mode.  The Raman shift peak was shifted toward the lower wavenumber with the increase of deposition temperature.

  1. On the origin of self-organization of SiO2 nanodots deposited by CVD enhanced by atmospheric pressure remote microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoult, G.; Belmonte, T.; Kosior, F.; Dossot, M.; Henrion, G.

    2011-05-01

    The origin of organization of nanostructured silica coatings deposited on stainless steel substrates by remote microplasma at atmospheric pressure is investigated. We show by resorting to thermal camera measurements coupled with modelling that deposition, limited to a few seconds in time, occurs at low temperature (~below 420 K) although the gas temperature may reach 1400 K. Raman analyses of deposited films with thicknesses below 1 µm show the presence of oxidized silicon bonded to the metallic surface. The origin of nanodots is explained as follows. Close to the microplasma nozzle, the concentration of oxidizing species and/or the temperature being high enough, a silica thin film is obtained, leading to ceramic-metallic oxide interface that leads to a Volmer-Weber growth mode and to the synthesis of 3D structures over long treatment times. Far from the nozzle, the reactivity decreasing, thin films get a plasma-polymer like behaviour which leads to a Franck-Van der Merwe growth mode and films with a higher density. Other nanostructures, made of hexagonal cells, are observed but remain unexplained.

  2. On the origin of self-organization of SiO{sub 2} nanodots deposited by CVD enhanced by atmospheric pressure remote microplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnoult, G; Belmonte, T; Kosior, F; Henrion, G [Institut Jean Lamour, Department of Physics and Chemistry of Solids and Surfaces, UMR 7198 CNRS, Nancy-Universite, Parc de Saurupt, CS 14234, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Dossot, M, E-mail: thierry.belmonte@mines.inpl-nancy.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement, UMR 7564 CNRS - Universite Henri Poincare, Nancy-Universite, 405, rue de Vandoeuvre, F-54600 Villers-les-Nancy (France)

    2011-05-04

    The origin of organization of nanostructured silica coatings deposited on stainless steel substrates by remote microplasma at atmospheric pressure is investigated. We show by resorting to thermal camera measurements coupled with modelling that deposition, limited to a few seconds in time, occurs at low temperature ({approx}below 420 K) although the gas temperature may reach 1400 K. Raman analyses of deposited films with thicknesses below 1 {mu}m show the presence of oxidized silicon bonded to the metallic surface. The origin of nanodots is explained as follows. Close to the microplasma nozzle, the concentration of oxidizing species and/or the temperature being high enough, a silica thin film is obtained, leading to ceramic-metallic oxide interface that leads to a Volmer-Weber growth mode and to the synthesis of 3D structures over long treatment times. Far from the nozzle, the reactivity decreasing, thin films get a plasma-polymer like behaviour which leads to a Franck-Van der Merwe growth mode and films with a higher density. Other nanostructures, made of hexagonal cells, are observed but remain unexplained.

  3. Electrochemically assisted deposition of hydroxyapatite on Ti6Al4V substrates covered by CVD diamond films — Coating characterization and first cell biological results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strąkowska, Paulina [Gdańsk University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Faculty (Poland); Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications, and Informatics (Poland); Beutner, René [Max Bergmann Center, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany); Gnyba, Marcin [Gdańsk University of Technology, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications, and Informatics (Poland); Zielinski, Andrzej [Gdańsk University of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Faculty (Poland); Scharnweber, Dieter, E-mail: Dieter.Scharnweber@tu-dresden.de [Max Bergmann Center, Technische Universität Dresden (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Although titanium and its alloys are widely used as implant material for orthopedic and dental applications they show only limited corrosion stability and osseointegration in different cases. The aim of the presented research was to develop and characterize a novel surface modification system from a thin diamond base layer and a hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coating deposited on the alloy Ti6Al4V widely used for implants in contact with bone. This coating system is expected to improve both the long-term corrosion behavior and the biocompatibility and bioactivity of respective surfaces. The diamond base films were obtained by Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW-PACVD); the HAp coatings were formed in aqueous solutions by electrochemically assisted deposition (ECAD) at varying polarization parameters. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman microscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements were applied to characterize the generated surface states; the calcium phosphate coatings were additionally chemically analyzed for their composition. The biological properties of the coating system were assessed using hMSC cells analyzing for cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation. Varying MW-PACVD process conditions resulted in composite coatings containing microcrystalline diamond (MCD/Ti-C), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) with the NCD coatings being dense and homogeneous and the B-NCD coatings showing increased electrical conductivity. The ECAD process resulted in calcium phosphate coatings from stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric HAp. The deposition of HAp on the B-NCD films run at lower cathodic potentials and resulted both in the highest coating mass and the most homogenous appearance. Initial cell biological investigations showed an improved cell adhesion in the order B-NCD > HAp/B-NCD > uncoated substrate. Cell proliferation was improved for both investigated coatings whereas ALP

  4. Phase composition, microstructure and microhardness of electroless nickel composite coating co-deposited with SiC on cast aluminium LM24 alloy substrate

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electroless Ni–P (EN) and composite Ni–P–SiC (ENC) coatings were developed on cast aluminium alloy substrate, LM24. The coating phase composition, microstructure and microhardness were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness tester, respectively, on as-plated and heat-treated specimens. The original microstructure of the Ni–P matrix is not affected by the inclusion of the hard particles SiC. No formation of Ni–Si phase was observed up t...

  5. Characterisation of phase composition, microstructure and microhardness of electroless nickel composite coating co-deposited with SiC on casting aluminium LM24 alloy substrate

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electroless Ni-P (EN) and composite Ni-P-SiC (ENC) coatings were developed on cast aluminium alloy, LM24. The coating phase composition, microstructure and microhardness were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microhardness tester, respectively, on as-plated and heat-treated specimens. The original microstructure of the Ni-P matrix is not affected by the inclusion of the hard particles SiC. No formation of Ni-Si phase was observed upto 500°C of ...

  6. Developing the Beijing CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU JINGXIAN

    2006-01-01

    @@ Slowly but surely, the high-end villa property in Beijing is gaining new momentum. Limited amounts of new properties, rising prices and increasing demand will be the trend in the villa market in 2006, real estate experts predict. Among them, the exclusive Central Villa District(CVD), a top-tier villa area along the Wenyu River in northeast Beijing, has emerged as a hot spot of the market.

  7. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  8. Correlation between optical emission spectra and the process parameters of a 915 MHz microwave plasma CVD reactor used for depositing polycrystalline diamond coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Awadesh Kumar Mallik; Sandip Bysakh; Someswar Dutta; Debabrata Basu

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen and hydrogen-methane mixed plasma have been generated inside a 33 cm diameter quartz bell jar with a low power (9 KW) and lower frequency 915 MHz microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. The reactor is being used for growing polycrystalline diamond (PCD) over large area (100 mm). The generated plasma is diagnosed by in situ optical emission spectroscopy method with wave length ranging from 200 to 900 nm. The effects of microwave power, chamber pressure and gas concentration on plasma characteristics have been studied in this work. Within the optical range, Balmer H, H, C2swan band and CH lines have been detected at the wavelengths of 655.95, 485.7, 515.82 and 430.17 nm, respectively. It has been observed that for hydrogen plasma, the amount of transition from hydrogen atom inner shell 3 to 2 (H) is almost constant with increasing microwave (MW) power (from 2000 to 2800 W) and pressure (from 15 to 30 Torr) initially, after that it increases with further increase of MW power and pressure, whereas, the transition from 4 to 2 (H) is slowly increased with increasing MW power and pressure. For hydrogen-methane plasma, intensities of C2 swan band, i.e., the transitions from D$^3\\Pi_\\text{g}$ to A$^3\\Pi_{\\mu}$ energy levels, are also increased with the increasing microwave power and reactor pressure. It has been observed that the radicals present in the plasma are affected by variation of different reactor parameters like pressure, MW power, CH4 concentration, etc.

  9. The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2013-08-01

    The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250°C, the temperature may reach 1600°C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

  10. CVD polymers fabrication of organic surfaces and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gleason, Karen K

    2015-01-01

    The method of CVD (chemical vapor deposition) is a versatile technique to fabricate high-quality thin films and structured surfaces in the nanometer regime from the vapor phase. Already widely used for the deposition of inorganic materials in the semiconductor industry, CVD has become the method of choice in many applications to process polymers as well. This highly scalable technique allows for synthesizing high-purity, defect-free films and for systematically tuning their chemical, mechanical and physical properties. In addition, vapor phase processing is critical for the deposition of insol

  11. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  12. Method of Monitoring the Corrosion Behavior the Surface Treated FMS and CVD Coated Specimen in Liquid Sodium Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Gr.92 and HT9 (Ferritic/martensitic steels) are considered as candidates of cladding materials of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs). HT9 and Gr.92 are known as compatible in sodium environment because the usual refueling time of SFRs is designed about 54 months. In the Ultra-long Cycle Fast Reactor (UCFR) which is developed in UNIST, however, cladding is exposed long-term in high temperature liquid sodium environment. So, it is very important to investigate the corrosion-related behavior such as surface corrosion rate, carburization, decarburization and mechanical properties for its operation time. The decarburization process where dissolved carbon near the specimen surface diffused in to the liquid sodium. This process can originate from the difference between dissolved carbon activity in the material and liquid sodium. A compatibility test the cladding tube revealed that a decrease of the mechanical property instigated by the aging proves governed the whole mechanical property. SiC and Si3N4 Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) coating for decarburization barrier on the surface of FMS is considered in this study. The CVD coated specimens are experiment for compatibility of high temperature liquid sodium. To monitor the corrosion behavior of these candidate materials in sodium environment, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) method is first introduced and investigated in this study. The use of the technique of impedance spectroscopy to measure the electrical impedance response of any oxide layers, SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} that may be present may be a solution to this monitoring problem.

  13. Analysis of Residual Thermal Stress in CVD-W Coating as Plasma Facing Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱大焕; 王坤; 王先平; 陈俊凌; 方前锋

    2012-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition-tungsten (CVD-W) coating covering the surface of the plasma facing component (PFC) is an effective method to implement the tungsten material as plasma facing material (PFM) in fusion devices. Residual thermal stress in CVD-W coating due to thermal mismatch between coating and substrate was successfully simulated by using a finite element method (ANSYS 10.0 code). The deposition parametric effects, i.e., coating thickness and deposition temperature, and interlayer were investigated to get a description of the residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating-substrate system. And the influence of the substrate materials on the generation of residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating was analyzed with respect to the CVD-W coating application as PFM. This analysis is beneficial for the preparation and application of CVD-W coating.

  14. Analysis of Residual Thermal Stress in CVD-W Coating as Plasma Facing Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dahuan; Wang, Kun; Wang, Xianping; Chen, Junling; Fang, Qianfeng

    2012-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposition-tungsten (CVD-W) coating covering the surface of the plasma facing component (PFC) is an effective method to implement the tungsten material as plasma facing material (PFM) in fusion devices. Residual thermal stress in CVD-W coating due to thermal mismatch between coating and substrate was successfully simulated by using a finite element method (ANSYS 10.0 code). The deposition parametric effects, i.e., coating thickness and deposition temperature, and interlayer were investigated to get a description of the residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating-substrate system. And the influence of the substrate materials on the generation of residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating was analyzed with respect to the CVD-W coating application as PFM. This analysis is beneficial for the preparation and application of CVD-W coating.

  15. Modeling for CVD of Solid Oxide Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.

    2002-09-18

    Because of its low thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion and high oxygen ion conductivity yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the material of choice for high temperature electrolyte applications. Current coating fabrication methods have their drawbacks, however. Air plasma spray (APS) is a relatively low-cost process and is suitable for large and relatively complex shapes. it is difficult to produce uniform, relatively thin coatings with this process, however, and the coatings do not exhibit the columnar microstructure that is needed for reliable, long-term performance. The electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process does produce the desirable microstructure, however, the capital cost of these systems is very high and the line-of-sight nature of the process limits coating uniformity and the ability to coat large and complex shapes. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process also produces the desirable columnar microstructure and--under proper conditions--can produce uniform coatings over complex shapes. CVD has been used for many materials but is relatively undeveloped for oxides, in general, and for zirconia, in particular. The overall goal of this project--a joint effort of the University of Louisville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)--is to develop the YSZ CVD process for high temperature electrolyte applications. This report describes the modeling effort at the University of Louisville, which supports the experimental work at ORNL. Early work on CVD of zirconia and yttria used metal chlorides, which react with water vapor to form solid oxide. Because of this rapid gas-phase reaction the water generally is formed in-situ using the reverse water-gas-shift reaction or a microwave plasma. Even with these arrangements gas-phase nucleation and powder formation are problems when using these precursors. Recent efforts on CVD of zirconia and YSZ have focused on use of metal-organic precursors (MOCVD). These are more stable in the gas

  16. TRISO coated fuel particles with enhanced SiC properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Tan, J.; Meadows, P.J. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor St., Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Marsh, G. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Spingfields, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Xiao, P., E-mail: ping.xiao@manchester.ac.u [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor St., Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The silicon carbide (SiC) layer used for the formation of TRISO coated fuel particles is normally produced at 1500-1650 deg. C via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition from methyltrichlorosilane in a hydrogen environment. In this work, we show the deposition of SiC coatings with uniform grain size throughout the coating thickness, as opposed to standard coatings which have larger grain sizes in the outer sections of the coating. Furthermore, the use of argon as the fluidizing gas and propylene as a carbon precursor, in addition to hydrogen and methyltrichlorosilane, allowed the deposition of stoichiometric SiC coatings with refined microstructure at 1400 and 1300 deg. C. The deposition of SiC at lower deposition temperatures was also advantageous since the reduced heat treatment was not detrimental to the properties of the inner pyrolytic carbon which generally occurs when SiC is deposited at 1500 deg. C. The use of a chemical vapor deposition coater with four spouts allowed the deposition of uniform and spherical coatings.

  17. Influence of microstructure on hydrothermal corrosion of chemically vapor processed SiC composite tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daejong; Lee, Ho Jung; Jang, Changheui; Lee, Hyeon-Geun; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon-Ju

    2017-08-01

    Multi-layered SiC composites consisting of monolithic SiC and a SiCf/SiC composite are one of the accident tolerant fuel cladding concepts in pressurized light water reactors. To evaluate the integrity of the SiC fuel cladding under normal operating conditions of a pressurized light water reactor, the hydrothermal corrosion behavior of multi-layered SiC composite tubes was investigated in the simulated primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor without neutron fluence. The results showed that SiC phases with good crystallinity such as Tyranno SA3 SiC fiber and monolithic SiC deposited at 1200 °C had good corrosion resistance. However, the SiC phase deposited at 1000 °C had less crystallinity and severely dissolved in water, particularly the amorphous SiC phase formed along grain boundaries. Dissolved hydrogen did not play a significant role in improving the hydrothermal corrosion resistance of the CVI-processed SiC phases containing amorphous SiC, resulting in a significant weight loss and reduction of hoop strength of the multi-layered SiC composite tubes after corrosion.

  18. Facility for continuous CVD coating of ceramic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Arthur W.

    1992-01-01

    An inductively heated CVD furnace of pilot-plant scale, whose hot zone is 150 mm in diameter x 300 mm in length, has been adapted for continuous coating of ceramic yarns. Coatings at very low pressures are possible in this facility due to the fact that the entire apparatus, including yarn feeding and collecting equipment, is under vacuum. SiC yarn has been coated with 0.1-0.2 microns of BN at yarn speeds of 60 cm/min; a 500-m spool; was coated in about 14 hrs. Coating capacity was tripled by adding pulleys to allow three yarn passes through the furnace.

  19. Effect of SiC particle size on the microstructure and properties of cold-sprayed Al/SiCp composite coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Hua, Junwei

    2017-07-01

    The Al5056/SiC composite coatings were prepared by cold spraying. Experimental results show that the SiC content in the composite coating deposited with the SiC powder having an average size of 67 μm (Al5056/SiC-67) is similar to that deposited with the SiC powder having an average size of 27 μm (Al5056/SiC-27). The microhardness and cohesion strength of Al5056/SiC-67 coating are higher than those of the Al5056/SiC-27 coating. In addition, the Al5056/SiC-67 coating having a superior wear resistance because of the coarse SiC powder with a superior kinetic energy contributes to the deformation resistance of the matrix Al5056 particles.

  20. Comparative evaluation of CVD diamond technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, T.R. [General Electric Corporate Research & Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds occurs from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures in the presence of atomic hydrogen at subatmospheric pressures. Most CVD methods are based on different means of generating and transporting atomic hydrogen in a particular system. Evaluation of these different techniques involves their capital costs, material costs, energy costs, labor costs and the type and quality of diamond that they produce. Currently, there is no universal agreement on which is the best technique and technique selection has been largely driven by the professional background of the user as well as the particular application of interest. This article discusses the criteria for evaluating a process for low-pressure deposition of diamond. Next, a brief history of low-pressure diamond synthesis is reviewed. Several specific processes are addressed, including the hot filament process, hot filament electron-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and plasma generation of atomic hydrogen by glow discharge, microwave discharge, low pressure radio frequency discharge, high pressure DC discharge, high pressure microwave discharge jets, high pressure RF discharge, and high and low pressure flames. Other types of diamond deposition methods are also evaluated. 101 refs., 15 figs.

  1. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, W.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  2. An assessment of radiotherapy dosimeters based on CVD grown diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Ramkumar, S; Conway, J; Whitehead, A J; Sussman, R S; Hill, G; Walker, S

    2001-01-01

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as a dosimeter for radiotherapy. Its radiation hardness, the near tissue equivalence and chemical inertness are some of the characteristics of diamond, which make it well suited for its application as a dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology have resulted in the improvement in the quality of material and increased its suitability for radiotherapy applications. We report in this paper, the response of prototype dosimeters based on two different types (CVD1 and CVD2) of CVD diamond to X-rays. The diamond devices were assessed for sensitivity, dependence of response on dose and dose rate, and compared with a Scanditronix silicon photon diode and a PTW natural diamond dosimeter. The diamond devices of CVD1 type showed an initial increase in response with dose, which saturates after approx 6 Gy. The diamond devices of CVD2 type had a response at low fields (1162.8 V/cm), the CVD2-type devices show...

  3. Effect of residual stresses on the strength, adhesion and wear resistance of SiC coatings obtained by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on low alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattamis, T.Z. (Department of Metallurgy, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States)); Chen, M. (Department of Metallurgy, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States)); Skolianos, S. (Aristoteles University, Thessaloniki (Greece)); Chambers, B.V. (Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States))

    1994-11-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide thin coatings were deposited on AISI 4340 low alloy steel wafers and thicker steel specimens by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The cohesion of the coating, its adhesion to the substrate and its friction coefficient were evaluated by automatic scratch testing, and its wear resistance by pin-on-disk tribometry. During annealing, the residual stress attributed to hydrogen entrapment during deposition gradually changed from compressive to tensile and its rate of increase decreased with increasing annealing time. The cohesion and adhesion failure loads and the abrasive wear resistance decreased with decreasing residual compressive stress and increasing residual tensile stress. The friction coefficient between the coating surface and a diamond stylus decreased with increasing annealing time. ((orig.))

  4. Functional materials - Study of process for CVD SiC/C composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Doo Jin; Wang, Chae Chyun; Lee, Young Jin; Oh, Byung Jun [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    The CVD SiC coating techniques are the one of high functional material manufactures that improve the thermal, wear, oxidization and infiltration resistance of the surface of raw materials and extend the life of material. Silicon carbide films have been grown onto graphite substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using MTS(CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3}) as a source precursor and H{sub 2} or N{sub 2} as a diluent gas. The experiments for temperature and diluent gas addition changes were performed. The effect of temperature from 900 deg. C to 1350 deg. C and the alteration of diluent gas species on the growth rate and structure of deposits have been studied. The experimental results showed that the deposition rate increased with increasing deposition temperature irrespective of diluent gases and reactant depletion effect increased especially at H{sub 2} diluent gas ambient. As the diluent gas added, the growth rate decreased parabolically. For N{sub 2} addition, surface morphology of leaf-like structure appeared, and for H{sub 2}, faceted structure at 1350 deg. C. The observed features were involved by crystalline phase of {beta}-SiC and surface composition with different gas ambient. We also compared the experimental results of the effect of partial pressure on the growth rate with the results of theoretical approach based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. C/SiC composites were prepared by isothermal chemical vapor infiltration (ICVI). In order to fabricate the more dense C/SiC composites, a novel process of the in-situ whisker growing and filling during ICVI was devised, which was manipulated by alternating dilute gas species. The denser C/SiC composites were successfully prepared by the novel process comparing with the conventional ICVI process. 64 refs., 36 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  5. Modeling and Testing Miniature Torsion Specimens for SiC Joining Development Studies for Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, Andrea; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-08-19

    The international fusion community has designed a miniature torsion specimen for neutron irradiation studies of joined SiC and SiC/SiC composite materials. Miniature torsion joints based on this specimen design were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti3SiC2 + SiC joints with CVD-SiC and tested in torsion-shear prior to and after neutron irradiation. However, many of these miniature torsion specimens fail out-of-plane within the CVD-SiC specimen body, which makes it problematic to assign a shear strength value to the joints and makes it difficult to compare unirradiated and irradiated joint strengths to determine the effects of the irradiation. Finite element elastic damage and elastic-plastic damage models of miniature torsion joints are developed that indicate shear fracture is likely to occur within the body of the joined sample and cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model results are compared and discussed with regard to unirradiated and irradiated joint test data for a variety of joint materials. The unirradiated data includes Ti3SiC2 + SiC/CVD-SiC joints with tailored joint moduli, and includes steel/epoxy and CVD-SiC/epoxy joints. The implications for joint data based on this sample design are discussed.

  6. Mo-C Multilayered CVD Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sagalovych

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Production processes of multi-layered Mo-C coatings by the method of chemical vapor deposition (CVD with the use of organometallic compounds were developed. Coatings are applied on technical purpose steel DIN 1.2379 (H12F1 and DIN 1.7709 (25H2MF (ÉI10 heat-treated ball with the high class of surface roughness (> 10. The average deposition rate was 50 μm / h. The optimal conditions of deposition coatings for different technological schemas were defined. Metallographic investigations of the obtained coatings were carried out. Tribological studies of the friction and wear characteristics of sliding friction in conditions of boundary lubrication of Ï-S multilayered CVD coatings shows, that coatings have low friction coefficients (0075-0095 at loads up to 2.0 kN, showed high resistance to wear and are effective in increasing the stability of the pair for precision friction pairs of hydraulical units.

  7. Synthesis of micro-sized interconnected Si-C composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Donghai; Yi, Ran; Dai, Fang

    2016-02-23

    Embodiments provide a method of producing micro-sized Si--C composites or doped Si--C and Si alloy-C with interconnected nanoscle Si and C building blocks through converting commercially available SiO.sub.x (0deposition of gas containing organic molecules that have carbon atoms.

  8. Compatibility of SiC and SiC Composites with Molten Lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H Tunison

    2006-03-07

    The choice of structural material candidates to contain Lead at 1000 C are limited in number. Silicon carbide composites comprise one choice of possible containment materials. Short term screening studies (120 hours) were undertaken to study the behavior of Silicon Carbide, Silicon Nitride, elemental Silicon and various Silicon Carbide fiber composites focusing mainly on melt infiltrated composites. Isothermal experiments at 1000 C utilized graphite fixtures to contain the Lead and material specimens under a low oxygen partial pressure environment. The corrosion weight loss values (grams/cm{sup 2} Hr) obtained for each of the pure materials showed SiC (monolithic CVD or Hexoloy) to have the best materials compatibility with Lead at this temperature. Increased weight loss values were observed for pure Silicon Nitride and elemental Silicon. For the SiC fiber composite samples those prepared using a SiC matrix material performed better than Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as a matrix material. Composites prepared using a silicon melt infiltration process showed larger corrosion weight loss values due to the solubility of silicon in lead at these temperatures. When excess silicon was removed from these composite samples the corrosion performance for these material improved. These screening studies were used to guide future long term exposure (both isothermal and non-isothermal) experiments and Silicon Carbide composite fabrication work.

  9. Preparation of nanosized sililcon carbide powders by chemical vapor deposition at low temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; ZHANG Changrui; HU Haifeng; QI Gongjin

    2007-01-01

    Liquid carbosilane was synthesized and analyzed by infrared(IR) and H-NMR(nuclear magnetic resonance)spectroscopy.Silicon carbide(SiC)powders were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)at 850℃ and 900℃ from liquid carbosilanes.The product powders were characterized by IR spectroscopy,X-ray diffractometry(XRD)and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).Results show that liquid carbosilane synthesized was the mixture of several oligomers that had a Si-C backbone.The powders prepared at 850℃ contain some organic segments,and those prepared at 900℃ are pure nanosized SiC powders,which are partly crystallized,the size of which is about 50-70 nm.

  10. CVD Diamond Sensors In Detectors For High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334150; Trischuk, William

    At the end of the next decade an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is planned which requires the development of new radiation tolerant sensor technology. Diamond is an interesting material for use as a particle detector in high radiation environments. The large band gap ($5.47\\,\\text{eV}$) and the large displacement energy suggest that diamond is a radiation tolerant detector material. In this Thesis the capability of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond as such a sensor technology is investigated. The radiation damage constant for $800\\,\\text{MeV}$ protons is measured using single crystalline CVD (scCVD) and polycrystalline CVD (pCVD) diamonds irradiated to particle fluences up to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$. In addition the signal response of a pCVD diamond detector after an irradiation to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$ is investigated to determine if such a detector can be operated efficiently in the expected HL-LHC environment. By using electrodes em...

  11. Detailed investigation of the influence of the process parameters on the nano-morphology of Ag deposited on SiC by radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffino, F.; Grimaldi, M. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Universita di Catania and MATIS IMM-CNR, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    In this work, a detailed study of the influence of the synthesis parameters (deposition time t and emission current I) on the morphological properties of Ag nanoparticles sputter-deposited on silicon carbide is carried out. Using the atomic force microscopy technique, we analyzed the evolution of several structural characteristics as a function both of t and I: the length and width of the Ag nanoparticles, the number of nanoparticles per unit area, the nanoparticles' fraction of the covered area, and the roughness of the resulting Ag film. Using consolidated theoretical frameworks and fitting approaches, the relations between such quantities and the process parameters t and I were established. In particular, the application of the interrupted coalescence model allowed us to evaluate the critical mean island diameter for the partial coalescence process; the dynamic scaling theories of growing interfaces lead, instead, to the determination of the dynamic scaling, growth, and roughness exponents (the values of which suggest a conservative growth process of the islands in which the atomic surface diffusion plays a key role). Finally, the Avrami approach to the study of the evolution of the fraction of area covered by the Ag islands allowed us to evaluate the Avrami exponent.

  12. Development of atmospheric pressure CVD processes for highquality transparent conductive oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, A. de; Deelen, J. van; Poodt, P.W.G.; Mol, A.M.B. van; Spee, C.I.M.A.; Grob, F.; Kuypers, A.

    2010-01-01

    For the past decade TNO has been involved in the research and development of atmospheric pressure CVD (APCVD) and plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) processes for deposition of transparent conductive oxides (TCO), such as tin oxide and zinc oxide. It is shown that by combining precursor development, fundam

  13. Surface analysis of CVD diamond exposed to fusion plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porro, S.; De Temmerman, G.; MacLaren, D. A.; Lisgo, S.; Rudakov, D. L.; Westerhout, J.; Wiora, M.; John, P.; Villalpando, I.; Wilson, J. I. B.

    2010-01-01

    Microcrystalline undoped and heavily boron-doped polycrystalline diamond layers have been deposited on various substrates by hot filament CVD and exposed to hydrogen plasma in a linear plasma reactor (Pilot-PSI, The Netherlands) that simulates the high flux and high density plasma conditions of toka

  14. Atmospheric pressure CVD of SNO2 and ZNO:AL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Kniknie, B.J.; Steijvers, H.L.A.H.; Mannie, G.; Thune, P.; Illiberi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure CVD (APCVD) is a highly cost effective method of depositing transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). In this work, insights in alcohol addition in the widely applied SnO2 process are discussed, including high resolution TEM images. Furthermore, the APCVD process of ZnO:Al was demon

  15. High collection efficiency CVD diamond alpha detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergonzo, P.; Foulon, F.; Marshall, R.D.; Jany, C.; Brambilla, A. [CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); McKeag, R.D.; Jackman, R.B. [University College London (United Kingdom). Electronic and Electrical Engineering Dept.

    1998-06-01

    Advances in Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond have enabled the routine use of this material for sensor device fabrication, allowing exploitation of its unique combination of physical properties (low temperature susceptibility (> 500 C), high resistance to radiation damage (> 100 Mrad) and to corrosive media). A consequence of CVD diamond growth on silicon is the formation of polycrystalline films which has a profound influence on the physical and electronic properties with respect to those measured on monocrystalline diamond. The authors report the optimization of physical and geometrical device parameters for radiation detection in the counting mode. Sandwich and co-planar electrode geometries are tested and their performances evaluated with regard to the nature of the field profile and drift distances inherent in such devices. The carrier drift length before trapping was measured under alpha particles and values as high as 40% of the overall film thickness are reported. Further, by optimizing the device geometry, they show that a gain in collection efficiency, defined as the induced charge divided by the deposited charge within the material, can be achieved even though lower bias values are used.

  16. Preparation of SiC Fiber Reinforced Nickel Matrix Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Zhang; Nanlin Shi; Jun Gong; Chao Sunt

    2012-01-01

    A method of preparing continuous(Al+Al2O3)-coated SiC fiber reinforced nickel matrix composite was presented,in which the diffusion between SiC fiber and nickel matrix could be prevented.Magnetron sputtering is used to deposit Ni coating on the surface of the(Al+Al2O3)-coated SiC fiber in preparation of the precursor wires.It is shown that the deposited Ni coating combines well with the(Al+Al2O3) coating and has little negative effect on the tensile strength of(Al+Al2O3)-coated SiC fiber.Solid-state diffusion bonding process is employed to prepare the(Al+Al2O3)-coated SiC fiber reinforced nickel matrix with 37% fibers in volume.The solid-state diffusion bonding process is optimized and the optimum parameters are temperature of 870,pressure of 50 MPa and holding time of 2 h.Under this condition,the precursor wires can diffuse well,composite of full density can be formed and the(Al+Al2O3) coating is effective to restrict the reaction between SiC fiber and nickel matrix.

  17. 具有SiC缓冲层的Si衬底上直接沉积碳原子生长石墨烯%Direct Graphene Growth by Depositing Carbon Atoms on Si Substrate Covered by SiC Buffer Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐军; 康朝阳; 李利民; 徐彭寿

    2011-01-01

    石墨烯是近年发现的一种新型多功能材料.在合适的衬底上制备石墨烯成为目前材料制备的一大挑战.本文利用分子束外延(MBE)设备,在Si 衬底上生长高质量的SiC 缓冲层,然后利用直接沉积C原子的方法生长石墨烯,并通过反射式高能电子衍射(RHEED)、拉曼(Raman)光谱和近边X 射线吸收精细结构谱(NEXAFS)等实验技术对不同衬底温度(800、900、1000、1100 °C)生长的薄膜进行结构表征.实验结果表明,在以上衬底温度下都能生长出具有乱层堆垛结构的石墨烯薄膜.当衬底温度升高时,碳原子的活性增强,其成键的能力也增大,从而使形成的石墨烯结晶质量提高.衬底温度为1000 °C时结晶质量最好.其原因可能是当衬底温度较低时,碳原子活性太低不足以形成有序的六方C-sp2环.但过高的衬底温度会使SiC 缓冲层的孔洞缺陷增加,衬底的Si 原子有可能获得足够的能量穿过SiC薄膜的孔洞扩散到衬底表面,与沉积的碳原子反应生成无序的SiC,这一方面会减弱石墨烯的生长,另一方面也会使石墨烯的结晶质量变差.%Graphene is a newly discovered material with many functions. The preparation of graphene on suitable substrates is a challenge in the material preparation field. In this paper, graphene thin films were grown on Si substrates covered with SiC buffer layers (SiC/Si) by the direct deposition of carbon atoms using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) equipment. The structural properties of the samples produced at different substrate temperatures (800, 900, 1000, 1100 ° C) were investigated by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The results indicate that the thin films grown at all temperatures exhibit the characteristics of graphene with a turbostratic stacking structure. As the substrate temperature increases the crystalline quality of the graphene

  18. Engineered CVD Diamond Coatings for Machining and Tribological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumpala, Ravikumar; Chandran, Maneesh; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    Diamond is an allotropes of carbon and is unique because of its extreme hardness (~100 GPa), low friction coefficient (fracture toughness can be tuned by controlling the grain size of the coatings from a few microns to a few nanometers. In this review, characteristics and performance of the CVD diamond coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates were discussed with an emphasis on WC-Co grade selection, substrate pretreatment, nanocrystallinity and microcrystallinity of the coating, mechanical and tribological characteristics, coating architecture, and interfacial adhesion integrity. Engineered coating substrate architecture is essential for CVD diamond coatings to perform well under harsh and highly abrasive machining and tribological conditions.

  19. Laser-Directed CVD 3D Printing of Refractory Metal Rocket Propulsion Hardware Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project, Ultramet will develop a three-dimensional (3D) laser-directed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) additive manufacturing system to build free-form...

  20. The effect of Cs{sup +} ions on codeposition of SiC particles with nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudnik, Ewa, E-mail: erudnik@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, Department of Physical Chemistry and Metallurgy of Non-Ferrous Metals, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Burzynska, Lidia; Gut, Marcin [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, Department of Physical Chemistry and Metallurgy of Non-Ferrous Metals, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The papers describes electrodeposition of SiC particles with nickel matrix in the presence of cesium ions. {yields} Correlations among the Cs{sup +} concentration in the bath, kinetics of the cathodic process, SiC content in the deposits as well as adsorption of Ni{sup 2+} ions on SiC were found. {yields} Microhardness of the Ni/SiC deposits was also determined. - Abstract: Electrodeposition of SiC particles (technical powder) with nickel matrix in the presence of cesium ions (0-37.6 mM) was investigated. The influence of Cs{sup +} concentration on cathodic polarization curves was determined in galvanostatic and potentiodynamic measurements. The presence of Cs{sup +} in the solution enhanced in some extent adsorption of Ni{sup 2+} ions on SiC, but preferential cesium adsorption occurred simultaneously. The last phenomenon resulted in cesium incorporation in the composite coating. The particle content in the deposits (16-24 vol%) was governed by the amount of nickel ions adsorbed on SiC. Structure of the composite coatings was studied by microscopic observations. At highest Cs{sup +} concentrations, incorporation of small SiC grains was inhibited. Microhardness of deposits (390-800 HV) was directly dependent on the SiC content in the coatings.

  1. Broadband Antireflection and Light Extraction Enhancement in Fluorescent SiC with Nanodome Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Zhu, Xiaolong; Jokubavicius, Valdas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a time-efficient and low-cost approach to fabricate Si3N4 coated nanodome structures in fluorescent SiC. Nanosphere lithography is used as the nanopatterning method and SiC nanodome structures with Si3N4 coating are formed via dry etching and thin film deposition process. By using...

  2. Development of nanoporous TiO2 and SiC membranes for membrane filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Katja; Vigna, Erika; Farsi, Ali

    reverse osmosis membranes by ceramic counterparts would provide higher fluxes and allow more efficient cleaning of the membranes. The aim of this work was to prepare defect-free nanoporous ceramic (TiO2 and SiC) layers on macroporous SiC supports by using electrophoretic deposition and dip...

  3. Present limitations of CVD diamond detectors for IMRT applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, C. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)], E-mail: cinzia.deangelis@iss.it; Casati, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Dipartimento di Tecnologie e Salute, Istituto Superiore di Sanita and INFN, Viale regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia dell' Universita and INFN, Florence (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    The aim of the work was to test the suitability of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond detectors for dosimetry in IMRT fields. We used in-house CVD detectors prepared with state-of-the-art polycrystalline diamond films (Element Six Ltd., UK). The parameters considered were time stability, dynamic response, dose-rate dependence and energy dependence. Output factors and TPR were measured in conventional photon fields and dose measurements were performed in IMRT fields using the step-and-shoot technique. Results prove that CVD diamond detectors are suitable for dosimetry in conventional treatments, but they still do not fit the IMRT dosimetry requirements, mainly because of their slow dynamic response. In particular, the slow dynamics affects linearity at low Monitor Units and renders it impossible to follow the sharp transients of IMRT fields. Time stability and dose-rate dependence as well must be improved to reduce their influence on dose assessment.

  4. Testing of porous SiC with dense coating under relevant conditions for Flow Channel Insert application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordás, N., E-mail: nordas@ceit.es [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Bereciartu, A.; García-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Manuel de Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián (Spain); Moroño, A.; Malo, M.; Hodgson, E.R. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Abellà, J.; Colominas, S. [Institut Químic de Sarrià, University Ramon Llull, Via Augusta 390, 08017 Barcelona (Spain); Sedano, L. [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Porous SiC coated by CVD with a dense coating was developed for Flow Channel Inserts (FCI) in dual-coolant blanket concept. • Porous SiC was obtained following the sacrificial template technique, using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering additives. • Flexural strength, thermal and electrical conductivity, and microstructure of uncoated and coated porous SiC are presented. • Adhesion of coating to porous SiC and its corrosion behavior under Pb-17.5Li at 700 °C are shown. - Abstract: Thermally and electrically insulating porous SiC ceramics are attractive candidates for Flow Channel Inserts (FCI) in dual-coolant blanket concepts thanks to its relatively inexpensive manufacturing route. To prevent tritium permeation and corrosion by Pb-15.7 a dense coating has to be applied on the porous SiC. Despite not having structural function, FCI must exhibit sufficient mechanical strength to withstand strong thermal gradients and thermo-electrical stresses during operation. This work summarizes the results on the development of coated porous SiC for FCI. Porous SiC was obtained following the sacrificial template technique, using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering additives and a carbonaceous phase as pore former. Sintering was performed in inert gas at 1850–1950 °C during 15 min to 3 h, followed by oxidation at 650 °C to eliminate the carbonaceous phase. The most promising bulk materials were coated with a ∼30 μm thick dense SiC by CVD. Results on porosity, bending tests, thermal and electrical conductivity are presented. The microstructure of the coating, its adhesion to the porous SiC and its corrosion behavior under Pb-17.5Li are also shown.

  5. Synthesis of CVD-graphene on rapidly heated copper foils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Hwangbo, Yun; Yoon, Jong-Hyuk; Lee, Eun-Kyu; Ryu, Jaechul; Lee, Hak-Joo; Cho, Seungmin; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-05-07

    Most chemical vapor deposition (CVD) systems used for graphene growth mainly employ convection and radiation heat transfer between the heating source and the metal catalyst in order to reach the activation temperature of the reaction, which in general leads to a long synthesis time and poor energy efficiency. Here, we report a highly time- and energy-efficient CVD setup, in which the metal catalyst (Cu) is designed to be physically contacted with a heating source to give quick heat transfer by conduction. The induced conduction heating enabled the usual effects of the pretreatment and annealing of Cu (i.e., annihilation of surface defects, impurities and contaminants) to be achieved in a significantly shorter time compared to conventional CVD. Notably, the rapid heating was observed to lead to larger grains of Cu with high uniformity as compared to the Cu annealed by conventional CVD, which are believed to be beneficial for the growth of high quality graphene. Through this CVD setup, bundles of high quality (∼252 Ω per square) and large area (over 16 inch) graphenes were able to be readily synthesized in 40 min in a significantly efficient way. When considering ease of scalability, high energy effectiveness and considerable productivity, our method is expected to be welcomed by industrialists.

  6. Electrophoretic Deposition for the Fabrication of High-Performance Metal-Ceramic Hybrid Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junghwan; Jung, Yangil; Park, Dongjun; Kim, Hyungil; Park, Jeongyong; Koo, Yanghyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Metal-ceramic hybrid cladding consisting of a Zr liner and SiC{sub f}/SiC composite is one of the candidate systems. To achieve a high-performance metal-ceramic hybrid cladding, it is important to synthesize the SiC{sub f}/SiC composites with high flexural strength. The most common interphases, such as pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and boron nitride (BN) coating, have been applied on the surface of SiC fibers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). In addition, the SiC matrix phase for SiC{sub f}/SiC composites has been commonly formed by CVI and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP), which are very costly and complicated processes. For this reason, the fabrication process of SiC{sub f}/SiC composites that is low-cost and simple has been strongly needed. In this study, weak phase coating using a commercial colloidal carbon black suspension was performed on SiC fibers through electrophoretic deposition (EPD), and carbon-coated SiC{sub f}/SiC composites were fabricated by EPD. The mechanical properties at room temperature were evaluated to investigate the effect of the carbon interfacial layer on the mechanical properties of carbon-coated SiC{sub f}/SiC composites. In this study, it was concluded that the EPD method is effective for homogeneous carbon black coating on SiC fibers, and that the carbon coating layer on SiC fibers plays an important role in optimizing the interface between fibers and the matrix, and enhances the toughness of carbon-coated SiC{sub f}/SiC composites during fracture.

  7. Polymer Layers by Initiated CVD for Thin Film Gas Barrier Encapsulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee, D.A.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter a thorough description of the initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process will be given, concentrating on molecular weight and deposition rate of the deposited polymer, which are essential for largescale application in hybrid gas barriers. Practical applications of coatings by

  8. A platform for large-scale graphene electronics--CVD growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jang, Won-Jun; Kim, Minwoo; Park, Seong-Yong; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kahng, Se-Jong; Choi, Jae-Young; Ruoff, Rodney S; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2013-05-21

    Direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film can suggest a large-scale and high-quality graphene/h-BN film hybrid structure with a defect-free interface. This sequentially grown graphene/h-BN film shows better electronic properties than that of graphene/SiO2 or graphene transferred on h-BN film, and suggests a new promising template for graphene device fabrication.

  9. Microfabrication of Tungsten, Molybdenum and Tungsten Carbide Rods by Laser-Assisted CVD

    OpenAIRE

    Björklund, Kajsa

    2001-01-01

    Thin films of refractory metals and carbides have been studied extensively over many years because of their wide range of application. The two major techniques used are Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD). These can result in the deposition of two-dimensional blanket or patterned thin films. Laser-assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (LCVD) can provide a maskless alternative for localised deposition in two and three dimensions. This thesis describes LCVD of mi...

  10. SICs and Algebraic Number Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Marcus; Flammia, Steven; McConnell, Gary; Yard, Jon

    2017-08-01

    We give an overview of some remarkable connections between symmetric informationally complete measurements (SIC-POVMs, or SICs) and algebraic number theory, in particular, a connection with Hilbert's 12th problem. The paper is meant to be intelligible to a physicist who has no prior knowledge of either Galois theory or algebraic number theory.

  11. Epitaxial sic devices for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M; Menichelli, D.; Pini, S.; Sciortino, S. [INFN, Firenze (Italy); Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Energetica; Bucciolini, M. [INFN, Firenze (Italy); Firenze Univ., Firenze (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica; Nava, F. [Modena Univ., Modena (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica; INFN, Bologna (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    The current response of SiC on-line dosimeters to {gamma}-radiation from{sup 60}Co and {sup 167}Cs {gamma}-sources, X-photons and 22MeV electrons from linear accelerator has been investigated. The devices used are 4H-SiC epitaxial n-type layer deposited onto a 4H-SiC n{sup +} type substrate wafer doped with nitrogen. Single-pad Schottky contacts have been produced by deposition of a 1000A gold film on the epitaxial layer and ohmic contacts have been deposited on the rear substrate side. The detector has been then embedded in epoxy resin and studied in the dose and dose-rate ranges 0.1-1 Gy 0.1-10Gy/min. A signal response comparable to that of silicon standard dosimeters has been measured with the unbiased SiC device. The released charge and induced current have been observed to increase linearly respectively with the dose and dose-rate. A preliminary study on the changes in the sensibility of the device after a {gamma}-rays accumulated dose up to 10kGy is also presented.

  12. Drastically Enhanced High-Rate Performance of Carbon-Coated LiFePO4 Nanorods Using a Green Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) Method for Lithium Ion Battery: A Selective Carbon Coating Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ruiyuan; Liu, Haiqiang; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Jiankun; Tan, Xinghua; Liu, Guangyao; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Xiaohua; Guo, Yanjun; Wang, Hanfu; Sun, Lianfeng; Chu, Weiguo

    2015-06-03

    Application of LiFePO4 (LFP) to large current power supplies is greatly hindered by its poor electrical conductivity (10(-9) S cm(-1)) and sluggish Li+ transport. Carbon coating is considered to be necessary for improving its interparticle electronic conductivity and thus electrochemical performance. Here, we proposed a novel, green, low cost and controllable CVD approach using solid glucose as carbon source which can be extended to most cathode and anode materials in need of carbon coating. Hydrothermally synthesized LFP nanorods with optimized thickness of carbon coated by this recipe are shown to have superb high-rate performance, high energy, and power densities, as well as long high-rate cycle lifetime. For 200 C (18s) charge and discharge, the discharge capacity and voltage are 89.69 mAh g(-1) and 3.030 V, respectively, and the energy and power densities are 271.80 Wh kg(-1) and 54.36 kW kg(-1), respectively. The capacity retention of 93.0%, and the energy and power density retention of 93.6% after 500 cycles at 100 C were achieved. Compared to the conventional carbon coating through direct mixing with glucose (or other organic substances) followed by annealing (DMGA), the carbon phase coated using this CVD recipe is of higher quality and better uniformity. Undoubtedly, this approach enhances significantly the electrochemical performance of high power LFP and thus broadens greatly the prospect of its applications to large current power supplies such as electric and hybrid electric vehicles.

  13. Passivation of surface-nanostructured f-SiC and porous SiC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang; Ou, Yiyu

    The further enhancement of photoluminescence from nanostructured fluorescent silicon carbide (f-SiC) and porous SiC by using atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 is studied in this paper.......The further enhancement of photoluminescence from nanostructured fluorescent silicon carbide (f-SiC) and porous SiC by using atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 is studied in this paper....

  14. Catalytic CVD of SWCNTs at Low Temperatures and SWCNT Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Robert; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Graham, Andrew P.; Duesberg, Georg S.; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang; Pompe, Wolfgang

    2004-09-01

    New results on the planar growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at low temperatures will be reported. Optimizing catalyst, catalyst support, and growth parameters yields SWCNTs at temperatures as low as 600 °C. Growth at such low temperatures largely affects the diameter distribution since coalescence of the catalyst is suppressed. A phenomenological growth model will be suggested for CVD growth at low temperatures. The model takes into account surface diffusion and is an alternative to the bulk diffusion based vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) model. Furthermore, carbon nanotubes field effect transistors based on substrate grown SWCNTs will be presented. In these devices good contact resistances could be achieved by electroless metal deposition or metal evaporation of the contacts.

  15. Low-energy SiC2H6+ and SiC3H9+ ion beam productions by the mass-selection of fragments produced from hexamethyldisilane for SiC film formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yoshimura

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We have been attempting to produce low-energy ion beams from fragments produced through the decomposition of hexamethyldisilane (HMD for silicon carbide (SiC film formations. We mass-selected SiC2H6+ and SiC3H9+ ions from fragments produced from HMD, and finally produced low-energy SiC2H6+ and SiC3H9+ ion beams. The ion energy was approximately 100 eV. Then, the ion beams were irradiated to Si(100 substrates. The temperature of the Si substrate was 800°C during the ion irradiation. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy of the substrates obtained following SiC2H6+ ion irradiation demonstrated the occurrence of 3C-SiC deposition. On the other hand, the film deposited by the irradiation of SiC3H9+ ions included diamond-like carbon in addition to 3C-SiC.

  16. Leakage current measurements of a pixelated polycrystalline CVD diamond detector

    OpenAIRE

    Zain, R.M.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Cunnigham, L.; Stehl, C.; Berderman, E.; Rahim, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Diamond has several desirable features when used as a material for radiation detection. With the invention of synthetic growth techniques, it has become feasible to look at developing diamond radiation detectors with reasonable surface areas. Polycrystalline diamond has been grown using a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique by the University of Augsburg and detector structures fabricated at the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) in the University of Glasgow in order to produce pi...

  17. THz-conductivity of CVD graphene on different substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Cortés, Daniel; Sempere, Bernat; Colominas, Carles; Ferrer Anglada, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic properties of CVD graphene are charac-terized over a wide frequency range: THz, IR, visible and near-UV. We used Raman spectroscopy to characterize the synthesized graphene films. All graphene layers were deposited on various substrates, some ones transparent or flexible, such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), quartz and silicon. Transmission Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) method, in the range from 100 GHz to 3 THz, is used to an...

  18. Investigation of the Millimeter-Wave Plasma Assisted CVD Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikharev, A; Gorbachev, A; Kozlov, A; Litvak, A; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2005-07-21

    A polycrystalline diamond grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is recognized as a unique material for high power electronic devices owing to unrivaled combination of properties such as ultra-low microwave absorption, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Microwave vacuum windows for modern high power sources and transmission lines operating at the megawatt power level require high quality diamond disks with a diameter of several centimeters and a thickness of a few millimeters. The microwave plasma-assisted CVD technique exploited today to produce such disks has low deposition rate, which limits the availability of large size diamond disk windows. High-electron-density plasma generated by the millimeter-wave power was suggested for enhanced-growth-rate CVD. In this paper a general description of the 30 GHz gyrotron-based facility is presented. The output radiation of the gyrotron is converted into four wave-beams. Free localized plasma in the shape of a disk with diameter much larger than the wavelength of the radiation is formed in the intersection area of the wave-beams. The results of investigation of the plasma parameters, as well as the first results of diamond film deposition are presented. The prospects for commercially producing vacuum window diamond disks for high power microwave devices at much lower costs and processing times than currently available are outlined.

  19. Cold-walled UHV/CVD batch reactor for the growth of Si1_x/Gex layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Christensen, Carsten; Andersen, C.R.;

    1997-01-01

    A novel cold-walled, lamp-heated, ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) batch system for the growth of SiGe layers is presented. This system combines the batch capability of the standard UHV/CVD furnace with the temperature processing available in rapid thermal processing (Rm) equi...

  20. CVD carbon powders modified by ball milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazmierczak Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon powders produced using a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods are an interesting subject of research. One of the most interesting methods of synthesizing these powders is using radio frequency plasma. This method, originally used in deposition of carbon films containing different sp2/sp3 ratios, also makes possible to produce carbon structures in the form of powder. Results of research related to the mechanical modification of these powders have been presented. The powders were modified using a planetary ball mill with varying parameters, such as milling speed, time, ball/powder mass ratio and additional liquids. Changes in morphology and particle sizes were measured using scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Phase composition was analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The influence of individual parameters on the modification outcome was estimated using statistical method. The research proved that the size of obtained powders is mostly influenced by the milling speed and the amount of balls. Powders tend to form conglomerates sized up to hundreds of micrometers. Additionally, it is possible to obtain nanopowders with the size around 100 nm. Furthermore, application of additional liquid, i.e. water in the process reduces the graphitization of the powder, which takes place during dry milling.

  1. SiC protective coating for photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xin; Kane, Sheryl; Cogan, Stuart; Lorach, Henri; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Theodore; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate plasma-enhanced, chemically vapor deposited (PECVD) amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) as a protective coating for retinal prostheses and other implantable devices, and to study their failure mechanisms in vivo. Approach. Retinal prostheses were implanted in rats sub-retinally for up to 1 year. Degradation of implants was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dissolution rates of SiC, SiN x and thermal SiO2 were measured in accelerated soaking tests in saline at 87 °C. Defects in SiC films were revealed and analyzed by selectively removing the materials underneath those defects. Main results. At 87 °C SiN x dissolved at 18.3 ± 0.3 nm d-1, while SiO2 grown at high temperature (1000 °C) dissolved at 0.104 ± 0.008 nm d-1. SiC films demonstrated the best stability, with no quantifiable change after 112 d. Defects in thin SiC films appeared primarily over complicated topography and rough surfaces. Significance. SiC coatings demonstrating no erosion in accelerated aging test for 112 d at 87 °C, equivalent to about 10 years in vivo, can offer effective protection of the implants. Photovoltaic retinal prostheses with PECVD SiC coatings exhibited effective protection from erosion during the 4 month follow-up in vivo. The optimal thickness of SiC layers is about 560 nm, as defined by anti-reflective properties and by sufficient coverage to eliminate defects.

  2. The Oxidation Rate of SiC in High Pressure Water Vapor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    CVD SiC and sintered alpha-SiC samples were exposed at 1316 C in a high pressure burner rig at total pressures of 5.7, 15, and 25 atm for times up to 100h. Variations in sample emittance for the first nine hours of exposure were used to determine the thickness of the silica scale as a function of time. After accounting for volatility of silica in water vapor, the parabolic rate constants for Sic in water vapor pressures of 0.7, 1.8 and 3.1 atm were determined. The dependence of the parabolic rate constant on the water vapor pressure yielded a power law exponent of one. Silica growth on Sic is therefore limited by transport of molecular water vapor through the silica scale.

  3. Dosimetric characterization of CVD diamonds irradiated with 62 MeV proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy)]. E-mail: cirrone@lns.infn.it; Cuttone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Lo Nigro, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della MAteria, Catania (Italy); Mongelli, V. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Fisica Sanitaria, Universita di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della MAteria, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliera Cannizzaro, Catania (Italy); Valastro, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Scuola di Specializzazione in Fisica Sanitaria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita di Florence (Italy); Onori, S. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    2005-10-21

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as on-line radiation dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of polycrystalline diamond by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have produced material with electronic properties suitable for dosimetry applications. In this work the possibility to use a segmented commercial CVD detector in the dosimetry of proton beams has been investigated. The response as function of dose, dose rate, the priming and the rise time have been investigated thoroughly. This study shows the suitability of CVD diamond for dosimetry of clinical 62 MeV proton beams.

  4. Radiation Hardness and Linearity Studies of CVD Diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Ghodbane, N; Imhof, A

    2003-01-01

    We report on the behavior of CVD diamonds under intense electromagnetic radiation and on the response of the detector to high density of deposited energy. Diamonds have been found to remain unaffected after doses of 10 MGy of MeV-range photons and the diamond response to energy depositions of up to 250 GeV/cm^3 has been found to be linear to better than 2 %. These observations make diamond an attractive detector material for a calorimeter in the very forward region of the detector proposed for TESLA.

  5. CVD of pure copper films from amidinate precursor

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Copper(I) amidinate [Cu(i-Pr-Me-AMD)]2 was investigated to produce copper films in conventional low pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using hydrogen as reducing gas-reagent. Copper films were deposited on steel, silicon, and SiO2/Si substrates in the temperature range 200–350°C at a total pressure of 1333 Pa. The growth rate on steel follows the surface reaction between atomic hydrogen and the entire precursor molecule up to 240°C. A significant increase of the growth rate at tempera...

  6. Influence of process pressure on β-SiC growth by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. A.; Sultanov, A. O.; Gusev, A. S.; Kargin, N. I.; Pavlova, E. P.

    2014-10-01

    3C-SiC films grown on Si (100) substrates by CVD method using silane-propane- hydrogen system were analyzed for crystallinity at various process pressures. The deposition experiments were carried out in a shower-head type cold-wall CVD reactor. The influence of growth conditions on a structural modification of experimental samples was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE).

  7. The effect of alkaline doped catalysts on the CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Nemeth, Zoltan; Fejes, Dora;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop new doped catalysts for chemical vapour deposition (CVD) synthesis in order to increase the quantity and quality of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Doping compounds such as CsBr, CsCl, KBr and KCl were used to reach higher carbon deposit and carbon yield. The amount o...

  8. CVD of solid oxides in porous substrates for ceramic membrane modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of yttria-doped zirconia has been experimented systematically in various types of porous ceramic substrates by a modified chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process operating in an opposing reactant geometry using water vapor and corresponding metal chloride vapors as reactants. The effe

  9. Effect of Addition of Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and Silicon Carbide (SiC) on Properties of Electroless Nickel Alloy Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yu-cheng; HU Xiao-ye; WANG Wen-fang; HUANG Xin-min

    2004-01-01

    Electroless nickel (copper)-phosphorus-silicon carbide (SiC)-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite coatings were prepared by adding SiC and PTFE into electroless nickel (copper)-phosphorus alloy baths. The effects of addition of SiC and PTFE on depositing rate, microhardness, wear resistance and anti-friction of the resulted composite coatings were studied. The results indicated that electroless nickel (copper)-phosphorus alloy coatings were greatly improved in depositing rate, microhardness, wear resistance and antifriction by co-deposited proper amount of SiC and PTFE.

  10. -SiC nanocomposite coatings synthesized by co-electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Mehran; Hashim, Mansor; Kamari, Halimah Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    In the present work, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-SiC and novel Ni-Al2O3-SiC metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings were electrodeposited onto pure copper samples using a modified Watt's nickel electroplating bath containing nano alumina and silicon carbide particles with an average particle size of 50 nm. The composition, crystalline structure and surface morphology of the deposits were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The results indicated that Ni-Al2O3-SiC hybrid composite films with an acceptable homogeneity and granular structure having 9.2 and 7.7 % vol. Al2O3 and SiC nanoparticles, respectively were developed successfully. The nanoparticles incorporated in the nickel layer effectively increased the micro hardness and wear resistance owing to dispersion and grain-refinement strengthening, changing the nickel matrix morphology as well as the texture and preferred grain growth direction from to the close-packed . The oxidation resistance of the Ni-Al2O3-SiC hybrid composite coatings was measured to be approximately 41 % greater than the unreinforced Ni deposit and almost 30 % better than the Ni-Al2O3 composite coatings.

  11. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition: recent progress, present state of the art and competitive opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    Hot Wire CVD (also called Catalytic CVD or initiated CVD) is an elegant low pressure deposition technique for the deposition of functional films, both inorganic and organic, based on the decomposition of precursor sources at a heated metallic surface. The conformal deposition of thin films on rigid

  12. X-ray sensitivity measurements on CVD diamond film detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, F.; Pochet, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Electronique et d`Instrumentation Nucleaire; Gheeraert, E. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1993-12-31

    Microwave chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond films have been used to fabricate radiation detectors. The polycrystalline diamond films have a resistivity of 10{sup 12} ohm.cm and carrier mobility and lifetime of about 280 cm{sup 2}/V.s and 530 ps. The detector response to laser pulses (355, 532 and 1064 nm), X-ray flux (15-50 keV) and alpha particles ({sup 241}Am, 5.49 MeV) has been investigated. The response speed of the detector is in the 100 ps range. A sensitivity of about 3 x 10{sup -10} A/V.Gy.s was measured under 50 keV X-ray flux. The detector current response to X-ray flux is almost linear. It is also shown that CVD diamond detectors can be used for alpha particle counting. (authors). 9 figs., 25 refs.

  13. Development of CVD diamond detectors for clinical dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliero, M. A.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Ryde, S. J. S.; Oliver, K.

    2014-11-01

    The use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) methods for the manufacture of diamonds could lead to detectors for high-resolution radiotherapy dosimetry that are cheaper and more reproducible than detectors based on natural diamonds. In this work two prototype designs (Diamond Detectors Ltd, Poole) of CVD diamond detectors were considered. The detectors were encapsulated in a water-proof housing in a form-factor that would be suitable for dosimetry measurements in water, as well as solid material phantoms. Stability of the dosimeter over time, the dose-response, dose-rate response and angular-response were examined. The study demonstrated that the detector behaviour conformed with theory in terms of the dose-rate response and had acceptable properties for use in the clinic.

  14. Optimization of process parameters in a large-area hot-wire CVD reactor for the deposition of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) for solar cell application with highly uniform material quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflueger, A.; Mukherjee, C.; Schroeder, B. [Department of Physics, Center of Materials Science, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, D-67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Scale-up of a-Si:H-based thin film applications such as solar cells, entirely or partly prepared by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), requires research on the deposition process in a large-area HWCVD system. The influence of gas supply and filament geometry on thickness uniformity has already been reported, but their influence on material quality is systematically studied for the first time. The optimization of deposition parameters for obtaining best material quality in our large-area HWCVD system resulted in an optimum filament temperature, T{sub fil}{approx}1600C, pressure, p=8mTorr and silane flow, F(SiH{sub 4})=100sccm, keeping the substrate temperature at T{sub S}=200C. A special gas supply (gas shower with tiny holes of uniform size) and a filament grid, consisting of six filaments with an interfilament distance, d{sub fil}=4cm were used. The optimum filament-to-substrate distance was found to be d{sub fil-S}=8.4cm. While studying the influence of different d{sub fil} and gas supply configurations on the material quality, the above-mentioned setup and parameters yield best results for both uniformity and material quality. With the setup mentioned, we could achieve device quality a-Si:H films with a thickness uniformity of {+-}2.5% on a circular area of 20cm in diameter. The material, grown at a deposition rate of r{sub d}{approx}4A/s, was characterized on nine positions of the 30cmx30cm substrate area, and revealed reasonable uniformity of the opto-electronic properties, e.g photosensitivity, {sigma}{sub Ph}/{sigma}{sub D}=(2.46{+-}0.7)x10{sup 5}, microstructure factor, R=0.17{+-}0.05, defect densities, N{sub d(PDS)}=(2.06{+-}0.6)x10{sup 17}cm{sup -3} and N{sub d(CPM)}=(2.05{+-}0.5)x10{sup 16}cm{sup -3} (film properties are given as mean values and standard deviations). Finally, we fabricated pin solar cells, with the i-layer deposited on small-area p-substrates distributed over an area of 20cmx20cm in this large-area deposition system, and

  15. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, S., E-mail: jacques@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, University of Bordeaux 1, CNRS, Herakles-Safran, CEA, 3 allee de la Boetie, F-33600 Pessac (France); Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P. [LCTS, University of Bordeaux 1, CNRS, Herakles-Safran, CEA, 3 allee de la Boetie, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2013-06-15

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called “interphase” between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC–TiC){sub n} interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC–TiC){sub n} films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  16. Diffusion of Ag, Au and Cs implants in MAX phase Ti3SiC2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weilin; Henager, Charles H.; Varga, Tamas; Jung, Hee Joon; Overman, Nicole R.; Zhang, Chonghong; Gou, Jie

    2015-05-16

    MAX phases (M: early transition metal; A: elements in group 13 or 14; X: C or N), such as titanium silicon carbide (Ti3SiC2), have a unique combination of both metallic and ceramic properties, which make them attractive for potential nuclear applications. Ti3SiC2 has been considered as a possible fuel cladding material. This study reports on the diffusivities of fission product surrogates (Ag and Cs) and a noble metal Au (with diffusion behavior similar to Ag) in this ternary compound at elevated temperatures, as well as in dual-phase nanocomposite of Ti3SiC2/3C-SiC and polycrystalline CVD 3C-SiC for behavior comparisons. Samples were implanted with Ag, Au or Cs ions and characterized with various methods, including x-ray diffraction, electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, helium ion microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that in contrast to immobile Ag in 3C-SiC, there is a significant outward diffusion of Ag in Ti3SiC2 within the dual-phase nanocomposite during Ag ion implantation at 873 K. Similar behavior of Au in polycrystalline Ti3SiC2 was also observed. Cs out-diffusion and release from Ti3SiC2 occurred during post-implantation thermal annealing at 973 K. This study suggests caution and further studies in consideration of Ti3SiC2 as a fuel cladding material for advanced nuclear reactors operating at very high temperatures.

  17. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  18. Mass production of CNTs using CVD multi-quartz tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousef, Samy; Mohamed, Alaa [Dept. of Production Engineering and Printing Technology, Akhbar Elyom Academy, Giza (Egypt)

    2016-11-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become the backbone of modern industries, including lightweight and heavy-duty industrial applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is considered as the most common method used to synthesize high yield CNTs. This work aims to develop the traditional CVD for the mass production of more economical CNTs, meeting the growing CNT demands among consumers by increasing the number of three particular reactors. All reactors housing is connected by small channels to provide the heat exchange possibility between the chambers, thereby decreasing synthesis time and reducing heat losses inside the ceramic body of the furnace. The novel design is simple and cheap with a lower reacting time and heat loss compared with the traditional CVD design. Methane, hydrogen, argon, and catalyzed iron nanoparticles were used as a carbon source and catalyst during the synthesis process. In addition, CNTs were produced using only a single quartz tube for comparison. The produced samples were examined using XRD, TEM, SEM, FTIR, and TGA. The results showed that the yield of CNTs increases by 287 % compared with those synthesized with a single quartz tube. Moreover, the total synthesis time of CNTs decreases by 37 % because of decreased heat leakage.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  20. PE-CVD fabrication of germanium nanoclusters for memory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerkop, T. [Institut fuer Materialien und Bauelemente der Elektronik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 11a, 30167 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: duerkop@mbe.uni-hannover.de; Bugiel, E. [Institut fuer Materialien und Bauelemente der Elektronik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 11a, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Costina, I. [IHP GmbH, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Ott, A.; Peibst, R.; Hofmann, K.R. [Institut fuer Materialien und Bauelemente der Elektronik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 11a, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    We have investigated Ge nanoclusters (Ge-NC) embedded in silicon dioxide, whose fundamental properties promise improved characteristics in NC flash memory devices as compared to Si nanoclusters. We present a simple new method, based on plasma-enhanced CVD (PE-CVD) deposition of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) onto SiO{sub 2}, to create gate stacks with embedded Ge-NC at vertically well-controlled positions suitable for use in flash memory devices. This process minimizes the exposure of Ge to environmental influences by depositing a-Ge as well as a SiO{sub 2} cap layer in situ within the same deposition chamber. Subsequent high-temperature anneals compatible with the temperature budget of CMOS processing are used for the actual cluster formation. Variation of annealing temperature and duration of this step as well as the thickness of the initial Ge layer controls the average cluster radius and density, as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Measurements of electrical properties show the capability of samples with NC to store charge.

  1. CVD growth and processing of graphene for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Shishir; Rezvani, Ehsan; Nolan, Hugo; Duesberg, Georg S. [School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McEvoy, Niall; Kim, Hye-Young; Lee, Kangho; Peltekis, Nikos; Weidlich, Anne; Daly, Ronan [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-11-15

    The remarkable properties of graphene have potential for numerous applications; however, their exploitation depends on its reliable production. The chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth of graphene on metal surfaces has become one of the most promising strategies for the production of high quality graphene in a scaleable manner. Here, we discuss graphene growth on nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu) directly from both gaseous hydrocarbons and solid carbon precursors. Further, we discuss in detail the transfer of graphene films to insulating substrates, by direct and polymer supported transfer methods. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Ultratough CVD single crystal diamond and three dimensional growth thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, Russell J [Washington, DC; Mao, Ho-kwang [Washington, DC; Yan, Chih-shiue [Washington, DC

    2009-09-29

    The invention relates to a single-crystal diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition that has a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a single-crystal diamond with a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a process for producing a single crystal CVD diamond in three dimensions on a single crystal diamond substrate.

  3. CVD diamond resistor as heater and temperature sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.S.; Aslam, M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Heat generation and temperature control, essential for most heater applications, require different components in a conventional system. We achieve the heat generation and temperature measurement simultaneously by using a single diamond resistor. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) p-type diamond resistors with different dimensions were fabricated on polycrystalline diamond or oxidized Si substrates using diamond film technology compatible with integrated circuit (IC) processing. The temperature response of the resistors was characterized in the temperature range of 25 - 500{degrees}C. Power densities in access of 600 watt/in{sup 2} were achieved.

  4. Chromized Layers Produced on Steel Surface by Means of CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KASPRZYCKA Ewa; BOGDA(N)SKI Bogdan; JEZIORSKI Leopold; JASI(N)SKI J(o)zef; TORBUS Roman

    2004-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition of chromium on the surface of carbon steel has been investigated using a novel CVD method that combines the low cost of pack cementation method with advantages of vacuum technique. The processes have been performed in chromium chlorides atmosphere at a low pressure range from 1 to 800 hPa, the treatment temperature 800 to 950℃. Studies of the layers thickness, the phase composition, Cr, C and Fe depth profiles in diffusion zone have been conducted. The effect of the vacuum level during the process and the process parameters such as time and temperature on layer diffusion growth on the carbon steel surface has been investigated.

  5. CVD diamond sensor for UV-photon detection

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Gervino, G; Lamarina, A M; Palmisano, C; Periale, R; Picchi, P

    2012-01-01

    A new generation of UV photosensors, based on single crystal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamonds to work optically coupled with large volume two-phase liquid-Ar (LAr) or liquid-Xe (LXe) detectors nowadays under design for the next generation of WIMPs experiments, is under development. Preliminary tests and first calibrations show these devices can have better performance than the existing UV sensitive detectors (higher photosensitivity and better signal-to-noise ratio). I-V characteristics, dark current measurements, linearity response to X-ray irradiation, and alpha-particle energy resolution are reported and discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fracture Characteristics of Monolayer CVD-Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwangbo, Yun; Lee, Choong-Kwang; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Su; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-03-01

    We have observed and analyzed the fracture characteristics of the monolayer CVD-graphene using pressure bulge testing setup. The monolayer CVD-graphene has appeared to undergo environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth in room condition, i.e. stress corrosion cracking arising from the adsorption of water vapor on the graphene and the subsequent chemical reactions. The crack propagation in graphene has appeared to be able to be reasonably tamed by adjusting applied humidity and stress. The fracture toughness, describing the ability of a material containing inherent flaws to resist catastrophic failure, of the CVD-graphene has turned out to be exceptionally high, as compared to other carbon based 3D materials. These results imply that the CVD-graphene could be an ideal candidate as a structural material notwithstanding environmental susceptibility. In addition, the measurements reported here suggest that specific non-continuum fracture behaviors occurring in 2D monoatomic structures can be macroscopically well visualized and characterized.

  7. Non-classical crystallization of thin films and nanostructures in CVD and PVD processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Nong Moon

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to a recently-developed approach to the growth mechanism of thin films and nanostructures via chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Starting from the underlying principles of the low pressure synthesis of diamond films, it is shown that diamond growth occurs not by individual atoms but by charged nanoparticles. This newly-discovered growth mechanism turns out to be general to many CVD and some physical vapor deposition (PVD) processes. This non-classical crystallization is a new paradigm of crystal growth, with active research taking place on growth in solution, especially in biomineralization processes. Established understanding of the growth of thin films and nanostructures is based around processes involving individual atoms or molecules. According to the author’s research over the last two decades, however, the generation of charged gas phase nuclei is shown to be the rule rather than the exception in the CVD process, and charged gas phase nuclei are actively ...

  8. iCVD Cyclic Polysiloxane and Polysilazane as Nanoscale Thin-Film Electrolyte: Synthesis and Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Reeja-Jayan, B; Liu, Andong; Lau, Jonathan; Dunn, Bruce; Gleason, Karen K

    2016-03-01

    A group of crosslinked cyclic siloxane (Si-O) and silazane (Si-N) polymers are synthesized via solvent-free initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Notably, this is the first report of cyclic polysilazanes synthesized via the gas-phase iCVD method. The deposited nanoscale thin films are thermally stable and chemically inert. By iCVD, they can uniformly and conformally cover nonplanar surfaces having complex geometry. Although polysiloxanes are traditionally utilized as dielectric materials and insulators, our research shows these cyclic organosilicon polymers can conduct lithium ions (Li(+) ) at room temperature. The conformal coating and the room temperature ionic conductivity make these cyclic organosilicon polymers attractive for use as thin-film electrolytes in solid-state batteries. Also, their synthesis process and properties have been systemically studied and discussed.

  9. Fracture Characteristics of Monolayer CVD-Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Hwangbo, Yun; Lee, Choong-Kwang; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Su; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    We have observed and analyzed the fracture characteristics of the monolayer CVD-graphene using pressure bulge testing setup. The monolayer CVD-graphene has appeared to undergo environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth in room condition, i.e. stress corrosion cracking arising from the adsorption of water vapor on the graphene and the subsequent chemical reactions. The crack propagation in graphene has appeared to be able to be reasonably tamed by adjusting applied humidity and stress. ...

  10. Designing polymer surfaces via vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Asatekin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD methods significantly augment the capabilities of traditional surface modification techniques for designing polymeric surfaces. In CVD polymerization, the monomer(s are delivered to the surface through the vapor phase and then undergo simultaneous polymerization and thin film formation. By eliminating the need to dissolve macromolecules, CVD enables insoluble polymers to be coated and prevents solvent damage to the substrate. Since de-wetting and surface tension effects are absent, CVD coatings conform to the geometry of the underlying substrate. Hence, CVD polymers can be readily applied to virtually any substrate: organic, inorganic, rigid, flexible, planar, three-dimensional, dense, or porous. CVD methods integrate readily with other vacuum processes used to fabricate patterned surfaces and devices. CVD film growth proceeds from the substrate up, allowing for interfacial engineering, real-time monitoring, thickness control, and the synthesis of films with graded composition. This article focuses on two CVD polymerization methods that closely translate solution chemistry to vapor deposition; initiated CVD and oxidative CVD. The basic concepts underlying these methods and the resultant advantages over other thin film coating techniques are described, along with selected applications where CVD polymers are an enabling technology.

  11. Recent Results from Beam Tests of 3D and Pad pCVD Diamond Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wallny, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Results from prototypes of a detector using chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond with embedded resistive electrodes in the bulk forming a 3D diamond device are presented. A detector system consisting of 3D devices based on poly-crystalline CVD (pCVD) diamond was connected to a multi-channel readout and successfully tested in a 120 GeV/c proton beam at CERN proving for the first time the feasibility of the 3D detector concept in pCVD for particle tracking applications. We also present beam test results on the dependence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on poly-crystalline CVD diamond. The detectors were tested in a 260 MeV/c pion beam over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2 . The pulse height of the sensors was measured with pad readout electronics at a peaking time of 7 ns. Our data from the 2015 beam tests at PSI indicate that the pulse height of poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensor irradiated to 5×1014 neq/cm2 is independent of particle flux...

  12. Large area SiC coating technology of RBSC for semiconductor processing component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon Ju

    2001-06-01

    As the semiconductor process is developed for the larger area wafer and the larger-scale integration, the processing fixtures are required to have excellent mechanical and high temperature properties. This highlights the importance of silicon carbide-based materials as a substitute for quartz-based susceptors. In this study, SiC coating technology on reaction sintered (RS) SiC with thickness variation of +/- 10% within a diameter of 8 inch by low pressure chemical vapor deposition has been developed for making a plate type SiC fixture such as heater, baffle, etc., with a diameter of 12 inch. Additionally, a state of art on fabrication technology and products of the current commercial SiC fixtures has been described.

  13. Photochemical CVD of Ru on functionalized self-assembled monolayers from organometallic precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kelsea R.; Arevalo Rodriguez, Paul; Brewer, Christopher R.; Brannaka, Joseph A.; Shi, Zhiwei; Yang, Jing; Salazar, Bryan; McElwee-White, Lisa; Walker, Amy V.

    2017-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is an attractive technique for the metallization of organic thin films because it is selective and the thickness of the deposited film can easily be controlled. However, thermal CVD processes often require high temperatures which are generally incompatible with organic films. In this paper, we perform proof-of-concept studies of photochemical CVD to metallize organic thin films. In this method, a precursor undergoes photolytic decomposition to generate thermally labile intermediates prior to adsorption on the sample. Three readily available Ru precursors, CpRu(CO)2Me, (η3-allyl)Ru(CO)3Br, and (COT)Ru(CO)3, were employed to investigate the role of precursor quantum yield, ligand chemistry, and the Ru oxidation state on the deposition. To investigate the role of the substrate chemistry on deposition, carboxylic acid-, hydroxyl-, and methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayers were used. The data indicate that moderate quantum yields for ligand loss (φ ≥ 0.4) are required for ruthenium deposition, and the deposition is wavelength dependent. Second, anionic polyhapto ligands such as cyclopentadienyl and allyl are more difficult to remove than carbonyls, halides, and alkyls. Third, in contrast to the atomic layer deposition, acid-base reactions between the precursor and the substrate are more effective for deposition than nucleophilic reactions. Finally, the data suggest that selective deposition can be achieved on organic thin films by judicious choice of precursor and functional groups present on the substrate. These studies thus provide guidelines for the rational design of new precursors specifically for selective photochemical CVD on organic substrates.

  14. Controlling the resistivity gradient in chemical vapor deposition-deposited aluminum-doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Verheijen, M. A.; Keuning, W.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) generally exhibit a major drawback, i.e., a gradient in resistivity extending over a large range of film thickness. The present contribution addresses the plasma-enhanced CVD deposition of ZnO: Al layers by focusing on the control

  15. CVD Diamond Detector Stability Issues for Operation at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Moran, M J; Lerche, R A; Izumi, N; Phillips, T W; Glebov, V Y; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2003-08-22

    Synthetic diamond crystals produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique can serve as fast, radiation hard, neutron sensors for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here we explore the stability issues, such as charge trapping and high-flux saturation, that will be relevant to operation at the NIF.

  16. Modelling and analysis of CVD processes in porous media for ceramic composite preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.S.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    A continuum phenomenological model is presented to describe chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of solid product inside porous substrate media for the preparation of reinforced ceramic-matrix composites [by the chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) process] and ceramic membrane composites (by a modified C

  17. Control of Reaction Surface in Low Temperature CVD to Enhance Nucleation and Conformal Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navneet

    2009-01-01

    The Holy Grail in CVD community is to find precursors that can afford the following: good nucleation on a desired substrate and conformal deposition in high AR features. Good nucleation is not only necessary for getting ultra-thin films at low thicknesses; it also offers films that are smooth at higher thickness values. On the other hand,…

  18. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, V.; Ullien, D.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Sachdeva, S.; Murthy, D.H.K.; Savenije, T.J.; Ahmad, H.A.; Nunney, T.S.; Janssens, S.D.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; De Smet, L.C.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ∼50 ml/min (STP) at ∼850

  19. Fabrication of Titanium Dioxide Thin Films by DBD-CVD Under Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi-wen; GUO Yu; HAN Gao-rong

    2007-01-01

    Titanium dioxide films were firstly deposited on glass substrate by DBD-CVD (dielectric barrier discharge enhanced chemical vapor deposition) technique.The structure of the films was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM).TiO2 films deposited under atmosphere pressure show preferred orientation,and exhibit columnar-like structure,while TiO2 films deposited under low gas pressure show no preferred orientation.The columnar-like structure with preferred orientation exhibits higher photocatalytic efficiency,since the columnar structure has larger surface area.However,it contributes little to the improvement of hydrophilicity. DBD-CVD is an alternative method to prepare photocatalytic TiO2 for its well-controllable property.

  20. CVD 908, CVD 908-htrA, and CVD 909 live oral typhoid vaccines: a logical progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacket, Carol O; Levine, Myron M

    2007-07-15

    Typhoid fever remains an important public health problem in many parts of the world. Despite the availability of oral Ty21a (Vivotif; Berna Biotech) and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccine (Typhim Vi; Aventis Pasteur), improved typhoid fever vaccines have been sought. These include a series of vaccine candidates developed at the Center for Vaccine Development, University of Maryland, based on attenuation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi by deletions in the aroC, aroD, and htrA genes. These vaccine candidates, designated "CVD 908," "CVD 908-htrA," and "CVD 909," have been developed and tested in volunteers with variable success. This review summarizes the clinical data that directed the logical progression of this vaccine development strategy.

  1. Modeling and testing miniature torsion specimens for SiC joining development studies for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, C.H., E-mail: chuck.henager@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Nguyen, B.N.; Kurtz, R.J.; Roosendaal, T.J.; Borlaug, B.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Ferraris, M.; Ventrella, A. [Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The international fusion community has designed a miniature torsion specimen for neutron irradiation studies of joined SiC and SiC/SiC composite materials. Miniature torsion joints based on this specimen design were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} + SiC joints with SiC and tested in torsion-shear prior to and after neutron irradiation. However, many miniature torsion specimens fail out-of-plane within the SiC specimen body, which makes it problematic to assign a shear strength value to the joints and makes it difficult to compare unirradiated and irradiated strengths to determine irradiation effects. Finite element elastic damage and elastic–plastic damage models of miniature torsion joints are developed that indicate shear fracture is more likely to occur within the body of the joined sample and cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model results are compared and discussed with regard to unirradiated and irradiated test data for a variety of joint materials. The unirradiated data includes Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} + SiC/CVD-SiC joints with tailored joint moduli, and includes steel/epoxy and CVD-SiC/epoxy joints. The implications for joint data based on this sample design are discussed. - Highlights: • Finite element damage models developed and applied to understand miniature torsion specimen. • Damage models correctly predict torsion joint failure locations for wide range of materials. • Tests of strong, stiff ceramic joints will not produce accurate shear strength values. • Miniature torsion specimen has diminished test utility but still valuable.

  2. Fabrication and Properties of Ti3SiC2/SiC Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hongfeng; FAN Qiang; REN Yun; ZHANG Junzhan

    2008-01-01

    Ti3SiC2/SiC composites were fabricated by reactive hot pressing method. Effects of hot pressing temperature, the content and panicle size of SiC on phase composition, densification, mechanical properties and behavior of stress-strain of the composites were investigated. The results showed that:(1)Hot-pressing temperature influenced the phase composition of Ti3SiC2/SiC composites. The flexural strength and fracture toughness of composites increased with hot pressing temperature.(2)It became more difficult for the composites to densify when the content of SiC in composites increased. It need be sintered at higher temperature to get denser composite. The flexural strength and fracture toughness of composites increased when the content of SiC added in composites increased. However, when the content of SiC reached 50 wt%, the flexural strength and fracture toughness of composites decreased due to high content of pore in composites.(3)When the content of SiC was same, Ti3SiC2/SiC composites were denser while the particle size of SiC added in composites is 12.8μm compared with the composites that the particle size of SiC added is 3μm.The flexural strength and fracture toughness of composites increased with the increase of particle size of SiC added in composites.(4)Ti3SiC2/SiC composites were non-brittle fracture at room temperature.

  3. High-temperature CVD for crystalline-silicon thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, F.R.; Hurrle, A.

    1999-10-01

    The fundamentals of thermal CVD for the deposition of silicon at high temperatures are briefly discussed and applied to the conditions in the CVD system that the authors have constructed and characterized. The system fulfills basic requirements to be met for solar cell application; solar cells made from epitaxial layers on various substrates were fabricated. The high-quality cells achieved 17.6% efficiency proving the excellent performance of the system, the cells on economically relevant substrates achieved 8% efficiency which still needs improvement.

  4. Electrical phase change of CVD-grown Ge-Sb-Te thin film device

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, C.C.; B. Gholipour; Ou, J.Y.; Knight, K.J.; Hewak, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    A prototype Ge-Sb-Te thin film phase-change memory device has been fabricated and reversible threshold and phase change switching demonstrated electrically, with a threshold voltage of 1.5 – 1.7 V. The Ge-Sb-Te thin film was fabricated by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) at atmospheric pressure using GeCl4, SbCl5, and Te precursors with reactive gas H2 at reaction temperature 780 °C and substrate temperature 250 °C. The surface morphology and composition of the CVD-grown Ge-Sb-Te thin film ha...

  5. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    OpenAIRE

    Le Normand, Francois; Cojocaru, Costel Sorin; Ersen, Ovidiu; Legagneux, Pierre; Gangloff, Laurent; Fleaca, C.; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Dumitrache, Florin; Morjan, Ion

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe2O3 (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes ::;5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO2/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD...

  6. Knowledge of risk factors for diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) is poor among individuals with risk factors for CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Monique F; Dunstan, Libby; Busingye, Doreen; Purvis, Tara; Reyneke, Megan; Orgill, Mary; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2017-01-01

    There is limited evidence on whether having pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) or risk factors for CVD such as diabetes, ensures greater knowledge of risk factors important for motivating preventative behaviours. Our objective was to compare knowledge among the Australian public participating in a health check program and their risk status. Data from the Stroke Foundation 'Know your numbers' program were used. Staff in community pharmacies provided opportunistic health checks (measurement of blood pressure and diabetes risk assessment) among their customers. Participants were categorised: 1) CVD ± risk of CVD: history of stroke, heart disease or kidney disease, and may have risk factors; 2) risk of CVD only: reported having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or atrial fibrillation; and 3) CVD risk free (no CVD or risk of CVD). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed including adjustment for age and sex. Among 4,647 participants, 12% had CVD (55% male, 85% aged 55+ years), 47% were at risk of CVD (40% male, 72% 55+ years) and 41% were CVD risk free (33% male, 27% 55+ years). Participants with CVD (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.80) or risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.57, 0.73) had poorer knowledge of the risk factors for diabetes/CVD compared to those who were CVD risk free. After adjustment, only participants with risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.93) had poorer knowledge. Older participants (55+ years) and men had poorer knowledge of diabetes/CVD risk factors and complications of diabetes. Participants with poorer knowledge of risk factors were older, more often male or were at risk of developing CVD compared with those who were CVD risk free. Health education in these high risk groups should be a priority, as diabetes and CVD are increasing in prevalence throughout the world.

  7. The Charge Collection Properties of CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, T; Oh, A; Steuerer, J; Wagner, A; Zeuner, W; Behnke, Ties; Hüntemeyer, Petra; Oh, Alexander; Steuerer, Johannes; Wagner, Albrecht; Zeuner, Wolfram

    1998-01-01

    The charge collection properties of CVD diamond have been investigated with ionising radiation. In this study two CVD diamond samples, prepared with electrical contacts have been used as solid state ionisation chambers. The diamonds have been studied with beta particles and 10 keV photons, providing a homogeneous ionisation density and with protons and alpha particles which are absorbed in a thin surface layer. For the latter case a strong decrease of the signal as function of time is observed, which is attributed to polarisation effects inside the diamond. Spatially resolved measurements with protons show a large variation of the charge collection efficiency, whereas for photons and minimum ionising particles the response is much more uniform and in the order of 18%. These results indicate that the applicability of CVD diamond as a position sensitive particle detector depends on the ionisation type and appears to be promising for homogeneous ionisation densities as provided by relativistic charged particles.

  8. Substrate Strengthening of CVD Coated Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O.Kessler; M.Heidkamp; F.Hoffmann; P.Mayr

    2004-01-01

    Properties of components and tools can be improved by the combination of coating and heat treatment processes due to the addition of single process advantages and due to the utilization of process interactions. Several low and high alloyed, structural and tool steels (AISI 4140, 52100, H13, A2, D2, etc.) have been treated by CVD-TiN-coating plus laser beam hardening respectively carburizing plus CVD-TiN-coating. Homogeneous, dense TiN-coatings with high hardness,high compressive residual stresses and good adhesion were supported by high strength substrate surfaces. Especially CVD plus laser beam hardening offers the possibility to reduce distortion due to the small heated surface volume.

  9. Polycrystalline SiC as source material for the growth of fluorescent SiC layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, M.; Hupfer, T.; Jokubavicus, V.;

    2013-01-01

    Polycrystalline doped SiC act as source for fluorescent SiC. We have studied the growth of individual grains with different polytypes in the source material. We show an evolution and orientation of grains of different polytypes in polycrystalline SiC ingots grown by the Physical Vapor Transport...

  10. Thermal annealing of SiC thin films with varying stoichiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuenle, Matthias [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: matthias.kuenle@ise.fraunhofer.de; Janz, Stefan [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstrasse 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Eibl, Oliver [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Tuebingen, Institute for Applied Physics, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Berthold, Christoph; Presser, Volker; Nickel, Klaus-Georg [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, Tuebingen, Institute for Geoscience, Applied Mineralogy, Wilhelmstrasse 56, 72074 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Thin films of amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) with varying stoichiometry of silicon and carbon were prepared by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD). After deposition a subsequent rapid thermal annealing was carried out at 900, 1100 and 1300 deg. C. The as-deposited and annealed SiC thin films were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), cross-section and plane view transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-Transformed Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. The deposited films were amorphous directly after deposition and became nanocrystalline after annealing at 1300 deg. C. This was verified by XRD measurements. Microvoids were found in all films investigated by TEM. Densification and crystallisation as well as cooling introduced tensile stresses within the annealed SiC film and lead eventually to crack formation in the film. The annealed stoichiometric SiC film shows v-shaped extended defects at the Si-SiC interface likely formed during the annealing at high temperatures. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy showed a strong influence of initial film properties such as hydrogen content and binding structure on the internal structure of the SiC thin films after annealing.

  11. Preparation and characterization of the electrodeposited Cr-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC composite coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Jifeng, E-mail: readlot@tom.com [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Suo Jinping, E-mail: jpsuo@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-09-01

    To increase the SiC content in Cr-based coatings, Cr-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC composite coatings were plated in Cr(VI) baths which contained Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-coated SiC powders. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-coated SiC composite particles were synthesized by calcining the precursor prepared by heterogeneous deposition method. The transmission electron microscopy analysis of the particles showed that the nano-SiC particle was packaged by alumina. The zeta potential of the particles collected from the bath was up to +23 mV, a favorable condition for the co-deposition of the particles and chromium. Pulse current was used during the electrodeposition. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) indicated that the coating was compact and combined well with the substrate. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis of Cr-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC coatings demonstrated that the concentration of SiC in the coating reached about 2.5 wt.%. The corrosion behavior of the composite coating was studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The data obtained suggested that the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC particles significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the composite coating in 0.05 M HCl solution.

  12. Cutting characteristics of dental diamond burs made with CVD technology Características de corte de pontas odontológicas diamantadas obtidas pela tecnologia CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Monti Lima

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the cutting ability of chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond burs coupled to an ultrasonic dental unit handpiece for minimally invasive cavity preparation. One standard cavity was prepared on the mesial and distal surfaces of 40 extracted human third molars either with cylindrical or with spherical CVD burs. The cutting ability was compared regarding type of substrate (enamel and dentin and direction of handpiece motion. The morphological characteristics, width and depth of the cavities were analyzed and measured using scanning electron micrographs. Statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test (p O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a habilidade de corte das pontas de diamante obtidas pelo processo de deposição química a vapor (CVD associadas ao aparelho de ultra-som no preparo cavitário minimamente invasivo. Uma cavidade padronizada foi preparada nas faces mesial e distal de 40 terceiros molares, utilizando-se pontas de diamante CVD cilíndrica e esférica. A habilidade de corte foi comparada quanto ao tipo de substrato (esmalte e dentina e quanto à direção do movimento realizado com a ponta. As características morfológicas, a largura e profundidade das cavidades foram analisadas e medidas em microscopia eletrônica de varredura. A análise estatística pelo teste de Kruskal-Wallis (p < 0,05 revelou que a largura e profundidade das cavidades foram significativamente maiores em dentina. Cavidades mais largas foram obtidas quando se utilizou a ponta de diamante CVD cilíndrica, e mais profundas quando a ponta esférica foi empregada. A direção do movimento da ponta não influenciou o tamanho das cavidades, sendo os cortes produzidos pelas pontas de diamante CVD precisos e conservadores.

  13. Elaboration and characterization of luminescent porous SiC microparticles/poly vinyl alcohol thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaci, S.; Mansouri, H.; Bozetine, I.; Keffous, A.; Guerbous, L.; Siahmed, Y.; Aissiou, S.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, Morphological, optical and photoluminescence characterizations of nanostructured SiC micropowder embedded in PVA matrix and deposited as thin films on glass substrates are reported. we prepared the porous SiC microparticles/PVA thin films by spin coating method. The average size of SiC microparticles were 7 μm. An electroless method was used for producing porous silicon carbide powder under UV irradiation. Silver nanoparticles coated SiC powder was formed by polyol process. The etchant was composed of aqueous HF and different oxidants. Various porous morphologies were obtained and studied as a function of oxidant type, etching time, and wavelength of irradiation. We concluded that the chemical etching conditions of SiC powder seems to have a large impact on the resulting properties. We noticed that the best photoluminescence property was achieved when SiC powder was etched in HF/K2S2O8 at reaction temperature of 80 °C for t = 40min and under UV light of 254 nm.

  14. Feasibility study on the application of carbide (ZrC, SiC) for VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon Ju; Jung, Choong Hwan; Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, Si Hyeong; Jang, Moon Hee; Lee, Young Woo

    2006-08-15

    A feasibility study on the coating process of ZrC for the TRISO nuclear fuel and applications of SiC as high temperature materials for the core components has performed to develop the fabrication process for the advanced ZrC TRISO fuels and the high temperature structural components for VHTR, respectively. In the case of ZrC coating, studies were focused on the comparisons of the developed coating processes for screening of our technology, the evaluations of the reactions parameters for a ZrC deposition by the thermodynamic calculations and the preliminary coating experiments by the chloride process. With relate to SiC ceramics, our interesting items are as followings; an analysis of applications and specifications of the SiC components and collections of the SiC properties and establishments of data base. For these purposes, applications of SiC ceramics for the GEN-IV related components as well as the fusion reactor related ones were reviewed. Additionally, the on-going activities with related to the ZrC clad and the SiC composites discussed in the VHTR GIF-PMB, were reviewed to make the further research plans at the section 1 in chapter 3.

  15. Strain Release Induced Novel Fluorescence Variation in CVD-Grown Monolayer WS2 Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shanghuai; Yang, Ruilong; Jia, Zhiyan; Xiang, Jianyong; Wen, Fusheng; Mu, Congpu; Nie, Anmin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Xu, Bo; Tao, Chenggang; Tian, Yongjun; Liu, Zhongyuan

    2017-10-04

    Tensile strain is intrinsic to monolayer crystals of transition metal disulfides such as Mo(W)S2 grown on oxidized silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) owing to the much larger thermal expansion coefficient of Mo(W)S2 than that of silica. Here we report fascinating fluorescent variation in intensity with aging time in CVD-grown triangular monolayer WS2 crystals on SiO2 (300 nm)/Si substrates and formation of interesting concentric triangular fluorescence patterns in monolayer crystals of large size. The novel fluorescence aging behavior is recognized to be induced by the partial release of intrinsic tensile strain after CVD growth and the induced localized variations or gradients of strain in the monolayer crystals. The results demonstrate that strain has a dramatic impact on the fluorescence and photoluminescence of monolayer WS2 crystals and thus could potentially be utilized to tune electronic and optoelectronic properties of monolayer transition metal disulfides.

  16. Response of CVD Diamond Detectors to 14 MeV Neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, C; Gagnon-Moisan, F; Kasper, A; Lucke, A; Schuhmacher, H; Weierganz, M; Zimba, A

    2012-01-01

    A series of measurements was taken at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) Braunschweig [1] using the 14 MeV neutron beam at the Van der Graaf accelerator with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond detectors, in preparation of an upcoming (n, ) cross-section measurement [2] at the CERN-n TOF experiment [3, 4]. A single-crystal (sCVD) as well as a poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond detector were used for the measurements. The response of both materials to the mono-energetic neutron beam was studied, also with the prospect for future applications in plasma diagnostics for fusion research. The results of the measurements are presented in this report.

  17. Relationship between texture and residual macro-strain in CVD diamond films based on phenomenological analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Mao; Hongxi Zhu; Leng Chen; Huiping Feng

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between texture and elastic properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films was analyzed based on the phenomenological theory, which reveals the influence of crystalline orientation and texture on the residual macro-strain and macro-stress. The phenomenological calculations indicated that the difference in Young's modulus could be 15% in single dia- mond crystals and 5% in diamond films with homogeneously distributed strong fiber texture. The experimentally measured residual strains of free-standing CVD diamond films were in good agreement with the correspondingly calculated Young's modulus in con- nection with the multi-fiber textures in the fills, though the difference in Young's modulus induced by texture was only around 1%. It is believed that texture should be one of the important factors influencing the residual stress and strain of CVD diamond films.

  18. Friction Properties of Polished Cvd Diamond Films Sliding against Different Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zichao; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties, like the well-known extreme hardness, low coefficient of friction and high chemical inertness, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have found applications as a hard coating for drawing dies. The surface roughness of the diamond films is one of the most important attributes to the drawing dies. In this paper, the effects of different surface roughnesses on the friction properties of diamond films have been experimentally studied. Diamond films were fabricated using hot filament CVD. The WC-Co (Co 6wt.%) drawing dies were used as substrates. A gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen gas was used as the feedstock gas. The CVD diamond films were polished using mechanical polishing. Polished diamond films with three different surface roughnesses, as well as the unpolished diamond film, were fabricated in order to study the tribological performance between the CVD diamond films and different metals with oil lubrication. The unpolished and polished CVD diamond films are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface profilometer, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The friction examinations were carried out by using a ball-on-plate type reciprocating friction tester. Low carbide steel, stainless steel, copper and aluminum materials were used as counterpart balls. Based on this study, the results presented the friction coefficients between the polished CVD films and different metals. The friction tests demonstrate that the smooth surface finish of CVD diamond films is beneficial for reducing their friction coefficients. The diamond films exhibit low friction coefficients when slid against the stainless steel balls and low carbide steel ball, lower than that slid against copper ball and aluminum ball, attributed to the higher ductility of copper and aluminum causing larger amount of wear debris adhering to the sliding interface and higher adhesive

  19. FY1995 development of a clean CVD process by evaluation and control of gas phase nucleation phenomena; 1995 nendo kisokaku seisei gensho no hyoka to seigyo ni yoru clean CVD process no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a high-rate and clean chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process as a breakthrough technique to overcome the problems that particles generated in the gas phase during CVD process for preparation of functional thin films cause reduced product yield and deterioration of the films. In the CVD process proposed here, reactant gas and generated particles are electrically charged to control the motion of them with an electric field. In this study, gas-phase nucleation phenomena are evaluated both theoretically and experimentally. A high-rate, ionized CVD method is first developed, in which reactant gas and generated particles are charged with negative ions generated from a radioisotope source and the UV/photoelectron method, and the motion of the charged gas and particles is controlled with an electric field. Charging and transport processes of fine particles are then investigated experimentally and theoretically to develop a clean CVD method in which generated particles are removed with the electric forces. As a result, quantitative evaluation of the charging and transport process was made possible. We also developed devices for measuring the size distribution and concentration of fine particles in low pressure gas such as those found in plasma CVD processes. In addition, numerical simulation and experiments in this study for a TEOS/O{sub 3} CVD process to prepare thin films could determine reaction rates which have not been known so far and give information on selecting good operation conditions for the process. (NEDO)

  20. Thermodynamic study of CVD-ZrO{sub 2} phase diagrams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Huerta, A.M., E-mail: atorresh@ipn.m [Research Center for Applied Science and Advanced Technology, Altamira-IPN, Altamira C.P.89600 Tamaulipas (Mexico); Vargas-Garcia, J.R. [Dept of Metallurgical Eng., ESIQIE-IPN, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. [Research Center for Applied Science and Advanced Technology, Altamira-IPN, Altamira C.P.89600 Tamaulipas (Mexico); Romero-Serrano, J.A. [Dept of Metallurgical Eng., ESIQIE-IPN, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-08-26

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) from zirconium acetylacetonate Zr(acac){sub 4} has been thermodynamically investigated using the Gibbs' free energy minimization method and the FACTSAGE program. Thermodynamic data Cp{sup o}, DELTAH{sup o} and S{sup o} for Zr(acac){sub 4} have been estimated using the Meghreblian-Crawford-Parr and Benson methods because they are not available in the literature. The effect of deposition parameters, such as temperature and pressure, on the extension of the region where pure ZrO{sub 2} can be deposited was analyzed. The results are presented as calculated CVD stability diagrams. The phase diagrams showed two zones, one of them corresponds to pure monoclinic phase of ZrO{sub 2} and the other one corresponds to a mix of monoclinic phase of ZrO{sub 2} and graphite carbon.

  1. Switching Performance Evaluation of Commercial SiC Power Devices (SiC JFET and SiC MOSFET) in Relation to the Gate Driver Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittini, Riccardo; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    and JFETs. The recent introduction of SiC MOSFET has proved that it is possible to have highly performing SiC devices with a minimum gate driver complexity; this made SiC power devices even more attractive despite their device cost. This paper presents an analysis based on experimental results...... of the switching losses of various commercially available Si and SiC power devices rated at 1200 V (Si IGBTs, SiC JFETs and SiC MOSFETs). The comparison evaluates the reduction of the switching losses which is achievable with the introduction of SiC power devices; this includes analysis and considerations...

  2. Epitaxial nucleation of CVD bilayer graphene on copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yenan; Zhuang, Jianing; Song, Meng; Yin, Shaoqian; Cheng, Yu; Zhang, Xuewei; Wang, Miao; Xiang, Rong; Xia, Yang; Maruyama, Shigeo; Zhao, Pei; Ding, Feng; Wang, Hongtao

    2016-12-08

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) has emerged as a promising candidate for next-generation electronic applications, especially when it exists in the Bernal-stacked form, but its large-scale production remains a challenge. Here we present an experimental and first-principles calculation study of the epitaxial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) nucleation process for Bernal-stacked BLG growth on Cu using ethanol as a precursor. Results show that a carefully adjusted flow rate of ethanol can yield a uniform BLG film with a surface coverage of nearly 90% and a Bernal-stacking ratio of nearly 100% on ordinary flat Cu substrates, and its epitaxial nucleation of the second layer is mainly due to the active CH3 radicals with the presence of a monolayer-graphene-covered Cu surface. We believe that this nucleation mechanism will help clarify the formation of BLG by the epitaxial CVD process, and lead to many new strategies for scalable synthesis of graphene with more controllable structures and numbers of layers.

  3. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  4. Organic solar cells using CVD-grown graphene electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hobeom; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Han, Tae-Hee; Lim, Kyung-Geun; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development of flexible organic solar cells (OSCs) incorporating graphene sheets synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as transparent conducting electrodes on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. A key barrier that must be overcome for the successful fabrication of OSCs with graphene electrodes is the poor-film properties of water-based poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) when coated onto hydrophobic graphene surfaces. To form a uniform PEDOT:PSS film on a graphene surface, we added perfluorinated ionomers (PFI) to pristine PEDOT:PSS to create ‘GraHEL’, which we then successfully spin coated onto the graphene surface. We systematically investigated the effect of number of layers in layer-by-layer stacked graphene anode of an OSC on the performance parameters including the open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current (Jsc), and fill factor (FF). As the number of graphene layers increased, the FF tended to increase owing to lower sheet resistance, while Jsc tended to decrease owing to the lower light absorption. In light of this trade-off between sheet resistance and transmittance, we determined that three-layer graphene (3LG) represents the best configuration for obtaining the optimal power conversion efficiency (PCE) in OSC anodes, even at suboptimal sheet resistances. We finally developed efficient, flexible OSCs with a PCE of 4.33%, which is the highest efficiency attained so far by an OSC with CVD-grown graphene electrodes to the best of our knowledge.

  5. CVD Rhenium Engines for Solar-Thermal Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Duffy, Andrew J.; Tucker, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Solar-thermal upper-stage propulsion systems have the potential to provide specific impulse approaching 900 seconds, with 760 seconds already demonstrated in ground testing. Such performance levels offer a 100% increase in payload capability compared to state-of-the-art chemical upper-stage systems, at lower cost. Although alternatives such as electric propulsion offer even greater performance, the 6- to 18- month orbital transfer time is a far greater deviation from the state of the art than the one to two months required for solar propulsion. Rhenium metal is the only material that is capable of withstanding the predicted thermal, mechanical, and chemical environment of a solar-thermal propulsion device. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most well-established and cost-effective process for the fabrication of complex rhenium structures. CVD rhenium engines have been successfully constructed for the Air Force ISUS program (bimodal thrust/electricity) and the NASA Shooting Star program (thrust only), as well as under an Air Force SBIR project (thrust only). The bimodal engine represents a more long-term and versatile approach to solar-thermal propulsion, while the thrust-only engines provide a potentially lower weight/lower cost and more near-term replacement for current upper-stage propulsion systems.

  6. CVD-graphene growth on different polycrystalline transition metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Lavin-Lopez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical vapor deposition (CVD graphene growth on two polycrystalline transition metals (Ni and Cu was investigated in detail using Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy as a way to synthesize graphene of the highest quality (i.e. uniform growth of monolayer graphene, which is considered a key issue for electronic devices. Key CVD process parameters (reaction temperature, CH4/H2flow rate ratio, total flow of gases (CH4+H2, reaction time were optimized for both metals in order to obtain the highest graphene uniformity and quality. The conclusions previously reported in literature about the performance of low and high carbon solubility metals in the synthesis of graphene and their associated reaction mechanisms, i.e. surface depositionand precipitation on cooling, respectively, was not corroborated by the results obtained in this work. Under the optimal reaction conditions, a large percentage of monolayer graphene was obtained over the Ni foil since the carbon saturation was not complete, allowing carbon atoms to be stored in the bulk metal, which could diffuse forming high quality monolayer graphene at the surface. However, under the optimal reaction conditions, the formation of a non-uniform mixture of few layers and multilayer graphene on the Cu foil was related to the presence of an excess of active carbon atoms on the Cu surface.

  7. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Can surface preparation with CVD diamond tip influence on bonding to dental tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecido Kawaguchi, Fernando; Brossi Botta, Sergio; Nilo Vieira, Samuel; Steagall Júnior, Washington; Bona Matos, Adriana

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) tips surface treatments of enamel and dentin on bonding resistance of two adhesive systems. Thirty embedded samples were divided in 12 groups ( n = 10), according to factors: substrate (enamel and dentin), adhesive system [etch-and-rinse (SB) and self-etch]; and the surface treatments (paper discs, impact CVD tips and tangential CVD tip). When CVD tip was used in the impact mode the tip was applied perpendicular to dental surface, while at tangential mode, the tip worked parallel to dental surface. Specimens were tested in tension after 24 h at 0.5 mm/min of cross-head speed. ANOVA results, in MPa showed that in enamel, only adhesive system factor was statistically significant ( p = 0.015) under tested conditions, with higher bond strength observed for SB groups. However, in dentin the best bonding performance was obtained in SE groups ( p = 0.00). In both tested substrates, results did not show statistically significant difference for factors treatment and its interactions. ConclusionsIt may be concluded that CVD-tip surface treatment, in both tested modes, did not influence on adhesion to enamel and dentin. But, it is important to choose adhesive system according to the tissue available to bonding.

  9. CVD diamond pixel detectors for LHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedenig, R.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; Blanquart, L.; Breugnion, P.; Charles, E.; Ciocio, A.; Clemens, J.C.; Dao, K.; Einsweiler, K.; Fasching, D.; Fischer, P.; Joshi, A.; Keil, M.; Klasen, V.; Kleinfelder, S.; Laugier, D.; Meuser, S.; Milgrome, O.; Mouthuy, T.; Richardson, J.; Sinervo, P.; Treis, J.; Wermes, N

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the development of CVD diamond pixel detectors. The preparation of the diamond pixel sensors for bump-bonding to the pixel readout electronics for the LHC and the results from beam tests carried out at CERN are described.

  10. Sporadic SICs and the Normed Division Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Blake C.

    2017-08-01

    Symmetric informationally complete quantum measurements, or SICs, are mathematically intriguing structures, which in practice have turned out to exhibit even more symmetry than their definition requires. Recently, Zhu classified all the SICs whose symmetry groups act doubly transitively. I show that lattices of integers in the complex numbers, the quaternions and the octonions yield the key parts of these symmetry groups.

  11. Laser alloying of Al with mixed Ni, Ti and SiC powders

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Laser alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4.4kW Rofin Sinar Nd:YAG laser to improve the surface hardness. Alloying was carried out by depositing Ni, Ti and SiC powders of different weight ratios on the aluminium substrate. The aim...

  12. Laser alloying of AI with mixed Ni, Ti and SiC powders

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser alloying of aluminium AA1200 was performed with a 4.4kW Rofin Sinar Nd:YAG laser to improve the surface hardness. Alloying was carried out by depositing Ni, Ti and SiC powders of different weight ratios on the aluminum substrate. The aim...

  13. SiC nanowires: material and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekentes, K.; Rogdakis, K.

    2011-04-01

    SiC nanowires are of high interest since they combine the physical properties of SiC with those induced by their low dimensionality. For this reason, a large number of scientific studies have been dedicated to their fabrication and characterization as well as to their application in devices. SiC nanowires' growth involving different growth mechanisms and configurations was the main theme for the large majority of these studies. Various physical characterization methods have been employed for evaluating SiC nanowire quality. SiC nanowires with narrow-diameter (channel material. On the other hand, the grown nanowires are suitable for field-emission applications and to be used as reinforcing material in composite structures as well as for increasing the hydrophobicity of Si surfaces. All these aspects are examined in detail in different sections of this paper.

  14. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVD mullite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, M.L.; Sarin, V.K. [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Mfg. Engineering

    1997-12-01

    For the first time, crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited on SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion and oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments.

  15. CVD Lu(2)O(3):Eu coatings For Advanced Scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Stephen G; Sarin, V K

    2009-03-01

    Currently Lu(2)O(3):Eu(3+) scintillators can only be fabricated via hot-pressing and pixelization, which is commercially not viable, thus restricting their use. Chemical vapor deposition is being developed as an alternative manufacturing process. Columnar coatings of Lu(2)O(3):Eu(3+) have been achieved using the halide-CO(2)-H(2) system, clearly signifying feasibility of the CVD process. Characterization of the coatings using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis have been used as an aid to optimize process parameters and attain highly oriented and engineered coating structures. These results have clearly demonstrated that this process can be successfully used to tailor sub-micron columnar growth of Lu(2)O(3):Eu(3+), with the potential of ultra high resolution x-ray imaging.

  16. CVD synthesis of carbon-based metallic photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zakhidov, A A; Baughman, R H; Iqbal, Z

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensionally periodic nanostructures on the scale of hundreds of nanometers, known as photonic crystals, are attracting increasing interest because of a number of exciting predicted properties. In particular, interesting behavior should be obtainable for carbon- based structures having a dimensional scale larger than fullerenes and nanotubes, but smaller than graphitic microfibers. We show here how templating of porous opals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) allows us to obtain novel types of graphitic nanostructures. We describe the synthesis of new cubic forms of carbon having extended covalent connectivity in three dimensions, which provide high electrical conductivity and unit cell dimensions comparable to optical wavelengths. Such materials are metallic photonic crystals that show intense Bragg diffraction. (14 refs).

  17. Towards a general growth model for graphene CVD on transition metal catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Weatherup, Robert S.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Caneva, Sabina; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene on three polycrystalline transition metal catalysts, Co, Ni and Cu, is systematically compared and a first-order growth model is proposed which can serve as a reference to optimize graphene growth on any elemental or alloy catalyst system. Simple thermodynamic considerations of carbon solubility are insufficient to capture even basic growth behaviour on these most commonly used catalyst materials, and it is shown that kinetic aspects such as carbon permeation have to be taken into account. Key CVD process parameters are discussed in this context and the results are anticipated to be highly useful for the design of future strategies for integrated graphene manufacture.The chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene on three polycrystalline transition metal catalysts, Co, Ni and Cu, is systematically compared and a first-order growth model is proposed which can serve as a reference to optimize graphene growth on any elemental or alloy catalyst system. Simple thermodynamic considerations of carbon solubility are insufficient to capture even basic growth behaviour on these most commonly used catalyst materials, and it is shown that kinetic aspects such as carbon permeation have to be taken into account. Key CVD process parameters are discussed in this context and the results are anticipated to be highly useful for the design of future strategies for integrated graphene manufacture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06873h

  18. Superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces: Wetting and wear properties of different CVD-generated coating types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, M.; Streller, F.; Simon, F.; Frenzel, R.; White, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    In view of generating superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces, this work presents further results for the combination of anodic oxidation as the primary pretreatment method and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) variants for chemical modification producing coatings of 250-1000 nm thickness. In detail, CVD involved the utilisation of i - hexafluoropropylene oxide as precursor within the hot filament CVD process for the deposition of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) coatings at alternative conditions (PTFE-AC) and ii - 1,3,5-trivinyltrimethylcyclotrisiloxane for the deposition of polysiloxane coatings (PSi) by initiated CVD. The substrate material was Al Mg1 subjected to usual or intensified sulphuric acid anodisation pretreatments (SAAu, SAAi, respectively) affording various degrees of surface micro-roughness (SAAu weathering and/or mild wear testing. Superhydrophobicity (SH) was observed with the system SAAi + PTFE-AC similarly to former findings with the standard hot filament CVD PTFE coating variant (SAAi + PTFE-SC). The results indicated that the specific coating morphology made an important contribution to the water-repellency, because even some of the SAAu-based samples tended to reveal SH. Subjecting samples to weathering treatment resulted in a general worsening of the wetting behaviour, primarily limited to the receding contact angles. These tendencies were correlated with the chemical composition of the sample surfaces as analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear tests showed, as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement, that the PTFE coatings were relatively sensitive to friction. This was connected with a dramatic deterioration of the water-repelling properties. PSi-coated surfaces generally showed rather poor water-repellency, but this coating type was surprisingly resistant towards the applied friction test. From these findings it may be concluded that the combination of hydrophobic fluorine containing structure

  19. Oxidation Resistance of Turbine Blades Made of ŻS6K Superalloy after Aluminizing by Low-Activity CVD and VPA Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagula-Yavorska, M.; Kocurek, P.; Pytel, M.; Sieniawski, J.

    2016-05-01

    Two aluminide layers (additive and interdiffusion) were deposited on a turbine blade made of ŻS6K superalloy by means of VPA and CVD methods. The additive and interdiffusion layers obtained by the VPA method consist of the NiAl phase and some carbides, while the additive layer deposited by the CVD method consists of the NiAl phase only. The residual stresses in the aluminide coating at the lock, suction side, and pressure side of the blade were tensile. The aluminide coating deposited by the CVD method has an oxidation resistance about 7 times better than that deposited by the VPA method. Al2O3 + HfO2 + NiAl2O4 phases were revealed on the surface of the aluminide coating deposited by the VPA method after 240 h oxidation. Al2O3 + TiO2 oxides were found on the surface of the aluminide coating deposited by the CVD method after 240 h oxidation. Increasing the time of oxidation from 240 to 720 h led to the formation of the NiO oxide on the surface of the coating deposited by the VPA method. Al2O3 oxide is still visible on the surface of the coating deposited by the CVD method. The residual stresses in the aluminide coating after 30 cycles of oxidation at the lock, suction side and pressure side of the turbine blade are compressive.

  20. Electronic properties of embedded graphene: doped amorphous silicon/CVD graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezki, Hakim; Boutchich, Mohamed; Alamarguy, David; Madouri, Ali; Alvarez, José; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Kleider, Jean-Paul; Yao, Fei; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-10-01

    Large-area graphene film is of great interest for a wide spectrum of electronic applications, such as field effect devices, displays, and solar cells, among many others. Here, we fabricated heterostructures composed of graphene (Gr) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper substrate and transferred to SiO2/Si substrates, capped by n- or p-type doped amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Using Raman scattering we show that despite the mechanical strain induced by the a-Si:H deposition, the structural integrity of the graphene is preserved. Moreover, Hall effect measurements directly on the embedded graphene show that the electronic properties of CVD graphene can be modulated according to the doping type of the a-Si:H as well as its phase i.e. amorphous or nanocrystalline. The sheet resistance varies from 360 Ω sq-1 to 1260 Ω sq-1 for the (p)-a-Si:H/Gr (n)-a-Si:H/Gr, respectively. We observed a temperature independent hole mobility of up to 1400 cm2 V-1 s-1 indicating that charge impurity is the principal mechanism limiting the transport in this heterostructure. We have demonstrated that embedding CVD graphene under a-Si:H is a viable route for large scale graphene based solar cells or display applications.

  1. Metal oxide growth, spin precession measurements and Raman spectroscopy of CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Akitomo

    quality on each step through the device fabrication process. The direct interface formation between the ferromagnetic transition metal and graphene indicated the strong interaction at the interface which could lead spin scattering. Fabricating metal oxide layers prior to metal deposition on CVD graphene significantly reduces the interfacial interactions induced by the transition metals. This knowledge is beneficial for the fabrication of future graphene based spintronic devices as well as other types of graphene based devices.

  2. Lipids, atherosclerosis and CVD risk: is CRP an innocent bystander?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, B G; Zacho, J

    2009-01-01

    exclude that genetically elevated CRP cause CVD. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that elevated CRP per se does not cause CVD; however, inflammation per se possibly contributes to CVD. Elevated CRP levels more likely is a marker for the extent of atherosclerosis or for the inflammatory activity...

  3. Influence of surface morphology and microstructure on performance of CVD tungsten coating under fusion transient thermal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jianbao; Feng, Fan; Lv, Yanwei; Song, Jiupeng; Chen, Jiming

    2016-12-01

    Thick tungsten coatings have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a rapid growth rate. A series of tungsten coatings with different thickness and surface morphology were prepared. The surface morphology, microstructure and preferred orientation of the CVD tungsten coatings were investigated. Thermal shock analyses were performed by using an electron beam facility to study the influence of the surface morphology and the microstructure on the thermal shock resistance of the CVD tungsten coatings. Repetitive (100 pulses) ELMs-like thermal shock loads were applied at various temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C with pulse duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of up to 1 GW/m2. The results of the tests demonstrated that the specific surface morphology and columnar crystal structure of the CVD tungsten have significant influence on the surface cracking threshold and crack propagation of the materials. The CVD tungsten coatings with a polished surface show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings with a rough surface.

  4. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of polysilanes polymer based thin films and their applications in compound semiconductors and silicon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulachgar, El Hassane

    . This work has demonstrated that a polysilane polymeric source can be used to deposit a wide range of thin film materials exhibiting similar properties with conventional ceramic materials such as silicon carbide (SiC), silicon oxynitride (SiON), silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) silicon dioxide (SiO2) and silicon nitride (Si3N4). The strict control of the deposition process allows precise control of the electrical, optical and chemical properties of polymer-based thin films within a broad range. This work has also demonstrated for the first time that poly(dimethylsilmaes) polymers deposited by CVD can be used to effectively passivate both silicon and gallium arsenide MOS devices. This finding makes polymer-based thin films obtained by CVD very promising for the development of high-kappa dielectric materials for next generation high-mobility CMOS technology. Keywords. Thin films, Polymers, Vapor Phase Deposition, CVD, Nanodielectrics, Organosilanes, Polysilanes, GaAs Passivation, MOSFET, Silicon Oxynitride, Integrated Waveguide, Silicon Carbide, Compound Semiconductors.

  5. Lateral boron distribution in polycrystalline SiC source materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Kaiser, M.; Liljedahl, R.

    2013-01-01

    Polycrystalline SiC containing boron and nitrogen are used in growth of fluorescent SiC for white LEDs. Two types of doped polycrystalline SiC have been studied in detail with secondary ion mass spectrometry: sintered SiC and poly-SiC prepared by sublimation in a physical vapor transport setup...

  6. Feasibility study of a SiC sandwich neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jian, E-mail: caepwujian@163.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan Province (China); Lei, Jiarong, E-mail: jiarong_lei@163.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan Province (China); Jiang, Yong; Chen, Yu; Rong, Ru; Zou, Dehui; Fan, Xiaoqiang [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan Province (China); Chen, Gang; Li, Li; Bai, Song [Nanjing Electronic Devices Institute, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2013-04-21

    Semiconductor sandwich neutron spectrometers are suitable for in-pile measurements of fast reactor spectra thanks to their compact and relatively simple design. We have assembled and tested a sandwich neutron spectrometer based on 4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC) Schottky diodes. The SiC diodes detect neutrons via neutron-induced charged particles (tritons and alpha particles) produced by {sup 6}Li(n,α){sup 3}H reaction. {sup 6}LiF neutron converter layers are deposited on the front surface of Schottky diodes by magnetron sputtering. The responses of SiC diodes to charged particles were investigated with an {sup 241}Am alpha source. A sandwich neutron spectrometer was assembled with two SiC Schottky diodes selected based on the charged-particle-response experimental results. The low-energy neutron response of the sandwich spectrometer was measured in the neutron field of the Chinese Fast Burst Reactor-II (CFBR-II). Spectra of alpha particles and tritons from {sup 6}Li(n,α){sup 3}H reaction were obtained with two well-resolved peaks. The energy resolution of the sum spectrum was 8.8%. The primary experimental results confirmed the 4H-SiC sandwich neutron spectrometer's feasibility. -- Highlights: ► Sandwich neutron spectrometer employing 4H-SiC as a detecting material has been developed for the first time. ► {sup 6}LiF neutron converter has been deposited on the surface of 4H-SiC Schottky diode. ► Preliminary testing results obtained with the 4H-SiC sandwich neutron spectrometer are presented.

  7. From SICs and MUBs to Eddington

    CERN Document Server

    Bengtsson, Ingemar

    2011-01-01

    This is a survey of some very old knowledge about Mutually Unbiased Bases (MUB) and Symmetric Informationally Complete POVMs (SIC). In prime dimensions the former are closely tied to an elliptic normal curve symmetric under the Heisenberg group, while the latter are believed to be orbits under the Heisenberg group in all dimensions. In dimensions 3 and 4 the SICs are understandable in terms of elliptic curves, but a general statement escapes us. The geometry of the SICs in 3 and 4 dimensions is discussed in some detail.

  8. Fiber/matrix interfaces for SiC/SiC composites: Multilayer SiC coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, H.; Curtin, W.A. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Tensile tests have been performed on composites of CVI SiC matrix reinforced with 2-d Nicalon fiber cloth, with either pyrolitic carbon or multilayer CVD SiC coatings [Hypertherm High-Temperature Composites Inc., Huntington Beach, CA.] on the fibers. To investigate the role played by the different interfaces, several types of measurements are made on each sample: (i) unload-reload hysteresis loops, and (ii) acoustic emission. The pyrolitic carbon and multilayer SiC coated materials are remarkably similar in overall mechanical responses. These results demonstrate that low-modulus, or compliant, interface coatings are not necessary for good composite performance, and that complex, hierarchical coating structures may possibly yield enhanced high-temperature performance. Analysis of the unload/reload hysteresis loops also indicates that the usual {open_quotes}proportional limit{close_quotes} stress is actually slightly below the stress at which the 0{degrees} load-bearing fibers/matrix interfaces slide and are exposed to atmosphere.

  9. Scalable ZnO nanotube arrays grown on CVD-graphene films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Park

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the growth of wafer-scale arrays of individually position-controlled and vertically aligned ZnO nanotube arrays on graphene deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD-graphene. Introducing two-dimensional layered materials such as graphene as a growth buffer has recently been suggested for growing nanomaterials on traditionally incompatible substrates. However, their growth has been restricted to small areas or had limited controllability. Here, we study the distinct growth behavior of ZnO on CVD-graphene that makes the selective area growth of individual nanostructures on its surface difficult, and propose a set of methods to overcome this. The resulting nanotube arrays, as examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, exhibited uniform morphologies and high structural quality over a large area and could be prepared on a broad variety of substrates, including amorphous, metallic, or flexible substrates.

  10. Pulse-height defect in single-crystal CVD diamond detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliuskina, O.; Imai, N. [The University of Tokyo, Center for Nuclear Study, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Strekalovsky, A.O.; Aleksandrov, A.A.; Aleksandrova, I.A.; Ilich, S.; Kamanin, D.V.; Knyazheva, G.N.; Kuznetsova, E.A.; Mishinsky, G.V.; Pyatkov, Yu.V.; Strekalovsky, O.V.; Zhuchko, V.E. [JINR, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Devaraja, H.M. [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Heinz, C. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); Heinz, S. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Giessen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Hofmann, S.; Kis, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Maurer, J.; Traeger, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Pomorski, M. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensor Laboratory, CEA/Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-02-15

    The pulse-height versus deposited energy response of a single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector was measured for ions of Ti, Cu, Nb, Ag, Xe, Au, and of fission fragments of {sup 252} Cf at different energies. For the fission fragments, data were also measured at different electric field strengths of the detector. Heavy ions have a significant pulse-height defect in CVD diamond material, which increases with increasing energy of the ions. It also depends on the electrical field strength applied at the detector. The measured pulse-height defects were explained in the framework of recombination models. Calibration methods known from silicon detectors were modified and applied. A comparison with data for the pulse-height defect in silicon detectors was performed. (orig.)

  11. Copper-Ti3SiC2 composite powder prepared by electroless plating under ultrasonic environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhongbao; XU Shaofan

    2007-01-01

    In this article, a new type of Cu-Ti3SiC2 composite powder prepared using the electroless plating technique was introduced. The initial Ti3SiC2 particles are 11 μm in diameter on an average. The Cu plating was carried out at middle temperature (62-65 ℃) with the application of ultrasonic agitation. The copper deposition rate was determined by measuring the weight gain of the powder after plating. It has been found that the pretreatment of Ti3SiC2 powder is very important to obtain copper nanoparticles on the surface of Ti3SiC2. The optimum procedure before plating aimed to add activated sites and the adjustment of the tradifonal composition of the electroless copper plating bath could decelerate the copper deposition rate to 0.8 μm/h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicates that the chemical composition of the plating layer is copper. SEM images show that the surface of the Ti3SiC2 particles is successfully coated with continuous copper layer. The wetting property between the copper matrix and Ti3SiC2 can be improved so as to increase the interfacial strength.

  12. Microstructure and properties of SiC gradiently coated Cf/C composites prepared by a RCLD method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-hua Chen; Cuang-li Chen; Hao-ran Geng; Yan Wang

    2009-01-01

    The SiC gradiently coated carbon fiber/carbon (Cf/C) composites were prepared by a two-step rapid chemical liquid depo-sition (RCLD) method. The microstructure and properties of the composites were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning elec-tron microscopy together with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, bending tests, and oxidation tests. The experimental results show that the surface layer of the composites is composed of SiC, pyrocarbon, and carbon fibers. Their inner area consists of pyrocarbon and carbon fibers. The SiC content gradiently decreases with increasing distance from the outer surface to the center of the compos-ites. Furthermore, the thickness of the SiC layer increases with increasing tetraethylorthosilicate content and deposition time. SiC coatings have no significant influence on the bending strength of the composites. However, the oxidation resistance of the compos-ites increases with increasing thickness of the SiC layer.

  13. Effects of SiC amount on phase compositions and properties of Ti3SiC2-based composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡艳芝; 殷小玮; 尹洪峰

    2015-01-01

    The phase compositions and properties of Ti3SiC2-based composites with SiC addition of 5%−30% in mass fraction fabricated by in-situ reaction and hot pressing sintering were studied. SiC addition effectively prevented TiC synthesis but facilitated SiC synthesis. The Ti3SiC2/TiC−SiC composite had better oxidation resistance when SiC added quantity reached 20% but poorer oxidation resistance with SiC addition under 15%than Ti3SiC2/TiC composite at higher temperatures. There were more than half of the original SiC and a few Ti3SiC2 remaining in Ti3SiC2/TiC−SiC with 20% SiC addition, but all constituents in Ti3Si2/TiC composite were oxidized after 12 h in air at 1500 °C. The oxidation scale thickness of TS30, 1505.78μm, was near a half of that of T, 2715μm, at 1500 °C for 20 h. Ti3SiC2/TiC composite had a flexural strength of 474 MPa, which was surpassed by Ti3SiC2/TiC−SiC composites when SiC added amount reached 15%. The strength reached the peak of 518 MPa at 20%SiC added amount.

  14. Fluorescent SiC with pseudo-periodic moth-eye structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Aijaz, Imran; Ou, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    material much superior to the phosphors in terms of high color rendering index value and long lifetime. The light extraction efficiency of the fluorescent SiC based all semiconductor LED light sources is usually low due to the large refractive index difference between the semiconductor and air. In order...... to enhance the extraction efficiency, we present a simple method to fabricate the pseudo-periodic moth-eye structures on the surface of the fluorescent SiC. A thin gold layer is deposited on the fluorescent SiC first. Then the thin gold layer is treated by rapid thermal processing. After annealing, the thin...... gold layer turns into discontinuous nano-islands. The average size of the islands is dependent on the annealing condition which could be well controlled. By using the reactive-ion etching, pseudo-periodic moth-eye structures would be obtained using the gold nano-islands as a mask layer. Reactive...

  15. Investigation of reactivity between SiC and Nb-1Zr in planned irradiation creep experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewinsohn, C.A.; Hamilton, M.L.; Jones, R.H.

    1997-08-01

    Thermodynamic calculations and diffusion couple experiments showed that SiC and Nb-1Zr were reactive at the upper range of temperatures anticipated in the planned irradiation creep experiment. Sputter-deposited aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was selected as a diffusion barrier coating. Experiments showed that although the coating coarsened at high temperature it was an effective barrier for diffusion of silicon from SiC into Nb-1Zr. Therefore, to avoid detrimental reactions between the SiC composite and the Nb-1Zr pressurized bladder during the planned irradiation creep experiment, a coating of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} will be required on the Nb-1Zr bladder.

  16. Significance of vapor phase chemical reactions on CVD rates predicted by chemically frozen and local thermochemical equilibrium boundary layer theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the role played by vapor-phase chemical reactions on CVD rates by comparing the results of two extreme theories developed to predict CVD mass transport rates in the absence of interfacial kinetic barrier: one based on chemically frozen boundary layer and the other based on local thermochemical equilibrium. Both theories consider laminar convective-diffusion boundary layers at high Reynolds numbers and include thermal (Soret) diffusion and variable property effects. As an example, Na2SO4 deposition was studied. It was found that gas phase reactions have no important role on Na2SO4 deposition rates and on the predictions of the theories. The implications of the predictions of the two theories to other CVD systems are discussed.

  17. Nanocrystalline sp 2 and sp 3 carbons: CVD synthesis and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, M. L.; Rossi, M.; Tamburri, E.

    2016-11-01

    The design and production of innovative materials based on nanocrystalline sp 2- and sp 3-coordinated carbons is presently a focus of the scientific community. We present a review of the nanostructures obtained in our labs using a series of synthetic routes, which make use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the selective production of non-planar graphitic nanostructures, nanocrystalline diamonds, and hybrid two-phase nanostructures.

  18. Tribological Testing of Some Potential PVD and CVD Coatings for Steel Wire Drawing Dies

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Maria; Olsson, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Cemented carbide is today the most frequently used drawing die material in steel wire drawing applications. This is mainly due to the possibility to obtain a broad combination of hardness and toughness thus meeting the requirements concerning strength, crack resistance and wear resistance set by the wire drawing process. However, the increasing cost of cemented carbide in combination with the possibility to increase the wear resistance of steel through the deposition of wear resistant CVD and...

  19. A 3D tomographic EBSD analysis of a CVD diamond thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu, Dierk Raabe and Stefan Zaefferer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the nucleation and growth processes in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond film using a tomographic electron backscattering diffraction method (3D EBSD. The approach is based on the combination of a focused ion beam (FIB unit for serial sectioning in conjunction with high-resolution EBSD. Individual diamond grains were investigated in 3-dimensions particularly with regard to the role of twinning.

  20. Comparison of Straight and Helical Nanotube Production in a Swirled Fluid CVD Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bathgate, Graham; Iyuke, Sunny; Kavishe, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Research into Carbon Nanotubes and their applications is fast becoming an extremely popular topic, and any means to greatly improve the synthesis process has a huge marketability. While investigating the feasibility of continuous production of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a vertical Swirled Fluid Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) reactor, it was discovered that helical nanotubes were lifted from the reactor by the gas current while straight tubes remained behind. Investigation into the me...

  1. Investigations of Ar ion irradiation effects on nanocrystalline SiC thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciun, V., E-mail: valentin.craciun@inflpr.ro [Laser Department, National Institute for Laser, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Craciun, D.; Socol, G. [Laser Department, National Institute for Laser, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Behdad, S.; Boesl, B. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Himcinschi, C. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg (Germany); Makino, H. [Research Institute, Kochi University of Technology, Kami, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Socol, M. [National Institute for Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Simeone, D. [CEA/DEN/DANS/DM2S/SRMA/LA2M-LRC CARMEN CEN, Saclay (France); CNRS/SPMS UMR8785 LRC CARMEN, Ecole Centrale de Paris, 92292 Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Thin polycrystalline SiC films grown by the pulsed laser deposition technique were irradiated by 800 keV Ar ions at a dose of 2.6 × 10{sup 14} at/cm{sup 2}. • The SiC films hardness and Young modulus values significantly decreased after irradiation. • Glancing X-ray diffraction investigations showed a partial transformation of the SiC hexagonal phase into the cubic phase. • Smooth PLD grown thin films are excellent for radiation effects investigations using XRR, GIXRD and nanoindentation techniques. - Abstract: The effects of 800 keV Ar ion irradiation on thin nanocrystalline SiC films grown on (100) Si substrates using the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique were investigated. On such PLD grown films, which were very dense, flat and smooth, X-ray reflectivity, glancing incidence X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation investigations were easily performed to evaluate changes induced by irradiation on the density, surface roughness, crystalline structure, and mechanical properties. Results indicated that the SiC films retained their crystalline nature, the cubic phase partially transforming into the hexagonal phase, which had a slightly higher lattice parameter then the as-deposited films. Simulations of X-ray reflectivity curves indicated a 3% decrease of the films density after irradiation. Nanoindentation results showed a significant decrease of the hardness and Young's modulus values with respect to those measured on as-deposited films. Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations found an increase of the C−C bonds and a corresponding decrease of the Si−C bonds in the irradiated area, which could explain the degradation of mechanical properties.

  2. Superhydrophobic Copper Surfaces with Anticorrosion Properties Fabricated by Solventless CVD Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaró, Ignasi; Yagüe, Jose L; Borrós, Salvador

    2017-01-11

    Due to continuous miniaturization and increasing number of electrical components in electronics, copper interconnections have become critical for the design of 3D integrated circuits. However, corrosion attack on the copper metal can affect the electronic performance of the material. Superhydrophobic coatings are a commonly used strategy to prevent this undesired effect. In this work, a solventless two-steps process was developed to fabricate superhydrophobic copper surfaces using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods. The superhydrophobic state was achieved through the design of a hierarchical structure, combining micro-/nanoscale domains. In the first step, O2- and Ar-plasma etchings were performed on the copper substrate to generate microroughness. Afterward, a conformal copolymer, 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate-ethylene glycol diacrylate [p(PFDA-co-EGDA)], was deposited on top of the metal via initiated CVD (iCVD) to lower the surface energy of the surface. The copolymer topography exhibited a very characteristic and unique nanoworm-like structure. The combination of the nanofeatures of the polymer with the microroughness of the copper led to achievement of the superhydrophobic state. AFM, SEM, and XPS were used to characterize the evolution in topography and chemical composition during the CVD processes. The modified copper showed water contact angles as high as 163° and hysteresis as low as 1°. The coating withstood exposure to aggressive media for extended periods of time. Tafel analysis was used to compare the corrosion rates between bare and modified copper. Results indicated that iCVD-coated copper corrodes 3 orders of magnitude slower than untreated copper. The surface modification process yielded repeatable and robust superhydrophobic coatings with remarkable anticorrosion properties.

  3. Surface characteristics and corrosion behaviour of WE43 magnesium alloy coated by SiC film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Cheng, Y.; Zheng, Y. F.; Zhang, X.; Xi, T. F.; Wei, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous SiC film has been successfully fabricated on the surface of WE43 magnesium alloy by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. The microstructure and elemental composition were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The immersion test indicated that SiC film could efficiently slow down the degradation rate of WE43 alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 ± 1 °C. The indirect toxicity experiment was conducted using L929 cell line and the results showed that the extraction medium of SiC coated WE43 alloys exhibited no inhibitory effect on L929 cell growth. The in vitro hemocompatibility of the samples was investigated by hemolysis test and blood platelets adhesion test, and it was found that the hemolysis rate of the coated WE43 alloy decreased greatly, and the platelets attached on the SiC film were slightly activated with a round shape. It could be concluded that SiC film prepared by PECVD made WE43 alloy more appropriate to biomedical application.

  4. Surface characteristics and corrosion behaviour of WE43 magnesium alloy coated by SiC film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M. [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cheng, Y., E-mail: chengyan@pku.edu.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, Y.F. [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, X.; Xi, T.F. [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei, S.C. [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Amorphous SiC film has been successfully fabricated on the surface of WE43 magnesium alloy by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. The microstructure and elemental composition were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), glancing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The immersion test indicated that SiC film could efficiently slow down the degradation rate of WE43 alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 {+-} 1 Degree-Sign C. The indirect toxicity experiment was conducted using L929 cell line and the results showed that the extraction medium of SiC coated WE43 alloys exhibited no inhibitory effect on L929 cell growth. The in vitro hemocompatibility of the samples was investigated by hemolysis test and blood platelets adhesion test, and it was found that the hemolysis rate of the coated WE43 alloy decreased greatly, and the platelets attached on the SiC film were slightly activated with a round shape. It could be concluded that SiC film prepared by PECVD made WE43 alloy more appropriate to biomedical application.

  5. Epitaxy relationships between Ge-islands and SiC(0 0 0 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait-Mansour, K. [Faculte des Sciences, LPSE, UMR CNRS 7014, 4, rue des Freres Lumiere, 68093 Mulhouse, Cedex (France)]. E-mail: k.ait-mansour@uha.fr; Dentel, D. [Faculte des Sciences, LPSE, UMR CNRS 7014, 4, rue des Freres Lumiere, 68093 Mulhouse, Cedex (France); Kubler, L. [Faculte des Sciences, LPSE, UMR CNRS 7014, 4, rue des Freres Lumiere, 68093 Mulhouse, Cedex (France); Diani, M. [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, LSGM, BP 416, Tanger, Maroc (Morocco); Bischoff, J.L. [Faculte des Sciences, LPSE, UMR CNRS 7014, 4, rue des Freres Lumiere, 68093 Mulhouse, Cedex (France); Bolmont, D. [Faculte des Sciences, LPSE, UMR CNRS 7014, 4, rue des Freres Lumiere, 68093 Mulhouse, Cedex (France)

    2005-03-15

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has been used to determine epitaxy relationships and in-plane orientations between Ge and SiC(0 0 0 1). Three monolayers of Ge have been deposited at 500 deg. C on a graphitized SiC (6{radical}3 x 6{radical}3)R30 deg. reconstructed surface, this surface supporting epitaxial Ge island growth in a Volmer-Weber mode. Nucleation of relaxed Ge-islands gives rise to transmission electron diffraction patterns allowing to deduce that pure Ge grows according to only one epitaxy relationship Ge{l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}//SiC(0 0 0 1). These {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}-Ge-islands have two in-plane orientations, a preferential one, Ge<-1-12>//SiC<1-100> and a minority one, Ge<-1-12>//SiC<10-10>, deduced one from the other by a 30 deg. rotation around the <1 1 1>-Ge (or [0 0 0 1]-SiC) growth axis. Due to the three-fold symmetry of the {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace}-Ge plane, each in-plane orientation is degenerated into two twin orientations, differing by a 180 deg. angle around Ge<111>.

  6. Lat.SIC - roum şi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Iliescu

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available In Jatina populară şi tîrzie ET 'şi' începe să fie întărit prin SIC 'astfel'. Locutiunea ET SIC putea avea sensurile 'şi astfel', 'şi apoi', 'şi imediat', 'şi deasemenea' sau nu mai şi'. Cu timpul s-a pierdut uneori determinantul ET şi SIC singur a inceput să exprime sensurile de mai sus. Astfel se explică etimologia şi accepţiunile rom. şi, conjunctie şi adverb. Se remană de asemenea că evoluţie semantica a lui SIC în română asta pînă la un punct identică cu cea din franceza veche.

  7. Study of CVD diamond layers with amorphous carbon admixture by Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a most often used standard technique for characterization of different carbon materials. In this work we present the Raman spectra of polycrystalline diamond layers of different quality, synthesized by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition method (HF CVD. We show how to use Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of the Raman bands to determine the structure of diamond films as well as the structure of amorphous carbon admixture. Raman spectroscopy has become an important technique for the analysis of CVD diamond films. The first-order diamond Raman peak at ca. 1332 cm−1 is an unambiguous evidence for the presence of diamond phase in the deposited layer. However, the existence of non-diamond carbon components in a CVD diamond layer produces several overlapping peaks in the same wavenumber region as the first order diamond peak. The intensities, wavenumber, full width at half maximum (FWHM of these bands are dependent on quality of diamond layer which is dependent on the deposition conditions. The aim of the present work is to relate the features of diamond Raman spectra to the features of Raman spectra of non-diamond phase admixture and occurrence of other carbon structures in the obtained diamond thin films.

  8. 衬底对 CVD生长石墨烯的影响研究%SUBSTR ATES FOR CVD GROWTH OF GRAPHENE RESEARCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玮; 满卫东; 涂昕; 林晓棋

    2013-01-01

    石墨烯有独特的结构和优异的性能,在电子、信息、能源、材料和生物医药等领域都有着广阔的应用前景。为了更好的应用这种新型材料,如何大规模可控合成高质量石墨烯是一个必须克服的困难。相比与机械剥离法、化学氧化还原法和碳化硅表面外延生长法,化学气相沉积法( CVD)因其可以生长大面积高质量连续石墨烯膜而倍受关注。基于石墨烯的生长机理,从衬底材料的角度,综述了近几年衬底对CVD生长石墨烯的影响的研究进展。展望了衬底选择的发展新趋势。%Graphene has a unique structure and excellent properties.It has broad application prospects in electronics, infor-mation, energy, materials and biomedicine and other fields.For a better application of this new material, how large quality-controlled synthesis of grapheme is a necessary overcome difficulties.Compared with the mechanical exfoliation, chemical ox-idation-reduction and epitaxial growth on SiC, chemical vapor deposition ( CVD) method has been receiving significant atten-tion because of it can grow high-quality large-area grapheme films.Based on the growth mechanism of grapheme , the recent substrates for CVD growth of grapheme research from the perspective of the substrate material is reviewed.Finally, the devel-opment of new trends in substrate selection are prospected.

  9. Q-factors of CVD monolayer graphene and graphite inductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zidong; Zhang, Qingping; Peng, Pei; Tian, Zhongzheng; Ren, Liming; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Ru; Wen, Jincai; Fu, Yunyi

    2017-08-01

    A carbon-based inductor may serve as an important passive component in a carbon-based radio-frequency (RF) integrated circuit (IC). In this work, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesized monolayer graphene and graphite inductors are fabricated and their Q-factors are investigated. We find that the large series resistance of signal path (including coil resistance and contact resistance) in monolayer graphene inductors causes negative Q-factors at the whole frequency range in measurement. Comparatively, some of the graphite inductors have all of their Q-factors above zero, due to their small signal path resistance. We also note that some other graphite inductors have negative Q-factor values at low frequency regions, but positive Q-factor values at high frequency regions. With an equivalent circuit model, we confirm that the negative Q-factors of some graphite inductors at low frequency regions are related to their relatively large contact resistances, and we are able to eliminate these negative Q-factors by improving the graphite-metal contact. Furthermore, the peak Q-factor (Q p) can be enhanced by lowering down the resistance of graphite coil. For an optimized 3/4-turn graphite inductor, the measured maximum Q-factor (Q m) can reach 2.36 and the peak Q-factor is theoretically predicted by the equivalent circuit to be as high as 6.46 at a high resonant frequency, which is beyond the testing frequency range. This research indicates that CVD synthesized graphite thin film is more suitable than graphene for fabricating inductors in carbon-based RF IC in the future.

  10. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; Nihtianov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, LB, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition(CVD) using diborane (B2H6) is reported. The value of LB is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and co

  11. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, V.; Nihtianov, S.

    2016-01-01

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, LB, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition(CVD) using diborane (B2H6) is reported. The value of LB is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and co

  12. Effect of mixture ratios and nitrogen carrier gas flow rates on the morphology of carbon nanotube structures grown by CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malgas, GF

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and investigates the effects of nitrogen carrier gas flow rates and mixture ratios on the morphology of CNTs on a silicon substrate by vaporizing...

  13. The conductivity of high-fluence noble gas ion irradiated CVD polycrystalline diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A. M.; Kazakov, V. A.; Mashkova, E. S.; Ovchinnikov, M. A.; Shemukhin, A. A.; Sigalaev, S. K.

    2017-09-01

    The conductivity of surface layer of polycrystalline CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond has been studied experimentally after high-fluence 30 keV Ne+, 20 and 30 keV Ar+ ion irradiation at target temperature range from 30 to 400 °C. The hot ion irradiation of CVD diamond may be described as ion-stimulated heat graphitization in which an exponential resistance decrease with increasing of the irradiation temperature is much faster than at the heat treatment. Under ion irradiation of CVD diamond the graphite-like materials resistivity is achieved at temperatures not exceeding 200 °C. The graphite phase in a heterogeneous structure of diamond irradiated layer is in dynamic equilibrium. In the temperature range from RT to 400 °C, the proportion of graphite phase increases so that at temperatures 200 < Tir < 400 °C it is dominant. The Raman spectra of ion-induced conductive layer created on CVD diamond reflect the processes of nanostructural ordering - disordering of sp2-bonded carbon.

  14. Defect studies in 4H- Silicon Carbide PVT grown bulk crystals, CVD grown epilayers and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrappa, Shayan M.

    Silicon Carbide [SiC] which exists as more than 200 different polytypes is known for superior high temperature and high power applications in comparison to conventional semiconductor materials like Silicon and Germanium. The material finds plethora of applications in a diverse fields due to its unique properties like large energy bandgap, high thermal conductivity and high electric breakdown field. Though inundated with superior properties the potential of this material has not been utilized fully due to impeding factors such as defects especially the crystalline ones which limit their performance greatly. Lots of research has been going on for decades to reduce these defects and there has been subsequent improvement in the quality as the diameter of SiC commercial wafers has reached 150mm from 25mm since its inception. The main focus of this thesis has been to study yield limiting defect structures in conjunction with several leading companies and national labs using advanced characterization tools especially the Synchrotron source. The in depth analysis of SiC has led to development of strategies to reduce or eliminate the density of defects by studying how the defects nucleate, replicate and interact in the material. The strategies discussed to reduce defects were proposed after careful deliberation and analysis of PVT grown bulk crystals and CVD grown epilayers. Following are some of the results of the study: [1] Macrostep overgrowth mechanism in SiC was used to study the deflection of threading defects onto the basal plane resulting in stacking faults. Four types of stacking faults associated with deflection of c/c+a threading defects have been observed to be present in 76mm, 100mm and 150mm diameter wafers. The PVT grown bulk crystals and CVD grown epilayers in study were subjected to contrast studies using synchrotron white beam X-ray topography [SWBXT]. The SWBXT image contrast studies of these stacking faults with comparison of calculated phase shifts for

  15. Transformation from amorphous to nano-crystalline SiC thin films prepared by HWCVD technique without hydrogen dilution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Shariatmadar Tehrani

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were deposited on Si(111) by the hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) technique using silane (SiH4) and methane (CH4) gases without hydrogen dilution. The effects of SiH4 to CH4 gas flow ratio (R) on the structural properties, chemical composition and photoluminescence (PL) properties of the films deposited at the different gas flow ratios were investigated and compared. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed a structural transition from amorphous SiC to cubic nano-crystalline SiC films with the increase in the gas flow ratio. Raman scattering confirmed the multi-phased nature of the films. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that the carbon incorporation in the film structure was strongly dependent on the gas flow ratio. A similar broad visible room-temperature PL with two peaks was observed for all SiC films. The main PL emission was correlated to the band to band transition in uniform a-SiC phase and the other lower energy emission was related to the confined a-Si : H clusters in a-SiC matrix. SiC nano-crystallites exhibit no significant contribution to the radiative recombination.

  16. CVD elaboration of nanostructured TiO2-Ag thin films with efficient antibacterial properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mungkalasiri, Jitti; Bedel, Laurent; Emieux, Fabrice; Dore, Jeanne; Renaud, François N. R.; Sarantopoulos, Christos; Maury, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Nanostructured TiO2-Ag composite coatings are deposited by direct liquid injection metal-organic (DLI-MO) CVD at 683K in a one-step process. Silver pivalate (AgPiv) and titanium tetra-iso-propoxide (TTIP) are used as Ag and Ti molecular precursors, respectively. Metallic silver nanoparticles are co-deposited with anatase TiO2 on stainless steel, glass, and silicon wafers. The silver particles are uniformly embedded in the oxide matrix through the entire film thickness. The influence of the gr...

  17. Fabricating Large-Area Sheets of Single-Layer Graphene by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    This innovation consists of a set of methodologies for preparing large area (greater than 1 cm(exp 2)) domains of single-atomic-layer graphite, also called graphene, in single (two-dimensional) crystal form. To fabricate a single graphene layer using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the process begins with an atomically flat surface of an appropriate substrate and an appropriate precursor molecule containing carbon atoms attached to substituent atoms or groups. These molecules will be brought into contact with the substrate surface by being flowed over, or sprayed onto, the substrate, under CVD conditions of low pressure and elevated temperature. Upon contact with the surface, the precursor molecules will decompose. The substituent groups detach from the carbon atoms and form gas-phase species, leaving the unfunctionalized carbon atoms attached to the substrate surface. These carbon atoms will diffuse upon this surface and encounter and bond to other carbon atoms. If conditions are chosen carefully, the surface carbon atoms will arrange to form the lowest energy single-layer structure available, which is the graphene lattice that is sought. Another method for creating the graphene lattice includes metal-catalyzed CVD, in which the decomposition of the precursor molecules is initiated by the catalytic action of a catalytic metal upon the substrate surface. Another type of metal-catalyzed CVD has the entire substrate composed of catalytic metal, or other material, either as a bulk crystal or as a think layer of catalyst deposited upon another surface. In this case, the precursor molecules decompose directly upon contact with the substrate, releasing their atoms and forming the graphene sheet. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can also be used. In this method, a substrate surface at low temperature is covered with exactly one monolayer of precursor molecules (which may be of more than one type). This is heated up so that the precursor molecules decompose and form one

  18. SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2003-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the

  19. TSC response of irradiated CVD diamond films

    CERN Document Server

    Borchi, E; Bucciolini, M; Guasti, A; Mazzocchi, S; Pirollo, S; Sciortino, S

    1999-01-01

    CVD diamond films have been irradiated with electrons, sup 6 sup 0 Co photons and protons in order to study the dose response to exposure to different particles and energies and to investigate linearity with dose. The Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) has been studied as a function of the dose delivered to polymethilmetacrilate (PMMA) in the range from 1 to 12 Gy with 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. The TSC spectrum has revealed the presence of two components with peak temperatures of about 470 and 520 K, corresponding to levels lying in the diamond band gap with activation energies of the order of 0.7 - 1 eV. After the subtraction of the exponential background the charge emitted during the heating scan has been evaluated and has been found to depend linearly on the dose. The thermally emitted charge of the CVD diamond films has also been studied using different particles. The samples have been irradiated with the same PMMA dose of about 2 Gy with 6 and 20 MeV electrons from a Linac, sup 6 sup 0 ...

  20. Thermoluminescent properties of CVD diamond: applications to ionising radiation dosimetry; Proprietes thermoluminescentes du diamant CVD: applications a la dosimetrie des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitfils, A

    2007-09-15

    Remarkable properties of synthetic diamond (human soft tissue equivalence, chemical stability, non-toxicity) make this material suitable for medical application as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). This work highlights the interest of this material as radiotherapy TLD. In the first stage of this work, we looked after thermoluminescent (TL) and dosimetric properties of polycrystalline diamond made by Chemically Vapor Deposited (CVD) synthesis. Dosimetric characteristics are satisfactory as TLD for medical application. Luminescence thermal quenching on diamond has been investigated. This phenomenon leads to a decrease of dosimetric TL peak sensitivity when the heating rate increases. The second part of this work analyses the use of synthetic diamond as TLD in radiotherapy. Dose profiles, depth dose distributions and the cartography of an electron beam obtained with our samples are in very good agreement with results from an ionisation chamber. It is clearly shown that CVD) diamond is of interest to check beams of treatment accelerators. The use of these samples in a control of treatment with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy underlines good response of synthetic diamond in high dose gradient areas. These results indicate that CVD diamond is a promising material for radiotherapy dosimetry. (author)

  1. Room Temperature Growth of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Enhanced CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yu; ZHANG Xiwen; HAN Gaorong

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited on Si (100) and glass substrates by dielectric barrier discharge enhanced chemical vapour deposition (DBD-CVD)in (SiH4+H2) atmosphere at room temperature.Results of the thickness measurement,SEM (scanning electron microscope),Raman,and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) show that with the increase in the applied peak voltage,the deposition rate and network order of the films increase,and the hydrogen bonding configurations mainly in di-hydrogen (Si-H2) and poly hydrogen (SiH2)n are introduced into the films.The UV-visible transmission spectra show that with the decrease in Sill4/ (SiH4+H2) the thin films'band gap shifts from 1.92 eV to 2.17 eV.These experimental results are in agreement with the theoretic analysis of the DBD discharge.The deposition of a-Si:H films by the DBD-CVD method as reported here for the first time is attractive because it allows fast deposition of a-Si:H films on large-area low-melting-point substrates and requires only a low cost of production without additional heating or pumping equipment.

  2. Studies on the Codeposition of SiC Nanopowder with Nickel, Cobalt, and Co-Ni Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Rudnik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of SiC nanopowder (approximately 120 nm with nickel, cobalt, and Co-Ni alloy matrix was studied. It was found that particles suspended in the bath affect slightly the reduction of metallic ions. Incorporation of the ceramic particles was governed mainly by the morphology of the matrix surface, while no strict correlation between the amount of cobalt ions adsorbed on the powder and the SiC content in the composites was found. Microhardness of nickel deposits was 585±5 HV, while for cobalt-rich coatings (84–95 wt.% Co the values were in the range of 260–290 HV, independently of the SiC content in the coatings. Fine-grained nickel deposits were characterized by good corrosion resistance, while cobalt and Co-Ni alloys showed high corrosion current densities.

  3. A generic strategy for co-presentation of heparin-binding growth factors based on CVD polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaopei; Lahann, Joerg

    2012-09-14

    A multifunctional copolymer with both aldehyde and alkyne groups is synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for orthogonal co-immobilization of biomolecules. Surface analytical methods including FTIR and XPS are used to confirm the surface modification. Heparin-binding growth factors [basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in this study] can be immobilized through interaction with heparin, which was covalently attached to the CVD surface through an aldehyde-hydrazide reaction. In parallel, an alkyne-azide reaction is used to orthogonally co-immobilize an adhesion peptide as the second biomolecule.

  4. Changes in chemical composition and nanostructure of SiC thin films prepared by PECVD during thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuenle, Matthias; Janz, Stefan [Fraunhofer Institute of Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Nickel, Klaus Georg [Applied Mineralogy, Institute for Geosciences, Eberhard-Karl-University Tuebingen, Wilhelmstr. 52, 72074 Tuebingen (Germany); Eibl, Oliver [Institute for Applied Physics, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, 72074 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were deposited on silicon (Si) using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Annealing was done in a rapid thermal annealing furnace at a temperature of 1300 C. As-deposited and annealed Si-rich and stoichiometric SiC thin films were investigated by analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM). TEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to quantify the chemical composition of the SiC thin films with high accuracy. The chemical composition of the near stoichiometric SiC thin film changed during annealing from Si{sub 0.4}C{sub 0.6} to Si{sub 0.5}C{sub 0.5} due to diffusion of Si from the Si substrate into the film. The Si-rich Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} film had the identical chemical composition of Si{sub 0.8}C{sub 0.2} before and after annealing. As-deposited films show nanoporosity within the bulk film. During annealing, v-shaped defect structures were formed at the interface of the stoichiometric SiC thin film to the Si substrate. Diffraction patterns revealed that as-deposited films were amorphous. During annealing the crystallization of 3C-SiC occurred in near-stoichiometric SiC thin films, whereas in Si-rich Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} thin films two phases, namely Si and 3C-SiC, crystallized. Low-loss and core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) verified the diffraction results. In the low-loss spectra of the near stoichiometric SiC thin film, a plasmon peak located at 20.2 eV before and at 22.3 eV after annealing was detected. The low-loss spectra of the Si-rich Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} thin film showed an asymmetric plasmon peak with two maxima located at 18.5 and 25.0 eV in the as-deposited film and 18.6 and 24.3 eV in the annealed Si-rich Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} film. The 18.5 eV plasmon peaks is assigned to Si and the 25 eV plasmon peak is attributed to the SiC phase. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Modeling Thermal and Irradiation-induced Swelling Effects on Integrity of Ti3SiC2/SiC Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2017-09-23

    Previously, results for CVD-SiC joints created using solid state displacement reactions to form a dual-phase SiC/MAX phase irradiated at 800˚C and 5 dpa indicated some extent of cracking in the joint and along the CVD-SiC/joint interface. This paper elucidates the origin of cracking by thermomechanical modeling combined with irradiation-induced swelling effects using a continuum damage approach with support of micromechanical modeling. Three irradiation temperatures (400oC, 500oC and 800oC) are considered assuming experimental irradiation doses in a range leading to saturation swelling in SiC. The analyses indicate that a SiC/MAX joint heated to 400oC fails during irradiation-induced swelling at this temperature while it experiences some damage after being heated to 500oC and irradiated at the same temperature. However, it fails during cooling from 500oC to room temperature. The joint experiences minor damage when heated to and irradiated at 800oC but does not fail after cooling. The prediction agrees with the experimental findings available for this case.

  6. Enhancement of the Electrical Properties of CVD-Grown Graphene with Ascorbic Acid Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chunmiao; Chen, Zhiying; Zhang, Haoran; Zhang, Yaqian; Zhang, Yanhui; Sui, Yanping; Yu, Guanghui; Cao, Yijiang

    2016-02-01

    Ascorbic acid was used to modify to chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene films transferred onto SiO2 substrate. Residual polymer (polymethyl methacrylate), Fe3+, Cl-, H2O, and O2 affected the electrical and thermal properties on graphene during the transfer or device fabrication processes. Exposure of transferred graphene to ascorbic acid resulted in significantly enhanced electrical properties with increased charge carrier mobility. All devices exhibited more than 30% improvement in room temperature carrier mobility in air. The carrier mobility of the treated graphene did not significantly decrease in 21 days. This result can be attributed to electron donation to graphene through the -OH functional group in ascorbic acid that is absorbed in graphene. This work provides a method to enhance the electrical properties of CVD-grown graphene.

  7. A Review of the Properties and CVD Synthesis of Coiled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóra Fejes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The CVD route for carbon nanotube production has become a popular method to make large amounts of multiwall carbon nanotubes. The structure, morphology and size of carbon materials depend critically on the catalyst preparation and deposition conditions. According to current knowledge, CVD method is the only process which can produce carbon nanocoils. These nanocoils are perfect candidates for nanotechnology applications. One might indeed hope that these coils would have the extraordinary stiffness displayed by straight nanotubes. Based on theoretical studies, regular coiled nanotubes exhibit exceptional mechanical, electrical, and magnetic properties due to the combination of their peculiar helical morphology and the fascinating properties of nanotubes. In spite of its technological interest, relatively low attention has been paid to this special field. In this paper we attempt to summarize results obtained until now.

  8. Synthesis of Few-Layer Graphene Using DC PE-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Hyuk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun

    2011-12-01

    Few layer graphene (FLG) had been successfully grown on polycrystalline Ni films or foils on a large scale using DC Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (DC PE-CVD) as a result of the Raman spectra drawn out of the sample. The size of graphene films is dependent on the area of the Ni film as well as the DC PE-CVD chamber size. Synthesis time has an effect on the quality of graphene produced. However, further analysis and experiments must be pursued to further identify the optimum settings and conditions of producing better quality graphene. Applied plasma voltage on the other hand, had an influence on the minimization of defects in the graphene grown. It has also presented a method of producing a free standing PMMA/graphene membrane on a FeCl3(aq) solution which could then be transferred to a desired substrate.

  9. Chemical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Camphoric Carbon by Thermal-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Chemical properties and surface study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The chemical properties of the CNTs were conducted using FTIR spectroscopy and PXRD analysis. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs.

  10. Electronic properties and strain sensitivity of CVD-grown graphene with acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Sasaki, Shinichirou; Ohnishi, Masato; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have shown that large-area monolayer graphene can be formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using methane gas, the growth of monolayer graphene using highly reactive acetylene gas remains a big challenge. In this study, we synthesized a uniform monolayer graphene film by low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) with acetylene gas. On the base of Raman spectroscopy measurements, it was found that up to 95% of the as-grown graphene is monolayer. The electronic properties and strain sensitivity of the LPCVD-grown graphene with acetylene were also evaluated by testing the fabricated field-effect transistors (FETs) and strain sensors. The derived carrier mobility and gauge factor are 862-1150 cm2/(V·s) and 3.4, respectively, revealing the potential for high-speed FETs and strain sensor applications. We also investigated the relationship between the electronic properties and the graphene domain size.

  11. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Normand, F. [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Bat 70, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francois.Le-Normand@ipcms.u-strasbg.fr; Cojocaru, C.S.; Ersen, O. [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Bat 70, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Legagneux, P.; Gangloff, L. [THALES R and T, Departementale 128, 91747 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Fleaca, C. [Groupe Surfaces and Interfaces, IPCMS, UMR 7504 CNRS, Bat 70, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg Cedex (France); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, P.O. Box MG-36, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Alexandrescu, R.; Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Laser Department, P.O. Box MG-36, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-12-15

    Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes {<=}5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO{sub 2}/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD process (PE-HF-CCVD). Vertically oriented and thin carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown with few differences between the two samples, except the diameter in relation to the initial size of the iron particles, and the density. The electron field emission of these samples exhibit quite interesting behavior with a low turn-on voltage at around 1 V/{mu}m.

  12. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Normand, F.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Ersen, O.; Legagneux, P.; Gangloff, L.; Fleaca, C.; Alexandrescu, R.; Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I.

    2007-12-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe 2O 3 (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes ≤5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO 2/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD process (PE-HF-CCVD). Vertically oriented and thin carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown with few differences between the two samples, except the diameter in relation to the initial size of the iron particles, and the density. The electron field emission of these samples exhibit quite interesting behavior with a low turn-on voltage at around 1 V/μm.

  13. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part Ⅰ Simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition)diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge (J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC (Kinetic Monte Carlo) method. The results show that: (1) under Joe's model, the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature; (2) the deposition rate and surface roughness () under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature ()and not evident bymass fraction of atom chlorine; (3)the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate, i.e. the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature, in agreement with Grujicic's prediction; (4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  14. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature—Part I simulation of CVD diamond film growth under Joe—Badgwell—Hauge model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xizhong; YuZhang; 等

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100} oriented CVD( Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond film under Joe-Badgwell-Hauge(J-B-H) model is simulated at atomic scale by using revised KMC(Kinetic Monte Carlo)method.The results show that:(1) under Joe's model,the growth mechanism from single carbon species is suitable for the growth of {100} oriented CVD diamond film in low temperature;(2) the deposition rate and surface roughness(Rq) under Joe's model are influenced intensively by temperature(Ts) and not evident bymass fraction Wc1 of atom chlorine;(3) the surface roughness increases with the deposition rate.i.e.the film quality becomes worse with elevated temperature,in agreement with Grujicic's prediction;(4) the simulation results cannot make sure the role of single carbon insertion.

  15. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Set Point Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-01-12

    This document provides the calculations used to determine the error of safety class signals used for the CVD process These errors are used with the Parameter limits to arrive at the initial set point. The Safety Class Instrumentation and Control (SCIC) system provides active detection and response to process anomalies that, if unmitigated would result in a safety event. Specifically actuation of the SCIC system includes two portions. The portion which isolates the MCO and initiates the safety-class helium (SCHe) purge, and the portion which detects and stops excessive heat input to the MCO on high tempered water MCO inlet temperature. For the MCO isolation and purge the SCIC receives signals from MCO pressure (both positive pressure and vacuum) helium flow rate, bay high temperature switches, seismic trips and time under vacuum trips.

  16. CVD diamond sensors for charged particle detection

    CERN Document Server

    Krammer, Manfred; Berdermann, E; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Dencuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zöller, M

    2001-01-01

    CVD diamond material was used to build position-sensitive detectors for single-charged particles to be employed in high-intensity physics experiments. To obtain position information, metal contacts shaped as strips or pixels are applied to the detector surface for one- or two- dimensional coordinate measurement. Strip detectors 2*4 cm/sup 2/ in size with a strip distance of 50 mu m were tested. Pixel detectors of various pixel sizes were bump bonded to electronics chips and investigated. A key issue for the use of these sensors in high intensity experiments is the radiation hardness. Several irradiation experiments were carried out with pions, protons and neutrons exceeding a fluence of 10/sup 15/ particles/cm/sup 2/. The paper presents an overview of the results obtained with strip and pixel detectors in high-energy test beams and summarises the irradiation studies. (8 refs).

  17. Ultrafast deposition of silicon nitride and semiconductor silicon thin films by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Verlaan, V.; Rath, J.K.; Li, H. B. T.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) or Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Cat-CVD) has made great progress during the last couple of years. This review discusses examples of significant progress. Specifically, silicon nitride deposition by HWCVD (HW-SiNx) is highlighted, a

  18. Premature menopause linked to CVD and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Claire; Overton, Caroline

    2010-03-01

    Premature menopause affects 1% of women under the age of 40, the usual age of the menopause is 51. Most women will present with irregular periods or no periods at all with or without climacteric symptoms. Around 10% of women present with primary amenorrhoea. A careful history and examination are required. It is important to ask specifically about previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy and to look for signs of androgen excess e.g. polycystic ovarian syndrome, adrenal problems e.g. galactorrhoea and thyroid goitres. Once pregnancy has been excluded, a progestagen challenge test can be performed in primary care. Norethisterone 5 mg tds po for ten days or alternatively medroxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg daily for ten days is prescribed. A withdrawal bleed within a few days of stopping the norethisterone indicates the presence of oestrogen and bleeding more than a few drops is considered a positive withdrawal bleed. The absence of a bleed indicates low levels of oestrogen, putting the woman at risk of CVD and osteoporosis. FSH levels above 30 IU/l are an indicator that the ovaries are failing and the menopause is approaching or has occurred. It should be remembered that FSH levels fluctuate during the month and from one month to the next, so a minimum of two measurements should be made at least four to six weeks apart. The presence of a bleed should not exclude premature menopause as part of the differential diagnosis as there can be varying and unpredictable ovarian function remaining. The progestagen challenge test should not be used alone, but in conjunction with FSH, LH and oestradiol. There is no treatment for premature menopause. Women desiring pregnancy should be referred to a fertility clinic and discussion of egg donation. Women not wishing to become pregnant should be prescribed HRT until the age of 50 to control symptoms of oestrogen deficiency and reduce the risks of osteoporosis and CVD.

  19. Growth of boron doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films by Hot Wire-CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawbake, Amit [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Mayabadi, Azam; Waykar, Ravindra; Kulkarni, Rupali; Jadhavar, Ashok [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Waman, Vaishali [Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Shivajinagar, Pune 411 005 (India); Parmar, Jayesh [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Bhattacharyya, Somnath [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, IIT Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ma, Yuan‐Ron [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Devan, Rupesh; Pathan, Habib [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Jadkar, Sandesh, E-mail: sandesh@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Boron doped nc-3C-SiC films prepared by HW-CVD using SiH{sub 4}/CH{sub 4}/B{sub 2}H{sub 6}. • 3C-Si-C films have preferred orientation in (1 1 1) direction. • Introduction of boron into SiC matrix retard the crystallanity in the film structure. • Film large number of SiC nanocrystallites embedded in the a-Si matrix. • Band gap values, E{sub Tauc} and E{sub 04} (E{sub 04} > E{sub Tauc}) decreases with increase in B{sub 2}H{sub 6} flow rate. - Abstract: Boron doped nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films have been prepared by HW-CVD using silane (SiH{sub 4})/methane (CH{sub 4})/diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) gas mixture. The influence of boron doping on structural, optical, morphological and electrical properties have been investigated. The formation of 3C-SiC films have been confirmed by low angle XRD, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis whereas effective boron doping in nc-3C-SiC have been confirmed by conductivity, charge carrier activation energy, and Hall measurements. Raman spectroscopy and HR-TEM analysis revealed that introduction of boron into the SiC matrix retards the crystallanity in the film structure. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and non contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) results signify that 3C-SiC film contain well resolved, large number of silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystallites embedded in the a-Si matrix having rms surface roughness ∼1.64 nm. Hydrogen content in doped films are found smaller than that of un-doped films. Optical band gap values, E{sub Tauc} and E{sub 04} decreases with increase in B{sub 2}H{sub 6} flow rate.

  20. Microwave joining of SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberglitt, R.; Ahmad, I.; Tian, Y.L. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to optimize the properties of SiC-SiC joints made using microwave energy. The current focus is on identification of the most effective joining methods for scale-up to large tube assemblies, including joining using SiC produced in situ from chemical precursors. During FY 1996, a new microwave applicator was designed, fabricated and tested that provides the capability for vacuum baking of the specimens and insulation and for processing under inert environment. This applicator was used to join continuous fiber-reinforced (CFCC) SiC/SiC composites using a polymer precursor to form a SiC interlayer in situ.

  1. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm(3)) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiO(x), or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H(2) gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000 °C were achieved even in 200 Torr H(2). We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  2. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  3. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  4. Contact resistance study of various metal electrodes with CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahoi, Amit; Wagner, Stefan; Bablich, Andreas; Kataria, Satender; Passi, Vikram; Lemme, Max C.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the contact resistance of various metals to chemical vapor deposited (CVD) monolayer graphene is investigated. Transfer length method (TLM) structures with varying channel widths and separation between contacts have been fabricated and electrically characterized in ambient air and vacuum condition. Electrical contacts are made with five metals: gold, nickel, nickel/gold, palladium and platinum/gold. The lowest value of 92 Ω μm is observed for the contact resistance between graphene and gold, extracted from back-gated devices at an applied back-gate bias of -40 V. Measurements carried out under vacuum show larger contact resistance values when compared with measurements carried out in ambient conditions. Post processing annealing at 450 °C for 1 h in argon-95%/hydrogen-5% atmosphere results in lowering the contact resistance value which is attributed to the enhancement of the adhesion between metal and graphene. The results presented in this work provide an overview for potential contact engineering for high performance graphene-based electronic devices.

  5. Thermoelectric properties of CVD grown large area graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherehiy, Andriy; Jayasinghe, Ruwantha; Stallard, Robert; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Sidorov, Anton; Benjamin, Daniel; Jiang, Zhigang; Yu, Qingkai; Wu, Wei; Bao, Jiming; Liu, Zhihong; Pei, Steven; Chen, Yong

    2010-03-01

    The thermoelectric power (TEP) of CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) grown large area graphene transferred onto a Si/SiO2 substrate was measured by simply attaching two miniature thermocouples and a resistive heater. Availability of such large area graphene facilitates straight forward TEP measurement without the use of any microfabrication processes. All investigated graphene samples showed a positive TEP ˜ + 30 μV/K in ambient conditions and saturated at a negative value as low as ˜ -75 μV/K after vacuum-annealing at 500 K in a vacuum of ˜10-7 Torr. The observed p-type behavior under ambient conditions is attributed to the oxygen doping, while the n-type behavior under degassed conditions is due to electron doping from SiO2 surface states. It was observed that the sign of the TEP switched from negative to positive for the degassed graphene when exposed to acceptor gases. Conversely, the TEP of vacuum-annealed graphene exposed to the donor gases became even more negative than the TEP of vacuum-annealed sample.

  6. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grilj, V., E-mail: vgrilj@irb.hr [Division for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M. [Division for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Pomorski, M. [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Kada, W. [Division of Electronics and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers’ traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers’ capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  7. A Fast CVD Diamond Beam Loss Monitor for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Griesmayer, E; Dobos, D; Effinger, E; Pernegger, H

    2011-01-01

    Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond detectors were installed in the collimation area of the CERN LHC to study their feasibility as Fast Beam Loss Monitors in a high-radiation environment. The detectors were configured with a fast, radiation-hard pre-amplifier with a bandwidth of 2 GHz. The readout was via an oscilloscope with a bandwidth of 1 GHz and a sampling rate of 5 GSPS. Despite the 250 m cable run from the detectors to the oscilloscope, single MIPs were resolved with a 2 ns rise time, a pulse width of 10 ns and a time resolution of less than 1 ns. Two modes of operation were applied. For the analysis of unexpected beam aborts, the loss profile was recorded in a 1 ms buffer and, for nominal operation, the histogram of the time structure of the losses was recorded in synchronism with the LHC period of 89.2 μs. Measurements during the LHC start-up (February to December 2010) are presented. The Diamond Monitors gave an unprecedented insight into the time structure of the beam losses resolving the 400...

  8. Rare genetic variants associated with early onset CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiwald, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western societies. CVD is mainly triggered by atherosclerosis. A combination of lipid accumulation, inflammation at the vessel wall and thrombotic reactions are underlying its pathobiology. Despite improvements in the ther

  9. Prevention: Reducing the risk of CVD in patients with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, Robert J; Van Dyke, Thomas E

    2010-09-01

    The association between periodontitis and other chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus, could be related to systemic inflammation initiated by a local inflammatory challenge. Oliveira et al. have added lack of oral hygiene, and its link with systemic inflammation, to the spectrum of risk factors for CVD.

  10. Superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces: Wetting and wear properties of different CVD-generated coating types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, M., E-mail: michael.thieme@tu-dresden.de [Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Streller, F., E-mail: streller@seas.upenn.edu [Technische Universität Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Simon, F., E-mail: frsimon@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Postfach 120 411, 01005 Dresden (Germany); Frenzel, R., E-mail: frenzelr@ipfdd.de [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung Dresden, Postfach 120 411, 01005 Dresden (Germany); White, A.J. [GVD Corporation, 45 Spinelli Place, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    In view of generating superhydrophobic aluminium-based surfaces, this work presents further results for the combination of anodic oxidation as the primary pretreatment method and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) variants for chemical modification producing coatings of 250–1000 nm thickness. In detail, CVD involved the utilisation of i – hexafluoropropylene oxide as precursor within the hot filament CVD process for the deposition of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) coatings at alternative conditions (PTFE-AC) and ii – 1,3,5-trivinyltrimethylcyclotrisiloxane for the deposition of polysiloxane coatings (PSi) by initiated CVD. The substrate material was Al Mg1 subjected to usual or intensified sulphuric acid anodisation pretreatments (SAAu, SAAi, respectively) affording various degrees of surface micro-roughness (SAAu < SAAi) to the oxidic layers. Performance characteristics were evaluated in the original as-coated states and after standardised artificial weathering and/or mild wear testing. Superhydrophobicity (SH) was observed with the system SAAi + PTFE-AC similarly to former findings with the standard hot filament CVD PTFE coating variant (SAAi + PTFE-SC). The results indicated that the specific coating morphology made an important contribution to the water-repellency, because even some of the SAAu-based samples tended to reveal SH. Subjecting samples to weathering treatment resulted in a general worsening of the wetting behaviour, primarily limited to the receding contact angles. These tendencies were correlated with the chemical composition of the sample surfaces as analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The wear tests showed, as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement, that the PTFE coatings were relatively sensitive to friction. This was connected with a dramatic deterioration of the water-repelling properties. PSi-coated surfaces generally showed rather poor water-repellency, but this coating type was surprisingly

  11. Handbook of chemical vapor deposition principles, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pierson, Hugh O

    1999-01-01

    Turn to this new second edition for an understanding of the latest advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. CVD technology has recently grown at a rapid rate, and the number and scope of its applications and their impact on the market have increased considerably. The market is now estimated to be at least double that of a mere seven years ago when the first edition of this book was published. The second edition is an update with a considerably expanded and revised scope. Plasma CVD and metallo-organic CVD are two major factors in this rapid growth. Readers will find the latest

  12. Conformal Thin Film Packaging for SiC Sensor Circuits in Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Karnick, David A.; Ponchak, George E.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation sputtered silicon carbide annealed at 300 C for one hour is used as a conformal thin film package. A RF magnetron sputterer was used to deposit 500 nm silicon carbide films on gold metal structures on alumina wafers. To determine the reliability and resistance to immersion in harsh environments, samples were submerged in gold etchant for 24 hours, in BOE for 24 hours, and in an O2 plasma etch for one hour. The adhesion strength of the thin film was measured by a pull test before and after the chemical immersion, which indicated that the film has an adhesion strength better than 10(exp 8) N/m2; this is similar to the adhesion of the gold layer to the alumina wafer. MIM capacitors are used to determine the dielectric constant, which is dependent on the SiC anneal temperature. Finally, to demonstrate that the SiC, conformal, thin film may be used to package RF circuits and sensors, an LC resonator circuit was fabricated and tested with and without the conformal SiC thin film packaging. The results indicate that the SiC coating adds no appreciable degradation to the circuits RF performance. Index Terms Sputter, silicon carbide, MIM capacitors, LC resonators, gold etchants, BOE, O2 plasma

  13. Novel photochemical vapor deposition reactor for amorphous silicon solar cell deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.; Hegedus, Steven S.; Buchanan, Wayne A.; Jackson, Scott C.

    1987-07-01

    A novel photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) reactor having a flexible ultraviolet-transparent Teflon curtain and a secondary gas flow to eliminate deposition on the window has been used to deposit amorphous silicon films and p-i-n solar cells. The background levels of atmospheric contaminants (H2O, CO2, N2) depend strongly on the vacuum procedures but not on the presence of a Teflon curtain in the reactor. Intrinsic films with a midgap density of states of 3×1015 eV-1 cm-3 and all-photo-CVD pin solar cells with efficiencies of 8.5% have been deposited.

  14. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  15. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  16. 29 CFR 510.21 - SIC codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SIC codes. 510.21 Section 510.21 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT IN PUERTO RICO...

  17. Microwave joining of SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberglitt, R.; Ahmad, I. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Black, W.M. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to optimize the properties of SiC-SiC joints made using microwave energy. The current focus is on optimization of time-temperature profiles, production of SiC from chemical precursors, and design of new applicators for joining of long tubes.

  18. Universal Converter Using SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallas Marckx; Brian Ratliff; Amit Jain; Matthew Jones

    2007-01-01

    The grantee designed a high power (over 1MW) inverter for use in renewable and distributed energy systems, such as PV cells, fuel cells, variable speed wind turbines, micro turbines, variable speed gensets and various energy storage methods. The inverter uses 10,000V SiC power devices which enable the use of a straight-forward topology for medium voltage (4,160VAC) without the need to cascade devices or topologies as is done in all commercial, 4,160VAC inverters today. The use of medium voltage reduces the current by nearly an order of magnitude in all current carrying components of the energy system, thus reducing size and cost. The use of SiC not only enables medium voltage, but also the use of higher temperatures and switching frequencies, further reducing size and cost. In this project, the grantee addressed several technical issues that stand in the way of success. The two primary issues addressed are the determination of real heat losses in candidate SiC devices at elevated temperature and the development of high temperature packaging for SiC devices.

  19. Passive SiC irradiation temperature monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, G.E.

    1996-04-01

    A new, improved passive irradiation temperature monitoring method was examined after an irradiation test at 627{degrees}C. The method is based on the analysis of thermal diffusivity changes during postirradiation annealing of polycrystalline SiC. Based on results from this test, several advantages for using this new method rather than a method based on length or lattice parameter changes are given.

  20. EFFECT OF SiC PARTICLE SIZE ON THE MATERIAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MULLITE BONDED SiC CERAMICS PROCESSED BY INFILTRATION TECHNIQUE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanchita Baitalik; Nijhuma Kayal; Dey Atanu; Chakrabarti Omprakash

    2014-01-01

    The influence of SiC particles size on the bonding phase content, microstructure, SiC oxidation degree, flexural strength, porosity and pore size distribution of mullitebonded porous SiC ceramics were...

  1. Raman modes in transferred bilayer CVD graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niilisk Ahti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic experimental Raman spectroscopic study of twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG domains localized inside wide-area single layer graphene (SLG produced by low-pressure CVD on Cu foil and transferred onto SiO2/Si substrate has been performed. According to the Raman characterization the tBLG domains had a great variety of twisting angles θ between the bottom and top graphene layers (6° < θ < 25°. The twisting angle θ was estimated from the spectral position of the rotating R and R' modes in the Raman spectrum.Under G band resonance conditions the breathing mode ZO' with a frequency of 95- 97 cm−1 was detected, and a breathing mode ZO was found in the spectra between 804 cm−1 and 836 cm−1, its position depending on the twisting angle θ. An almost linear relationship was found between the frequencies ωZO and ωR. Also a few other spectral peculiarities were found, e.g. a high-energy excitation of the G band resonance, the 2G overtone appearing at 3170-3180 cm−1 by the G band resonance, revealing a linear dispersion of 80 cm−1/eV of the 2D band in tBLG

  2. Fast method for reactor and feature scale coupling in ALD and CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2017-08-08

    Transport and surface chemistry of certain deposition techniques is modeled. Methods provide a model of the transport inside nanostructures as a single-particle discrete Markov chain process. This approach decouples the complexity of the surface chemistry from the transport model, thus allowing its application under general surface chemistry conditions, including atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Methods provide for determination of determine statistical information of the trajectory of individual molecules, such as the average interaction time or the number of wall collisions for molecules entering the nanostructures as well as to track the relative contributions to thin-film growth of different independent reaction pathways at each point of the feature.

  3. Randschicht- und durchgreifendes Härten von 42CrMo4 nach CVD-Beschichtung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Kessler, Olaf; Hoffmann, Franz

    1999-01-01

    the properties of steel substrates ready for operation. Bulk hardening and induction surface hardening as two different post-deposition heat treatments are applied on TiN-coated 42CrMo4 (AISI 4140) substrates. The results show great advantages of induction surface hardening because only low distortion appear......The properties of hard coatings deposited using CVD-processes are usually excellent. However, high deposition temperatures may negativelly influence the properties of the steel substrates, especially in the case of low alloyed steels. Therefore, a subsequent heat treatment is necessary to restore...... and the properties of the steel substrates are improved without loosing good coating properties. Thereby, the properties of the steel substrates can be influenced by the parameters of induction heating in a wide range....

  4. Aluminum and aluminum/silicon coatings on ferritic steels by CVD-FBR technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F.J. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: fjperez@quim.ucm.es; Hierro, M.P. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Trilleros, J.A. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carpintero, M.C. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, L. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bolivar, F.J. [Grupo de Investigacion de Ingenieria de Superficies, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-05-10

    The use of chemical vapor deposition by fluidized bed reactors (CVD-FBR) offers some advantages in comparison to other coating techniques such as pack cementation, because it allows coating deposition at lower temperatures than pack cementation and at atmospheric pressure without affecting the mechanical properties of material due to heat treatments of the bulk during coating process. Aluminum and aluminum/silicon coatings have been obtained on two different ferritics steels (P-91 and P-92). The coatings were analyzed using several techniques like SEM/EDX and XRD. The results indicated that both coatings were form by Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} intermetallic compound, and in the co-deposition the Si was incorporated to the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} structure in small amounts.

  5. CO{sub 2} laser-induced plasma CVD synthesis of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konov, V.I.; Prokhorov, A.M.; Uglov, S.A.; Bolshakov, A.P.; Leontiev, I.A. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Obshchej Fiziki; Dausinger, F.; Huegel, H.; Angstenberger, B. [Institute of High Power Beam Technology (IFSW), Stuttgart University, Pfaffenwaldring 43, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Sepold, G.; Metev, S. [Bremen Institute of Applied Beam Technology, D-28800 Bremen 33, Klagenfurter Str. 2 (Germany)

    1998-05-01

    A novel technique for CVD synthesis of materials that does not demand a vacuum chamber and provides high deposition rates has been developed. It is based on CO{sub 2} laser maintenance of a stationary optical discharge in a gas stream, exhausting over a substrate into the air (laser plasmatron). Nano- and polycrystalline-diamond films were deposited on tungsten substrates from atmospheric-pressure Xe(Ar):H{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} gas mixtures at flow rates of 2 l/min. A 2.5-kW CO{sub 2} laser focused beam produced plasma. The deposition area was about 1 cm{sup 2} and growth rates were up to 30-50 {mu}m/h. Peculiarities and advantages of laser plasmatrons are discussed. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 refs.

  6. Randschicht- und durchgreifendes Härten von 42CrMo4 nach CVD-Beschichtung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Kessler, Olaf; Hoffmann, Franz;

    1999-01-01

    The properties of hard coatings deposited using CVD-processes are usually excellent. However, high deposition temperatures may negativelly influence the properties of the steel substrates, especially in the case of low alloyed steels. Therefore, a subsequent heat treatment is necessary to restore...... the properties of steel substrates ready for operation. Bulk hardening and induction surface hardening as two different post-deposition heat treatments are applied on TiN-coated 42CrMo4 (AISI 4140) substrates. The results show great advantages of induction surface hardening because only low distortion appear...... and the properties of the steel substrates are improved without loosing good coating properties. Thereby, the properties of the steel substrates can be influenced by the parameters of induction heating in a wide range....

  7. Mechanics-driven patterning of CVD graphene for roll-based manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Min; Jang, Bongkyun; Jo, Kyungmin; Kim, Donghyuk; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Kyung-Shik; Lee, Seung-Mo; Lee, Hak-Joo; Han, Seung Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Graphene is considered as a promising material for flexible and transparent electrodes due to its outstanding electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. Efforts to mass-produce graphene electrodes led to the development of roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene growth and transfer, and the only remaining obstacle to the mass-production of CVD graphene electrodes is a cost-effective patterning technique that is compatible with the roll-to-roll manufacturing. Herein, we propose a mechanics-driven technique for patterning graphene synthesized on copper foil (commonly used in roll-to-roll manufacturing). The copper foil is exposed to high temperature for a prolonged period during the CVD growth of graphene, and thus can result in recrystallization and grain growth of the copper foil and thereby reducing to the yield strength. This softening behavior of the copper was carefully controlled to allow simple stamp patterning of the graphene. The strength of the underlying substrate was controlled for the accuracy of the residual patterns. The proposed stamp patterning technique is mask-less and photoresist-free, and can be performed at room temperature without high-energy sources such as lasers or plasma. To demonstrate the capability of this process to produce a continuous electrode, a transparent in-plane supercapacitor was fabricated using the proposed patterning technique.

  8. A CVD Diamond Detector for (n,a) Cross-Section Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Christina; Griesmayer, Erich; Guerrero, Carlos

    A novel detector based on the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond technology has been developed in the framework of this PhD, for the experimental determination of (n,a) cross-sections at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN. The 59Ni(n,a)56Fe cross-section, which is relevant for astrophysical questions as well as for risk-assessment studies in nuclear technology, has been measured in order to validate the applicability of the detector for such experiments. The thesis is divided in four parts. In the introductory part the motivation for measuring (n,a) cross-sections, the experimental challenges for such measurements and the reasons for choosing the CVD diamond technology for the detector are given. This is followed by the presentation of the n_TOF facility, an introduction to neutron-induced nuclear reactions and a brief summary of the interaction of particles with matter. The CVD diamond technology and the relevant matters related to electronics are given as well in this first part of the t...

  9. Radio Frequency Transistors and Circuits Based on CVD MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanne, Atresh; Ghosh, Rudresh; Rai, Amritesh; Yogeesh, Maruthi Nagavalli; Shin, Seung Heon; Sharma, Ankit; Jarvis, Karalee; Mathew, Leo; Rao, Rajesh; Akinwande, Deji; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-08-12

    We report on the gigahertz radio frequency (RF) performance of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) monolayer MoS2 field-effect transistors (FETs). Initial DC characterizations of fabricated MoS2 FETs yielded current densities exceeding 200 μA/μm and maximum transconductance of 38 μS/μm. A contact resistance corrected low-field mobility of 55 cm(2)/(V s) was achieved. Radio frequency FETs were fabricated in the ground-signal-ground (GSG) layout, and standard de-embedding techniques were applied. Operating at the peak transconductance, we obtain short-circuit current-gain intrinsic cutoff frequency, fT, of 6.7 GHz and maximum intrinsic oscillation frequency, fmax, of 5.3 GHz for a device with a gate length of 250 nm. The MoS2 device afforded an extrinsic voltage gain Av of 6 dB at 100 MHz with voltage amplification until 3 GHz. With the as-measured frequency performance of CVD MoS2, we provide the first demonstration of a common-source (CS) amplifier with voltage gain of 14 dB and an active frequency mixer with conversion gain of -15 dB. Our results of gigahertz frequency performance as well as analog circuit operation show that large area CVD MoS2 may be suitable for industrial-scale electronic applications.

  10. Synthesis of Different Layers of Graphene on Stainless Steel Using the CVD Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Tahir, Paridah Md; Yunus, Robiah

    2016-12-01

    In this study, different types of graphene, including single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene, were grown on a stainless steel (SS) mesh coated with Cu catalyst by using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Even though the SS mesh consisted of different types of metals, such as Fe, Ni, and Cr, which can also be used as catalysts, the reason for coating Cu catalyst on the SS surface had been related to the nature of the Cu, which promotes the growth of graphene with high quality and quantity at low temperature and time. The reaction temperature and run time, as the most important parameters of the CVD method, were varied, and thus led to the synthesis of different layers of graphene. Moreover, the presence of single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene was confirmed by employing two techniques, namely transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. On top of that, electron dispersive X-ray (EDX) was further applied to establish the influence of the CVD parameters on the growth of graphene.

  11. Giant enhancement in vertical conductivity of stacked CVD graphene sheets by self-assembled molecular layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanpeng; Yuan, Li; Yang, Ming; Zheng, Yi; Li, Linjun; Gao, Libo; Nerngchamnong, Nisachol; Nai, Chang Tai; Sangeeth, C. S. Suchand; Feng, Yuan Ping; Nijhuis, Christian A.; Loh, Kian Ping

    2014-11-01

    Layer-by-layer-stacked chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene films find applications as transparent and conductive electrodes in solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes and touch panels. Common to lamellar-type systems with anisotropic electron delocalization, the plane-to-plane (vertical) conductivity in such systems is several orders lower than its in-plane conductivity. The poor electronic coupling between the planes is due to the presence of transfer process organic residues and trapped air pocket in wrinkles. Here we show the plane-to-plane tunnelling conductivity of stacked CVD graphene layers can be improved significantly by inserting 1-pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester between the graphene layers. The six orders of magnitude increase in plane-to-plane conductivity is due to hole doping, orbital hybridization, planarization and the exclusion of polymer residues. Our results highlight the importance of interfacial modification for enhancing the performance of LBL-stacked CVD graphene films, which should be applicable to other types of stacked two-dimensional films.

  12. Synthesis of Different Layers of Graphene on Stainless Steel Using the CVD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Ferial; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Tahir, Paridah Md; Yunus, Robiah

    2016-11-01

    In this study, different types of graphene, including single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene, were grown on a stainless steel (SS) mesh coated with Cu catalyst by using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Even though the SS mesh consisted of different types of metals, such as Fe, Ni, and Cr, which can also be used as catalysts, the reason for coating Cu catalyst on the SS surface had been related to the nature of the Cu, which promotes the growth of graphene with high quality and quantity at low temperature and time. The reaction temperature and run time, as the most important parameters of the CVD method, were varied, and thus led to the synthesis of different layers of graphene. Moreover, the presence of single-, few-, and multi-layer graphene was confirmed by employing two techniques, namely transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. On top of that, electron dispersive X-ray (EDX) was further applied to establish the influence of the CVD parameters on the growth of graphene.

  13. Direct CVD Graphene Growth on Semiconductors and Dielectrics for Transfer-Free Device Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaping; Yu, Gui

    2016-07-01

    Graphene is the most broadly discussed and studied two-dimensional material because of its preeminent physical, mechanical, optical, and thermal properties. Until now, metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been widely employed for the scalable production of high-quality graphene. However, in order to incorporate the graphene into electronic devices, a transfer process from metal substrates to targeted substrates is inevitable. This process usually results in contamination, wrinkling, and breakage of graphene samples - undesirable in graphene-based technology and not compatible with industrial production. Therefore, direct graphene growth on desired semiconductor and dielectric substrates is considered as an effective alternative. Over the past years, there have been intensive investigations to realize direct graphene growth using CVD methods without the catalytic role of metals. Owing to the low catalytic activity of non-metal substrates for carbon precursor decomposition and graphene growth, several strategies have been designed to facilitate and engineer graphene fabrication on semiconductors and insulators. Here, those developed strategies for direct CVD graphene growth on semiconductors and dielectrics for transfer-free fabrication of electronic devices are reviewed. By employing these methods, various graphene-related structures can be directly prepared on desired substrates and exhibit excellent performance, providing versatile routes for varied graphene-based materials fabrication.

  14. Deposition and Investigation of Hydrophobic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safonov Aleksey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluoropolymer coatings of different morphologies are deposited by the HWCVD (Hot Wire CVD method. The effect of activator filament temperature on the structure of fluoropolymer coating is shown. The results of studying the hydrophobic fluoropolymer coatings with different structures, deposited by the HWCVD method, are presented.

  15. Anomalous forward I-V characteristics of Ti/Au SiC Schottky barrier diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, D.J.; Wright, N.G.; Johnson, C.M.; O' Neill, A.G. [Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Electr. and Electron. Eng.; Hilton, K.P.; Uren, M.J. [Defence Evaluation Research Agency, Malvern, Worcestershire (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-30

    The aim of this study was to improve the adhesion of Au Schottky contacts to SiC. In order to do this, before the deposition of the Au layer, a thin layer of Ti was deposited. However, this resulted in an anomalous step in the forward bias electrical characteristic for some diodes. An equivalent circuit model is introduced to explain this irregularity in terms of two barrier heights. PSPICE is used to simulate this model. Simulated and experimental data are in good agreement over the temperature range 25 to 250 C. (orig.)

  16. Synthesis of High Purity SiC Powder for High-resistivity SiC Single Crystals Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li WANG; Xiaobu HU; Xiangang XU; Shouzheng JIANG; Lina NING; Minhua JIANG

    2007-01-01

    High purity silicon carbide (SiC) powder was synthesized in-situ by chemical reaction between silicon and carbon powder. In order to ensure that the impurity concentration of the resulting SiC powder is suitable for high-resistivity SiC single crystal growth, the preparation technology of SiC powder is different from that of SiC ceramic. The influence of the shape and size of carbon particles on the morphology and phase composition of the obtained SiC powder were discussed. The phase composition and morphology of the products were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Raman microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the composition of resulting SiC by in-situ synthesis from Si/C mixture strongly depends on the nature of the carbon source, which corresponds to the particle size and shape, as well as the preparation temperature. In the experimental conditions, flake graphite is more suitable for the synthesis of SiC powder than activated carbon because of its relatively smaller particle size and flake shape, which make the conversion more complete. The major phase composition of the full conversion products is β-SiC, with traces of α-SiC.Glow discharge mass spectroscopy measurements indicated that SiC powder synthesized with this chemical reaction method can meet the purity demand for the growth of high-resistivity SiC single crystals.

  17. Fabrication and characteristics of self-assembly nano-polystyrene films by laser induced CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Tingting [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Cai, Congzhong [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Peng, Liping [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wu, Weidong, E-mail: wuweidongding@163.com [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-10-01

    The self-assembly nano-polystyrene (PS) films have been prepared by laser induced CVD at room temperature. The XPS, Raman and UV–vis absorption spectra all indicated that the films were PS. The optical properties, microstructure and controllable nanostructure of PS films have been investigated. Dewetting-like microstructure in PS films was investigated and uniform island structures with a diameter of about 200 nm were observed at the deposition pressure of 14 Pa. The films possess good toughness and precisely controlled thicknesses. The free-standing PS films with thickness of 10 nm could be obtained by this method though a series of process.

  18. Utilization of Neutron Bang-time CVD diamond detectors at the Z Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Gordon; Hahn, Kelly; Ruiz, Carlos; Jones, Brent; Gomez, Matthew; Hess, Mark; Harding, Eric; Knapp, Patrick; Bur, James; Torres, Jose; Norris, Edward; Cooper, Gary; Styron, Jedediah; Moy, Ken; McKenna, Ian; Glebov, Vladimir; Fittinghoff, David; May, Mark; Snyder, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    We are utilizing Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) Diamond detectors at 2.3 meters on the Z accelerator to infer neutron bang-times from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) sources yielding up to 3e12 DD neutrons and to bound the neutron time history of Deuterium Gas Puff loads producing 5e13 DD neutrons. The current implementation of the diagnostic and initial results will be shown as well as our future plans for the diagnostic. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. SiC nanoparticles cyto- and genotoxicity to Hep-G2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barillet, Sabrina; Jugan, Mary-Line; Simon-Deckers, Angelique; Carriere, Marie [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR9956, IRAMIS, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)], E-mail: marie.carriere@cea.fr; Leconte, Yann; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Mayne-l' Hermite, Martine; Reynaud, Cecile [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA-CNRS URA2453, IRAMIS, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2009-05-01

    While emerging nanotechnologies have seen significant development in recent years, knowledge on exposure levels as well as data on toxicity of nanoparticles are still quite limited. Indeed, there is a general agreement that development of nanotechnologies may lead to considerable dissemination of nanoparticles in the environment. Nevertheless, questions relative to toxicity versus innocuousness of such materials still remain. Our present study has thus been carried out with the purpose of assessing some aspects of toxicological capacities of three kinds of nano-sized particles: TiO{sub 2} and SiC nanoparticles, as well as multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT). In order to address the question of their potential toxicity toward living cells, we chose several cellular models. Assuming inhalation as the most probable exposure scenario, we used A549 alveolar epithelial cells as a model for mammalian primary target organ (lung). Furthermore, we considered that nanoparticles that would deposit into the pulmonary system may be translocated to the circulatory system. Thus, we decided to study the effect of nanoparticles on potentially secondary target organs: liver (WIF-B9, Can-10, HepG2) and kidneys (NRK-52E, LLC-PK1). Herein, we will focus our attention on results obtained on the HepG2 cell line exposed to SiC nanoparticles. Scarce literature exists on SiC nanotoxicology. According to the authors that have already carried out studies on this particular nanoparticle, it would seem that SiC nanoparticles do not induce cytotoxicity. That is one of the reasons of the potential use of these nanoparticles as biological labels [1]. We thus were interested in acquiring more data on biological effects induced by SiC nanoparticles. Furthermore, one of the particular aspects of the present study lies in the fact that we tried to specify the influence of physico-chemical characteristics of nanoparticles on toxicological endpoints (cytotoxicity and genotoxicity)

  20. Carbon Nanotubes Deposited by Hot Wire Plasma CVD and water assisted CVD for Energetic and Environmental Applications

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have experienced a tremendous growth in few years. Nanotechnologies are the design, characterization, production and application of structures, devices and systems by controlling shape and size at nanometer scale. Carbon exists in several forms, depending on how the carbon atoms are arranged, their properties vary. One of the carbon forms is carbon nanotubes, which are capped at each end by half of a fullerene, and have aroused great interest in the research com...

  1. High growth rate of a-SiC:H films using ethane carbon source by HW-CVD method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahesh M Kamble; Vaishali S Waman; Sanjay S Ghosh; Azam Mayabadi; Vasant G Sathe; T Shripathi; Habib M Pathan; Sandesh R Jadkar

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films were prepared using pure silane (SiH4) and ethane (C2H6), a novel carbon source, without hydrogen dilution using hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HW-CVD) method at low substrate temperature (200 °C) and at reasonably higher deposition rate (19.5 Å/s < d < 35.2 Å/s). Formation of a-SiC:H films has been confirmed from FTIR, Raman and XPS analysis. Influence of deposition pressure on compositional, structural, optical and electrical properties has been investigated. FTIR spectroscopy analysis revealed that there is decrease in C–H and Si–H bond densities while, Si–C bond density increases with increase in deposition pressure. Total hydrogen content drops from 22.6 to 14.4 at.% when deposition pressure is increased. Raman spectra show increase in structural disorder with increase in deposition pressure. It also confirms the formation of nearly stoichiometric a-SiC:H films. Bandgap calculated using both Tauc’s formulation and absorption at 104 cm-1 shows decreasing trend with increase in deposition pressure. Decrease in refractive index and increase in Urbach energy suggests increase in structural disorder and microvoid density in the films. Finally, it has been concluded that C2H6 can be used as an effective carbon source in HW-CVD method to prepare stoichiometric a-SiC:H films.

  2. Thermal reaction of SiC films with tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, J.; Le Petitcorps, Y. [Univ Bordeaux 1, Lab Composites Thermostruct, CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1, UMR 5801, F-33600 Pessac, (France); Roger, J.; Audubert, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA/LTEC, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Solid-state reactions between SiC films and W-xRe (x = 0, 5 and 25 at%) substrates on thermal annealing between 1673 K and 1873 K for various durations have been investigated. SiC coatings were deposited on metallic wires by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) from a gas mixture of tetramethyl-silane (TMS) and hydrogen at 1373 K under normal pressure. The interface zones were characterized using scanning electron and optical microscopies, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe microanalysis. All analyses reveal that SiC reacts with substrates. Various metal silicides and carbides were formed in layered reaction and the presence of these phases was confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. The effects of rhenium on the reactivity were established by the determination of growth kinetics deducted from the thicknesses of reaction zones as a function of annealing time. It has been found that an increase in the diffusion kinetics and activation energy with the quantity of rhenium in the tungsten wire. (authors)

  3. Young's modulus measurements of SiC coatings on spherical particles by using nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, J.; Meadows, P.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Zhang, D. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Chen Xi [Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University, New York (United States); Lopez-Honorato, E.; Zhao, X.; Yang, F. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Abram, T. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Xiao, P., E-mail: ping.xiao@manchester.ac.u [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M1 7HS (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Spherical silicon carbide coatings are deposited by fluidised bed chemical vapour deposition for the application to Tristructural Isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles. The silicon carbide exhibits columnar structure and grows along the radial direction during deposition. In this work, two measurements are made with nanoindentation, one is measured vertically to the grain growth direction, which gives a Young's modulus of 391.1 +- 12.9 GPa, and the other is measured along the grain growth direction which gives a Young's modulus of 442.5 +- 13.3 GPa. Finite element analysis and a theoretical effort are introduced to estimate the bending contribution when the indentation is carried out on the external surface of SiC. The relationship between grain orientation of SiC and its Young's modulus has been examined.

  4. Incorporation of oxygen in SiC implanted with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcz, A.; Jakieła, R.; Kozubal, M.; Dyczewski, J.; Celler, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen accumulation at buried implantation-damage layers was studied after post-implantation annealing of hydrogen- or deuterium-implanted 4H-SiC. In this study H+ or 2H+ implantation was carried out at energies E, from 200 keV to 1 MeV, to fluences D, ranging from 2 × 1016/cm2 to 1 × 1017/cm2. For comparison, the implantation was also done into float-zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ) silicon wafers. Post-implantation annealing at temperatures from 400 °C to 1150 °C was performed either in pure argon or in a water vapor. Characterization methods included SIMS, RBS and TEM. At sufficiently high doses, hydrogen implantation into semiconductors leads to the irreversible formation of a planar zone of microcavities, bubbles and other extended defects located at the maximum of deposited energy. This kind of highly perturbed layer, containing large amounts of agglomerated hydrogen is known to efficiently getter a number of impurities. Oxygen was detected in both CZ and FZ silicon subjected to Smart-Cut™ processing. We have identified, by SIMS profiling, a considerable oxygen peak situated at the interface between the SiC substrate and a layer implanted with 1 × 1017 H ions/cm2 and heated to 1150 °C in either H2O vapor or in a nominally pure Ar. In view of a lack of convincing evidence that a hexagonal SiC might contain substantial amounts of oxygen, the objective of the present study was to identify the source and possible transport mechanism of oxygen species to the cavity band. Through the analysis of several implants annealed at various conditions, we conclude that, besides diffusion from the bulk or from surface oxides, an alternative path for oxygen agglomeration is migration of gaseous O2 or H2O from the edge of the sample through the porous layer.

  5. Growth and characterization of cubic SiC single-crystal films on Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Matus, L. G.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    1987-01-01

    Morphological and electrical characterization results are presented for cubic SiC films grown by chemical vapor deposition on single-crystal Si substrates. The films, up to 40 microns thick, were characterized by optical microscopy, (SEM), (TEM), electron channeling, surface profilometry, and Hall measurements. A variety of morphological features observed on the SiC films are described. Electrical measurements showed a decrease in the electron mobility with increasing electron carrier concentration, similar to that observed in Si. Room-temperature electron mobilities up to 520 sq cm/V-s (at an electron carrier concentration of 5 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm) were measured. Finally, a number of parameters believed to be important in the growth process were investigated, and some discussion is given of their possible effects on the film characteristics.

  6. Investigation of the SiC thin films synthetized by Thermionic Vacuum Arc method (TVA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupina, V.; Vladoiu, R.; Lungu, C. P.; Dinca, V.; Contulov, M.; Mandes, A.; Popov, P.; Prodan, G.

    2012-04-01

    Thermionic Vacuum Arc method (TVA) was used for the first time to prepare SiC thin films. This method is very suitable for deposition of high purity thin films with compact structure and extremely smooth in vacuum conditions. The nanocomposites were investigated using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analyses provided with HR-TEM and SAED facilities. The structure of the films can be indexed as following three forms: cubic structure of SiC (F4-3m) a = 0.4348 nm, cubic Si (Fd3m) a = 0.54307 nm and graphite (P63/mmc) a = 0.2456 nm; c = 0.6696 nm. The morphology, topography, wettability and wear properties were also performed by SEE system and by Raman Spectroscopy, increasing the interest for emerging applications.

  7. Point Defects in SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvanut, Mary Ellen

    2004-03-01

    Production of high frequency, high power electronic devices using wide bandgap semiconductors has spurred renewed interest in point defects in SiC. Recent electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy studies focus on centers in as-grown high purity semi-insulating substrates because intrinsic defects are thought to compensate unavoidable shallow centers, thus creating the high resistivity required. The EPR studies address the chemical/structural composition of the defects, the defect level (energy with respect to a band edge with which the defect can accept or release an electron) and thermal stability. Thus far, the positively charged carbon vacancy, the Si vacancy, a carbon-vacancy/carbon antisite pair, and several as yet-unidentified centers have been observed in as-grown electronic-grade 4H-SiC [1-3]. The talk will review the types of defects recently identified in SiC and discuss their possible relationship to compensation. The photo-induced EPR experiments used to determine defect levels will be discussed, with a particular focus on the carbon vacancy. The use of high frequency EPR to resolve the many different types of centers in SiC will also be covered. Finally, the presentation will review the thermal stability of the intrinsic defects detected in as-grown 4H SiC. 1. M. E. Zvanut and V. V. Konovalov, Appl. Phys. Lett. 80, 410 (2002). 2. N.T. Son, Z. Zolnai, and E. Janzen, Phys. Rev. B64, 2452xx (2003). 3. W.E. Carlos, E.R. Glaser, and B.V. Shanabrook, in Proceedings of the 22nd conference on Defects in Semiconductors, Aarhus, Denmark, July 2003.

  8. SiC Schottky diode electrothermal macromodel

    OpenAIRE

    Masana Nadal, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a SiC Schottky diode model including static, dynamic and thermal features implemented as separate parameterized blocks constructed from SPICE Analog Behavioral Modeling (ABM) controlled sources. The parameters for each block are easy to extract, even from readily available diode data sheet information. The model complexity is low thus allowing reasonably long simulation times to cope with the rather slow self heating process and yet accurate enough for practical purposes.

  9. CVD synthesis of polycrystalline magnetite thin films: structural, magnetic and magnetotransport properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantovan, R; Lamperti, A; Georgieva, M; Tallarida, G; Fanciulli, M, E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.infm.i [Laboratorio Nazionale MDM CNR-INFM, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2010-02-17

    Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) is predicted to be half metallic at room temperature (RT) and it shows the highest Curie temperature among oxides. The use of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films is therefore promising for spintronic devices such as magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) and magnetoresistive sensors. The structural, magnetic and magnetotransport properties of magnetite are reported to be strongly dependent on the growth conditions. We have developed a very simple deposition chamber for growing thin magnetite films via a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process based on the Fe{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} carbonyl precursor. The structural, morphological, and magnetic properties of the as deposited Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films have been investigated by means of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, atomic force microscopy, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Magnetotransport measurements show magnetoresistance up to -2.4% at RT at the maximum applied field of 1.1 T. Resistivity measurements in the 100-300 K temperature range reveal that the magnetotransport properties of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} films are governed by inter-granular tunnelling of the spin-polarized electrons. The spin polarization is estimated to be around -16%. A possible route for increasing the spin-polarized performances of our magnetite films is proposed. We have also deposited Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MgO/Co stacks by using a combined CVD and atomic layer-deposition process. The trilayer's hysteresis curve evidences the presence of two distinct switching fields making it promising for magnetite-based MTJ applications.

  10. CVD synthesis of polycrystalline magnetite thin films: structural, magnetic and magnetotransport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovan, R.; Lamperti, A.; Georgieva, M.; Tallarida, G.; Fanciulli, M.

    2010-02-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is predicted to be half metallic at room temperature (RT) and it shows the highest Curie temperature among oxides. The use of Fe3O4 thin films is therefore promising for spintronic devices such as magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) and magnetoresistive sensors. The structural, magnetic and magnetotransport properties of magnetite are reported to be strongly dependent on the growth conditions. We have developed a very simple deposition chamber for growing thin magnetite films via a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process based on the Fe3(CO)12 carbonyl precursor. The structural, morphological, and magnetic properties of the as deposited Fe3O4 films have been investigated by means of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, atomic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Magnetotransport measurements show magnetoresistance up to -2.4% at RT at the maximum applied field of 1.1 T. Resistivity measurements in the 100-300 K temperature range reveal that the magnetotransport properties of the Fe3O4 films are governed by inter-granular tunnelling of the spin-polarized electrons. The spin polarization is estimated to be around -16%. A possible route for increasing the spin-polarized performances of our magnetite films is proposed. We have also deposited Fe3O4/MgO/Co stacks by using a combined CVD and atomic layer-deposition process. The trilayer's hysteresis curve evidences the presence of two distinct switching fields making it promising for magnetite-based MTJ applications.

  11. Effect of RF power and gas flow ratio on the growth and morphology of the PECVD SiC thin films for MEMS applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhavana Peri; Bikash Borah; Raj Kishora Dash

    2015-08-01

    Low-temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) deposited silicon carbide (SiC) thin films are promising materials for the development of high-temperature working microelectromechanical system (MEMS) owing to their excellent mechanical properties, non-corrosive nature and ability to withstand high temperature. However, the surface roughness of such thin films is the main obstacle to achieve thicker thin films for MEMS applications as the surface becomes more rougher with the increase in the thickness of PECVD SiC thin films. Therefore, in this present study, thicker SiC thin films were deposited by PECVD process by using CH4 and SiH4 as the precursor gases in the presence of Ar as the carrier gas and two process parameters, i.e., radio frequency (RF) power with mixed frequency condition and flow ratio of silane to methane were varied by keeping the temperature and pressure constant to investigate the influence of these parameters on the growth rate, surface roughness and morphology of SiC thin films. It was observed that both the RF power (with the mixed frequency condition) and flow ratio of SiH4/CH4 can control the growth rate, surface roughness and morphology of the PECVD SiC thin films. Higher the carbon content in the thin films the surface became more smoother, whereas the surface became for rougher by increasing the RF power.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes by CVD and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassell, Alan; Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Stevens, Ramsey; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) exhibits extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and offers significant potential for structural, sensor, and nanoelectronics applications. An overview of CNT, growth methods, properties and applications is provided. Single-wall, and multi-wall CNTs have been grown by chemical vapor deposition. Catalyst development and optimization has been accomplished using combinatorial optimization methods. CNT has also been grown from the tips of silicon cantilevers for use in atomic force microscopy.

  13. Acetylene-sourced CVD-synthesised catalytically active graphene for electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osikoya, Adeniyi Olugbenga; Parlak, Onur; Murugan, N Arul; Dikio, Ezekiel Dixon; Moloto, Harry; Uzun, Lokman; Turner, Anthony Pf; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we have demonstrated the use of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown-graphene to develop a highly-ordered graphene-enzyme electrode for electrochemical biosensing. The graphene sheets were deposited on 1.00mm thick copper sheet at 850°C using acetylene (C2H2) as carbon source in an argon (Ar) and nitrogen (N2) atmosphere. An anionic surfactant was used to increase wettability and hydrophilicity of graphene; thereby facilitating the assembly of biomolecules on the electrode surface. Meanwhile, the theoretical calculations confirmed the successful modification of hydrophobic nature of graphene through the anionic surface assembly, which allowed high-ordered immobilisation of glucose oxidase (GOx) on the graphene. The electrochemical sensing activities of the graphene-electrode was explored as a model for bioelectrocatalysis. The bioelectrode exhibited a linear response to glucose concentration ranging from 0.2 to 9.8mM, with sensitivity of 0.087µA/µM/cm(2) and a detection limit of 0.12µM (S/N=3). This work sets the stage for the use of acetylene-sourced CVD-grown graphene as a fundamental building block in the fabrication of electrochemical biosensors and other bioelectronic devices.

  14. Faraday effect of bismuth iron garnet thin film prepared by mist CVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Situ; Sato, Takafumi; Kaneko, Kentaro; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Metastable bismuth iron garnet (BIG, an abbreviation of Bi3Fe5O12), one kind of garnet-type ferrites, is known to manifest very large Faraday rotation as well as low optical absorption in the visible to infrared region. We report on successful synthesis of thin film composed of single-phase BIG epitaxially grown on single-crystalline gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, GGG) substrate by using mist chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, which is an emerging technique for preparation of thin films. The crystal structure, surface morphology, and magnetic, optical and magneto-optical properties of the resultant thin films have been explored. The BIG thin film has a relatively flat surface free from roughness compared to those prepared by other vapor deposition methods. Saturation magnetization is about 1620 G at room temperature, which is close to that expected from the ideal magnetic structure of BIG. The maximum value of Faraday rotation angle reaches 54.3 deg/µm at a wavelength of 424 nm. This value is rather large when compared with those reported for BIG thin films prepared by other techniques. The wavelength dependence of Faraday rotation angle is analyzed well in terms of the crystal electric field (CEF) level schema. Our result suggests that the mist CVD method is a simple and effective technique to synthesize BIG thin film with excellent magneto-optical properties.

  15. Amorphous SiC layers for electrically conductive Rugate filters in silicon based solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, S.; Peters, M.; Künle, M.; Gradmann, R.; Suwito, D.

    2010-05-01

    The subject of this work is the development of an electrically conductive Rugate filter for photovoltaic applications. We think that the optical as well as the electrical performance of the filter can be adapted especially to the requirements of crystalline Si thin-film and amorphous/crystalline silicon tandem solar cells. We have deposited amorphous hydrogenated Silicon Carbide layers (a-SixC1-x:H) with the precursor gases methane (CH4), silane (SiH4) and diborane (B2H6) applying Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD). Through changing just the precursor flows a floating refractive index n from 1.9 to 3.5 (at 633 nm) could be achieved quite accurately. Different complex layer stacks (up to 200 layers) with a sinusoidal refractive index variation normal to the incident light were deposited in just 80 min on 100x100 mm2. Transmission measurements show good agreement between simulation and experiment which proofs our ability to control the deposition process, the good knowledge of the optical behaviour of the different SiC single layers and the advanced stage of our simulation model. The doped single layers show lateral conductivities which were extremely dependent on the Si/C ratio.

  16. SiC Power MOSFET with Improved Gate Dielectric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sbrockey, Nick M; Tompa, Gary S; Spencer, Michael G; Chandrashekhar, Chandra MVS

    2010-08-23

    In this STTR program, Structured Materials Industries (SMI), and Cornell University are developing novel gate oxide technology, as a critical enabler for silicon carbide (SiC) devices. SiC is a wide bandgap semiconductor material, with many unique properties. SiC devices are ideally suited for high-power, highvoltage, high-frequency, high-temperature and radiation resistant applications. The DOE has expressed interest in developing SiC devices for use in extreme environments, in high energy physics applications and in power generation. The development of transistors based on the Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) structure will be critical to these applications.

  17. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Large Area Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Benjamin Barbour Spanget

    be eliminated. Further opportunities arise when exchanging the copper foil for copper thin film on a wafer e.g. better integration with current cleanroom processing of devices and better control over the copper crystallinity. Typical strategies for controlling the temperature during CVD fabrication of graphene...... of thermocouples leads to large variations in the grown graphene. This was solved by controlling the temperature through applying a set power to the heat source, resulting in a more stable temperature from process to process. Micro Raman spectroscopy is used to characterize the structural quality of the grown......Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) is a viable technique for fabrication of large areas of graphene. CVD fabrication is the most prominent and common way of fabricating graphene in industry. In this thesis I have attempted to optimize a growth recipe and catalyst layer for CVD fabrication of uniform...

  18. Effect of substrate roughness on growth of diamond by hot filament CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Awadesh K Mallik; S R Binu; L N Satapathy; Chandrabhas Narayana; Md Motin Seikh; S A Shivashankar; S K Biswas

    2010-06-01

    Polycrystalline diamond coatings are grown on Si (100) substrate by hot filament CVD technique. We investigate here the effect of substrate roughening on the substrate temperature and methane concentration required to maintain high quality, high growth rate and faceted morphology of the diamond coatings. It has been shown that as we increase the substrate roughness from 0.05 m to 0.91 m (centre line average or CLA) there is enhancement in deposited film quality (Raman peak intensity ratio of 3 to non-3 content increases from 1.65 to 7.13) and the substrate temperature can be brought down to 640°C without any additional substrate heating. The coatings grown at adverse conditions for 3 deposition has cauliflower morphology with nanocrystalline grains and coatings grown under favourable 3 condition gives clear faceted grains.

  19. CVD-grown Fe2+:ZnSe polycrystals for laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsov, K. N.; Gavrishchuk, E. M.; Ikonnikov, V. B.; Kazantsev, S. Yu; Kononov, I. G.; Rodin, S. A.; Savin, D. V.; Sirotkin, A. A.; Timofeeva, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    A technique for growing bulk zinc selenide polycrystals, doped with iron ions, by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), has been developed. It has been shown that iron is embedded in the crystal lattice of deposited zinc selenide in the optically active state of Fe2+. To improve the optical quality, the grown material was subjected to postgrowth hot isostatic pressing (HIP) treatment. It was experimentally demonstrated that the synthesised bulk crystals can be used as the active media of Fe2+:ZnSe lasers and as the passive Q-switches for three-micron lasers. The letter goes on to discuss the prospect of extending the proposed method to the synthesis of zinc sulphide doped with iron ions.

  20. Dropwise Condensation of Low Surface Tension Fluids on iCVD Grafted Polymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Karim; Gleason, Karen; Varanasi, Kripa

    2016-11-01

    A large majority of the work devoted to surface engineering for promoting dropwise condensation heat transfer has focused on steam. Much less attention has been dedicated to the condensation of low surface tension fluids such as hydrocarbons, cryogens, and fluorinated refrigerants, which are used in several industrial applications, including LNG storage and organic Rankine cycles used for heat recovery from low temperature sources such as biomass combustion, industrial waste, or geothermal heat sources. Most hydrophobic modifiers used previously to promote dropwise condensation are silane-based monolayers that have been shown to rapidly degrade under industrial conditions. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of low surface tension liquids on durable covalently-grafted polymer films deposited using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) on metals such as titanium. We observe a four to seven-fold improvement in the vapor-side heat transfer coefficient by promoting dropwise condensation of low surface tension fluids on these stable films.

  1. 500?C SiC JFET Driver Circuits and Packaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the proposed development, SiC JFET control circuitry and normally-off SiC JFET power switch will be integrated in a single SiC chip that will provide digital...

  2. Nanocrystalline SiC and Ti3SiC2 Alloys for Reactor Materials: Diffusion of Fission Product Surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H.; Jiang, Weilin

    2014-11-01

    MAX phases, such as titanium silicon carbide (Ti3SiC2), have a unique combination of both metallic and ceramic properties, which make them attractive for potential nuclear applications. Ti3SiC2 has been suggested in the literature as a possible fuel cladding material. Prior to the application, it is necessary to investigate diffusivities of fission products in the ternary compound at elevated temperatures. This study attempts to obtain relevant data and make an initial assessment for Ti3SiC2. Ion implantation was used to introduce fission product surrogates (Ag and Cs) and a noble metal (Au) in Ti3SiC2, SiC, and a dual-phase nanocomposite of Ti3SiC2/SiC synthesized at PNNL. Thermal annealing and in-situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were employed to study the diffusivity of the various implanted species in the materials. In-situ RBS study of Ti3SiC2 implanted with Au ions at various temperatures was also performed. The experimental results indicate that the implanted Ag in SiC is immobile up to the highest temperature (1273 K) applied in this study; in contrast, significant out-diffusion of both Ag and Au in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 occurs during ion implantation at 873 K. Cs in Ti3SiC2 is found to diffuse during post-irradiation annealing at 973 K, and noticeable Cs release from the sample is observed. This study may suggest caution in using Ti3SiC2 as a fuel cladding material for advanced nuclear reactors operating at very high temperatures. Further studies of the related materials are recommended.

  3. Transport mechanisms through PE-CVD coatings: influence of temperature, coating properties and defects on permeation of water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheim, Dennis; Jaritz, Montgomery; Mitschker, Felix; Gebhard, Maximilian; Brochhagen, Markus; Hopmann, Christian; Böke, Marc; Devi, Anjana; Awakowicz, Peter; Dahlmann, Rainer

    2017-03-01

    Gas transport mechanisms through plastics are usually described by the temperature-dependent Arrhenius-model and compositions of several plastic layers are represented by the CLT. When it comes to thin films such as plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PE-CVD) or plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) coatings on substrates of polymeric material, a universal model is lacking. While existing models describe diffusion through defects, these models presume that permeation does not occur by other means of transport mechanisms. This paper correlates the existing transport models with data from water vapour transmission experiments.

  4. Characterization of polycrystalline SiC layers grown by ECR-PECVD for micro-electro-mechanical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricciardi, C.; Bennici, E.; Cocuzza, M.; Mandracci, P.; Bich, D.; Guglielmetti, V.; Barucca, G

    2003-03-03

    Large area (up to 4 inch) polycrystalline 3C-SiC films have been deposited by electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition technique. Crystalline and non-crystalline substrates such as (1 0 0) Si wafers, thermally oxidized Si wafers and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic sheets have been used, maintaining the same deposition conditions. The structural and morphological properties of the films were analyzed by means of transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry, while surface morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy. Preliminary results on technological processes for the realization of polycrystalline SiC based micro-electro-mechanical systems are reported.

  5. Simulation optimization of filament parameters for uniform depositions of diamond films on surfaces of ultra-large circular holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinchang; Shen, Xiaotian; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have been widely applied as protective coatings on varieties of anti-frictional and wear-resistant components, owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties close to the natural diamond. In applications of some components, the inner hole surface will serve as the working surface that suffers severe frictional or erosive wear. It is difficult to realize uniform depositions of diamond films on surfaces of inner holes, especially ultra-large inner holes. Adopting a SiC compact die with an aperture of V80 mm as an example, a novel filament arrangement with a certain number of filaments evenly distributed on a circle is designed, and specific effects of filament parameters, including the filament number, arrangement direction, filament temperature, filament diameter, circumradius and the downward translation, on the substrate temperature distribution are studied by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations based on the finite volume method (FVM), adopting a modified computational model well consistent with the actual deposition environment. Corresponding temperature measurement experiments are also conducted to verify the rationality of the computational model. From the aspect of depositing uniform boron-doped micro-crystalline, undoped micro-crystalline and undoped fine-grained composite diamond (BDM-UMC-UFGCD) film on such the inner hole surface, filament parameters as mentioned above are accurately optimized and compensated by orthogonal simulations. Moreover, deposition experiments adopting compensated optimized parameters and some typical contrastive parameters are also accomplished for further verifying the rationality of the computational model and the correctness of the compensation coefficient 0.7 defined for the downward translation determined by simulations. More importantly, on the basis of more simulations and verification tests, a general filament arrangement model suitable for V50-120 mm

  6. Low temperature growth of diamond films on optical fibers using Linear Antenna CVD system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficek, M.; Drijkoningen, S.; Karczewski, J.; Bogdanowicz, R.; Haenen, K.

    2016-01-01

    It is not trivial to achieve a good quality diamond-coated fibre interface due to a large difference in the properties and composition of the diamond films (or use coating even) and the optical fibre material, i.e. fused silica. One of the biggest problems is the high temperature during the deposition which influences the optical fibre or optical fibre sensor structure (e.g. long-period gratings (LPG)). The greatest advantage of a linear antenna microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (LA MW CVD) is the fact that it allows to grow the diamond layers at low temperature (below 300°C) [1]. High quality nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films with thicknesses ranging from 70 nm to 150 nm, were deposited on silicon, glass and optical fibre substrates [2]. Substrates pretreatment by dip-coating and spin coating process with a dispersion consisting of detonation nanodiamond (DND) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been applied. During the deposition process the continuous mode of operation of the LA MW CVD system was used, which produces a continuous wave at a maximum power of 1.9 kW (in each antenna). Diamond films on optical fibres were obtained at temperatures below 350°C, providing a clear improvement of results compared to our earlier work [3]. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging to investigate the morphology of the nanocrystalline diamond films. The film growth rate, film thickness, and optical properties in the VIS-NIR range, i.e. refractive index and extinction coefficient will be discussed based on measurements on reference quartz plates by using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE).

  7. A new CVD Diamond Mosaic-Detector for (n,$\\alpha$) Cross-Section Measurements at the n_TOF Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, C; Guerrero, C; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Barbagallo, M; Becares, V; Becvar, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calvino, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapico, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Cortes-Giraldo, M.A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; Garcia, A.R; Giubrone, G; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B; Goncalves, I.F; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Hernandez-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D.G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; KäPpeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krticka, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L.S; Losito, R; Mallick, A; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martinez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P.F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P.M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J.M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M.S; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sabate-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J.L; Tarrio, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M.J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Wright, T; Zugec, P

    2013-01-01

    At the n_TOF experiment at CERN a dedicated single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) Diamond Mosaic-Detector has been developed for (n,$\\alpha$) cross-section measurements. The detector, characterized by an excellent time and energy resolution, consists of an array of 9 sCVD diamond diodes. The detector has been characterized and a cross-section measurement has been performed for the $^{59}$Ni(n,$\\alpha$)$^{56}$Fe reaction in 2012. The characteristics of the detector, its performance and the promising preliminary results of the experiment are presented.

  8. Catalytic Synthesis of Substrate-Free, Aligned and Tailored High Aspect Ratio Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes in an Ultrasonic Atomization Head CVD Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Fahad Ali Rabbani; Zuhair Omar Malaibari; Muataz Ali Atieh; Ammar Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has proven its benchmark, over other methods, for the production of different types of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on commercial and lab scale. In this study, an injection vertical CVD reactor fitted with an ultrasonic atomization head was used in a pilot-plant scale (height 274 cm, radius 25 cm) for semicontinuous production of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). p-Xylene was used as a hydrocarbon precursor in which ferrocene was dissolved and provided the ...

  9. Iron (III) chloride doping of CVD graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi; Fang, Wenjing; Hsu, Allen L; Kong, Jing

    2014-10-03

    Chemical doping has been shown as an effective method of reducing the sheet resistance of graphene. We present the results of our investigations into doping large area chemical vapor deposition graphene using Iron (III) Chloride (FeCl(3)). It is shown that evaporating FeCl(3) can increase the carrier concentration of monolayer graphene to greater than 10(14) cm(-2) and achieve resistances as low as 72 Ω sq(-1). We also evaluate other important properties of the doped graphene such as surface cleanliness, air stability, and solvent stability. Furthermore, we compare FeCl(3) to three other common dopants: Gold (III) Chloride (AuCl(3)), Nitric Acid (HNO(3)), and TFSA ((CF(3)SO(2))(2)NH). We show that compared to these dopants, FeCl(3) can not only achieve better sheet resistance but also has other key advantages including better solvent stability.

  10. Investigation on the priming effect of a CVD diamond microdosimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond microdosimeter is an ideal substitute of common Si.GaAs detector for extremely strong radiation experimental environment due to its high band gap energy, fast charge collection, low dielectric constant and hardness. In order to improve its character, a CVD diamond microdosimeter was irradiated by a proton dose of 46 Gy, and a lateral micro-ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique was utilized to characterize it in low beam current (~fA). It was clearly shown that charge collection efficiency and energy resolution were greatly improved after proton irradiation of that dose. Moreover, the homogeneities of both its counting performance and collection efficiency were enhanced. Proton irradiation of 46 Gy has been proved to be an effective way to prime a CVD diamond.

  11. Investigation on the priming effect of a CVD diamond microdosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Rong Rong; Jiang Da; Li Xiao Lin; Zhu Jie Qing

    2002-01-01

    CVD diamond microdosimeter is an ideal substitute of common Si, GaAs detector for extremely strong radiation experimental environmental due to its high band gap energy, fast charge collection, low dielectric constant and hardness. In order to improve its character, a CVD diamond microdosimeter was irradiated by a proton dose of 46 Gy, and a lateral micro-ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique was utilized to characterize it in low beam current (approx fA). It was clearly shown that charge collection efficiency and energy resolution were greatly improved after proton irradiation of that dose. Moreover, the homogeneities of both its counting performance and collection efficiency were enhanced. Proton irradiation of 46 Gy has been proved to be an effective way to prime a CVD diamond

  12. TOF MS Investigation of Nickel Oxide CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrateva, Anastasia S.; Mishin, Maxim V.; Alexandrov, Sergey E.

    2017-08-01

    NiO layers were deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using bis-(ethylcyclopentadienyl) nickel (EtCp)2Ni and oxygen or ozone. As a continuation of kinetic study of NiO MOCVD the gas-phase, transformations of (EtCp)2Ni were studied in the temperature range of 380-830 K. Time of reactions corresponding to the residence time of the gas stream in hot zone of the reactor was about 0.1 s under conditions studied. The interaction of (EtCp)2Ni with oxygen started at 450 K and its conversion rate reached the maximum at 700 K. The interaction of (EtCp)2Ni with ozone started at 400 K and its conversion rate reached the maximum at 600 K. Transformations of the gas phase with the temperature in the reaction zone were studied, the model reaction schemes illustrating (EtCp)2Ni transformations in the reaction systems containing oxygen and ozone have developed. In the reaction system (EtCp)2Ni-O2-Ar the main gas-phase products at 380-500 K were CO, CO2, HCO, C2H5OH, CpCOOH, and CpO. Formation of the C2H2O, C3H4O, and C5H8O was found at 630-830 K. The same gas-phase species, (C4H3O)2Ni and dialdehydes was formed in the reaction system (EtCp)2Ni-O3-O2-Ar. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Makino, Yuri; Fukukawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-11-01

    To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide) supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate) and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air), reductive (hydrogen-containing argon), or inert (pure argon) atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  14. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Iwasaki

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air, reductive (hydrogen-containing argon, or inert (pure argon atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  15. Advances in wide bandgap SiC for optoelectronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Ou, Yiyu; Argyraki, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has played a key role in power electronics thanks to its unique physical properties like wide bandgap, high breakdown field, etc. During the past decade, SiC is also becoming more and more active in optoelectronics thanks to the progress in materials growth and nanofabrication...

  16. Challenges in Switching SiC MOSFET without Ringing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Helong; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Switching SiC MOSFET without ringing in high frequency applications is important for meeting the EMI (ElectroMagnetic Interference) standard. Achieving a clean switching waveform of SiC MOSFET without additional components is becoming a challenge. In this paper, the switching oscillation mechanis...

  17. Electrocatalysts with platinum, cobalt and nickel preparations by mechanical alloyed and CVD for the reaction of oxygen reduction; Electrocatalizadores a base de platino, cobalto y niquel preparados por aleado mecanico y CVD para la reaccion de reduccion de oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia C, M. A. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    In this research, the molecular oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated on electrocatalysts of Co, Ni, Pt and their alloys CoNi, PtCo, PtNi and PtCoNi by using H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 0.5 and KOH 0.5 M solutions as electrolytes. The electrocatalysts were synthesized by Mechanical Alloying (MA) and Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) processes. For MA, metallic powders were processed during 20 h of milling in a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. For CVD, a hot-wall reactor was utilized and Co, Ni and Pt acetilactetonates were used as precursors. Films were deposited at a total pressure of 1 torr and temperatures of 400-450 C. Electrocatalysts were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Electrocatalysts prepared by mechanical alloying showed a homogeneously dispersed agglomeration of particles with nano metric size. Electrocatalysts obtained by CVD showed, in some cases, non uniform films, with particles of nano metric size, as well. The electrocatalytic performance was evaluated by using the Rotating Disk Electrode technique (RDE). Electrocatalysts prepared by MA showed higher activity than those obtained by CVD. All electrocatalysts were evaluated in alkaline media. Only electrocatalysts containing Pt were evaluated in acid media, because those materials with Co, Ni and their alloys showed instability in acidic media. Most electrocatalysts followed a mechanism for the ORR producing a certain proportion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. All electrocatalysts, exhibited a fair or good electrocatalytic activity in comparison with other similar reported materials. It was found that MA and CVD are appropriate processes to prepare electrocatalysts for the ORR with particles of nano metric size and performing with an acceptable catalytic activity. PtCoNi 70-23-7% by MA and PtCoNi-CVD electrocatalysts showed the highest activity in alkaline media, while in acidic

  18. Preparation and Dielectric Properties of Carbon-coated SiC Fibers%SiC纤维表面C涂层的制备及介电性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑文景; 周万城; 罗发; 于新民

    2009-01-01

    A earbon coating of 100nm thick was prepared on the surface of SiC fibers by chemical vapor deposition method. The effect of fabrication temperature on microstructure of carbon coating and on the body conductivity, permittivity of carbon-coated fiber was studied. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman microscopy were employed to investigate the surface morphology and microstructure of the coatings. The results show that when fabrication temperature increases from 800℃ to 900℃, the crystallization degree and the grain size of carbon coatings increase and the body conductivity of SiC filament also increases from 0. 745Ω~(-1)·cm~(-1) to 6. 289Ω~(-1)·cm~(-1). The real part of complex permittiv-ity of SiC woven sheet increases from 90 to 132, imaginary part from 87 to 150, respectively,and the dielectric dissipation fraction increases from 0. 95 to1.14 at the same time. The increase of the real part and imaginary part has connection with the increased density of current carrier and missed con-ductivity, respectively. The changes above are attributed to the conductivity increases of the carbon coatings on SiC fibers. The dissipation derived from direct current conductivity is the primary mecha-nism of the dissipation above all.%采用化学气相沉积(CVD)法,在SiC纤维表面沉积了100nm厚的C涂层,研究了制备温度对C涂层微观结构、单丝纤维体电导率及纤维编制体介电性能的影响.采用SEM和RAM显微技术(Raman microscopy)对C涂层的表面形貌和微观结构进行分析.结果表明:保持C涂层厚度一致,当沉积温度由800℃升到900℃后,C涂层的石墨化程度提高,晶粒变大,SiC纤维单丝体电导率由0.745Ω~(-1)·cm~(-1)升到6.289Ω~(-1)·cm~(-1);SiC纤维编制体的复介电常数实部由90升到132,介电损耗由0.95升到1.14,其中虚部由87升到150.实部增大与载流子浓度增大有关,虚部增大与材料漏导电有关.认为这是SiC纤维表面沉积的C层使纤维电导率增大

  19. Prospects for SiC electronics and sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick G. Wright

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been substantial international research effort in the development of SiC electronics over the last ten years. With promising applications in power electronics, hostile-environment electronics, and sensors, there is considerable industrial interest in SiC as a material for electronics. However, issues relating to crystal growth and the difficulties of material processing have restricted SiC devices to relatively limited use to date. The eventual success of SiC as an electronic technology will depend on the close interplay of research in fundamental material science with progress in design of electronic devices and packaging. We review the current status of SiC electronics from a materials perspective – highlighting current difficulties and future opportunities for progress.

  20. 2.5 GHz integrated graphene RF power amplifier on SiC substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, T.; Deltimple, N.; Khenissa, M. S.; Pallecchi, E.; Happy, H.; Frégonèse, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report the design of 2.5 GHz integrated power amplifier based on a graphene FET fabricated with thermal deposition on SiC. In this first large signal study of graphene radiofrequency power amplifiers, a power gain of 8.9 dB is achieved, the maximum reported output power and power added efficiency are 5.1 dBm and 2.2% respectively. Furthermore, graphene and Si CMOS amplifiers are compared; conclusions are drawn towards the technology enhancements to optimize the amplifiers figures of merit.

  1. Making Lightweight Structures By Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goela, Jitendra S.; Pickering, Michael A.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1990-01-01

    Technique developed for fabrication of stiff, strong, lightweight structures of silicon carbide or other materials by any of several deposition processes. Structures made by method can have complicated shapes. Ability to manufacture complex shape from pure deposited SiC useful and leads to new products in several fields. These lightweight structures used as backup structures for optical components, as structural components in automotive, aerospace, and outer space applications, and as lightweight parts of furniture for outer space.

  2. Lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms over Si/B surfaces during CVD of pure boron layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, V., E-mail: V.Mohammadi@tudelft.nl; Nihtianov, S. [Department of Microelectronics, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD, Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    The lateral gas phase diffusion length of boron atoms, L{sub B}, along silicon and boron surfaces during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is reported. The value of L{sub B} is critical for reliable and uniform boron layer coverage. The presented information was obtained experimentally and confirmed analytically in the boron deposition temperature range from 700 °C down to 400 °C. For this temperature range the local loading effect of the boron deposition is investigated on the micro scale. A L{sub B} = 2.2 mm was determined for boron deposition at 700 °C, while a L{sub B} of less than 1 mm was observed at temperatures lower than 500 °C.

  3. A design of experiments investigation of the effects of synthesis conditions on the quality of CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Ramakrishnan; Rangarajan, Murali; Devanathan, Sriram; Sathe, Vasant G.; Senthilkumar, R.; Kothurkar, Nikhil K.

    2016-12-01

    Control over quality of graphene and the number of layers is vital for various applications. This is the first methodical report which quantitatively relates the process conditions in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene with crystallinity and number of graphene layers, using a design of experiments approach. This report investigates the effects of three vital synthesis parameters namely (i) carbon source (benzene, naphthalene and anthracene) (ii) synthesis temperature and (iii) mass flow rate of the carbon source, on the crystallinity and the number of layers of graphene, as inferred through micro-Raman analysis. These results give a preliminary indication of how the quality of graphene synthesized through CVD could be controlled. These results throw light on further experiments, simulations, and analysis needed to precisely determine how to control the synthesis of graphene.

  4. Adhesive strength of CVD diamond thin films quantitatively measured by means of the bulge and blister test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daohui Xiang; Ming Chen; Yuping Ma; Fanghong Sun

    2008-01-01

    Large advancement has been made in understanding the nucleation and growth of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, but the adhesion of CVD diamond to substrates is poor and there is no good method for quantitative evaluation of the adhesive strength. The blister test is a potentially powerful tool for characterizing the mechanical properties of diamond films. In this test, pressure was applied on a thin membrane and the out-of-plane deflection of the membrane center was measured. The Young's modulus, residual stress, and adhesive strength were simultaneously determined using the load-deflection behavior of a membrane. The free-standing window sample of diamond thin films was fabricated by means of photolithography and anisotropic wet etching. The research indicates that the adhesive strength of diamond thin films is 4.28±0.37J/m2. This method uses a simple apparatus, and the fabrication of samples is very easy.

  5. Tip-based chemical vapor deposition with a scanning nano-heater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, a moving nano-heater directs a chemical vapor deposition reaction (nano-CVD) demonstrating a tip-based nanofabrication (TBN) method. Localized nano-CVD of copper (Cu) and copper oxide (CuO) on a silicon (Si) and silicon oxide (SiO2) substrate from gasses, namely sublimate

  6. TEM investigation of beta-SiC grown epitaxially on Si substrate by CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorey, C. M.; Pirouz, P.; Mitchell, T. E.; Powell, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study is being conducted on the microstructure of beta-SiC films grown epitaxially on 001-plane silicon by chemical vapor deposition. Observations have been made in plain view and in cross-section. A high density of stacking faults has been found in the bulk of the epilayer which are bounded by partials of the Shockley type with Burgers vectors 1/6 211-line. Cross-sectional high resolution electron microscopy of the interface has shown it to be semicoherent with misfit dislocations to accommodate the lattice parameter difference between the substrate and the epilayer. In addition to misfit dislocations, a high density of twins and some stacking faults are present in the SiC near the interface. Mechanisms for the nucleation and growth of these defects are discussed.

  7. CVD growth of (001) and (111)3C-SiC epilayers and their interface reactivity with pradeodymium oxide dielectric layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohal, R.

    2006-07-24

    In this work, growth and characterisation of 3C-SiC thin films, investigation of oxidation of thus prepared layers and Pr-silicate and AlON based interface with SiC have been studied. Chemical vapor deposition of 3C-SiC thin films on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates has been investigated. Prior to the actual SiC growth, preparation of initial buffer layers of SiC was done. Using such a buffer layer, epitaxial growth of 3C-SiC has been achieved on Si(111) and Si(001) substrates. The temperature of 1100 C and 1150 C has been determined to be the optimal temperature for 3C-SiC growth on Si (111) and Si(001) substrates respectively. The oxidation studies on SiC revealed that a slow oxidation process at moderate temperatures in steps was useful in reducing and suppressing the g-C at the SiO{sub 2}/SiC interface. Clean, graphite-free SiO{sub 2} has been successfully grown on 3C-SiC by silicon evaporation and UHV anneal. For the application of high-k Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on silicon carbide, plausible interlayer, Pr-Silicate and AlON, have been investigated. Praseodymium silicate has been prepared successfully completely consuming the SiO2 and simultaneously suppressing the graphitic carbon formation. A comparatively more stable interlayer using AlON has been achieved. This interlayer mainly consists of stable phases of AlN along with some amount of Pr-aluminates and CN. Such layers act as a reaction barrier between Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC, and simultaneously provide higher band offsets. (orig.)

  8. Electrocatalytic characterization and dye degradation of Nano-TiO{sub 2} electrode films fabricated by CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jih-Hsing, E-mail: changjh@cyut.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, 168 JiFong E. Rd., WuFong Township, 41349 Taichung County, Taiwan (China); Ellis, Amanda V. [Flinders University, School of Chemistry, Physics and Earth Sciences, , GPO Box 2100, Bedford Park, Adelaide S.A. 5042 (Australia); Hsieh, Yung-Hsu; Tung, Cheng-Hung; Shen, Shan-Yi [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung, 40277, Taiwan (China)

    2009-11-01

    A 20-40 nm anatase-titania film on a titanium electrode was fabricated using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The film was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The CVD deposition time and number of deposition coatings were evaluated to establish the appropriate film fabrication parameters. Results indicate that two coatings at a deposition time of 6 h each produced the best nano-TiO{sub 2} electrode films (NTEFs) with an even distribution of ca. 20 nm diameter nanoparticles in the anatase lattice. The NTEF was tested as an electrocatalytic anode to investigate the degradation efficiency in treating methyl orange dye wastewater. A high removal efficiency of methyl orange dye and total organic carbon (TOC) of 97 and 56%, respectively; was achieved using a current density of 20 mA cm{sup -2} for 160 min. Cyclic voltammetry showed that the electrochemical degradation reaction rate at the NTEF surface was predominately driven by molecular diffusion. The electrocatalytic decomposition rate of organic pollutants at the NTEF is controlled by mass transport, which was associated with the nanostructure of the electrocatalytic electrode.

  9. Incorporation of oxygen in SiC implanted with hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcz, A., E-mail: barcz@ite.waw.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Electron Technology, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Jakieła, R. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Kozubal, M. [Institute of Electron Technology, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Dyczewski, J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Celler, G.K. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Devices, and Nanotechnology (IAMDN)/Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen accumulation at buried implantation-damage layers was studied after post-implantation annealing of hydrogen- or deuterium-implanted 4H–SiC. In this study H{sup +} or {sup 2}H{sup +} implantation was carried out at energies E, from 200 keV to 1 MeV, to fluences D, ranging from 2 × 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2} to 1 × 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2}. For comparison, the implantation was also done into float-zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ) silicon wafers. Post-implantation annealing at temperatures from 400 °C to 1150 °C was performed either in pure argon or in a water vapor. Characterization methods included SIMS, RBS and TEM. At sufficiently high doses, hydrogen implantation into semiconductors leads to the irreversible formation of a planar zone of microcavities, bubbles and other extended defects located at the maximum of deposited energy. This kind of highly perturbed layer, containing large amounts of agglomerated hydrogen is known to efficiently getter a number of impurities. Oxygen was detected in both CZ and FZ silicon subjected to Smart-Cut™ processing. We have identified, by SIMS profiling, a considerable oxygen peak situated at the interface between the SiC substrate and a layer implanted with 1 × 10{sup 17} H ions/cm{sup 2} and heated to 1150 °C in either H{sub 2}O vapor or in a nominally pure Ar. In view of a lack of convincing evidence that a hexagonal SiC might contain substantial amounts of oxygen, the objective of the present study was to identify the source and possible transport mechanism of oxygen species to the cavity band. Through the analysis of several implants annealed at various conditions, we conclude that, besides diffusion from the bulk or from surface oxides, an alternative path for oxygen agglomeration is migration of gaseous O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O from the edge of the sample through the porous layer.

  10. Nanomorph Silicon Thin Films Prepared by Using an HW-MWECR CVD System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yue-Hui; MA Zhan-Jie; ZHOU Huai-En; ZHU Xiu-Hong; CHEN Guang-Hua; ZHOU Jian-Er; RONG Yan-Dong; LI Ying; SONG Xue-Mei; ZHANG Wen-Li; DING Yi; GAO Zhuo

    2005-01-01

    @@ We have prepared hydrogenated nano-amorph silicon (na-Si:H) films by using a hot-wire-assisted microwave electron-cyclotron-resonance (HW-MWECR) chemical vapour deposition (CVD) system. The films are deposited in two steps: in the first 9min, a hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer is deposited by using hydrogen-diluted silane with a concentration of SiH4/(SiH4+H2) = 20%, and then a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) layer is deposited by using various highly hydrogen-diluted silane. The Raman TO-like mode peak of the films was found in the range 497-508 cm-1. When the silane concentration used for preparation of the nc-Si layer is 14.3%, the film has a large crystalline volume fraction of 65.4%, a wide optical band gap of 1.89eV and a low hydrogen content of 9.5at.%. Moreover, the na-Si:H films rather than nc-Si possess high photosensitivity of about 15.

  11. Laser diagnostics and modeling of plasma assisted CVD. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) represents a novel approach for utilizing the nonequilibrium effects of reactive plasmas for depositing a wide range of protective hardface coatings that have both wear and erosion application. The nonequilibrium plasma is the heart of this complex system and has the function of generating the reactive molecular fragments (radicals) and atomic species at concentration levels unattainable by other competing processes. It is now widely accepted that such advanced protective hardface coatings materials will play a vital role in the energy technologies of the coming decades, with major applications in diverse areas ranging from aerospace and commercial propulsion systems (jet engines) to automotive components and internal combustion engines, (ceramic heat engines), cutting and machining tools, electronic packaging, thermal management, and possibly room-temperature superconductors. Wear and associated erosion aspects are responsible for an enormous expenditure of energy and fiscal resources in almost all DOE applications. Many of the results from this investigation arc also applicable to other materials processing reactors such as electron beam, PVD, CVD, laser ablation, microwave, high energy cathodic arc, thermal plasma (rf or dc) and combustion spray. These also include the various hybrid systems such as the rf/dc arc as used in Japan for diamond deposition and e-beam PVD deposition of advanced titanium alloy coatings as used at the Paton Institute in Kiev, Ukraine.

  12. Influence of tungsten on the carbon nanotubes growth by CVD process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Mariano [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia, CONICET-UBA, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina)], E-mail: mescobar@qi.fcen.uba.ar; Rubiolo, Gerardo H. [LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Materiales, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (1650), Bs As (Argentina); Moreno, M. Sergio [Centro Atomico Bariloche, (8400) S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Goyanes, Silvia [LP and MC, Dep. De Fisica, FCEyN-UBA, Pabellon 1, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina); Candal, Roberto [Instituto de Fisicoquimica de Materiales, Ambiente y Energia, CONICET-UBA, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Bs As (Argentina)

    2009-06-24

    The effect of tungsten (W) on the growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process over a metal Fe-W catalyst incorporated into a silica matrix is reported. A W molar content in Fe/SiO{sub 2} up to 10% was studied. The incorporation of only 2% of W substantially modifies the crystalline phases and the crystalline degree of the catalyst during the MWNTs synthesis. This fact seems to have a strong influence on the type and yield of the carbonaceous species obtained by the CVD of acetylene, at 600 deg. C and 180 Torr, over each catalyst. Tungsten interacts with iron within the matrix, diminishing the catalytic activity of the metal nanoparticles, and both, carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers, are obtained when tungsten is present. The results obtained support the hypothesis of a base growth model for carbon nanotubes indicating a strong interaction between silica matrix and Fe/W nanoparticles, independently of the content of W.

  13. High-speed roll-to-roll manufacturing of graphene using a concentric tube CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S.; McNerny, Daniel Q.; Viswanath, B.; Pattinson, Sebastian W.; John Hart, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the design of a concentric tube (CT) reactor for roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on flexible substrates, and its application to continuous production of graphene on copper foil. In the CTCVD reactor, the thin foil substrate is helically wrapped around the inner tube, and translates through the gap between the concentric tubes. We use a bench-scale prototype machine to synthesize graphene on copper substrates at translation speeds varying from 25 mm/min to 500 mm/min, and investigate the influence of process parameters on the uniformity and coverage of graphene on a continuously moving foil. At lower speeds, high-quality monolayer graphene is formed; at higher speeds, rapid nucleation of small graphene domains is observed, yet coalescence is prevented by the limited residence time in the CTCVD system. We show that a smooth isothermal transition between the reducing and carbon-containing atmospheres, enabled by injection of the carbon feedstock via radial holes in the inner tube, is essential to high-quality roll-to-roll graphene CVD. We discuss how the foil quality and microstructure limit the uniformity of graphene over macroscopic dimensions. We conclude by discussing means of scaling and reconfiguring the CTCVD design based on general requirements for 2-D materials manufacturing. PMID:25997124

  14. Computation of flow and thermal fields in a model CVD reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishwadeep Saxena; K Muralidhar; V Eswaran

    2002-12-01

    Mixing of coaxial jets within a tube in the presence of blockage has been numerically studied. This configuration is encountered during the modelling of flow and heat transfer in CVD (chemical vapour deposition) reactors. For the conditions prevailing in the reactor, the Reynolds numbers are low and flow can be taken to be laminar and incompressible. The unsteady forms of the governing equations have been solved by a finite volume method that can treat complex three-dimensional geometries. The algorithm is a two-step procedure, wherein the first step predicts the velocity field using an assumed pressure field. The second step corrects the fields using a Poisson equation to obtain the pressure corrections. Advection terms have been treated by a hybrid upwind-central difference technique. The computer code developed is fully three-dimensional, though most computations of the present study have been carried out for two-dimensional geometry. Results have been obtained in the form of velocity vector plots, wall shear stress variation on the block and the tube wall, isotherms and temperature profiles. The flow and heat transfer characteristics of jet mixing have been explored in terms of the Reynolds number, the jet velocity ratio, the axial position of the block, and the blockage ratio. The results obtained show that a proper combination of the process parameters can lead to an improved performance of the CVD reactor.

  15. CVD Method for Carbon Nanotubes Preparation Based on Orthogonal Experiment Using C3H6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Xunwen; JIANG Fang

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have potential applications in many fields, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is an effective method for CNTs preparation. By CVD, the catalytic pyrolysis temperature, pyrolysis time and the size of the raw gas lfow have a great inlfuence on yield rate of CNTs and their form. In this paper, the orthogonal experiment analysis method is used for studying the inlfuence factors of yield rate of CNTs. Research results show that, in the suitable temperature range of preparing CNTs, there is relatively more CNTs with excellent morphology, otherwise, if the temperature is too low, the growth of CNTs will not be sufifcient; if the temperature is too high, then CNTs will be generated with excessive defects; with longer growth time of suitable pyrolysis of CNTs, higher yield of CNTs will be obtained; CNTs morphology with reaction time is not proportional; too low or too high raw gas lfow rate is not conducive to the growth of CNTs. We have found the optimum conditions for the CNTs preparation: pyrolysis temperature 680℃, pyrolysis time 35 min, propylene lfow rate of 180 mL/min. The results have a reference value for the preparation of CNTS and their composites.

  16. VO{sub x} effectively doping CVD-graphene for transparent conductive films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Qinghua; Shi, Liangjing [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Qinghong [State Key Laboratory of Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Material Science and Engineering, Donghua University, 2999 North Renmin Road, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Weiqi; Zheng, Huifeng [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Yuzhi [The Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu, Yangqiao, E-mail: yqliu@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Sun, Jing, E-mail: jingsun@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Doping process operated easily. • Sheet resistance decreased efficiently after doping. • Sheet resistance of doped graphene is stable after exposed in the air. • Mechanism of doping process is studied. - Abstract: Chemical vapor deposition(CVD)-synthesized graphene is potentially an alternative for tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) transparent conductive films (TCFs), however its sheet resistance is still too high to meet many demands. Vanadium oxide has been widely applied as smart window materials, however, no study has been reported to use it as dopant to improve the conductivity of graphene TCFs. In this study, we firstly reported that VO{sub x} doping can effectively lower the sheet resistance of CVD-graphene films while keeping its good optical properties, whose transmittance is as high as 86–90%. The optimized VO{sub x}-doped graphene exhibits a sheet resistance as low as 176 Ω/□, which decreases by 56% compared to the undoped graphene films. The doping process is convenient, stable, economical and easy to operate. What is more, VO{sub x} can effectively increase the work function(WF) of the film, making it more appropriate for use in solar cells. The evolution of the VO{sub x} species annealed at different temperatures below 400 °C has been detailed studied for the first time, based on which the doping mechanism is proposed. The prepared VO{sub x} doped graphene is expected to be a promising candidate for transparent conductive film purposes.

  17. Optimization of CVD parameters for long ZnO NWs grown on ITO/glass substrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABDULQADER D FAISAL

    2016-12-01

    The optimization of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) parameters for long and vertically aligned (VA) ZnO nanowires (NWs) were investigated. Typical ZnO NWs as a single crystal grown on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate were successfully synthesized. First, the conducted side of ITO–glass substrate was coated with zinc acetate dihydrate to form seed layer of ZnO nanocrystals. Double zone tube furnace connected to vacuum pump was used for ZnO growth process. Zn metal powder was positioned at the first zone at temperature 900$^{\\circ}$C. The ITO–glass substrate with pre-coated seed layer was then located in the second zone of tube furnace at growth temperature of 550$^{\\circ}$C. The growth of ZnO NWs was controlled under constant concentration of seed layer, while other parameters such as argon and oxygen flow rates, substrate position, time and oxygen flow rate were varied.The VA ZnO NWs were finally characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometer and high-resolution transmission electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showthat long and VA ZnO NWs were single crystalline with hexagonal wurtzite structure. The ultimate length and average diameter of ZnO NWs were 10 $\\mu$m and 50–100 nm, respectively. These were achieved under optimized CVD growth parameters. The mechanism of vertical growth model of ZnO NWs is also discussed.

  18. Unravelling merging behaviors and electrostatic properties of CVD-grown monolayer MoS2 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Song; Yang, Bingchu; Gao, Yongli

    2016-08-28

    The presence of grain boundaries is inevitable for chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown MoS2 domains owing to various merging behaviors, which greatly limits its potential applications in novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. It is therefore of great significance to unravel the merging behaviors of the synthesized polygon shape MoS2 domains. Here we provide systematic investigations of merging behaviors and electrostatic properties of CVD-grown polycrystalline MoS2 crystals by multiple means. Morphological results exhibit various polygon shape features, ascribed to polycrystalline crystals merged with triangle shape MoS2 single crystals. The thickness of triangle and polygon shape MoS2 crystals is identical manifested by Raman intensity and peak position mappings. Three merging behaviors are proposed to illustrate the formation mechanisms of observed various polygon shaped MoS2 crystals. The combined photoemission electron microscopy and kelvin probe force microscopy results reveal that the surface potential of perfect merged crystals is identical, which has an important implication for fabricating MoS2-based devices.

  19. Surface Study of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by Thermal-CVD of Camphor Precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Surface morphology study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature, which indirectly maybe cost effective. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs. The camphoric hydrocarbons not only found acts as the precursors but also enhances the production rate and the quality of CNTs.

  20. Large scale integration of CVD-graphene based NEMS with narrow distribution of resonance parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmandi-Tash, Hadi; Allain, Adrien; (Vitto Han, Zheng; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel method for the fabrication of the arrays of suspended micron-sized membranes, based on monolayer pulsed-CVD graphene. Such devices are the source of an efficient integration of graphene nano-electro-mechanical resonators, compatible with production at the wafer scale using standard photolithography and processing tools. As the graphene surface is continuously protected by the same polymer layer during the whole process, suspended graphene membranes are clean and free of imperfections such as deposits, wrinkles and tears. Batch fabrication of 100 μm-long multi-connected suspended ribbons is presented. At room temperature, mechanical resonance of electrostatically-actuated devices show narrow distribution of their characteristic parameters with high quality factor and low effective mass and resonance frequencies, as expected for low stress and adsorbate-free membranes. Upon cooling, a sharp increase of both resonant frequency and quality factor is observed, enabling to extract the thermal expansion coefficient of CVD graphene. Comparison with state-of-the-art graphene NEMS is presented.

  1. Facet-dependent study of efficient growth of graphene on copper by ethanol-CVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Kumar Singh; Anjan Kumar Gupta

    2015-12-01

    The growth of graphene by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on copper is the most promising scalable method for high-quality graphene. The use of ethanol, an economic and safe precursor, for the fast growth of graphene on copper by a home-built CVD set-up was analysed. Full coverage of uniform single-layer graphene with high crystalline quality was found on $\\langle100\\rangle$ textured Cu foils in just 30 s. The nucleation density of graphene islands was found to be independent of facets but the island shape showed facet dependence. Diamond-like islands were observed on Cu(100) facets while random shaped islands were seen on other facets. The last observation is discussed in terms of a competition between graphene-island growth and its relaxation rate on different facets. On Cu(100) slower island growth as compared to its relaxation leads to equilibrium shapes as opposed to other facets. Further, an observed evolution in graphene contrast in electron micrographs with time on different facets was discussed in terms of oxygen diffusion between graphene and Cu.

  2. Synthesis of nanometal oxides and nanometals using hot-wire and thermal CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, S. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States)], E-mail: saibal-mitra@utulsa.edu; Sridharan, K.; Unnam, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States); Ghosh, K. [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Materials Science, Missouri State University, MO65897 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    We report the synthesis of nano-oxides of molybdenum, tungsten, and zinc. Molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 3}) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub x}) were produced by hot-wire CVD with molybdenum and tungsten filaments, respectively while zinc oxide (ZnO) was produced by thermal CVD. When high purity molybdenum wire was oxidized at ambient system atmosphere, nanorods and nanostraws of MoO{sub 3} with length ranging from {approx} 20-80 nm and diameters ranging from {approx} 5-15 nm were produced. Also, the oxidation of the tungsten filament led to the deposition of tungsten oxide nanorods (10-25 nm diameter and 75-90 nm long) and nanospheres with diameters of {approx} 60 nm. Each oxide was reduced to its metallic form by annealing in a hydrogen environment to produce metallic nanoparticles. Nanorods and nanoribbons of ZnO with diameters ranging from 20-65 nm and lengths up to 2 {mu}m were also produced.

  3. Effect of a Balanced Concentration of Hydrogen on Graphene CVD Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chaitoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraordinary properties of graphene make it one of the most interesting materials for future applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD is the synthetic method that permits obtaining large areas of monolayer graphene. To achieve this, it is important to find the appropriate conditions for each experimental system. In our CVD reactor working at low pressure, important factors appear to be the pretreatment of the copper substrate, considering both its cleaning and its annealing before the growing process. The carbon precursor/hydrogen flow ratio and its modification during the growth are significant in order to obtain large area graphene crystals with few defects. In this work, we have focused on the study of the methane and the hydrogen flows to control the production of single layer graphene (SLG and its growth time. In particular, we observe that hydrogen concentration increases during a usual growing process (keeping stable the methane/hydrogen flow ratio resulting in etched domains. In order to balance this increase, a modification of the hydrogen flow results in the growth of smooth hexagonal SLG domains. This is a result of the etching effect that hydrogen performs on the growing graphene. It is essential, therefore, to study the moderated presence of hydrogen.

  4. LaCoO3 nanosystems by a hybrid CVD/sol-gel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armelao, Lidia; Barreca, Davide; Bottaro, Gregorio; Gasparotto, Alberto; Maragno, Cinzia; Tondello, Eugenio; Sada, Cinzia

    2005-05-01

    LaCoO3 nanosystems are receiving increasing attention for the development of innovative fuel cells and heterogeneous catalysts. In this report, we describe the synthesis of nanophasic LaCoO3 thin films by a hybrid chemical vapor deposition (CVD)/sol-gel (SG) approach. The adopted strategy consists in the CVD of La-O-based systems on SG cobalt oxide xerogels CoOx(OH)y at temperatures as low as 200 degrees C and in the subsequent thermal treatment in air (400-800 degrees C, 2-8 h). In this context, particular attention is devoted to achieving an intimate La/Co intermixing already in the as-prepared systems, in order to favor reactions yielding a single La-Co-O phase with uniform composition. The obtained results point out to the formation of pure and structurally homogeneous LaCoO3 nanosystems after annealing at 700 degrees C, 2 h, with a typical grain-like morphology. More severe thermal treatment resulted in the thermal decomposition of LaCoO3 nanocrystallites.

  5. A large-scale NEMS light-emitting array based on CVD graphene (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungsik; Kim, Young Duck; Lee, Changhyuk; Lee, Sunwoo; Seo, Dong-jea; Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Chun, Seung-Hyun; Hone, James; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2017-02-01

    Graphene has received much interest from optical communities largely owing to its photon-like linear energy band structure called Dirac cone. While majority of the recent research has dealt with plasmon and polariton of the two-dimensional material, a recently reported graphene light emitter could render a new dimension of applications, particularly in high-speed optical communication. Moreover chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth technique for graphene is available today providing means for scalable high quality graphene. The reported graphene emitter provides broadband light emission from visible to mid-infrared which could be instrumental in multi-color display units and optical communications, however a truly large scale implementation has not previously been achieved. Here we demonstrate a CMOS-compatible 262,144 light-emitting pixels array (10 x 10 mm2) based on suspended CVD graphene nano-electro-mechanical systems (GNEMS). A single photoemission area is 19.6 µm2 and a unit pixel is consisting of 512 photoemission devices (16 x 16) where a multiplexer and a digital to analog converter (DAC) are used to control each pixel. This work clearly demonstrates scalability of multi-channel GNEMS light-emitting array, an atomically thin electro-optical module, and further paves a path for its commercial implementation transparent display or high-speed optical communication.

  6. Cyclic oxidation performance of a CVD-FBR aluminised 18Cr-8Ni stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, F.J.; Pedraza, F.; Hierro, M.P.; Carpintero, M.C.; Gomez, C. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ciencia de los Materiales

    2001-07-01

    Stainless steel is still the material of choice because it finds numerous applications and its good performance in different environments and its relatively low price. However, its poor mechanical strength and the formation of volatile CrO{sub 3} oxide under oxygen environments restrict their upper operation temperature to less than 950 C. Thus, the application of aluminide coatings may increase the upper limit of temperature of these steels in case they did not have to withstand important mechanical loads. Chemical vapour deposition in fluidised bed reactors (CVD-FBR) has been used to coat the AISI 304 stainless steel at temperatures of 525 C for 1.5 hours followed by a heat treatment up to 900 C under inert Ar gas. Cyclic oxidation experiments of both coated and uncoated specimens have been performed at 950 C under atmospheric pressure of air. The results will show that the application of the CVD-FBR is very promising as a surface modification technology since the behaviour of the coated specimens is much better than that of the uncoated ones. (orig.)

  7. Active Oxidation of SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers,Dwight L.; Harder, Bryan J.

    2011-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation of silicon carbide occurs in either a passive or active mode, depending on temperature and oxygen potential. Passive oxidation forms a protective oxide film which limits attack of the SiC:SiC(s) + 3/2 O2(g) = SiO2(s) + CO(g.) Active oxidation forms a volatile oxide and leads to extensive attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + O2(g) = SiO(g) + CO(g). The transition points and rates of active oxidation are a major issue. Previous studies are reviewed and the leading theories of passive/active transitions summarized. Comparisons are made to the active/passive transitions in pure Si, which are relatively well-understood. Critical questions remain about the difference between the active-to-passive transition and passive-to-active transition. For Si, Wagner [2] points out that the active-to-passive transition is governed by the criterion for a stable Si/SiO2 equilibria and the passive-to-active transition is governed by the decomposition of the SiO2 film. This suggests a significant oxygen potential difference between these two transitions and our experiments confirm this. For Si, the initial stages of active oxidation are characterized by the formation of SiO(g) and further oxidation to SiO2(s) as micron-sized rods, with a distinctive morphology. SiC shows significant differences. The active-to-passive and the passive-to-active transitions are close. The SiO2 rods only appear as the passive film breaks down. These differences are explained in terms of the reactions at the SiC/SiO2 interface. In order to understand the breakdown of the passive film, pre-oxidation experiments are conducted. These involve forming dense protective scales of 0.5, 1, and 2 microns and then subjecting the samples with these scales to a known active oxidation environment. Microstructural studies show that SiC/SiO2 interfacial reactions lead to a breakdown of the scale with a distinct morphology.

  8. Diagramas de fase CVD para la preparación de películas de iridio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Pérez, M. A.

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemical vapor deposition (CVD phase diagrams for the preparation of iridium films were calculated using Gibbs free energy minimization method. Iridium acetylacetonate (Ir(acac3 was used as the precursor compound. Two gaseous mixtures were analyzed: Ir(acac3-O2-Ar and Ir(acac3-Ar. The deposition temperatures were explored from 300 to 800 °C, total pressures from 13.3 to 13.332 Pa and partial pressures of Ir(acac3 gas and O2 gas from 0.001 to 1.000 Pa. The Ir-CVD diagrams predicted that without Oj gas in the gaseous mixture, the solid films consist of two solid phases: Ir+C. In contrast, with addition of O2 to the gaseous mixture, the Ir-CVD diagrams revealed different domains of condensed phases which include IrO2, IrO2+Ir, Ir and Ir+C. These diagrams allow one to establish the total pressures and temperatures required to obtain a given film composition. The results predicted by the Ir-CVD diagrams are in good agreement with those experimentally obtained.

    Se calcularon los diagramas de fase CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition para la preparación de películas de iridio empleando el método de minimización de la energía libre de Gibbs. Como precursor se utilizó acetilacetonato de iridio (Ir(acac3. Se analizaron las mezclas gaseosas Ir(acac3-O2Ar e Ir(acac3-Ar. Las temperaturas de depósito se exploraron desde 300 hasta 800 °C, las presiones totales de 13,3 a 13.332 Pa y las presiones parciales de los gases Ir(acac3 y O2 desde 0,001 hasta 1.000 Pa. Los diagramas Ir-CVD predicen que sin O2 en la mezcla gaseosa, las películas constan de las fases sólidas Ir+C. En contraste, con adición de O2 los diagramas Ir-CVD revelan diferentes dominios de fases sólidas que incluyen IrO2, IrO2+Ir, Ir e Ir+C. Estos diagramas permiten establecer

  9. Irradiation damage of SiC semiconductor device (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon Ju

    2000-09-01

    This report reviewed the irradiation damage of SiC semiconductor devices and examined a irradiation behavior of SiC single crystal as a pre-examination for evaluation of irradiation behavior of SiC semiconductor devices. The SiC single was crystal irradiated by gamma-beam, N+ ion and electron beam. Annealing examinations of the irradiated specimens also were performed at 500 deg C. N-type 6H-SiC dopped with N+ ion was used and irradiation doses of gamma-beam, N+ion and electron beam were up to 200 Mrad, 1x10{sup 16} N{sup +} ions/cm{sup 2} and 3.6 x 10{sup 17} e/cm{sup 2} and 1.08 x 10{sup 18} e/cm{sup 2} , respectively. Irradiation damages were analyzed by the EPR method. Additionally, properties of SiC, information about commercial SiC single crystals and the list of web sites with related to the SiC device were described in the appendix.

  10. Clean diffusion coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnes, B.M.; Punola, D.C. [Howmet Thermatech Coatings, Whitehall, MI (United States)

    1997-10-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify diffusion coating impurities introduced by standard aluminizing processes and to evaluate the impact of those impurities on oxidation resistance of the resultant Pt aluminide coating. IN-738 tabs and foils were platinum-electroplated, and then aluminized using three different processes: high-activity pack cementation, high-activity CVD and low-activity CVD. The results suggest that aluminizing processes which involve aluminum bearing alloys in the coating retort with H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/HCl gas at high temperature can contaminate the diffusion coating during deposition. CVD low-activity aluminizing (coating gas generated at low temperature outside the coating chamber from 99.999% Al) did not introduce any coating impurities. In addition, the data indicates that harmful impurities from the IN-738 substrate (sulfur, boron and tungsten) and the electroplating process (phosphorus) were removed from the coating during deposition. The CVD low-activity Pt aluminide coating was the `cleanest` in the study, and it exhibited the best high-temperature oxidation resistance of the coatings considered. It can be concluded that trace elements in diffusion coatings from the superalloy substrate and/or the aluminizing process can adversely effect the oxidation resistance of those coatings, and that CVD low-activity aluminizing yields cleaner coatings than other commercially available aluminizing techniques. (orig.) 10 refs.

  11. Detail study of SiC MOSFET switching characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Helong; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2014-01-01

    This paper makes detail study of the latest SiC MOSFETs switching characteristics in relation to gate driver maximum current, gate resistance, common source inductance and parasitic switching loop inductance. The switching performance of SiC MOSFETs in terms of turn on and turn off voltage...... and current are presented. Switching losses analysis is made according to the experiment results. The switching characteristics study and switching losses analysis could give some guidelines of gate driver IC and gate resistance selection, switching losses estimation and circuit design of SiC MOSFETs....

  12. Challenges in Switching SiC MOSFET without Ringing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Helong; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Switching SiC MOSFET without ringing in high frequency applications is important for meeting the EMI (ElectroMagnetic Interference) standard. Achieving a clean switching waveform of SiC MOSFET without additional components is becoming a challenge. In this paper, the switching oscillation mechanism...... is analysed in detail. According to the analysis, the optimal circuit design to minimize the parasitic parametric is introduced for a clean switching waveform. Experiment results show the clean switching waveform of SiC MOSFET. Guidelines are established for circuit design....

  13. Bubble formation in oxide scales on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Mitchell, T. E.; Heuer, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of alpha-SiC single crystals and sintered alphaand beta-SiC polycrystals has been investigated at elevated temperatures. Bubble formation is commonly observed in oxide scales on polycrystalline SiC, but is rarely found on single-crystal scales; bubbles result from the preferential oxidation of C inclusions, which are abundant in SiC polycrystals. The absence of bubbles on single crystals, in fact, implies that diffusion of the gaseous species formed on oxidation, CO (or possibly SiO), controls the rate of oxidation of SiC.

  14. SiC MOSFETs based split output half bridge inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Helong; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2014-01-01

    Body diode of SiC MOSFETs has a relatively high forward voltage drop and still experiences reverse recovery phenomenon. Half bridge with split output aims to decouple both the body diode and junction capacitance of SiC MOSFETs, therefore achieving a reduced switching loss in a bridge configuration....... This paper makes the current commutation mechanism and efficiency analysis of half bridge with split output based on SiC MOSFETs. Current commutation process analysis is illustrated together with LTspice simulation and afterwards, verified by the experimental results of a double pulse test circuit with split...

  15. Bubble formation in oxide scales on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Mitchell, T. E.; Heuer, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of alpha-SiC single crystals and sintered alphaand beta-SiC polycrystals has been investigated at elevated temperatures. Bubble formation is commonly observed in oxide scales on polycrystalline SiC, but is rarely found on single-crystal scales; bubbles result from the preferential oxidation of C inclusions, which are abundant in SiC polycrystals. The absence of bubbles on single crystals, in fact, implies that diffusion of the gaseous species formed on oxidation, CO (or possibly SiO), controls the rate of oxidation of SiC.

  16. HV/CVD Grown Relaxed SiGe Buffer Layers for SiGe HMOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文韬; 罗广礼; 史进; 邓宁; 陈培毅; 钱佩信

    2003-01-01

    High-vacuum/chemical-vapor deposition (HV/CVD) system was used to grow relaxed SiGe buffer layers on Si substrates. Several methods were then used to analyze the quality of the SiGe films. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed that the upper layer was almost fully relaxed. Second ion mass spectroscopy showed that the Ge compositions were step-graded. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the misfit dislocations were restrained to the graded SiGe layers. Tests of the electrical properties of tensile-strained Si on relaxed SiGe buffer layers showed that their transconductances were higher than that of Si devices. These results verify the high quality of the relaxed SiGe buffer layer. The calculated critical layer thicknesses of the graded Si1-xGex layer on Si substrate and a Si layer on the relaxed SiGe buffer layer agree well with experimental results.

  17. Simulation and experimental approach to CVD-FBR aluminide coatings on ferritic steels under steam oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alcala, G. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: galcades@yahoo.es; Bolivar, F.J.; Sanchez, L.; Hierro, M.P.; Perez, F.J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Dep. CC. Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Avenida Complutense s/n, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The ferritic steels used to produce structural components for steam turbines are susceptible to strong corrosion and creep damage due to the extreme working conditions pushed to increase the process efficiency and to reduce pollutants release. The response of aluminide coatings on the P-92 ferritic steel, deposited by CVD-FBR, during oxidation in a simulated steam environment was studied. The analyses were performed at 650 deg. C in order to simulate the working conditions of a steam turbine, and 800 deg. C in order to produce a critical accelerated oxidation test. The Thermo-Calc software was used to predict the different solid phases that could be generated during the oxidation process, in both, coated and uncoated samples. In order to validate the thermodynamic results, the oxides scales produced during steam tests were characterized by different techniques such as XRD, SEM and EDS. The preliminary results obtained are discussed in the present work.

  18. A Bayesian method to estimate the neutron response matrix of a single crystal CVD diamond detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginatto, Marcel; Araque, Jorge Guerrero; Nolte, Ralf; Zbořil, Miroslav; Zimbal, Andreas [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Gagnon-Moisan, Francis [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-01-13

    Detectors made from artificial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single crystal diamond are very promising candidates for applications where high resolution neutron spectrometry in very high neutron fluxes is required, for example in fusion research. We propose a Bayesian method to estimate the neutron response function of the detector for a continuous range of neutron energies (in our case, 10 MeV ≤ E{sub n} ≤ 16 MeV) based on a few measurements with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. This method is needed because a complete set of measurements is not available and the alternative approach of using responses based on Monte Carlo calculations is not feasible. Our approach uses Bayesian signal-background separation techniques and radial basis function interpolation methods. We present the analysis of data measured at the PTB accelerator facility PIAF. The method is quite general and it can be applied to other particle detectors with similar characteristics.

  19. Crystallographic analysis of CVD films using x-ray polychromatic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavelle, B. [CNRS, Toulouse (France). Centre d`Elaboration de Materiaux et d`Etudes Structurales; Brissonneau, L.; Baggot, E.; Vahlas, C. [INPT-CNRS, Toulouse (France). Lab. Materiaux et Interfaces

    1998-12-31

    The Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffractometry (EDXD) technique was tested for in-situ crystallographic characterization of nickel films processed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The diffracted beam at low Bragg angle was analyzed in energy by a solid state detector. A nickel reference sample was used to face the problems of EDXD background signal and uncertainty of sample location. The relative accuracy on lattice parameters measurements is 1.5.10{sup {minus}3}, to be compared to 0.5.10{sup {minus}3} for classical (monochromatic) X-ray diffraction. Texture measurements yields results in agreement with those obtained form recent texture goniometer. Finally, an estimation of the thickness was obtained from the intensity of nickel fluorescence peak. In view of the obtained results, EDXD appears to be a promising technique for in-situ studies. Although less powerful compared to the synchrotron facility, it is more flexible and can be applied at lower cost.

  20. Electrochemical Intercalation of Lithium into Raw and Mild Oxide-treated Carbon Nanotubes Prepared by CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Ke-zhi; XU Yan-hui; WANG Xiao-lin; LUO Guo-hua

    2004-01-01

    The raw carbon nanotubes (CNTs) prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were used in electrochemical lithiation. To remove the impurity the mild oxidation was done on the samples. The electrochemical characteristics of the two samples are investigated by the galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The structural and interfacial changes of the CNTs electrode were analyzed by XRD and FT-IR. The samples show a reversibility of lithium intercalation and de-intercalation. The reversible capacities of the first five cycles are larger than 300 mAh/g and the irreversible capacity of the first cycle was much larger than that mentioned in literatures. There is no identical change in the structure during the charge and discharge. The reactions at the interface between electrode and the electrolyte are similar to those of other carbonaceous materials.

  1. CVD Synthesis of Hierarchical 3D MWCNT/Carbon-Fiber Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Susi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were synthesized by CVD on industrially manufactured highly crystalline vapor-grown carbon fibers (VGCFs. Two catalyst metals (Ni and Fe and carbon precursor gases (C2H2 and CO were studied. The catalysts were deposited on the fibers by sputtering and experiments carried out in two different reactors. Samples were characterized by electron microscopy (SEM and TEM. Iron was completely inactive as catalyst with both C2H2 and CO for reasons discussed in the paper. The combination of Ni and C2H2 was very active for secondary CNT synthesis, without any pretreatment of the fibers. The optimal temperature for CNT synthesis was 750∘C, with total gas flow of 650 cm3min⁡−1 of C2H2, H2, and Ar in 1.0:6.7:30 ratio.

  2. Development of laser-fired contacts for amorphous silicon layers obtained by Hot-Wire CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, D. [XaRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)], E-mail: delfina@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C.; Blanque, S. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Ibarz, D.; Bertomeu, J. [XaRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Alcubilla, R. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    In this work we study aluminium laser-fired contacts for intrinsic amorphous silicon layers deposited by Hot-Wire CVD. This structure could be used as an alternative low temperature back contact for rear passivated heterojunction solar cells. An infrared Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) has been used to locally fire the aluminium through the thin amorphous silicon layers. Under optimized laser firing parameters, very low specific contact resistances ({rho}{sub c} {approx} 10 m{omega} cm{sup 2}) have been obtained on 2.8 {omega} cm p-type c-Si wafers. This investigation focuses on maintaining the passivation quality of the interface without an excessive increase in the series resistance of the device.

  3. Synthesis and Optimization of MWCNTs on Co-Ni/MgO by Thermal CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ryu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were prepared by the thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD technique. Monometallic and bimetallic Co and Ni combinations were used as a catalyst on MgO support. The mixer of H2/C2H2 was used as a carbon source. The prepared CNTs were found to possess different shapes, morphologies, and sizes. Maximum yield was found for 50% Co (MgO: 50% and Ni: 0% catalyst at 600°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM techniques were used for structural analysis. Raman spectra were taken to investigate the quality and crystalline perfection of the prepared CNTs. The ratio of D- and G-bands (ID/IG was measured from these spectra.

  4. Changes in CVD risk factors in the activity counseling trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Baruth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Meghan Baruth1, Sara Wilcox1, James F Sallis3, Abby C King4,5, Bess H Marcus6, Steven N Blair1,21Department of Exercise Science, 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Public Health Research Center, Columbia, SC, USA; 3Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA; 4Department of Health Research and Policy, 5Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 6Behavioral and Social Sciences Section, Brown University Program in Public Health, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Primary care facilities may be a natural setting for delivering interventions that focus on behaviors that improve cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors. The purpose of this study was to examine the 24-month effects of the Activity Counseling Trial (ACT on CVD risk factors, to examine whether changes in CVD risk factors differed according to baseline risk factor status, and to examine whether changes in fitness were associated with changes in CVD risk factors. ACT was a 24-month multicenter randomized controlled trial to increase physical activity. Participants were 874 inactive men and women aged 35–74 years. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three arms that varied by level of counseling, intensity, and resource requirements. Because there were no significant differences in change over time between arms on any of the CVD risk factors examined, all arms were combined, and the effects of time, independent of arm, were examined separately for men and women. Time × Baseline risk factor status interactions examined whether changes in CVD risk factors differed according to baseline risk factor status. Significant improvements in total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and triglycerides were seen in

  5. Growth of Hexagonal Columnar Nanograin Structured SiC Thin Films on Silicon Substrates with Graphene–Graphitic Carbon Nanoflakes Templates from Solid Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanshun Zhao

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a new method for growing hexagonal columnar nanograin structured silicon carbide (SiC thin films on silicon substrates by using graphene–graphitic carbon nanoflakes (GGNs templates from solid carbon sources. The growth was carried out in a conventional low pressure chemical vapor deposition system (LPCVD. The GGNs are small plates with lateral sizes of around 100 nm and overlap each other, and are made up of nanosized multilayer graphene and graphitic carbon matrix (GCM. Long and straight SiC nanograins with hexagonal shapes, and with lateral sizes of around 200–400 nm are synthesized on the GGNs, which form compact SiC thin films.

  6. MCNPX Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport in SiC semiconductor detectors of fast neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlačková, K.; Zat'ko, B.; Šagátová, A.; Pavlovič, M.; Nečas, V.; Stacho, M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate particle transport properties of a fast neutron detector based on silicon carbide. MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) code was used in our study because it allows seamless particle transport, thus not only interacting neutrons can be inspected but also secondary particles can be banked for subsequent transport. Modelling of the fast-neutron response of a SiC detector was carried out for fast neutrons produced by 239Pu-Be source with the mean energy of about 4.3 MeV. Using the MCNPX code, the following quantities have been calculated: secondary particle flux densities, reaction rates of elastic/inelastic scattering and other nuclear reactions, distribution of residual ions, deposited energy and energy distribution of pulses. The values of reaction rates calculated for different types of reactions and resulting energy deposition values showed that the incident neutrons transfer part of the carried energy predominantly via elastic scattering on silicon and carbon atoms. Other fast-neutron induced reactions include inelastic scattering and nuclear reactions followed by production of α-particles and protons. Silicon and carbon recoil atoms, α-particles and protons are charged particles which contribute to the detector response. It was demonstrated that although the bare SiC material can register fast neutrons directly, its detection efficiency can be enlarged if it is covered by an appropriate conversion layer. Comparison of the simulation results with experimental data was successfully accomplished.

  7. Effect of CVD-diamond coatings on the tribological performance of cemented tungsten carbide substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleem Ahmad Najar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison has been documented between nanocrystalline diamond (NCD and microcrystalline diamond (MCD coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co substrates with architectures of WC-Co/NCD & WC-Co/MCD, using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique. In the present work, the frictional characteristics were studied using ball-on-disc type linear reciprocating micro-tribometer, under the application of 1–10N normal loads, when sliding against smooth alumina (Al2O3 ceramic ball for the total duration of 15min, under dry sliding conditions. Nanoindentation tests were also conducted using Berkovich nanoindenter for the purpose of measurement of hardness and elastic modulus values. The average coefficients of friction of MCD and NCD coatings decrease from 0.37 – 0.32 and 0.3 – 0.27 respectively, when the load is increased from 1–10N. However, for conventional WC-Co substrate the average coefficient of friction increases from 0.60–0.75, under the same input operating conditions. The wear tracks formed on the surfaces of CVD-diamond coatings and WC-Co substrate, after friction measurement were characterised using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. However, the compositional analysis for the formation of tribo-layer observed on the wear tracks of CVD-diamond coatings was confirmed using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS technique. Therefore, maintaining an appropriate level of normal load and using appropriate type of diamond coating, friction may be kept to some lower value to improve mechanical processes.

  8. Mechanical Properties of SiC Fiber-Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Si3N4 Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    in this study were obtained from AVCO Specialty Mate- rials Division . These fibers were produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from methyl...SILICON PODER r1ATE RIAt CA 0 ’E . AR O. ITNLRO’C-, IRO, SURFACE T AVERAGE .’ ,t" ;VA AREA. PARTICLE -. " I.2 : SIlt. ’u AS-RELEIVEn F1 43 1 .(125 0. fO

  9. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  10. Filmes de diamante CVD dopado com boro. Parte I . Histórico, produção e caracterização Boron-doped CVD diamond films. Part I. History, production and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Mendes de Barros

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a brief account concerning the production, characterization and evolution of the knowledge in the area of diamond and boron-doped diamond films. The most important methods used for the growth of these films, such as chemical vapor deposition and high pressure/high temperature systems, as well as the several kinds of reactors which can be employed are reviewed. However, larger emphasis is given to the CVD method. Morphological, structural and electric properties of these films, as well as their role in the performance of voltammetric electrodes for electrochemistry and electroanalytical chemistry are also discussed.

  11. Fabrication of micro hole array on the surface of CVD ZnS by scanning ultrafast pulse laser for antireflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangping; Zhang, Tianhui; Fan, Siling; Cheng, Guanghua

    2017-04-01

    Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) ZnS is a promising long-wave infrared (8-12 μm) window material. Yet antireflection is necessary since Fresnel reflection from its surface is high due to the high refractive index of ZnS. Sub-wavelength structured surface of micro hole array was fabricated on CVD ZnS by scanning ultrafast pulse laser ablation. The effects of beam profile, pulse width and beam power on the radius and morphology of the holes were studied. Gaussian beam can cause severe melted-resolidified layers around the hole, yet Bessel beam only resulted in thin ribbon around the hole. The picosecond Bessel laser is more suitable than femtosecond laser for ablating holes on ZnS. The radius of the holes increases with increasing the Bessel beam pulse width and the beam power. But larger power may cause circle grooves around the central holes. Ordered hole array was fabricated on single side of CVD ZnS and antireflection was realized.

  12. Process in manufacturing high efficiency AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells by MO-CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Y. C. M.; Chang, K. I.; Tandon, J.

    1984-01-01

    Manufacturing technology for mass producing high efficiency GaAs solar cells is discussed. A progress using a high throughput MO-CVD reactor to produce high efficiency GaAs solar cells is discussed. Thickness and doping concentration uniformity of metal oxide chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) GaAs and AlGaAs layer growth are discussed. In addition, new tooling designs are given which increase the throughput of solar cell processing. To date, 2cm x 2cm AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells with efficiency up to 16.5% were produced. In order to meet throughput goals for mass producing GaAs solar cells, a large MO-CVD system (Cambridge Instrument Model MR-200) with a susceptor which was initially capable of processing 20 wafers (up to 75 mm diameter) during a single growth run was installed. In the MR-200, the sequencing of the gases and the heating power are controlled by a microprocessor-based programmable control console. Hence, operator errors can be reduced, leading to a more reproducible production sequence.

  13. The corrosion behavior of CVI SiC matrix in SiCf/SiC composites under molten fluoride salt environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongda; Feng, Qian; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Haijun; Kan, Yanmei; Hu, Jianbao; Dong, Shaoming

    2017-04-01

    High temperature corrosion behavior and microstructural evolution of designed chemical-vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix in SiC fiber reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composites in 46.5LiF-11.5NaF-42.0KF (mol. %) eutectic salt at 800 °C for various corrosion time was studied. Worse damage was observed as extending the exposure time, with the mass loss ratio increasing from 0.716 wt. % for 50 h to 5.914 wt. % for 500 h. The mass loss rate showed a trend of first decrease and then increase with the extended corrosion exposure. Compared with the near-stoichiometric SiC matrix layers, the O-contained boundaries between deposited matrix layers and the designed Si-rich SiC matrix layers were much less corrosion resistant and preferentially corroded. Liner relationship between the mass loss ratio and the corrosion time obtained from 50 h to 300 h indicated that the corrosion action was reaction-control process. Further corrosion would lead to matrix layer exfoliation and higher mass loss ratio.

  14. SiC Avalanche Photodiodes and Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aymont Technology, Inc. (Aymont) will demonstrate the feasibility of SiC p-i-n avalanche photodiodes (APD) arrays. Aymont will demonstrate 4 x 4 arrays of 2 mm2 APDs...

  15. Microwave joining of SiC ceramics and composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Silberglitt, R.; Tian, Y.L. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Potential applications of SiC include components for advanced turbine engines, tube assemblies for radiant burners and petrochemical processing and heat exchangers for high efficiency electric power generation systems. Reliable methods for joining SiC are required in order to cost-effectively fabricate components for these applications from commercially available shapes and sizes. This manuscript reports the results of microwave joining experiments performed using two different types of SiC materials. The first were on reaction bonded SiC, and produced joints with fracture toughness equal to or greater than that of the base material over an extended range of joining temperatures. The second were on continuous fiber-reinforced SiC/SiC composite materials, which were successfully joined with a commercial active brazing alloy, as well as by using a polymer precursor.

  16. An Extension of SIC Predictions to the Wiener Coactive Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Joseph W; Townsend, James T

    2011-06-01

    The survivor interaction contrasts (SIC) is a powerful measure for distinguishing among candidate models of human information processing. One class of models to which SIC analysis can apply are the coactive, or channel summation, models of human information processing. In general, parametric forms of coactive models assume that responses are made based on the first passage time across a fixed threshold of a sum of stochastic processes. Previous work has shown that that the SIC for a coactive model based on the sum of Poisson processes has a distinctive down-up-down form, with an early negative region that is smaller than the later positive region. In this note, we demonstrate that a coactive process based on the sum of two Wiener processes has the same SIC form.

  17. DC characteristics of the SiC Schottky diodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    W Janke; A Hapka; M Oleksy

    2011-01-01

      DC characteristics of the SiC Schottky diodes The isothermal and non-isothermal characteristics of silicon carbide Schottky diodes in the wide range of currents and ambient temperatures are investigated in this paper...

  18. Surface morphology, growth rate and quality of diamond films synthesized in hot filament CVD system under various methane concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2011-08-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has been used to deposit diamond films on silicon substrate. In the present study, diamond films were grown at various vol.% CH 4 in H 2 from 0.5% to 3.5%, at substrate temperature and pressure of 850 °C and 80 torr, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the properties of deposited films. The formation of methyl radicals as a function of vol.% CH 4 not only changes film morphology but also increase film growth rate. At low, intermediate and high vol.% CH 4, cluster, faceted cubes and pyramidal features growth, were dominant. By increasing vol.% CH 4 from 0.5% to 3.5%, as the growth rate improved from ˜0.25 μm/h to ˜2.0 μm/h. Raman studies features revealed high purity diamond films at intermediate range of vol.% CH 4 and grain density increased by increasing CH 4 concentration. The present study represents experimentally surface morphology, growth rate and quality of diamond films grown in hot filament CVD system at various CH 4 concentrations.

  19. CVD of polymeric thin films: applications in sensors, biotechnology, microelectronics/organic electronics, microfluidics, MEMS, composites and membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde; Coclite, Anna Maria; Gleason, Karen K

    2012-01-01

    Polymers with their tunable functionalities offer the ability to rationally design micro- and nano-engineered materials. Their synthesis as thin films have significant advantages due to the reduced amounts of materials used, faster processing times and the ability to modify the surface while preserving the structural properties of the bulk. Furthermore, their low cost, ease of fabrication and the ability to be easily integrated into processing lines, make them attractive alternatives to their inorganic thin film counterparts. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as a polymer thin-film deposition technique offers a versatile platform for fabrication of a wide range of polymer thin films preserving all the functionalities. Solventless, vapor-phase deposition enable the integration of polymer thin films or nanostructures into micro- and nanodevices for improved performance. In this review, CVD of functional polymer thin films and the polymerization mechanisms are introduced. The properties of the polymer thin films that determine their behavior are discussed and their technological advances and applications are reviewed.

  20. Surface properties of diamond-like carbon films prepared by CVD and PVD methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Dong-Ping; Liu Yan-Hong; Chen Bao-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited using three different techniques: (a) electron cyclotron resonance-plasma source ion implantation, (b) low-pressure dielectric barrier discharge, (c) filtered-pulsed cathodic arc discharge. The surface and mechanical properties of these films are compared using atomic force microscopebased tests. The experimental results show that hydrogenated DLC films are covered with soft surface layers enriched with hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon while the soft surface layers of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films have graphite-like structure. The formation of soft surface layers can be associated with the surface diffusion and growth induced by the low-energy deposition process. For typical CVD methods, the atomic hydrogen in the plasmas can contribute to the formation of hydrogen and sp3 hybridized carbon enriched surface layers. The high-energy ion implantation causes the rearrangement of atoms beneath the surface layer and leads to an increase in film density. The ta-C films can be deposited using the medium energy carbon ions in the highly-ionized plasma.

  1. Degradation of a tantalum filament during the hot-wire CVD of silicon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliphant, C.J. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); National Metrology Institute of South Africa, Private Bag X34, Lynwood Ridge, Pretoria 0040 (South Africa); Arendse, C.J., E-mail: cjarendse@uwc.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Jordaan, W.A. [National Metrology Institute of South Africa, Private Bag X34, Lynwood Ridge, Pretoria 0040 (South Africa); Knoesen, D. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2015-01-30

    Electron backscatter diffraction revealed that during the hot-wire deposition of silicon nitride, a tantalum filament partially transformed to some of its nitrides and silicides. The deposition of an encapsulating silicon nitride layer occurred at the cooler filament ends. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy disclosed the presence of hydrogen, nitrogen and silicon containing ions within the aged filament bulk. Hardness measurements revealed that the recrystallized tantalum core experienced significant hardening, whereas the silicides and nitrides were harder but more brittle. Crack growth, porosity and the different thermal expansion amongst the various phases are all enhanced at the hotter centre regions, which resulted in failure at these areas. - Highlights: • Tantalum filament degrades and fails during hot-wire CVD of silicon nitride thin films. • An encapsulating silicon nitride layer is deposited at the cooler ends. • Electron backscatter diffraction reveals Ta-silicides and -nitrides with a Ta core. • Filament failure occurs at hot centre regions due to different mechanical properties of Ta, its silicides and nitrides.

  2. Preparation of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films with hot-wire-assisted MWECR-CVD system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Bin; Chen Guang-Hua; Zhu Xiu-Hong; Zhang Wen-Li; Ding Yi; Ma Zhan-Jie; Gao Zhi-Hua; Song Xue-Mei; Deng Jin-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Intrinsic hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films have been prepared by hot-wire-assisted microwave electron-cyclotron-resonance chemical vapour deposition (Hw-MwECR-CVD) under different deposition conditions.Fourier-transform infrared spectra and Raman spectra were measured.Optical band gap WaS determined by Tauc plots,and experiments of photo-induced degradation were performed.It was observed that hydrogen dilution plays a more essential role than substrate temperature in microcrystalline transformation at low temperatures. Crystalline volume fraction and mean grain size in the films increase with the dilution ratio (R=H2/(H2+SiH4)).With the rise of crystallinity in the films,the optical band gap tends to become narrower while the hydrogen content and photo-induced degradation decrease dramatically.The samples,were identified as μc-Si:H films,by calculating the optical band gap.It is considered that hydrogen dilution has an effect on reducing the crystallization activation energy of the material,which promotes the heterogeneous solid-state phase transition characterized by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation.The films with the needed structure can be prepared by balancing deposition and crystaUization through controlling process parameters.

  3. Avalanche robustness of SiC Schottky diode

    OpenAIRE

    Dchar, Ilyas; Buttay, Cyril; Morel, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Reliability is one of the key issues for the application of Silicon carbide (SiC) diode in high power conversion systems. For instance, in high voltage direct current (HVDC) converters, the devices can be submitted to high voltage transients which yield to avalanche. This paper presents the experimental evaluation of SiC diodes submitted to avalanche, and shows that the energy dissipation in the device can increase quickly and will not be uniformly distributed across t...

  4. Electrical Characterization of Defects in SiC Schottky Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, C. M.; Tabib-Azar, M.; Raffaelle, R. P.; Su, H. B.; Dudley, M.; Neudeck, P. G.; Bailey, S.

    2005-01-01

    We have been investigating the effect of screw dislocation and other structural defects on the electrical properties of SiC. SiC is a wide-bandgap semiconductor that is currently received much attention due to its favorable high temperature behavior and high electric field breakdown strength. Unfortunately, the current state-of-the-art crystal growth and device processing methods produce material with high defect densities, resulting in a limited commercial viability

  5. Argan oil improves surrogate markers of CVD in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sour, Souad; Belarbi, Meriem; Khaldi, Darine; Benmansour, Nassima; Sari, Nassima; Nani, Abdelhafid; Chemat, Farid; Visioli, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Limited - though increasing - evidence suggests that argan oil might be endowed with potential healthful properties, mostly in the areas of CVD and prostate cancer. We sought to comprehensively determine the effects of argan oil supplementation on the plasma lipid profile and antioxidant status of a group of healthy Algerian subjects, compared with matched controls. A total of twenty healthy subjects consumed 15 g/d of argan oil - with toasted bread - for breakfast, during 4 weeks (intervention group), whereas twenty matched controls followed their habitual diet, but did not consume argan oil. The study lasted 30 d. At the end of the study, argan oil-supplemented subjects exhibited higher plasma vitamin E concentrations, lower total and LDL-cholesterol, lower TAG and improved plasma and cellular antioxidant profile, when compared with controls. In conclusion, we showed that Algerian argan oil is able to positively modulate some surrogate markers of CVD, through mechanisms which warrant further investigation.

  6. Crystal growth of CVD diamond and some of its peculiarities

    CERN Document Server

    Piekarczyk, W

    1999-01-01

    Experiments demonstrate that CVD diamond can form in gas environments that are carbon undersaturated with respect to diamond. This fact is, among others, the most serious violation of principles of chemical thermodynamics. In this $9 paper it is shown that none of the principles is broken when CVD diamond formation is considered not a physical process consisting in growth of crystals but a chemical process consisting in accretion of macro-molecules of polycyclic $9 saturated hydrocarbons belonging to the family of organic compounds the smallest representatives of which are adamantane, diamantane, triamantane and so forth. Since the polymantane macro-molecules are in every respect identical with $9 diamond single crystals with hydrogen-terminated surfaces, the accretion of polymantane macro- molecules is a process completely equivalent to the growth of diamond crystals. However, the accretion of macro-molecules must be $9 described in a way different from that used to describe the growth of crystals because so...

  7. CVD Diamonds in the BaBar Radiation Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Bruinsma, M; Edwards, A J; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Kirkby, D; Petersen, B A

    2006-01-01

    To prevent excessive radiation damage to its Silicon Vertex Tracker, the BaBar experiment at SLAC uses a radiation monitoring and protection system that triggers a beam abort whenever radiation levels are anomalously high. The existing system, which employs large area Si PIN diodes as radiation sensors, has become increasingly difficult to operate due to radiation damage. We have studied CVD diamond sensors as a potential alternative for these silicon sensors. Two diamond sensors have been routinely used since their installation in the Vertex Tracker in August 2002. The experience with these sensors and a variety of tests in the laboratory have shown CVD diamonds to be a viable solution for dosimetry in high radiation environments. However, our studies have also revealed surprising side-effects.

  8. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) OCRWM Loop Error Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-07-26

    Characterization is specifically identified by the Richland Operations Office (RL) for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), as requiring application of the requirements in the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (RW-0333P DOE 1997a). Those analyses that provide information that is necessary for repository acceptance require application of the QARD. The cold vacuum drying (CVD) project identified the loops that measure, display, and record multi-canister overpack (MCO) vacuum pressure and Tempered Water (TW) temperature data as providing OCRWM data per Application of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Quality Assurance Requirements to the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project HNF-SD-SNF-RPT-007. Vacuum pressure transmitters (PT 1*08, 1*10) and TW temperature transmitters (TIT-3*05, 3*12) are used to verify drying and to determine the water content within the MCO after CVD.

  9. Luminescent Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Thin Film Deposited by Helicon Wave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wan-bing; YU Wei; WU Li-ping; CUI Shuang-kui; FU Guang-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were deposited on the single-crystal silicon substrate using the helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HW-PECVD) technique. The influences of magnetic field and hydrogen dilution ratio on the structures of SiC thin film were investigated with the atomic force microscopy (AFM), the Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the high plasma activity of the helicon wave mode proves to be a key factor to grow crystalline SiC thin films at a relative low substrate temperature. Also, the decrease in the grain sizes from the level of microcrystalline to that of nanocrystalline can be achieved by increasing the hydrogen dilution ratios. Transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that the size of most nanocrystals in the film deposited under the higher hydrogen dilution ratios is smaller than the doubled Bohr radius of 3C-SiC (approximately 5.4 nm), and the light emission measurements also show a strong blue photoluminescence at the room temperature, which is considered to be caused by the quantum confinement effect of small-sized SiC nanocrystals.

  10. Characterization of SiC in DLC/a-Si films prepared by pulsed filtered cathodic arc using Raman spectroscopy and XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srisang, C. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Western Digital (Thailand) Company Limited, Ayuthaya 13160 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Asanithi, P. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Siangchaew, K. [Western Digital (Thailand) Company Limited, Ayuthaya 13160 (Thailand); Pokaipisit, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Limsuwan, P., E-mail: opticslaser@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-05-15

    DLC/a-Si films were deposited on germanium substrates. a-Si film was initially deposited as a seed layer on the substrate using DC magnetron sputtering. DLC film was then deposited on the a-Si layer via a pulsed filtered cathodic arc (PFCA) system. In situ ellipsometry was used to monitor the thicknesses of the growth films, allowing a precise control over the a-Si and DLC thicknesses of 6 and 9 nm, respectively. It was found that carbon atoms implanting on a-Si layer act not only as a carbon source for DLC formation, but also as a source for SiC formation. The Raman peak positions at 796 cm{sup -1} and 972 cm{sup -1} corresponded to the LO and TO phonon modes of SiC, respectively, were observed. The results were also confirmed using TEM, XPS binding energy and XPS depth profile analysis.

  11. Electrochromic behavior in CVD grown tungsten oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogova, D.; Iossifova, A.; Ivanova, T.; Dimitrova, Zl; Gesheva, K.

    1999-03-01

    Solid state electrochemical devices (ECDs) for smart windows, large area displays and automobile rearview mirrors are of considerable technological and commercial interest. In this paper, we studied the electrochromic properties of amorphous and polycrystalline CVD carbonyl tungsten oxide films and the possibility for sol-gel thin TiO 2 film to play the role of passive electrode in an electrochromic window with solid polymer electrolyte.

  12. Electrochromic behavior in CVD grown tungsten oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogova, D.; Iossifova, A.; Ivanova, T.; Gesheva, K.; Dimitrova, Z. [Central Laboratory for Solar Energy and New Energy Sources at Bulgarian Academy of Science, 72 Tzarigradsko shossee Blvd., Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1999-03-15

    Solid state electrochemical devices (ECDs) for smart windows, large area displays and automobile rearview mirrors are of considerable technological and commercial interest. In this paper, we studied the electrochromic properties of amorphous and polycrystalline CVD carbonyl tungsten oxide films and the possibility for sol-gel thinTiO{sub 2} film to play the role of passive electrode in an electrochromic window with solid polymer electrolyte

  13. Evidence relating sodium intake to blood pressure and CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Martin; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Sodium is an essential nutrient, mostly ingested as salt (sodium chloride). Average sodium intake ranges from 3 to 6 g per day (7.5-15 g/day of salt) in most countries, with regional variations. Increasing levels of sodium intake have a positive association with higher blood pressure. Randomized controlled trials report a reduction in blood pressure with reducing sodium intake from moderate to low levels, which is the evidence that forms the basis for international guidelines recommending all people consume less than 2.0 g of sodium per day. However, no randomized trials have demonstrated that reducing sodium leads to a reduction in cardiovascular disease (CVD). In their absence, the next option is to examine the association between sodium consumption and CVD in prospective cohort studies. Several recent prospective cohort studies have indicated that while high intake of sodium (>6 g/d) is associated with higher risk of CVD compared to those with moderate intake (3 to 5 g/d), lower intake (<3 g/day) is also associated with a higher risk (despite lower blood pressure levels). However, most of these studies were conducted in populations at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Current epidemiologic evidence supports that an optimal level of sodium intake is in the range of about 3-5 g/day, as this range is associated with lowest risk of CVD in prospective cohort studies. Randomized controlled trials, comparing the effect of low sodium intake to moderate intake on incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality, are required to truly define optimal intake range.

  14. Infrared spectroscopic study of carrier scattering in gated CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kwangnam; Kim, Jiho; Kim, Joo Youn; Lee, Wonki; Hwang, Jun Yeon; Hwang, E. H.; Choi, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    We measured Drude absorption of gated CVD graphene using far-infrared transmission spectroscopy and determined the carrier scattering rate (γ ) as a function of the varied carrier density (n ). The n -dependent γ (n ) was obtained for a series of conditions systematically changed as (10 K, vacuum) → (300 K, vacuum) → (300 K, ambient pressure), which reveals that (1) at low-T, charged impurity (=A /√{n } ) and short-range defect (=B √{n } ) are the major scattering sources which constitute the total scattering γ =A /√{n }+B √{n } , (2) among various kinds of phonons populated at room-T , surface polar phonon of the SiO2 substrate is the dominantly scattering source, and (3) in air, the gas molecules adsorbed on graphene play a dual role in carrier scattering as charged impurity center and resonant scattering center. We present the absolute scattering strengths of those individual scattering sources, which provides the complete map of scattering mechanism of CVD graphene. This scattering map allows us to find out practical measures to suppress the individual scatterings, the mobility gains accompanied by them, and finally the ultimate attainable carrier mobility for CVD graphene.

  15. Ultra-high Burst Strength of CVD Graphene Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael; Kidambi, Piran; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Porous graphene membranes have significant potential in gas separation, water desalination and nanofiltration. Understanding the mechanical strength of porous graphene is crucial because membrane separations can involve high pressures. We studied the burst strength of CVD graphene membrane placed on porous support at applied pressures up to 100 bar by monitoring the gas flow rate across the membrane as a function of pressure. Increase of gas flow rate with pressure allowed for extraction of the burst fraction of graphene as it failed under increasing pressure. We also studied the effect of sub-nanometer pores on the ability of graphene to withstand pressure. The results showed that porous graphene membranes can withstand pressures comparable to or even higher than the >50 bar pressures encountered in water desalination, with non-porous CVD graphene exhibiting even higher mechanical strength. Our study shows that porous polycrystalline CVD graphene has ultra-high burst strength under applied pressure, suggesting the possibility for its use in high-pressure membrane separations. Principal Investigator

  16. Approach to diabetes management in patients with CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathief, Sanam; Inzucchi, Silvio E

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiologic analyses have established a clear association between diabetes and macrovascular disease. Vascular dysfunction caused by metabolic abnormalities in patients with diabetes is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Patients with diabetes are at two to four fold higher CV risk as compared to non-diabetic individuals, and CVD remains the leading cause of mortality in patients with this condition. One strategy to reduce CVD burden in patients with diabetes has been to focus on controlling the major metabolic abnormality in this condition, namely hyperglycemia. However, this has not been unequivocally demonstrated to reduced CV events, in contrast to controlling other CVD risk factors linked to hyperglycemia, such as blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and platelet dysfunction. However, In contradistinction, accrued data from a number of large, randomized clinical trials in both type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) over the past 3 decades have proven that more intensive glycemic control retards the onset and progression of microvascular disease. In this review, we will summarize the key glucose-lowering CV outcomes trials in diabetes, provide an overview of the different drugs and their impact on the CV system, and describe our approach to management of the frequently encountered patient with T2DM and coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or heart failure (HF).

  17. Continuous SiC fiber, CVI SiC matrix composites for nuclear applications: Properties and irradiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai, E-mail: katohy@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ozawa, Kazumi; Shih, Chunghao; Nozawa, Takashi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shinavski, Robert J. [Hyper-Therm High Temperature Composites, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi-ken (Japan); Snead, Lance L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) continuous fiber-reinforced, SiC-matrix composites (SiC/SiC composites) are industrially available materials that are promising for applications in nuclear environments. The SiC/SiC composites consisting of near-stoichiometric SiC fibers, stoichiometric and fully crystalline SiC matrices, and the pyrocarbon (PyC) or multilayered PyC/SiC interphase between the fiber and the matrix are considered particularly resistant to very high radiation environments. This paper provides a summary compilation of the properties of these composites, specifically those with the chemically vapor-infiltrated (CVI) SiC matrices, including newly obtained results. The properties discussed are both in unirradiated condition and after neutron irradiation to intermediate fluence levels (most data are for <∼10 displacement per atom) at 300–1300 °C.

  18. The Role of Government in Responding to Foreign CVD Investigations:Shenzhen’s Experiences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The paper probes into a series of meaningful and constructive work accomplished by Shenzhen government on foreign CVD investigations.Specifically, this paper analyzes the characteristics of CVD investigations for Shenzhen and the harmful impact of CVD investigation.It evaluates the major investigated subsidy programs in foreign CVDs against Chinese imports and discusses how to avoid CVD cases effectively and analyzes the principal measures taken by Shenzhen in dealing with CVD investigations concretely.The paper concludes that these works not only promoted the implementation of China’s WTO commitments,but also contributed to boost Shenzhen economic and social development and internationalization.

  19. The impact resistance of SiC and other mechanical properties of SiC and Si3N4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Studies focused on the impact and mechanical behavior of SiC and Si3N4 at high temperatures are summarized. Instrumented Charpy impact testing is analyzed by a compliance method and related to strength; slow crack growth is related to processing, and creep is discussed. The transient nature of flaw populations during oxidation under load is emphasized for both SiC and Si3N4.

  20. Electroluminescence of Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}:Mn through SiC whisker electric field enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagstaff, Brandon, E-mail: wagstabj@mcmaster.ca [McMaster University, Department of Engineering Physics, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Kitai, Adrian, E-mail: kitaia@mcmaster.ca [McMaster University, Department of Engineering Physics, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); McMaster University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Alternating current (AC) electroluminescence of thin film oxide phosphors is well known. However in this work electroluminescence of bulk oxide powder phosphors is achieved. A new type of AC Electroluminescent (ACEL) device has been created and developed by integrating SiC whiskers into a phosphor matrix composed of manganese-activated zinc germanate (Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}:Mn{sup 2+}). The conductive SiC whiskers enhance the average electric field in specific regions of the phosphor such that localized breakdown of the phosphor occurs, thus emitting green light. This field enhancement allows light emission to occur in thick film oxide powder phosphors and is notably the first time that bright and reasonably efficient electroluminescence of zinc germanate has been observed without using expensive thin film deposition techniques. Light emission has been achieved in thick pressed pellets using surface-deposited electrodes and the brightness-voltage characteristics of light emission are shown to be consistent with field emission of carriers from the embedded whiskers. - Highlights: • A new electroluminescent phosphor, Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}Mn{sup 2+}+SiC whiskers, is proposed. • A procedure is described to fabricate a solid sample of this composite material. • Under an AC voltage, green light is emitted only in samples containing the SiC whiskers. • A brightness of 25 Cd/m{sup 2} and efficiency of 0.25 Lm/W is observed 9.6×10{sup 6} V/m. • This is notably the first time that ACEL has been observed in bulk Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}Mn{sup 2+}.

  1. A Comparison between Thin-Film Transistors Deposited by Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition and PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Zarchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of new growth techniques on the mobility and stability of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H thin film transistors (TFTs has been studied. It was suggested that the key parameter controlling the field-effect mobility and stability is the intrinsic stress in the a-Si:H layer. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films were deposited by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD at 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Structural properties of these films were measured by Raman Spectroscopy. Electronic properties were measured by dark conductivity, σd, and photoconductivity, σph. For amorphous silicon films deposited by RF-PECVD on PET, photosensitivity's of >105 were obtained at both 100 º C and 25 ºC. For amorphous silicon films deposited by HW-CVD, a photosensitivity of > 105 was obtained at 100 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films deposited by HW-CVD at 95% hydrogen dilution show σph~ 10-4 Ω-1cm-1, while maintaining a photosensitivity of ~102 at both 100 ºC and 25 ºC. Microcrystalline silicon films with a large crystalline fraction (> 50% can be deposited by HW-CVD all the way down to room temperature.

  2. /SiC Composite to Titanium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, X.; Jiménez, C.; Mergia, K.; Yialouris, P.; Messoloras, S.; Liedtke, V.; Wilhelmi, C.; Barcena, J.

    2014-08-01

    In view of aerospace applications, an innovative structure for joining a Ti alloy to carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide has been developed. This is based on the perforation of the CMC material, and this procedure results in six-fold increase of the shear strength of the joint compared to the unprocessed CMC. The joint is manufactured using the active brazing technique and TiCuAg as filler metal. Sound joints without defects are produced and excellent wetting of both the composite ceramic and the metal is observed. The mechanical shear tests show that failure occurs always within the ceramic material and not at the joint. At the CMC/filler, Ti from the filler metal interacts with the SiC matrix to form carbides and silicides. In the middle of the filler region depletion of Ti and formation of Ag and Cu rich regions are observed. At the filler/Ti alloy interface, a layered structure of the filler and Ti alloy metallic elements is formed. For the perforation to have a significant effect on the improvement of the shear strength of the joint appropriate geometry is required.

  3. Initiated-chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon layers: Monomer adsorption, bulk growth, and process window definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aresta, G.; Palmans, J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Organosilicon layers have been deposited from 1,3,5-trivinyl-1,3,5-trimethylcyclotrisiloxane (V3D3) by means of the initiated-chemical vapor deposition (i-CVD) technique in a deposition setup, ad hoc designed for the engineering of multilayer moisture permeation barriers. The application of Fourier

  4. Effects of Ni catalyzer on growth velocity and morphology of SiC nano-fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xian-feng; XIAO Peng; XIONG Xiang; HUANG Bai-yun

    2009-01-01

    Composite felts reinforced by both SiC nano-fibers (SiC-NFs) and carbon fibers were prepared at 1 273 K using Ni granules as catalyzers with different deposition time. SiC-NFs were deposited on the surface of the carbon fibers in situ by catalytic chemical vapor deposition(CCVD). The phase, microstructure and morphology of the fibers after electroplating and deposition were characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. The results show that the SiC-NFs produced by CCVD are composed of single crystal of β-SiC. It is found that smaller nano-granules are more active as catalyzers. The resulting SiC-NFs appear more spindle-like and have a more homogeneous dispersion. The mass change of the samples before and after deposition shows that using more Ni granules results in a faster growth velocity of SiC-NFs. With the same electroplating time, the growth velocity of the SiC-NFs first increases and then decreases. At around 4 h, it reaches the maximum growth velocity, and it becomes nearly constant at around 8 h. After 8 h, the stable growth velocity of the electroplated Ni samples is faster than that of the conventional sample produced without catalyzers, because the SiC-NFs can improve the specific surface area and the activity of the surface.

  5. FABRICATION OF CNTS BY TOLUENE DECOMPOSITION IN A NEW REACTOR BASED ON AN ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE PLASMA JET COUPLED TO A CVD SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIPE RAMÍREZ-HERNÁNDEZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a method to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs based on the coupling between two conventional techniques used for the preparation of nanostructures: an arc-jet as a source of plasma and a chemical vapour deposition (CVD system. We call this system as an “atmospheric pressure plasma (APP-enhanced CVD” (APPE-CVD. This reactor was used to grow CNTs on non-flat aluminosilicate substrates by the decomposition of toluene (carbon source in the presence of ferrocene (as a catalyst. Both, CNTs and by-products of carbon were collected at three different temperatures (780, 820 and 860 °C in different regions of the APPE-CVD system. These samples were analysed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine the effect of APP on the thermal stability of the as-grown CNTs. It was found that the amount of metal catalyst in the synthesised CNTs is reduced by applying APP, being 820 °C the optimal temperature to produce CNTs with a high yield and carbon purity (95 wt. %. In contrast, when the synthesis temperature was fixed at 780 °C or 860 °C, amorphous carbon or CNTs with different structural defects, respectively, was formed through APEE-CVD reactor. We recommended the use of non-flat aluminosilicate particles as supports to increase CNT yield and facilitate the removal of deposits from the substrate surface. The approach that we implemented (to synthesise CNTs by using the APPE-CVD reactor may be useful to produce these nanostructures on a gram-scale for use in basic studies. The approach may also be scaled up for mass production.

  6. Preparation of 6066/SiCp composites by multilayer spray deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康智涛; 陈振华

    2001-01-01

    SiC particulate reinforced 6066 aluminium alloy metal matrix composites (MMCs) were prepared by multi-layer spray forming. The preparation technology and process parameters were discussed. It is shown that SiC particulate can be continuously and evenly fed and co-deposited in the spray forming process. The reciprocally scanning movement of spraying system can make the SiC particulates distribute homogeneously in the composite. The ratio of SiC particulates captured by the metal matrix is influenced by process parameters, especially the metal flow rate. 6066/SiCp composite preforms of d300  mm×540  mm and tubes with a size of up to d650/d300  mm×1  000  mm were made by the same process. After extrusion and T6 heat treatment, the multi-layer spray deposited 6066/SiCp composites can achieve improved properties.

  7. Thermal shock tests of $beta;-sic pellets prepared from laser synthesized nanoscale sic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, A.; Borsella, E.; Botti, S.; Martelli, S.; Nannetti, C. A.; Mancini, M. R.; Morjan, I.

    1996-10-01

    Nanoscale SiC powders, produced by laser synthesis from gaseous precursors, have been successfully used to prepare sintered pellets. All the sintered samples showed the low temperature β-SiC structures and presented an enhanced thermal conductivity (> 20%) with respect to materials prepared from commercial powders. Samples hardness and toughness, comparable with commercial products, confirmed the good samples quality. The thermal shock tests have been performed by irradiating the pellets with a Nd-YAG pulsed laser (pulse duration and energy: 0.25 μs and 0.18 J or 0.4 ms and 0.65 J). The laser fluence (power density) was increased by reducing the spot size, up to the appearance of a visible surface damage. The threshold values for the structural damage were quantified using a heat flux parameter φ abs√ tp. The measured threshold value rose from ca. 20 MW/m 2 √s for the best materials prepared from commercial SiC powders to ca. 24 MW/m 2√s for the newly developed β-SiC.

  8. Using hot wire and initiated chemical vapor deposition for gas barrier thin film encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spee, D.A., E-mail: diederickspee@gmail.com; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2015-01-30

    Hot wire CVD (HWCVD) and initiated CVD (iCVD) are very well suited deposition techniques for the fabrication of transparent thin film gas barriers. Single inorganic or organic layers, however, face challenges, which are hard to overcome: unavoidable defects and low intrinsic barrier function. We demonstrate that by combining inorganic HWCVD films and organic iCVD films, a water vapor transmission rate a low as 5 ∗ 10{sup −6} g/m{sup 2}/day at 60 °C and 90% RH for a simple pinhole free three layer structure is obtained even with non-optimized individual layers. Given the 100 °C deposition temperature, the layer stacks can be deposited on any sensitive electronic device.

  9. Numerical modeling of first experiments on PbLi MHD flows in a rectangular duct with foam-based SiC flow channel insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolentsev, S., E-mail: sergey@fusion.ucla.edu [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Courtessole, C.; Abdou, M.; Sharafat, S. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Sahu, S. [Institute of Plasma Research (India); Sketchley, T. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Numerical studies were performed as a pre-experimental analysis to the experiment on MHD PbLi flows in a rectangular duct with a flow channel insert (FCI). • Dynamic testing of foam-based SiC foam-based CVD coated FCI has been performed using MaPLE facility at UCLA. • Two physical models were proposed to explain the experimental results and 3D and 2D computations performed using COMSOL, HIMAG and UCLA codes. • The obtained results suggest that more work on FCI development, fabrication and testing has to be done to assure good hermetic properties before the implementation in a fusion device. - Abstract: A flow channel insert (FCI) is the key element of the DCLL blanket concept. The FCI serves as electrical and thermal insulator to reduce the MHD pressure drop and to decouple the temperature-limited ferritic structure from the flowing hot lead-lithium (PbLi) alloy. The main focus of the paper is on numerical computations to simulate MHD flows in the first experiments on PbLi flows in a stainless steel rectangular duct with a foam-based silicon carbide (SiC) FCI. A single uninterrupted long-term (∼6500 h) test has recently been performed on a CVD coated FCI sample in the flowing PbLi in a magnetic field up to 1.5 T at the PbLi temperature of 300 °C using the MaPLE loop at UCLA. An unexpectedly high MHD pressure drop measured in this experiment suggests that a PbLi ingress into the FCI occurred in the course of the experiment, resulting in degradation of electroinsulating FCI properties. The ingress through the protective CVD layer was further confirmed by the post-experimental microscopic analysis of the FCI. The numerical modeling included 2D and 3D computations using HIMAG, COMSOL and a UCLA research code to address important flow features associated with the FCI finite length, fringing magnetic field, rounded FCI corners and also to predict changes in the MHD pressure drop in the unwanted event of a PbLi ingress. Two physical

  10. Evaluation of a bivalent (CVD 103-HgR/CVD 111) live oral cholera vaccine in adult volunteers from the United States and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D N; Tacket, C O; Losonsky, G; Castro, O; Gutierrez, J; Meza, R; Nataro, J P; Kaper, J B; Wasserman, S S; Edelman, R; Levine, M M; Cryz, S J

    1997-09-01

    To provide optimum protection against classical and El Tor biotypes of Vibrio cholerae O1, a single-dose, oral cholera vaccine was developed by combining two live, attenuated vaccine strains, CVD 103-HgR (classical, Inaba) and CVD 111 (El Tor, Ogawa). The vaccines were formulated in a double-chamber sachet; one chamber contained lyophilized bacteria, and the other contained buffer. In the first study, 23 U.S. adult volunteers received CVD 103-HgR at 10(8) CFU plus CVD 111 at 10(8), 10(7), or 10(6) CFU, CVD 111 alone at 10(7) CFU, or placebo. In the second study, 275 Peruvian adults were randomized to receive CVD 103-HgR at 10(9) CFU plus CVD 111 at 10(9) or 10(8) CFU, CVD 111 alone at 10(9) CFU, CVD 103-HgR alone at 10(9) CFU, or placebo. Three of 15 U.S. volunteers who received CVD 111 at 10(7) or 10(8) CFU developed mild diarrhea, compared to none of 4 who received CVD 111 at 10(6) CFU and 1 of 4 who received placebo. Twelve (63%) of 19 vaccine recipients shed the El Tor vaccine strain. All but one volunteer developed significant Ogawa and Inaba vibriocidal antibody titers. Volunteers who received CVD 111 at 10(7) CFU had geometric mean Ogawa titers four to five times higher than those of volunteers who received the lower dose. In the second study, all dosage regimens were well tolerated in Peruvians. About 20% of volunteers who received CVD 111 at the high dose excreted the El Tor organism, compared to 7% in the low-dose group. CVD 111 was detected in the stools of two placebo recipients, neither of whom had symptoms or seroconverted. In all vaccine groups, 69 to 76% developed fourfold rises in Inaba vibriocidal antibodies. Among those who received the bivalent vaccine, 53 to 75% also developed significant rises in Ogawa vibriocidal antibodies. We conclude that it is feasible to produce a single-dose, oral bivalent vaccine that is safe and immunogenic against both biotypes (El Tor and classical) and both serotypes (Inaba and Ogawa) of cholera for populations in

  11. Prediction of the properties of PVD/CVD coatings with the use of FEM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa, Agata; Mikuła, Jarosław; Gołombek, Klaudiusz; Tański, Tomasz; Kwaśny, Waldemar; Bonek, Mirosław; Brytan, Zbigniew

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of the prediction of the properties of PVD/CVD coatings with the use of finite element method (FEM) analysis. The possibility of employing the FEM in the evaluation of stress distribution in multilayer Ti/Ti(C,N)/CrN, Ti/Ti(C,N)/(Ti,Al)N, Ti/(Ti,Si)N/(Ti,Si)N, and Ti/DLC/DLC coatings by taking into account their deposition conditions on magnesium alloys has been discussed in the paper. The difference in internal stresses in the zone between the coating and the substrate is caused by, first of all, the difference between the mechanical and thermal properties of the substrate and the coating, and also by the structural changes that occur in these materials during the fabrication process, especially during the cooling process following PVD and CVD treatment. The experimental values of stresses were determined based on X-ray diffraction patterns that correspond to the modelled values, which in turn can be used to confirm the correctness of the accepted mathematical model for testing the problem. An FEM model was established for the purpose of building a computer simulation of the internal stresses in the coatings. The accuracy of the FEM model was verified by comparing the results of the computer simulation of the stresses with experimental results. A computer simulation of the stresses was carried out in the ANSYS environment using the FEM method. Structure observations, chemical composition measurements, and mechanical property characterisations of the investigated materials has been carried out to give a background for the discussion of the results that were recorded during the modelling process.

  12. Atomic scale KMC simulation of {100} oriented CVD diamond film growth under low substrate temperature-Part II Simulation of CVD diamond film growth in C-H system and in Cl-containing systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of {100}-oriented CVD diamond film under two modifications of J-B-H model at low substrate temperatures was simulated by using a revised KMC method at atomic scale. The results were compared both in Cl-containing systems and in C-H system as follows: (1) Substrate temperature can produce an important effect both on film deposition rate and on surface roughness; (2) Aomic Cl takes an active role for the growth of diamond film at low temperatures; (3) {100}-oriented diamond film cannot deposit under single carbon insertion mechanism, which disagrees with the predictions before; (4) The explanation of the exact role of atomic Cl is not provided in the simulation results.

  13. A Comparative Study of Three Different Chemical Vapor Deposition Techniques of Carbon Nanotube Growth on Diamond Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares between the methods of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs on diamond substrates and evaluates the quality of the CNTs and the interfacial strength. One potential application for these materials is a heat sink/spreader for high-power electronic devices. The CNTs and diamond substrates have a significantly higher specific thermal conductivity than traditional heat sink/spreader materials making them good replacement candidates. Only limited research has been performed on these CNT/diamond structures and their suitability of different growth methods. This study investigates three potential chemical vapor deposition (CVD techniques for growing CNTs on diamond: thermal CVD (T-CVD, microwave plasma-enhanced CVD (MPE-CVD, and floating catalyst thermal CVD (FCT-CVD. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to analyze the morphology and topology of the CNTs. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the quality of the CNTs by determining the ID/IG peak intensity ratios. Additionally, the CNT/diamond samples were sonicated for qualitative comparisons of the durability of the CNT forests. T-CVD provided the largest diameter tubes, with catalysts residing mainly at the CNT/diamond interface. The MPE-CVD process yielded non uniform defective CNTs, and FCT-CVD resulted in the smallest diameter CNTs with catalyst particles imbedded throughout the length of the nanotubes.

  14. Urchin-like artificial gallium oxide nanowires grown by a novel MOCVD/CVD-based route for random laser application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Ronaldo P. de [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Colégio Militar do Recife, Exército Brasileiro, Recife PE 50730-120 (Brazil); Oliveira, Nathalia Talita C. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Dominguez, Christian Tolentino; Gomes, Anderson S. L.; Araújo, Cid B. de [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife (Brazil); Falcão, Eduardo H. L.; Alves, Severino; Luz, Leonis L. da [Departamento de Química Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife (Brazil); Chassagnon, Remi [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Sacilotti, Marco [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife (Brazil); Nanoform Group, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon (France)

    2016-04-28

    A novel procedure based on a two-step method was developed to obtain β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The first step consists in the gallium micro-spheres growth inside a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition environment, using an organometallic precursor. Nanoscale spheres covering the microspheres were obtained. The second step involves the CVD oxidization of the gallium micro-spheres, which allow the formation of β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires on the micro-sphere surface, with the final result being a nanostructure mimicking nature's sea urchin morphology. The grown nanomaterial is characterized by several techniques, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, transmission electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. A discussion about the growth mechanism and the optical properties of the β-Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} material is presented considering its unknown true bandgap value (extending from 4.4 to 5.68 eV). As an application, the scattering properties of the nanomaterial are exploited to demonstrate random laser emission (around 570 nm) when it is permeated with a laser dye liquid solution.

  15. Oats and CVD risk markers: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, Frank; Masson, Lindsey F; Boffetta, Paolo; Kris-Etherton, Penny

    2014-10-01

    High consumption of whole-grain food such as oats is associated with a reduced risk of CVD and type 2 diabetes. The present study aimed to systematically review the literature describing long-term intervention studies that investigated the effects of oats or oat bran on CVD risk factors. The literature search was conducted using Embase, Medline and the Cochrane library, which identified 654 potential articles. Seventy-six articles describing sixty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Most studies lacked statistical power to detect a significant effect of oats on any of the risk factors considered: 59 % of studies had less than thirty subjects in the oat intervention group. Out of sixty-four studies that assessed systemic lipid markers, thirty-seven (58 %) and thirty-four (49 %) showed a significant reduction in total cholesterol (2-19 % reduction) and LDL-cholesterol (4-23 % reduction) respectively, mostly in hypercholesterolaemic subjects. Few studies (three and five, respectively) described significant effects on HDL-cholesterol and TAG concentrations. Only three out of twenty-five studies found a reduction in blood pressure after oat consumption. None of the few studies that measured markers of insulin sensitivity and inflammation found any effect after long-term oat consumption. Long-term dietary intake of oats or oat bran has a beneficial effect on blood cholesterol. However, there is no evidence that it favourably modulates insulin sensitivity. It is still unclear whether increased oat consumption significantly affects other risk markers for CVD risk, and comprehensive, adequately powered and controlled intervention trials are required to address this question.

  16. Epigenetic modifications and human pathologies: cancer and CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Susan J

    2011-02-01

    Epigenetic changes are inherited alterations in DNA that affect gene expression and function without altering the DNA sequence. DNA methylation is one epigenetic process implicated in human disease that is influenced by diet. DNA methylation involves addition of a 1-C moiety to cytosine groups in DNA. Methylated genes are not transcribed or are transcribed at a reduced rate. Global under-methylation (hypomethylation) and site-specific over-methylation (hypermethylation) are common features of human tumours. DNA hypomethylation, leading to increased expression of specific proto-oncogenes (e.g. genes involved in proliferation or metastasis) can increase the risk of cancer as can hypermethylation and reduced expression of tumour suppressor (TS) genes (e.g. DNA repair genes). DNA methyltransferases (DNMT), together with the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), facilitate DNA methylation. Abnormal DNA methylation is implicated not only in the development of human cancer but also in CVD. Polyphenols, a group of phytochemicals consumed in significant amounts in the human diet, effect risk of cancer. Flavonoids from tea, soft fruits and soya are potent inhibitors of DNMT in vitro, capable of reversing hypermethylation and reactivating TS genes. Folates, a group of water-soluble B vitamins found in high concentration in green leafy vegetables, regulate DNA methylation through their ability to generate SAM. People who habitually consume the lowest level of folate or with the lowest blood folate concentrations have a significantly increased risk of developing several cancers and CVD. This review describes how flavonoids and folates in the human diet alter DNA methylation and may modify the risk of human colon cancer and CVD.

  17. X-ray fluorescence microtomography of SiC shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ice, G.E.; Chung, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nagedolfeizi, M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    TRISCO coated fuel particles contain a small kernel of nuclear fuel encapsulated by alternating layers of C and SiC. The TRISCO coated fuel particle is used in an advanced fuel designed for passive containment of the radioactive isotopes. The SiC layer provides the primary barrier for radioactive elements in the kernel. The effectiveness of this barrier layer under adverse conditions is critical to containment. The authors have begun the study of SiC shells from TRISCO fuel. They are using the fluorescent microprobe beamline 10.3.1. The shells under evaluation include some which have been cycled through a simulated core melt-down. The C buffer layers and nuclear kernels of the coated fuel have been removed by laser drilling through the SiC and then exposing the particle to acid. Elements of interest include Ru, Sb, Cs, Ce and Eu. The radial distribution of these elements in the SiC shells can be attributed to diffusion of elements in the kernel during the melt-down. Other elements in the shells originate during the fabrication of the TRISCO particles.

  18. Hysteresis in the Active Oxidation of SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Harder, Bryan J.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2011-01-01

    Si and SiC show both passive oxidation behavior where a protective film of SiO2 forms and active oxidation behavior where a volatile suboxide SiO(g) forms. The active-to-passive and passive-to-active oxidation transitions are explored for both Si and SiC. Si shows a dramatic difference between the P(O2) for the two transitions of 10-4 bar. The active-to-passive transition is controlled by the condition for SiO2/Si equilibrium and the passive-to-active transition is controlled by the decomposition of SiO2. In the case of SiC, the P(O2) for these transitions are much closer. The active-to-passive transition appears to be controlled by the condition for SiO2/SiC equilibrium. The passive-to-active transition appears to be controlled by the interfacial reaction of SiC and SiO2 and subsequent generation of gases at the interface which leads to scale breakdown.

  19. CVD Diamond Sink Application in High Power 3D MCMs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Kuo-jun; JIANG Chang-shun; LI Cheng-yue

    2005-01-01

    As electronic packages become more compact, run at faster speeds and dissipate more heat, package designers need more effective thermal management materials. CVD diamond, because of its high thermal conductivity, low dielectric loss and its great mechanical strength, is an excellent material for three dimensional (3D) multichip modules (MCMs) in the next generation compact high speed computers and high power microwave components. In this paper, we have synthesized a large area freestanding diamond films and substrates, and polished diamond substrates, which make MCMs diamond film sink becomes a reality.

  20. Induktive Randschichthärtung CVD-beschichteter Stähle mit Abschreckung im Gasdüsenfeld

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Kessler, Olaf; Hoffmann, Franz

    2000-01-01

    the properties of steel substrates ready for operation. Induction surface hardening is applied to TiN-coated 100Cr6 (AISI 52100) and X155CrVMo12-1 (AISI D2) substrates. In comparison to TiN-42CrMo4(AISI 4140)-compounds it is found, that induction heating to higher temperatures is necessary to harden higher......The properties of hard coatings deposited using CVD-processes are usually excellent. However, high deposition temperatures may negatively influence the properties of steel substrates, especially in the case of low alloyed steels. Therefore, a subsequent heat treatment is necessary to restore...... alloyed steels but these high temperatures may cause modifications of TiN-coatings. Nevertheless, by optimising the parameters of the induction process there are great advantages of induction surface hardening compared to conventional bulk hardening....