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Sample records for deposited tantalum base

  1. Nanocomposite tantalum-carbon-based films deposited by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benchikh, N. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Garrelie, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Wolski, K. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Donnet, C. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)]. E-mail: Christophe.Donnet@univ-st-etienne.fr; Fillit, R.Y. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS - URA CNRS 5146, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne, Cedex 02 (France); Rogemond, F. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Subtil, J.L. [Laboratoire Traitement du Signal et Instrumentation, UMR 5516, Universite J. Monnet, 10 rue Barrouin, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Rouzaud, J.N. [Laboratoire de Geologie de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris 24, rue Lhomond 75231-Paris Cedex 5 (France); Laval, J.Y. [Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, UPR5 CNRS-ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin 75231-Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2006-01-03

    Nanostructured coatings of metal (tantalum) containing diamond-like carbon (a-C:Ta) have been prepared by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The films, containing 15 at.% tantalum, have been deposited by ablating sequentially graphite and metallic tantalum in vacuum conditions with an amplified Ti:sapphire laser. The coatings have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing angle X-ray diffraction, energy filtered transmission electron microscopy, scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscopies. Evidence of metallic {alpha}-Ta and {beta}-Ta particles (diameter in the 100 nm range) and smaller quasi-amorphous tantalum clusters embedded in the carbonaceous matrix have been shown. A thin tantalum carbide interface between the carbon matrix and the top surface of the tantalum nodules has also been identified. The ability of femtosecond pulsed laser deposition to synthetize nanocomposite carbon-based films and to control their nanostructure is discussed.

  2. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  3. Pulsed laser deposition of tantalum pentoxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Boyd, I. W.

    We report thin tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) films grown on quartz and silicon substrates by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique employing a Nd:YAG laser (wavelength λ=532 nm) in various O2 gas environments. The effect of oxygen pressure, substrate temperature, and annealing under UV irradiation using a 172-nm excimer lamp on the properties of the grown films has been studied. The optical properties determined by UV spectrophotometry were also found to be a sensitive function of oxygen pressure in the chamber. At an O2 pressure of 0.2 mbar and deposition temperatures between 400 and 500 °C, the refractive index of the films was around 2.18 which is very close to the bulk Ta2O5 value of 2.2, and an optical transmittance around 90% in the visible region of the spectrum was obtained. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the as-deposited films were amorphous at temperatures below 500 °C and possessed an orthorhombic (β-Ta2O5) crystal structure at temperatures above 600 °C. The most significant result of the present study was that oxygen pressure could be used to control the composition and modulate optical band gap of the films. It was also found that UV annealing can significantly improve the optical and electrical properties of the films deposited at low oxygen pressures (<0.1 mbar).

  4. The Chemical Vapour Deposition of Tantalum - in long narrow channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki

    use as a construction material for process equipment, with the cheaper alternative being the construction of equipment from steel and then protecting it with a thin but efficacious layer of tantalum. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) is chosen as the most effective process to apply thin corrosion...... protective layers of tantalum because of the process’ ability to coat complex geometries and its relative ease to control. This work focuses on studying the CVD of tantalum in long narrow channels with the view that the knowledge gained during the project can be used to optimise the commercial coating...... process that Tantaline A/S and Alfa Laval (Sweden) use to manufacture tantalum coated plate heat exchangers. Experiments are done by coating the inner side of long, thin stainless steel tubes in the temperature range of 700 – 950 °C and pressure range of 25 – 990 mbar while using different reactant...

  5. Magnetron sputter deposited tantalum and tantalum nitride thin films: An analysis of phase, hardness and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernoulli, D. [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH-Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Müller, U. [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Schwarzenberger, M. [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH-Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Hauert, R. [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Spolenak, R. [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials, ETH-Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-12-02

    Tantalum (Ta) and tantalum nitride thin films are highly important as diffusion barriers and adhesion layers in microelectronics and hard coatings for cutting tools. In this study, the effect of the underlying substrate on the phase formation of Ta and the influence of a changing N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio on hardness, phase and composition of reactively formed tantalum nitride have been investigated. Ta is DC sputter deposited and forms β-Ta on amorphous diamond-like carbon and on the amorphous natural oxide layers of Ti and Si(100) while a 15 nm TaN seed layer results in the formation of α-Ta. The chemical composition of the topmost layers of a substrate influences the formation of α- and β-Ta. With increasing N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratios a transition from amorphous Ta-rich tantalum nitride over face-centered cubic tantalum nitride (fcc-TaN) to (100) textured fcc-TaN at flow ratios above 45% is observed. The hardness of the tantalum nitride thin film reaches a maximum at a flow ratio of 45%, followed by a decrease in hardness for higher N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratios. The increase in hardness is associated with a decrease in grain size and shows a stronger correlation for a Meyers and Ashworth relationship than for a Hall–Petch relationship. - Highlights: • Chemical composition of the substrate influences the phase of deposited Ta. • FCC-TaN seed layer leads to α-Ta on the natural oxide layers of Ti and Si(100). • Meyers and Ashworth relationship correlates stronger than Hall–Petch relationship.

  6. Mineral-deposit model for lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; McCauley, Andrew D.; Stillings, Lisa M.

    2017-06-20

    Lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) pegmatites comprise a compositionally defined subset of granitic pegmatites. The major minerals are quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and muscovite; typical accessory minerals include biotite, garnet, tourmaline, and apatite. The principal lithium ore minerals are spodumene, petalite, and lepidolite; cesium mostly comes from pollucite; and tantalum mostly comes from columbite-tantalite. Tin ore as cassiterite and beryllium ore as beryl also occur in LCT pegmatites, as do a number of gemstones and high-value museum specimens of rare minerals. Individual crystals in LCT pegmatites can be enormous: the largest spodumene was 14 meters long, the largest beryl was 18 meters long, and the largest potassium feldspar was 49 meters long.Lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites account for about one-fourth of the world’s lithium production, most of the tantalum production, and all of the cesium production. Giant deposits include Tanco in Canada, Greenbushes in Australia, and Bikita in Zimbabwe. The largest lithium pegmatite in the United States, at King’s Mountain, North Carolina, is no longer being mined although large reserves of lithium remain. Depending on size and attitude of the pegmatite, a variety of mining techniques are used, including artisanal surface mining, open-pit surface mining, small underground workings, and large underground operations using room-and-pillar design. In favorable circumstances, what would otherwise be gangue minerals (quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and muscovite) can be mined along with lithium and (or) tantalum as coproducts.Most LCT pegmatites are hosted in metamorphosed supracrustal rocks in the upper greenschist to lower amphibolite facies. Lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatite intrusions generally are emplaced late during orogeny, with emplacement being controlled by pre-existing structures. Typically, they crop out near evolved, peraluminous granites and leucogranites from which they are inferred to be

  7. Tantalum Coating of Steel, Copper, Aluminum, and Titanium by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Bjerrum, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Tantalum coatings ranging from 0.5 to 120 mm has been deposited by CVD at 625-1000 C using tantalum pentachloride as precursor. Deposition rates range from 1 to 80mm/h and an activation energy of 103 kJ/mole is calculated. Well adhering deposits has been obtained on stainless steel, carbon steels...

  8. Analytical fingerprint for tantalum ores from African deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, F.; Graupner, T.; Sitnikova, M.; Oberthür, T.; Henjes-Kunst, F.; Gäbler, E.; Rantitsch, G.

    2009-04-01

    Kibaran age either show flat patterns for most tantalites, rising values from the LREE to the HREE, or trough-like patterns. Eu anomalies are strongly negative in columbite-tantalite from the Alto Ligonha Province in Mozambique, from the Namaqualand Province (Namibia, South Africa), and from Zimbabwe. Four main age populations of coltan deposits in Africa were revealed: (1) Archean (>2.5 Ga), (2) Paleoproterozoic (2.1-1.9 Ga), (3) early Neoproterozoic ("Kibaran", 1.0-0.9 Ga), and (4) late Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic (Pan-African; ca. 0.6-0.4 Ga). Currently, we focus on the resolution of the fingerprinting system from region via ore province down to deposit scale, establishing a large and high-quality analytical data base, and developing fast-screening and low-cost methods. Analytical flow-charts and identification schemes for coltan ores will be presented at the Conference. The analytical results obtained so far indicate that a certification scheme including fingerprinting of sources of coltan ores is feasible. The methodology developed is capable to assist in the establishment of a control instrument in an envisaged certification of the production and trade chain of coltan.

  9. Kinetic Study of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Tantalum in Long Narrow Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Petrushina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic study of the chemical vapor deposition of tantalum in long narrow channels is done to optimize the industrial process for the manufacture of tantalum coated plate heat exchangers. The developed model fits well at temperatures between 750 and 850 °C, and in the pressure range of25–990 mb...

  10. Rapid synthesis of tantalum oxide dielectric films by microwave microwave-assisted atmospheric chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndiege, Nicholas [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)], E-mail: ndiege@uiuc.edu; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)], E-mail: ravisv@unr.edu; Shannon, Mark A. [Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)], E-mail: mshannon@uiuc.edu; Masel, Richard I. [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)], E-mail: r-masel@uiuc.edu

    2008-10-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical vapor deposition has been used to generate high quality, high-k dielectric films on silicon at high deposition rates with film thicknesses varying from 50 nm to 110 {mu}m using inexpensive equipment. Characterization of the post deposition products was performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Film growth was determined to occur via rapid formation and accumulation of tantalum oxide clusters from tantalum (v) ethoxide (Ta(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 5}) vapor on the deposition surface.

  11. Tantalum-based semiconductors for solar water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jijie; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-07-07

    Solar energy utilization is one of the most promising solutions for the energy crises. Among all the possible means to make use of solar energy, solar water splitting is remarkable since it can accomplish the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. The produced hydrogen is clean and sustainable which could be used in various areas. For the past decades, numerous efforts have been put into this research area with many important achievements. Improving the overall efficiency and stability of semiconductor photocatalysts are the research focuses for the solar water splitting. Tantalum-based semiconductors, including tantalum oxide, tantalate and tantalum (oxy)nitride, are among the most important photocatalysts. Tantalum oxide has the band gap energy that is suitable for the overall solar water splitting. The more negative conduction band minimum of tantalum oxide provides photogenerated electrons with higher potential for the hydrogen generation reaction. Tantalates, with tunable compositions, show high activities owning to their layered perovskite structure. (Oxy)nitrides, especially TaON and Ta3N5, have small band gaps to respond to visible-light, whereas they can still realize overall solar water splitting with the proper positions of conduction band minimum and valence band maximum. This review describes recent progress regarding the improvement of photocatalytic activities of tantalum-based semiconductors. Basic concepts and principles of solar water splitting will be discussed in the introduction section, followed by the three main categories regarding to the different types of tantalum-based semiconductors. In each category, synthetic methodologies, influencing factors on the photocatalytic activities, strategies to enhance the efficiencies of photocatalysts and morphology control of tantalum-based materials will be discussed in detail. Future directions to further explore the research area of tantalum-based semiconductors for solar water splitting

  12. Highly conformal atomic layer deposition of tantalum oxide using alkylamide precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausmann, Dennis M.; Rouffignac, Philippe de; Smith, Amethyst; Gordon, Roy; Monsma, Douwe

    2003-10-22

    Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal films of tantalum oxide were studied using tantalum alkylamide precursors and water as the oxygen source. These films also exhibited a very high degree of conformality: 100% step coverage on vias with aspect ratios greater than 35. As deposited, the films were free of detectable impurities with the expected (2.5-1) oxygen to metal ratio and were smooth and amorphous. The films were completely uniform in thickness and composition over the length of the reactor used for depositions. Films were deposited at substrate temperatures from 50 to 350 deg. C from precursors that were vaporized at temperatures from 50 to 120 deg. C. As deposited, the films showed a dielectric constant of 28 and breakdown field consistently greater than 4.5 MV/cm.

  13. Ion beam and dual ion beam sputter deposition of tantalum oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevro, Mirza; Carter, George

    1994-11-01

    Ion beam sputter deposition (IBS) and dual ion beam sputter deposition (DIBS) of tantalum oxide films was investigated at room temperature and compared with similar films prepared by e-gun deposition. Optical properties ie refractive index and extinction coefficient of IBS films were determined in the 250 - 1100 nm range by transmission spectrophotometry and at (lambda) equals 632.8 nm by ellipsometry. They were found to be mainly sensitive to the partial pressure of oxygen used as a reactive gas in the deposition process. The maximum value of the refractive index of IBS deposited tantalum oxide films was n equals 2.15 at (lambda) equals 550 nm and the extinction coefficient of order k equals 2 X 10-4. Films deposited by e-gun deposition had refractive index n equals 2.06 at (lambda) equals 550 nm. Films deposited using DIBS ie deposition assisted by low energy Ar and O2 ions (Ea equals 0 - 300 eV) and low current density (Ji equals 0 - 40 (mu) A/cm2) showed no improvement in the optical properties of the films. Preferential sputtering occurred at Ea(Ar) equals 300 eV and Ji equals 20 (mu) A/cm2 and slightly oxygen deficient films were formed. Different bonding states in the tantalum-oxide films were determined by x-ray spectroscopy while composition of the film and contaminants were determined by Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. Tantalum oxide films formed by IBS contained relatively high Ar content (approximately equals 2.5%) originating from the reflected argon neutrals from the sputtering target while assisted deposition slightly increased the Ar content. Stress in the IBS deposited films was measured by the bending technique. IBS deposited films showed compressive stress with a typical value of s equals 3.2 X 109 dyn/cm2. Films deposited by concurrent ion bombardment showed an increase in the stress as a function of applied current density. The maximum was s approximately equals 5.6 X 109 dyn/cm2 for Ea equals 300 eV and Ji equals 35 (mu) A/cm2. All

  14. Ion-beam and dual-ion-beam sputter deposition of tantalum oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevro, Mirza; Carter, George

    1995-02-01

    Ion-beam sputter deposition (IBS) and dual-ion-beam sputter deposition (DIBS) of tantalum oxide films was investigated at room temperature and compared with similar films prepared by e-gun deposition. The optical properties, i.e., refractive index and extinction coefficient, of IBS films were determined in the 250- to 1100-nm range by transmission spectrophotometry and at (lambda) equals 632.8 nm by ellipsometry. They were found to be mainly sensitive to the partial pressure of oxygen used as a reactive gas in the deposition process. The maximum value of the refractive index of IBS deposited tantalum oxide films was n equals 2.15 at (lambda) equals 550 nm and the extinction coefficient of order k equals 2 X 10-4. Films deposited by e-gun deposition had refractive index n 2.06 at (lambda) equals 550 nm. Films deposited using DIBS, i.e., deposition assisted by low energy Ar and O2 ions (Ea equals 0 to 300 eV) and low current density (Ji equals 0 to 40 (mu) A/cm2), showed no improvement in the optical properties of the films. Preferential sputtering occurred at Ea(Ar) equals 300 eV and Ji equals 20 (mu) A/cm2 and slightly oxygen deficient films were formed. Different bonding states in the tantalum-oxide films were determined by x-ray spectroscopy, whereas composition of the film and contaminants were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Tantalum oxide films formed by IBS contained relatively high Ar content (approximately equals 2.5%) originating from the reflected argon neutrals from the sputtering target whereas assisted deposition slightly increased the Ar content. Stress in the IBS-deposited films was measured by the bending technique. IBS-deposited films showed compressive stress with a typical value of s equals 3.2 X 109 dyn/cm2. Films deposited by concurrent ion bombardment showed an increase in the stress as a function of applied current density. The maximum was s approximately equals 5.6 X 109 dyn/cm2 for Ea equals 300 eV and Ji equals

  15. Structure and phase composition of deposited tantalum-carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Volodin, V. N.; Zhakanbaev, E. A.; Alimzhan, B.

    2016-08-01

    Ion plasma sputtering and the subsequent codeposition of ultrafine tantalum and carbon particles were used to prepare coatings with 4.6-71.5 at % C. Structural studies of the coatings showed the existence of carbon solid solutions in β Ta at carbon contents to 4.6 at %, carbon solid solutions in α Ta at carbon contents of 4.6-10.3 at %, and direct synthesis of TaC at carbon contents of 44.7-71.5 at %. During heat treatments to 700°C, the substantial concentration widening of regions of the existence of Ta2C and TaC was found. The lattice parameters of hexagonal Ta2C and fcc TaC carbides were determined for composition ranges of the existence of phases during heating to 700°C. Upon heating above 600°C, the progressive transition of quasiamorphous Ta2C carbide into the crystalline Ta2C carbide was found to take place. The possibility of applying the direct synthesis of TaC carbide in engineering was noted.

  16. Tantalum coating on porous Ti6Al4V scaffold using chemical vapor deposition and preliminary biological evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiang, E-mail: xiangliwj@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Wang, Lin [Institute of Orthopaedics, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Yu, Xiaoming [The Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Feng, Yafei [Institute of Orthopaedics, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Wang, Chengtao [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Yang, Ke [The Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Su, Daniel [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai, 200240 (China)

    2013-07-01

    Porous tantalum (Ta), produced via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of commercially pure Ta onto a vitreous carbon, is currently available for use in orthopedic applications. However, the relatively high manufacturing cost and the incapability to produce customized implant using medical image data have limited its application to gain widespread acceptance. In this study, Ta film was deposited on porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds using CVD technique. Digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the Ta coating evenly covered the entire scaffold structure. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the coating consisted of α and β phases of Ta. Goat mesenchymal stem cells were seeded and cultured on the Ti6Al4V scaffolds with and without coating. The tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay exhibited better cell adhesion and proliferation on Ta-coated scaffolds compared with uncoated scaffolds. The porous scaffolds were subsequently implanted in goats for 12 weeks. Histological analysis revealed similar bone formation around the periphery of the coated and uncoated implants, but bone ingrowth is better within the Ta-coated scaffolds. To demonstrate the ability of producing custom implant for clinical applications via this technology, we designed and fabricated a porous Ti6Al4V scaffold with segmental mandibular shape derived from patient computerized tomography data. - Highlights: • Ta film was coated on porous Ti6Al4V scaffold using chemical vapor deposition. • Tantalum coating allowed for higher levels of cell adhesion and proliferation. • Better new bone formation occurred inside the tantalum-coated scaffolds. • Clinical image data was integrated with EBM to fabricate customized scaffold.

  17. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  18. Growth of tantalum pentoxide film by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ying; Fang, Qi; Boyd, Ian W.

    1999-01-01

    Thin films of Ta 2O 5 have been deposited on quartz and silicon substrates by 532-nm (Nd:YAG) pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in various O 2 gas environments. The influence of the deposition parameters, such as oxygen pressure, substrate temperature and annealing under UV irradiation using a 172-nm excimer lamp, on the properties of the grown films, has been studied. The refractive index of the films increases with increasing pressure of O 2. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the as-deposited films are amorphous at temperatures below 500°C and possess orthorhombic (β-Ta 2O 5) crystal structure at temperatures above 600°C. The optical properties determined by UV spectrophotometry also strongly depend on the deposition parameters. At O 2 pressures above 0.15 mbar, the refractive index of the films was about 2.12 which is close to the bulk Ta 2O 5 value of 2.2. Optical transmittance around 85% in the visible region of the spectrum was obtained at an oxygen pressure of 0.2 mbar.

  19. Effects of Processing Variables on Tantalum Nitride by Reactive-Ion-Assisted Magnetron Sputtering Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao‑Tsang; Shieh, Han‑Ping D.

    2006-08-01

    The binary compound tantalum nitride (TaN) and ternary compounds tantalum tungsten nitrides (Ta1-xWxNy) exhibit interesting properties such as high melting point, high hardness, and chemical inertness. Such nitrides were deposited on a tungsten carbide (WC) die and silicon wafers by ion-beam-sputter evaporation of the respective metal under nitrogen ion-assisted deposition (IAD). The effects of N2/Ar flux ratio, post annealing, ion-assisted deposition, deposition rate, and W doping in coating processing variables on hardness, load critical scratching, oxidation resistance, stress and surface roughness were investigated. The optimum N2/Ar flux ratios in view of the hardness and critical load of TaN and Ta1-xWxNy films were ranged from 0.9 to 1.0. Doping W into TaN to form Ta1-xWxNy films led significant increases in hardness, critical load, oxidation resistance, and reduced surface roughness. The optimum doping ratio was [W/(W+Ta)]=0.85. From the deposition rate and IAD experiments, the stress in the films is mainly contributed by sputtering atoms. The lower deposition rate at a high N2/Ar flux ratio resulted in a higher compressive stress. A high compressive residual stress accounts for a high hardness. The relatively high compressive stress was attributed primarily to peening by atoms, ions and electrons during film growth, the Ta1-xWxNy films showed excellent hardness and strength against a high temperature, and sticking phenomena can essentially be avoided through their use. Ta1-xWxNy films showed better performance than the TaN film in terms of mechanical properties and oxidation resistance.

  20. Influence of Deposition Parameters on Surface Evolution of Sputtered Tantalum Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiang-dong; LUO Chong-tai

    2008-01-01

    Tantalum thin films with different thicknesses varying from 50 nm to 600 nm were deposited on Si substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering as functions of deposition temperature(Ts) and bias voltage(Ub). Surface roughness and its dynamic evolution behavior were quantitatively investigated by using atomic force microscopy(AFM). With increasing Ts from 300 K to 600 K, surface roughness Rrms and dynamic exponent β decreases gradually. With the increase of Ub from 0 V to -150 V, Rrms and β first decrease and then increase. The dependence of Ts and Ub on the film surface evolution has been discussed in terms of surface diffusion, mound growth, and ion impinging effect.

  1. Growth and characteristics of tantalum oxide thin films deposited using thermionic vacuum arc technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladoiu, Rodica; Ciupina, Victor; Mandes, Aurelia; Dinca, Virginia; Prodan, Madalina; Musa, Geavit

    2010-11-01

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) thin films were synthesized using thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) technology. TVA is an original deposition method using a combination of anodic arc and electron gun system for the growth of thin films from solid precursors under vacuum of 10-6 Torr. The properties of the deposited Ta2O5 thin films were investigated in terms of wettability, refractive index, morphology, and structure. The surface free energy was determined by means of surface energy evaluation system indicating a hydrophilic character and the refractive index was measured by Filmetrics F20 device. The morphology was determined from bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image performed by Philips CM 120 ST TEM system. It exhibits nanoparticles of 3-6 nm diameter smoothly distributed. Selected area electron diffraction pattern revealed the contrast fringes given by complex polycrystalline particles included in the amorphous film. The measured fringes could be indexed using monoclinic structure of Ta2O5.

  2. Extension of the lifetime of tantalum filaments in the hot-wire (Cat) 3 Chemical Vapor Deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Knoesen, D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the prime components of a hot-wire (Cat) Chemical Vapor Deposition system is the filament used to pyro-catalytically crack the gases like silane. Burnt out tantalum filaments were studied to determine the possible improvement of lifetime...

  3. Synthesis of chemical vapor deposition graphene on tantalum wire for supercapacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mingji, E-mail: limingji@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Guo, Wenlong [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Hongji, E-mail: hongjili@yeah.net [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Xu, Sheng [School of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • The capacitance of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wire electrodes is firstly reported. • Graphene was grown on the Ta surface by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. • Graphene/Ta wire structure is favorable for fast ion and electron transfer. • The graphene/Ta wire electrode shows high capacitive properties. - Abstract: This paper studies the synthesis and electrochemical characterization of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wires as high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. Graphene on Ta wires is prepared by the thermal decomposition of methane under various conditions. The graphene nanosheets on the Ta wire surface have an average thickness of 1.3–3.4 nm and consist typically of a few graphene monolayers, and TaC buffer layers form between the graphene and Ta wire. A capacitor structure is fabricated using graphene/Ta wire with a length of 10 mm and a diameter of 0.6 mm as the anode and Pt wire of the same size as the cathode. The electrochemical behavior of the graphene/Ta wires as supercapacitor electrodes is characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous electrolyte. The as-prepared graphene/Ta electrode has highest capacitance of 345.5 F g{sup −1} at current density of 0.5 A g{sup −1}. The capacitance remains at about 84% after 1000 cycles at 10 A g{sup −1}. The good electrochemical performance of the graphene/Ta wire electrode is attributed to the unique nanostructural configuration, high electrical conductivity, and large specific surface area of the graphene layer. This suggests that graphene/Ta wire electrode materials have potential applications in high-performance energy storage devices.

  4. Tantalum coating on porous Ti6Al4V scaffold using chemical vapor deposition and preliminary biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Lin; Yu, Xiaoming; Feng, Yafei; Wang, Chengtao; Yang, Ke; Su, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Porous tantalum (Ta), produced via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of commercially pure Ta onto a vitreous carbon, is currently available for use in orthopedic applications. However, the relatively high manufacturing cost and the incapability to produce customized implant using medical image data have limited its application to gain widespread acceptance. In this study, Ta film was deposited on porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds using CVD technique. Digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated that the Ta coating evenly covered the entire scaffold structure. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the coating consisted of α and β phases of Ta. Goat mesenchymal stem cells were seeded and cultured on the Ti6Al4V scaffolds with and without coating. The tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay exhibited better cell adhesion and proliferation on Ta-coated scaffolds compared with uncoated scaffolds. The porous scaffolds were subsequently implanted in goats for 12weeks. Histological analysis revealed similar bone formation around the periphery of the coated and uncoated implants, but bone ingrowth is better within the Ta-coated scaffolds. To demonstrate the ability of producing custom implant for clinical applications via this technology, we designed and fabricated a porous Ti6Al4V scaffold with segmental mandibular shape derived from patient computerized tomography data.

  5. Composition and structure variation for magnetron sputtered tantalum oxynitride thin films, as function of deposition parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristea, D.; Pătru, M.; Crisan, A.; Munteanu, D. [Department of Materials Science, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania); Crăciun, D. [Laser Department, National Institute for Laser, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Magurele (Romania); Barradas, N.P. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Apreutesei, M. [Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR 5270, CNRS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully F-69134 (France); MATEIS Laboratory-INSA de Lyon, Bât. B. Pascal, 7 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Moura, C. [Center of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Cunha, L., E-mail: lcunha@fisica.uminho.pt [Center of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Structural evolution from β-Ta, to fcc-Ta(O,N), to amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} with increasing P(N{sub 2} + O{sub 2}). • The substrate bias influences the N content, but does not influence the O content of the films. • The structural features of the films appear at lower P(N{sub 2} + O{sub 2}) when produced with grounded substrate. - Abstract: Tantalum oxynitride thin films were produced by magnetron sputtering. The films were deposited using a pure Ta target and a working atmosphere with a constant N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} ratio. The choice of this constant ratio limits the study concerning the influence of each reactive gas, but allows a deeper understanding of the aspects related to the affinity of Ta to the non-metallic elements and it is economically advantageous. This work begins by analysing the data obtained directly from the film deposition stage, followed by the analysis of the morphology, composition and structure. For a better understanding regarding the influence of the deposition parameters, the analyses are presented by using the following criterion: the films were divided into two sets, one of them produced with grounded substrate holder and the other with a polarization of −50 V. Each one of these sets was produced with different partial pressure of the reactive gases P(N{sub 2} + O{sub 2}). All the films exhibited a O/N ratio higher than the N/O ratio in the deposition chamber atmosphere. In the case of the films produced with grounded substrate holder, a strong increase of the O content is observed, associated to the strong decrease of the N content, when P(N{sub 2} + O{sub 2}) is higher than 0.13 Pa. The higher Ta affinity for O strongly influences the structural evolution of the films. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction showed that the lower partial pressure films were crystalline, while X-ray reflectivity studies found out that the density of the films depended on the deposition conditions: the higher the gas pressure, the

  6. Tantalum films with well-controlled roughness grown by oblique incidence deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechendorff, K.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Chevallier, J.; Foss, M.; Besenbacher, F.

    2005-08-01

    We have investigated how tantalum films with well-controlled surface roughness can be grown by e-gun evaporation with oblique angle of incidence between the evaporation flux and the surface normal. Due to a more pronounced shadowing effect the root-mean-square roughness increases from about 2 to 33 nm as grazing incidence is approached. The exponent, characterizing the scaling of the root-mean-square roughness with length scale (α), varies from 0.75 to 0.93, and a clear correlation is found between the angle of incidence and root-mean-square roughness.

  7. Phenomenological effets of tantalum incorporation into diamond films: Experimental and first principle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Mahtab, E-mail: mahtabullah@bzu.edu.pk [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan (Pakistan); Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmad, E. [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan (Pakistan); Raza, Rizwan [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore-54000 (Pakistan); Hussain, Fayyaz [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan (Pakistan); Hussain, Akhtar; Iqbal, Muhammad [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fabrication of tantalum incorporated diamonds films using HFCVD technique. • Decrease in resistivity by increasing tantalum content in diamond thin films. • Electronic structure calculations of tantalum incorporated diamonds films through VASP code. • A rise of bond length and bond angles by addition of tantalum in the diamond lattice. • Confirmation of decrease of resistivity by adding tantalum due to creation of impurity states in the bandgap. - Abstract: Tantalum (Ta) incorporated diamond films are synthesized on silicon substrate by chemical vapor deposition under gas mixture of CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}. Characterizations of the resulting films indicate that morphology and resistivity of as-grown diamond films are significantly influenced by the process parameters and the amount of tantalum incorporated in the diamond films. XRD plots reveal that diamond films are composed of TaC along with diamond for higher concentration of tantalum and Ta{sub 2}C phases for lower concentration of tantalum. EDS spectra confirms the existence of tantalum in the diamond films. Resistivity measurements illustrate a sudden fall of about two orders of magnitude by the addition of tantalum in the diamond films. Band structure of Ta-incorporated diamond has been investigated based on density functional theory (DFT) using VASP code. Band structure calculations lead to the semiconducting behavior of Ta-incorporated diamond films because of the creation of defects states inside the band gap extending towards conduction band minimum. Present DFT results support experimental trend of resistivity that with the incorporation of tantalum into diamond lattice causes a decrease in the resistivity of diamond films so that tantalum-incorporated diamond films behave like a good semiconductor.

  8. Synthesis of chemical vapor deposition graphene on tantalum wire for supercapacitor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingji; Guo, Wenlong; Li, Hongji; Xu, Sheng; Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe

    2014-10-01

    This paper studies the synthesis and electrochemical characterization of graphene/tantalum (Ta) wires as high-performance electrode material for supercapacitors. Graphene on Ta wires is prepared by the thermal decomposition of methane under various conditions. The graphene nanosheets on the Ta wire surface have an average thickness of 1.3-3.4 nm and consist typically of a few graphene monolayers, and TaC buffer layers form between the graphene and Ta wire. A capacitor structure is fabricated using graphene/Ta wire with a length of 10 mm and a diameter of 0.6 mm as the anode and Pt wire of the same size as the cathode. The electrochemical behavior of the graphene/Ta wires as supercapacitor electrodes is characterized by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. The as-prepared graphene/Ta electrode has highest capacitance of 345.5 F g-1 at current density of 0.5 A g-1. The capacitance remains at about 84% after 1000 cycles at 10 A g-1. The good electrochemical performance of the graphene/Ta wire electrode is attributed to the unique nanostructural configuration, high electrical conductivity, and large specific surface area of the graphene layer. This suggests that graphene/Ta wire electrode materials have potential applications in high-performance energy storage devices.

  9. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; niobium (columbium) and tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, R.N.; Sutphin, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    Major world resources of niobium and tantalum are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory (ISMI). ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Part I of this report presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of niobium and tantalum based on inventory information; Part II contains tables of both geologic and mineral-resource information and includes production data collected by ISMI participants. Niobium is used principally as an alloying element in special steels and superalloys, and tantalum is used mainly in electronics. Minerals in the columbite-tantalite series are principal ore minerals of niobium and tantalum. Pyrochlore is a principal source of niobium. These minerals are found in carbonatite, certain rocks in alkaline igneous complexes, pegmatite, and placer deposits. ISMI estimates show that there are over 7 million metric tons of niobium and almost 0.5 million metric tons of tantalum in known deposits, outside of China and the former Soviet Union, for which reliable estimates have been made. Brazilian deposits, followed by Canadian deposits, contain by far the largest source of niobium. Tantalum production is spread widely among several countries, and Brazil and Canada are the most significant of these producers. Brazil's position is further strengthened by potential byproduct columbite from tin mining. Present economically exploitable resources of niobium appear to be sufficient for the near future, but Brazil will continue to be the predominant world supplier of ferrocolumbium. Tantalum, a byproduct of tin production, has been captive to the fluctuations of that market, but resources in pegmatite in Canada and Australia make it likely that future increases in the present modest demand will be met.

  10. The effects of tantalum on the microstructure of two polycrystalline nickel-base superalloys: B-1900 + Hf and MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowski, G. M.; Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.

    1986-11-01

    Changes in the γ/γ'/carbide microstructure as a function of Ta content were studied in conventionally cast B-1900 + Hf and both conventionally cast and directionally solidified MAR-M247.* The effects of tantalum on the microstructure were found to be similar in both nickel-base superalloys. In particular, the γ' and carbide volume fractions increased approximately linearly with tantalum additions in both alloys. The γ' phase compositions did not change as tantalum additions were made with the exception of an increase in the tantalum level. Bulk tantalum additions increased the tantalum, chromium, and cobalt levels of the γ phase in both alloy series. The increase in the concentrations of the latter two elements was attributed to a decrease in the γ phase fraction with increasing bulk tantalum level and nearly constant γ' /γ partitioning ratios. It was demonstrated that the large increase in the γ ' volume fraction was a result of tantalum not affecting the partitioning ratios of the other alloying elements. The addition of tantalum led to a partial replacement of the hafnium in the MC carbides, although the degree of replacement was reduced by the solutionizing and aging heat treat-ment. In addition, chromium-rich M23C6 carbides formed as a result of MC carbide decomposition during heat treatment.

  11. Biological Response of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Commercial Tantalum Coatings with Microscale and Nanoscale Surface Topographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A.; Kumar, Girish; Goering, Peter L.; Williams, Brian; Stiglich, Jack; Narayan, Roger J.

    2016-06-01

    Tantalum is a promising orthopaedic implant coating material due to its robust mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and excellent biocompatibility. Previous studies have demonstrated improved biocompatibility and tissue integration of surface-treated tantalum coatings compared to untreated tantalum. Surface modification of tantalum coatings with biologically inspired microscale and nanoscale features may be used to evoke optimal tissue responses. The goal of this study was to evaluate commercial tantalum coatings with nanoscale, sub-microscale, and microscale surface topographies for orthopaedic and dental applications using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Tantalum coatings with different microscale and nanoscale surface topographies were fabricated using a diffusion process or chemical vapor deposition. Biological evaluation of the tantalum coatings using hBMSCs showed that tantalum coatings promote cellular adhesion and growth. Furthermore, hBMSC adhesion to the tantalum coatings was dependent on surface feature characteristics, with enhanced cell adhesion on sub-micrometer- and micrometer-sized surface topographies compared to hybrid nano-/microstructures. Nanostructured and microstructured tantalum coatings should be further evaluated to optimize the surface coating features to promote osteogenesis and enhance osseointegration of tantalum-based orthopaedic implants.

  12. Quasi-static Tensile and Compressive Behavior of Nanocrystalline Tantalum Based on Miniature Specimen Testing—Part II: Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligda, J.; D'Antuono, D. Scotto; Taheri, M. L.; Schuster, B. E.; Wei, Q.

    2016-11-01

    In Part I of this work (this issue), we presented the microstructure of tantalum processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT). In this part, we will present results based on site-specific micro-mechanical testing. The experimental techniques were used due to the intrinsic microstructure gradient associated with HPT processing. The primary objective is to explore the grain size effect on the quasi-static mechanical properties of HPT processed tantalum with ultrafine grained (UFG, grain size d 100 nm) and nanocrystalline (NC, d body-centered cubic metals with UFG/NC microstructure tend to have localized shear band even under quasi-static uniaxial compression.

  13. Studying tantalum-based high-κ dielectrics in terms of capacitance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovska-Georgievska, L.

    2016-08-01

    The trend of rapid development of microelectronics towards nano-miniaturization dictates the inevitable introduction of dielectrics with high permittivity (high-κ dielectrics), as alternative material for replacing SiO2. Therefore, studying these materials in terms of their characteristics, especially in terms of reliability, is of great importance for proper design and manufacture of devices. In this paper, alteration of capacitance in different frequency regimes is used, in order to determine the overall behavior of the material. Samples investigated here are MOS structures containing nanoscale tantalum based dielectrics. Layers of pure Ta2O5, but also Hf and Ti doped tantalum pentoxide, i.e. Ta2O5:Hf and Ta2O5:Ti are studied here. All samples are considered as ultrathin oxide layers with thicknesses less than 15 nm, obtained by radio frequent sputtering on p-type silicon substrate. Measuring capacitive characteristics enables determination of several specific parameters of the structures. The obtained results for capacitance in accumulation, the thickness and time evolution of the interfacial SiO2 layer, values of flatband and threshold voltage, density of oxide charges, interfacial and border states, and reliability properties favor the possibilities for more intensive use of studied materials in new nanoelectronic technologies.

  14. Structural and electrical properties of tantalum oxide films grown by photo-assisted pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the growth of thin films of Ta 2O 5 on quartz and silicon (1 0 0) substrates by an in situ photo-assisted pulsed laser deposition (photo-PLD) using radiation from a Nd:YAG laser (wavelength, λ=532 nm) to stimulate the ablation, and from an excimer lamp to excite additional photochemistry. The layers grown were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry and electrical measurements. We have found that they exhibit a significant improvement in microstructure, and optical and electrical properties compared with conventional PLD films prepared under, otherwise, identical conditions. For example, FT-IR results showed that the suboxide content in the as-grown films deposited by the photo-PLD process is less, while the leakage current density was an order of magnitude less at around 10 -6 A/cm 2 at a bias of 1 V. These results indicate that this photo-PLD process approach can be advantageous for dielectric and optical oxide film growth.

  15. Surface modification of tantalum pentoxide coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering and correlation with cell adhesion and proliferation in in vitro tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykova, A.; Safonov, V.; Goltsev, A.; Dubrava, T.; Rossokha, I.; Donkov, N.; Yakovin, S.; Kolesnikov, D.; Goncharov, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2016-03-01

    The effect was analyzed of surface treatment by argon ions on the surface properties of tantalum pentoxide coatings deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. The structural parameters of the as-deposited coatings were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction profiles and X-ray photoelectron spectra were also acquired. The total surface free energy (SFE), the polar, dispersion parts and fractional polarities, were estimated by the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaeble method. The adhesive and proliferative potentials of bone marrow cells were evaluated for both Ta2O5 coatings and Ta2O5 coatings deposited by simultaneous bombardment by argon ions in in vitro tests.

  16. The tantalum-cased tantalum capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Tantalum-cased tantalum capacitors were tested with regard to temperature stability, capacitance ratio, surge current capabilities, shock, vibration, and thermal shock. They were found to be superior to the conventional wet slug tantalum capacitor cased in silver, since they are more resistant to sulfuric acid. The tantalum-cased tantalum capacitors are widely accepted for use in critical electronic equipment because of their excellent performance and reliability.

  17. Effect of Heat Treatment on Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Performance of Cold-Sprayed Tantalum Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Vidyasagar, V.; Jyothirmayi, A.; Joshi, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The cold-spray technique is of significant interest to deposit refractory metals with relatively high melting point for a variety of demanding applications. In the present study, mechanical properties of cold-sprayed tantalum coatings heat treated at different temperatures were investigated using microtensile testing, scratch testing, and nanoindentation. The corrosion performance of heat-treated coatings was also evaluated in 1 M KOH solution, and potentiodynamic polarization as well as impedance spectroscopy studies were carried out. Assessment of structure-property correlations was attempted based on microstructure, porosity, and intersplat bonding state, together with mechanical and corrosion properties of the heat-treated cold-sprayed tantalum coatings. Coatings annealed at 1500 °C, which is very close to the recrystallization temperature of tantalum, were found to perform almost as bulk tantalum, with exciting implications for various applications.

  18. Quasi-static Tensile and Compressive Behavior of Nanocrystalline Tantalum Based on Miniature Specimen Testing—Part II: Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligda, J.; D'Antuono, D. Scotto; Taheri, M. L.; Schuster, B. E.; Wei, Q.

    2016-09-01

    In Part I of this work (this issue), we presented the microstructure of tantalum processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT). In this part, we will present results based on site-specific micro-mechanical testing. The experimental techniques were used due to the intrinsic microstructure gradient associated with HPT processing. The primary objective is to explore the grain size effect on the quasi-static mechanical properties of HPT processed tantalum with ultrafine grained (UFG, grain size d 100 nm) and nanocrystalline (NC, d imaging microscopy (OIM) show that the shear bands form by grain rotation. Comparing d in these two regions to the mechanism proposed in the literature shows that reduced d in the shear banding region is more susceptible to localized shearing via grain rotation. This work unifies, or at least further substantiates, the notion that body-centered cubic metals with UFG/NC microstructure tend to have localized shear band even under quasi-static uniaxial compression.

  19. A novel tantalum-based sol-gel packed microextraction syringe for highly specific enrichment of phosphopeptides in MALDI-MS applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelikbıçak, Ömür; Atakay, Mehmet; Güler, Ülkü; Salih, Bekir

    2013-08-07

    A new tantalum-based sol-gel material was synthesized using a unique sol-gel synthesis pathway by PEG incorporation into the sol-gel structure without performing a calcination step. This improved its chemical and physical properties for the high capacity and selective enrichment of phosphopeptides from protein digests in complex biological media. The specificity of the tantalum-based sol-gel material for phosphopeptides was evaluated and compared with tantalum(V) oxide (Ta2O5) in different phosphopeptide enrichment applications. The tantalum-based sol-gel and tantalum(V) oxide were characterized in detail using FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and also using a surface area and pore size analyzer. In the characterization studies, the surface morphology, pore volume, crystallinity of the materials and PEG incorporation into the sol-gel structure to produce a more hydrophilic material were successfully demonstrated. The X-ray diffractograms of the two different materials were compared and it was noted that the broad signals of the tantalum-based sol-gel clearly represented the amorphous structure of the sol-gel material, which was more likely to create enough surface area and to provide more accessible tantalum atoms for phosphopeptides to be easily adsorbed when compared with the neat and more crystalline structure of Ta2O5. Therefore, the phosphopeptide enrichment performance of the tantalum-based sol-gels was found to be remarkably higher than the more crystalline Ta2O5 in our studies. Phosphopeptides at femtomole levels could be selectively enriched using the tantalum-based sol-gel and detected with a higher signal-to-noise ratio by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometer (MALDI-MS). Moreover, phosphopeptides in a tryptic digest of non-fat bovine milk as a complex real-world biological sample were retained with higher yield using a tantalum-based sol-gel. Additionally, the sol-gel material

  20. Development of a recycling process for tantalum from capacitor scraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Kunio; Okabe, Toru H.

    2005-02-01

    A process based on oxidation treatment at elevated temperature, followed by mechanical separation and chemical treatment, was investigated to develop an effective process for recycling tantalum from capacitor scraps. By this process, tantalum oxide powder, free of SiO2 or other impurities, was recovered from capacitor scrap. Tantalum powder with 99 mass% purity was recovered by magnesiothermic reduction of the obtained tantalum oxide powder.

  1. Role of tantalum nitride as active top electrode in electroforming-free bipolar resistive switching behavior of cerium oxide-based memory cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Muhammad, E-mail: ismailmalikbzu10@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Ahmed, Ejaz; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Talib, Ijaz; Khan, Tahira [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Iqbal, Khalid [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore (Pakistan); Nadeem, Muhammad Younus [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan)

    2015-05-29

    Electroforming-free cerium oxide-based bipolar resistive switching memory devices have been deposited using radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique. These devices demonstrate two types of forming-free cells: some in the low-resistance state and the others in high-resistance state. The transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses illustrate the formation of tantalum oxynitride layer between tantalum nitride (TaN) and cerium oxide (CeO{sub x}), which looks to be responsible for the two types of cells as well as their memory performance. Ohmic and Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanisms are found to be responsible for charge transport in the low- and high-resistance states. The current-voltage characteristics and temperature dependence of resistance suggest that resistive switching mechanism in our TaN/CeO{sub x}/Pt devices may be explained by the model of connection and disconnection of filamentary paths made of oxygen vacancies. The reliability characteristics of TaN/CeO{sub x}/Pt devices indicate better endurance and stable retention performance at relatively lower programming voltages and larger memory window (OFF/ON resistance ratio ~ 10{sup 3}) at room temperature and at 100 °C. - Highlights: • Electroforming-free TaN/CeO{sub x}/Pt memory cells have been fabricated by sputtering. • Device exhibits good endurance, long data retention and high-resistance window (~ 10{sup 3}). • Voltages for SET and RESET transitions of our device exhibit narrow distribution. • The device is forming-free due to pre-existence of abundant oxygen vacancies. • TaN top electrode play major role in uniformity of resistive switching characteristics.

  2. Development of advanced high strength tantalum base alloys. Part 2: Scale-up investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, R. L.; Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Three experimental tantalum alloy compositions containing 14-16% W, 1% Re, 0.7% Hf, 0.025% C or 0.015% C and 0.015% N were prepared as two inch diameter ingots by consumable electrode vacuum arc melting. The as-cast ingots were processed by extrusion and swaging to one inch and 0.4 inch diameter rod and evaluated. Excellent high temperature forging behavior was exhibited by all three compositions. Creep strength at 2000 F to 2400 F was enhanced by higher tungsten additions as well as substitution of nitrogen for carbon. Weldability of all three compositions was determined to be adequate. Room temperature ductility was retained in the advanced tantalum alloy compositions as well as a notched/unnotched strength ratio of 1.4 for a notched bar having a K sub t = 2.9.

  3. Spallation modeling in tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, D.L.; Hixson, R.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.

    1997-09-01

    A gas gun plate impact spallation experiment has been performed on commercial purity rolled tantalum. The shock pressure achieved was about 7 Gpa and was sufficient to induce incipient spallation. The particle velocity was measured at the free surface of the spalled plate, and the spalled sample was recovered and examined metallographically using image analysis. The quantitative image analysis results are being used to develop a damage model. The model is micromechanically based and involves novel void growth and coalescence processes. The 1D characteristics code CHARADE has been used in a preliminary simulation of the VISAR free surface particle velocity record. Implications for ductile damage modeling will be discussed.

  4. Tantalum oxide thin films as protective coatings for sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carsten; Reus, Roger De; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1999-01-01

    Reactively sputtered tantalum oxide thin films have been investigated as protective coatings for aggressive media exposed sensors. Tantalum oxide is shown to be chemically very robust. The etch rate in aqueous potassium hydroxide with pH 11 at 140°C is lower than 0.008 Å h-l. Etching in liquids...... annealing O2 in the residual thin-film stress can be altered from compressive to tensile and annealing at 450°C for 30 minutes gives a stress-free film. The step coverage of the sputter deposited amorphous tantalum oxide is reasonable, but metallization lines are hard to cover. Sputtered tantalum oxide...

  5. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Woo, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    the possibility of coating a biocompatible metal layer on top of the carbon fiber material, to improve its biological performance. Tantalum was chosen because of its bone compatibility, based on our previous studies. A novel spinal fusion cage was fabricated by applying a thin tantalum coating on the surface...... of carbon-carbon composite material through chemical vapor deposition. Mechanical and biological performance was tested in vitro and in vivo. Compress strength was found to be 4.9 kN (SD, 0.2). Fatigue test with 500,000 cycles was passed. In vitro radiological evaluation demonstrated good compatibility...... and newly formed bone. No inflammatory cells were found around the implant. Cages packed with two different graft materials (autograft and COLLOSS) achieved the same new bone formation. The present study proved that coating tantalum on top of the carbon-based implant is feasible, and good bone integration...

  6. Research on control method of Tantalum wet metallurgy based on ANFIS%基于 ANFIS的钽湿法冶炼控制方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋威; 吴可; 林满山

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problem of experience-based decision made in Tantalum wet metallurgy, a control method of Tantalum wet metallurgy based on Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference System ( ANFIS) is proposed. By analyzing the control target of Tantalum wet metallurgy,the control model is constructed. Then,the structure and technique realization of ANFIS is described. And the control process is presented in detail. Experimental results show that the proposed method can ensure the temperature of reaction tank rises steadily, which lays foundation for safety production of Tantalum wet metallurgy.%针对钽湿法冶炼生产决策主要依靠经验的问题,提出基于自适应神经模糊推理系统( ANFIS)的钽湿法冶炼控制方法。在分析钽湿法冶炼控制目标的基础上,构建控制模型,描述ANFIS结构与技术实现,并给出详细控制流程。实验结果表明,该方法实现了反应槽温度的平稳上升,能够确保钽湿法冶炼的安全生产。

  7. Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Peter C.; Rodriguez, Patrick J.; Pereyra, Ramiro A.

    1999-01-01

    Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries.

  8. Tsunami Deposit Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, B. H.; Wanink, M.

    2007-05-01

    A digital database has been established describing tsunami deposits around the world (3 phases; 15 months). The projects involved the review and tabulation of data derived from books, catalogs, journals, preprints, citations and abstracts (currently 1000 references), into a database designed to provide a comprehensive review of the types of tsunami deposits, their geographic distribution and location, sedimentary characteristics, fossil content, age, preservation, run-up, wave height and inundation observations, etc. (34 parameters). The tsunami occurrences can be divided into many subjects, e.g., Volcanogenic (N=375), Seismites (N=49), Co-seismic (N=258), K/T Boundary Impact-triggered debris flows (N=97), Landslides (N=43), etc. Numerous publications compare tsunami deposits to storm deposits (N=38), or analyze the origin of megaboulders (N=22). Tsunami deposits occur throughout geologic time (Pre-Cambrian to present day), and because of plate tectonics, they occur along plate margins (primarily subduction zones) as well as interior to plates. In addition, they occur in epi-continental seas, fjords, etc. Few publications describe depositional processes. Deposits generated by tsunamis occur in multiple environments such as the marine, fresh water, and subaerial. Common characteristics of tsunami deposits include: 1) Deposition of thin sand sheets (can be normal, massive, inversely graded, chaotic or bimodal). 2) Erosional: basal uncomformity, mud balls, rip-up clasts, reworked fossils produced by scouring. 3) Lithology: Stacks of couplets reflecting marine incursions (often sands) into fresh water or subaerial environments (mud, soil, peat). 4) Fossil: Couplets reflects marine fossils, fresh water fossils or a mixed assemblage. 5) Geomorphology: The sand sheets taper landward and can rise in elevation. 6) Deformation: syn-depositional (soft sediments) and intraformational (stiff sediments).

  9. Investigation of Production Process of Polymer Solid Electrolyte Tantalum Capacitor Based on High Specific Surface Area Tantalum Powder%基于高比容钽粉的聚合物片式电容器制备工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻俊峰; 蒋亚东; 杨亚杰; 徐建华

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication process of polymer solid-electrolyte tantalum capacitor employing high capacitance tantalum powder of 50000~70000μF · V/g as anode material was investigated. The optimized fabrication process for tantalum powder pellet anode and cathode film deposition process was explored, and the obtained polymer solid-electrolyte tantalum capacitor exhibited excellent electronic performance. The influence of fabrication parameter such as-pressing density, current density of Ta2O5 film formation.and stepwise-deposition process of cathode film on capacitor performance such as capacitance, equivalent series resistance(ESR), leakage current were studied in detail. Moreover, the discussion of working mechanism about polymer solid-electrolyte tantalum capacitor was included.%针对比容为50000~70000μF ·V/g的较高比容钽粉,研究了导电聚合物聚3,4-乙烯基二氧噻吩(PEDOT)作为阴极材料的有机片式固体钽电解电容器的制备工艺,通过调整阳极体制备及阴极被覆工艺等参数实现了PEDOT在高比容钽块表面的有效被覆,获得了各项性能参数良好的聚合物片式钽电解电容器.重点研究了压制密度、形成电流密度等参数及分段被膜工艺对聚合物片式固体钽电容器容量引出、等效串联电阻、漏电流等性能的影响,并讨论了相应的电容器工作机理.

  10. Mechanical properties and constitutive relations for tantalum and tantalum alloys under high-rate deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III; Bingert, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1996-05-01

    Tantalum and its alloys have received increased interest as a model bcc metal and for defense-related applications. The stress-strain behavior of several tantalums, possessing varied compositions and manufacturing histories, and tantalum alloyed with tungsten, was investigated as a function of temperature from {minus}196 C to 1,000 C, and strain rate from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} to 8,000 s{sup {minus}1}. The yield stress for all the Ta-materials was found to be sensitive to the test temperature, the impurity and solute contents; however, the strain hardening remained very similar for various ``pure`` tantalums but increased with alloying. Powder-metallurgy (P/M) tantalum with various levels of oxygen content produced via different processing paths was also investigated. Similar mechanical properties compared to conventionally processed tantalums were achieved in the P/M Ta. This data suggests that the frequently observed inhomogeneities in the mechanical behavior of tantalum inherited from conventional processes can be overcome. Constitutive relations based upon the Johnson-Cook, the Zerilli-Armstrong, and the Mechanical Threshold Stress models were evaluated for all the Ta-based materials. Parameters were also fit for these models to a tantalum-bar material. Flow stresses of a Ta bar stock subjected to a large-strain deformation of {var_epsilon} = 1.85 via multiple upset forging were obtained. The capabilities and limitations of each model for large-strain applications are examined. The deformation mechanisms controlling high-rate plasticity in tantalum are revisited.

  11. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the elevated temperature mechanical properties of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-10-01

    The influence of composition on the tensile and creep strength of [001] oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals at temperatures near 1000 °C was investigated. Cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten concentrations were varied according to a matrix of compositions based on the single crystal version of MAR-M247.* For alloys with the baseline refractory metal level of 3 wt pct Ta and 10 wt pct W, decreases in Co level from 10 to 0 wt pct resulted in increased tensile and creep strength. Substitution of 2 wt pct W for 3 wt pct Ta resulted in decreased creep life at high stresses, but improved life at low stresses. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large reductions in tensile strength and creep resistance, and corresponding increases in ductility. For these alloys with low Ta plus W totals, strength was independent of Co level. The effects of composition on properties were related to the microstructural features of the alloys. In general, high creep strength was associated with high levels of γ' volume fraction, γ-γ' lattice mismatch, and solid solution hardening.

  12. Dynamic tensile deformation behavior of Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten or tantalum fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungsoo; Kim, Gyeong Su; Jeon, Changwoo; Sohn, Seok Su; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-07-01

    Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten (W) or tantalum (Ta) continuous fibers were fabricated by liquid pressing process. Their dynamic tensile properties were investigated in relation with microstructures and deformation mechanisms by using a split Hopkinson tension bar. The dynamic tensile test results indicated that the maximum strength of the W-fiber-reinforced composite (757 MPa) was much lower than the quasi-statically measured strength, whereas the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite showed very high maximum strength (2129 MPa). In the W-fiber-reinforced composite, the fracture abruptly occurred in perpendicular to the tensile direction because W fibers did not play a role in blocking cracks propagated from the amorphous matrix, thereby resulting in abrupt fracture within elastic range and consequent low tensile strength. The very high dynamic tensile strength of the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite could be explained by the presence of ductile Ta fibers in terms of mechanisms such as (1) interrupted propagation of cracks initiated in the amorphous matrix, (2) formation of lots of cracks in the amorphous matrix, and (3) sharing of loads and severe deformation (necking) of Ta fibers in cracked regions.

  13. Tens of GHz Tantalum pentoxide-based micro-ring all-optical modulator for Si photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chung-Lun; Chi, Wen-Chun; Chiu, Yi-Jen; Lin, Yuan-Yao; Hung, Yung-Jr; Chu, Ann-Kuo [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Cheng-Hsuan; Lin, Gong-Ru [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei (China); Shih, Min-Hsiung [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chao-Kuei [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2017-03-15

    A tantalum pentoxide-based (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based) micro-ring all-optical modulator was fabricated. The refractive index inside the micro-ring cavity was modified using the Kerr effect by injecting a pumped pulse. The transmittance of the ring resonator was controlled to achieve all-optical modulation at the wavelength of the injected probe. When 12 GHz pulses with a peak power of 1.2 W were coupled in the ring cavity, the transmission spectrum of the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} resonator was red-shifted by 0.04 nm because of the Kerr effect. The relationship between the modulation depth and gap of the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} directional coupler is discussed. An optimized gap of 1100 nm was obtained, and a maximum buildup factor of 11.7 with 84% modulation depth was achieved. The nonlinear refractive index of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} at 1.55 μm was estimated as 3.4 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/W based on the Kerr effect, which is almost an order of magnitude higher than that of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. All results indicate that Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} has potential for use in nonlinear waveguide applications with modulation speeds as high as tens of GHz. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Tantalum oxide thin films as protective coatings for sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carsten; Reus, Roger De; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1999-01-01

    Reactively sputtered tantalum oxide thin-films have been investigated as protective coating for aggressive media exposed sensors. Tantalum oxide is shown to be chemically very robust. The etch rate in aqueous potassium hydroxide with pH 11 at 140°C is lower than 0.008 Å/h. Etching in liquids with p...... the residual thin-film stress can be altered from compressive to tensile and annealing at 450°C for 30 minutes gives a stress-free film. The step coverage of the sputter deposited amorphous tantalum oxide is reasonable, but metallisation lines are hard to cover. Sputtered tantalum oxide exhibits high...... dielectric strength and the pinhole density for 0.5 μm thick films is below 3 cm-2...

  15. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  16. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  17. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Ju; Jeon, Dong Su; Park, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaNx-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from -0.82 V to -0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>105 s) and pulse-switching endurance (>106 cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaNx-based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices.

  18. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Ju; Jeon, Dong Su; Park, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Geun, E-mail: tgkim1@korea.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Anam-dong 5ga, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-18

    This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10{sup 5 }s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10{sup 6} cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN{sub x}-based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices.

  19. Structure-property effects of tantalum additions to nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Koss, D. A.; Jackson, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The characterization of the effect of Ta on the structure of Ni base superalloys, the determination of the effects of Ta (structure) variations on the mechanical, thermal, and oxidation behavior, and the identification of alloying elements which have potential as substitutes for Ta are investigated. Mar M247 type alloys are emphasized; nominal and analyzed compositions of ten alloys under study are given. X-ray and composition analysis are being used to determine the partitioning of alloying elements between gamma, gamma primes, and MC (cubic) as a function of Ta content. The diffusional interactions of the Mar M247-type alloys with as cast beta + gamma alloys are studied to determine the effects of Ta on alloy/coating degradation.

  20. Structural Characteristics & Dielectric Properties of Tantalum Oxide Doped Barium Titanate Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubayyat Mahbub

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the causal relationship between the dielectric properties and the structural characteristics of 0.5 & 1.0 mol% Ta2O5 doped BaTiO3 based ceramic materials were investigated under different sintering conditions. Dielectric properties and microstructure of BaTio3 ceramics were significantly influenced by the addition of a small amount of Ta2O5. Dielectric properties were investigated by measuring the dielectric constant (k as a function of temperature and frequency. Percent theoretical density (%TD above 90% was achieved for 0.5 and 1.0 mol% Ta2O5 doped BaTiO3. It was observed that the grain size decreased markedly above a doping concentration of 0·5 mol% Ta2O5. Although fine grain size down to 200-300nm was attained, grain sizes in the range of 1-1.8µm showed the most alluring properties. The fine-grain quality and high density of the Ta2O5 doped BaTiO3 ceramic resulted in tenfold increase of dielectric constant. Stable value of dielectric constant as high as 13000-14000 was found in the temperature range of  55 to 80°C, for 1.0 mol% Ta2O5 doped samples with corresponding shift of Curie point to ~82°C. Experiments divulged that incorporation of a proper content of Ta2O5 in BaTiO3 could control the grain growth, shift the Curie temperature and hence significantly improve the dielectric property of the BaTiO3 ceramics.

  1. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS & DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF TANTALUM OXIDE DOPED BARIUM TITANATE BASED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Fakhrul Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the causal relationship between the dielectric properties and the structural characteristics of 0.5 & 1.0 mole % Ta2O5 doped BaTiO3 based ceramic materials were investigated under different sintering conditions. Dielectric properties and microstructure of BaTio3 ceramics were significantly influenced by the addition of a small amount of Ta2O5. Dielectric properties were investigated by measuring the dielectric constant (k as a function of temperature and frequency. Percent theoretical density (%TD above 90 % was achieved for 0.5 and 1.0 mole %Ta2O5 doped BaTiO3. It was observed that the grain size decreased markedly above a doping concentration of 0.5 mole % Ta2O5. Although fine grain size down to 200 - 300 nm was attained, grain sizes in the range of 1-1.8µm showed the most alluring properties. The fine-grain quality and high density of the Ta2O5 doped BaTiO3 ceramic resulted in tenfold increase of dielectric constant. Stable value of dielectric constant as high as 13000 - 14000 was found in the temperature range of 55 to 80 °C, for 1.0 mole % Ta2O5 doped samples with corresponding shift of Curie point to ~82 °C. Experiments divulged that incorporation of a proper content of Ta2O5 in BaTiO3 could control the grain growth, shift the Curie temperature and hence significantly improve the dielectric property of the BaTiO3 ceramics.

  2. Structure refinement for tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Lianyun [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Science, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shang Yuan Cun, Haidian District, Beijing 100044 (China); Huang, Kai; Hou, Jungang [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhu, Hongmin, E-mail: hzhu@metall.ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Tantalum nitrides nanocrystals with various phases and morphologies for the first time have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. Highlights: ► The spherical TaN, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. ► The crystal structures of different tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement on the X-ray diffraction data and the examinations of electron microcopies. ► The specific surface area of the tantalum nitrides powders was around 10 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. ► Tantalum nitrides powders could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance. -- Abstract: Tantalum nitrides (TaN{sub x}) nanocrystals with different phase and morphology have been synthesized through homogenous sodium reduction under low temperature with the subsequent annealing process under high vacuum. The crystal structures of tantalum nitrides were determined by Rietveld refinement based on the X-ray diffraction data. The morphologies of various tantalum nitrides nanocrystals in high quality were analyzed through the electron microcopies examinations. The spherical TaN nanoparticles, cuboidal TaN{sub 0.83} and TaN{sub 0.5} nanocrystals have been selectively prepared at different annealing temperatures. In addition, the specific surface areas of the tantalum nitrides nanocrystals measured by BET method were around 9.87–11.64 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, indicating that such nano-sized tantalum nitrides could be suitable for capacitor with high specific capacitance.

  3. Fabrication of Nano-Crossbar Resistive Switching Memory Based on the Copper-Tantalum Pentoxide-Platinum Device Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olga Gneri, Paula; Jardim, Marcos

    Resistive switching memory has been of interest lately not only for its simple metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure but also for its promising ease of scalability an integration into current CMOS technologies like the Field Programmable Gate Arrays and other non-volatile memory applications. There are several resistive switching MIM combinations but under this scope of research, attention will be paid to the bipolar resistive switching characteristics and fabrication of Tantalum Pentaoxide sandwiched between platinum and copper. By changing the polarity of the voltage bias, this metal-insulator-metal (MIM) device can be switched between a high resistive state (OFF) and low resistive state (ON). The change in states is induced by an electrochemical metallization process, which causes a formation or dissolution of Cu metal filamentary paths in the Tantalum Pentaoxide insulator. There is very little thorough experimental information about the Cu-Ta 2O5-Pt switching characteristics when scaled to nanometer dimensions. In this light, the MIM structure was fabricated in a two-dimensional crossbar format. Also, with the limited available resources, a multi-spacer technique was formulated to localize the active device area in this MIM configuration to less than 20nm. This step is important in understanding the switching characteristics and reliability of this structure when scaled to nanometer dimensions.

  4. Evaluation of residual stress in sputtered tantalum thin-film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-masha’al, Asa’ad, E-mail: asaad.al@ed.ac.uk; Bunting, Andrew; Cheung, Rebecca

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Tantalum thin-films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering system. • Thin-film stress is observed to be strongly influenced by sputtering pressure. • Transition towards the compressive stress is ascribed to the annealing at 300 °C. • Expose thin-film to air ambient or ion bombardment lead to a noticeable change in the residual stress. - Abstract: The influence of deposition conditions on the residual stress of sputtered tantalum thin-film has been evaluated in the present study. Films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and curvature measurement method has been employed to calculate the residual stress of the films. Transitions of tantalum film stress from compressive to tensile state have been observed as the sputtering pressure increases. Also, the effect of annealing process at temperature range of 90–300 °C in oxygen ambient on the residual stress of the films has been studied. The results demonstrate that the residual stress of the films that have been deposited at lower sputtering pressure has become more compressive when annealed at 300 °C. Furthermore, the impact of exposure to atmospheric ambient on the tantalum film stress has been investigated by monitoring the variation of the residual stress of both annealed and unannealed films over time. The as-deposited films have been exposed to pure Argon energy bombardment and as result, a high compressive stress has been developed in the films.

  5. The effect of tantalum and carbon on the structure/properties of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The microstructure, phase chemistry, and creep and hot tensile properties were studied as a function of tantalum and carbon levels in Mar-M247 type single crystal alloys. Microstructural studies showed that several types of carbides (MC, M23C6 and M5C) are present in the normal carbon (0.10 wt % C) alloys after heat treatment. In general, the composition of the MC carbides changes from titanium rich to tantalum rich as the tantalum level in the alloy increases. Small M23C6 carbides are present in all alloys. Tungsten rich M6C carbides are also observed in the alloy containing no tantalum. No carbides are present in the low carbon (0.01 wt % C) alloy series. The morphology of gamma prime is observed to be sensitive to heat treatment and tantalum level in the alloy. Cuboidal gamma prime is present in all the as cast structures. After heat treatment, the gamma prime precipitates tend to have a more spheroidal like morphology, and this tendency increases as the tantalum level decreases. On prolonged aging, the gamma prime reverts back to a cuboidal morphology or under stress at high temperatures, forms a rafted structure. The weight fraction and lattice parameter of the spheroidal gamma prime increases with increasing tantalum content. Changes in the phase chemistry of the gamma prime matrix and gamma prime have also been analyzed using phase extraction techniques. The partitioning ratio decreases for tungsten and aluminum and increases for tantalum as the tantalum content increases for both alloy series; no significant changes occur in the partitioning ratios of the other alloying elements. A reduction in secondary creep rate and an increase in rupture time result from increasing the tantalum content and decreasing the carbon level.

  6. Thin tantalum-silicon-oxygen/tantalum-silicon-nitrogen films as high-efficiency humidity diffusion barriers for solar cell encapsulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuer, H. [Institut fuer Halbleiter-und Mikrosystemtechnik (IHM) Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, 01062 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: Henning.Heuer@izfp-d.fraunhofer.de; Wenzel, C. [Institut fuer Halbleiter-und Mikrosystemtechnik (IHM) Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Herrmann, D. [Institut fuer Halbleiter-und Mikrosystemtechnik (IHM) Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW) Industriestrasse 6, 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Huebner, R. [Institut fuer Halbleiter-und Mikrosystemtechnik (IHM) Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Leibniz Institut fuer Festkoerper-und Werkstoffforschung Dresden (IFW) Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069, Dresden (Germany); Zhang, Z.L. [Institut fuer Halbleiter-und Mikrosystemtechnik (IHM) Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Max-Planck-Gesellschaft fuer Metallforschung (MPI) Heisenbergstrasse 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Bartha, J.W. [Institut fuer Halbleiter-und Mikrosystemtechnik (IHM) Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-12-05

    Flexible thin-film solar cells require flexible encapsulation to protect the copper-indium-2 selenide (CIS) absorber layer from humidity and aggressive environmental influences. Tantalum-silicon-based diffusion barriers are currently a favorite material to prevent future semiconductor devices from copper diffusion. In this work tantalum-silicon-nitrogen (Ta-Si-N) and tantalum-silicon-oxygen (Ta-Si-O) films were investigated and optimized for thin-film solar cell encapsulation of next-generation flexible solar modules. CIS solar modules were coated with tantalum-based barrier layers. The performance of the thin-film barrier encapsulation was determined by measuring the remaining module efficiency after a 1000 h accelerated aging test. A significantly enhanced stability against humidity diffusion in comparison to non-encapsulated modules was reached with a reactively sputtered thin-film system consisting of 250 nm Ta-Si-O and 15 nm Ta-Si-N.

  7. Wetting layer of copper on the tantalum (001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, Maxime; Poloni, Roberta; Ratter, Kitti; Rodney, David; De Santis, Maurizio; Gilles, Bruno; Beutier, Guillaume; Verdier, Marc

    2016-12-01

    The heteroepitaxial interface formed by copper deposited onto the tantalum (001) surface is studied by surface x-ray diffraction and ab initio calculations. The analysis of the crystal truncation rods reveals the presence of a wetting layer of copper made of two atomic planes pseudomorphic to the tantalum substrate, with the upper most atomic planes significantly deformed. These findings are in total agreement with the results of density-functional-theory calculations. The presence of the wetting layer confirms a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and is thought to explain the extremely fast atomic diffusion of copper during the dewetting process in the solid state at high temperature.

  8. Stopping power of C, O and Cl in tantalum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barradas, Nuno P., E-mail: nunoni@ctn.ist.utl.pt [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Laboratório de Engenharia Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, Lisboa 1049-001 (Portugal); Fonseca, M. [Dep. Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829- 516 Caparica (Portugal); ISLA Campus Lisboa| Laureate International Universities, 1500-210 Lisboa (Portugal); Siketić, Z.; Bogdanović Radović, I. [Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: •We measured the stopping power of C, O, and Cl in tantalum oxide. •A bulk sample method was used, with Bayesian inference data analysis. •Good agreement was found with SRIM2012 calculations. -- Abstract: Tantalum oxide is used in a variety of applications due to its high bandgap, high-K and high index of refraction. Unintentional impurities can change properties of tantalum oxide, and heavy ion elastic recoil detection is a method that can play a fundamental role in the quantification of those impurities. Furthermore, tantalum oxide is frequently part of the samples that also include other materials, which are often analysed with ion beam techniques. However, there are very few reported stopping power measurements for tantalum oxide, and data analysis relies not only on interpolation from a sparse data base but also on the Bragg rule. As is well known, the Bragg rule is often inaccurate for oxides, particularly when the difference in atomic numbers of the involved elements is very large as is case for Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. We have used a bulk method, previously developed by us and applied successfully to other systems, to determine experimentally the stopping power of tantalum oxide for three different ion types: C, O and Cl. In the present paper the results of our measurements and bulk method analysis are presented.

  9. Phase and structural states in the NiTi-based alloy surface layer formed by electron-ion-plasma methods using tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neiman, Aleksei A., E-mail: nasa@ispms.tsc.ru; Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Meisner, Ludmila L., E-mail: meisner2l@yahoo.com; Semin, Viktor O. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports on a study of regularities of formation gradient nano-, submicron and microstructural conditions in the surface layers of the samples after pulsed electron-beam melting of tantalum coating on the substrate NiTi alloy. Experimentally revealed the presence of submicron columnar structure in the upper layers of the tantalum coating. After irradiation modified NiTi surface takes on a layered structure in which each layer differs in phase composition and structural phase state.

  10. Platelet-containing tantalum powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiele, E.K.

    1988-04-26

    A method of forming platelet tantalum powders is described comprising the steps of: (a) providing an ingot-derived precursor tantalum powder, and (b) ball-milling the precursor powder for a time sufficient to form a platelet powder having an average FSSS of less than about 2 micrometers, a Scott density not greater than about 30 g/in/sup 3/ and a BET surface area of at least about 0.7 in/sup 2//g.

  11. Hydride Olefin complexes of tantalum and niobium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, Aan Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations on low-valent tantalum and niobium hydride and alkyl complexes, particularly the dicyclopentadienyl tantalum hydride olefin complexes Cp2Ta(H)L (L=olefin). ... Zie: Summary

  12. Synthesis and characterization of tantalum silsesquioxane complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillo, Pascal; Fasulo, Meg E; Lipschutz, Michael I; Tilley, T Don

    2013-02-14

    Tantalum polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane (POSS) complexes have been synthesised and characterized. X-ray structures of these complexes revealed that the coordination number of the tantalum center greatly affects the cube-like silsesquioxane framework.

  13. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Improvement in R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratio and reset current via combining compliance current with multilayer structure in tantalum oxide-based RRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaorong; Feng, Jie [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of Ministry of Education, Department of Micro/Nano Electronics, Shanghai (China)

    2015-07-15

    Improvements in the R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratio and reset current are required prior to the practical application of RRAM. To achieve this improvement, tantalum oxide-based RRAM devices with multilayer structure (bi-layer and tri-layer) were fabricated and various compliance currents were adopted. The reset current of 40 μA was observed; the R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratio increased to more than 20 in the tri-layer structure device. Resistance changes in two types of devices under voltage pulses with different pulse width were also conducted. The tri-layer device exhibited lower reset voltage and higher R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratio than the bi-layer device under voltage pulses. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated the formation of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} via plasma oxidation, and there was an oxygen gradient in the multilayer devices. The results demonstrated that the tri-layer structure with oxygen gradient was an effective method for achieving better device performance. Additionally, it is implied that reasonable control of the proportion of TaO{sub 2} and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and compliance current can improve device performance. (orig.)

  15. LASER Additive Manufacturing of Titanium-Tantalum Alloy Structured Interfaces for Modular Orthopedic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, Jacob; Medlin, Dana; Carter, Michael; Sears, James; Vander Voort, George

    2015-04-01

    Tantalum is recognized to have better biocompatibility and osseointegrative properties than other more commonly used orthopedic grade alloys. There are several novel methods that tantalum or tantalum-titanium could be used to augment orthopedic implants. A tantalum or tantalum-titanium alloy at the bone/implant or modular component interfaces would substantially increase the longevity and performance of modular devices. Bonding a functional tantalum coating to a titanium orthopedic device is inherently difficult because of the small difference between the melting temperature of tantalum, 3017°C, and the boiling point of titanium, 3287°C. LASER powder deposition (LPD) is a fusion operation using an Nd:YAG to melt a small volume of substrate into which metal powder is sprayed achieving high temperature with a high solidification rate. LPD of Ti-Ta onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate produced both a solid surface and structured coating with a pore size in the optimal 350-500 μm range.

  16. Fabrication and characterisation of suspended microstructures of tantalum

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Masha-al, Asa'ad; Cheung, Rebecca; Bunting, Andrew; Mastropaolo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of the influence of deposition and post-fabrication processes on the final mechanical structure of tantalum beams is reported in the present study. The final deflection profiles of doubly supported beams made from compressive and tensile-stressed films have been studied experimentally. An optimum finite element model has been developed to predict the buckling behaviour of the doubly supported beams by considering the boundary conditions in the form of a compressive stress and...

  17. Flake tantalum powder for manufacturing electrolytic capacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jilin; YANG Guoqi; PAN Luntao; LIU Hongdong; BAO Xifang

    2008-01-01

    The FTP200 flake tantalum powder was introduced.The microstructures of the powder with leaf-like primary particles having an average flakiness of 2 to 20 and porous agglomerated particles were observed.The chemical composition,physical properties,and electrical properties of the FTP200 powder were compared with those of the FTW300 nodular powder.The FTP200 powder is more sinter-resistant,and the surface area of the flake tantalum powder under sintering at high temperature has less loss than that of the nodular tantalum powder.The specific capacitance of the flake tantalum powder is higher than that of the nodular tantalum powder with the same surface area when anodized at high voltage,Thus,the flake tantalum powder is suitable for manufacturing tantalum solid electrolytic capacitors in the range of median and high (20-63 V) voltages.

  18. Aggressive media exposed differential pressure sensor with a deposited membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Bouaidat, Salim; Eriksen, Gert Friis; Reus, Roger De; Bouwstra, Siebe

    2001-01-01

    A new piezoresistive differential pressure sensor design for harsh wet environments is presented. The sensor design is based on a deposited membrane, which is deposited on top of polysilicon interconnects and piezoresistors. Flat membrane surfaces are thereby achieved. This enables thin film protective coating using sputtered films, which usually have poor step coverage. The concept is demonstrated using both epipoly silicon and sputtered amorphous silicon as membrane materials and tantalum o...

  19. Stationary phase deposition based on onium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David R.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Trudell, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Onium salt chemistry can be used to deposit very uniform thickness stationary phases on the wall of a gas chromatography column. In particular, the stationary phase can be bonded to non-silicon based columns, especially microfabricated metal columns. Non-silicon microfabricated columns may be manufactured and processed at a fraction of the cost of silicon-based columns. In addition, the method can be used to phase-coat conventional capillary columns or silicon-based microfabricated columns.

  20. Structure dependent resistivity and dielectric characteristics of tantalum oxynitride thin films produced by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristea, D., E-mail: daniel.cristea@unitbv.ro [Department of Materials Science, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania); Crisan, A. [Department of Materials Science, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania); Cretu, N. [Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics Department, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania); Borges, J. [Centro de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710 - 057 Braga (Portugal); Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Lopes, C.; Cunha, L. [Centro de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710 - 057 Braga (Portugal); Ion, V.; Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, “Photonic Processing of Advanced Materials” Group, PO Box MG-16, RO 77125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Barradas, N.P. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Apreutesei, M. [MATEIS Laboratory-INSA de Lyon, 21 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully F-69134 (France); Munteanu, D. [Department of Materials Science, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Tantalum oxynitride thin films have been deposited by magnetron sputtering, in various configurations. • The rising of the reactive gases mixture flow has the consequence of a gradual increase in the non-metallic content in the films, which results in a 10 orders of magnitude resistivity domain. • The higher resistivity films exhibit dielectric constants up to 41 and quality factors up to 70. - Abstract: The main purpose of this work is to present and to interpret the change of electrical properties of Ta{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} thin films, produced by DC reactive magnetron sputtering. Some parameters were varied during deposition: the flow of the reactive gases mixture (N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, with a constant concentration ratio of 17:3); the substrate voltage bias (grounded, −50 V or −100 V) and the substrate (glass, (1 0 0) Si or high speed steel). The obtained films exhibit significant differences. The variation of the deposition parameters induces variations of the composition, microstructure and morphology. These differences cause variation of the electrical resistivity essentially correlated with the composition and structural changes. The gradual decrease of the Ta concentration in the films induces amorphization and causes a raise of the resistivity. The dielectric characteristics of some of the high resistance Ta{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} films were obtained in the samples with a capacitor-like design (deposited onto high speed steel, with gold pads deposited on the dielectric Ta{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} films). Some of these films exhibited dielectric constant values higher than those reported for other tantalum based dielectric films.

  1. Founder of Niobium-Tantalum Granite Deposit——Li Renke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    Li Renke, Vice director of Nonferrous Metals Geological Research Institute of Guangxi, Senior Engineer, discovered a new type of niobium-tantalum granite deposit as his major contribution and made significant progress in ore exploration of this type of ore deposit.

  2. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A.T., E-mail: atnelson@lanl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); O' Toole, J.A.; Valicenti, R.A. [Accelerator Operations and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Maloy, S.A. [Civilian Nuclear Program Office, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Development of a solid state bonding technique suitable to clad tungsten targets with tantalum was completed to improve operation of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Centers spallation target. Significant deterioration of conventional bare tungsten targets has historically resulted in transfer of tungsten into the cooling system through corrosion resulting in increased radioactivity outside the target and reduction of delivered neutron flux. The fabrication method chosen to join the tantalum cladding to the tungsten was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) given the geometry constraints of a cylindrical assembly and previous success demonstrated at KENS. Nominal HIP parameters of 1500 Degree-Sign C, 200 MPa, and 3 h were selected based upon previous work. Development of the process included significant surface engineering controls and characterization given tantalums propensity for oxide and carbide formation at high temperatures. In addition to rigorous acid cleaning implemented at each step of the fabrication process, a three layer tantalum foil gettering system was devised such that any free oxygen and carbon impurities contained in the argon gas within the HIP vessel was mitigated to the extent possible before coming into contact with the tantalum cladding. The result of the numerous controls and refined techniques was negligible coarsening of the native Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} surface oxide, no measureable oxygen diffusion into the tantalum bulk, and no detectable carburization despite use of argon containing up to 5 ppm oxygen and up to 40 ppm total CO, CO{sub 2}, or organic contaminants. Post bond characterization of the interface revealed continuous bonding with a few microns of species interdiffusion.

  3. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A. T.; O'Toole, J. A.; Valicenti, R. A.; Maloy, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a solid state bonding technique suitable to clad tungsten targets with tantalum was completed to improve operation of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Centers spallation target. Significant deterioration of conventional bare tungsten targets has historically resulted in transfer of tungsten into the cooling system through corrosion resulting in increased radioactivity outside the target and reduction of delivered neutron flux. The fabrication method chosen to join the tantalum cladding to the tungsten was hot isostatic pressing (HIP) given the geometry constraints of a cylindrical assembly and previous success demonstrated at KENS. Nominal HIP parameters of 1500 °C, 200 MPa, and 3 h were selected based upon previous work. Development of the process included significant surface engineering controls and characterization given tantalums propensity for oxide and carbide formation at high temperatures. In addition to rigorous acid cleaning implemented at each step of the fabrication process, a three layer tantalum foil gettering system was devised such that any free oxygen and carbon impurities contained in the argon gas within the HIP vessel was mitigated to the extent possible before coming into contact with the tantalum cladding. The result of the numerous controls and refined techniques was negligible coarsening of the native Ta2O5 surface oxide, no measureable oxygen diffusion into the tantalum bulk, and no detectable carburization despite use of argon containing up to 5 ppm oxygen and up to 40 ppm total CO, CO2, or organic contaminants. Post bond characterization of the interface revealed continuous bonding with a few microns of species interdiffusion.

  4. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Woo, Charlotte; Ding, Ming; Lind, Martin; Bünger, Cody

    2007-04-01

    Implants of carbon fiber composite have been widely used in orthopedic and spinal surgeries. However, studies using carbon fiber-reinforced cages demonstrate frequent appearance of fibrous layer interposed between the implant and the surrounding bone. The aim of the present study was to test the possibility of coating a biocompatible metal layer on top of the carbon fiber material, to improve its biological performance. Tantalum was chosen because of its bone compatibility, based on our previous studies. A novel spinal fusion cage was fabricated by applying a thin tantalum coating on the surface of carbon-carbon composite material through chemical vapor deposition. Mechanical and biological performance was tested in vitro and in vivo. Compress strength was found to be 4.9 kN (SD, 0.2). Fatigue test with 500,000 cycles was passed. In vitro radiological evaluation demonstrated good compatibility with X-ray and CT scan examinations. In vivo test employed eight pigs weighing 50 kg each. Instrumented lumbar spine fusion of L3/4 and L4/5 with these cages was performed on each pig. After 3 months, excellent bone integration property was demonstrated by direct contact of the cage with the host bone and newly formed bone. No inflammatory cells were found around the implant. Cages packed with two different graft materials (autograft and COLLOSS) achieved the same new bone formation. The present study proved that coating tantalum on top of the carbon-based implant is feasible, and good bone integration could be achieved.

  5. Niobium and tantalum: indispensable twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus; Papp, John

    2014-01-01

    Niobium and tantalum are transition metals almost always paired together in nature. These “twins” are difficult to separate because of their shared physical and chemical properties. In 1801, English chemist Charles Hatchett uncovered an unknown element in a mineral sample of columbite; John Winthrop found the sample in a Massachusetts mine and sent it to the British Museum in London in 1734. The name columbium, which Hatchet named the new element, came from the poetic name for North America—Columbia—and was used interchangeably for niobium until 1949, when the name niobium became official. Swedish scientist Anders Ekberg discovered tantalum in 1802, but it was confused with niobium, because of their twinned properties, until 1864, when it was recognized as a separate element. Niobium is a lustrous, gray, ductile metal with a high melting point, relatively low density, and superconductor properties. Tantalum is a dark blue-gray, dense, ductile, very hard, and easily fabricated metal. It is highly conductive to heat and electricity and renowned for its resistance to acidic corrosion. These special properties determine their primary uses and make niobium and tantalum indispensable.

  6. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wauthle, Ruben; Van Der Stok, Johan; Yavari, Saber Amin; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of it

  7. The effect of tantalum on the structure/properties of two polycrystalline nickel-base superalloys: B-1900 + Hf MAR-M247. M.S. Thesis, Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowski, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    The microstructure, phase compositions, and phase fractions were studied in conventionally cast B-1900 + Hf and both conventionally cast and directionally solidified MAR-M247 as a function of tantalum concentration. The hot tensile and creep rupture properties of the solutionized and aged MAR-M247-type alloys were also determined as a function of tantalum level. The effects of tantalum on the microstructure and phase compositions of B-1900 + Hf and MAR-M247 (conventionally cast and directionally solidified) were found to be very similar. The addition of tantalum to the as cast and heat treated alloys was shown to cause the partial replacement of the Hf in the MC carbides by Ta, although the degree of replacement was decreased by the solutionizing and aging heat treatment. The gamma prime and minor phase fractions (primarily MC type carbides) both increased approximately linearly with tantalum concentration. The gamma prime phase compositions were relatively insensitive to tantalum variations with the exception of the tantalum and/or hafnium levels. Bulk tantalum additions increased the tantalum, chromium, and cobalt levels of the gamma phase in both alloy series. The increase in the concentrations of the latter two elements in the gamma phase was a result of the decrease in the gamma phase fraction with increasing bulk tantalum concentration and constant gamma/gamma prime partitioning ratio. Tantalum additions increased the yield stress and ultimate tensile strength of the directionally solidified MAR-M247 type alloys and had no significant effect on ductility.

  8. 2014 NEPP Tasks Update for Ceramic and Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation describes recent development in research on MnO2, wet, and polymer tantalum capacitors. Low-voltage failures in multilayer ceramic capacitors and techniques to reveal precious metal electrode (PME) and base metal electrode (BME) capacitors with cracks are discussed. A voltage breakdown technique is suggested to select high quality low-voltage BME ceramic capacitors.

  9. A microwave molecular solution based approach towards high-κ-tantalum(V)oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, dielectric properties and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies of their defect chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, R C; Kaloumenos, M; Spiehl, D; Erdem, E; Repp, S; Weber, S; Schneider, J J

    2015-12-21

    Stable dispersions of tantalum oxide nanoparticles are accessible from solutions of tantalum(V) complexes with a mixed malonato and alkanolato ligand sphere in ethoxyethanol by microwave processing. The malonato ligand is cleaved during decomposition and acetic acid or acetic acid esters are formed as derived from in situ spectroscopic studies. The solubility of the tantalum precursor and the obtained particle size therefrom depend strongly on the type of alkanolato ligand moiety. Dispersions of the molecular complexes possess good film forming properties. Films with low surface roughness can be obtained by spincoating. These exhibited a dielectric constant of about 15 and disruptive strengths above 1.5 MV cm(-1). The electrical measurements indicate that the presence of moisture is detrimental with respect to the dielectric performance of the films. After removal of the solvent from the suspensions of the nanoparticles, the residue can be redispersed in aprotic solvents. The particles can be isolated therefrom by precipitation with pentane. XRD and HRTEM indicate that the material remains amorphous up to temperatures of 750 °C. XPS proved that only Ta2O5 is formed as lower oxidation states of Ta cannot be detected. A detailed EPR study allows us to gain insight into the surface defect chemistry. Multiple types of oxygen vacancies exist at the surface of the Ta2O5 particles which are influenced by additional calcination and annealing in a vacuum.

  10. Characterization of Tantalum Polymer Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    Overview Reviewed data Caution must be taken when accelerating test conditions Data not useful to establish an acceleration model Introduction of new failure mechanism skewing results Evidence of Anti-Wear-Out De-doping of polymer Decreased capacitance Increased ESR Not dielectric breakdown Needs further investigation Further investigation into tantalum polymer capacitor technology Promising acceleration model for Manufacturer A Possibility for use in high-reliability space applications with suitable voltage derating.

  11. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-10-01

    The influence of composition on the microstructure of single crystal nickel-base superalloys was investigated. Co was replaced by Ni, and Ta was replaced by either Ni or W, according to a matrix of compositions based on MAR-M247. Substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in γ' solvus temperature, an increase in γ-γ' lattice mismatch, and the precipitation of W-rich phases in the alloys with high refractory metal levels. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large decreases in γ' solvus temperature, γ' volume fraction, and γ-γ' lattice mismatch, whereas substitution of W for Ta resulted in smaller decreases in these features. For the alloys with γ' particles that remained coherent, substitution of Ni for Co caused an increase in γ' coarsening rate. The two alloys with the largest magnitude of lattice mismatch possessed γ' particles which lost coherency during unstressed aging and exhibited anomalously low coarsening rates. Creep exposure at 1000 °C resulted in the formation of γ' lamellae oriented perpendicular to the applied stress axis in all alloys.

  12. Vacuum pyrolysis characteristics and parameter optimization of recycling organic materials from waste tantalum capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenyang; Niu, Bo; Zhang, Lingen; Xu, Zhenming

    2017-08-12

    Recycling rare metal tantalum from waste tantalum capacitors (WTCs) is significant to alleviate the shortage of tantalum resource. However, environmental problems will be caused if the organic materials from WTCs are improperly disposed. This study presented a promising vacuum pyrolysis technology to recycle the organic materials from WTCs. The organics removal rate could reach 94.32wt% according to TG results. The optimal parameters were determined as 425°C, 50Pa and 30min on the basis of response surface methodology (RSM). The oil yield and residual rate was 18.09wt% and 74.94wt%, respectively. All pyrolysis products can be recycled through a reasonable route. Besides, to deeply understand the pyrolysis process, the pyrolysis mechanism was also proposed based on the product and free radical theory. This paper provides an efficient process for recycling the organic material from WTCs, which can facilitate the following tantalum recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical mechanical polishing of tantalum and tantalum nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjam, Sathish Babu S. V.

    There is a continuing need in the semiconductor industry to clear residual copper (Cu) and planarize the tantalum (Ta)/tantalum nitride (TaN) barrier/etch stop layer with a higher removal rate using the technique of Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP). Obtaining high removal rates for Ta/TaN is very challenging as the films are very hard, and hence it is difficult to achieve high Ta/TaN removal rates by just relying on an increase in the mechanical forces (operating pressure) alone during CMP. Ta/TaN is an inert metal, therefore, obtaining high Ta/TaN removal rates by using chemical additives is also challenging. Not only Ta/TaN needs to be removed at a higher rate in the second step of polishing, but also remaining Cu should be cleared. It is important to search for novel chemicals that can form a thin film on the Ta/TaN surface which can be easily abraded by the polishing pad with very less pressure. In this work, oxalic and tartaric acids have been investigated as the complexing agents in slurries for Ta/TaN CMP. Oxalic and tartaric acids appear to be reactive with Ta in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. A dispersion of the Oxalic acid (OA)/Tartaric Acid (TA) - peroxide mixtures with silica (fumed/colloidal) can be used to achieve Ta removal rates that are ˜ 90 nm/min at pH between 3 to 6 by applying a down force of 6.3 psi, where as at a lower down force of 2 psi, a removal rate of ˜ 40 nm/min has been achieved at pH = 3. It was shown earlier that a high Cu removal rate can be obtained using OA-peroxide based slurries with/without the addition of abrasives at pH = 3 [1]. So, in the first step, Cu could be removed at high rates at pH = 3 and by changing the pH to 5 or 6, Ta/TaN can be removed as mentioned above. Hence these slurries could be used as "single dispersion slurries " that could be used for both the first and second steps of Cu CMP. During the second step (barrier layer polish), Cu removal rates are low but not low enough to minimize dishing with

  14. Corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks compared to titanium modular necks in a simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Ulrich; Neumann, Daniel; Frank, Mario

    2014-04-01

    This study compared the corrosion behavior of tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks with that of titanium alloy modular necks at their junction to titanium-alloy femoral stem. Tests were performed in a dry assembly and two wet assemblies, one contaminated with calf serum and the other contaminated with calf serum and bone particles. Whereas the titanium modular neck tested in the dry assembly showed no signs of corrosion, the titanium modular necks tested in both wet assemblies showed marked depositions and corrosive attacks. By contrast, the tantalum-coated cobalt-chromium modular necks showed no traces of corrosion or chemical attack in any of the three assemblies. This study confirms the protective effect of tantalum coating the taper region of cobalt-chromium modular neck components, suggesting that the use of tantalum may reduce the risk of implant failure due to corrosion.

  15. Optical properties of d.c. magneto sputtered tantalum and titanium nanostructure thin film metal hydrides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Singh; S Srivastava; S Agarwal; S Kumar; Y K Vijay

    2010-10-01

    Nanostructured thin films of tantalum and titanium were deposited on glass substrate using d.c. magnetron sputtering technique under the argon gas environment at a pressure of 0.1 mbar. Optical transmission and absorption studies were carried out for these samples with pressure of hydrogen. Large changes in both transmission and absorption on loading these films with hydrogen are accompanied by significant phase changes and electronic transformation. Optical photograph shows the colour variation after hydrogenation in case of tantalum film which may be used as decorative mirrors and hydrogen sensors. The hydrogen storage capability of thin films was confirmed by variation in optical properties.

  16. An exploration in mineral supply chain mapping using tantalum as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Viruet, Yadira; Menzie, W. David; Papp, John F.; Yager, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    This report uses the supply chain of tantalum (Ta) to investigate the complexity of mineral and metal supply chains in general and show how they can be mapped. A supply chain is made up of all the manufacturers, suppliers, information networks, and so forth, that provide the materials and parts that go into making up a final product. The mineral portion of the supply chain begins with mineral material in the ground (the ore deposit); extends through a series of processes that include mining, beneficiation, processing (smelting and refining), semimanufacture, and manufacture; and continues through transformation of the mineral ore into concentrates, refined mineral commodities, intermediate forms (such as metals and alloys), component parts, and, finally, complex products. This study analyses the supply chain of tantalum beginning with minerals in the ground to many of the final goods that contain tantalum.

  17. Direct electroplating of copper on tantalum from ionic liquids in high vacuum: origin of the tantalum oxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaltin, Stijn; D'Urzo, Lucia; Zhao, Qiang; Vantomme, André; Plank, Harald; Kothleitner, Gerald; Gspan, Christian; Binnemans, Koen; Fransaer, Jan

    2012-10-21

    In this paper, it is shown that high vacuum conditions are not sufficient to completely remove water and oxygen from the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. Complete removal of water demands heating above 150 °C under reduced pressure, as proven by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). Dissolved oxygen gas can only be removed by the use of an oxygen scavenger such as hydroquinone, despite the fact that calculations show that oxygen should be removed completely by the applied vacuum conditions. After applying a strict drying procedure and scavenging of molecular oxygen, it was possible to deposit copper directly on tantalum without the presence of an intervening oxide layer.

  18. Quasi-static Tensile and Compressive Behavior of Nanocrystalline Tantalum based on Miniature Specimen Testing—Part I: Materials Processing and Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligda, J.; Scotto D'Antuono, D.; Taheri, M. L.; Schuster, B. E.; Wei, Q.

    2016-11-01

    Grain size reduction of metals into ultrafine-grained (UFG, grain size 100 nm cubic metals such as copper, nickel, etc., and the limited efforts on body-centered cubic metals have mainly focused on high strain rate behavior where these metals are shown to deform via adiabatic shear bands. Except for the work on Fe, only a few papers can be found associated with UFG/NC refractory metals. In the first part of the present work (Part I), high-pressure torsion (HPT) is used to process UFG/NC tantalum, a typical refractory metal. The microstructure of the HPT disk as a function of radial location as well as orientation will be examined. In the subsequent part (Part II), the location-specific mechanical behavior will be presented and discussed. It is suggested that refractory metals such as Ta are ideal to employ SPD technology for microstructure refinement because of the extremely high melting point and relatively good workability.

  19. Ultra fine tantalum powder for advanced capacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Ultra fine tantalum and niobium powders are applicable in many areas of engineering. Of particular significance are high purity powders that are usable in production of high capacitance capacitors and superconductors.

  20. Ultra fine tantalum powder for advanced capacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nebera; A.; Markusbkin; Yu.; Azarov; V.; Ermolaev; N.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra fine tantalum and niobium powders are applicable in many areas of engineering. Of particular significance are high purity powders that are usable in production of high capacitance capacitors and superconductors.……

  1. High charge, low leakage tantalum powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiele, E. K.; Manley Jr., R. V.; Rerat, C. F.

    1985-10-01

    Tantalum powders for electrolytic capacitors having improved electrical capacity and low direct current leakage characteristics are produced by the introduction of combinations of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur-containing materials.

  2. Analysis of bone ingrowth on a tantalum cup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D′Angelo F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trabecular Metal (TM is a new highly porous material made of tantalum (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana, USA. Its three-dimensional structure is composed of a series of interconnected dodecahedron pores that are on average 550 μm in diameter. This size is considered optimal for bone ingrowth and is similar to trabecular bone. The elastic modulus of TM (3 GPa is more similar to that of cancellous (0,1-1,5 GPa or cortical (112-18 GPa bone and is significantly less similar to that of Titanium (110 GPa and Co-Cr alloys (220 GPa. These features enable bone apposition and remodeling. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the histology of the bone-implant interface in a human specimen. Materials and Methods: A highly porous tantalum cup (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana, USA was removed for recurrent dislocations three years after implantation. In order to obtain a slice of the cup, two cuts were made on the centre using an Exakt cutting machine. Then the slice was embedded in a Technovit resin and a Hematoxylin-eosin stain was used to study the bone tissue. Bone ingrowth was calculated using a method based on simple calculations of planar geometry. Results: The histological evaluation of the periprosthetic tissues revealed a typical chronic inflammation with few particles of polyethylene that were birefringent using polarized light. The quantitative evaluation of bone ingrowth revealed that more than 95% of voids were filled with bone. Discussion: In the literature, a lot of studies focused on tantalum were carried on animal model. Up to now little information is available about the histology of the bone-tantalum interface in a human artificial joint. We had an opportunity to remove a well integrated cup hence this study. The histology confirmed the strong relationship between the structure of this material and bone. The morphometric analysis revealed a high percentage of bone ingrowth.

  3. Fabrication and characterisation of suspended microstructures of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-masha'al, A.; Mastropaolo, E.; Bunting, A.; Dunare, C.; Cheung, R.

    2017-01-01

    An investigation of the influence of deposition and post-fabrication processes on the final mechanical structure of tantalum beams is reported in the present study. The final deflection profiles of doubly supported beams made from compressive and tensile-stressed films have been studied experimentally. An optimum finite element model has been developed to predict the buckling behaviour of the doubly supported beams by considering the boundary conditions in the form of a compressive stress and an applied load. No matter which etch release method has been used, the initial stress state of the as-deposited films has been found to have a significant impact on the final deflection profile of the fabricated device. The compressive-stressed films have presented larger deflection in the final released beams than the tensile-stressed films. Taking into account the type of etch release methods, the beams that have been released in the dry etch release processes have been found to deform more vertically than those released in the wet-etch release method. Moreover, it has been found that the amplitude of vertical deflection increases with the increase of the beam length and thickness. The results indicate that optimum profiles of tantalum suspended structures can be obtained from the tensile-stressed films that have been released by the wet etching method with an aspect ratio of 1:48.

  4. Application of pyrolysis to recycling organics from waste tantalum capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Bo; Chen, Zhenyang; Xu, Zhenming

    2017-08-05

    Tantalum capacitors (TCs) are widely used in electronic appliances. The rapid replacement of electronic products results in generating large amounts of waste TCs (WTCs). WTCs, rich in valuable tantalum, are considered as high quality tantalum resources for recycling. However, environmental pollution will be caused if the organics of WTCs were not properly disposed. Therefore, effectively recycling the organics of WTCs is significant for recovering the valuable parts. This study proposed an argon (Ar) pyrolysis process to recycle the organics from WTCs. The organic decomposition kinetic was first analyzed by thermogravimetry. The results showed that the organics were decomposed in two major steps and the average activation energy was calculated to 234kJ/mol. Then, the suitable pyrolysis parameters were determined as 550°C, 30min and 100ml/min. The organics were effectively decomposed and converted to oils (mainly contained phenol homologs and benzene homologs) and gases (some hydrocarbon). These pyrolysis products could be reutilized as energy sources. Moreover, based on the products and bond energy theory, the pyrolysis mechanisms of the organics were also discussed. Finally, a reasonable technological process for products utilization was presented. This study contributes to the efficient recycling the organics before valuable material recovery from WTCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The impact of substrate properties and thermal annealing on tantalum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosser, M., E-mail: michaela_grosser@yahoo.de [Chair of Micromechanics, Microfluidics/Microactuators, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Muench, M.; Seidel, H. [Chair of Micromechanics, Microfluidics/Microactuators, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Bienert, C.; Roosen, A. [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Schmid, U. [Department for Microsystems Technology, Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-01-15

    In this study film properties of sputter-deposited tantalum nitride (TaN{sub x}) thin layers are investigated focusing on the impact of substrate properties, varying nitrogen content for film synthetization as well as post-deposition annealings in the temperature range up to 500 Degree-Sign C. For comparison, these investigations are done on low temperature co-fired ceramics and on silicon based substrates whereas the latter approach ensures defined and well-known surface properties. Furthermore, results on the phase evolution with high temperature annealings are presented showing a transformation of Ta{sub 4}N to Ta{sub 2}N in the temperature range between 350 Degree-Sign C and 500 Degree-Sign C. With increasing nitrogen content (i.e. nitrogen flow during film deposition) in the TaN{sub x} layers the topography shows first an increase in surface roughness, next a range where a smoothing of the surface characteristics is observed, and finally buckling and the existence of grain agglomerates. All these analyses are further evaluated with electrical measurements on the film resistivity and on the oxidation behaviour to gain deeper insight into material parameters relevant for micromachined devices which are operated under harsh environmental conditions.

  6. The impact of substrate properties and thermal annealing on tantalum nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, M.; Münch, M.; Seidel, H.; Bienert, C.; Roosen, A.; Schmid, U.

    2012-01-01

    In this study film properties of sputter-deposited tantalum nitride (TaNx) thin layers are investigated focusing on the impact of substrate properties, varying nitrogen content for film synthetization as well as post-deposition annealings in the temperature range up to 500 °C. For comparison, these investigations are done on low temperature co-fired ceramics and on silicon based substrates whereas the latter approach ensures defined and well-known surface properties. Furthermore, results on the phase evolution with high temperature annealings are presented showing a transformation of Ta4N to Ta2N in the temperature range between 350 °C and 500 °C. With increasing nitrogen content (i.e. nitrogen flow during film deposition) in the TaNx layers the topography shows first an increase in surface roughness, next a range where a smoothing of the surface characteristics is observed, and finally buckling and the existence of grain agglomerates. All these analyses are further evaluated with electrical measurements on the film resistivity and on the oxidation behaviour to gain deeper insight into material parameters relevant for micromachined devices which are operated under harsh environmental conditions.

  7. Diffusion kinetics of nitrogen in tantalum during plasma-nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德元; 林勤; 曾卫军; 李放; 许兰萍; 付青峰

    2001-01-01

    The activation energies of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions were calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The activation energy calculated is 148.873±0.390  kJ/mol. The depth increasing of nitriding layer with time follows square root relation. The nitriding process of tantalum is controlled by diffusion of nitrogen atoms in tantalum solid solution.

  8. Photoionization of an aluminum plasma by a tantalum X source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaudin, Patrick; Back, Christina A.; Chenais-Popovics, Claude; Audebert, Patrick; Geindre, Jean-Paul; Gauthier, Jean-Claude

    1991-05-01

    Photoionization of a helium like aliminum plasma is carried out by an external x-source. The laser beam used corresponds to the 3d to 4F transition level of tantalum. The experimental spectrum of tantalum is shown superimposed over the emission spectrum of aluminum on diagrammatic form. Good correspondence is seen between the 3d to 4F emissions of tantalum and helium like aluminum. Plasma pumping is obtained by exposure of a tantalum target to laser rays.

  9. Mesoscale Particle-Based Model of Electrophoretic Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giera, Brian; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis A.; Pascall, Andrew J.; Weisgraber, Todd H.

    2017-01-17

    We present and evaluate a semiempirical particle-based model of electrophoretic deposition using extensive mesoscale simulations. We analyze particle configurations in order to observe how colloids accumulate at the electrode and arrange into deposits. In agreement with existing continuum models, the thickness of the deposit increases linearly in time during deposition. Resulting colloidal deposits exhibit a transition between highly ordered and bulk disordered regions that can give rise to an appreciable density gradient under certain simulated conditions. The overall volume fraction increases and falls within a narrow range as the driving force due to the electric field increases and repulsive intercolloidal interactions decrease. We postulate ordering and stacking within the initial layer(s) dramatically impacts the microstructure of the deposits. We find a combination of parameters, i.e., electric field and suspension properties, whose interplay enhances colloidal ordering beyond the commonly known approach of only reducing the driving force.

  10. Addition of oxygen to and distribution of oxides in tantalum alloy T-111 at low concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1975-01-01

    Oxygen was added at 820 and 990 C at an oxygen pressure of about .0003 torr. The technique permitted predetermined and reproducible oxygen doping of the tantalum alloy (T-111). Based on the temperature dependency of the doping reaction, it was concluded that the initial rates of oxygen pickup are probably controlled by solution of oxygen into the T-111 lattice. Although hafnium oxides are more stable than those of tantalum or tungsten, analyses of extracted residues indicate that the tantalum and tungsten oxides predominate in the as-doped specimens, presumably because of the higher concentrations of tantalum and tungsten in the alloy. However, high-temperature annealing promotes gettering of dissolved oxygen and oxygen from other oxides to form hafnium oxides. Small amounts of tantalum and tungsten oxides were still present after high temperature annealing. Tungsten oxide (WO3) volatilizes slightly from the surface of T-111 at 990 C but not at 820 C. The vaporization of WO3 has no apparent effect on the doping reaction.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of polyvinylpyrrolidine assisted tantalum pentoxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Ndiege, Nicholas; Seebauer, E.G. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaignm, 600 S. Mathews, Urbana, IL-61801 (United States); Shannon, Mark A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaignm, 600 S. Mathews, Urbana, IL-61801 (United States); Masel, Richard I. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaignm, 600 S. Mathews, Urbana, IL-61801 (United States)], E-mail: r-masel@uiuc.edu

    2008-06-02

    Micron thick tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) films have been proposed as thermal insulating layers in microchemical systems, but so far it has been difficult to deposit thick enough films over complex substrates. So far sol-gel films cracked upon heating whenever the film thicknesses were above 350 nm. A 350 nm thick film is too thin for effective insulation. Other techniques are not suitable for coating the complex structures associated with microchemical systems. In this paper we report sol-gel synthesis of 1.6 {mu}m thick tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) films. The films are almost crack free, and adhere to silicon surfaces even upon flashing to 900 deg. C. The key to the synthesis is the addition of Polyvinylpyrrolidine (PVP) to the sol. Films grown in the absence of PVP all show cracks upon calcination to 900 deg. C while few cracks are seen with PVP. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infra red analysis show that orthorhombic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} is formed in all cases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows the O:Ta ratio to be 2.8:1. This shows that sol-gel is a viable process for making the micron thick films of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} needed as insulators for microchemical systems.

  12. Degradation of a tantalum filament during the hot-wire CVD of silicon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliphant, C.J. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); National Metrology Institute of South Africa, Private Bag X34, Lynwood Ridge, Pretoria 0040 (South Africa); Arendse, C.J., E-mail: cjarendse@uwc.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Jordaan, W.A. [National Metrology Institute of South Africa, Private Bag X34, Lynwood Ridge, Pretoria 0040 (South Africa); Knoesen, D. [Department of Physics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2015-01-30

    Electron backscatter diffraction revealed that during the hot-wire deposition of silicon nitride, a tantalum filament partially transformed to some of its nitrides and silicides. The deposition of an encapsulating silicon nitride layer occurred at the cooler filament ends. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy disclosed the presence of hydrogen, nitrogen and silicon containing ions within the aged filament bulk. Hardness measurements revealed that the recrystallized tantalum core experienced significant hardening, whereas the silicides and nitrides were harder but more brittle. Crack growth, porosity and the different thermal expansion amongst the various phases are all enhanced at the hotter centre regions, which resulted in failure at these areas. - Highlights: • Tantalum filament degrades and fails during hot-wire CVD of silicon nitride thin films. • An encapsulating silicon nitride layer is deposited at the cooler ends. • Electron backscatter diffraction reveals Ta-silicides and -nitrides with a Ta core. • Filament failure occurs at hot centre regions due to different mechanical properties of Ta, its silicides and nitrides.

  13. Growth of carbon nanofiber coatings on nickel thin films on fused silica by catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition: On the use of titanium, titanium–tungsten and tantalum as adhesion layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, D.B.; Tiggelaar, R.M.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Coatings of carbon nanofiber (CNF) layers were synthesized on fused silica substrates using a catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition process (C-TCVD). The effects of various adhesion layers–titanium, titanium–tungsten and tantalum–under the nickel thin film on the attachment of carbon nanofiber

  14. Electrostatic spray deposition based lithium ion capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Richa; Chen, Chunhui; Wang, Chunlei

    2016-05-01

    Conventional Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) are well suited as power devices that can provide large bursts of energy in short time periods. However, their relatively inferior energy densities as compared to their secondary battery counterparts limit their application in devices that require simultaneous supply of both high energy and high power. In the wake of addressing this shortcoming of EDLCs, the concept of hybridization of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and EDLCs has attracted significant scientific interest in recent years. Such a device, generally referred to as the "lithium-ion capacitor" typically utilizes a lithium intercalating electrode along with a fast charging capacitor electrode. Herein we have constructed a lithium hybrid electrochemical capacitor comprising a Li4Ti5O12-TiO2 (LTO-TiO2) anode and a reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotube (rGO-CNT) composite cathode using electrostatic spray deposition (ESD). The electrodes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements were carried out to evaluate the electrochemical performance of the individual electrodes and the full hybrid cells.

  15. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in alkali halide melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    in a single 4 electron step. By electrolyses at a constant potential of - 1.4 V vs. Pt in a NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 melt at 800 °C coherent carbon containing surface layers could be obtained on tantalum substrates, when a CO2 atmosphere was applied. Copyright © 2012 by The Electrochemical Society....

  16. Hafnium radioisotope recovery from irradiated tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Jamriska, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Hafnium is recovered from irradiated tantalum by: (a) contacting the irradiated tantalum with at least one acid to obtain a solution of dissolved tantalum; (b) combining an aqueous solution of a calcium compound with the solution of dissolved tantalum to obtain a third combined solution; (c) precipitating hafnium, lanthanide, and insoluble calcium complexes from the third combined solution to obtain a first precipitate; (d) contacting the first precipitate of hafnium, lanthanide and calcium complexes with at least one fluoride ion complexing agent to form a fourth solution; (e) selectively adsorbing lanthanides and calcium from the fourth solution by cationic exchange; (f) separating fluoride ion complexing agent product from hafnium in the fourth solution by adding an aqueous solution of ferric chloride to obtain a second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron; (g) dissolving the second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron in acid to obtain an acid solution of hafnium and iron; (h) selectively adsorbing the iron from the acid solution of hafnium and iron by anionic exchange; (i) drying the ion exchanged hafnium solution to obtain hafnium isotopes. Additionally, if needed to remove residue remaining after the product is dried, dissolution in acid followed by cation exchange, then anion exchange, is performed.

  17. Bone remodeling around cementless tantalum cups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grillo, J. -C.; Flecher, X.; Bouvenot, J.; Argenson, J. -N.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of the study.-Most studies have reported a significant decrease in periacetabular bone stock one year after implantation of a cementless cup. The purpose of this work was to study the bone-implant interface of the tantalum cup using plain X-rays and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). M

  18. Tantalum-modified Stellite 6 thick coatings : microstructure and mechanical performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farnia, A.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Rao, J. C.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2013-01-01

    Thick Co-based coatings with different contents of tantalum were prepared by simultaneous powder feeding laser cladding technique on 304 stainless steel substrate, with the Ta wt% being 0, 2, 7 and 12. Laser processing was carried out with a continuous 3.3 kW Yt:YAG fiber laser. Microstructural obse

  19. Separating the strengthening phase in nickel-cobalt alloys doped with tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaipov, R. Kh.; Kerimov, E. Yu.; Slyusarenko, E. M.

    2017-02-01

    The hardness values of monophasic (fcc solid solution) and biphasic (fcc solid solution and separated phase) nickel-cobalt alloys doped with tantalum are determined using the Vickers method. Based on the resulting data, a composition-structure-hardness diagram is devised for the Co-Ni-Ta system.

  20. Spectroscopic study of the electrochemical behaviour of tantalum(V) chloride and oxochloride species in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babushkina, Olga B., E-mail: olga.babushkina@cest.a [Centre in Electrochemical Surface Technology (CEST), Viktor Kaplan street 2, A-2700, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Ekres, Silvia [Centre in Electrochemical Surface Technology (CEST), Viktor Kaplan street 2, A-2700, Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2010-12-30

    FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify the oxochloride species of tantalum(V) in ionic liquids and to confirm the correlations between their presence in electrolytes and the changes in the route of electrochemical reduction of tantalum(V). Electrochemical behaviour of the mixtures (x)1-butyl-1-methyl-pyrrolidinium chloride-(1 - x)TaCl{sub 5} at x = 0.80, 0.65, and 0.40 was investigated over the temperature range 90-160 {sup o}C with respect to the electrochemical deposition of tantalum and was discussed in terms of spectroscopic data. The mechanism of electrochemical reduction of tantalum(V) in the basic and acidic electrolytes depends strongly on the structure and composition of the electro active species of tantalum(V) defined by the molar composition of ionic liquids and on the competition between tantalum(V) chloride and oxochloride species. In the basic mixture at x = 0.80, with octahedral [TaCl{sub 6}]{sup -} ions as the electrochemically active species only the first reduction step Ta{sup 5+} {yields} Ta{sup 4+} at -0.31 V was observed. The competitive reduction of tantalum(V) oxochloride species occurs at more anodic potential (-0.01 V) than the reduction of the chloride complexes and can restrict the further reduction of tantalum(IV). In the basic ionic liquid at x = 0.65, the cyclic voltammograms exhibit reduction peaks at -0.31 V and -0.51 V attributed to the diffusion controlled process as [TaCl{sub 6}]{sup -} + e{sup -} {yields} [TaCl{sub 6}]{sup 2-} and [TaCl{sub 6}]{sup 2-} + e{sup -} {yields} [TaCl{sub 6}]{sup 3-}. The further irreversible reduction of tantalum(III) to metallic state may occur at -2.1 V. In the acidic ionic liquids, at x = 0.40 the electrochemical reduction of two species occurs, TaCl{sub 6}{sup -} and Ta{sub 2}Cl{sub 11}{sup -} and it is limited by two electron transfer for both of them at -0.3 V and -1.5 V, respectively.

  1. Superconducting properties in tantalum decorated three-dimensional graphene and carbon structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobaleda, Cayetano S. F., E-mail: ccobaleda@usal.es, E-mail: wpan@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1086, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Xiao, Xiaoyin; Burckel, D. Bruce; Polsky, Ronen; Pan, W., E-mail: ccobaleda@usal.es, E-mail: wpan@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1086, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Huang, Duanni [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, MS 1086, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Diez, Enrique [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2014-08-04

    We present here the results on superconducting properties in tantalum thin films (100 nm thick) deposited on three-dimensional graphene (3DG) and carbon structures. A superconducting transition is observed in both composite thin films with a superconducting transition temperature of 1.2 K and 1.0 K, respectively. We have further measured the magnetoresistance at various temperatures and differential resistance dV/dI at different magnetic fields in these two composite thin films. In both samples, a much large critical magnetic field (∼2 T) is observed and this critical magnetic field shows linear temperature dependence. Finally, an anomalously large cooling effect was observed in the differential resistance measurements in our 3DG-tantalum device when the sample turns superconducting. Our results may have important implications in flexible superconducting electronic device applications.

  2. Dinitrogen dissociation on an isolated surface tantalum atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenier, P; Taoufik, M; Lesage, A; Solans-Monfort, X; Baudouin, A; de Mallmann, A; Veyre, L; Basset, J-M; Eisenstein, O; Emsley, L; Quadrelli, E A

    2007-08-24

    Both industrial and biochemical ammonia syntheses are thought to rely on the cooperation of multiple metals in breaking the strong triple bond of dinitrogen. Such multimetallic cooperation for dinitrogen cleavage is also the general rule for dinitrogen reductive cleavage with molecular systems and surfaces. We have observed cleavage of dinitrogen at 250 degrees C and atmospheric pressure by dihydrogen on isolated silica surface-supported tantalum(III) and tantalum(V) hydride centers [(identical with Si-O)2Ta(III)-H] and [(identical with Si-O)2Ta(V)H3], leading to the Ta(V) amido imido product [(identical with SiO)2Ta(=NH)(NH2)]: We assigned the product structure based on extensive characterization by infrared and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, isotopic labeling studies, and supporting data from x-ray absorption and theoretical simulations. Reaction intermediates revealed by in situ monitoring of the reaction with infrared spectroscopy support a mechanism highly distinct from those previously observed in enzymatic, organometallic, and heterogeneous N2 activating systems.

  3. Concept for lightweight spaced-based deposition technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulton, Michael; Anders, Andre

    2006-02-28

    In this contribution we will describe a technology path to very high quality coatings fabricated in the vacuum of space. To accomplish the ambitious goals set out in NASA's Lunar-Mars proposal, advanced thin-film deposition technology will be required. The ability to deposit thin-film coatings in the vacuum of lunar-space could be extremely valuable for executing this new space mission. Developing lightweight space-based deposition technology (goal:<300 g, including power supply) will enable the future fabrication and repair of flexible large-area space antennae and fixed telescope mirrors for lunar-station observatories. Filtered Cathodic Arc (FCA) is a proven terrestrial energetic thin-film deposition technology that does not need any processing gas but is well suited for ultra-high vacuum operation. Recently, miniaturized cathodic arcs have already been developed and considered for space propulsion. It is proposed to combine miniaturized pulsed FCA technology and robotics to create a robust, enabling space-based deposition system for the fabrication, improvement, and repair of thin films, especially of silver and aluminum, on telescope mirrors and eventually on large area flexible substrates. Using miniature power supplies with inductive storage, the typical low-voltage supply systems used in space are adequate. It is shown that high-value, small area coatings are within the reach of existing technology, while medium and large area coatings are challenging in terms of lightweight technology and economics.

  4. Tantalum oxide barrier in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghua Yu; Tingting Ren; Wei Ji; Jiao Teng; Fengwu Zhu

    2004-01-01

    Tantalum as an insulating barrier can take the place of Al in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). Ta barriers in MTJs were fabricated by natural oxidation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the oxidation states of Ta barrier.The experimental results show that the chemical state of tantalum is pure Ta5+ and the thickness of the oxide is 1.3 nm. The unoxidized Ta in the barrier may chemically reacted with NiFe layer which is usually used in MTJs to form an intermetallic compound,NiTa2. A magnetic "dead layer" could be produced in the NiFe/Ta interface. The "dead layer" is likely to influence the spinning electron transport and the magnetoresistance effect.

  5. First Principles Force Field for Metallic Tantalum

    OpenAIRE

    Strachan, Alejandro; Cagin, Tahir; Gulseren, Oguz; Mukherjee, Sonali; Cohen, Ronald E.; Goddard III, William A.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a general strategy to develop accurate Force Fields (FF) for metallic systems derived from ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) calculations; we illustrate this approach for tantalum. As input data to the FF we use the linearized augmented plane wave method (LAPW) with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) to calculate: (i) the zero temperature equation of state (EOS) of Ta for bcc, fcc, and hcp crystal structures for pressures up to ~500 GPa. (ii) Elastic constants. (iii) We u...

  6. Tantalum: A strategic metal; Tantalo: Un metal estrategico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Lopez, G.; Lopez-Lopez, J.; Garcia-Yagues, M. R.

    2009-07-01

    In nature, the main source of tantalum is an isomorphous series of minerals containing oxides of tantalum, niobium, iron and manganese, which are collectively known as columbine-tantalite (coltan). Upgraded Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-containing tin slags are also used as a secondary source of tantalum. Coltan, either naturally occurring or synthetically produced as concentrates from tin slags, are digested with hydrofluoric and sulphuric acid at an elevated temperature. the aqueous solution of ta-Nb in hydrofluoric acid is extracted in several continuously operating mixer-settler systems or extraction columns with an organic solvent like methyl isobutyl ketone. The organic phase is then scrubbed with 6-15 N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to separate the niobium from the tantalum by selective stripping. The tantalum salt is extracted from the organic phase with water or diluted aqueous ammonium fluoride solution, the demands of the solid tantalum capacitor industry for high quality, high surface area tantalum powders have driven improvements in the sodium reduction of K{sub 2}TaF{sub 7}. The much-improved chemistry reflects the many modifications to the process put in place after 1990 and the subsequent improvements in the electrical quality as measured by the performance of tantalum capacitors. (Author) 5 refs.

  7. XPS and GDOES Characterization of Porous Coating Enriched with Copper and Calcium Obtained on Tantalum via Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Rokosz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available XPS and GDOES characterizations of porous coatings on tantalum after Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO at 450 V for 3 minutes in electrolyte containing concentrated (85% phosphoric acid with calcium nitrate and copper (II nitrate are described. Based on the obtained data, it may be concluded that the PEO coating consists of tantalum (Ta5+, calcium (Ca2+, copper (Cu2+  and Cu+, and phosphates (PO43-. It has to be pointed out that copper and calcium are distributed throughout the volume. The authors also propose a new model of PEO, based on the derivative of GDOES signals with sputtering time.

  8. Plasma deposition of amorphous silicon-based materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Giovanni; Madan, Arun

    1995-01-01

    Semiconductors made from amorphous silicon have recently become important for their commercial applications in optical and electronic devices including FAX machines, solar cells, and liquid crystal displays. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon-Based Materials is a timely, comprehensive reference book written by leading authorities in the field. This volume links the fundamental growth kinetics involving complex plasma chemistry with the resulting semiconductor film properties and the subsequent effect on the performance of the electronic devices produced. Key Features * Focuses on the plasma chemistry of amorphous silicon-based materials * Links fundamental growth kinetics with the resulting semiconductor film properties and performance of electronic devices produced * Features an international group of contributors * Provides the first comprehensive coverage of the subject, from deposition technology to materials characterization to applications and implementation in state-of-the-art devices.

  9. Base cation deposition in Europe - Part II. Acid neutralization capacity and contribution to forest nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draaijers, G.P.J.; Leeuwen, E.P. van; Jong, P.G.H. de; Erisman, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    An assessment was made of the capacity of base cations to neutralize acid deposition and of the contribution of base cation deposition to forest nutrition in Europe. In large parts of southern Europe more than 50% of the potential acid deposition was found counteracted by deposition of non-sea salt

  10. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of contact lens deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Green-Church, Kari B.; Nichols, Jason J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this report is to describe the contact lens deposition proteome associated with two silicone hydrogel contact lenses and care solutions using a mass spectrometric-based approach. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, examiner-masked crossover clinical trial that included 48 participants. Lenses and no-rub care solutions evaluated included galyfilcon A (Acuvue Advance, Vistakon Inc., Jacksonville, FL), lotrafilcon B (O2 Optix, CIBA Vision Inc., Duluth, GA), AQuify (...

  11. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of contact lens deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Green-Church, Kari B.; Nichols, Jason J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this report is to describe the contact lens deposition proteome associated with two silicone hydrogel contact lenses and care solutions using a mass spectrometric-based approach. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, examiner-masked crossover clinical trial that included 48 participants. Lenses and no-rub care solutions evaluated included galyfilcon A (Acuvue Advance, Vistakon Inc., Jacksonville, FL), lotrafilcon B (O2 Optix, CIBA Vision Inc., Duluth, GA), AQuify (...

  12. Fabrication of anodized tantalum oxide integrated capacitors on singulated chips with active devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasef, Mohammed Aziz

    The purpose of this project was to determine the feasibility and processability of fabricating anodized tantalum oxide integrated capacitors on singulated chips. Using high-resolution transparencies to pattern the metals during the photolithographic process, capacitors as large as 0.25 cm2 were fabricated successfully with the yield being higher for capacitors smaller than 0.1 cm2. Several capacitor designed were attempted and final designed was selected on the basis of ease of alignment and prevention of shorts. The next step in the project involved utilizing this design to fabricate capacitors on 2.2 mm by 2.2 mm silicon dummy chips. In order to accomplish this task, a support wafer technique was used. A silicon wafer with holes etched all the way through was attached to a non-etched silicon wafer to provide a base for the dummy chips that were placed in the holes of the support wafer, thus making the top of the chips co-planar with a wafer that could be put through standard wafer processing equipment. The chips were glued to the wafer using a thermoplastic as an adhesive. The design specified for this project called for five 100 pF capacitors and a single 50 pF capacitor. Since the chips had to be individually placed in the holes, all the masks used in the project had to be individually designed for reach run. The capacitors had a bottom plate thickness of 2500 A of tantalum which was anodized at 120 V and 0.5 mA/cm2 to an oxide thickness of 1920 A. The top plate was 2 mum of aluminum and the insulating ring around the bottom plate was made of 5 mum of benzocyclobutene. After fabrication, testing of the capacitors provided a yield of 97% for the 100 pF capacitors with average capacitance of 98.3 pF +/- 3.6 pF and 75% for the 50 pF capacitors with an average capacitance of 50 pF +/- 1.65 pF. The inductance of the capacitors was less than 20 pH and resistance was about 110 O. The resistance was brought down to 1 O when a 2 mum sublayer of aluminum was deposited

  13. Solution Based Deposition of Polyimide Ablators for NIF Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, R

    2002-07-11

    Between June 1997 and March 2002 Luxel Corporation was contracted to explore the possibility of preparing NIF scale capsules with polyimide ablators using solution-based techniques. This work offered a potential alternative to a vapor deposition approach talking place at LLNL. The motivation for pursuing the solution-based approach was primarily two-fold. First, it was expected that much higher strength capsules (relative to vapor deposition) could be prepared since the solution precursors were known to produce high strength films. Second, in applying the ablator as a fluid it was expected that surface tension effects would lead to very smooth surfaces. These potential advantages were offset by expected difficulties, primary among them that the capsules would need to be levitated in some fashion (for example acoustically) during coating and processing, and that application of the coating uniformly to thicknesses of 150 pm on levitated capsules would be difficult. Because of the expected problems with the coupling of levitation and coating, most of the initial effort was to develop coating and processing techniques on stalk-mounted capsules. The program had some success. Using atomizer spray techniques in which application of {approx}5 {micro}m fluid coatings were alternated with heating to remove solvent resulted in up to 70 {micro}m thick coatings that were reasonably smooth at short wavelengths, and showed only about a 1 {micro}m thickness variation over long wavelengths. More controlled deposition with an inkjet devise was also developed. However difficult technical problems remained, and these problems coupled with the relative success of the vapor deposition approach led to the termination of the solution-based work in 2002. What follows is a compilation of the progress reports submitted by Luxel for this work which spanned a number of separate contracts. The reports are arranged chronologically, the last report in the collection has a modest summary of what

  14. Compton profile of tantalum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomas Varghese; K M Balakrishna; K Siddappa

    2003-03-01

    The Compton profile of tantalum (Ta) has been measured using IGP type coaxial photon detector. The target atoms were excited by means of 59.54 keV -rays from Am-241. The measurements were carried out on a high purity thin elemental foil. The data were recoreded in a 4 K multichannel analyzer. These data duly corrected for various effects are presented and compared with theoretical and measured values. Best agreement with experiment is found for the 5d36s2 electron configuration.

  15. Fracture of an uncemented tantalum patellar component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan L. Grimm, MD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old man presented with the acute, atraumatic onset of pain 3 years after uncemented right total knee arthroplasty. He complained of new mechanical locking with the knee held in extension on examination and unable to flex the knee. On the plain radiographs, the patellar component peg was fractured and the plate was dislocated. The knee was immobilized, and revision to a cemented 3-peg component was performed. Fracture of a single-peg, tantalum-backed uncemented patellar component has not been described. Clinical suspicion for this should be given in the setting of acute locking. We recommend revision with a cemented polyethylene component.

  16. 电容器级钽粉关键技术与开发研究%The Key Technique and R & D of Capacitor Grade Tantalum Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何季麟; 张学清; 杨国启; 郑爱国

    2014-01-01

    This paper cites the characteristics of tantalum capacitors,applications and application characteristics of alu-minum capacitors and multilayer ceramic capacitors.It analyzes the new trends that the chip-based and miniaturization tantalum capacitors led capacitor grade tantalum powder to higher capacity.It describes the challenges of the demand for high reliability in high-voltage tantalum powder of aviation,aerospace and military field voltage capacitor to a higher volt-age and lower ESR direction.It reviews the application development process of the capacitor tantalum powder with high ca-pacitance tantalum powder,high voltage tantalum powder and medium voltage (flake)tantalum powder.It analyzes the performance,product grades and key technologies of high capacitance tantalum powder,high voltage tantalum powder and medium voltage(flake)tantalum powder by methods of the classical methods of potassium tantalum fluoride (K2TaF7)so-dium metal reduction,electron beam melting and ball milled production.For 30~80 kμFV/g tantalum powder,the influ-ence factors of withstand voltage performance have been analyzed.Finally,it presents new technologies,devices,prod-ucts morphology,performance,advantages and disadvantages of the high capacitance tantalum powder and high voltage technology.On the basis of capacitor grade tantalum powder,this paper points out sustainable development ideas of higher capacitance and higher voltage for tantalum capacitors.%引述了Ta电容器与Al电容器、多层陶瓷电容器相比突出的性能与应用特征,分析了Ta电容器片式化、小型化促进电容器级Ta粉高比容化发展的新趋势,叙述了航空、航天和军工领域对高压电容器高可靠性能的需求,以及对中高压Ta粉向更高电压、更低SER方向发展的引领,回顾了电容器用高比容Ta粉、中高压Ta粉发展应用进程,介绍了经典氟钽酸钾(K2 TaF7)金属Na还原法、电子束熔炼法、球磨片式化法生产的高

  17. Facile synthesis of efficient photocatalytic tantalum nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheng; Wang, Jiangting; Hou, Jungang; Huang, Kai; Jiao, Shuqiang [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhu, Hongmin, E-mail: hzhu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Tantalum nitride nanoparticles as a visible-light-driven photocatalyst prepared by a novel homogeneously chemical reduction of tantalum pentachloride using sodium in liquid ammonia and the morphologies, visible-light photocatalytic properties and stability of tantalum nitride nanoparticles were investigated. Highlights: ► Tantalum nitride nanoparticles have been prepared by a homogeneously chemical reduction. ► The crystal structure of tantalum nitride was determined by Rietveld refinement and XRD patterns. ► The Tantalum nitride nanoparticle size was in the range of 20–50 nm. ► Much high photocatalytic activities of Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticles were obtained under visible-light irradiation. -- Abstract: Tantalum nitride nanoparticles, as visible-light photocatalysts were synthesized by a two-step homogeneously chemical reduction without any polymers and templates. The well-crystallized Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticles with a range of 20–50 nm in size have been characterized by a number of techniques, such as XRD, XPS, SEM, TEM, BET and UV–Vis spectrum. Most importantly, the Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticles with good stability exhibited higher photooxidation activities in the water splitting and degradation of methylene blue under visible light irradiation than bulk Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} particles and commercial P25 TiO{sub 2}, demonstrating that Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} nanoparticle is a promising candidate as a visible-light photocatalyst.

  18. Large, larger, largest--a family of cluster-based tantalum copper aluminides with giant unit cells. I. Structure solution and refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Kobas, Miroslav; Conrad, Matthias; Harbrecht, Bernd; Steurer, Walter

    2009-06-01

    This is the first of two parts, where we report the structure determination of a novel family of cluster-based intermetallic phases of unprecedented complexity: cF444-Al(63.6)Ta(36.4) (AT-19), a = 19.1663 (1) A, V = 7040 A3, cF(5928-x)-Al(56.6)Cu(3.9)Ta(39.5), x = 20 (ACT-45), a = 45.376 (1) A, V = 93,428 A(3) and cF(23,256-x)-Al(55.4)Cu(5.4)Ta(39.1), x = 122 (ACT-71), a = 71.490 (4) A, V = 365,372 A3. The space group is F43m in all three cases. These cluster-based structures are closely related to the class of Frank-Kasper phases. It is remarkable that all three structures show the same average structure that resembles the cubic Laves phase.

  19. Deformation mechanisms during compressive loading of tantalum and tantalum-2.5 weight percent tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Rajeev

    In this study it was attempted to understand the deformation behavior of tantalum and tantalum alloyed with 2.5 weight % tungsten. Uniaxial compressive deformation was carried out on polycrystalline Ta, Ta-2.5%W, and single crystal Ta. Experiments were carried out for a range of strain rates (10sp{-4}/s to 3000/s), and for a range of temperatures (77K, 296K-1000K). During high strain rate adiabatic plastic deformation of Ta-2.5%W, the energy converted to heat was directly measured using an infra-red method, and indirectly, using the recovery Hopkinson bar technique. It was concluded that within experimental error close to 100% of the work is converted to heat. During high strain rate deformation, the internal dislocation structure of both Ta and Ta-2.5%W was found to be independent of testing temperature. Thus the flow stress could be separated into two types of components, one type which are strain rate - temperature dependent and the other type which are only strain dependent. However, at lower strain rates prominent dynamic strain aging is observed and the effect of strain is coupled with the strain rate - temperature effect. At these lower strain rates, the evolution of structure does depend on the applied strain rate and temperature. When deformed at liquid nitrogen temperature, tantalum twins even at strain rates as low as 0.001/s. In the high strain rate - room temperature regime no twinning is observed. With the addition of tungsten to tantalum, the temperature and strain rate sensitivity of flow stress reduces. In addition to this, twinning is inhibited and occurs only at high strain rates - liquid nitrogen temperatures. Experiments on single crystal tantalum carried out revealed that the temperature sensitivity of flow stress on the (211) (111) slip system is similar to that on the (101) (111) slip system. Further experiments carried out on single crystal tantalum to study latent hardening did show 10% latent hardening on the \\{211\\} intersecting slip

  20. Twinning anisotropy of tantalum during nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, Saurav, E-mail: S.GOEL@qub.ac.uk [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Beake, Ben [Micro Materials Limited, Willow House, Yale Business Village, Ellice Way, Wrexham LL13 7YL (United Kingdom); Dalton Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, M15GD (United Kingdom); Chan, Chi-Wai [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Haque Faisal, Nadimul [School of Engineering, Robert Gordon University, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen AB10 7GJ (United Kingdom); Dunne, Nicholas [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-11

    Unlike other BCC metals, the plastic deformation of nanocrystalline Tantalum (Ta) during compression is regulated by deformation twinning. Whether or not this twinning exhibits anisotropy was investigated through simulation of displacement-controlled nanoindentation test using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. MD data was found to correlate well with the experimental data in terms of surface topography and hardness measurements. The mechanism of the transport of material was identified due to the formation and motion of prismatic dislocations loops (edge dislocations) belonging to the 1/2〈111〉 type and 〈100〉 type Burgers vector family. Further analysis of crystal defects using a fully automated dislocation extraction algorithm (DXA) illuminated formation and migration of twin boundaries on the (110) and (111) orientation but not on the (010) orientation and most importantly after retraction all the dislocations disappeared on the (110) orientation suggesting twinning to dominate dislocation nucleation in driving plasticity in tantalum. A significant finding was that the maximum shear stress (critical Tresca stress) in the deformation zone exceeded the theoretical shear strength of Ta (Shear modulus/2π~10.03 GPa) on the (010) orientation but was lower than it on the (110) and the (111) orientations. In light of this, the conventional lore of assuming the maximum shear stress being 0.465 times the mean contact pressure was found to break down at atomic scale.

  1. Evaluation of Polymer Hermetically Sealed Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer cathode tantalum capacitors have lower ESR (equivalent series resistance) compared to other types of tantalum capacitors and for this reason have gained popularity in the electronics design community. Their use allows improved performance of power supply systems along with substantial reduction of size and weight of the components used. However, these parts have poor thermal stability and can degrade in humid environments. Polymer hermetically sealed (PHS) capacitors avoid problems related to environmental degradation of molded case parts and can potentially replace current wet and solid hermetically sealed capacitors. In this work, PHS capacitors manufactured per DLA LAM DWG#13030 are evaluated for space applications. Several lots of capacitors manufactured over period from 2010 to 2014 were tested for the consistency of performance, electrical and thermal characteristics, highly accelerated life testing, and robustness under reverse bias and random vibration conditions. Special attention was given to analysis of leakage currents and the effect of long-term high temperature storage on capacitors in as is condition and after hermeticity loss. The results show that PHS capacitors might be especially effective for low-temperature applications or for system requiring a cold start-up. Additional screening and qualification testing have been recommended to assure the necessary quality of capacitors for space projects.

  2. The effects of tantalum on the microstructure of two polycrystalline nickel-base superalloys - B-1900 + Hf and MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Janowski, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of changing the content of Ta on the gamma/gamma-prime carbide microstructure was investigated in two crystalline nickel-base superalloys: conventionally cast B-1900 + Hf, and both conventionally cast and directionally solidified MAR-M247. The changes occurring in the microstructure effects were similar in both alloys. The gamma-prime and carbide volume fractions increased linearly with Ta additions, while the gamma-prime phase compositions did not change. Bulk Ta additions increased the levels of Cr and Co (in addition to that of Ta) of the gamma phase, a result of the approximately constant partitioning ratios for these two elements. The addition of Ta led to a partial replacement of Hf in the MC carbides. In addition, Cr-rich M(23)C(6) carbides formed as a result of MC carbide decomposition during heat treatment.

  3. Simultaneous determination of trace niobium, tantalum and tungsten in ferrous and non-ferrous alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilaros, G L; Byrnes, C J

    1976-03-01

    A method is presented for the determination of niobium, tantalum and tungsten in steel and non-ferrous alloys, based on hydrolysis with sulphurous acid followed by X-ray fluorescence measurements. The limit of determination is about 0.002% and the standard deviation is 0.002 at the 0.05% level. Results below 0.01% by this method are only semiquantitative.

  4. 2017 NEPP Tasks Update for Ceramic and Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of current NEPP tasks on ceramic and tantalum capacitors and plans for the future. It includes tasks on leakage currents, gas generation and case deformation in wet tantalum capacitors; ESR degradation and acceleration factors in MnO2 and polymer cathode capacitors. Preliminary results on the effect of moisture on degradation of reverse currents in MnO2 tantalum capacitors are discussed. Latest results on mechanical characteristics of MLCCs and modeling of degradation of leakage currents in BME capacitors with defects are also presented.

  5. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. SOUZA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  6. Preparation of tantalum carbide from an organometallic precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, C.P. [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Geoquimica. Lab. de Termodinamica e Reatores]. E-mail: carlson at ufrnet.ufrn.br; Favotto, C.; Satre, P.; L' Honore, A.; Roubin, M. [Universite du Toulon et de Var B.P. (France). Equipe der Materiaux a Finalite Specifique. Lab. de Physicochimie du Materiaux et du Milieu Marin]. E-mail: roubin at univ-tln.fr

    1999-03-01

    In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta{sub 2} O{sub 5} nH{sub 2}O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, Ta C, in the powder form at 1000 deg C. The natural sintering of Ta C powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400 deg C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to density the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value. (author)

  7. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChangZeng

    2007-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.……

  8. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.

  9. Tantalum cones and bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureau, F; Putman, S; Arnould, A; Dereudre, G; Migaud, H; Pasquier, G

    2015-04-01

    Management of bone loss is a major challenge in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The development of preformed porous tantalum cones offers new possibilities, because they seem to have biological and mechanical qualities that facilitate osseointegration. Compared to the original procedure, when metaphyseal bone defects are too severe, a single tantalum cone may not be enough and we have developed a technique that could extend the indications for this cone in these cases. We used 2 cones to fill femoral bone defects in 7 patients. There were no complications due to wear of the tantalum cones. Radiological follow-up did show any migration or loosening. The short-term results confirm the interest of porous tantalum cones and suggest that they can be an alternative to allografts or megaprostheses in case of massive bone defects.

  10. Chemical systems for electrochemical mechanical planarization of copper and tantalum films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumaran, Ashok Kumar

    Electro-Chemical Mechanical Planarization (ECMP) is a new and highly promising technology just reaching industrial application; investigation of chemistries, consumables, and tool/control approaches are needed to overcome technological limitations. Development of chemical formulations for ECMP presents several challenges. Unlike conventional CMP, formulations for ECMP may not need an oxidant. Organic additives, especially inhibitors used to control planarity (i.e. to protect recessed regions), need to be stable under applied anodic potential. To have a high current efficiency, the applied current should not induce decomposition of the formulations. In addition, to enable clearing of the copper film, the interactions between multiple exposed materials (barrier material as well as copper) must be considered. Development of a full sequence ECMP process would require the removal of the barrier layer as well. Chemical systems that exhibit a 1:1 selectivity between the barrier layer and copper would be ideal for the barrier removal step of ECMP. The main goal of this research is to investigate the chemistries suitable for ECMP of copper and tantalum films. Copper was electroplated onto the gold electrode of quartz crystals, and its dissolution/passivation behavior in hydroxylamine solutions was studied at different applied potential values. The dissolution rate of copper is pH dependent and exhibits a maximum in the vicinity of pH 6. Copper dissolution increases with respect to overpotential (eta) and dissolution rates as high as 6000 A/min have been obtained at overpotential of 750mV. While both benzotriazole (BTA) and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHA) serve as good inhibitors at lower overpotentials, their effectiveness decreases at higher overpotentials. A fundamental study was undertaken to evaluate the usefulness of a sulfonic acid based chemical system for the removal of tantalum under ECMP conditions. Tantalum as well as copper samples were polished at low pressures (

  11. Mechanism of the electrochemical deposition of samarium-based coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Edgar J. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Ortega-Borges, Raul [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Godinez, Luis A. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Chapman, Thomas W. [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico); Meas-Vong, Yunny [Electrochemistry Department, Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Parque Tecnologico Queretaro Sanfandila, P.O. Box 064, Pedro Escobedo, 76700 Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: yunnymeas@cideteq.mx

    2006-11-12

    Samarium-based films have been shown to form from aqueous solutions on the surfaces of metallic substrates such as steel or aluminum, and their presence has been reported to decrease substantially the corresponding corrosion rate of the underlying metallic substrate. Based on previous reports on the deposition of oxides or hydroxides of the closely related element cerium, this work demonstrates that samarium films are formed following a similar mechanism, which involves as the fundamental step an increase in interfacial pH resulting from cathodic oxygen-reduction or hydrogen-evolution reactions. With cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical quartz-crystal microbalance (EQCM) measurements, rotating-disk electrode (RDE) tests, and surface characterization techniques, namely, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray surface microanalysis (EDX), the postulated mechanism was verified, and the surface morphology of the resulting films was correlated with the nature of the reduction reaction that triggers film formation.

  12. Water erosion tests on a tantalum sample: A short communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C. J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports results from an experiment exposing the hot isostatic pressed tantalum cladding of a tungsten spallation target sample to a 34 m/s water jet. The unpolished tantalum surface was placed under the jet for 4.5 months with a view to quantifying pitting and erosion. Micrographs and laser profilometry records of the sample surface taken before and after the experiment are reported here.

  13. Tantalum recycling from waste of electrical and electronic equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowicz Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of tantalum recycling from waste of electrical and electronic equipment was investigated. Study was carried out using basic physical and chemical methods, ie. mechanical separation via crushing, leaching of silver layer in diluted HNO3, grinding and oxidation of anodes and thermic reduction with metallic reducing agent. A recovery rate of anodes was determined at 96%, and recycling efficiency of tantalum to pure form was determined more than 50%. Also was made mass balance.

  14. Corrosion behavior of tantalum and its nitride in alkali solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deyuan; LIN Qin; FEI Qinyong; ZHAO Haomin; KANG Guangyu; GENG Man

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of tantalum and its nitrides in stirring NaOH solutions was researched by potenfiostatic method, cyclic voltammetry and XPS. The results showed that the corrosion products were composed of Ta2O5 and NaTaO3.The corrosion reaction formula of tantalum and its nitrides was written according to cyclic volt-ampere curves. The electric charge transfer coefficient and the electric charge transfer number were calculated.

  15. Numerical investigation of sputtering power effect on nano-tribological properties of tantalum-nitride film using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzabadi, S. S.; Dehghani, K.; Naderi, M.; Mahboubi, F.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, surface profile of tantalum-nitride films, deposited with different sputtering power is analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to find out the effect of sputtering power density on the surface properties. In this regard, micron size tantalum nitride films were deposited using reactive magnetron sputtering system with sputtering power density of 1.5-3 W/cm2 in argon environment mixed with nitrogen. The process was then simulated numerically using molecular dynamics simulation (MD) and Morse interatomic potential in order to study the mechanism of surface roughness variation with sputtering power. According to experimental results, with increasing the sputtering power density from 1.5 to 3, the surface roughness decreased at first followed by an increase. The reason of this behavior was investigated using MD simulation. In this regard, the effect of sputtering power was attributed into two different phenomena: (i) the deposition rate and (ii) the incident-atom energy. Simulation was performed at different deposition rates from 33 to 666 atoms/ps and different sputtered atom energies from .31 to 7.67 eV. It is found that increasing the incident-atom energy causes the atoms to move along the surface and reduces the surface roughness. In contrast, increasing the deposition rate restricted the surface mobility of atoms and roughened the surface. It is also indicated that an increase in the sputtering power cannot increase the adatoms kinetic energy continuously and so the surface diffusion of atoms. Therefore, there is an optimum value for minimum roughness of surface in sputter deposition of tantalum-nitride films which is in agreement with simulation findings.

  16. Forward modeling of shock-ramped tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin L.; Carpenter, John H.; Seagle, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic materials experiments on the Z-machine are beginning to reach a regime where traditional analysis techniques break down. Time dependent phenomena such as strength and phase transition kinetics often make the data obtained in these experiments difficult to interpret. We present an inverse analysis methodology to infer the equation of state (EOS) from velocimetry data in these types of experiments, building on recent advances in the propagation of uncertain EOS information through a hydrocode simulation. An example is given for a shock-ramp experiment in which tantalum was shock compressed to 40 GPa followed by a ramp to 80 GPa. The results are found to be consistent with isothermal compression and Hugoniot data in this regime.

  17. Tantalum Sheet for Superconductor Diffusion Barrier Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaudhu, S. N.; Hartwig, K. T.; Barber, R. E.; Pyon, T.

    2006-03-01

    This report presents preliminary results of a project with the aim to fabricate fine-grained tantalum sheet having a uniform microstructure that co-deforms well with pure copper for superconductor diffusion barrier applications. Multi-pass equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) was used to refine the microstructure of 25 mm square cross-section bars of Ta; rolling was used to convert the bars to 0.38 mm thick sheet. Cu-Ta co-deformation characteristics were evaluated by assembling and drawing experimental Cu-Ta composite wires, containing the ECAE processed sheets, to 0.83 mm diameter and metallographically examining the thinned 2-4 micron Ta layer. The ECAE processed Ta sheet co-deformed well with Cu, and was found to have a smaller recrystallized grain size, a narrower grain size distribution and a slightly higher hardness compared to commercial diffusion barrier grade Ta sheet. The favorable results encourage further work.

  18. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  19. Antibacterial properties and cytocompatibility of tantalum oxide coatings with different silver content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Heng-Li [School of Dentistry, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yin-Yu, E-mail: yinyu@mail2000.com.tw; Chen, Hung-Jui; Chou, Yu-Kai [Department of Mechanical and Computer-Aided Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Lai, Chih-Ho [School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chen, Michael Y. C. [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-15

    Tantalum (Ta) oxides and their coatings have been proved to increase their applications in the biomedical fields by improving osseointegration and wear resistance. In this study, Ta oxide coatings containing different proportions of Ag are deposited on SS304 materials. A twin-gun magnetron sputtering system is used to deposit the tantalum oxide-Ag coating. In this study, Staphylococcus aureus, which exhibits physiological commensalism on the human skin, nares, and mucosal and oral areas, is chosen as the model for in vitro antibacterial analyses via a fluorescence staining method using Syto9. The cytocompatibility and adhesive morphology of human skin fibroblast cells (CCD-966SK) on the coatings are also determined by using the microculture tetrazolium assay. This study shows that Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Ag coatings with 12.5 at. % of Ag exhibit improved antibacterial effects against S. aureus and have good skin fibroblast cell cellular biocompatibility.

  20. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide and graphene reinforced tantalum carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Ajith Kumar

    Tantalum carbide (TaC), an ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC), is well known for its exceptional properties such as high hardness (15-19 GPa), melting point (3950 °C), elastic modulus (537 GPa), chemical resistance, and thermal shock resistance. To make TaC to be the future material for hypersonic vehicles, it is required to improve its thermal conductivity, strength, and fracture toughness. Researchers have previously reinforced TaC ceramic with carbides of silicon and boron as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, these reinforcements either undergo chemical changes or induce defects in the matrix during processing. In addition, these reinforcements exhibit a very minimal improvement in the properties. In the present work, we attempted to improve TaC fracture toughness by reinforcing with graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) and processing through spark plasma sintering at high temperature of 2000 °C, pressure of 70 MPa, and soaking time of 10 min. In addition, we investigated the active densification mechanism during SPS of TaC powder and the effect of ball milling time on mechanical properties of sintered TaC. A relative density of >96% was achieved using SPS of monolithic TaC (<3 μm). Ball milling improved the sintering kinetics and improved the mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness). Activation energy (100 kJ/mol) and stress exponent (1.2) were obtained using the analytical model developed for power-law creep. Grain boundary sliding is proposed as active densification mechanism based on these calculations. Reinforcing GNPs (2-6 vol.% ) in the TaC matrix improved relative density (99.8% for TaC-6 vol.% GNP). Also ˜150% and ˜180% increase in flexural strength and fracture toughness, respectively, was observed for TaC-6 vol.% GNP composite. The significant improvement in these properties is attributed to improved densification and toughening mechanisms such as sheet pull-out and crack

  1. Sol-gel synthesis of tantalum oxide and phosphonic acid-modified carbon nanotubes composite coatings on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maho, Anthony; Detriche, Simon; Delhalle, Joseph; Mekhalif, Zineb

    2013-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes used as fillers in composite materials are more and more appreciated for the outstanding range of accessible properties and functionalities they generate in numerous domains of nanotechnologies. In the framework of biological and medical sciences, and particularly for orthopedic applications and devices (prostheses, implants, surgical instruments, …), titanium substrates covered by tantalum oxide/carbon nanotube composite coatings have proved to constitute interesting and successful platforms for the conception of solid and biocompatible biomaterials inducing the osseous regeneration processes (hydroxyapatite growth, osteoblasts attachment). This paper describes an original strategy for the conception of resistant and homogeneous tantalum oxide/carbon nanotubes layers on titanium through the introduction of carbon nanotubes functionalized by phosphonic acid moieties (-P(=O)(OH)2). Strong covalent C-P bonds are specifically inserted on their external sidewalls with a ratio of two phosphonic groups per anchoring point. Experimental results highlight the stronger "tantalum capture agent" effect of phosphonic-modified nanotubes during the sol-gel formation process of the deposits compared to nanotubes bearing oxidized functions (-OH, -C=O, -C(=O)OH). Particular attention is also paid to the relative impact of the rate of functionalization and the dispersion degree of the carbon nanotubes in the coatings, as well as their wrapping level by the tantalum oxide matrix material. The resulting effect on the in vitro growth of hydroxyapatite is also evaluated to confirm the primary osseous bioactivity of those materials. Chemical, structural and morphological features of the different composite deposits described herein are assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electronic microscopies, energy dispersive X-rays analysis (EDX) and peeling tests.

  2. Microstructural and Electrical Characterization of Barium Strontium Titanate-Based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-03

    Strontium Titanate-Based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public...Society H2.4 Microstructural and Electrical Characterization of Barium Strontium Titanate- based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic...investigated and report the microstructural and electrical characterization of selected barium strontium titanate-based solid solution thin films

  3. GIS-based identification of areas that have resource potential for critical minerals in six Selected Groups of Deposit Types in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Susan M.; Jones, III, James V.; Hayes, Timothy S.

    2016-11-16

    Alaska has considerable potential for undiscovered mineral resources. This report evaluates potential for undiscovered critical minerals in Alaska. Critical minerals are those for which the United States imports more than half of its total supply and which are largely derived from nations that cannot be considered reliable trading partners. In this report, estimated resource potential and certainty for the state of Alaska are analyzed and mapped for the following six selected mineral deposit groups that may contain one or more critical minerals: (1) rare earth elements-thorium-yttrium-niobium(-uranium-zirconium) [REE-Th-Y-Nb(-U-Zr)] deposits associated with peralkaline to carbonatitic igneous intrusive rocks; (2) placer and paleoplacer gold (Au) deposits that in some places might also produce platinum group elements (PGE), chromium (Cr), tin (Sn), tungsten (W), silver (Ag), or titanium (Ti); (3) platinum group elements(-cobalt-chromium-nickel-titanium-vanadium) [PGE(-Co-Cr-Ni-Ti-V)] deposits associated with mafic to ultramafic intrusive rocks; (4) carbonate-hosted copper(-cobalt-silver-germanium-gallium) [Cu(-Co-Ag-Ge-Ga)] deposits; (5) sandstone-hosted uranium(-vanadium-copper) [U(-V-Cu)] deposits; and (6) tin-tungsten-molybdenum(-tantalum-indium-fluorspar) [Sn-W-Mo(-Ta-In-fluorspar)] deposits associated with specialized granites.This study used a data-driven, geographic information system (GIS)-implemented method to identify areas that have mineral resource potential in Alaska. This method systematically and simultaneously analyzes geoscience data from multiple geospatially referenced datasets and uses individual subwatersheds (12-digit hydrologic units) as the spatial unit of classification. The final map output uses a red, yellow, green, and gray color scheme to portray estimated relative potential (High, Medium, Low, Unknown) for each of the six groups of mineral deposit types, and it indicates the relative certainty (High, Medium, Low) of that estimate for

  4. DISSOLUTION OF FISSILE MATERIALS CONTAINING TANTALUM METAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T; Mark Crowder, M; Michael Bronikowski, M

    2007-05-29

    The dissolution of composite materials containing plutonium (Pu) and tantalum (Ta) metals is currently performed in Phase I of the HB-Line facility. The conditions for the present flowsheet are the dissolution of 500 g of Pu metal in the 15 L dissolver using a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.2 M potassium fluoride (KF) at 95 C for 4-6 h.[1] The Ta metal, which is essentially insoluble in HNO{sub 3}/fluoride solutions, is rinsed with process water to remove residual acid, and then burned to destroy classified information. During the initial dissolution campaign, the total mass of Pu and Ta in the dissolver charge was limited to nominally 300 g. The reduced amount of Pu in the dissolver charge coupled with significant evaporation of solution during processing of several dissolver charges resulted in the precipitation of a fluoride salt contain Pu. Dissolution of the salt required the addition of aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}) and a subsequent undesired 4 h heating cycle. As a result of this issue, HB-Line Engineering requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to optimize the dissolution flowsheet to reduce the cycle time, reduce the risk of precipitating solids, and obtain hydrogen (H{sub 2}) generation data at lower fluoride concentrations.[2] Using samples of the Pu/Ta composite material, we performed three experiments to demonstrate the dissolution of the Pu metal using HNO{sub 3} solutions containing 0.15 and 0.175 M KF. When 0.15 M KF was used in the dissolving solution, 95.5% of the Pu in the sample dissolved in approximately 6 h. The undissolved material included a small amount of Pu metal and plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) solids. Complete dissolution of the metal would have likely occurred if the dissolution time had been extended. This assumption is based on the steady increase in the Pu concentration observed during the last several hours of the experiment. We attribute the formation of PuO{sub 2} to the complexation

  5. Effect of sodium injection rate in reduction process on characteristics of tantalum powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a research the effect of sodium injection rate in a melt containing potassium tantalum fluoride and a flux on morphology and characteristics of tantalum powders obtained by sodium reduction.

  6. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of contact lens deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Church, Kari B; Nichols, Jason J

    2008-02-08

    The purpose of this report is to describe the contact lens deposition proteome associated with two silicone hydrogel contact lenses and care solutions using a mass spectrometric-based approach. This was a randomized, controlled, examiner-masked crossover clinical trial that included 48 participants. Lenses and no-rub care solutions evaluated included galyfilcon A (Acuvue Advance, Vistakon Inc., Jacksonville, FL), lotrafilcon B (O2 Optix, CIBA Vision Inc., Duluth, GA), AQuify (CIBA Vision Inc.), and ReNu MoistureLoc (Bausch and Lomb Inc., Rochester, NY). After two weeks of daily wear in each lens-solution combination, the left lens was removed by the examiner (using gloves and forceps) and placed in a protein precipitation buffer (acetone). The precipitate was quantitated for total protein concentration (per lens), and proteins were then identified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) and peptide sequencing. Between 7.32 and 9.76 microg/lens of protein was observed on average from each lens-solution combination. There were 19 total unique proteins identified across the two lens materials, and six proteins were identified in all four lens-solution combinations including lipocalin, lysozyme, lacritin, lactoferrin, proline rich 4, and Ig Alpha. Lotrafilcon B was associated with 15 individual proteins (across both care solutions), and 53% of these proteins were observed in at least 50% of the analyses. Galyfilcon A was associated with 13 individual proteins, and 38.5% of these proteins were observed in at least 50% of the analyses. There were three unique proteins identified from galyfilcon A and four unique proteins identified from lotrafilcon B. The total amount of proteins identified from silicone hydrogel materials is much less than the amount from traditional soft lens materials. For the most part, the deposition proteome across these lenses is similar, although the different polymer characteristics might be associated with some

  7. Base cation deposition in Europe - Part I. Model description, results and uncertainties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draaijers, G.P.J.; Leeuwen, E.P. van; Jong, P.G.H. de; Erisman, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Deposition of base cations (Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, K+) in Europe was mapped for 1989 with a spatial resolution of 10 x 20 km using the so-called inferential modeling technique. Deposition fields resembled the geographic variability of sources, land-use and climate. Dry deposition constituted on average 45

  8. Investigation of Tantalum Recycling by Electron Beam Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Vutova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigations are carried out and obtained experimental and theoretical data for tantalum scrap recycling by electron beam melting (EBM is presented in this paper. Different thermal treatment process conditions are realized and results are discussed. A chemical analysis is performed and refining mechanisms for electron beam (EB refining of Ta are discussed. For the performed experiments the best purification of Ta (99.96 is obtained at 21.6 kW beam power for a melting time of 3 min. A statistical approach is applied for estimation of the material losses and the liquid pool characteristics based on experimentally-obtained data. The aim is to improve the EBM and choosing optimal process conditions, depending on the concrete characteristic requirements. Model-based quality optimization of electron beam melting and refining (EBMR processes of Ta is considered related to the optimization of the molten pool parameters, connected to the occurring refining processes, and to minimal material losses. Optimization of the process of EBM of Ta is based on overall criteria, giving compromised solutions, depending on the requirements concerning the quality of the performed products. The accumulated data, the obtained results, and the optimization statistical approach allow us to formulate requirements on the process parameters.

  9. Critical Defense Materials: Government Collected Data Are Sufficiently Reliable to Assess Tantalum Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    collection methods . For example, government data prepared by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) on tantalum production reports information on...mined at prevailing prices.4 Countries for which the USGS reported tantalum mine production in 2014 are Brazil , Burundi, China, Democratic Republic of...Data Are Sufficiently Reliable to Assess Tantalum Availability Why GAO Did This Study The United States relies on foreign mine production of tantalum

  10. Multistate Memristive Tantalum Oxide Devices for Ternary Arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonjoo; Chattopadhyay, Anupam; Siemon, Anne; Linn, Eike; Waser, Rainer; Rana, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Redox-based resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) offers excellent properties to implement future non-volatile memory arrays. Recently, the capability of two-state ReRAMs to implement Boolean logic functionality gained wide interest. Here, we report on seven-states Tantalum Oxide Devices, which enable the realization of an intrinsic modular arithmetic using a ternary number system. Modular arithmetic, a fundamental system for operating on numbers within the limit of a modulus, is known to mathematicians since the days of Euclid and finds applications in diverse areas ranging from e-commerce to musical notations. We demonstrate that multistate devices not only reduce the storage area consumption drastically, but also enable novel in-memory operations, such as computing using high-radix number systems, which could not be implemented using two-state devices. The use of high radix number system reduces the computational complexity by reducing the number of needed digits. Thus the number of calculation operations in an addition and the number of logic devices can be reduced. PMID:27834352

  11. Multistate Memristive Tantalum Oxide Devices for Ternary Arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonjoo; Chattopadhyay, Anupam; Siemon, Anne; Linn, Eike; Waser, Rainer; Rana, Vikas

    2016-11-01

    Redox-based resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) offers excellent properties to implement future non-volatile memory arrays. Recently, the capability of two-state ReRAMs to implement Boolean logic functionality gained wide interest. Here, we report on seven-states Tantalum Oxide Devices, which enable the realization of an intrinsic modular arithmetic using a ternary number system. Modular arithmetic, a fundamental system for operating on numbers within the limit of a modulus, is known to mathematicians since the days of Euclid and finds applications in diverse areas ranging from e-commerce to musical notations. We demonstrate that multistate devices not only reduce the storage area consumption drastically, but also enable novel in-memory operations, such as computing using high-radix number systems, which could not be implemented using two-state devices. The use of high radix number system reduces the computational complexity by reducing the number of needed digits. Thus the number of calculation operations in an addition and the number of logic devices can be reduced.

  12. Plasma-nitriding of tantalum at relatively low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deyuan; LIN Qin; ZHAO Haomin; FEI Qinyong; GENG Man

    2004-01-01

    The combined quadratic orthogonal regression method of experiment design was employed to explore the effects of process parameters of plasma nitriding of tantalum such as total pressure, temperature and original hydrogen molar fraction on the hardness, roughness and structure of nitriding surfaces. The regression equations of hardness, roughness and structure were given according to the results of regression and statistic analysis. And the diffusion activation energy of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions was calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The diffusion activation energy calculated belongs to (155.49 + 10.51)kJ/mol (783-983 K).

  13. Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors: Design, Specifications and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Insertion of new types of commercial, high volumetric efficiency wet tantalum capacitors in space systems requires reassessment of the existing quality assurance approaches that have been developed for capacitors manufactured to MIL-PRF-39006 requirements. The specifics of wet electrolytic capacitors is that leakage currents flowing through electrolyte can cause gas generation resulting in building up of internal gas pressure and rupture of the case. The risk associated with excessive leakage currents and increased pressure is greater for high value advanced wet tantalum capacitors, but it has not been properly evaluated yet. This presentation gives a review of specifics of the design, performance, and potential reliability risks associated with advanced wet tantalum capacitors. Problems related to setting adequate requirements for DPA, leakage currents, hermeticity, stability at low and high temperatures, ripple currents for parts operating in vacuum, and random vibration testing are discussed. Recommendations for screening and qualification to reduce risks of failures have been suggested.

  14. Atmospheric Deposition of Sulfur and Base Cations to European Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Ivens, W.

    1988-01-01

    To simulate acidification processes in forests (soils), it is important to know as well as possible the atmospheric input. Large scale models have recently been improved to take better into account the differences in deposition between forests and other surfaces. In this report measurements of sulfur-fluxes onto the forest floor (54 case studies) are compared with deposition fluxes as calculated by the EMEP-model and by the RAINS modifications on this model. The value of the filtering pa...

  15. Formability of porous tantalum sheet-metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebosky, Paul S.; Schmid, Steven R.; Pasang, Timotius

    2009-08-01

    Over the past ten years, a novel cellular solid, Trabecular Metal™, has been developed for use in the orthopaedics industry as an ingrowth scaffold. Manufactured using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on top of a graphite foam substrate, this material has a regular matrix of interconnecting pores, high strength, and high porosity. Manufacturing difficulties encourage the application of bending, stamping and forming technologies to increase CVD reactor throughput and reduce material wastes. In this study, the bending and forming behaviour of Trabecular Metal™ was evaluated using a novel camera-based system for measuring surface strains, since the conventional approach of printing or etching gridded patterns was not feasible. A forming limit diagram was obtained using specially fabricated 1.65 mm thick sheets. A springback coefficient was measured and modeled using effective hexagonal cell arrangements.

  16. Change in lattice parameter of tantalum due to dissolved hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyanendra P. Tiwari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The volume expansion of tantalum due to the dissolved hydrogen has been determined using Bragg equation. The hydrogen was dissolved in the pure tantalum metal at constant temperature (360 °C and constant pressure (132 mbar by varying the duration of hydrogen charging. The amount of dissolved hydrogen was within the solid solubility limit. The samples with different hydrogen concentration were analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Slight peak shifts as well as peak broadening were observed. The relative changes of lattice parameters plotted against the hydrogen concentration revealed that the lattice parameters varied linearly with the hydrogen concentration.

  17. Complications associated with use of tantalum-mesh--covered implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyla, V A; La Piana, F G

    1982-02-01

    In 1948, ophthalmologists started implanting plastic spheres partially covered with tantalum mesh (eg, the Valley Forge Implant) in anophthalmic sockets. Numerous patients have developed complications ten to 15 years after surgery: pain ("pinching" or "deep"), headache, heavy mucopurulent discharge and diffuse conjunctival inflammation, migration of the implant, thinning or erosion of tissues covering the implant (extrusion), and inability to wear an artificial eye. Management includes refabrication of the artificial eye and replacement of the implant with a dermis-fat graft or a silicone ball plus scleral graft. Tantalum-mesh--covered orbital implants should probably not be used.

  18. Conflict minerals from the Democratic Republic of the Congo: global tantalum processing plants, a critical part of the tantalum supply chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) analyzes mineral and metal supply chains to identify and describe major components of mineral and metal material flows from ore extraction, through intermediate forms, to a final product. Supply chain analyses may be used (1) to identify risks to the United States associated with the supply of critical and strategic minerals and metals and (2) to provide greater supply chain transparency so that policymakers have the fact-based information needed to formulate public policy. This fact sheet focuses on the post-mining/pre-consumer-product part of the tantalum supply chain. The USGS National Minerals Information Center (NMIC) has been asked by governmental and non-governmental organizations to provide information about tantalum, tin, tungsten, and gold (collectively known as “3TG minerals”) processing facilities worldwide in response to U.S. legislation aimed at identifying and removing the supply chain links between the trade in these minerals and civil unrest in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and adjacent countries.

  19. Diffusion of liquid uranium into foils of tantalum metal and tantalum-10 wt% tungsten alloy up to 1350/sup 0/C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznietz, M.; Livne, Z.; Cotler, C.; Erez, G.

    1988-05-01

    Immersion experiments have been performed to investigate the diffusion of liquid uranium into 0.3 mm thick foils of tantalum metal and tantalum-10wt% tungsten alloy in the temperature range of 1160/sup 0/C to 1350/sup 0/C, for reaction times up to 20 h, in zirconia crucibles. The orginal and uranium-reacted foils have been studied microscopically (SEM-EDAX) and a multilayer structure is revealed in the reacted foils. Layers identified for tantalum immersed in uranium: Uranium-tantalum (U/Ta approx. = 1), precipitated columnar tantalum (< 1wt% U), inner uranium, and inner tantalum (with grown grains and uranium along grain boundaries). Layers identified for Ta-10wt% W alloy immersed in uranium: Uranium-tantalum (U/Ta approx. = 1, 0.3wt% W), precipitated tantalum (< 1wt% U, down to 1-2wt% W), and inner Escher-type grains of tantalum-tungsten (up to 18wt% W) and of uranium (< 2wt% Ta, < 0.4wt% W). A mechanism for the multilayer formation and the intrusion of liquid uranium into the solid foils is proposed and substantiated.

  20. Tantalum oxide nanoscale resistive switching devices: TEM/EELS study (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Kate J.; Zhang, Jiaming; Merced-Grafals, Emmanuelle; Musunuru, Srinitya; Zhang, Max; Samuels, Katy; Yang, Jianhua J.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2015-08-01

    The field of non-volatile memory devices has been boosted by resistive switching, a reversible change in electrical resistance of a dielectric layer through the application of a voltage potential. Tantalum oxide being one of the leading candidates for the dielectric component of resistance switching devices was investigated in this study. 55nm TaOx devices in all states were compared through cross sectional TEM techniques including HRTEM, EELS, and EFTEM and will be discussed in this presentation. Based on the chemical and physical features found in the cross sectioned nanodevices we will discuss the switching mechanism of these nanoscale devices.

  1. Base surge deposits, eruption history, and depositional processes of a wet phreatomagmatic volcano in Central Anatolia (Cora Maar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençalioğlu-Kuşcu, Gonca; Atilla, Cüneyt; Cas, Ray A. F.; Kuşcu, İlkay

    2007-01-01

    Cora Maar is a Quaternary volcano located to the 20 km northwest of Mount Erciyes, the largest of the 19 polygenetic volcanic complexes of the Cappadocian Volcanic Province in central Anatolia. Cora Maar is a typical example of a maar-diatreme volcano with a nearly circular crater with a mean diameter of c.1.2 km, and a well-bedded base surge-dominated maar rim tephra sequence up to 40 m in thickness. Having a diameter/depth ratio ( D/ d) of 12, Cora is a relatively "mature" maar compared to recent maar craters in the world. Cora crater is excavated within the andesitic lava flows of Quaternary age. The tephra sequence is not indurated, and consists of juvenile clasts up to 70 cm, non-juvenile clasts up to 130 cm, accretionary lapilli up to 1.2 cm in diameter, and ash to lapilli-sized tephra. Base surge layers display well-developed antidune structures indicating the direction of the transport. Both progressive and regressive dune structures are present within the tephra sequence. Wavelength values increase with increasing wave height, and with large wavelength and height values. Cora tephra display similarities to Taal and Laacher See base surge deposits. Impact sags and small channel structures are also common. Lateral and vertical facies changes are observed for the dune bedded and planar bedsets. According to granulometric analyses, Cora Maar tephra samples display a bimodal distribution with a wide range of Md φ values, characteristic for the surge deposits. Very poorly sorted, bimodal ash deposits generally vary from coarse tail to fine tail grading depending on the grain size distribution while very poorly sorted lapilli and block-rich deposits display a positive skewness due to fine tail grading.

  2. Structural evolution of a Ta-filament during hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of Silicon investigated by electron backscatter diffraction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the structural changes of a burnt-out tantalum filament that was operated at typical hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon synthesis conditions in our hot-wire chemical vapour deposition chamber. Scanning electron...

  3. 21 CFR 886.3100 - Ophthalmic tantalum clip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic tantalum clip. 886.3100 Section 886.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... or temporarily to bring together the edges of a wound to aid healing or prevent bleeding from small...

  4. Fibronectin adsorption on tantalum: the influence of nanoroughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Rechendorff, Kristian; Chevallier, Jacques; Foss, Morten; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2008-07-17

    The complex mechanisms of protein adsorption at the solid-liquid interface is of great importance in many research areas, including protein purification, biocompatibility of medical implants, biosensing, and biofouling. The protein adsorption process depends crucially on both the nanoscale chemistry and topography of the interface. Here, we investigate the adsorption of the cell-binding protein fibronectin on flat and nanometer scale rough tantalum oxide surfaces using ellipsometry and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). On the flat tantalum oxide surfaces, the interfacial protein spreading causes an increase in the rigidity and a decrease in the thickness of the adsorbed fibronectin layer with decreasing bulk protein concentration. For the tantalum oxide surfaces with well-controlled, stochastic nanometer scale roughness, similar concentration effects are observed for the rigidity of the fibronectin layer and saturated fibronectin uptake. However, we find that the nanorough tantalum oxide surfaces promote additional protein conformational changes, an effect especially apparent from the QCM-D signals, interpreted as an additional stiffening of the formed fibronectin layers.

  5. Electrochemical Study of Tantalum in Fluoride and Oxofluoride Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyakova, L.; Polyakov, E.; Matthiesen, F.

    1994-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of tantalum in the form of K2TaF7 in an LiF-NaF-KF eutectic melt has been studied by linear voltammetry in the temperature range of 560 to 815-degrees-C with and without additions of Na2O. An amperometric titration has been performed by measuring the heights of the ca...

  6. An experimental study of the solubility and speciation of tantalum in fluoride-bearing aqueous solutions at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, A.; Migdisov, Art. A.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    The solubility of Ta2O5 (solid) and the speciation of tantalum in HF-bearing aqueous solutions have been determined at temperatures of 100-250 °C and vapour-saturated water pressure. Tantalum is transported as the species Ta(OH)50 at low HF concentration and pH ∼1-3. At higher HF concentration, tantalum mobility is controlled by the species TaF3(OH)3- and TaF50; the presence of TaF50 is only evident at ⩽150 °C. Equilibrium constants range from -17.4 ± 0.45 to -16.4 ± 0.12 for the formation of Ta(OH)50 from crystalline Ta2O5 and from -8.24 ± 0.64 to -8.55 ± 0.68 for the formation of TaF3(OH)3- at 100 and 250 °C, respectively. For TaF50, they were determined to be 0.13 at 100 °C and -0.35 at 150 °C. In many respects, the behaviour of tantalum in acidic fluoride-bearing solutions is similar to that of niobium. The solubility of Ta2O5 (solid) is not dependent on HF concentration in fluoride-poor fluids, but rises rapidly at higher HF concentration. However, at the conditions of our experiments, namely a pH of ∼2, temperature up to 250 °C, and a wide range of HF concentrations, Ta2O5 (solid) solubility is almost invariably lower than that of Nb2O5 (solid). Modelling of Nb and Ta leaching confirmed the preferential mobility of niobium under most conditions expected in natural fluoride-rich hydrothermal systems. This modelling also demonstrated that both niobium and tantalum are rapidly deposited upon removal of fluoride from an acidic brine. As a result of hydrothermal alteration, the Nb/Ta ratios of secondary minerals may increase relative to those of the primary mineral, or remain largely unaffected, depending on the pH of the fluid.

  7. Mineral Deposit Data for Epigenetic Base- and Precious-metal and Uranium-thorium Deposits in South-central and Southwestern Montana and Southern and Central Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    Metal deposits spatially associated with the Cretaceous Boulder and Idaho batholiths of southwestern Montana and southern and central Idaho have been exploited since the early 1860s. Au was first discovered in placer deposits; exploitation of vein deposits in bedrock soon followed. In 1865, high-grade Ag vein deposits were discovered and remained economically important until the 1890s. Early high-grade deposits of Au, Ag and Pb were found in the weathered portions of the veins systems. As mining progressed to deeper levels, Ag and Pb grades diminished. Exploration for and development of these vein deposits in this area have continued until the present. A majority of these base- and precious-metal vein deposits are classified as polymetallic veins (PMV) and polymetallic carbonate-replacement (PMR) deposits in this compilation. Porphyry Cu and Mo, epithermal (Au, Ag, Hg and Sb), base- and precious-metal and W skarn, W vein, and U and Th vein deposits are also common in this area. The world-class Butte Cu porphyry and the Butte high-sulfidation Cu vein deposits are in this study area. PMV and PMR deposits are the most numerous in the region and constitute about 85% of the deposit records compiled. Several types of syngenetic/diagenetic sulfide mineral deposits in rocks of the Belt Supergroup or their equivalents are common in the region and they have been the source of a substantial metal production over the last century. These syngenetic deposits and their metamorphosed/structurally remobilized equivalents were not included in this database; therefore, deposits in the Idaho portion of the Coeur d'Alene district and the Idaho Cobalt belt, for example, have not been included because many of them are believed to be of this type.

  8. A dynamical system of deposit and loan volumes based on the Lotka-Volterra model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarti, N.; Nurfitriyana, R.; Nurwenda, W.

    2014-02-01

    In this research, we proposed a dynamical system of deposit and loan volumes of a bank using a predator-prey paradigm, where the predator is loan volumes, and the prey is deposit volumes. The existence of loan depends on the existence of deposit because the bank will allocate the loan volume from a portion of the deposit volume. The dynamical systems have been constructed are a simple model, a model with Michaelis-Menten Response and a model with the Reserve Requirement. Equilibria of the systems are analysed whether they are stable or unstable based on their linearised system.

  9. The genesis of the base metal ore deposit from Herja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Damian

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The Herja ore deposit is one of the most known of the Baia Mare Neogene metallogenetic district and is associated with a complex stock of Pannonian age. The hydrothermal alterations associated with the mineralizations are represented by: the propylitization, the argillization, the phyllic and potassic alteration. The monoascenedant character of the mineralizations is predominant. The magmatic intrusions have been sequential placed and have represented the heat, metals and hydrothermal solutions source. In the first stages of mineralization the hydrothermal solutions contain predominantly magmatic water and in the final stages the water is of connate and meteoric origin. According to the structural magmatic control, to the mineralogical composition and to the hydrothermal alterations, the Herja ore deposits are of a low sulphidation epithermal systems type.

  10. Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carroll, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boyce, Brad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weinberger, Christopher [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we present a multi-scale computational model to simulate plastic deformation of tantalum and validating experiments. In atomistic/ dislocation level, dislocation kink- pair theory is used to formulate temperature and strain rate dependent constitutive equations. The kink-pair theory is calibrated to available data from single crystal experiments to produce accurate and convenient constitutive laws. The model is then implemented into a BCC crystal plasticity finite element method (CP-FEM) model to predict temperature and strain rate dependent yield stresses of single and polycrystalline tantalum and compared with existing experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, classical continuum constitutive models describing temperature and strain rate dependent flow behaviors are fit to the yield stresses obtained from the CP-FEM polycrystal predictions. The model is then used to conduct hydro- dynamic simulations of Taylor cylinder impact test and compared with experiments. In order to validate the proposed tantalum CP-FEM model with experiments, we introduce a method for quantitative comparison of CP-FEM models with various experimental techniques. To mitigate the effects of unknown subsurface microstructure, tantalum tensile specimens with a pseudo-two-dimensional grain structure and grain sizes on the order of millimeters are used. A technique combining an electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and high resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) is used to measure the texture and sub-grain strain fields upon uniaxial tensile loading at various applied strains. Deformed specimens are also analyzed with optical profilometry measurements to obtain out-of- plane strain fields. These high resolution measurements are directly compared with large-scale CP-FEM predictions. This computational method directly links fundamental dislocation physics to plastic deformations in the grain-scale and to the engineering-scale applications. Furthermore, direct

  11. Conflict minerals in the compute sector: estimating extent of tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold use in ICT products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Colin; Olivetti, Elsa; Miller, Reed; Roth, Richard; Kirchain, Randolph

    2015-01-20

    Recent legislation has focused attention on the supply chains of tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold (3TG), specifically those originating from the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The unique properties of these so-called “conflict minerals” lead to their use in many products, ranging from medical devices to industrial cutting tools. This paper calculates per product use of 3TG in several information, communication, and technology (ICT) products such as desktops, servers, laptops, smart phones, and tablets. By scaling up individual product estimates to global shipment figures, this work estimates the influence of the ICT sector on 3TG mining in covered countries. The model estimates the upper bound of tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold use within ICT products to be 2%, 0.1%, 15%, and 3% of the 2013 market share, respectively. This result is projected into the future (2018) based on the anticipated increase in ICT device production.

  12. Large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers for pH measurement at the Nernstian limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakih, Ibrahim, E-mail: ibrahim.fakih@mail.mcgill.ca; Sabri, Shadi; Szkopek, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.szkopek@mcgill.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Mahvash, Farzaneh [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada); Nannini, Matthieu [McGill Nanotools Microfab, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2A7 (Canada); Siaj, Mohamed [Département de Chimie et Biochimie, Universite du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2014-08-25

    We have fabricated and characterized large area graphene ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs) with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers and demonstrated pH sensitivities approaching the Nernstian limit. Low temperature atomic layer deposition was used to deposit tantalum pentoxide atop large area graphene ISFETs. The charge neutrality point of graphene, inferred from quantum capacitance or channel conductance, was used to monitor surface potential in the presence of an electrolyte with varying pH. Bare graphene ISFETs exhibit negligible response, while graphene ISFETs with tantalum pentoxide sensing layers show increased sensitivity reaching up to 55 mV/pH over pH 3 through pH 8. Applying the Bergveld model, which accounts for site binding and a Guoy-Chapman-Stern picture of the surface-electrolyte interface, the increased pH sensitivity can be attributed to an increased buffer capacity reaching up to 10{sup 14} sites/cm{sup 2}. ISFET response was found to be stable to better than 0.05 pH units over the course of two weeks.

  13. Inversion of Tsunamis Characteristics from Sediment Deposits Based on Ensemble Kalman Filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Xiao, Heng; Weiss, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Sediment deposits are the only leftover records from paleo tsunami events. Therefore, inverse modeling method based on the information contained in the deposit is an indispensable way of deciphering the quantitative characteristics of the tsunamis, e.g., the flow speed and the flow depth. While several models have been proposed to perform tsunami inversion, i.e., to infer the tsunami characteristics based on the sediment deposits, the existing methods lack mathematical rigorousness and are not able to account for uncertainties in the inferred quantities. In this work, we propose an inversion scheme based on Ensemble Kalman Filtering (EnKF) to infer tsunami characteristics from sediment deposits. In contrast to traditional data assimilation methods using EnKF, a novelty of the current work is that we augment the system state to include both the physical variables (sediment fluxes) that are observable and the unknown parameters (flow speed and flow depth) to be inferred. Based on the rigorous Bayesian inference...

  14. Biological characteristics of the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells on composite tantalum carbide/amorphous carbon films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Yu Chang

    Full Text Available Tantalum (Ta is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon content in the deposited coatings was regulated by controlling the magnetron power ratio of the pure graphite and Ta cathodes. The deposited TaC and TaC/a-C coatings exhibited better cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 than the uncoated Ti and Ta-coated samples. Inverted optical and confocal imaging was used to demonstrate the cell adhesion, distribution, and proliferation of each sample at different time points during the whole culture period. The results show that the TaC/a-C coating, which contained two metastable phases (TaC and a-C, was more biocompatible with MG-63 cells compared to the pure Ta coating. This suggests that the TaC/a-C coatings exhibit a better biocompatible performance for MG-63 cells, and they may improve implant osseointegration in clinics.

  15. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain, E.

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 by gas mixture (C12 + CO + N2 between 380 and 1,000 °C is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the pardal pressure of Cl2 and CO at temperatures below 650 °C on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb2Os and Ta2O5, respectively. At temperatures above 650°C the Arrhenius diagram presents an anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCl2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl2+CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl2 + N2. The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides.

    En este trabajo se estudia la cinética de carbocloruración del Nb2O5 y del Ta2O5 por la mezcla de gases (Cl2 + CO + N2 entre 380 y 1000°C. Se hace un cálculo de la energía libre estándar de carbocloruración y se dibujan los diagramas de equilibrio de fases. Se estudia la influencia del flujo de gas, la temperatura y la presión parcial de Cl2 y CO a temperaturas por debajo de 650°C sobre la velocidad de reacción. La energía de activación es aproximadamente 75 y 110 kJ/mol para el Nb2O5 y el Ta2O5, respectivamente. A temperaturas por encima de 650°C, el diagrama de Arrhenius presenta una anomalía que puede ser atribuida a la

  16. Dissolution kinetics of small amounts of oxygen in tantalum alloy T-111 and internal oxide displacement reactions during annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    Oxygen was added to T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf, wt. %) at 820 and 990 C at an oxygen pressure of about 0.0003 torr. The technique employed permitted predetermined and reproducible doping of T-111 up to 3.0 at. % oxygen. Based on the temperature dependence of the doping reaction, it is concluded that the initial rates of oxygen pickup are probably controlled by solution of oxygen into the T-111 lattice. Although hafnium oxides are more stable than those of tantalum or tungsten, analyses of extracted residues indicate that the latter oxides predominate in the as-doped specimens, presumably because of the higher concentrations of tantalum and tungsten in the alloy. However, high-temperature annealing promotes gettering of dissolved oxygen and of other oxides to form hafnium oxides. Small amounts of tantalum and tungsten oxides were still present after high-temperature annealing. Tungsten oxide (WO3) volatilizes slightly from the surface of T-111 at 990 C. The vaporization of WO3 has no apparent affect on the doping reaction.

  17. Multifunctional hybrid coating on titanium towards hydroxyapatite growth: Electrodeposition of tantalum and its molecular functionalization with organophosphonic acids films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, Christelle; Delhalle, Joseph [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mekhalif, Zineb [Laboratory of Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Surfaces, University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)], E-mail: zineb.mekhalif@fundp.ac.be

    2008-07-20

    Titanium and its alloys are base materials used in the dental and orthopaedic fields owing to suitable intrinsic properties: good biocompatibility, high corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties. However, the bonding between titanium and bone tissue is not always strong enough and can become a critical problem. In this context, the two main objectives of this paper are the increase of the corrosion resistance and the improvement of the hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. The surface modification considered here is achieved in three main steps and consists in the elaboration of different inorganic and organic coatings. The first step is the elaboration of electrodeposition of tantalum on the titanium oxide film of a titanium substrate. The second step is the modification of the tantalum oxide coating with organophosphonic acids. The last step is the nucleation and growth of HAP on the outermost layer of the system by immersion in a simulated body fluid. The hybrid coating tantalum oxide/organophosphonic acids/molecular layer is shown to be promising for orthopaedic implants.

  18. A Novel Method for Assessment of Polyethylene Liner Wear in Radiopaque Tantalum Acetabular Cups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Anders; Greene, Meridith E; Ayers, David C

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for wear is not possible in patients with tantalum cups. We propose a novel method for wear analysis in tantalum cups. Wear was assessed by gold standard RSA and the novel method in total hip arthroplasty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled...... to the gold standard in titanium cups. The novel method offered accurate assessment and is a viable solution for assessment of wear in studies with tantalum cups....

  19. Oxide-based materials by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewski, Marek; Pietruszka, Rafał; Kaszewski, Jarosław; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S.; Gierałtowska, Sylwia; Wachnicki, Łukasz; Godlewski, Michał M.; Slonska, Anna; Gajewski, Zdzisław

    2017-02-01

    Thin films of wide band-gap oxides grown by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) are suitable for a range of applications. Some of these applications will be presented. First of all, ALD-grown high-k HfO2 is used as a gate oxide in the electronic devices. Moreover, ALD-grown oxides can be used in memory devices, in transparent transistors, or as elements of solar cells. Regarding photovoltaics (PV), ALD-grown thin films of Al2O3 are already used as anti-reflection layers. In addition, thin films of ZnO are tested as replacement of ITO in PV devices. New applications in organic photovoltaics, electronics and optoelectronics are also demonstrated Considering new applications, the same layers, as used in electronics, can also find applications in biology, medicine and in a food industry. This is because layers of high-k oxides show antibacterial activity, as discussed in this work.

  20. Synthesis of Tantalum-Doped Tin Oxide Thin Films by Magnetron Sputtering for Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Minh; Luu, Manh Quynh; Nguyen, Minh Hieu; Nguyen, Duy Thien; Bui, Van Diep; Truong, Thanh Tu; Pham, Van Thanh; Nguyen-Tran, Thuat

    2017-06-01

    Tantalum-doped tin oxide transparent conductive thin films were deposited on glass substrates by radio frequency and direct current reactive magnetron co-sputtering methods in an argon and oxygen environment. Optimization of the thin films for photovoltaic applications was performed using a dimensionless figure of merit by combining electrical and transparency properties. The optimized thin film showed a weight-averaged transmittance of 83%, a band gap value of 3.2 eV, resistivity of 5.2 × 10-3 Ω cm, and bulk carrier concentration of 1.2 × 1020 cm-3. The lowest resistivity among all films was 2.1 × 10-3 Ω cm, corresponding to a weight-averaged transmittance of 62%. The optimized deposition condition was carried out by co-sputtering on heated substrates at 270°C. Thin films deposited under this optimized condition were applied for our perovskite solar cells, and demonstrated promising power conversion efficiency.

  1. Synthesis of Tantalum-Doped Tin Oxide Thin Films by Magnetron Sputtering for Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Minh; Luu, Manh Quynh; Nguyen, Minh Hieu; Nguyen, Duy Thien; Bui, Van Diep; Truong, Thanh Tu; Pham, Van Thanh; Nguyen-Tran, Thuat

    2017-01-01

    Tantalum-doped tin oxide transparent conductive thin films were deposited on glass substrates by radio frequency and direct current reactive magnetron co-sputtering methods in an argon and oxygen environment. Optimization of the thin films for photovoltaic applications was performed using a dimensionless figure of merit by combining electrical and transparency properties. The optimized thin film showed a weight-averaged transmittance of 83%, a band gap value of 3.2 eV, resistivity of 5.2 × 10-3 Ω cm, and bulk carrier concentration of 1.2 × 1020 cm-3. The lowest resistivity among all films was 2.1 × 10-3 Ω cm, corresponding to a weight-averaged transmittance of 62%. The optimized deposition condition was carried out by co-sputtering on heated substrates at 270°C. Thin films deposited under this optimized condition were applied for our perovskite solar cells, and demonstrated promising power conversion efficiency.

  2. Electronic properties of tantalum pentoxide polymorphs from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); Lu, W. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); Kioupakis, E., E-mail: kioup@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States)

    2014-11-17

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is extensively studied for its attractive properties in dielectric films, anti-reflection coatings, and resistive switching memory. Although various crystalline structures of tantalum pentoxide have been reported, its structural, electronic, and optical properties still remain a subject of research. We investigate the electronic and optical properties of crystalline and amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} structures using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and the GW method. The calculated band gaps of the crystalline structures are too small to explain the experimental measurements, but the amorphous structure exhibits a strong exciton binding energy and an optical band gap (∼4 eV) in agreement with experiment. We determine the atomic orbitals that constitute the conduction band for each polymorph and analyze the dependence of the band gap on the atomic geometry. Our results establish the connection between the underlying structure and the electronic and optical properties of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}.

  3. Measurement of the production of charged pions by protons on a tantalum target

    CERN Document Server

    Catanesi, M.G.; Edgecock, R.; Ellis, Malcolm; Robbins, S.; Soler, F.J.P.; Gossling, C.; Bunyatov, S.; Krasnoperov, A.; Popov, B.; Serdiouk, V.; Tereschenko, V.; Di Capua, E.; Vidal-Sitjed, G.; Artamonov, A.; Arce, P.; Giani, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Gorbunov, P.; Grant, A.; Grossheim, A.; Gruber, P.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pasternak, J.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsukerman, I.; Veenhof, R.; Wiebusch, C.; Zucchelli, P.; Blondel, A.; Borghi, S.; Campanelli, M.; Morone, M.C.; Prior, G.; Schroeter, R.; Engel, R.; Meurer, C.; Kato, I.; Gastaldi, U.; Mills, G.B.; Graulich, J.S.; Gregoire, G.; Bonesini, M.; De Min, A.; Ferri, F.; Paganoni, M.; Paleari, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Bagulya, A.; Grichine, V.; Polukhina, N.; Palladino, V.; Coney, L.; Schmitz, D.; Barr, G.; De Santo, A.; Pattison, C.; Zuber, K.; Bobisut, F.; Gibin, D.; Guglielmi, A.; Mezzetto, M.; Dumarchez, J.; Vannucci, F.; Dore, U.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Booth, C.; Buttar, C.; Hodgson, P.; Howlett, L.; Bogomilov, M.; Chizhov, M.; Kolev, D.; Tsenov, R.; Apollonio, M.; Chimenti, P.; Giannini, G.; Santin, G.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martin-Albo, J.; Novella, P.; Sorel, M.; Tornero, A.

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the double-differential cross-section for the production of charged pions in proton--tantalum collisions emitted at large angles from the incoming beam direction is presented. The data were taken in 2002 with the HARP detector in the T9 beam line of the CERN PS. The pions were produced by proton beams in a momentum range from 3 \\GeVc to 12 \\GeVc hitting a tantalum target with a thickness of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The angular and momentum range covered by the experiment ($100 \\MeVc \\le p < 800 \\MeVc$ and $0.35 \\rad \\le \\theta <2.15 \\rad$) is of particular importance for the design of a neutrino factory. The produced particles were detected using a small-radius cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) placed in a solenoidal magnet. Track recognition, momentum determination and particle identification were all performed based on the measurements made with the TPC. An elaborate system of detectors in the beam line ensured the identification of the incident particles. Results a...

  4. Measurement of the production of charged pions by protons on a tantalum target

    CERN Document Server

    Catanesi, M G; Edgecock, R; Ellis, M; Robbins, S; Soler, F J P; Gössling, C; Bunyatov, S; Krasnoperov, A V; Popov, B; Serdiouk, V; Tereshchenko, V V; Di Capua, E; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Artamonov, A; Arce, P; Giani, S; Gilardoni, S; Gorbunov, P; Grant, A; Grossheim, A; Gruber, P; Ivanchenko, V; Kayis-Topaksu, A; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I; Pasternak, J; Chernyaev, E; Tsukerman7, I; Veenhof, R; Wiebusch, C; Zucchelli, P; Blondel, A; Borghi, S; Campanelli, M; Morone, M C; Prior, G; Schroeter, R; Engel, R; Meurer, C; Kato, I; Gastaldi, Ugo; Mills, G B; Graulich, J S; Grgoire, G; Bonesini, M; De Min, A; Ferri, F; Paganoni, M; Paleari, F; Kirsanov, M; Bagulya, A; Grichine, V; Polukhina, N; Palladino, V; Coney, L; Schmitz, D; Barr, G; De Santo, A; Pattison, C; Zuber, K; Bobisut, F; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, Alberto M; Mezzetto, M; Dumarchez, J; Vannucci, F; Dore, U; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Booth, C; Buttar, C; Hodgson, P; Howlett, L; Bogomilov, M; Chizhov, M; Kolev, D; Tsenov, R; Piperov, S; Temnikov, P; Apollonio, M; Chimenti, P; Giannini, G; Santin, G; Burguet-Castell, J; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Martín-Albo, J; Novella, P; Sorel, M; Tornero, A

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the double-differential cross-section for the production of charged pions in proton--tantalum collisions emitted at large angles from the incoming beam direction is presented. The data were taken in 2002 with the HARP detector in the T9 beam line of the CERN PS. The pions were produced by proton beams in a momentum range from 3 \\GeVc to 12 \\GeVc hitting a tantalum target with a thickness of 5% of a nuclear interaction length. The angular and momentum range covered by the experiment ($100 \\MeVc \\le p < 800 \\MeVc$ and $0.35 \\rad \\le \\theta <2.15 \\rad$) is of particular importance for the design of a neutrino factory. The produced particles were detected using a small-radius cylindrical time projection chamber (TPC) placed in a solenoidal magnet. Track recognition, momentum determination and particle identification were all performed based on the measurements made with the TPC. An elaborate system of detectors in the beam line ensured the identification of the incident particles. Results a...

  5. Diffusion of liquid uranium into solid tantalum foils up to 1350C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznietz, M.; Livne, Z.; Cotler, C.

    1986-01-01

    The diffusion of liquid uranium into solid foils, 0.3 mm thick, was investigated in the temperature range 1160-1350C, for reaction times up to 20 h. The tantalum foils were immersed in liquid uranium contained in zirconia crucibles. Uranium was found to cover the tantalum foils and climb upwards in amounts rising with reaction time and temperature. A scanning electron microscope study with microanalysis by EDAX revealed a multilayer structure. On the tantalum-foil surfaces, exposed to liquid uranium, layers form progressively inwards, under the outer uranium layers, in the following sequence: a uranium-tantalum layer (with a U:Ta ratio between 40:60 and 60:40) forms at 1160 C and 1185 C, and disappears completely at 1255 C; a columnar tantalum layer (containing <1W/O U); an inner uranium layer (at 1210 C and above); an inner tantalum-grain layer with uranium along grain boundaries (above 1210 C). The growth of the recrystallized columnar tantalum layer is related to the penetration of uranium as liquid into the solid tantalum foil. Cracks in this layer at 1300 C and above cause tears and failures in the tantalum.

  6. Contact Resistance of Tantalum Coatings in Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers using Acidic Electrolytes at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik; Barner, Jens H. Von

    2014-01-01

    Tantalum has so far been found to be the only construction material with sufficient corrosion resistance for high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzers using acidic electrolytes above 100◦C. In this work the interfacial contact resistances of tantalum plates and tantalum coated...... stainless steel were found to be far below the US Department of Energy target value of 10mcm2. The good contact resistance of tantalum was demonstrated by simulating high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane electrolysis conditions by anodization performed in 85% phosphoric acid at 130◦C, followed...

  7. Corrosion resistance of high-performance materials titanium, tantalum, zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the property of a material to resist corrosion attack in a particular aggressive environment. Although titanium, tantalum and zirconium are not noble metals, they are the best choice whenever high corrosion resistance is required. The exceptionally good corrosion resistance of these high–performance metals and their alloys results from the formation of a very stable, dense, highly adherent, and self–healing protective oxide film on the metal surface. This naturally occurring oxide layer prevents chemical attack of the underlying metal surface. This behavior also means, however, that high corrosion resistance can be expected only under neutral or oxidizing conditions. Under reducing conditions, a lower resistance must be reckoned with. Only very few inorganic and organic substances are able to attack titanium, tantalum or zirconium at ambient temperature. As the extraordinary corrosion resistance is coupled with an excellent formability and weldability these materials are very valua...

  8. [Preparation and optical properties of tantalum tungsten bronze].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wan-jun; Xie, Xiang; Li, Xing-liang; Zhang, Rui; Lü, Kai; Wei, Hong-yuan

    2015-01-01

    Tantalum tungsten bronze(TaxWO3)nanowires were successfully synthesized via hydrothermal method using TaCl5 and Na2WO4 . 2H20 as raw materials. The morphology, crystal structure and optical properties of synthesized products were characterized by means of XRD, TEM, SEM, UV-Vis and Raman technologies. The XRD results showed that TaxWO3 nanowire exhibited hexagonal structure. By increasing the doping content, the cell parameter was kept increasing gradually till Ta/W= 0. 04, then it remained almost constant. The UV-Vis diffraction spectrum analysis showed that the absorption peaks redshifted, the band gap energy decreased with increasing the doping content. The Raman peaks moved with a downshift, and the peak gradually became broader, which further proved the influence of the tantalum doping for tungsten oxide. The reactions of decomposing liquid rhodamine B solution showed that the nanosized TaxWO3 had a high photo-catalytic activity.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of tantalum oxide coatings decorated with Ag nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Huiliang, E-mail: hlc@mail.sic.ac.cn; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong, E-mail: xyliu@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Silver plasma immersion ion implantation was used to decorate silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on tantalum oxide (TO) coatings. The coatings acted against bacterial cells (Staphylococcus epidermidis) in the dark by disrupting their integrity. The action was independent of silver release and likely driven by the electron storage capability of the Schottky barriers established at the interfaces between Ag NPs and the TO support. Moreover, no apparent side effect on the adhesion and differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells was detected when using Ag NPs-modified TO coatings. These results demonstrate that decoration of tantalum oxide using Ag NPs could be a promising procedure for improving the antibacterial properties for orthopedic and dental implants.

  10. Plasticity In High Temperature Materials: Tantalum and Monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-12

    centered cu- bic tantalum, the methodology also demonstrated a relationship between dislocation mean free path length and GND density. A framework to...c) _ [110] x1 x2 F undeformed def orm ed ω3 x 1’ x 2’ (b) φ1=54.7° (110) [001] [110] _ x1 x2 S(1) S(2) S(3) _ _ (a) [110] [001] [110] (111)[101

  11. Sodium Purification Device for Production of Tantalum Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the process of tantalum powder production it requires pure sodium to reduce potassium fluotantalate, thus the design of a sodium purification device is improved, later it is built and commissioned. The device includes sodium transportation tank, storage tank, filter, cold trap, final storage tank, metering tank, regulating valve, argon purification system, electric control panel and instrument. Industrial purity sodium is purified, the impurities in the sodium were reduced to very

  12. Semimicrodetermination of combined tantalum and niobium with selenous acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Schnepfe, M.

    1959-01-01

    Tantalum and niobium are separated and determined gravimetrically by precipitation with selenous acid from highly acidic solutions in the absence of complexing agents. Hydrogen peroxide is used in the preparation of the solution and later catalytically destroyed during digestion of the precipitate. From 0.2 to 30 mg., separately or in mixtures, of niobium or tantalum pentoxide can be separated from mixtures containing 100 mg. each of the oxides of scandium, yttrium, cerium, vanadium, molybdenum, iron, aluminum, tin, lead, and bismuth with a single precipitation; and from 30 mg. of titanium dioxide, and 50 mg. each of the oxides of antimony and thorium, when present separately, with three precipitations. At least 50 mg. of uranium(VI) oxide can be separated with a single precipitation when present alone; otherwise, three precipitations may be needed. Zirconium does not interfere when the tantalum and niobium contents of the sample are small, but in general, zirconium as well as tungsten interfere. The method is applied to the determination of the earth acids in tantaloniobate ores.

  13. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion implantation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A H RAMEZANI; M R HANTEHZADEH; M GHORANNEVISS; E DARABI

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the effect of nitrogen ion implantation on tantalum surface structure. In this experiment, nitrogen ions which had an energy of 30 keV and doses of $1 \\times 10^{17}$ to $10 \\times 10^{17}$ ions cm$^{−2}$ were used. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was applied for both the metallic Ta substrate and the study of new structures that have been created through the nitrogen ion implantation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was also used tocheck the roughness variations prior to and also after the implantation phase. The experimental results show the formation of hexagonal tantalum nitride (TaN$_{0.43}$) in addition to the fact that by increasing the ion dose, the nitrogen atoms occupy more interstitial spaces in the target crystal. The nitride phase also seen for $3\\times 10^{17}$ and $5\\times 10^{17}$ ions cm$^{−2}$, while it disappeared for higher dose of $7\\times 10^{17}$ and $1\\times 10^{18}$ ions cm$^{−2}$. The FWHM of the dominant peak of tantalum nitride suggest the growth of the crystallite’s size, which is in agreement with the AFM results ofthe grains.

  14. Microstructures and phase transformations in interstitial alloys of tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahmen, U.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of microstructures, phases, and possible ordering of interstitial solute atoms is fundamental to an understanding of the properties of metal-interstitial alloys in general. As evidenced by the controversies on phase transformations in the particular system tantalum--carbon, our understanding of this class of alloys is inferior to our knowledge of substitutional metal alloys. An experimental clarification of these controversies in tantalum was made. Using advanced techniques of electron microscopy and ultrahigh vacuum techology, an understanding of the microstructures and phase transformations in dilute interstitial tantalum--carbon alloys is developed. Through a number of control experiments, the role and sources of interstitial contamination in the alloy preparation (and under operating conditions) are revealed. It is demonstrated that all previously published work on the dilute interstitially ordered phase Ta/sub 64/C can be explained consistently in terms of ordering of the interstitial contaminants oxygen and hydrogen, leading to the formation of the phases Ta/sub 12/O and Ta/sub 2/H.

  15. Leakage Currents and Gas Generation in Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Currently, military grade, established reliability wet tantalum capacitors are among the most reliable parts used for space applications. This has been achieved over the years by extensive testing and improvements in design and materials. However, a rapid insertion of new types of advanced, high volumetric efficiency capacitors in space systems without proper testing and analysis of degradation mechanisms might increase risks of failures. The specifics of leakage currents in wet electrolytic capacitors is that the conduction process is associated with electrolysis of electrolyte and gas generation resulting in building up of internal gas pressure in the parts. The risk associated with excessive leakage currents and increased pressure is greater for high value advanced wet tantalum capacitors, but it has not been properly evaluated yet. In this work, in Part I, leakages currents in various types of tantalum capacitors have been analyzed in a wide range of voltages, temperatures, and time under bias. Gas generation and the level of internal pressure have been calculated in Part II for different case sizes and different hermeticity leak rates to assess maximal allowable leakage currents. Effects related to electrolyte penetration to the glass seal area have been studied and the possibility of failures analyzed in Part III. Recommendations for screening and qualification to reduce risks of failures have been suggested.

  16. Random Vibration Testing of Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Advanced wet tantalum capacitors allow for improved performance of power supply systems along with substantial reduction of size and weight of the systems that is especially beneficial for space electronics. Due to launch-related stresses, acceptance testing of all space systems includes random vibration test (RVT). However, many types of advanced wet tantalum capacitors cannot pass consistently RVT at conditions specified in MIL-PRF-39006, which impedes their use in space projects. This requires a closer look at the existing requirements, modes and mechanisms of failures, specifics of test conditions, and acceptance criteria. In this work, different lots of advanced wet tantalum capacitors from four manufacturers have been tested at step stress random vibration conditions while their currents were monitored before, during, and after the testing. It has been shown that the robustness of the parts and their reliability are mostly due to effective self-healing processes and limited current spiking or minor scintillations caused by RVT do not increase the risk of failures during operation. A simple model for scintillations events has been used to simulate current spiking during RVT and optimize test conditions. The significance of scintillations and possible effects of gas generation have been discussed and test acceptance criteria for limited current spiking have been suggested.

  17. Solution processed deposition of electron transport layers on perovskite crystal surface-A modeling based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuza, S. M.; Taufique, M. F. N.; Banerjee, Soumik

    2017-02-01

    The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has reached up to ∼20%. However, structural and chemicals defects that lead to hysteresis in the perovskite based thin film pose challenges. Recent work has shown that thin films of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) deposited on the photo absorption layer, using solution processing techniques, minimize surface pin holes and defects thereby increasing the PCE. We developed and employed a multiscale model based on molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to establish a relationship between deposition rate and surface coverage on perovskite surface. The MD simulations of PCBMs dispersed in chlorobenzene, sandwiched between (110) perovskite substrates, indicate that PCBMs are deposited through anchoring of the oxygen atom of carbonyl group to the exposed lead (Pb) atom of (110) perovskite surface. Based on rates of distinct deposition events calculated from MD, kMC simulations were run to determine surface coverage at much larger time and length scales than accessible by MD alone. Based on the model, a generic relationship is established between deposition rate of PCBMs and surface coverage on perovskite crystal. The study also provides detailed insights into the morphology of the deposited film.

  18. Towards a CFD-based mechanistic deposit formation model for straw-fired boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Baxter, L.L.

    2006-01-01

    in the reminder of the paper. The growth of deposits on furnace walls and super heater tubes is treated including the impact on heat transfer rates determined by the CFD code. Based on the commercial CFD code FLUENTe, the overall model is fully implemented through the User Defined Functions. The model...... is configured entirely through a graphical user interface integrated in the standard FLUENTe interface. The model considers fine and coarse mode ash deposition and sticking mechanisms for the complete deposit growth, as well as an influence on the local boundary conditions for heat transfer due to thermal...

  19. Mineralogy, geochemistry and origin of Zafarabad iron deposit based on REE and trace elements of magnetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Barati

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zafarabad iron deposit is located northwest of Divandareh, in the northern margin of Sanandaj-Sirjan plutonic-metamorphic zone. The deposit is in lentoid to tubular shape, within a shear zone and occrrued in host rocks of calc-schist and limestone. Magnetite with massive, cataclastic and replacement textures are the main phases, while pyrite and other sulfide minerals are found. Major and trace elements are measured by ICP-MS and ICP-AES methods. Based on some ratios of trace elements in the ore samples and (Ti+V vs. Cal+Al+Mn and Ti+V vs. Ni/(Cr+Mn diagrams which are used for classification of iron deposit types, Zafarabad iron deposit fall in the range of skarn deposits. Spider diagrams show a steady decline from LREE to HREE elements with Eu (mean value of 0.06 ppm and Ce (mean value of 0.94 ppm negative anomalies. Comparing the distribution patterns of REE for the Zafarabad magnetites with those of various types of iron deposits shows that the REE pattern for Zafarabad is similar to these deposits. Analysis of calculated parameters for REE shows that the hydrothermal fluids responsible for mineralization are mainly of magmatic origin through fractionation and crystallization processes of a deep iron rich fluid phase and its emplacement within the carbonate rocks, forming iron skarn.

  20. Lichen-based critical loads for atmospheric nitrogen deposition in Western Oregon and Washington Forests, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiser, Linda H., E-mail: lgeiser@fs.fed.u [US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Air Resource Management Program, Siuslaw National Forest, PO Box 1148, Corvallis, OR 97339 (United States); Jovan, Sarah E. [US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program, Pacific Northwest Research Station, 620 SW Main St, Suite 400, Portland, OR 97205 (United States); Glavich, Doug A. [US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Region Air Resource Management Program, Siuslaw National Forest, PO Box 1148, Corvallis, OR 97339 (United States); Porter, Matthew K. [Laboratory for Atmospheric Research, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Critical loads (CLs) define maximum atmospheric deposition levels apparently preventative of ecosystem harm. We present first nitrogen CLs for northwestern North America's maritime forests. Using multiple linear regression, we related epiphytic-macrolichen community composition to: 1) wet deposition from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program, 2) wet, dry, and total N deposition from the Communities Multi-Scale Air Quality model, and 3) ambient particulate N from Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE). Sensitive species declines of 20-40% were associated with CLs of 1-4 and 3-9 kg N ha{sup -1} y{sup -1} in wet and total deposition. CLs increased with precipitation across the landscape, presumably from dilution or leaching of depositional N. Tight linear correlation between lichen and IMPROVE data suggests a simple screening tool for CL exceedance in US Class I areas. The total N model replicated several US and European lichen CLs and may therefore be helpful in estimating other temperate-forest lichen CLs. - Lichen-based critical loads for N deposition in western Oregon and Washington forests ranged from 3 to 9 kg ha{sup -1} y{sup -1}, increasing with mean annual precipitation.

  1. Wear Resistance of Deposited Layer Using Nickel-Based Composite Powders by Plasma-Arc Surfacing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-hong; ZHU Sheng; XU Bin-shi; DU Ze-yu

    2004-01-01

    Nickel-based composite alloy powders were deposited on the surface of Q235 steel by plasma-arc surfacing in this work. Optimal proportions of elements intensifying the composite powders were ascertained by orthogonal design of three factors and three levels and orthogonal polynomial regression analysis , which Cr , Mn , W were 10% ,4% and 7 % respectively.Phase and structure of deposited materials were characterized by optical microscope and X- ray diffraction. Hardness tests and wear resistance tests were carried out to determine the performance of the deposited layers. The results show that the microstructure of deposited layers of composite powders mainly consist of γ-( Ni, Fe ) , γ- Ni, WC, W2 C, Mn31Si12, Cr23 C6,Cr7 C3, Cr, NiB, Ni2B etc. Wear resistance and hardness of the surface increased evidently.

  2. Growth characteristics and functional changes in rat chondrocytes cultured in porous tantalum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling ZHANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the growth characteristics and functional changes in rat chondrocytes cultured in porous tantalum in vitro. Methods The chondrocytes isolated from cartilage of 3-week old SD rats were cultured in vitro, then the 2nd passage cells were identified and implanted in porous tantalum scaffolds with a density of 1×106 cells/ml. The morphological characteristics of the chondrocytes cultured in porous tantalum were observed under inverted microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM, and the content of glycosaminoglycan (GAG in the chondrocytes was measured by chromatometry. Results The harvested cells were identified as chondrocytes by type Ⅱ collagen immunocytochemical staining, toluidine blue staining and safranin-O staining. Many chondrocytes adhering to the edge of porous tantalum were found by inverted microscope. Observation under SEM showed that chondrocytes spread well on the surface and distributed in the holes of porous tantalum, and they proliferated and secreted some extracellular matrixes. TEM observation showed that the ultrastructure of chondrocytes cultured in porous tantalum was similar to that of normal chondrocytes. Chromatometry determination showed that the chondrocytes in porous tantalum could secrete GAG continuously. Conclusion Porous tantalum is shown to have a satisfactory biocompatibility with chondrocytes in vitro, and may be used as a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.06.08

  3. Thick sputtered tantalum coatings for high-temperature energy conversion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelmakh, Veronika, E-mail: stelmakh@mit.edu; Peykov, Daniel; Chan, Walker R.; Senkevich, Jay J.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan [Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Castillo, Robert; Coulter, Kent; Wei, Ronghua [Materials Engineering Department, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Thick sputtered tantalum (Ta) coatings on polished Inconel were investigated as a potential replacement for bulk refractory metal substrates used for high-temperature emitters and absorbers in thermophotovoltaic energy conversion applications. In these applications, high-temperature stability and high reflectance of the surface in the infrared wavelength range are critical in order to sustain operational temperatures and reduce losses due to waste heat. The reflectance of the coatings (8 and 30 μm) was characterized with a conformal protective hafnia layer as-deposited and after one hour anneals at 700, 900, and 1100 °C. To further understand the high-temperature performance of the coatings, the microstructural evolution was investigated as a function of annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the texture and residual stress in the coatings at four reflections (220, 310, 222, and 321), as-deposited and after anneal. No significant changes in roughness, reflectance, or stress were observed. No delamination or cracking occurred, even after annealing the coatings at 1100 °C. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the thick Ta coatings are a promising alternative to bulk substrates and pave the way for a relatively low-cost and easily integrated platform for nanostructured devices in high-temperature energy conversion applications.

  4. Dynamic behaviour of tantalum hydride supported on silica or MCM-41 in the metathesis of alkanes

    KAUST Repository

    Soignier, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    The metathesis of ethane and propane catalysed by tantalum hydride supported on silica or MCM-41 was studied under static and dynamic conditions. During the reaction, the rate decreased over time, indicating deactivation of the catalyst. The evolution of the catalytic system and surface species over time was monitored by various physico-chemical methods: FTIR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and chemical reactivity. A carbonaceous deposit composed of unsaturated hydrocarbyl species was observed by 13C NMR. This deposit was responsible for poisoning of the catalyst. The deactivation of the catalyst proved more severe at higher temperatures and under static rather than dynamic conditions. A partial regeneration of the catalyst could be achieved during a series of repeated runs. Mechanistically, the deconvolution of the products\\' distribution over time indicated the occurrence of hydrogenolysis in the early stages of the reaction, while pure metathesis dominated later on. The hydrogen was supplied by the dehydrogenation of hydrocarbyl surface species involved in the deactivation process. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Electrochemical Deposition of Niobium onto the Surface of Copper Using a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wixtroma, Alex I. [Christopher Newport U.; Buhlera, Jessica E. [Christopher Newport U.; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M. [Christopher Newport U.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride-based solutions can be used to replace acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. In this study niobium metal was successfully deposited on the surface of copper substrate via electrochemical deposition using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. The niobium metal used for deposition on the Cu had been dissolved in the solution from electrochemical polishing of a solid niobium piece prior to the deposition. The visible coating on the surface of the Cu was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing.

  6. Heterogeneity in the Effects of Reward- and Deposit-based Financial Incentives on Smoking Cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Scott D; French, Benjamin; Small, Dylan S; Saulsgiver, Kathryn; Harhay, Michael O; Audrain-McGovern, Janet; Loewenstein, George; Asch, David A; Volpp, Kevin G

    2016-10-15

    Targeting different smoking cessation programs to smokers most likely to quit when using them could reduce the burden of lung disease. To identify smokers most likely to quit using pure reward-based financial incentives or incentive programs requiring refundable deposits to become eligible for rewards. We conducted prespecified secondary analyses of a randomized trial in which 2,538 smokers were assigned to an $800 reward contingent on sustained abstinence from smoking, a refundable $150 deposit plus a $650 reward, or usual care. Using logistic regression, we identified characteristics of smokers that were most strongly associated with accepting their assigned intervention and ceasing smoking for 6 months. We assessed modification of the acceptance, efficacy, and effectiveness of reward and deposit programs by 11 prospectively selected demographic, smoking-related, and psychological factors. Predictors of sustained smoking abstinence differed among participants assigned to reward- versus deposit-based incentives. However, greater readiness to quit and less steep discounting of future rewards were consistently among the most important predictors. Deposit-based programs were uniquely effective relative to usual care among men, higher-income participants, and participants who more commonly failed to pay their bills (all interaction P values rewards, deposits were more effective among black persons (P = 0.022) and those who more commonly failed to pay their bills (P = 0.082). Relative to rewards, deposits were more commonly accepted by higher-income participants, men, white persons, and those who less commonly failed to pay their bills (all P incentives suggests potential benefits of targeting behavior-change interventions based on patient characteristics. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01526265).

  7. Plasmonic Sensors Based on Doubly-Deposited Tapered Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín González-Cano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR transducers based on tapered fibers that have been developed in the last years is presented. The devices have proved their good performance (specifically, in terms of sensitivity and their versatility and they are a very good option to be considered as basis for any kind of chemical and biological sensor. The technology has now reached its maturity and here we summarize some of the characteristics of the devices produced.

  8. An Experimental Study on Slurry Erosion Resistance of Single and Multilayered Deposits of Ni-WC Produced by Laser-Based Powder Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu; Hamid, Syed; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Single and multilayered deposits containing different mass fractions of tungsten carbide (WC) in nickel (Ni)-matrix (NT-20, NT-60, NT-80) are deposited on a AISI 4140 steel substrate using a laser-based powder deposition process. The transverse cross section of the coupons reveals that the higher the mass fraction of WC in Ni-matrix leads to a more uniform distribution through Ni-matrix. The slurry erosion resistance of the fabricated coupons is tested at three different impingement angles using an abrasive water jet cutting machine, which is quantified based on the erosion rate. The top layer of a multilayered deposit (i.e., NT-60 in a two-layer NT-60 over NT-20 deposit) exhibits better erosion resistance at all three tested impingement angles when compared to a single-layer (NT-60) deposit. A definite increase in the erosion resistance is noted with an addition of nano-size WC particles. The relationship between the different mass fractions of reinforcement (WC) in the deposited composite material (Ni-WC) and their corresponding matrix (Ni) hardness on the erosion rate is studied. The eroded surface is analyzed in the light of a three-dimensional (3-D) profilometer and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that a volume fraction of approximately 62% of WC with a Ni-matrix hardness of 540 HV resulting in the gouging out of WC from the Ni-matrix by the action of slurry. It is concluded that the slurry erosion resistance of the AISI 4140 steel can be significantly enhanced by introducing single and multilayered deposits of Ni-WC composite material fabricated by the laser-based powder deposition process.

  9. Feature based Weld-Deposition for Additive Manufacturing of Complex Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchagnula, Jayaprakash Sharma; Simhambhatla, Suryakumar

    2016-08-01

    Fabricating functional metal parts using Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a leading trend. However, realizing overhanging features has been a challenge due to the lack of support mechanism for metals. Powder-bed fusion techniques like, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) employ easily-breakable-scaffolds made of the same material to realize the overhangs. However, the same approach is not extendible to deposition processes like laser or arc based direct energy deposition processes. Although it is possible to realize small overhangs by exploiting the inherent overhanging capability of the process or by blinding some small features like holes, the same cannot be extended for more complex geometries. The current work presents a novel approach for realizing complex overhanging features without the need of support structures. This is possible by using higher order kinematics and suitably aligning the overhang with the deposition direction. Feature based non-uniform slicing and non-uniform area-filling are some vital concepts required in realizing the same and are briefly discussed here. This method can be used to fabricate and/or repair fully dense and functional components for various engineering applications. Although this approach has been implemented for weld-deposition based system, the same can be extended to any other direct energy deposition processes also.

  10. A discrete element based simulation framework to investigate particulate spray deposition processes

    KAUST Repository

    Mukherjee, Debanjan

    2015-06-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. This work presents a computer simulation framework based on discrete element method to analyze manufacturing processes that comprise a loosely flowing stream of particles in a carrier fluid being deposited on a target surface. The individual particulate dynamics under the combined action of particle collisions, fluid-particle interactions, particle-surface contact and adhesive interactions is simulated, and aggregated to obtain global system behavior. A model for deposition which incorporates the effect of surface energy, impact velocity and particle size, is developed. The fluid-particle interaction is modeled using appropriate spray nozzle gas velocity distributions and a one-way coupling between the phases. It is found that the particle response times and the release velocity distribution of particles have a combined effect on inter-particle collisions during the flow along the spray. It is also found that resolution of the particulate collisions close to the target surface plays an important role in characterizing the trends in the deposit pattern. Analysis of the deposit pattern using metrics defined from the particle distribution on the target surface is provided to characterize the deposition efficiency, deposit size, and scatter due to collisions.

  11. Alternative mechanism for coffee-ring deposition based on active role of free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari Kang, Saeed; Vandadi, Vahid; Felske, James D.; Masoud, Hassan

    2016-12-01

    When a colloidal sessile droplet dries on a substrate, the particles suspended in it usually deposit in a ringlike pattern. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as the "coffee-ring" effect. One paradigm for why this occurs is as a consequence of the solutes being transported towards the pinned contact line by the flow inside the drop, which is induced by surface evaporation. From this perspective, the role of the liquid-gas interface in shaping the deposition pattern is somewhat minimized. Here, we propose an alternative mechanism for the coffee-ring deposition. It is based on the bulk flow within the drop transporting particles to the interface where they are captured by the receding free surface and subsequently transported along the interface until they are deposited near the contact line. That the interface captures the solutes as the evaporation proceeds is supported by a Lagrangian tracing of particles advected by the flow field within the droplet. We model the interfacial adsorption and transport of particles as a one-dimensional advection-generation process in toroidal coordinates and show that the theory reproduces ring-shaped depositions. Using this model, deposition patterns on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces are examined in which the evaporation is modeled as being either diffusive or uniform over the surface.

  12. Iron based coatings deposited by arc thermal spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Patiño-Infante

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se estudió la resistencia al desgaste y la dureza de recubrimientos a base de hierro, aplicados mediante el método de proyección térmica por arco sobre sustratos en acero AISI-SAE 4340 a temperatura ambiente. Los recubrimientos se realizan con tres tipos diferentes de alambres Castolin Eutectic: 530AS, 560AS y 140MXC; depositados en forma de capas de un solo elemento y bicapas de tipo 530AS/140MXC y 560AS/140MXC, las cuales fueron depositadas con diferentes espesores. Los recubrimientos se caracterizaron mediante difracción de rayos X (DRX, espectroscopia de rayos X de energía dispersiva (EDS, se determinó su nano dureza y se determinó su resistencia al desgaste mediante la técnica de Pin on Disk. Los recubrimientos obtenidos son altamente inhomogéneos, el mejor comportamiento frente al desgaste se encontró en las capas de material 140 MXC y en las bicapas 530AS/140MXC y 560AS/140MXC y fue independiente en general del número de capas aplicadas.

  13. Hydrous Tantalum Phosphates for Ion Exchange Purposes: A Systematic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.C.P.da Silva

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available This work describes two methods of preparation of hydrous tantalum phosphates and their characterization as ion exchangers. The hydrous metallic phosphate compounds were chemically and physically characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffractometry and surface area measurements. By the first method, tantalum phosphate was prepared by alkaline fusion of Ta2O5 with an excess of K2CO3, followed by lixiviation of the tantalate fusion product with hot water, and precipitation with diluted H3PO4. Preparation II was performed using metallic Ta dissolved in concentrated HF/HNO3 acidic mixture followed by hydrolysis of fluortantalic acid intermediary and precipitation with diluted H3PO4. Both freshly prepared materials (I and II were exaustively refluxed with concentrated H3PO4, in its boiling point temperature, resulting respectively in Ta2O5. 2.1 H2O, (IR and Ta2O5. 1.3 H2O, (IIR. Characterization of the prepared products have presented the following values: surface area of 108.27 ± 2.80; 220.14 ± 2.67; 117.07 ± 5.25 and 141.61 ± 0.27 m².g-1 respectively for I, IR, II and IIR. All these materials were amorphous. The ion exchange behavior for all four hydrous tantalum phosphates was studied using Na+, K+ and Ba+2 as the exchanged species. The values for typical ion exchange capacity were 1.64; 1.23; 1.47 and 1.01 miliequivalent.g-1, respectively for I, IR, II and IIR products.

  14. Nanoparticle layer deposition for highly controlled multilayer formation based on high-coverage monolayers of nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yue; Williams, Mackenzie G.; Miller, Timothy J.; Teplyakov, Andrew V., E-mail: andrewt@udel.edu

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes a strategy for chemical deposition of functionalized nanoparticles onto solid substrates in a layer-by-layer process based on self-limiting surface chemical reactions leading to complete monolayer formation within the multilayer system without any additional intermediate layers — nanoparticle layer deposition (NPLD). This approach is fundamentally different from previously established traditional layer-by-layer deposition techniques and is conceptually more similar to well-known atomic and molecular layer deposition processes. The NPLD approach uses efficient chemical functionalization of the solid substrate material and complementary functionalization of nanoparticles to produce a nearly 100% coverage of these nanoparticles with the use of “click chemistry”. Following this initial deposition, a second complete monolayer of nanoparticles is deposited using a copper-catalyzed “click reaction” with the azide-terminated silica nanoparticles of a different size. This layer-by-layer growth is demonstrated to produce stable covalently-bound multilayers of nearly perfect structure over macroscopic solid substrates. The formation of stable covalent bonds is confirmed spectroscopically and the stability of the multilayers produced is tested by sonication in a variety of common solvents. The 1-, 2- and 3-layer structures are interrogated by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy and the thickness of the multilayers formed is fully consistent with that expected for highly efficient monolayer formation with each cycle of growth. This approach can be extended to include a variety of materials deposited in a predesigned sequence on different substrates with a highly conformal filling. - Highlights: • We investigate the formation of high-coverage monolayers of nanoparticles. • We use “click chemistry” to form these monolayers. • We form multiple layers based on the same strategy. • We confirm the formation of covalent bonds

  15. The ASTARTE Paleotsunami Deposits data base - a web-based reference for tsunami research around Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martini, Paolo Marco; Orefice, Simone; Patera, Antonio; Paris, Raphael; Terrinha, Pedro; Noiva, Joao; Hunt, James; Pantosti, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    EU project ASTARTE aims at developing a higher level of tsunami hazard assessment in the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean (NEAM) region by a combination of field work, experimental work, numerical modeling and technical development. The project is a cooperative work of 26 institutes from 16 countries and links together the description of past tsunamigenic events, the characterization of tsunami sources, the calculation of the impact of such events, and the development of adequate resilience strategies (www.astarte.eu). Within ASTARTE a web-based data base on Paleotsunami Deposits in the NEAM areas is being created that will be the future reference source for this kind of research in Europe. The aim is to integrate every existing scientific reference on the topic and update on new entries every six months, hosting information and detailed data that are crucial, e.g for tsunami modeling. At present 127 sites with evidence for at least one paleotsunami deposit have been collected. A relational database managed by ArcGIS for Desktop 10.3 software has been implemented to allow all partners to collaborate through a common platform for archiving and exchanging data and interpretations, such as paleotsunami type of evidence (sediment, blocks, geomorphological signature, etc), geometric characteristics (thickness, depth, etc), but also age and dating method and type of analysis supporting the tsunami interpretation. Moreover, information on the type of the site (natural or artificial exposure, exploratory trench, hand or engine core, etc), on its geomorphic setting (coastal lake, marsh, fluvial plain, offshore, etc) and on its elevation and distance from the present shoreline are provided. One of the final goals of the project is the public sharing of the archived datasets through a web-based map service that will allow to visualize, question, analyze, and interpret all datasets. The interactive map service will be hosted by ArcGIS Online and will deploy the cloud

  16. Selective electrodesorption based atomic layer deposition (SEBALD): a novel electrochemical route to deposit metal clusters on Ag(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenti, M; Bellandi, S; Lastraioli, E; Loglio, F; Foresti, M L

    2011-09-20

    The possibility of synergic effects of some metals on the catalytic activity of silver led us to study the way to perform controlled deposition on silver. In fact, many metals of technological interest such as Co, Ni, and Fe cannot be deposited at underpotential on silver, and any attempt to control the deposition at overpotential, even at potentials slightly negative of the Nernst value, did not allow an effective control. However, due to the favorable energy gain involved in the formation of the corresponding sulfides, these metals can be deposited at underpotential on sulfur covered silver. The deposition is surface limited and the successive electrodesorption of sulfur leaves confined clusters of metals. The method can also be used to obtain metal clusters of different size. In fact, the alternate underpotential deposition of elements that form a compound is the basis of the electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (ECALE), and the reiteration of the basic cycle allows us to obtain sulfide deposits whose thickness increases with the number of cycles. Therefore, the successive selective desorption of sulfur leaves increasing amounts of metals.

  17. Tip-based chemical vapor deposition with a scanning nano-heater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, a moving nano-heater directs a chemical vapor deposition reaction (nano-CVD) demonstrating a tip-based nanofabrication (TBN) method. Localized nano-CVD of copper (Cu) and copper oxide (CuO) on a silicon (Si) and silicon oxide (SiO2) substrate from gasses, namely sublimate

  18. An electroplating topography model based on layout-dependent variation of copper deposition rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qiang; Chen Lan; Li Zhigang; Ruan Wenbiao

    2011-01-01

    A layout-pattern-dependent electroplating model is developed based on the physical mechanism of the electroplating process.Our proposed electroplating model has an advantage over former ones due to a consideration of the variation of copper deposition rate with different layout parameters during the process.The simulation results compared with silicon data demonstrate the improvement in accuracy.

  19. Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition to the Oceans: Observation- and Model-Based Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Alex

    2016-04-01

    The reactive nitrogen (Nr) burden of the atmosphere has been increased by a factor of 3-4 by anthropogenic activity since the Industrial Revolution. This has led to large increases in the deposition of nitrate and ammonium to the surface waters of the open ocean, particularly downwind of major human population centres, such as those in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia. In oligotrophic waters, this deposition has the potential to significantly impact marine productivity and the global carbon cycle. Global-scale understanding of N deposition to the oceans is reliant on our ability to produce effective models of reactive nitrogen emission, atmospheric chemistry, transport and deposition (including deposition to the land surface). Over land, N deposition models can be assessed using comparisons to regional monitoring networks of precipitation chemistry (notably those located in North America, Europe and Southeast Asia). No similar datasets exist which would allow observation - model comparisons of wet deposition for the open oceans, because long-term wet deposition records are available for only a handful of remote island sites and rain collection over the open ocean itself is logistically very difficult. In this work we attempt instead to use ~2800 observations of aerosol nitrate and ammonium concentrations, acquired from sampling aboard ships in the period 1995 - 2012, to assess the performance of modelled N deposition fields over the remote ocean. This database is non-uniformly distributed in time and space. We selected three ocean regions (the eastern tropical North Atlantic, the northern Indian Ocean and northwest Pacific) where we considered the density and distribution of observational data is sufficient to provide effective comparison to the model ensemble. Our presentation will focus on the eastern tropical North Atlantic region, which has the best data coverage of the three. We will compare dry deposition fluxes calculated from the observed nitrate

  20. Kinetic Investigations on the Leaching of Niobium from a Low-Grade Niobium-Tantalum Ore by Concentrated KOH Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周宏明; 郑诗礼; 张懿

    2004-01-01

    The leaching kinetics of niobium from a low-gr~te niobium-tantalum ore by concentrated KOH solution under atmospheric pressure has been studied. Significant effects of reaction temperature, KOH concentration,stirring speed, particle size and mass ratio of alkali-to-ore on the dissolution rate of niobium were examined. The experimental data of the leaching rates and the observed effects of the relevant operating variables were well interpreted with a shrinking core model under diffusion control. By using the Arrhenius expression, the apparent activation energy for the dissolution of niobium was evaluated. Finally, on the base of the shrinking core model, the rate equation was established.

  1. Effects of tantalum content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low-carbon RAFM steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Chenxi; Liu, Yongchang; Yan, Biyu; Li, Huijun

    2016-10-01

    In order to explore the influence of tantalum content on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon RAFM (reduced activation ferritic/martensitic) steels, three low carbon RAFM steels with different tantalum contents (0%, 0.027%, 0.073%) were designed. The precipitation behavior and effect of precipitates on the mechanical properties of the Low-C RAFM steel were investigated. The results indicate that increase of tantalum content causes decrease of the prior austenite grain size and the amount of M23C6 carbides precipitated along prior austenite grain boundaries and packet boundaries as well as increase of the amount of MX nano-sized particles within intragranular regions. The impact properties of low carbon RAFM steels are excellent regardless of the tantalum content. The impact properties and hardness are obviously improved by increasing tantalum content, which may be related to increase of the number of MX and decrease of M23C6. Furthermore, the tensile properties at elevated temperature below 600 °C are hardly changed with increase of tantalum content, yet those at 800 °C are improved with increasing tantalum content. This implies that MX carbides would be more important for tensile properties at higher temperature.

  2. Liquid-phase-deposited siloxane-based capping layers for silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veith-Wolf, Boris [Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH), Am Ohrberg 1, 31860 Emmerthal (Germany); Wang, Jianhui; Hannu-Kuure, Milja; Chen, Ning; Hadzic, Admir; Williams, Paul; Leivo, Jarkko; Karkkainen, Ari [Optitune International Pte. Ltd., 20 Maxwell Road, #05-08 Maxwell House, Singapore 069113 (Singapore); Schmidt, Jan [Institute for Solar Energy Research Hamelin (ISFH), Am Ohrberg 1, 31860 Emmerthal (Germany); Department of Solar Energy, Institute of Solid-State Physics, Leibniz University Hanover, Appelstrasse 2, 30167 Hanover (Germany)

    2015-02-02

    We apply non-vacuum processing to deposit dielectric capping layers on top of ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide (AlO{sub x}) films, used for the rear surface passivation of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. We examine various siloxane-based liquid-phase-deposited (LPD) materials. Our optimized AlO{sub x}/LPD stacks show an excellent thermal and chemical stability against aluminum metal paste, as demonstrated by measured surface recombination velocities below 10 cm/s on 1.3 Ωcm p-type silicon wafers after firing in a belt-line furnace with screen-printed aluminum paste on top. Implementation of the optimized LPD layers into an industrial-type screen-printing solar cell process results in energy conversion efficiencies of up to 19.8% on p-type Czochralski silicon.

  3. Microstructural evaluation of NiTi-based films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crăciunescu, Corneliu M., E-mail: corneliu.craciunescu@upt.ro; Mitelea, Ion, E-mail: corneliu.craciunescu@upt.ro; Budău, Victor, E-mail: corneliu.craciunescu@upt.ro [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara (Romania); Ercuţa, Aurel [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, Politehnica University of Timisoara and Department of Physics, West University Timisoara (Romania)

    2014-11-24

    Shape memory alloy films belonging to the NiTi-based systems were deposited on heated and unheated substrates, by magnetron sputtering in a custom made system, and their structure and composition was analyzed using electron microscopy. Several substrates were used for the depositions: glass, Cu-Zn-Al, Cu-Al-Ni and Ti-NiCu shape memory alloy ribbons and kapton. The composition of the Ti-Ni-Cu films showed limited differences, compared to the one of the target and the microstructure for the DC magnetron sputtering revealed crystallized structure with features determined on peel off samples from a Si wafer. Both inter and transcrystalline fractures were observed and related to the interfacial stress developed on cooling from deposition temperature.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of powder metallurgy tantalum components prepared by high compaction pressure technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngmoo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Agency for Defense Development, Yuseong, P.O. Box 35, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34186, Republic of Korea. (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jaewon [Samsung Electronics, 129 Samsung-ro, Youngtong-gu, Suwon 16677 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ho Jin, E-mail: hojinryu@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Soon Hyung, E-mail: shhong@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The present study has investigated the consolidation behaviors of tantalum powders during compaction and sintering, and the characteristics of sintered components. For die compaction, the densification behaviors of the powders are simulated by finite element analyses based on the yield function proposed by Shima and Oyane. Accordingly, the green density distribution for coarser particles is predicted to be more uniform because they exhibits higher initial relative tap density owing to lower interparticle friction. It is also found that cold isostatic pressing is capable of producing higher dense compacts compared to the die pressing. However, unlike the compaction behavior, the sintered density of smaller particles is found to be higher than those of coarser ones owing to their higher specific surface area. The maximum sintered density was found to be 0.96 of theoretical density where smaller particles were pressed isostatically at 400 MPa followed by sintering at 2000 °C. Moreover, the effects of processing conditions on grain size and texture were also investigated. The average grain size of the sintered specimen is 30.29 μm and its texture is less than 2 times random intensity. Consequently, it is concluded that the higher pressure compaction technique is beneficial to produce high dense and texture-free tantalum components compared to hot pressing and spark plasma sintering. - Highlights: • Higher Ta density is obtained from higher pressure and sintering temperature. • High compaction method enables P/M Ta to achieve the density of 16.00 g·cm{sup −3}. • A P/M Ta component with fine microstructure and random orientation is developed.

  5. Occurrence model for volcanogenic beryllium deposits: Chapter F in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Lindsey, David A.; Seal, Robert R., II; Jaskula, Brian W.; Piatak, Nadine M.

    2012-01-01

    Current global and domestic mineral resources of beryllium (Be) for industrial uses are dominated by ores produced from deposits of the volcanogenic Be type. Beryllium deposits of this type can form where hydrothermal fluids interact with fluorine and lithophile-element (uranium, thorium, rubidium, lithium, beryllium, cesium, tantalum, rare earth elements, and tin) enriched volcanic rocks that contain a highly reactive lithic component, such as carbonate clasts. Volcanic and hypabyssal high-silica biotite-bearing topaz rhyolite constitutes the most well-recognized igneous suite associated with such Be deposits. The exemplar setting is an extensional tectonic environment, such as that characterized by the Basin and Range Province, where younger topaz-bearing igneous rock sequences overlie older dolomite, quartzite, shale, and limestone sequences. Mined deposits and related mineralized rocks at Spor Mountain, Utah, make up a unique economic deposit of volcanogenic Be having extensive production and proven and probable reserves. Proven reserves in Utah, as reported by the U.S. Geological Survey National Mineral Information Center, total about 15,900 tons of Be that are present in the mineral bertrandite (Be4Si2O7(OH)2). At the type locality for volcanogenic Be, Spor Mountain, the tuffaceous breccias and stratified tuffs that host the Be ore formed as a result of explosive volcanism that brought carbonate and other lithic fragments to the surface through vent structures that cut the underlying dolomitic Paleozoic sedimentary rock sequences. The tuffaceous sediments and lithic clasts are thought to make up phreatomagmatic base surge deposits. Hydrothermal fluids leached Be from volcanic glass in the tuff and redeposited the Be as bertrandite upon reaction of the hydrothermal fluid with carbonate clasts in lithic-rich sections of tuff. The localization of the deposits in tuff above fluorite-mineralized faults in carbonate rocks, together with isotopic evidence for the

  6. Isolated Subtalar Distraction Arthrodesis Using Porous Tantalum: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadelis, Eustratios A; Karampinas, Panagiotis K; Kavroudakis, Eustratios; Vlamis, John; Polizois, Vasilios D; Pneumaticos, Spiros G

    2015-09-01

    During reconstructive procedures of the hindfoot, a structural graft is often needed to fill gaps. To eliminate donor site morbidity and limited availability of autografts, porous tantalum was used. Eighteen patients who underwent subtalar joint distraction arthrodesis by means of trabecular metal augment were reviewed retrospectively. The results were evaluated clinically, with the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score and the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and were assessed radiologically. The mean follow-up period was 18 months. Computed tomography showed sound fusion. There was a marked increase in AOFAS scores and a decrease in VAS scores. Arthrodesis was achieved in all cases with no major postoperative complications. Radiographically, there was a marked increase in all measured parameters (talocalcaneal angle, talocalcaneal height, talar declination angle), and the intraoperatively achieved correction was maintained at the last follow-up visit. Our data suggest that porous tantalum may be used as a structural graft option for subtalar arthrodesis. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Synergistic helium and deuterium blistering in tungsten–tantalum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, M., E-mail: marta.dias@itn.pt [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Mateus, R.; Catarino, N.; Franco, N. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, D. [CENIMAT-I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [LNEG, Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Hanada, K. [AIST, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-8564 Ibaraki (Japan); Sârbu, C. [National Institute of Materials and Physics, 105bis Atomistilor street, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); and others

    2013-11-15

    Abstruct: Tungsten–tantalum composites with 10 and 20 at.% Ta were prepared by ball milling W powder with Ta fibers and by consolidating the milled materials with spark plasma sintering. The composites were implanted at room temperature with He{sup +} (30 keV with a fluence 5 × 10{sup 21} at/m{sup 2}) and/or D{sup +} (15 keV with a fluence 5 × 10{sup 21} at/m{sup 2}) ion beams. The materials were studied by scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, both coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. The microstructure observations revealed that the milling operation resulted in severe fragmentation of the Ta fibers. Furthermore, during the consolidation process the Ta phase acted as oxygen getter and reduced the W oxide present in the original material. The surface of the tungsten–tantalum composites implanted with D{sup +} remained essentially unaltered, while the materials implanted with He{sup +} evidenced blisters on the Ta-rich regions. D retention in the composites increased with He{sup +} pre-implantation.

  8. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  9. Large-scale nanoelectromechanical switches based on directly deposited nanocrystalline graphene on insulating substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Schmidt, Marek E.; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Chong, Harold M. H.; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    The direct growth of graphene on insulating substrate is highly desirable for the commercial scale integration of graphene due to the potential lower cost and better process control. We report a simple, direct deposition of nanocrystalline graphene (NCG) on insulating substrates via catalyst-free plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at relatively low temperature of ~800 °C. The parametric study of the process conditions that we conducted reveals the deposition mechanism and allows us to grow high quality films. Based on such film, we demonstrate the fabrication of a large-scale array of nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches using regular thin film process techniques, with no transfer required. Thanks to ultra-low thickness, good uniformity, and high Young's modulus of ~0.86 TPa, NCG is considered as a promising material for high performance NEM devices. The high performance is highlighted for the NCG switches, e.g. low pull-in voltage scale integration of graphene due to the potential lower cost and better process control. We report a simple, direct deposition of nanocrystalline graphene (NCG) on insulating substrates via catalyst-free plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at relatively low temperature of ~800 °C. The parametric study of the process conditions that we conducted reveals the deposition mechanism and allows us to grow high quality films. Based on such film, we demonstrate the fabrication of a large-scale array of nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches using regular thin film process techniques, with no transfer required. Thanks to ultra-low thickness, good uniformity, and high Young's modulus of ~0.86 TPa, NCG is considered as a promising material for high performance NEM devices. The high performance is highlighted for the NCG switches, e.g. low pull-in voltage <3 V, reversible operations, minimal leakage current of ~1 pA, and high on/off ratio of ~105. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00253f

  10. Thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium and tantalum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.F.

    1981-10-01

    Heats of transport have been determined for thermotransport of hydrogen and deuterium in pure vanadium, niobium and tantalum; in vanadium alloyed with either niobium, titanium or chromium; and in niobium-tantalum alloys. In all cases, thermotransport was toward colder regions and was significantly greater for deuterium than for hydrogen. A mass spectrometric technique was used to simultaneously measure heats of transport for hydrogen and deuterium in a single specimen containing both isotopes. This technique greatly increased the precision with which isotope effects in the heat of transport could be measured. The predominant effect of alloying was to dramatically increase thermotransport; however, thermotransport decreased as niobium was added to tantalum.

  11. Guidelines for the selection and application of tantalum electrolytic capacitors in highly reliable equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Guidelines are given for the selection and application of three types of tantalum electrolytic capacitors in current use in the design of electrical and electronic circuits for space flight missions. In addition, the guidelines supplement requirements of existing military specifications used in the procurement of capacitors. A need exists for these guidelines to assist designers in preventing some of the recurring, serious problems experienced with tantalum electrolytic capacitors in the recent past. The three types of capacitors covered by these guidelines are; solid, wet foil, and tantalum cased wet slug.

  12. Synthesis of tantalum nitride diffusion barriers for Cu metal by plasma immersion ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, M; Kumar, D; George, P J; Paul, A K

    2002-01-01

    A Tantalum nitride diffusion barrier layer for copper metal was synthesized by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation technique (PIII). Effect of nitrogen dose in Ta layer was investigated in improving its diffusion barrier properties. Silicon wafers coated with Ta were implanted with nitrogen at two different doses viz. 10$^{15}$ions/cm$^2$ and 10$^{17}$ions/cm$^2$ corresponding to low and high dose regime. High dose of implanted nitrogen ions in the film render it to become Ta(N), Thereafter a copper (Cu) layer was deposited on the samples to produce Cu/Ta(N)/Si structure. To evaluate the barrier properties of Ta(N) these samples were annealed up to 700$^\\circ$C for 30 minutes. Sheet resistance, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) measurements were carried out to investigate the effect of annealing. Low dose implanted Ta layer does not show any change in its diffusion barrier properties, while high dose implanted layer stops the diffusion of Cu metal through it at annealing temperature...

  13. Optimization of Nano-Process Deposition Parameters Based on Gravitational Search Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norlina Mohd Sabri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research is focusing on the radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering process, a physical vapor deposition technique which is widely used in thin film production. This process requires the optimized combination of deposition parameters in order to obtain the desirable thin film. The conventional method in the optimization of the deposition parameters had been reported to be costly and time consuming due to its trial and error nature. Thus, gravitational search algorithm (GSA technique had been proposed to solve this nano-process parameters optimization problem. In this research, the optimized parameter combination was expected to produce the desirable electrical and optical properties of the thin film. The performance of GSA in this research was compared with that of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO, Genetic Algorithm (GA, Artificial Immune System (AIS and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO. Based on the overall results, the GSA optimized parameter combination had generated the best electrical and an acceptable optical properties of thin film compared to the others. This computational experiment is expected to overcome the problem of having to conduct repetitive laboratory experiments in obtaining the most optimized parameter combination. Based on this initial experiment, the adaptation of GSA into this problem could offer a more efficient and productive way of depositing quality thin film in the fabrication process.

  14. A Physically Based Theoretical Model of Spore Deposition for Predicting Spread of Plant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isard, Scott A; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    A physically based theory for predicting spore deposition downwind from an area source of inoculum is presented. The modeling framework is based on theories of turbulence dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer and applies only to spores that escape from plant canopies. A "disease resistance" coefficient is introduced to convert the theoretical spore deposition model into a simple tool for predicting disease spread at the field scale. Results from the model agree well with published measurements of Uromyces phaseoli spore deposition and measurements of wheat leaf rust disease severity. The theoretical model has the advantage over empirical models in that it can be used to assess the influence of source distribution and geometry, spore characteristics, and meteorological conditions on spore deposition and disease spread. The modeling framework is refined to predict the detailed two-dimensional spatial pattern of disease spread from an infection focus. Accounting for the time variations of wind speed and direction in the refined modeling procedure improves predictions, especially near the inoculum source, and enables application of the theoretical modeling framework to field experiment design.

  15. Tribological Performance of MoS2-based Coatings after Deposition and Storage in Humid Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JINGYang; LUOJian-bin; PANGSi-qin

    2004-01-01

    MoS2-based composite coatings were deposited with the nano-compound unbalanced plasma plating technique the effects of processing parameters and working enwironments on the tribological properties of the coatings were examined by the drilling experiuments and XPS.the distances between substrate and Ti larget, Ti content and deposition pressure were varied in order to determine the optimun conditions for producing lubricious,long-lasting MoS2-based coatings,IT is found that the tribological performance of Tin-MoS2 roating decreases rqapidly in humid air but the humid resistant property of Tin-MoS2/Ti coating improves evidently it is indicated that the humid-resistantance property and the abrasion durability of MoS2-based coatings can be enhanced markedly by adding Ti with a certain contents.

  16. Quantum cascade laser-based measurement of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslar, James E; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2012-03-01

    An in situ gas-phase diagnostic for the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), Hf[N(C(2)H(5))(CH(3))](4), was demonstrated. This diagnostic is based on direct absorption measurement of TEMAH vapor using an external cavity quantum cascade laser emitting at 979 cm(-1), coinciding with the most intense TEMAH absorption in the mid-infrared spectral region, and employing 50 kHz amplitude modulation with synchronous detection. Measurements were performed in a single-pass configuration in a research-grade atomic layer deposition (ALD) chamber. To examine the detection limit of this technique for use as a TEMAH delivery monitor, this technique was demonstrated in the absence of any other deposition reactants or products, and to examine the selectivity of this technique in the presence of deposition products that potentially interfere with detection of TEMAH vapor, it was demonstrated during ALD of hafnium oxide using TEMAH and water. This technique successfully detected TEMAH at molecular densities present during simulated industrial ALD conditions. During hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, absorbance from gas-phase reaction products did not interfere with TEMAH measurements while absorption by reaction products deposited on the optical windows did interfere, although interfering absorption by deposited reaction products corresponded to only ≈4% of the total derived TEMAH density. With short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging, estimated TEMAH minimum detectable densities as low as ≈2 × 10(12) molecules/cm(3) could be obtained. While this technique was demonstrated specifically for TEMAH delivery and hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, it should be readily applicable to other metal alkylamide compounds and associated metal oxide and nitride deposition chemistries, assuming similar metal alkylamide molar absorptivity and molecular density in the measurement chamber.

  17. Ti{sub 1−x}Ag{sub x} electrodes deposited on polymer based sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, S.M., E-mail: mariana.marques@fisica.uminho.pt [GRF-CFUM, Physics Department, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal); Manninen, N.K. [SEG-CEMUC Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Ferdov, Stanislav [GRF-CFUM, Physics Department, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal); Lanceros-Mendez, S. [Physics Department, University of Minho, 4700-057 Braga (Portugal); Carvalho, S. [GRF-CFUM, Physics Department, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal); SEG-CEMUC Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ti{sub 1−x}Ag{sub x} thin films with diverse Ag/Ti ratios were deposited by sputtering on piezoelectric PVDF. • The deposition conditions do not promote changes on the polymer structure. • The coatings do not change the piezoelectric properties of the polymer. • Sheet resistivity values show a typical behavior of a binary alloy system. • The deposited films are suitable for the development of functional electrodes. - Abstract: Piezoelectric materials are interesting for the development of sensors and actuators for biomedical applications in areas such as smart prosthesis, implantable biosensors and biomechanical signal monitoring, among others. For acquiring or applying the electrical signal from/to the piezoelectric material, suitable electrodes can be produced from Ti based coatings with tailored multifunctional properties: conductivity and antibacterial characteristics through Ag inclusions. This work reports on Ti{sub 1−x}Ag{sub x} electrodes with different Ag/Ti atomic ratios deposited by dc and pulsed magnetron sputtering at room temperature on poly(vinylidene fluoride), PVDF. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed that the deposition conditions preserve the polymer structure and suggested the presence of crystalline Tiβ phase in pure titanium coating and fcc-Ag phase in pure silver coating. According to the results obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, the coatings are homogeneous and no clusters were found; since β-PVDF is anisotropic, the deposited coatings replicate the underlying substrate surface. Sheet resistivity values show a typical behavior of a binary alloy system, with low resistivity values for coatings of zone 1 (Ti rich) and zone 3 (Ag rich) and a slightly higher resistivity values in zone 2. The piezoelectricity of the different samples show similar values.

  18. Base level change and depositional filling response of Jurassic in the Qiangtang Basin of Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The base level during the deposition of Jurassic in the Qiangtang Basin shows a complete cycle from rising to falling. The base level change is closely connected with tectonic evolution of the basin,especially connected with Bangonghu-Nujiang ocean evolution process in the formation and evolution of the basin. It is also affected by climate. The Jurassic strata correspond to a long-term base level cycle sequence. The sequence is in fact a non-complete symmetrical cycle,consisting of rising hemicycle and falling hemicycle. It can be divided into 6 intermediate-term base level cycle sequences,including 2 carbonate sequences,3 mixture sedimentary sequences of carbonate and clastic rocks and one clastic sedimentary sequence. Depositional filling characteristics during base level change show that Bangonghu-Nujiang ocean spreads in Toarcian-Bajocian ages,and is at the height of spreading of Bangonghu-Nujiang ocean in Bathonian-Oxfordian ages. In that process,sea area became smaller because of the dry climate. Eventually,marine depositional filling is ended with the subduction and collision of Bangonghu-Nujiang ocean.

  19. Inkwells for on-demand deposition rate measurement in aerosol-jet based 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Gutierrez, David; Das, Siddhartha; Hines, D. R.

    2017-09-01

    Aerosol-jet printing (AJP) is an important direct-write printing technology based on additive manufacturing methods. Numerous research groups have utilized AJP for the fabrication of electronic circuits and devices. However, there has not been any real-time or even any on-demand method for quantitatively measuring and/or setting the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream. In this paper, we present a method for measuring the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream by printing into an array of inkwells that were fabricated using photolithography and were characterized using x-ray tomography and optical profilometry. These inkwell arrays were then used to establish a set of deposition rates namely 0.0011, 0.0024, 0.0035, 0.0046 and 0.0059 mm3 s-1 that were subsequently compared with independently-measured deposition rates obtained by printing the ink stream into a weighing pan for a specified time and calculating the resulting deposition rate from the weight of the printed sample. From this comparison, it is observed that, for a human operator, the error in setting a specific deposition rate is less for inkwell fill times greater than 3 s and greater for fill times less than 3 s. This observation indicates that the average volume of an inkwell array should be at least three times the desired deposition rate (V inkwell  >  3R). It was also observed that when the diameter of the inkwell was only slightly larger than the ink stream diameter, the ink uniformly wets the sidewall of the inkwell and results in a well filled inkwell for which the point at which it is just fully filled is easily observable. Finally, the interactions of the ink with both ‘philic’ and ‘phobic’ inkwells were studied illustrating the ability to use inkwells of various materials for setting the desired deposition rates for a variety of AJ printable inks.

  20. The importance of atmospheric base cation deposition for preventing soil acidification in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Shaun A; Whitfield, Colin J; Fenn, Mark E

    2014-09-15

    Industrial activities in the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada have resulted in greatly elevated emissions of SO2 and N (NO(x) and NH3) and there are concerns over possible widespread ecosystem acidification. Acid sensitive soils in the region are common and have very low base cation weathering rates: the median base cation weathering rate estimated for 63 sites using PROFILE was just 17 mmol cm(-2) yr(-1). Deposition of S and N in throughfall was approximately twice as high as deposition measured with open collectors and could be as high as 360 mmol cm(-2) yr(-1) within 20 km of the main industrial center, although deposition declined logarithmically with distance from the industrial activities. Base cation deposition however, mostly exceeded the combined inputs of S and N in bulk deposition and throughfall, particularly during the summer months. The potential for soil acidification at a site close (deposition at the site, soil base saturation and soil solution pH and molar Ca:Al ratio were predicted to increase in the future assuming acid and base cation deposition constant at current rates. This work shows that despite extremely low soil base cation weathering rates in the region, the risk of soil acidification is mitigated to a large extent by high base cation deposition, which in contrast to S emissions is derived from fugitive dust sources in the mines, and is poorly quantified for regional modeling studies.

  1. Cobalt-based magnetic nanostructures grown by focused-electron-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begun, Evgeniya; Schwenk, Johannes; Porrati, Fabrizio; Huth, Michael [Physikalisches Institut, Goethe-Universitaet, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The fabrication of magnetic nanostructures by means of the direct-writing technique focused-electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID) is an alternative to more conventional lithographic methods. We have grown magnetic cobalt structures by FEBID using the precursor dicobaltoctacarbonyl Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8}. The obtained structures have a large metal content of about 85 at.% as compared to other metal-based deposits grown by the same technique, such as tungsten-based structures with 34 at.% maximum tungsten content and platin-based structures with about 24 at.% maximum platin content. We present a growth strategy for cobalt structures with tunable metal content. In particular, we show the influence of different combinations of electron-beam energy and current, the dwell time and the refresh time on the deposit composition, which was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) at 5 keV. First results of magnetotransport measurements on these cobalt-based structures are presented.

  2. Comparative analysis of the effects of tantalum doping and annealing on atomic layer deposited (Ta2O5)x(Al2O3)1-x as potential gate dielectrics for GaN/AlxGa1-xN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partida-Manzanera, T.; Roberts, J. W.; Bhat, T. N.; Zhang, Z.; Tan, H. R.; Dolmanan, S. B.; Sedghi, N.; Tripathy, S.; Potter, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a method to optimally combine wide band gap Al2O3 with high dielectric constant (high-κ) Ta2O5 for gate dielectric applications. (Ta2O5)x(Al2O3)1-x thin films deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) on GaN-capped AlxGa1-xN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures have been studied as a function of the Ta2O5 molar fraction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the bandgap of the oxide films linearly decreases from 6.5 eV for pure Al2O3 to 4.6 eV for pure Ta2O5. The dielectric constant calculated from capacitance-voltage measurements also increases linearly from 7.8 for Al2O3 up to 25.6 for Ta2O5. The effect of post-deposition annealing in N2 at 600 °C on the interfacial properties of undoped Al2O3 and Ta-doped (Ta2O5)0.12(Al2O3)0.88 films grown on GaN-HEMTs has been investigated. These conditions are analogous to the conditions used for source/drain contact formation in gate-first HEMT technology. A reduction of the Ga-O to Ga-N bond ratios at the oxide/HEMT interfaces is observed after annealing, which is attributed to a reduction of interstitial oxygen-related defects. As a result, the conduction band offsets (CBOs) of the Al2O3/GaN-HEMT and (Ta2O5)0.16(Al2O3)0.84/GaN-HEMT samples increased by ˜1.1 eV to 2.8 eV and 2.6 eV, respectively, which is advantageous for n-type HEMTs. The results demonstrate that ALD of Ta-doped Al2O3 can be used to control the properties of the gate dielectric, allowing the κ-value to be increased, while still maintaining a sufficient CBO to the GaN-HEMT structure for low leakage currents.

  3. A STUDY OF THE GALLIC ACID COMPLEXES OF NIOBIUM, TANTALUM, TITANIUM, AND IRON,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of gallic acid in a spectrophotometric procecure for tantalum, niobium and other metals was investigated. The optical properties of Nb, Ta and several other metal chelates were explored. (Author)

  4. High-quality-factor tantalum oxide nanomechanical resonators by laser oxidation of TaSe2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santiago J. CartamiI-Bueno[1; Peter G. Steeneken[1; Frans D. Tichelaar[2; Efren Navarro-Moratalla[3; Warner J. Venstra[1; Ronald van Leeuwen[1; Eugenio Coronado[3; Herre S.J. van der Zant[1; Gary A. Steele[1; Andres Castellanos-Gomez[1

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the strain in two-dimensional (2D) materials is an interesting avenue to tailor the mechanical properties of nanoelectromechanical systems. Here, we demonstrate a technique to fabricate ultrathin tantalum oxide nanomechanical resonators with large stress by the laser oxidation of nano-drumhead resonators composed of tantalum diselenide (TaSe2), a layered 2D material belonging to the metal dichalcogenides. Before the study of their mechanical properties with a laser interferometer, we verified the oxidation and crystallinity of the freely suspended tantalum oxide using high-resolution electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the stress of tantalum oxide resonators increases by 140 MPa (with respect to pristine TaSe2 resonators), which causes an enhancement in the quality factor (14 times larger) and resonance frequency (9 times larger) of these resonators.

  5. The development of fast tantalum foil targets for short-lived isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, J.R.J. E-mail: roger.bennett@rl.ac.uk; Bergmann, U.C.; Drumm, P.V.; Ravn, H

    2003-05-01

    The most recent developments of fast tantalum foil targets for short-lived isotopes are described and the performance of the targets at ISOLDE with beams of {sup 11}Li, {sup 12}Be and {sup 14}Be is given.

  6. World War II, tantalum, and the evolution of modern cranioplasty technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Patrick; Kshettry, Varun R; Benzel, Edward C

    2014-04-01

    Cranioplasty is a unique procedure with a rich history. Since ancient times, a diverse array of materials from coconut shells to gold plates has been used for the repair of cranial defects. More recently, World War II greatly increased the demand for cranioplasty procedures and renewed interest in the search for a suitable synthetic material for cranioprostheses. Experimental evidence revealed that tantalum was biologically inert to acid and oxidative stresses. In fact, the observation that tantalum did not absorb acid resulted in the metal being named after Tantalus, the Greek mythological figure who was condemned to a pool of water in the Underworld that would recede when he tried to take a drink. In clinical use, malleability facilitated a single-stage cosmetic repair of cranial defects. Tantalum became the preferred cranioplasty material for more than 1000 procedures performed during World War II. In fact, its use was rapidly adopted in the civilian population. During World War II and the heyday of tantalum cranioplasty, there was a rapid evolution in prosthesis implantation and fixation techniques significantly shaping how cranioplasties are performed today. Several years after the war, acrylic emerged as the cranioplasty material of choice. It had several clear advantages over its metallic counterparts. Titanium, which was less radiopaque and had a more optimal thermal conductivity profile (less thermally conductive), eventually supplanted tantalum as the most common metallic cranioplasty material. While tantalum cranioplasty was popular for only a decade, it represented a significant breakthrough in synthetic cranioplasty. The experiences of wartime neurosurgeons with tantalum cranioplasty played a pivotal role in the evolution of modern cranioplasty techniques and ultimately led to a heightened understanding of the necessary attributes of an ideal synthetic cranioplasty material. Indeed, the history of tantalum cranioplasty serves as a model for innovative

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Saturated Liquid Toluene by Use of Anodized Tantalum Hot Wires at High Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, R. A.; Ramires, M. L. V.; Nieto de Castro, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Absolute measurements of the thermal conductivity of a distilled and dried sample of toluene near saturation are reported. The transient hot-wire technique with an anodized tantalum hot wire was used. The thermal conductivities were measured at temperatures from 300 K to 550 K at different applied power levels to assess the uncertainty with which it is possible to measure liquid thermal conductivity over wide temperature ranges with an anodized tantalum wire. The wire resistance versus temper...

  8. Coordination compounds as precursors for laser deposition of nickel-based conducting films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillers, M.; Dupuis, O.; Janosi, A.; Soumillion, J. P.

    1994-09-01

    Coordination compounds of nickel(II) are used as precursors for the formation of nickel and nickel oxide deposits on alumina substrates by direct laser writing using an argon ion laser. The starting resins are made of aqueous, methanolic or N,N-dimethylformamide (dmf) solutions of nickel(II) acetate, formate or acetylacetonate in the presence of a polymeric cellulose-based additive which controls the spin-coating step of the substrate. Infrared, UV-visible and NMR spectroscopic studies are carried out on the acetate solutions and resins to understand the interactions occurring between the various components. Arguments supporting the replacement of water molecules in tetrahydrated nickel(II) acetate by the organic solvent are described. The nature of the obtained deposits is determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Whereas resins based on acetate or acetylacetonate compounds in dmf and methanol are shown to generate nickel oxide films, aqueous resins based on nickel(II) formate are found to be very promising in view of obtaining conductive deposits of nickel metal. The role of the cellulosic additive is clearly restricted to the viscosity modulation.

  9. Optical properties and environmental stability of oxide coatings deposited by reactive sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlou, S M; Smajkiewicz, A; Al-Jumaily, G A

    1993-10-01

    Refractory metal-oxide coatings are deposited by reactive dc magnetron sputtering in an oxygen environment. The optical constants and the environmental stability of silicon oxide, aluminium oxide, hafnium oxide, zirconium oxide, tantalum oxide, titanium oxide, and a blend of hafnium oxide with silicon oxide are investigated. Properties of both single-layer and multilayer interference filters are examined.

  10. Atomistic simulation of Cu-Ta thin film deposition and other phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, T.P.C.

    2004-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) is a metal with good properties to act as a diffusion barrier material in computer chips, where it should prevent the mixing of Cu into Si and SiO. The deposition of thin Cu films onto various Ta substrates has been studied through molecular dynamics simulations, using either empirical

  11. Tunable structural color of anodic tantalum oxide films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Cui-Cui; Cai Yun-Yu; Dai En-Mei; Liang Chang-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) oxide films with tunable structural color were fabricated easily using anodic oxidation.The structure,components,and surface valence states of the oxide filns were investigated by using gazing incidence X-ray diffractometry,X-ray photoelectron microscopy,and surface analytical techniques.Their thickness and optical properties were studied by using spectroscopic ellipsometry and total reflectance spectrum.Color was accurately defined using L*a*b* scale.The thickness of compact Ta2O5 films was linearly dependent on anodizing voltage.The film color was tunable by adjusting the anodic voltage.The difference in color appearance resulted from the interference behavior between the interfaces of air-oxide and oxide-metal.

  12. Subtrochanteric Fracture following Removal of a Porous Tantalum Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek F. Amanatullah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the hip accounts for about 10% of all total hip arthroplasty cases and presents a significant challenge for those patients with and without femoral head collapse. Subtrochanteric femur fractures have been reported with numerous types of proximal femoral implants. Care must be taken to avoid penetrating the lateral cortex of the proximal femur inferior to the distal border of the lesser trochanter. Core decompression requires a 3 mm to 20 mm defect in the lateral femoral cortex. Subtrochanteric femur fractures are a well-known complication of core decompression as well. We present a case of a subtrochanteric fracture following the removal of a porous tantalum implant.

  13. Modelling of marine base cation emissions, concentrations and deposition in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Werner

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Base cations exert a large impact on various geochemical and geophysical processes both in the atmosphere and at the Earth surface. One of the essential roles of these compounds is impact on surface pH causing an increase in alkalinity and neutralizing the effects of acidity generated by sulphur and nitrogen deposition. During recent years anthropogenic emissions of base cations in the UK have decreased substantially, by about 70%, 78%, 75% and 48% for Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+, respectively, over the period 1990–2006. For the island regions, such as the UK, the main source of base cation particles is the aerosol produced from the sea surface. Here, the sea salt aerosol (SSA emissions are calculated with parameterisations proposed by Mårtensson et al. (2003 for ultra fine particles, Monahan et al. (1986 for fine particles and Smith and Harisson (1998 for coarse particles continuously with a 0.1 μm size step using WRF-modelled wind speed data at a 5 km × 5 km grid square resolution with a 3 h time step for two selected years 2003 and 2006. SSA production has been converted into base cation emissions, with the assumption that the chemical composition of the particle emitted from the sea surface is equal to the chemical composition of sea water, and used as input data in the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange Model (FRAME. FRAME model annual mean concentrations and total wet deposition at a 5 km × 5 km grid resolution, are compared with concentrations in air and wet deposition from the National Monitoring Network and measurements based estimates of UK deposition budget. The correlation coefficient for wet deposition achieves high values (R = 0.8 for Na+ and Mg2+, whereas for Ca2+ the correlation is poor (R < 0.3. Base cation concentrations are also represented well, with some overestimations on the west coast and underestimations in the

  14. Effect of dilute tungsten alloying on the dynamic strength of tantalum under ramp compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C. S.; Brown, J. L.; Millett, J. C. F.; Whiteman, G.; Asay, J. R.; Bourne, N. K.

    2015-06-01

    The strength of tantalum and tantalum alloys are of considerable interest due to their widespread use in both military and industrial applications. Previous work has shown that strength in these materials is tied to dislocation density and mobility within the microstructure. Accordingly, strength has been observed to increase with dilute alloying which serves to increase the dislocation density. In this study, we examine the effect of alloying on the strength of a dilute tantalum-tungsten alloy (2.5 weight percent W) under ramp compression. The strength of the alloy is measured using the ``self-consistent'' technique which examines the response under longitudinal unloading from peak compression. The results are compared to previous studies of pure tantalum and dilute tantalum-tungsten alloys under both shock and ramp compression and indicate strengthening of the alloy when compared to pure tantalum. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Can porous tantalum be used to achieve ankle and subtalar arthrodesis?: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigg, Arno; Dougall, Hugh; Boyd, Steve; Nigg, Benno

    2010-01-01

    A structural graft often is needed to fill gaps during reconstructive procedures of the ankle and hindfoot. Autograft, the current gold standard, is limited in availability and configuration and is associated with donor-site morbidity in as much as 48%, whereas the alternative allograft carries risks of disease transmission and collapse. Trabecular metal (tantalum), with a healing rate similar to that of autograft, high stability, and no donor-site morbidity, has been used in surgery of the hip, knee, and spine. However, its use has not been documented in foot and ankle surgery. We retrospectively reviewed nine patients with complex foot and ankle arthrodeses using a tantalum spacer. Minimum followup was 1.9 years (average, 2 years; range, 1.9-2.4 years). Bone ingrowth into the tantalum was analyzed with micro-CT in three of the nine patients. All arthrodeses were fused clinically and radiographically at the 1- and 2 year followups and no complications occurred. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score increased from 32 to 74. The micro-CT showed bony trabeculae growing onto the tantalum. Our data suggest tantalum may be used as a structural graft option for ankle and subtalar arthrodesis. All nine of our patients achieved fusion and had no complications. Using tantalum obviated the need for harvesting of the iliac spine. Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  16. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed "Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD", but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and "SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein Receptor Proteins (SNARE" protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1 to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the

  17. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD) via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nawroth, Peter P; Tyedmers, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed "Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD)", but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS) where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT) pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and "SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) Receptor Proteins (SNARE)" protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1) to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the Hsp104

  18. Comparative analysis of the effects of tantalum doping and annealing on atomic layer deposited (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub x}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 1−x} as potential gate dielectrics for GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partida-Manzanera, T., E-mail: sgtparti@liv.ac.uk [Centre for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Innovis, 2 Fusionopolis way, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Roberts, J. W.; Sedghi, N.; Potter, R. J. [Centre for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Bhat, T. N.; Zhang, Z.; Tan, H. R.; Dolmanan, S. B.; Tripathy, S. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), Innovis, 2 Fusionopolis way, Singapore 138634 (Singapore)

    2016-01-14

    This paper describes a method to optimally combine wide band gap Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with high dielectric constant (high-κ) Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} for gate dielectric applications. (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub x}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 1−x} thin films deposited by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) on GaN-capped Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures have been studied as a function of the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} molar fraction. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the bandgap of the oxide films linearly decreases from 6.5 eV for pure Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to 4.6 eV for pure Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The dielectric constant calculated from capacitance-voltage measurements also increases linearly from 7.8 for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} up to 25.6 for Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The effect of post-deposition annealing in N{sub 2} at 600 °C on the interfacial properties of undoped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ta-doped (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 0.12}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.88} films grown on GaN-HEMTs has been investigated. These conditions are analogous to the conditions used for source/drain contact formation in gate-first HEMT technology. A reduction of the Ga-O to Ga-N bond ratios at the oxide/HEMT interfaces is observed after annealing, which is attributed to a reduction of interstitial oxygen-related defects. As a result, the conduction band offsets (CBOs) of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaN-HEMT and (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 0.16}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.84}/GaN-HEMT samples increased by ∼1.1 eV to 2.8 eV and 2.6 eV, respectively, which is advantageous for n-type HEMTs. The results demonstrate that ALD of Ta-doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be used to control the properties of the gate dielectric, allowing the κ-value to be increased, while still maintaining a sufficient CBO to the GaN-HEMT structure for low leakage currents.

  19. Utility of tantalum (Ta) coating to improve surface hardness in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility of Co–Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Vuong-Hung [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No 1, Dai Co Viet Road, Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Lee, Seung-Hee; Li, Yuanlong; Kim, Hyoun-Ee [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kwan-Ha [Department of Dental Laboratory Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Young-Hag, E-mail: kohyh@korea.ac.kr [Department of Dental Laboratory Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, 136-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-01

    This study reports the utility of tantalum (Ta) coating for improving the surface hardness, in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility of Co–Cr implants. The use of direct current sputtering allowed for the deposition of a dense and uniform Ta film onto a Co–Cr substrate, which was composed of β-phase Ta grains. This hard Ta coating significantly improved the surface hardness of the Co–Cr by a factor of > 2.3. In addition, the Ta-deposited Co–Cr substrate showed a vigorous precipitation of apatite crystals on its surface after 4 weeks of immersion in simulated body fluid, suggesting its excellent in vitro bioactivity. This bioactive Ta coating led to a considerable improvement in the in vitro biocompatibility of the Co–Cr, which was assessed in terms of the attachment, proliferation and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1). - Highlights: • Dense and uniform Ta film was deposited onto a Co–Cr substrate using DC sputtering. • The Ta coating significantly enhanced the surface hardness of the Co–Cr. • The in vitro biocompatibility of the Co–Cr was also significantly improved.

  20. Chalcogenide-based thin film sensors prepared by pulsed laser deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, J.; Schöning, M. J.; Schmidt, C.; Siegert, M.; Mesters, St.; Zander, W.; Kordos, P.; Lüth, H.; Legin, A.; Mourzina, Yu. G.; Seleznev, B.; Vlasov, Yu. G.

    One advantage of the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method is the stoichiometric transfer of multi-component target material to a given substrate. This advantage of the PLD determined the choice to prepare chalco-genide-based thin films with an off-axis geometry PLD. Ag-As-S and Cu-Ag-As-Se-Tetargets were used to deposit thin films on Si substrates for an application as a heavy metal sensing device. The films were characterized by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical measurements. The same stoichiometry of the films and the targets was confirmed by RBS measurements. We observed a good long-term stability of more than 60 days and a nearly Nernstian sensitivity towards Pb and Cu, which is comparable to bulk sensors.

  1. Low-Loss Silica-Based Optical Film Waveguides Deposited by Helicon-Activated Reactive Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Douglas A. P.; Li, Wei-Tang; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod; Ankiewicz, Adrian; Love, John D.

    2005-03-01

    Planar silica-based optical waveguides have been deposited by a plasma helicon-activated reactive evaporation system, at a low temperature and with reduced hydrogen contamination, on thermally oxidized silicon wafers. The transmission loss of the rib waveguides, formed on the deposited films by etching with hydrofluoric acid, is determined to be lower than 0.1 and 0.7 dB/cm at wavelengths of 1310 and 1510 nm, respectively, for TE polarization. The influence of substrate leakage on propagation loss is determined numerically and compared with experimental results for TE and TM polarizations. The presence of the OH vibrational overtone band in the fabricated waveguides, at a wavelength of around 1385 nm, is discussed in terms of the waveguide structure.

  2. Effect of post deposition annealing on the performance of copper phthalocyanine based organic thin film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, N.; Sawant, Shilpa N.; Sen, Shaswati; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    The electrical performance of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) based OFETs on SiO2 dielectric was studied with and without post deposition annealing of CuPc films. Field effect mobility of holes and the drain current modulation (Ion/Ioff) was found to increase by one order for devices with annealed films as compared to that with as deposited film. This is attributed to well connected grains and increased crystallinity of CuPc film. Subthreshold slope (SS) was found to be reducing with increase in annealing temperature and was minimum for the device with CuPc film annealed at 225 °C, implying lesser traps affecting the mobility of charge carriers.

  3. Controllable synthesis of graphene-based titanium dioxide nanocomposites by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangbo; Geng, Dongsheng; Liu, Jian; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2011-04-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to synthesize graphene-based metal oxide nanocomposites. This strategy was fulfilled on the preparation of TiO2-graphene nanosheet (TiO2-GNS) nanocomposites using titanium isopropoxide and water as precursors. The synthesized nanocomposites demonstrated that ALD exhibited many benefits in a controllable means. It was found that the as-deposited TiO2 was tunable not only in its morphologies but also in its structural phases. As for the former, TiO2 was transferable from nanoparticles to nanofilms with increased cycles. With regard to the latter, TiO2 was changeable from amorphous to crystalline phase, and even a mixture of the two with increased growth temperatures (up to 250 °C). The underlying growth mechanisms were discussed and the resultant TiO2-GNS nanocomposites have great potentials for many applications, such as photocatalysis, lithium-ion batteries, fuel cells, and sensors.

  4. Electrophoretically deposited multiwalled carbon nanotube based amperometric genosensor for E.coli detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Hema; Solanki, Shipra; Sumana, Gajjala

    2016-04-01

    This work reports on a sensitive and selective genosensor fabrication method for Escherichia coli (E.coli) detection. The functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) synthesized via chemical vapour deposition have been deposited electrophoretically onto indium tin oxide coated glass surface and have been utilized as matrices for the covalent immobilization of E.coli specific probe oligonucleotide that was identified from the 16s rRNA coding region of the E.coli genome. This fabricated functionalized MWCNT based platform sought to provide improved fundamental characteristics to electrode interface in terms of electro-active surface area and diffusion coefficient. Electrochemical cyclic voltammetry revealed that this genosensor exhibits a linear response to complementary DNA in the concentration range of 10-7 to 10-12 M with a detection limit of 1×10-12 M.

  5. Thermal recrystallization of physical vapor deposition based germanium thin films on bulk silicon (100)

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-08-16

    We demonstrate a simple, low-cost, and scalable process for obtaining uniform, smooth surfaced, high quality mono-crystalline germanium (100) thin films on silicon (100). The germanium thin films were deposited on a silicon substrate using plasma-assisted sputtering based physical vapor deposition. They were crystallized by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 1100 °C. We report that the best quality germanium thin films are obtained above the melting point of germanium (937 °C), thus offering a method for in-situ Czochralski process. We show well-behaved high-κ /metal gate metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) using this film. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Technological Aspects of High Speed Direct Laser Deposition Based on Heterophase Powder Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turichin, G. A.; Klimova, O. G.; Zemlyakov, E. V.; Babkin, K. D.; Kolodyazhnyy, D. Yu.; Shamray, F. A.; Travyanov, A. Ya.; Petrovskiy, P. V.

    The article deals with physical peculiarities and technology of high speed processes of direct laser deposition. On the base of theoretic research and computer modeling the powder transfer has been optimized, increasing process stability and productivity. Principles of nozzles design also have been developed in accordance with technological needs. An influence of process mode on product properties and material structure was defined for heat resisted Ni-based superalloys. Developed technology provided the mechanic properties of products on the level of rolled material and allows avoid heat treatment and HIP in production process. Possible ways for increasing process performance and economic efficiency also have been discussed.

  7. Temperature dependences of the Hall and magnetoresistance coefficients of vanadium and tantalum single crystals: Anisotropy of electron-phonon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkenshtein, N.V.; Veprev, A.G.; Startsev, V.E.; Cherepanov, A.N.; Cherepanov, V.I.

    1985-07-01

    The Hall coefficient R/sub H/(T), transverse magnetoresistance rho/sub c/(T), and the temperature-dependent component rho/sub c/(T) of the impurity electrical resistance are measured as functions of temperature T = 4.2--300 K for vanadium and tantalum single crystals with rho/sub 273.2//rho/sub 4.2/ = 1350 and 500, respectively. The curves R/sub H/(T) have minima at T0 = 33 and 24 K for vanadium and tantalum, respectively, which indicates that the electron-phonon scattering is anisotropic. The anisotropy is caused by ''intersheet'' electron-phonon processes in which the charge carriers are scattered between the open hole surface GAMMAH3h and the closed hole ellipsoids N3h. The curves r/sub H/(T) and rho/sub c/(T) have maxima for T close to T0. The observed extrema have a common physical origin and can be explained by the Kagan-Zhernov-Flerov theory, which postulates that the nonequilibrium part of the electron distribution function is anisotropic. The observed dependence R/sub H/(T) for T>T0 agrees with calculations of R/sub H/(T) for vanadium based on realistic models for the electron and phonon spectra, including the anisotropy for the electron-phonon interaction matrix element.

  8. A niobium and tantalum co-doped perovskite cathode for solid oxide fuel cells operating below 500 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengran; Zhao, Mingwen; Li, Feng; Zhou, Wei; Peterson, Vanessa K.; Xu, Xiaoyong; Shao, Zongping; Gentle, Ian; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    The slow activity of cathode materials is one of the most significant barriers to realizing the operation of solid oxide fuel cells below 500 °C. Here we report a niobium and tantalum co-substituted perovskite SrCo0.8Nb0.1Ta0.1O3-δ as a cathode, which exhibits high electroactivity. This cathode has an area-specific polarization resistance as low as ~0.16 and ~0.68 Ω cm2 in a symmetrical cell and peak power densities of 1.2 and 0.7 W cm-2 in a Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95-based anode-supported fuel cell at 500 and 450 °C, respectively. The high performance is attributed to an optimal balance of oxygen vacancies, ionic mobility and surface electron transfer as promoted by the synergistic effects of the niobium and tantalum. This work also points to an effective strategy in the design of cathodes for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  9. In situ X-ray diffraction based investigation of crystallization in solution deposited PZT thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittala, Krishna

    Solution deposited PZT based thin films have potential applications in embedded decoupling capacitors and pulse discharge capacitors. During solution deposition, precursor solution is deposited onto a substrate to obtain an amorphous film. The film is then crystallized by heating it at a high temperature (˜600 - 700°C). Conditions during the crystallization anneal such as precursor stoichiometry in solution, heating rate and adhesion layer in the substrate are known to influence phase and texture evolution in these films. However, a mechanistic understanding of the changes taking place in these thin films during crystallization is lacking. A better understanding of the crystallization processes in these thin films could enable tailoring the properties of thin films to suit specific applications. To explore the crystallization process in solution deposited PZT thin films, high temperature in situ laboratory and synchrotron X-ray diffraction based techniques were developed. Taking advantage of the high X-ray flux available at synchrotron facilities such as beamline 6-ID-B, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, crystalline phases formed in the thin films during crystallization at the high heating rates (0.5 -- 60°C/s) typically used during film processing could be measured. Using a 2-D detector for these measurements allowed the simultaneous measurement of both phase and texture information during crystallization. Analytical treatment of the unconventional diffraction geometry used during the synchrotron based measurements was performed to develop methodologies for quantitative estimation of texture components. The nominal lead content in the starting solutions and the heating rate used during crystallization was observed to influence the sequence of phases formed during crystallization of the films. In films crystallized at fast heating rates, titanium segregation, probably due to diffusion of titanium from the adhesion layer, was observed. To

  10. Research on the manufacturing of electrical power fittings based on metal droplet deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, SuLi; Wei, ZhengYing; Jun, Du; Zhao, Guangxi; Wang, Xin; Lu, BingHeng

    2017-06-01

    Molten metal droplets deposition is an additive process in which parts are produced from molten materials in a single operation without the use of any mold or other tooling. Near-net shaped parts are fabricated by sequentially depositing molten droplets layer by layer. For larger inventories, higher purchase cost, and lower production efficiency of Electrical power fittings now; this paper puts forward an innovation method to manufacture Electrical power fittings using the process of metal droplet deposition, meeting the needs of electrical repairs, while reducing installation costs and achieving zero inventories. In accordance with the structure features, through reasonable selection of process parameters, the typical thin-walled parts and ball head rings of Electrical power fittings were realized; meanwhile, microstructure analysis and performance tests of the parts were carried out. The result showed that the structures were reasonable and the mechanical properties were excellent. The works should be helpful for the process optimization and non-destructive detection of drop-based rapid prototyping techniques.

  11. Ti1-xAgx electrodes deposited on polymer based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, S. M.; Manninen, N. K.; Ferdov, Stanislav; Lanceros-Mendez, S.; Carvalho, S.

    2014-10-01

    Piezoelectric materials are interesting for the development of sensors and actuators for biomedical applications in areas such as smart prosthesis, implantable biosensors and biomechanical signal monitoring, among others. For acquiring or applying the electrical signal from/to the piezoelectric material, suitable electrodes can be produced from Ti based coatings with tailored multifunctional properties: conductivity and antibacterial characteristics through Ag inclusions. This work reports on Ti1-xAgx electrodes with different Ag/Ti atomic ratios deposited by dc and pulsed magnetron sputtering at room temperature on poly(vinylidene fluoride), PVDF. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed that the deposition conditions preserve the polymer structure and suggested the presence of crystalline Tiβ phase in pure titanium coating and fcc-Ag phase in pure silver coating. According to the results obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, the coatings are homogeneous and no clusters were found; since β-PVDF is anisotropic, the deposited coatings replicate the underlying substrate surface. Sheet resistivity values show a typical behavior of a binary alloy system, with low resistivity values for coatings of zone 1 (Ti rich) and zone 3 (Ag rich) and a slightly higher resistivity values in zone 2. The piezoelectricity of the different samples show similar values.

  12. Sputtered tungsten-based ternary and quaternary layers for nanocrystalline diamond deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walock, Michael J; Rahil, Issam; Zou, Yujiao; Imhoff, Luc; Catledge, Shane A; Nouveau, Corinne; Stanishevsky, Andrei V

    2012-06-01

    Many of today's demanding applications require thin-film coatings with high hardness, toughness, and thermal stability. In many cases, coating thickness in the range 2-20 microm and low surface roughness are required. Diamond films meet many of the stated requirements, but their crystalline nature leads to a high surface roughness. Nanocrystalline diamond offers a smoother surface, but significant surface modification of the substrate is necessary for successful nanocrystalline diamond deposition and adhesion. A hybrid hard and tough material may be required for either the desired applications, or as a basis for nanocrystalline diamond film growth. One possibility is a composite system based on carbides or nitrides. Many binary carbides and nitrides offer one or more mentioned properties. By combining these binary compounds in a ternary or quaternary nanocrystalline system, we can tailor the material for a desired combination of properties. Here, we describe the results on the structural and mechanical properties of the coating systems composed of tungsten-chromium-carbide and/or nitride. These WC-Cr-(N) coatings are deposited using magnetron sputtering. The growth of adherent nanocrystalline diamond films by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition has been demonstrated on these coatings. The WC-Cr-(N) and WC-Cr-(N)-NCD coatings are characterized with atomic force microscopy and SEM, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation.

  13. Gadolinium deposition within the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus after repeated administrations of gadolinium-based contrast agents - current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanov, Dragan [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia); Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Aracki-Trenkic, Aleksandra [Center for Radiology, Nis (Serbia); Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela [University of Nis, Faculty of Medicine, Nis (Serbia)

    2016-05-15

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) have been used clinically since 1988 for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Generally, GBCAs are considered to have an excellent safety profile. However, GBCA administration has been associated with increased occurrence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in patients with severely compromised renal function, and several studies have shown evidence of gadolinium deposition in specific brain structures, the globus pallidus and dentate nucleus, in patients with normal renal function. Gadolinium deposition in the brain following repeated CE-MRI scans has been demonstrated in patients using T1-weighted unenhanced MRI and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Additionally, rodent studies with controlled GBCA administration also resulted in neural gadolinium deposits. Repeated GBCA use is associated with gadolinium deposition in the brain. This is especially true with the use of less-stable, linear GBCAs. In spite of increasing evidence of gadolinium deposits in the brains of patients after multiple GBCA administrations, the clinical significance of these deposits continues to be unclear. Here, we discuss the current state of scientific evidence surrounding gadolinium deposition in the brain following GBCA use, and the potential clinical significance of gadolinium deposition. There is considerable need for further research, both to understand the mechanism by which gadolinium deposition in the brain occurs and how it affects the patients in which it occurs. (orig.)

  14. Nanotechnology based surface treatments for corrosion protection and deposit control of power plant equipment. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-05-15

    Nanotechnology can provide possibilities for obtaining new valuable information regarding performance and corrosion protection in power plants. In general the desired performance of the contact surfaces is an easy-to-release effect. This is in order to prolong the time interval between cleaning periods or make the cleaning procedures easier and less expensive. Corrosion protection is also desired in order to extend the life time of various parts in the power plants and thus optimize the energy output and overall efficiency of the plant. Functional sol-gel coating based on nanotechnology is tested in a variety of conditions. Applications of functional sol-gel coatings were performed in the condenser and on seven air preheaters at Fynsvaerket, Odense, with corrosion protection as the main issue. Coatings with easy-to-clean effects were tested in the Flue Gas Desulphurization plant at Nordjyllandsvaerket, Aalborg, with the aim of reducing gipsum deposit. Thermo stabilized coatings were tested on tube bundles between in the passage from the 1st to 2end pass and on the wall between 1st and 2end pass at Amagervaerket, Copenhagen, and in the boiler at Haderslev CHP plant. The objective of this test were reducing deposits and increasing corrosion protection. The tested coatings were commercial available coatings and coatings developed in this project. Visual inspections have been performed of all applications except at Nordjyllandsvaerket. Corrosion assessment has been done at DTU - Mechanical Engineering. The results range from no difference between coated and uncoated areas to some improvements. At Amagervaerket the visual assessment showed in general a positive effect with a sol-gel hybrid system and a commercial system regarding removal of deposits. The visual assessment of the air preheaters at Fynsvaerket indicates reduced deposits on a sol-gel nanocomposite coated air preheater compared to an uncoated air preheater. (Author)

  15. Deposition Time and Thermal Cycles of Fabricating Thin-wall Steel Parts by Double Electrode GMAW Based Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Dongqing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deposition time for fabricating the thin-wall part as well as the peak temperature of the substrate during the process was analyzed in the double electrode gas metal arc welding (DE-GMAW based additive manufacturing (AM. The total deposition time and the interlayer idle time of the manufacturing process decreased with the increasing of the bypass current under the same interlayer temperature and the same deposition rate. The thermal cycling curves illustrated that the peak temperature of the substrate was lower in the DE-GMAW base AM under the same conditions. When depositing the thin-wall parts, the DE-GMAW based AM can reduce the heat input to the substrate and improve the fabrication efficiency, compared with the GMAW based AM.

  16. Non-oxidative coupling reaction of methane to ethane and hydrogen catalyzed by the silica-supported tantalum hydride: ([triple bond]SiO)2Ta-H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulivong, Daravong; Norsic, Sébastien; Taoufik, Mostafa; Copéret, Christophe; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Chakka, Sudhakar; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2008-04-16

    Silica-supported tantalum hydride, (SiO)2Ta-H (1), proves to be the first single-site catalyst for the direct non-oxidative coupling transformation of methane into ethane and hydrogen at moderate temperatures, with a high selectivity (>98%). The reaction likely involves the tantalum-methyl-methylidene species as a key intermediate, where the methyl ligand can migrate onto the tantalum-methylidene affording the tantalum-ethyl.

  17. Are The Profit Rates of the Islamic Investment Deposit Accounts Truly Performance Based? A Case Study of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this study we were motivated to ascertain whether the profit rates of the investment deposit accounts based on the profit and loss sharing contracts offered by the Islamic banks are truly based on the performance of the underlying assets or otherwise, by taking Malaysia as our case study. Given the facts that Islamic investment deposits are interest free in nature and that they are supposedly used in real economic activities, one would naturally expect that their returns are directly relat...

  18. Surface chemistry and cytotoxicity of reactively sputtered tantalum oxide films on NiTi plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, K. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Kolaj-Robin, O.; Belochapkine, S.; Laffir, F. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Gandhi, A.A. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Tofail, S.A.M., E-mail: tofail.syed@ul.ie [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Department of Physics & Energy, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland)

    2015-08-31

    NiTi, an equiatomic alloy containing nickel and titanium, exhibits unique properties such as shape memory effect and superelasticity. NiTi also forms a spontaneous protective titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) layer that allows its use in biomedical applications. Despite the widely perceived biocompatibility there remain some concerns about the sustainability of the alloy's biocompatibility due to the defects in the TiO{sub 2} protective layer and the presence of high amount of sub-surface Ni, which can give allergic reactions. Many surface treatments have been investigated to try to improve both the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of this layer. For such purposes, we have sputter deposited tantalum (Ta) oxide thin films onto the surface of the NiTi alloy. Despite being one of the promising metals for biomedical applications, Ta, and its various oxides and their interactions with cells have received relatively less attention. The oxidation chemistry, crystal structure, morphology and biocompatibility of these films have been investigated. In general, reactive sputtering especially in the presence of a low oxygen mixture yields a thicker film with better control of the film quality. The sputtering power influenced the surface oxidation states of Ta. Both microscopic and quantitative cytotoxicity measurements show that Ta films on NiTi are biocompatible with little to no variation in cytotoxic response when the surface oxidation state of Ta changes. - Highlights: • Reactive sputtering in low oxygen mixture yields thicker better quality films. • Sputtering power influenced surface oxidation states of Ta. • Cytotoxicity measurements show Ta films on NiTi are biocompatible. • Little to no variation in cytotoxic response when oxidation state changes.

  19. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-02-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50-200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10-50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  20. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  1. Metallorganic chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition approaches for the growth of hafnium-based thin films from dialkylamide precursors for advanced CMOS gate stack applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Steven P.

    To continue the rapid progress of the semiconductor industry as described by Moore's Law, the feasibility of new material systems for front end of the line (FEOL) process technologies needs to be investigated, since the currently employed polysilicon/SiO2-based transistor system is reaching its fundamental scaling limits. Revolutionary breakthroughs in complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology were recently announced by Intel Corporation and International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), with both organizations revealing significant progress in the implementation of hafnium-based high-k dielectrics along with metal gates. This announcement was heralded by Gordon Moore as "...the biggest change in transistor technology since the introduction of polysilicon gate MOS transistors in the late 1960s." Accordingly, the study described herein focuses on the growth of Hf-based dielectrics and Hf-based metal gates using chemical vapor-based deposition methods, specifically metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). A family of Hf source complexes that has received much attention recently due to their desirable properties for implementation in wafer scale manufacturing is the Hf dialkylamide precursors. These precursors are room temperature liquids and possess sufficient volatility and desirable decomposition characteristics for both MOCVD and ALD processing. Another benefit of using these sources is the existence of chemically compatible Si dialkylamide sources as co-precursors for use in Hf silicate growth. The first part of this study investigates properties of MOCVD-deposited HfO2 and HfSixOy using dimethylamido Hf and Si precursor sources using a customized MOCVD reactor. The second part of this study involves a study of wet and dry surface pre-treatments for ALD growth of HfO2 using tetrakis(ethylmethylamido)hafnium in a wafer scale manufacturing environment. The third part of this study is an investigation of

  2. Cost Estimate for Molybdenum and Tantalum Refractory Metal Alloy Flow Circuit Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Robert R.; Martin, James J.; Schmidt, George R.; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Bryhan, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been tasked by the Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to provide a cost and delivery rough order of magnitude estimate for a refractory metal-based lithium (Li) flow circuit. The design is based on the stainless steel Li flow circuit that is currently being assembled for an NRPCT task underway at the EFF-TF. While geometrically the flow circuit is not representative of a final flight prototype, knowledge has been gained to quantify (time and cost) the materials, manufacturing, fabrication, assembly, and operations to produce a testable configuration. This Technical Memorandum (TM) also identifies the following key issues that need to be addressed by the fabrication process: Alloy selection and forming, cost and availability, welding, bending, machining, assembly, and instrumentation. Several candidate materials were identified by NRPCT including molybdenum (Mo) alloy (Mo-47.5 %Re), tantalum (Ta) alloys (T-111, ASTAR-811C), and niobium (Nb) alloy (Nb-1 %Zr). This TM is focused only on the Mo and Ta alloys, since they are of higher concern to the ongoing effort. The initial estimate to complete a Mo-47%Re system ready for testing is =$9,000k over a period of 30 mo. The initial estimate to complete a T-111 or ASTAR-811C system ready for testing is =$12,000k over a period of 36 mo.

  3. β-Tantalum, a better candidate for spin-to-charge conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magginetti, David; Tian, Kun; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2017-01-01

    Development of thermoelectric energy harvesting devices has hit a stumbling block due to the intrinsically linked electrical and thermal conductivities of materials. However, this field can still be improved by employing devices that take advantage of spin-based effects. A temperature gradient can be converted to a spin-polarized current in a ferrimagnetic insulator by the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), and that spin current can be converted to an electrical voltage in a heavy metal by the Inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). Thus, the thermal energy capture and charge production steps can be separated into two distinct regions of the thermoelectric device, allowing separate tuning of electrical and thermal conductivities. The second step of this process, spin current to electrical voltage conversion, is controlled by the strength and sign of ISHE in the metal, and platinum has become the standard for this purpose. However, here we report a better candidate, β-Tantalum, which shows a spin Seebeck voltage approximately 4 times higher than that of Pt at room temperature. The temperature dependence of spin Seebeck in YIG/β-Ta also closely follows that of YIG/Pt, consistent with magnon spin current theory. The sign of the spin Seebeck voltage in Ta found to be opposite to that of Pt, making the two materials highly complementary for fabricating spintronics-based thermoelectric modules for practical applications.

  4. Clustering of transmutation elements tantalum, rhenium and osmium in tungsten in a fusion environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-08-01

    The formation of transmutation solute-rich precipitates has been reported to seriously degrade the mechanical properties of tungsten in a fusion environment. However, the underlying mechanisms controlling the formation of the precipitates are still unknown. In this study, first-principles calculations are therefore performed to systemically determine the stable structures and binding energies of solute clusters in tungsten consisting of tantalum, rhenium and osmium atoms as well as irradiation-induced vacancies. These clusters are known to act as precursors for the formation of precipitates. We find that osmium can easily segregate to form clusters even in defect-free tungsten alloys, whereas extremely high tantalum and rhenium concentrations are required for the formation of clusters. Vacancies greatly facilitate the clustering of rhenium and osmium, while tantalum is an exception. The binding energies of vacancy-osmium clusters are found to be much higher than those of vacancy-tantalum and vacancy-rhenium clusters. Osmium is observed to strongly promote the formation of vacancy-rhenium clusters, while tantalum can suppress the formation of vacancy-rhenium and vacancy-osmium clusters. The local strain and electronic structure are analyzed to reveal the underlying mechanisms governing the cluster formation. Employing the law of mass action, we predict the evolution of the relative concentration of vacancy-rhenium clusters. This work presents a microscopic picture describing the nucleation and growth of solute clusters in tungsten alloys in a fusion reactor environment, and thereby explains recent experimental phenomena.

  5. Synthesis of Coral-Like Tantalum Oxide Films via Anodization in Mixed Organic-Inorganic Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin; Zhu, Suiyi; Yang, Xia; Wang, Xinhong; Sun, Hongwei; Huo, Mingxin

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple method to fabricate nano-porous tantalum oxide films via anodization with Ta foils as the anode at room temperature. A mixture of ethylene glycol, phosphoric acid, NH4F and H2O was used as the electrolyte where the nano-porous tantalum oxide could be synthesized by anodizing a tantalum foil for 1 h at 20 V in a two–electrode configuration. The as-prepared porous film exhibited a continuous, uniform and coral-like morphology. The diameters of pores ranged from 30 nm to 50 nm. The pores interlaced each other and the depth was about 150 nm. After calcination, the as-synthesized amorphous tantalum oxide could be crystallized to the orthorhombic crystal system. As observed in photocatalytic experiments, the coral-like tantalum oxide exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of phenol than that with a compact surface morphology, and the elimination rate of phenol increased by 66.7%. PMID:23799106

  6. Synthesis of coral-like tantalum oxide films via anodization in mixed organic-inorganic electrolytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Yu

    Full Text Available We report a simple method to fabricate nano-porous tantalum oxide films via anodization with Ta foils as the anode at room temperature. A mixture of ethylene glycol, phosphoric acid, NH4F and H2O was used as the electrolyte where the nano-porous tantalum oxide could be synthesized by anodizing a tantalum foil for 1 h at 20 V in a two-electrode configuration. The as-prepared porous film exhibited a continuous, uniform and coral-like morphology. The diameters of pores ranged from 30 nm to 50 nm. The pores interlaced each other and the depth was about 150 nm. After calcination, the as-synthesized amorphous tantalum oxide could be crystallized to the orthorhombic crystal system. As observed in photocatalytic experiments, the coral-like tantalum oxide exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of phenol than that with a compact surface morphology, and the elimination rate of phenol increased by 66.7%.

  7. Thermochemical hydrogen sensor based on Pt-coated nanofiber catalyst deposited on pyramidally textured thermoelectric film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seil; Song, Yoseb; Lee, Young-In; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen gas-sensing performance has been systemically investigated of a new type of thermochemical hydrogen (TCH) sensor, composed of pyramidally textured thermoelectric (TE) film and catalytic Pt-coated nanofibers (NFs) deposited over the TE film. The TE film was composed of stoichiometric Bi2Te3, synthesized by means of cost-effective electrochemical deposition onto a textured silicon wafer. The resulting pyramidally textured TE film played a critical role in maximizing hydrogen gas flow around the overlying Pt NFs, which were synthesized by means of electrospinning followed by sputtering and acted as a heating catalyst. The optimal temperature increase of the Pt NFs was determined by means of optimizations of the electrospinning and sputtering durations. The output voltage signal of the optimized TCH sensor based on Pt NFs was 17.5 times higher than that of a Pt thin film coated directly onto the pyramidal TE material by using the same sputtering duration, under the fixed conditions of 3 vol% H2 in air at room temperature. This observation can be explained by the increased surface area of (111) planes accessible on the Pt-coated NFs. The best response time and recovery time observed for the optimized TCH sensor based on Pt-coated NFs were respectively 17 and 2 s under the same conditions. We believe that this type of TCH sensor can be widely used for supersensitive hydrogen gas detection by employing small-size Pt NFs and various chalcogenide thin films with high thermoelectric performance.

  8. In Situ Synthesis and Characterization of Fe-Based Metallic Glass Coatings by Electrospark Deposition Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, Alexander A.; Pyachin, S. A.; Ermakov, M. A.; Syuy, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    Crystalline FeWMoCrBC electrode materials were prepared by conventional powder metallurgy. Metallic glass (MG) coatings were produced by electrospark deposition onto AISI 1035 steel in argon atmosphere. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy verified the amorphous structure of the as-deposited coatings. The coatings have a thickness of about 40 microns and a uniform structure. The results of dry sliding wear tests against high-speed steel demonstrated that Fe-based MG coatings had a lower friction coefficient and more than twice the wear resistance for 20 km sliding distance with respect to AISI 1035 steel. High-temperature oxidation treatment of the metal glass coatings at 1073 K in air for 12 h revealed that the oxidation resistance of the best coating was 36 times higher than that for bare AISI 1035 steel. These findings are expected to broaden the applications of electrospark Fe-based MG as highly protective and anticorrosive coatings for mild steel.

  9. Porous tantalum coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying enhance bmscs osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Tang

    Full Text Available Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS, which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration.

  10. Thin films of copper oxide and copper grown by atomic layer deposition for applications in metallization systems of microelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waechtler, Thomas

    2010-05-25

    Copper-based multi-level metallization systems in today's ultralarge-scale integrated electronic circuits require the fabrication of diffusion barriers and conductive seed layers for the electrochemical metal deposition. Such films of only several nanometers in thickness have to be deposited void-free and conformal in patterned dielectrics. The envisaged further reduction of the geometric dimensions of the interconnect system calls for coating techniques that circumvent the drawbacks of the well-established physical vapor deposition. The atomic layer deposition method (ALD) allows depositing films on the nanometer scale conformally both on three-dimensional objects as well as on large-area substrates. The present work therefore is concerned with the development of an ALD process to grow copper oxide films based on the metal-organic precursor bis(trin- butylphosphane)copper(I)acetylacetonate [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)]. This liquid, non-fluorinated {beta}-diketonate is brought to react with a mixture of water vapor and oxygen at temperatures from 100 to 160 C. Typical ALD-like growth behavior arises between 100 and 130 C, depending on the respective substrate used. On tantalum nitride and silicon dioxide substrates, smooth films and selfsaturating film growth, typical for ALD, are obtained. On ruthenium substrates, positive deposition results are obtained as well. However, a considerable intermixing of the ALD copper oxide with the underlying films takes place. Tantalum substrates lead to a fast self-decomposition of the copper precursor. As a consequence, isolated nuclei or larger particles are always obtained together with continuous films. The copper oxide films grown by ALD can be reduced to copper by vapor-phase processes. If formic acid is used as the reducing agent, these processes can already be carried out at similar temperatures as the ALD, so that agglomeration of the films is largely avoided. Also for an integration with subsequent

  11. MAPLE deposition of polypyrrole-based composite layers for bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra, E-mail: irina.paun@physics.pub.ro [Faculty of Applied Sciences, University Politehnica of Bucharest, RO-060042 (Romania); National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Acasandrei, Adriana Maria [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering IFIN-HH, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Luculescu, Catalin Romeo, E-mail: catalin.luculescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering IFIN-HH, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Ion, Valentin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Mihailescu, Mona; Vasile, Eugenia [Faculty of Applied Sciences, University Politehnica of Bucharest, RO-060042 (Romania); Dinescu, Maria, E-mail: dinescum@nipne.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • PPy-based composite layers for bone regeneration were produced by MAPLE. • Conductive PPy nanograins were embedded in insulating PLGA and PU matrices. • PLGA was chosen for providing biodegradability and PU for toughness and elasticity. • The layers conductivities reached 10{sup −2} S/cm for PPy loadings of 1:10 weight ratios. • The layers promoted osteoblast viability, proliferation and mineralization. - Abstract: We report on biocompatible, electrically conductive layers of polypyrrole (PPy)-based composites obtained by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) for envisioned bone regeneration. In order to preserve the conductivity of the PPy while overcoming its lack of biodegradability and low mechanical resilience, conductive PPy nanograins were embedded in two biocompatible, insulating polymeric matrices, i.e. poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) and polyurethane (PU). PLGA offers the advantage of full biodegradability into non-toxic products, while PU provides toughness and elasticity. The PPy nanograins formed micro-domains and networks within the PLGA and PU matrices, in a compact spatial arrangement favorable for electrical percolation. The proposed approach allowed us to obtain PPy-based composite layers with biologically meaningful conductivities up to 10{sup −2} S/cm for PPy loadings as low as 1:10 weight ratios. Fluorescent staining and viability assays showed that the MG63 osteoblast-like cells cultured on the PPy-based layers deposited by MAPLE were viable and retained their capacity to proliferate. The performance of the proposed method was demonstrated by quantitative evaluation of the calcium phosphate deposits from the cultured cells, as indicative for cell mineralization. Electrical stimulation using 200 μA currents passing through the PPy-based layers, during a time interval of 4 h, enhanced the osteogenesis in the cultured cells. Despite their lowest conductivity, the PPy/PU layers showed the best

  12. Investigation of Non-Vacuum Deposition Techniques in Fabrication of Chalcogenide-Based Solar Cell Absorbers

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaggaf, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    The environmental challenges are increasing, and so is the need for renewable energy. For photovoltaic applications, thin film Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGS) and CuIn(S,Se)2 (CIS) solar cells are attractive with conversion efficiencies of more than 20%. However, the high-efficiency cells are fabricated using vacuum technologies such as sputtering or thermal co-evaporation, which are very costly and unfeasible at industrial level. The fabrication involves the uses of highly toxic gases such as H2Se, adding complexity to the fabrication process. The work described here focused on non-vacuum deposition methods such as printing. Special attention has been given to printing designed in a moving Roll-to-Roll (R2R) fashion. The results show potential of such technology to replace the vacuum processes. Conversion efficiencies for such non-vacuum deposition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 solar cells have exceeded 15% using hazardous chemicals such as hydrazine, which is unsuitable for industrial scale up. In an effort to simplify the process, non-toxic suspensions of Cu(In,Ga)S2 molecular-based precursors achieved efficiencies of ~7-15%. Attempts to further simplify the selenization step, deposition of CuIn(S,Se)2 particulate solutions without the Ga doping and non-toxic suspensions of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 quaternary precursors achieved efficiencies (~1-8%). The contribution of this research was to provide a new method to monitor printed structures through spectral-domain optical coherence tomography SD-OCT in a moving fashion simulating R2R process design at speeds up to 1.05 m/min. The research clarified morphological and compositional impacts of Nd:YAG laser heat-treatment on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorber layer to simplify the annealing step in non-vacuum environment compatible to R2R. Finally, the research further simplified development methods for CIGS solar cells based on suspensions of quaternary Cu(In,Ga)Se2 precursors and ternary CuInS2 precursors. The methods consisted of post deposition reactive

  13. Effect of aluminum on hydrogen absorption kinetics of tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxak, Manju, E-mail: m.taxak@gmail.com; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar

    2015-02-25

    Highlights: • The hydrogen absorption kinetics in Ta–Al alloys is investigated for the first time. • The rate constant for hydrogen absorption increases with increasing temperature. • The three-dimensional diffusion is the rate-limiting step of hydrogen absorption in Ta–Al alloys. • The apparent activation energy for hydrogen absorption in Ta–Al alloys increases with increasing Al content. - Abstract: The isothermal hydrogen absorption kinetics of Ta{sub 1−z}Al{sub z} alloys (z = 0, 1, 1.6 and 2.4 atom%) has been investigated in the temperature range of 673–973 K. The reacted fractions of hydrogen as well as reaction rate constant have been determined from time dependent hydrogen absorption curves using pressure drop method. The variation in rate constant with respect to temperature has been observed for all the alloys. Three-dimensional diffusion processes seems to be the intrinsic rate limiting step of hydrogen absorption. The apparent activation energy of hydrogen absorption has been calculated using Arrhenius equation. With increasing aluminum concentration, the hydrogen absorption kinetics slows down. Consequently, the rate constant decreases and the apparent activation energy of hydrogen absorption increases. The apparent activation energy of hydrogen absorption increases from 53.7 to 57.7 kJ/mol with increasing Al concentration from 0 to 2.4 atom% in tantalum.

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  15. Phase Transformation in Tantalum under Extreme Laser Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.-H.; Hahn, E. N.; Remington, B. A.; Maddox, B. R.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The structural and mechanical response of metals is intimately connected to phase transformations. For instance, the product of a phase transformation (martensite) is responsible for the extraordinary range of strength and toughness of steel, making it a versatile and important structural material. Although abundant in metals and alloys, the discovery of new phase transformations is not currently a common event and often requires a mix of experimentation, predictive computations, and luck. High-energy pulsed lasers enable the exploration of extreme pressures and temperatures, where such discoveries may lie. The formation of a hexagonal (omega) phase was observed in recovered monocrystalline body-centered cubic tantalum of four crystallographic orientations subjected to an extreme regime of pressure, temperature, and strain-rate. This was accomplished using high-energy pulsed lasers. The omega phase and twinning were identified by transmission electron microscopy at 70 GPa (determined by a corresponding VISAR experiment). It is proposed that the shear stresses generated by the uniaxial strain state of shock compression play an essential role in the transformation. Molecular dynamics simulations show the transformation of small nodules from body-centered cubic to a hexagonal close-packed structure under the same stress state (pressure and shear).

  16. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  17. Phase Transformation in Tantalum under Extreme Laser Deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C-H; Hahn, E N; Remington, B A; Maddox, B R; Bringa, E M; Meyers, M A

    2015-10-19

    The structural and mechanical response of metals is intimately connected to phase transformations. For instance, the product of a phase transformation (martensite) is responsible for the extraordinary range of strength and toughness of steel, making it a versatile and important structural material. Although abundant in metals and alloys, the discovery of new phase transformations is not currently a common event and often requires a mix of experimentation, predictive computations, and luck. High-energy pulsed lasers enable the exploration of extreme pressures and temperatures, where such discoveries may lie. The formation of a hexagonal (omega) phase was observed in recovered monocrystalline body-centered cubic tantalum of four crystallographic orientations subjected to an extreme regime of pressure, temperature, and strain-rate. This was accomplished using high-energy pulsed lasers. The omega phase and twinning were identified by transmission electron microscopy at 70 GPa (determined by a corresponding VISAR experiment). It is proposed that the shear stresses generated by the uniaxial strain state of shock compression play an essential role in the transformation. Molecular dynamics simulations show the transformation of small nodules from body-centered cubic to a hexagonal close-packed structure under the same stress state (pressure and shear).

  18. Strontium adsorption on tantalum-doped hexagonal tungsten oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingliang; Mu, Wanjun; Xie, Xiang; Liu, Bijun; Tang, Hui; Zhou, Guanhong; Wei, Hongyuan; Jian, Yuan; Luo, Shunzhong

    2014-01-15

    Hexagonal tungsten oxide (hex-WO3) has the potential to separate (137)Cs and (90)Sr from nuclear power plant or fission (99)Mo production waste. This study aims to increase the capacity of hex-WO3 to adsorb Sr(2+). Ta-doped hex-WO3 was synthesized by the hydrothermal treatment of sodium tungstate dihydrate and tantalum chloride in concentrated HCl, in the presence of ammonium sulfate. Incorporating Ta into the WO3 framework caused the interlayer spacing to expand, and the band gap to shift to higher energy. The Sr(2+) adsorption capacity of Ta-doped hex-WO3 was significantly higher than that of hex-WO3. Sr(2+) adsorption reached equilibrium within 2h in acidic solution. Maximum Sr(2+) removal occurred at pH 4. Sr(2+) uptake by hex-WO3 was described better by the Freundlich model than by the Langmuir model. Sr(2+) adsorption on hex-WO3 was spontaneous under the studied conditions.

  19. Tuning Acid-Base Properties Using Mg-Al Oxide Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David H K; O'Neill, Brandon J; Lee, Jechan; Huber, George W; Dumesic, James A; Kuech, Thomas F

    2015-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to coat γ-Al2O3 particles with oxide films of varying Mg/Al atomic ratios, which resulted in systematic variation of the acid and base site areal densities. Variation of Mg/Al also affected morphological features such as crystalline phase, pore size distribution, and base site proximity. Areal base site density increased with increasing Mg content, while acid site density went through a maximum with a similar number of Mg and Al atoms in the coating. This behavior leads to nonlinearity in the relationship between Mg/Al and acid/base site ratio. The physical and chemical properties were elucidated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 physisorption, and CO2 and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Fluorescence emission spectroscopy of samples grafted with 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was used for analysis of base site proximity. The degree of base site clustering was correlated to acid site density. Catalytic activity in the self-condensation of acetone was dependent on sample base site density and independent of acid site density.

  20. Welding of a corrosion-resistant composite material based on VT14 titanium alloy obtained using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkovski, M. G.; Samoylenko, V. V.; Polyakov, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Chakin, I. K.; Komarov, P. N.; Ruktuev, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigates the possibility of inert gas arc welding of a double layer composite material on a titanium base with an anti-corrosive layer obtained by fused deposition of a powder mix containing tantalum and niobium over a titanium base using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere. Butt welding and fillet welding options were tested with two types of edge preparation. Welds were subjected to a metallographic examination including a structural study and an analysis of the chemical and phase composition of the welds. A conclusion was made regarding the possibility of using welding for manufacturing of items from the investigated composite material.

  1. Development of slurry erosion resistant materials by laser-based direct metal deposition process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrapareddy, Eswar

    The current research deals with the development of slurry erosion resistant materials by the laser-based direct metal deposition (LBDMD) process for different industrial applications. The work started with the development of functionally graded materials using nickel-tungsten carbide (Ni-Tung) powders and finally produced a better erosion resistant materials system by reinforcing nano-tungsten carbide particles with nickel-tungsten carbide powders. Functionally graded materials (FGMs) consisting of Ni-Tung) powders with different concentrations of tungsten carbide particles are successfully deposited by the LBDMD process on 4140 Steel substrates. The slurry erosion behavior of the Ni-Tung FGMs is studied at different impingement angles. The slurry erosion tests are performed at Southern Methodist University's Center for Laser Aided Manufacturing using a centrifugal force driven erosion testing machine. For the purpose of comparison, Ni-Tung 40 depositions and 4140 steel samples are also tested. The results indicate that the LBDMD process is able to deposit defect-free Ni-Tung FGMs with a uniform distribution of tungsten carbide particles in a nickel-based matrix. The slurry erosion resistance of Ni-Tung FGMs is observed to be much better than that of the Ni-Tung 40 and 4140 steels. The superior slurry erosion resistance of Ni-Tung FGMs is attributed to the presence of large amounts of very hard tungsten carbide particles. The material removal rate (MRR) from erosion decreases with a decrease in the impingement angle, except at a 45 degree impingement angle on 4140 steel. The relationship among the material removal rates, the craters depth of penetration, the areas of the craters formed, the average surface roughness values, and the impingement angles is established for Ni-Tung FGMs, Ni-Tung 40, and 4140 steels. The surface profiles of the eroded samples are analyzed by measuring the depth of penetration of the craters formed by the slurry jet using a needle

  2. Effect factors of wear particles deposition in the ferrogram based on grey relative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a lot of ferrographic experiments have been made by means of rotary fer-rograph and ferroscope. The oil sample of the experiments has been collected from slip diesel en-gines. The data of the experiments has been analyzed based on grey relative analysis and relativeorder. The result of grey relative analysis shows that the effect of the dilution ratio of the oil sampleis the most key factor, in which the volume and the dilution ratio of the oil sample, and the effect ofthe rotation speed of the magnetic disc on the deposition state of wear particles are investigated.This conclusion is in accordance with the orthogonal experiment based on the same oil sample. Itprovides a new practical method for ferrographic experimental analysis.

  3. Optical granulometric analysis of sedimentary deposits by color segmentation-based software: OPTGRAN-CS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, G. Moreno; Sarocchi, D.; Santana, E. Arce; Borselli, L.

    2015-12-01

    The study of grain size distribution is fundamental for understanding sedimentological environments. Through these analyses, clast erosion, transport and deposition processes can be interpreted and modeled. However, grain size distribution analysis can be difficult in some outcrops due to the number and complexity of the arrangement of clasts and matrix and their physical size. Despite various technological advances, it is almost impossible to get the full grain size distribution (blocks to sand grain size) with a single method or instrument of analysis. For this reason development in this area continues to be fundamental. In recent years, various methods of particle size analysis by automatic image processing have been developed, due to their potential advantages with respect to classical ones; speed and final detailed content of information (virtually for each analyzed particle). In this framework, we have developed a novel algorithm and software for grain size distribution analysis, based on color image segmentation using an entropy-controlled quadratic Markov measure field algorithm and the Rosiwal method for counting intersections between clast and linear transects in the images. We test the novel algorithm in different sedimentary deposit types from 14 varieties of sedimentological environments. The results of the new algorithm were compared with grain counts performed manually by the same Rosiwal methods applied by experts. The new algorithm has the same accuracy as a classical manual count process, but the application of this innovative methodology is much easier and dramatically less time-consuming. The final productivity of the new software for analysis of clasts deposits after recording field outcrop images can be increased significantly.

  4. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Stavarache, Ionel

    2017-07-21

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling of nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. It is reported here the significant progress introduced by synthesis procedure to the in-situ structuring of Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films by heating the substrate at low temperature, 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency of 850 %. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the efort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  5. Near room-temperature direct encapsulation of organic photovoltaics by plasma-based deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, Alberto; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M.; Kippelen, Bernard; Creatore, Mariadriana; Graham, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used for the deposition of environmental barriers directly onto organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs) at near room temperature (30 °C). To study the effect of the ALD process on the organic materials forming the device, the precursor diffusion and intermixing at the interface during the growth of different plasma-assisted ALD inorganic barriers (i.e. Al2O3 and TiO2) onto the organic photoactive layer (P3HT:ICBA) was investigated. Depth profile x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the composition of the organic/inorganic interface to investigate the infiltration of the plasma-assisted ALD precursors into the photoactive layer as a function of the precursor dimension, the process temperature, and organic layer morphology. The free volume in the photoactive layer accessible to the ALD precursor was characterized by means of ellipsometric porosimetry (EP) and spectroscopic ellipsometry as a function of temperature. The organic layer is shown to exhibit free volume broadening at high temperatures, increasing the infiltration depth of the ALD precursor into the photoactive layer. Furthermore, based on previous investigations, the intrinsic permeation properties of the inorganic layers deposited by plasma-assisted ALD were predicted from the nano-porosity content as measured by EP and found to be in the 10-6 gm-2 d-1 range. Insight from our studies was used to design and fabricate multilayer barriers synthesized at near-room temperature by plasma-assisted ALD in combination with plasma-enhanced CVD onto organic photovoltaic (OPVs) devices. Encapsulated OPVs displayed shelf-lifetimes up to 1400 h at ambient conditions.

  6. Ultrasonic Spray-Assisted Solution-Based Vapor-Deposition of Aluminum Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Jinchun; Katori, Shigetaka; Ikenoue, Takumi; Fujita, Shizuo

    2011-02-01

    Aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) thin films were fabricated by a vapor-deposition technique from its methanol solution, that is, by the ultrasonic-assisted mist deposition technique. The application of high ultrasonic power to the Alq3-methanol mixture resulted in a stable and transparent solution. Mist particles formed by ultrasonic atomization of the solution were used as the source for vapor-deposition at the substrate temperature of 100-200 °C. Optical absorption and photoluminescence characteristics indicated the formation of Alq3 thin films. The results promise the formation of thin films of a variety of organic materials by the solution-based technique.

  7. Functional and structural fatigue of titanium tantalum high temperature shape memory alloys (HT SMAs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niendorf, T., E-mail: Thomas.Niendorf@iwt.tu-freiberg.de [Institute of Materials Engineering, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Krooß, P. [Lehrstuhl für Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), University of Paderborn, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Batyrsina, E. [Institut für Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Paulsen, A.; Motemani, Y.; Ludwig, A.; Buenconsejo, P.; Frenzel, J.; Eggeler, G. [Institut für Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Maier, H.J. [Institut für Werkstoffkunde (Materials Science), Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30823 Garbsen (Germany)

    2015-01-03

    Due to their high work output and good mechanical properties, actuators made from shape memory alloys (SMAs) are used in numerous applications. Unfortunately, SMAs such as nickel–titanium (Ni–Ti) can only be employed at temperatures up to about 100 °C. Lately, high-temperature shape memory alloys (HT SMAs) have been introduced to overcome this limitation. Ternary systems based on Ni–Ti have been intensively characterized and alloys are available that can operate at elevated temperatures. However, these alloys either contain substantial amounts of expensive noble elements like platinum and palladium, or the materials are brittle. The titanium–tantalum (Ti–Ta) system has been developed to overcome these issues. Binary Ti–Ta provides relatively high M{sub S} temperature combined with excellent workability, but it suffers from fast cyclic degradation. By alloying with third elements this drawback can be overcome: The ternary Ti–Ta–Al alloy shows overall promising properties as will be shown in the present work. In-situ thermo-mechanical cycling experiments were conducted and allowed for evaluation of the factors affecting the functional and structural fatigue of this alloy. Functional fatigue is dominated by ω-phase evolution, while structural fatigue is triggered by an interplay of ω-phase induced embrittlement and deformation constraints imposed by unsuitable texture. In addition, a concept for fatigue life extension proposed very recently for binary Ti–Ta, is demonstrated to be also applicable for the ternary Ti–Ta–Al.

  8. Bounds on the Rate Dependent Plastic Flow of Tantalum up to 75 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan; Patterson, Reed; Kumar, Mukul

    2013-06-01

    We report improvements in a general thermodynamics-based velocimetry analysis method designed to extract strength and plastic-flow information from shock and ramp compression experiments. The method allows extraction of thermodynamic histories, including deviatoric stress and plastic strain, including nonsteady rate-dependent features. The improved method includes free-surface corrections for pullback waves, reduced noise sensitivity, and application to pressures of 75 GPa and higher. Specifically, we show results for shock waves in tantalum, including bounds on the plastic flow behavior at strain rates exceeding 1e7/s.The deviatoric stress appears to be almost entirely dependent on strain rate, with very little pressure dependence.The deviatoric stress in the post-shock plateau state appears to be very small at higher pressures, calling into question the value of considering strength as a steady- state pressure-dependent quantity. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Dependence of ZnO-based dye-sensitized solar cell characteristics on the layer deposition method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anca Dumbrava; Gabriel Prodan; Adrian Georgescu; Florin Moscalu

    2015-02-01

    The selection of a proper method for the semiconductor layer deposition is an important requirement towards a high efficiency for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We compared three techniques for deposition of the semiconductor thin layer in ZnO-based DSSCs, in order to determine the dependence between the deposition method, the ZnO film properties and finally the DSSCs characteristics. For this purpose, we varied the method used for deposition of the semiconductor film and we replaced ZnO with Al-doped ZnO. The nanostructured films morphology was analysed by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The optical properties were examined by UV–visible spectroscopy and the bandgap energies were calculated using the Tauc equation. The higher fill factor value was registered for DSSCs based on the ZnO film obtained by electrochemical method, but the higher efficiency was registered for doctorblading method.

  10. Post-irradiation analysis of the tantalum container of an ISOLDE LBE target

    CERN Document Server

    Noah, E; Bruetsch, R; Catherall, R; Gavillet, D; Krbanjevic, J; Linder, H P; Martin, M; Neuhausen, J; Schumann, D; Stora, T; Zanini, L

    2012-01-01

    CERN-ISOLDE operates a range of oxides, carbides, refractory metal foils and liquid metal targets for the production of radioactive ion beams. Following irradiation with a pulsed beam of 1 GeV and 1.4 GeV protons at temperatures reaching 600 degrees C, the tantalum container of a liquid lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) target was examined. A thin layer of Pb/Bi was observed on the inner surface of the container. A sample of the surface prepared using the focused ion beam technique was investigated using SEM and EDX. Results show a higher concentration of bismuth at the interface with tantalum and micron-sized cracks in the tantalum filled with LBE. Implications of these results for the lifetime of the target container which has been known to fail under pulsed beam operation are discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reliability of High-Voltage Tantalum Capacitors. Parts 3 and 4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Weibull grading test is a powerful technique that allows selection and reliability rating of solid tantalum capacitors for military and space applications. However, inaccuracies in the existing method and non-adequate acceleration factors can result in significant, up to three orders of magnitude, errors in the calculated failure rate of capacitors. This paper analyzes deficiencies of the existing technique and recommends more accurate method of calculations. A physical model presenting failures of tantalum capacitors as time-dependent-dielectric-breakdown is used to determine voltage and temperature acceleration factors and select adequate Weibull grading test conditions. This model is verified by highly accelerated life testing (HALT) at different temperature and voltage conditions for three types of solid chip tantalum capacitors. It is shown that parameters of the model and acceleration factors can be calculated using a general log-linear relationship for the characteristic life with two stress levels.

  12. Influence of Electrolyte on ESR of Medium Voltage Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘仲娥; 宋金荣; 陈晓静; 李忆莲; 桂娟

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of working electrolyte on high-frequency electrical performance of wet tantalum capacitors is studied. Emphasis is especially put on the study of the contribution of depolariser in reducing Equivalent Series Resistance(ESR). According to the theory of depolarization in electrochemistry and the theory of cathode capacitance of electrolytic capacitor, different kinds of depolarisers are added separately into the foregone electrolyte. Then capacitors are assembled with tantalum cores dipped with the compounded electrolytes. The best depolariser and its concentration in the whole electrolyte could be selected according to the test results of the capacitance and ESR of the capacitors. The results of our experiment show that depolariser Fe2(SO4)3 used in working electrolyte of 100 V/100 μF wet tantalum capacitors can help to obtain lower ESR and higher capacitance at frequency from 0.1 kHz to 100 kHz.

  13. Evaluation of Ferrite Chip Beads as Surge Current Limiters in Circuits with Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Limiting resistors are currently required to be connected in series with tantalum capacitors to reduce the risk of surge current failures. However, application of limiting resistors decreases substantially the efficiency of the power supply systems. An ideal surge current limiting device should have a negligible resistance for DC currents and high resistance at frequencies corresponding to transients in tantalum capacitors. This work evaluates the possibility of using chip ferrite beads (FB) as such devices. Twelve types of small size FBs from three manufacturers were used to evaluate their robustness under soldering stresses and at high surge current spikes associated with transients in tantalum capacitors. Results show that FBs are capable to withstand current pulses that are substantially greater than the specified current limits. However, due to a sharp decrease of impedance with current, FBs do not reduce surge currents to the required level that can be achieved with regular resistors.

  14. Bacterial adherence on fluorinated carbon based coatings deposited on polyethylene surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terriza, A; Del Prado, G; Perez, A Ortiz; Martinez, M J; Puertolas, J A; Manso, D Molina; Gonzalez-Elipe, A R; Yubero, F; Barrena, E Gomez; Esteban, J, E-mail: antonia.terriza@icmse.csic.es

    2010-11-01

    Development of intrinsically antibacterial surfaces is of key importance in the context of prostheses used in orthopaedic surgery. In this work we present a thorough study of several plasma based coatings that may be used with this functionality: diamond like carbon (DLC), fluorine doped DLC (F-DLC) and a high fluorine content carbon-fluor polymer (CF{sub X}). The study correlates the surface chemistry and hydrophobicity of the coating surfaces with their antibacterial performance. The coatings were deposited by RF-plasma assisted deposition at room temperature on ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) samples. Fluorine content and relative amount of C-C and C-F bond types was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hydrophobicity by water contact angle measurements. Adherence of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to non-coated and coated UHMWPE samples was evaluated. Comparisons of the adherence performance were evaluated using a paired t test (two materials) and a Kruskall Wallis test (all the materials). S. aureus was statistically significant (p< 0.001) less adherent to DLC and F-DLC surfaces than S. epidermidis. Both bacteria showed reduction of adherence on DLC/UHMWPE. For S. aureus, reduction of bacterial adherence on F-DLC/UHMWPE was statistically significant respect to all other materials.

  15. Surface Preparation and Deposited Gate Oxides for Gallium Nitride Based Metal Oxide Semiconductor Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. McIntyre

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The literature on polar Gallium Nitride (GaN surfaces, surface treatments and gate dielectrics relevant to metal oxide semiconductor devices is reviewed. The significance of the GaN growth technique and growth parameters on the properties of GaN epilayers, the ability to modify GaN surface properties using in situ and ex situ processes and progress on the understanding and performance of GaN metal oxide semiconductor (MOS devices are presented and discussed. Although a reasonably consistent picture is emerging from focused studies on issues covered in each of these topics, future research can achieve a better understanding of the critical oxide-semiconductor interface by probing the connections between these topics. The challenges in analyzing defect concentrations and energies in GaN MOS gate stacks are discussed. Promising gate dielectric deposition techniques such as atomic layer deposition, which is already accepted by the semiconductor industry for silicon CMOS device fabrication, coupled with more advanced physical and electrical characterization methods will likely accelerate the pace of learning required to develop future GaN-based MOS technology.

  16. Preparation and mechanical properties of two nickel base alloy coatings achieved by electrospark deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping ZHANG; Lin MA; Zhijie LIANG; Junjun ZHAO

    2011-01-01

    Ni398 and Ni818 base alloy coatings were deposited on 1045 steel by electrospark deposition technique (ESD).Forming properties,thickness,microhardness and wear resistance of the coatings were investigated.The chemical composition and crosssection morphology were analyzed through energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) and metalloscope.The results show that the technological parameter window of Ni398 is larger than that of Ni818 electrode.However,other properties of the Ni818 coating,such as thickness and microhardness,were better than those of the Ni398 coating.Especially the wornout volume of Ni818 coating is only 1/6 of that for 1045 steel and 1/3 for Ni398 coating.Chemical composition analysis indicated that the addition of Mo promoted grain refinement of nickel alloy.Metallographic analysis shows that the molten droplets of Ni398 coatings have an average structure thickness of 20-40 μm while the microstructure of Ni818 coatings is flat with width of 5-20 μm.

  17. Electrospun TiO2 nanofibre-based gas sensors fabricated by AC electrophoresis deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Z Karimi; J Esmaeilzadeh; E Marzbanrad

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, gas sensing properties of the sensor based on titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofibres are reported. These nanofibres were synthesized through electrospinning of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) / titanium tetra isopropoxide. Calcination of the obtained amorphous PVP/TiO2 nanofibres resulted in nanofibres of TiO2 with the same morphology. In this step, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were applied in order to analyse these nanofibres. Then, nanofibres of TiO2 were deposited selectively by AC electrophoretic deposition on interdigitated electrodes and exposed to different concentrations of NO2 (8–50 p.p.m.) at 450–550°C. Gas sensing measurements illustrated that this sensor had adequate response to target gas at 450°C. The maximum response of gas sensors, (the ratio of sensor resistances $S = R_{\\text{gas}}/R_{\\text{N2}}$), achieved was around 30 for 50 p.p.m. NO2 at 450°C.

  18. Experimental and numerical studies on laser-based powder deposition of slurry erosion resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Prabu

    Slurry erosion (the removal of material caused by the randomly moving high velocity liquid-solid particle mixture) is a serious issue in crude oil drilling, mining, turbines, rocket nozzles, pumps, and boiler tubes that causes excessive downtime and high operating costs as a result of premature part failure. The goal of this research is to enhance the service life of high-value components subjected to slurry erosion by utilizing the concept of functionally graded metal-ceramic composite material (FGMCCM) in which the favorable properties of metal (toughness, ductility, etc.) and ceramic (hardness) are tailored smoothly to improve erosion resistance. Among the potential manufacturing processes, such as the laser-based powder deposition (LBPD), the plasma transferred arc (PTA), and the thermal spray the LBPD process offers good composition and microstructure control with a high deposition rate in producing the FGMCCM. This research focuses on the development of nickel-tungsten carbide (Ni-WC) based FGMCCM using the LBPD process for applications the above mentioned. The LBPD of Ni-WC involves the introduction of Ni and WC powder particle by an inert gas into the laser-formed molten pool at the substrate via nozzles. The LBPD of Ni-WC includes complex multi-physical interactions between the laser beam, Ni-WC powder, substrate, and carrier and shielding gases that are governed by a number of process variables such as laser power, scanning speed, and powder flow rate. In order to develop the best Ni-WC based slurry erosion resistant material using the LBPD process, the following challenges associated with the fabrication and the performance evaluation need to be addressed: 1) flow behavior of the Ni-WC powder and its interaction with the laser, 2) the effect of the process variables, the material compositions, and the thermo-physical properties on thermal cycles, temperature gradient, cooling rate, and residual stress formation within the material and the subsequent

  19. Synthesis of designed materials by laser-based direct metal deposition technique: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huan

    Direct metal deposition (DMD), a laser-cladding based solid freeform fabrication technique, is capable of depositing multiple materials at desired composition which makes this technique a flexible method to fabricate heterogeneous components or functionally-graded structures. The inherently rapid cooling rate associated with the laser cladding process enables extended solid solubility in nonequilibrium phases, offering the possibility of tailoring new materials with advanced properties. This technical advantage opens the area of synthesizing a new class of materials designed by topology optimization method which have performance-based material properties. For better understanding of the fundamental phenomena occurring in multi-material laser cladding with coaxial powder injection, a self-consistent 3-D transient model was developed. Physical phenomena including laser-powder interaction, heat transfer, melting, solidification, mass addition, liquid metal flow, and species transportation were modeled and solved with a controlled-volume finite difference method. Level-set method was used to track the evolution of liquid free surface. The distribution of species concentration in cladding layer was obtained using a nonequilibrium partition coefficient model. Simulation results were compared with experimental observations and found to be reasonably matched. Multi-phase material microstructures which have negative coefficients of thermal expansion were studied for their DMD manufacturability. The pixel-based topology-optimal designs are boundary-smoothed by Bezier functions to facilitate toolpath design. It is found that the inevitable diffusion interface between different material-phases degrades the negative thermal expansion property of the whole microstructure. A new design method is proposed for DMD manufacturing. Experimental approaches include identification of laser beam characteristics during different laser-powder-substrate interaction conditions, an

  20. Evaluation of wet tantalum capacitors after exposure to extended periods of ripple current, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The application of tantalum capacitors in the Viking Lander includes dc voltage and ripple current electrical stress, high temperature during nonoperating times (sterilization), and high vibration and shock loads. The capacitors must survive these severe environments without any degradation if reliable performance is to be achieved. A test program was established to evaluate both wet-slug tantalum and wet-foil capacitors under conditions accurately duplicating actual Viking applications. Test results of the electrical performance characteristics during extended periods of ripple current, the characteristics of the internal silver migration as a function of extended periods of ripple current, and the existence of any memory characteristics are presented.

  1. Evaluation of wet tantalum capacitors after exposure to extended periods of ripple current, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G. W.; Lasharr, J. C.; Shumaker, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The application of tantalum capacitors in the Viking Lander includes both dc voltage and ripple current electrical stress, high temperature during nonoperating times (sterilization), and high vibration and shock loads. The capacitors must survive these severe environments without any degradation if reliable performance is to be achieved. A test program was established to evaluate both wet-slug tantalum and wet-foil capacitors under conditions accurately duplicating actual Viking applications. Test results of the electrical performance characteristics during extended periods of ripple current, the characteristics of the internal silver migration as a function for extended periods of ripple current, and the existence of any memory characteristics are presented.

  2. EBSD coupled to SEM in situ annealing for assessing recrystallization and grain growth mechanisms in pure tantalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerisit, C; Logé, R E; Jacomet, S; Llorca, V; Bozzolo, N

    2013-06-01

    An in situ annealing stage has been developed in-house and integrated in the chamber of a Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Electron BackScattered Diffraction system. Based on the Joule effect, this device can reach the temperature of 1200°C at heating rates up to 100°C/s, avoiding microstructural evolutions during heating. A high-purity tantalum deformed sample has been annealed at variable temperature in the range 750°C-1030°C, and classical mechanisms of microstructural evolutions such as recrystallization and grain coarsening phenomena have been observed. Quantitative measurements of grain growth rates provide an estimate of the mean grain boundary mobility, which is consistent with the value estimated from physical parameters reported for that material. In situ annealing therefore appears to be suited for complementing bulk measurements at relatively high temperatures, in the context of recrystallization and grain growth in such a single-phase material.

  3. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Diaphragm Biosensors Based on Micro-Machining Technology and Chemical Solution Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new approach to the fabrication of integrated silicon-based piezoelectric diaphragm-type biosensors by using sodium potassium niobate-silver niobate (0.82KNN-0.18AN composite lead-free thin film as the piezoelectric layer. The piezoelectric diaphragms were designed and fabricated by micro-machining technology and chemical solution deposition. The fabricated device was very sensitive to the mass changes caused by various targets attached on the surface of diaphragm. The measured mass sensitivity value was about 931 Hz/μg. Its good performance shows that the piezoelectric diaphragm biosensor can be used as a cost-effective platform for nucleic acid testing.

  4. Technology of High-speed Direct Laser Deposition from Ni-based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova-Korsmik, Olga; Turichin, Gleb; Zemlyakov, Evgeniy; Babkin, Konstantin; Petrovsky, Pavel; Travyanov, Andrey

    Recently, additive manufacturing is the one of most perspective technologies; it can replace conventional methods of casting and subsequent time-consuming machining. One of the most interesting additive technologies - high-speed direct laser deposition (HSDLD) allows realizing heterophase process during the manufacturing, which there is process takes place with a partial melting of powder. This is particularly important for materials, which are sensitive to strong fluctuations of temperature treatment regimes, like nickel base alloys with high content of gamma prime phase. This alloys are interested for many industrial areas, mostly there are used in engine systems, aircraft and shipbuilding, aeronautics. Heating and cooling rates during the producing process determine structure and affect on its properties. Using HSDLD process it possible to make a products from Ni superalloys with ultrafine microstructure and satisfactory mechanical characteristics without special subsequent heatreatment.

  5. Optical Characterization of SERS Substrates Based on Porous Au Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Strelchuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The SERS (surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates based on nanocomposite porous films with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs arrays were formed using the method of the pulsed laser deposition from the back low-energy flux of erosion torch particles on the glass substrate fixed at the target plain. The dependencies of porosity, and morphology of the surface of the film regions located near and far from the torch axis on the laser ablation regime, laser pulses energy density, their number, and argon pressure in the vacuum chamber, were ascertained. The Au NPs arrays with the controllable extinction spectra caused by the local surface plasmon resonance were prepared. The possibility of the formation of SERS substrates for the detection of the Rhodamine 6G molecules with the concentration 10−10 Mol/L with the enhancement factor 4·107 was shown.

  6. Deposition and characterization of carbon nanotubes (CNTS) based films for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissanayake, Amila C.

    The advent of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has opened up lot of novel applications because of their unique electrical and mechanical properties. CNTs are well known material for its exceptional electrical, mechanical, optical, thermal and chemical properties. A single-wall nanotube (SWNT) can be either semiconducting, metallic or semi-metallic, based on its chirality and diameter. SWNTs can be used in transistor device as active channels due to high electron mobility (~10000 cm2/(V s), electrical interconnects, nano-scale circuits, field-emission displays, light-emitting devices and thermal heat sinks due to low resistivity, high current density (~109A cm-2 ) and high thermal conductivity (~3500 W m-1). Further, their high Young's modulus and fracture stress is suitable for various sensing applications such as strain/pressure and use in chemical/biological sensors. This work mainly involves the deposition of CNT-based films following two different methods via a conventional microwave chemical vapor deposition (MWCVD) and spinning CNT-composites, and explored the possibility of using CNT-based films in strain gauge applications. Deposited films are characterized and analyzed for their structure, microstructure, composition and electrical properties. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), X-ray Reflectivity (XRR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and electrical impedance measurement techniques are used to characterize the films prepared by both the above mentioned methods. The synthesis/deposition process is improved based on the observed films properties. A carbon nanotube forest grown on the Si (100) substrate with Ni as a catalyst using CVD system shows an amorphous nature due to loss of catalytic activity of Ni nano-islands. XPS and RBS data show Ni nano-particles diffused into the Si substrate and surface layer of Ni particles turns out to nickel silicide. The

  7. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Diaphragm Biosensors Based on Micro-Machining Technology and Chemical Solution Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng; Wu, Xiaoqing; Shi, Peng; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-12

    In this paper, we present a new approach to the fabrication of integrated silicon-based piezoelectric diaphragm-type biosensors by using sodium potassium niobate-silver niobate (0.82KNN-0.18AN) composite lead-free thin film as the piezoelectric layer. The piezoelectric diaphragms were designed and fabricated by micro-machining technology and chemical solution deposition. The fabricated device was very sensitive to the mass changes caused by various targets attached on the surface of diaphragm. The measured mass sensitivity value was about 931 Hz/μg. Its good performance shows that the piezoelectric diaphragm biosensor can be used as a cost-effective platform for nucleic acid testing.

  8. Carbon Deposition during CO2 Electrolysis in Ni-Based Solid-Oxide-Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Graves, Christopher R.; Blennow, P.

    2015-01-01

    of carbon deposition. The outlet gas composition at each current step was estimated based on the inlet gas composition and the reactant conversion using Faraday's law. The increase in voltage was observed at lower pCO/pCO2 ratios than that corresponding to the thermodynamic threshold for carbon formation......, the carbon formation threshold in an operating cell was investigated during electrolysis of an idealized reactant atmosphere of CO and CO2. The electrolysis current was gradually increased in steps until the cell voltage spontaneously increased, thereby indicating cell degradation and possibly the onset...... conditions for commercial systems. The effect would be even more severe on stack level, where the gas diffusion and temperature gradients are more pronounced. Initial results of the mitigation strategy of infiltrating CGO are negative, but increased performance prior to coking was observed....

  9. Wet Etching of Heat Treated Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposited Zirconium Oxide in HF Based Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Raghavan, Srini

    2008-06-01

    Alternative materials are being considered to replace silicon dioxide as gate dielectric material. Of these, the oxides of hafnium and zirconium show the most promise. However, integrating these new high-k materials into the existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process remains a challenge. One particular area of concern is the wet etching of heat treated high-k dielectrics. In this paper, work done on the wet etching of heat treated atomic layer chemical vapor deposited (ALCVD) zirconium oxide in HF based solutions is presented. It was found that heat treated material, while refractory to wet etching at room temperature, is more amenable to etching at higher temperatures when methane sulfonic acid is added to dilute HF solutions. Selectivity over SiO2 is still a concern.

  10. Fabrication of a SFF-based three-dimensional scaffold using a precision deposition system in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Young; Park, Eui Kyun; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Shin, Jung-Woog; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2008-05-01

    Recent developments in tissue-engineering techniques allow physicians to treat a range of previously untreatable conditions. In the development of such techniques, scaffolds with a controllable pore size and porosity have been manufactured using solid free-form fabrication methods to investigate cell interaction effects such as cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we describe the fabrication of scaffolds from two types of biodegradable materials using a precision deposition system that we developed. The precision deposition system uses technology that enables the manufacture of three-dimensional (3D) microstructures. The fabrication of 3D tissue-engineering scaffolds using the precision deposition system required the combination of several technologies, including motion control, thermal control, pneumatic control and CAD/CAM software. Through the fabrication and cell interaction analysis of two kinds of scaffolds using polycaprolactone and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid, feasibility of application to the tissue engineering of the developed SFF-based precision deposition system is demonstrated.

  11. Compositional Effects and Mechanical Parametric Analysis of Outwash Deposits Based on the Randomised Generation of Stone Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the distribution of the stone blocks in outwash deposits, the paper present a modeling method for the random structure of outwash deposits, in which the long axis of the stone blocks is supposed obeying a lognormal distribution. Then numerical experiments of biaxial compression using the granular discrete element method are used in the macro- and micro parametric analysis. The influences of strength of the cementation, the sizes of stone blocks, and the content of stone blocks on the peak compressive and shear strength are discussed. The micromechanical parameters of the outwash deposits are also analyzed. The proposed method offers a supplement to the mechanical characterization of outwash deposits and accounts for the limitation that indoor experiments cannot consider large stone blocks.

  12. Surface modification of stainless steel by plasma-based fluorine and silver dual ion implantation and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinonaga, Yukari; Arita, Kenji

    2009-11-01

    The aims of this study were to modify dental device surface with fluorine and silver and to examine the effectiveness of this new surface modification method. Stainless steel plates were modified by plasma-based fluorine and silver ion implantation-deposition method. The surface characteristics and brushing abrasion resistance were evaluated by XPS, contact angle and brushing abrasion test. XPS spectra of modified specimens showed the peaks of fluoride and silver. These peaks were detected even after brushing abrasion test. Water contact angle significantly increased due to implantation-deposition of both fluorine and silver ions. Moreover, the contact angle of the modified specimen was significantly higher than that of fluorine only deposited specimen with the same number of brushing strokes. This study indicates that this new surface modification method of fluorine and silver ion implantation-deposition improved the brushing abrasion resistance and hydrophobic property making it a potential antimicrobial device.

  13. Particle emission rates during electrostatic spray deposition of TiO2 nanoparticle-based photoactive coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivisto, Antti J.; Jensen, Alexander C. Ø.; Kling, Kirsten I.

    2017-01-01

    to 31μm-size particles and volatile organic compounds (VOC), as well as particle deposition onto room surfaces and on the spray gun user hand. The particle emission and deposition rates were quantified using aerosol mass balance modelling. The geometric mean particle number emission rate was 1.9×1010s-1...... and the mean mass emission rate was 381μgs-1. The respirable mass emission-rate was 65% lower than observed for the entire measured size-range. The mass emission rates were linearly scalable (±ca. 20%) to the process duration. The particle deposition rates were up to 15h-1 for......Here, we studied the particle release rate during Electrostatic spray deposition of anatase-(TiO2)-based photoactive coating onto tiles and wallpaper using a commercially available electrostatic spray device. Spraying was performed in a 20.3m3 test chamber while measuring concentrations of 5.6nm...

  14. A review of hydroxyapatite-based coating techniques: Sol-gel and electrochemical depositions on biocompatible metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asri, R I M; Harun, W S W; Hassan, M A; Ghani, S A C; Buyong, Z

    2016-04-01

    New promising techniques for depositing biocompatible hydroxyapatite-based coatings on biocompatible metal substrates for biomedical applications have continuously been exploited for more than two decades. Currently, various experimental deposition processes have been employed. In this review, the two most frequently used deposition processes will be discussed: a sol-gel dip coating and an electrochemical deposition. This study deliberates the surface morphologies and chemical composition, mechanical performance and biological responses of sol-gel dip coating as well as the electrochemical deposition for two different sample conditions, with and without coating. The review shows that sol-gel dip coatings and electrochemical deposition were able to obtain the uniform and homogeneous coating thickness and high adherent biocompatible coatings even in complex shapes. It has been accepted that both coating techniques improve bone strength and initial osseointegration rate. The main advantages and limitations of those techniques of hydroxyapatite-based coatings are presented. Furthermore, the most significant challenges and critical issues are also highlighted.

  15. Physically-based failure analysis of shallow layered soil deposits over large areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Sabatino; Castorino, Giuseppe Claudio; Iervolino, Aniello

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades, the analysis of slope stability conditions over large areas has become popular among scientists and practitioners (Cascini et al., 2011; Cuomo and Della Sala, 2013). This is due to the availability of new computational tools (Baum et al., 2002; Godt et al., 2008; Baum and Godt, 2012; Salciarini et al., 2012) - implemented in GIS (Geographic Information System) platforms - which allow taking into account the major hydraulic and mechanical issues related to slope failure, even for unsaturated soils, as well as the spatial variability of both topography and soil properties. However, the effectiveness (Sorbino et al., 2010) of the above methods it is still controversial for landslides forecasting especially depending on the accuracy of DTM (Digital Terrain Model) and for the chance that distinct triggering mechanisms may occur over large area. Among the major uncertainties, layering of soil deposits is of primary importance due to soil layer conductivity contrast and differences in shear strength. This work deals with the hazard analysis of shallow landslides over large areas, considering two distinct schematizations of soil stratigraphy, i.e. homogeneous or layered. To this purpose, the physically-based model TRIGRS (Baum et al., 2002) is firstly used, then extended to the case of layered deposit: specifically, a unique set of hydraulic properties is assumed while distinct soil unit weight and shear strength are considered for each soil layer. Both models are applied to a significant study area of Southern Italy, about 4 km2 large, where shallow deposits of air-fall volcanic (pyroclastic) soils have been affected by several landslides, causing victims, damages and economic losses. The achieved results highlight that soil volume globally mobilized over the study area highly depends on local stratigraphy of shallow deposits. This relates to the depth of critical slip surface which rarely corresponds to the bedrock contact where cohesionless coarse

  16. ‘Poor rich fen mosses’: atmospheric N-deposition and P-eutrophication in base-rich fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Base-rich fens in the Netherlands are threatened by acidification and replacement of rich-fen bryophytes by Sphagnum spp. Acidification is a natural process when input of base-rich water is reduced, and is probably accelerated by high atmospheric deposition, leading to lower pH at similar calcium le

  17. GEANT4 simulation of electron energy deposition in extended media

    CERN Document Server

    Kadri, O; Gharbi, F; Trabelsi, A

    2007-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that GEANT4 yields a consistent description of electron transport processes in semi-infinite homogeneous and heterogeneous extended media. This comparison covers the e− energy deposition profiles in a range of elements from aluminum to tantalum through molybdenum at source energies from 0.3 to 1.0 MeV and at incident angles from 0° to 60°. The good agreement between simulation results and data confirms that the Monte Carlo used code is capable of accurate electron beam energy deposition calculation even under such conditions.

  18. One-step electrochemical deposition of Schiff base cobalt complex as effective water oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Binbin; Wang, Yan; Zhan, Shuzhong; Ye, Jianshan

    2017-02-01

    Schiff base metal complexes have been applied in many fields, especially, a potential homogeneous catalyst for water splitting. However, the high overpotential, time consumed synthesis process and complicated working condition largely limit their application. In the present work, a one-step approach to fabricate Schiff base cobalt complex modified electrode is developed. Microrod clusters (MRC) and rough spherical particles (RSP) can be obtained on the ITO electrode through different electrochemical deposition condition. Both of the MRC and RSP present favorable activity for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) compared to the commercial Co3O4, taking an overpotential of 650 mV and 450 mV to drive appreciable catalytic current respectively. The highly active and stable RSP shows a Tafel plot of 84 mV dec-1 and negligible decrease of the current density for 12 h bulk electrolysis. The synthesis strategy of effective and stable catalyst in this work provide a simple method to fabricate heterogeneous OER catalyst with Schiff base metal complex.

  19. Microstructures and Wear Performance of PTAW Deposited Ni-Based Coatings with Spherical Tungsten Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewei Deng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ni-based coatings with different content of spherical tungsten carbide were deposited by plasma transfer arc welding (PTAW method on 304 austenitic stainless steel sheets in this study. The microstructure and wear property of spherical tungsten carbide particle reinforced composite coatings were investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA and sliding wear test. It is shown that the fraction of spherical tungsten carbides has an important influence on microstructure of Ni-based overlay. The Ni40 overlay consists of γ-Ni dendrites with interdendritic Ni-based eutectics, borides and carbides improving the wear resistance. In the case of composite coatings with different content of tungsten carbide, many new phases are observed, such as Ni2W4C and NiW. In addition, there are a large number of irregular structures in composite coatings, such as acicular structure and irregular stripe organization. The results of sliding wear test indicate that the mass loss of coatings is influenced by the content of tungsten carbide. The mass loss decreases with the increase of tungsten carbide fraction. At high load, the abrasive resistance of composite coating with 60 wt. % tungsten carbide is improved about 50-fold compared to that of Ni40 overlay.

  20. Si-nanocrystal-based LEDs fabricated by ion implantation and plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralvarez, M; Carreras, Josep; Navarro-Urrios, D; Lebour, Y; Garrido, B [MIND, IN2UB, Department of Electronics, University of Barcelona, C/Marti i Franques 1, PL2, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Barreto, J; DomInguez, C [IMB-CNM, CSIC, Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Morales, A, E-mail: mperalvarez@el.ub.e [INAOE, Electronics Department, Apartado 51, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2009-10-07

    An in-depth study of the physical and electrical properties of Si-nanocrystal-based MOSLEDs is presented. The active layers were fabricated with different concentrations of Si by both ion implantation and plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Devices fabricated by ion implantation exhibit a combination of direct current and field-effect luminescence under a bipolar pulsed excitation. The onset of the emission decreases with the Si excess from 6 to 3 V. The direct current emission is attributed to impact ionization and is associated with the reasonably high current levels observed in current-voltage measurements. This behaviour is in good agreement with transmission electron microscopy images that revealed a continuous and uniform Si nanocrystal distribution. The emission power efficiency is relatively low, {approx}10{sup -3}%, and the emission intensity exhibits fast degradation rates, as revealed from accelerated ageing experiments. Devices fabricated by chemical deposition only exhibit field-effect luminescence, whose onset decreases with the Si excess from 20 to 6 V. The absence of the continuous emission is explained by the observation of a 5 nm region free of nanocrystals, which strongly reduces the direct current through the gate. The main benefit of having this nanocrystal-free region is that tunnelling current flow assisted by nanocrystals is blocked by the SiO{sub 2} stack so that power consumption is strongly reduced, which in return increases the device power efficiency up to 0.1%. In addition, the accelerated ageing studies reveal a 50% degradation rate reduction as compared to implanted structures.

  1. Template-based growth of titanium dioxide nanorods by a particulate sol-electrophoretic deposition process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Reza Mohammadi; Farideh Ordikhani; Derek J. Fray; Farzad Khornamizadeh

    2011-01-01

    TiO2 nanorods have been successfully grown into a track-etched polycarbonate (PC) membrane by a particulate sol-electrophoretic deposition from an aqueous medium, The prepared sols had a narrow particle size distribution around 17 nm and excellent stability against aging, with zeta potentials in the range of 47-50 mV at pH 2. It was found that TiO2 nanorods were grown from dilute aqueous sol with a Iow, 0.1-M concentration. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis confirmed that a full conversion of titanium isopropoxide was obtained by hydrolysis, resulting in the formation of TiO2particles. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed that TiO2 nanorods dried at 100°C were a mixture of anatase and brookite phases, whereas they were a mixture of anatase and rutile structures at 500℃.Moreover, the futile content of the TiO2 nanorods was higher than that of TiO2 powders. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images confirmed that TiO2 nanorods had a smooth morphology and longitudinal uniformity in diameter. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images showed that Ti02 nanorods grown by sol-electrophoresis from the dilute aqueous sol had a dense structure with a uniform diameter of 200 nm, containing small particles with an average size of 15 nm. Simultaneous differential thermal (SDT) analysis verified that individual TiO2 nanorods, grown into a PC template, were obtained after annealing at 500℃. Based on kinetic studies, it was found that uniform TiO2 nanorods with high-quality morphology were obtained under optimum conditions at an applied potential of 0.3 V/cm and a deposition time or 60 min.

  2. Atomic layer deposition on polymer based flexible packaging materials: Growth characteristics and diffusion barrier properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeaeriaeinen, Tommi O., E-mail: tommi.kaariainen@lut.f [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Prikaatinkatu 3 E, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Maydannik, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.maydannik@lut.f [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Prikaatinkatu 3 E, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Cameron, David C., E-mail: david.cameron@lut.f [ASTRaL, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Prikaatinkatu 3 E, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Lahtinen, Kimmo, E-mail: kimmo.lahtinen@tut.f [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 541, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Johansson, Petri, E-mail: petri.johansson@tut.f [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 541, 33101 Tampere (Finland); Kuusipalo, Jurkka, E-mail: jurkka.kuusipalo@tut.f [Tampere University of Technology, Paper Converting and Packaging Technology, P.O. Box 541, 33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2011-03-01

    One of the most promising areas for the industrial application of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is for gas barrier layers on polymers. In this work, a packaging material system with improved diffusion barrier properties has been developed and studied by applying ALD on flexible polymer based packaging materials. Nanometer scale metal oxide films have been applied to polymer-coated papers and their diffusion barrier properties have been studied by means of water vapor and oxygen transmission rates. The materials for the study were constructed in two stages: the paper was firstly extrusion coated with polymer film, which was then followed by the ALD deposition of oxide layer. The polymers used as extrusion coatings were polypropylene, low and high density polyethylene, polylactide and polyethylene terephthalate. Water vapor transmission rates (WVTRs) were measured according to method SCAN-P 22:68 and oxygen transmission rates (O{sub 2}TRs) according to a standard ASTM D 3985. According to the results a 10 nm oxide layer already decreased the oxygen transmission by a factor of 10 compared to uncoated material. WVTR with 40 nm ALD layer was better than the level currently required for most common dry flexible packaging applications. When the oxide layer thickness was increased to 100 nm and above, the measured WVTRs were limited by the measurement set up. Using an ALD layer allowed the polymer thickness on flexible packaging materials to be reduced. Once the ALD layer was 40 nm thick, WVTRs and O{sub 2}TRs were no longer dependent on polymer layer thickness. Thus, nanometer scale ALD oxide layers have shown their feasibility as high quality diffusion barriers on flexible packaging materials.

  3. Tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays for the degradation of atrazine in vis-Fenton-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingxun; Zhao, Lu; Chang, Yuguang; Su, Yaling

    2012-07-30

    In order to overcome the limitation of the application of nanoparticles, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays on a Ta foil were synthesized and introduced in vis (visible light)-Fenton-like system to enhance the degradation of atrazine. At first, the anodization of tantalum foil in a mild electrolyte solution containing ethylene glycol and water (v:v=2:1) plus 0.5wt.% NH(4)F produced tantala nanotubes with an average diameter of 30nm and a length of approximately 1μm. Then the nitridation of tantala nanotube arrays resulted in the replacement of N atoms to O atoms to form tantalum (oxy)nitrides (TaON and Ta(3)N(5)), as testified by XRD and XPS analyses. The synthesized tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes absorb well in the visible region up to 600nm. Under visible light, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays were catalytically active for Fe(3+) reduction. With tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays, the degradation of atrazine and the formation of the intermediates in vis/Fe(3+)/H(2)O(2) system were significantly accelerated. This was explained by the higher concentration of Fe(2+) and thus the faster decomposition of H(2)O(2) with tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes. In addition, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes exhibited stable performance during atrazine degradation for three runs. The good performance and stability of the tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes film with the convenient separation, suggest that this film is a promising catalyst for vis-Fenton-like degradation.

  4. An Empirical Analysis on Individuals’ DepositWithdrawal Behaviors Using Data Collected through a Web-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko TAKEMURA

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate relationships between individual depositor behaviors, as to whether they will withdraw all of their deposits, and factors behind them such as the degree of trust in information sources, frequency of communication, individuals' transaction with banks, and individuals’ attributes. By doing so, we suggest possible countermeasures whereby depositors will not excessively withdraw their deposits after receiving uncertain information on the financial environment. In this paper, we analyze the relationships by using data collected through a Web-based survey. The results were as follows: First, individuals who trust in information sources such as weekly/monthly magazines, the Internet, and conversations with people at workplace would be more likely to withdraw their deposits. Second, increases in phone calls with friends and in communication frequency at neighborhood and workplaces also make depositors to withdraw funds. Third, their tendency to withdraw deposits is affected by the individuals’ attributes such as gender and education. As the recognition of the deposit insurance scheme among people seems to affect their behavior according to our analysis, we suggest that it is better that authorities advertise the function of deposit insurance schemes to prevent depositors from getting into a panic situation like bank run.

  5. Recovery of soil base saturation following termination of N deposition: Increased biological weathering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, R. W.; Högberg, P.

    2012-12-01

    Current models suggest the removal rate of base cations (i.e. calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium) from forest soils due to forest growth or forest management practices is greater than the resupply rate in many areas of North America and Europe. This is particularly concerning given the recent historical depletion of base cations from forest soils during times of high acid deposition and their critical role in buffering against acidity changes in both soils and surface waters. Because base cations are not easily replaced in soil, being primarily supplied through slow processes such as the primary weathering of parent minerals or the decomposition of organic materials, rapid removals of base cations can jeopardize the long-term fertility of forests. Using a long-term nitrogen (N) addition experiment in a Pinus sylvestris forest that has been ongoing since 1970, we examined how the availability of inorganic N mediates the recovery of base cations in forest soil and tree pools in a boreal forest in northern Sweden. Contrary to model projections, exchangeable base cations in the top 10 cm of mineral soils recovered much faster than predicted. The base saturation of mineral soils in the high N addition treatment (90 kg N ha-1), which was applied annually from 1970-1990 and has been allowed to recover for the last 22 years, was 120% of that of soil in the control treatment. Similarly, the base saturation of the upper 10 cm of mineral soil in the medium N treatment (60 kg N ha-1 yr-1) increased from 30% of that of the control in 2007 following 37 years of N addition to 80% of that of the control in 2010 following two years of recovery. Importantly, the base saturation of the low N treatment (30 kg N ha-1 yr-1) continually declined from 1970 to 2007 and remained low in 2010. Furthermore, the total calcium pool in the top 10 cm of mineral soil was significantly lower in the high and medium N treatments than in the control treatment. These results suggest there may

  6. Facile encapsulation of oxide based thin film transistors by atomic layer deposition based on ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Morteza; Babin, Nikolai; Behrendt, Andreas; Jakob, Timo; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2013-05-28

    A simplified encapsulation strategy for metal-oxide based TFTs, using ozone instead of water as an oxygen source in a low-temperature ALD process is demonstrated. Thereby, the threshold voltage remains unaltered and the hysteresis is permanently reduced. Costly energy- and time-consuming post-treatment processes can be avoided. This concept is widely applicable to various encapsulation materials (e.g., Al2 O3 , TiO2 , ZrO2 ) and metal-oxide channel semiconductors (e.g., zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO), indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO)).

  7. Effect of pH on the Electrochemical Behavior of Tantalum in Borate Buffer Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarzadeh, F. R.; Attarzadeh, N.; Vafaeian, S.; Fattah-Alhosseini, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this research, various electrochemical methods were used to investigate the electrochemical behavior of tantalum in borate buffer solutions of various pH values, ranging from 9.0 to 6.5. Potentiodynamic polarization curves revealed that tantalum showed excellent passive behavior in borate buffer solutions. The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results showed that the passive film formed on tantalum offered its best protective behavior when the pH is 8.0, with the passivity undergoing a drastic change as the pH moved toward higher values. The semiconductive behavior of the passive films formed on tantalum was investigated by employing Mott-Schottky analysis in conjunction with a point defect model. The results indicated that the passive film exhibited n-type semiconductive behavior and that donor densities were in the range of 1.958-7.242 × 1020 cm-3. Moreover, this analysis showed that the donor density and flat band potential were quite sensitive to the pH.

  8. Morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on titanium, tantalum, and chromium surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Lind, M.; Mygind, Tina;

    2007-01-01

    the interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and smooth surfaces of titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr). Mean cellular area was quantified using fluorescence microscopy (4 h). Cellular proliferation was assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and methylene blue cell counting assays (4...

  9. Transmittance and Refractive Index of the Lanthanum Strontium Aluminium Tantalum Oxide Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Bo-Qing; WANG Xiao-Ming; ZHOU Tang; ZHAO Zong-Yuan; WU Xing; CHEN Xiao-Long

    2001-01-01

    The lanthanum strontium aluminium tantalum oxide (LSAT) crystal is grown by means of a floating or pulling method. Its optical transmittance, refractive indices in visible and near-infrared areas and its dispersion curve are reported. The transparence range of LSAT is from 0.45 to 4.2μm and its refractive index is 2.0244.

  10. Electrosynthesis of tantalum borides in oxygen-free and oxygen-containing fluoride melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyakova, L.P.; Polyakov, E.G.; Makarova, O.V.;

    2001-01-01

    Results of electrosynthesis of tantalum borides in fluoride and oxyfluoride melts are compared. It is shown that the single-phase X-ray-amorphous micro-layered coatings form only in the latter case. Linear and square-wave voltammetry, complemented by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR spectroscopy...

  11. The effects of argon ion bombardment on the corrosion resistance of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, A. H.; Sari, A. H.; Shokouhy, A.

    2017-02-01

    Application of ion beam has been widely used as a surface modification method to improve surface properties. This paper investigates the effect of argon ion implantation on surface structure as well as resistance against tantalum corrosion. In this experiment, argon ions with energy of 30 keV and in doses of 1 × 1017-10 × 1017 ions/cm2 were used. The surface bombardment with inert gases mainly produces modified topography and morphology of the surface. Atomic Force Microscopy was also used to patterned the roughness variations prior to and after the implantation phase. Additionally, the corrosion investigation apparatus wear was applied to compare resistance against tantalum corrosion both before and after ion implantation. The results show that argon ion implantation has a substantial impact on increasing resistance against tantalum corrosion. After the corrosion test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyzed the samples' surface morphologies. In addition, the elemental composition is characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The purpose of this paper was to obtain the perfect condition for the formation of tantalum corrosion resistance. In order to evaluate the effect of the ion implantation on the corrosion behavior, potentiodynamic tests were performed. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the samples strongly depends on the implantation doses.

  12. Synthesis of Monodispersed Tantalum(V) oxide Nanospheres by an Ethylene Glycol Mediated Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantalum(V) oxide (Ta2O5) nanospheres have been synthesized by a very simple ethylene glycol mediated route. The two-step process involves the formation of glycolate nanoparticles and their subsequent hydrolysis and calcination to generate the final Ta2O5 nanospheres. The synthes...

  13. Design, Development, manufacture and qualification of wet-slug all-tantalum capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Specifications and qualification tests data are presented for over eleven hundred T3 case all-tantalum capacitors encompassing four ratings. The finalized product has all the advantages of the silver cased wet and is capable of withstanding some reverse potential ac ripple current.

  14. Deformation of Cases in High Capacitance Value Wet Tantalum Capacitors under Environmental Stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Internal gas pressure in hermetic wet tantalum capacitors is created by air, electrolyte vapor, and gas generated by electrochemical reactions at the electrodes. This pressure increases substantially with temperature and time of operation due to excessive leakage currents. Deformation of the case occurs when the internal pressure exceeds pressure of the environments and can raise significantly when a part operates in space. Contrary to the cylinder case wet tantalum capacitors that have external sealing by welding and internal sealing provided by the Teflon bushing and crimping of the case, no reliable internal sealing exists in the button case capacitors. Single seal design capacitors are used for high capacitance value wet tantalum capacitors manufactured per DLA L&M drawings #04003, 04005, and 10011, and require additional analysis to assure their reliable application in space systems. In this work, leakage currents and case deformation of button case capacitors were measured during different environmental test conditions. Recommendations for derating, screening and qualification testing are given. This work is a continuation of a series of NEPP reports related to quality and reliability of wet tantalum capacitors.

  15. Complex-Mediated Synthesis of Tantalum Oxyfluoride Hierarchical Nanostructures for Highly Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leilei; Gong, Haotian; Deng, Li; Long, Fei; Gu, Yu; Guan, Jianguo

    2016-04-13

    In this work, we have, for the first time, developed a facile wet-chemical route to obtain a novel photocatalytic material of tantalum oxyfluoride hierarchical nanostructures composed of amorphous cores and single crystalline TaO2F nanorod shells (ACHNs) by regulating the one-step hydrothermal process of TaF5 in a mixed solution of isopropanol (i-PrOH) and H2O. In this approach, elaborately controlling the reaction temperature and volume ratio of i-PrOH and H2O enabled TaF5 to transform into intermediate coordination complex ions of [TaOF3·2F](2-) and [TaF7](2-), which subsequently produced tantalum oxyfluoride ACHNs via a secondary nucleation and growth due to a stepwise change in hydrolysis rates of the two complex ions. Because of the unique chemical composition, crystal structure and micromorphology, the as-prepared tantalum oxyfluoride ACHNs show a more negative flat band potential, an accelerated charge transfer, and a remarkable surface area of 152.4 m(2) g(-1) contributing to increased surface reaction sites. As a result, they exhibit a photocatalytic activity for hydrogen production up to 1.95 mmol h(-1) g(-1) under the illumination of a simulated solar light without any assistance of co-catalysts, indicating that the as-prepared tantalum oxyfluoride ACHNs are a novel promising photocatalytic material for hydrogen production.

  16. Electrosynthesis of tantalum borides in oxygen-free and oxygen-containing fluoride melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyakova, L.P.; Polyakov, E.G.; Makarova, O.V.

    2001-01-01

    Results of electrosynthesis of tantalum borides in fluoride and oxyfluoride melts are compared. It is shown that the single-phase X-ray-amorphous micro-layered coatings form only in the latter case. Linear and square-wave voltammetry, complemented by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR spectroscopy...

  17. Effect of Compressive Stresses on Leakage Currents in Microchip Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Microchip tantalum capacitors are manufactured using new technologies that allow for production of small size capacitors (down to EIA case size 0402) with volumetric efficiency much greater than for regular chip capacitors. Due to a small size of the parts and leadless design they might be more sensitive to mechanical stresses that develop after soldering onto printed wiring boards (PWB) compared to standard chip capacitors. In this work, the effect of compressive stresses on leakage currents in capacitors has been investigated in the range of stresses up to 200 MPa. Significant, up to three orders of magnitude, variations of currents were observed after the stress exceeds a certain critical level that varied from 10 MPa to 180 MPa for capacitors used in this study. A stress-induced generation of electron traps in tantalum pentoxide dielectric is suggested to explain reversible variations of leakage currents in tantalum capacitors. Thermo-mechanical characteristics of microchip capacitors have been studied to estimate the level of stresses caused by assembly onto PWB and assess the risk of stress-related degradation and failures. Keywords: tantalum capacitors, leakage current, soldering, reliability, mechanical stress.

  18. Effect of oxygen deficiency on electronic properties and local structure of amorphous tantalum oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denny, Yus Rama [Department of Physics Education, University of Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa, Banten 42435 (Indonesia); Firmansyah, Teguh [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa, Banten 42435 (Indonesia); Oh, Suhk Kun [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 28644 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Jae, E-mail: hjkang@cbu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 28644 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong-Seok [Department of Physics Education, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 28644 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Sung; Chung, JaeGwan; Lee, Jae Cheol [Analytical Engineering Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon 16678 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The effect of oxygen flow rate on electronic properties and local structure of tantalum oxide thin films was studied. • The oxygen deficiency induced the nonstoichiometric state a-TaOx. • A small peak at 1.97 eV above the valence band side appeared on nonstoichiometric Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films. • The oxygen flow rate can change the local electronic structure of tantalum oxide thin films. - Abstract: The dependence of electronic properties and local structure of tantalum oxide thin film on oxygen deficiency have been investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (REELS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The XPS results showed that the oxygen flow rate change results in the appearance of features in the Ta 4f at the binding energies of 23.2 eV, 24.4 eV, 25.8, and 27.3 eV whose peaks are attributed to Ta{sup 1+}, Ta{sup 2+}, Ta{sup 3+}/Ta{sup 4+}, and Ta{sup 5+}, respectively. The presence of nonstoichiometric state from tantalum oxide (TaOx) thin films could be generated by the oxygen vacancies. In addition, XAS spectra manifested both the increase of coordination number of the first Ta-O shell and a considerable reduction of the Ta-O bond distance with the decrease of oxygen deficiency.

  19. Spatial and temporal changes in the morphology of preosteoblastic cells seeded on microstructured tantalum surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Lorentzen, M.; Andersen, L. K.

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely reported that surface morphology on the micrometer scale affects cell function as well as cell shape. In this study, we have systematically compared the influence of 13 topographically micropatterned tantalum surfaces on the temporal development of morphology, including spreadi...

  20. Tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays for the degradation of atrazine in vis-Fenton-like process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingxun, E-mail: yxdu@niglas.ac.cn [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhao, Lu [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Chang, Yuguang [School of Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, Nanjing Xiaozhuang Univeristy, Nanjing 211171 (China); Su, Yaling [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tantala nanotubes on a Ta foil were formed by anodization in a NH{sub 4}F-containing electrolyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes were active for Fe{sup 3+} reduction under visible light. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atrazine degradation by {center_dot}OH was accelerated with tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes display stable performance for atrazine degradation. - Abstract: In order to overcome the limitation of the application of nanoparticles, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays on a Ta foil were synthesized and introduced in vis (visible light)-Fenton-like system to enhance the degradation of atrazine. At first, the anodization of tantalum foil in a mild electrolyte solution containing ethylene glycol and water (v:v = 2:1) plus 0.5 wt.% NH{sub 4}F produced tantala nanotubes with an average diameter of 30 nm and a length of approximately 1 {mu}m. Then the nitridation of tantala nanotube arrays resulted in the replacement of N atoms to O atoms to form tantalum (oxy)nitrides (TaON and Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}), as testified by XRD and XPS analyses. The synthesized tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes absorb well in the visible region up to 600 nm. Under visible light, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays were catalytically active for Fe{sup 3+} reduction. With tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotube arrays, the degradation of atrazine and the formation of the intermediates in vis/Fe{sup 3+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system were significantly accelerated. This was explained by the higher concentration of Fe{sup 2+} and thus the faster decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes. In addition, tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes exhibited stable performance during atrazine degradation for three runs. The good performance and stability of the tantalum (oxy)nitrides nanotubes film with the convenient separation, suggest that this film is

  1. Deposition and Characterization of the Titanium-Based Coating by a Multi-Chamber Detonation Sprayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseenko M.Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces some of the aspects of the deposition of titanium-based coating (80-120 μm thick on aluminium samples using a multi-chamber detonation sprayer (MCDS. The characteristic feature of MCDS is that the powder is accelerated by using combustion products that are formed in MCDS chambers and are converged before entering the nozzle, where they interact with the two-phase gas-powder cloud. The microstructures and properties of the coating were characterized with the use of scanning electronic microscopes (SEM, optical microscope (OM, X-ray Diffraction (XRD techniques, and Vickers hardness tester with a 50 g test load. Wear tests were carried out using a computer controlled pin-on-disc type tribometer. It was established that MCDS has provided the conditions for formation of a dense titanium-based coating with a porosity of less than 1.0%, microhardness 810±250 HV0.05 and a specific wear rate of 2.077∙10-4 mm3(m∙N-1.

  2. Thermo-Electrochemical Cells Based on Carbon Nanotube Electrodes by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijin Qian; Mingxuan Cao; Fei Xie; Changkun Dong

    2016-01-01

    Drawbacks of low efficiency and high cost of the electrode materials have restricted the wide applications of the thermo-electrochemical cells (TECs). Due to high specific areas and electrical conductivities, the low cost multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are promising alternative electrode materials. In this work, the MWNT films of up to 16 cm2 were synthesized on stainless steel substrates by the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to make the thermo-electrochemical electrodes. MWNT electrodes based on TECs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the long-term stability tests with the potassium ferri/ferrocyanide electrolyte. The TECs reached the current density of 45.2 A m-2 and the maximum power density of 0.82 W m-2. The relative power conversion efficiency of the MWNT electrode is 50%higher than that for the Pt electrode. Meanwhile, the TECs was operated continuously for 300 h without performance degradation. With the priorities of low cost and simple fabrication, EPD-based MWNT TECs may become commercially viable.

  3. High efficiency organic-electrolyte DSSC based on hydrothermally deposited titanium carbide-carbon counter electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towannang, Madsakorn; Kumlangwan, Pantiwa; Maiaugree, Wasan; Ratchaphonsaenwong, Kunthaya; Harnchana, Viyada; Jarenboon, Wirat; Pimanpang, Samuk; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2015-07-01

    Pt-free TiC based electrodes were hydrothermally deposited onto FTO/glass substrates and used as dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) counter electrodes. A promising efficiency of 3.07% was obtained from the annealed hydrothermal TiC DSSCs based on a disulfide/thiolate electrolyte. A pronounced improvement in performance of 3.59% was achieved by compositing TiC with carbon, compared to that of a Pt DSSC, 3.84%. TEM analysis detected that the TiC particle surfaces were coated by thin carbon layer (7 nm). The SAED pattern and Raman spectrum of TiC-carbon films suggested that the carbon layer was composed of amorphous and graphite carbon. The formation of graphite on the TiC nanoparticles plays a crucial role in enhancing the film's reduction current to 10.12 mA/cm2 and in reducing the film impedance to 237.63 Ω, resulting in a high efficiency of the TiC-carbon DSSC. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. New exploration methods for platinum and rhodium deposits poor in base-metal sulphides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohnenstetter, M.; Johan, Z.; Cocherie, A.

    1999-01-01

    of the deposits occur in Albania, in the Tropoja and Bulqiza massifs, and are part of an ophiolitic belt created in an oceanic environment during the Upper Jurassic. The other two deposits occur in Madagascar, in the Andohankiranomena and Lavotrafo ultramafic massifs, and are within a Pan-African rifted zone.A Pt...

  5. Prediction Model Based on the Grey Theory for Tackling Wax Deposition in Oil Pipelines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Wu; Shujuan Qiu; Jianfeng Liu; Ling Zhao

    2005-01-01

    Problems involving wax deposition threaten seriously crude pipelines both economically and operationally. Wax deposition in oil pipelines is a complicated problem having a number of uncertainties and indeterminations. The Grey System Theory is a suitable theory for coping with systems in which some information is clear and some is not, so it is an adequate model for studying the process of wax deposition.In order to predict accurately wax deposition along a pipeline, the Grey Model was applied to fit the data of wax deposition rate and the thickness of the deposited wax layer on the pipe-wall, and to give accurate forecast on wax deposition in oil pipelines. The results showed that the average residential error of the Grey Prediction Model is smaller than 2%. They further showed that this model exhibited high prediction accuracy. Our investigation proved that the Grey Model is a viable means for forecasting wax deposition.These findings offer valuable references for the oil industry and for firms dealing with wax cleaning in oil pipelines.

  6. Synthesis of NPN-Coordinated Tantalum Alkyl Complexes and Their Hydrogenolysis: Isolation of a Terminal Tantalum Hydride Incorporating a Doubly Cyclometalated NPN Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batke, Sonja; Sietzen, Malte; Wadepohl, Hubert; Ballmann, Joachim

    2017-05-01

    The closely related benzylene-linked diaminophosphines PhP(CH2C6H4-o-NHPh)2 (AH2) and PhP(C6H4-o-CH2NHXyl)2 (BH2 with Xyl = 3,5-Me2C6H3) were employed for the synthesis of tantalum(V) alkyls, which were then studied with respect to hydrogenolysis. In the case of AH2, the tantalum trimethyl complex [Ta(A)Me3] (1) and the tantalum hydrocarbyl complex [Ta(A)(CH2SiMe3)(η(2)-EtC≡CEt)] (2) were prepared from the ligand's dilithium salt (A)Li2(diox). Upon hydrogenolysis of 1 and 2, the formation of methane and SiMe4, respectively, was observed, but well-defined tantalum hydrides could not be detected. In the case of BH2, the cyclometalated species [Ta(B*)(NMe2)2] (3 with B* = κ(4)-N,P,N,C-(PhP(C6H4-o-CH2NXyl)(C6H4-o-CHNXyl))(3-)) was isolated and converted to the corresponding diiodo species [Ta(B*)I2] (4). Treatment of 4 with LiCH2SiMe3 resulted in the isolation of the corresponding dialkyl complex [Ta(B*)(CH2SiMe3)2] (5), which was converted to the doubly cyclometalated monoalkyl complexes [Ta(B**)(CH2SiMe3)(PMe3)] (6 with B** = κ(5)-C,N,P,N,C-(PhP(C6H4-o-CHNXyl)2)(4-)) and [Ta(B**)(CH2SiMe3)(dmpe)] (7) via reaction with PMe3 and dmpe, respectively. In contrast to 5 and 6, 7 was found to react cleanly with dihydrogen to afford the corresponding terminal tantalum(V) hydride [Ta(B**)(H)(dmpe)] (8). Upon reaction of 7 with D2, the deuteride [Ta(d2-B**)(D)(dmpe)] (9) was obtained and found to contain deuterium atoms in the methine positions of both tantalaaziridine subunits. The partially deuterated derivatives [Ta(B**)(D)(dmpe)] (10) and [Ta(d2-B**)(H)(dmpe)] (11) were generated via reaction of 8 and 9 with PhSiD3 and PhSiH3, respectively. Prior to the addition of gaseous D2 or H2, no H/D scrambling was observed in 10 or 11, indicating that the exchange of the methine positions proceeds via addition of D2 or H2 across the tantalaaziridine Ta-C bonds.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pradip; Singh, Arvind; Topkar, Anita; Dusane, Rajiv

    2015-04-01

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and 10B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 μm and 0.5 μm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhari, Pradip, E-mail: pradipcha@gmail.com [Semiconductor Thin Films and Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai – 400076 (India); Singh, Arvind, E-mail: arvindsingh1884@gmail.com [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai – 400085 (India); Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita.topkar@gmail.com [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai – 400085 (India); Dusane, Rajiv, E-mail: rodusane@iitb.ac.in [Semiconductor Thin Films and Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai – 400076 (India)

    2015-04-11

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and {sup 10}B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 µm and 0.5 µm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  9. Observation- and model-based estimates of particulate dry nitrogen deposition to the oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Alex R.; Kanakidou, Maria; Altieri, Katye E.; Daskalakis, Nikos; Okin, Gregory S.; Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Dentener, Frank; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Sarin, Manmohan M.; Duce, Robert A.; Galloway, James N.; Keene, William C.; Singh, Arvind; Zamora, Lauren; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Rohekar, Shital S.; Prospero, Joseph M.

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) emissions to the atmosphere have increased significantly the deposition of nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) to the surface waters of the open ocean, with potential impacts on marine productivity and the global carbon cycle. Global-scale understanding of the impacts of N deposition to the oceans is reliant on our ability to produce and validate models of nitrogen emission, atmospheric chemistry, transport and deposition. In this work, ˜ 2900 observations of aerosol NO3- and NH4+ concentrations, acquired from sampling aboard ships in the period 1995-2012, are used to assess the performance of modelled N concentration and deposition fields over the remote ocean. Three ocean regions (the eastern tropical North Atlantic, the northern Indian Ocean and northwest Pacific) were selected, in which the density and distribution of observational data were considered sufficient to provide effective comparison to model products. All of these study regions are affected by transport and deposition of mineral dust, which alters the deposition of N, due to uptake of nitrogen oxides (NOx) on mineral surfaces. Assessment of the impacts of atmospheric N deposition on the ocean requires atmospheric chemical transport models to report deposition fluxes; however, these fluxes cannot be measured over the ocean. Modelling studies such as the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), which only report deposition flux, are therefore very difficult to validate for dry deposition. Here, the available observational data were averaged over a 5° × 5° grid and compared to ACCMIP dry deposition fluxes (ModDep) of oxidised N (NOy) and reduced N (NHx) and to the following parameters from the Tracer Model 4 of the Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (TM4): ModDep for NOy, NHx and particulate NO3- and NH4+, and surface-level particulate NO3- and NH4+ concentrations. As a model ensemble, ACCMIP can be expected to be more robust than

  10. Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium surface coated with amorphous tantalum pentoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ying-Sui [Department of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Jean-Heng [Dental Department, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) possesses good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. This study aimed to improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) by coating it with an amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} surface layer. An amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer was prepared on the Ti surface using a simple hydrolysis–condensation process at room temperature. The surface characteristics of the test specimens were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and contact angle measurements. The corrosion resistance of the test specimens was evaluated from the potentiodynamic polarization curves and ion release measurements in simulated blood plasma (SBP). The biocompatibility of the test specimens was evaluated in terms of the protein (albumin) adsorption, cell adhesion, and cell growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). The amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer with a porous micro-/nano-scale topography, which was deposited on the Ti surface using a simple hydrolysis–condensation process, increased the corrosion resistance (i.e., increased the corrosion potential and decreased the anodic current and ion release) of the Ti in the SBP and improved the surface wettability, albumin adsorption, and cell adhesion. We conclude that the presence of an amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer on the Ti surface increased the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of Ti. - Highlights: ► Amorphous Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer was coated on Ti using simple hydrolysis–condensation process. ► Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} surface layer showed a micro-/nano-scale porous topography. ► Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer enhanced wettability and corrosion resistance of Ti. ► Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer enhanced protein adsorption, cell adhesion, and cell proliferation of Ti.

  11. Depositional Model of the Marcellus Shale in West Virginia Based on Facies Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruner, Kathy

    2011-11-14

    A lithologic analysis of well exposed Marcellus outcrops has identified six different facies in West Virginia and neighboring states: (1) light gray calcareous shale, (2) fossiliferous limestone, (3) black calcareous shale, (4) black noncalcareous shale, (5) dark gray noncalcareous shale, and (6) K-bentonite. Close interbedding of these rock types attests to a complex, ever-changing environment on the eastern foreland ramp of the Appalachian Basin. The environmental setting was clearly not a deep trough, permanently anoxic, salinity stratified, sediment starved, and populated exclusively by phytoplankton—the traditional depositional model. To the contrary, our sedimentary data suggest a rather shallow water depth, intermittent anoxia, normal-marine salinity, a fluctuating input of siliciclastic mud, and faunal communities of low and moderate diversity. Interbedding of the shale and limestone lithofacies as well as the vertical stacking of facies associations is explained most simply by fluctuations in water depth coupled with fluctuations in sediment supply. The sea floor was, at times, immediately below wave base (Facies 1 and 2), around the depth of the thermocline (Facies 2 and 3), or below the thermocline (Facies 4 and 5), relative sea level changing through two sequences of lowstand, transgression, and highstand. Simultaneously the supply of siliciclastic mud was greater at times of lowstand (increased erosion) and highstand (prograding shoreline), and the supply smaller during transgression (sediment stored in distant coastal plain).

  12. Chemical vapor deposition based tungsten disulfide (WS2) thin film transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-04-01

    Tungsten disulfide (WS2) is a layered transition metal dichalcogenide with a reported band gap of 1.8 eV in bulk and 1.32-1.4 eV in its thin film form. 2D atomic layers of metal dichalcogenides have shown changes in conductivity with applied electric field. This makes them an interesting option for channel material in field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, we show a highly manufacturable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) based simple process to grow WS2 directly on silicon oxide in a furnace and then its transistor action with back gated device with room temperature field effect mobility of 0.1003 cm2/V-s using the Schottky barrier contact model. We also show the semiconducting behavior of this WS2 thin film which is more promising than thermally unstable organic materials for thin film transistor application. Our direct growth method on silicon oxide also holds interesting opportunities for macro-electronics applications. © 2013 IEEE.

  13. Improving electrochemical performance of tin-based anodes formed via oblique angle deposition method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Deniz Polat; Ozgul Keles

    2014-12-01

    An oblique angle electron beam co-deposition technique was used to fabricate nanostructured Sn-based thin films: Sn, Cu–Sn and Cu–Sn–C. The morphological and structural properties of the films were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thin film X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The electrochemical (CV and EIS) and the galvanostatic test results demonstrated that the addition of Cu with or without C affected the electrochemical performance of the thin film positively since Cu and C improved both the mechanical and the electrical properties of the nanostructured Sn thin film electrode. The high cycleability and capacity retention were achieved when the nanostructured Cu–Sn–C thin film was used as an anode material since C increased the mechanical tolerance of the thin film to the volume expansion due to its grain refiner effect. Cu not only improved the electrical conductivity and the adhesion of the film to substrate but also the mechanical tolerance of the film with its ductile property.

  14. Graphene-based LbL deposited films: further study of electrical and gas sensing properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabok A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-surfactant composite materials obtained by the ultrasonic exfoliation of graphite powder in the presence of ionic surfactants (either CTAB or SDS were utilised to construct thin films using layer-by-layer (LbL electrostatic deposition technique. A series of graphene-based thin films were made by alternating layers of either graphene-SDS with polycations (PEI or PAH or graphene-CTAB with polyanions (PSS. Also, graphene-phthalocyanine composite films were produced by alternating layers of graphene-CTAB with tetrasulfonated nickel phthalocyanine. Graphene-surfactant LbL films exhibited good electric conductivity (about 0.1 S/cm of semiconductor type with a band gap of about 20 meV. Judging from UV-vis spectra measurements, graphene-phthalocyanine LbL films appeared to form joint π-electron system. Gas sensing testing of such composite films combining high conductivity of graphene with the gas sensing abilities of phthalocyanines showed substantial changes (up to 10% in electrical conductivity upon exposure to electro-active gases such as HCl and NH3.

  15. Effect of temperature on deposition layer formation in HBr/N2/fluorocarbon-based plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Taku; Yokogawa, Kenetsu; Mori, Masahito

    2017-06-01

    The effects of wafer temperature on etching rate and surface composition were investigated to clarify the surface reaction mechanism under HBr/N2/fluorocarbon-based gas plasma for developing a process for three-dimensional NAND flash devices. The etching rates of both polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) and SiO2 were found to increase at a wafer temperature of 20 °C as compared with those at 60 °C. Comparing the gas combination of fluorocarbon/N2 and HBr/N2 mixtures, the temperature dependence of SiO2 etching rates was considered to relevant to the sticking probability of fluorocarbon polymers. To determine the cause of the temperature dependence of the poly-Si etching rate, surface composition was evaluated by thermal-desorption-spectroscopy and laser-sputtered-neutral-mass-spectrometry analyses. Ammonium bromide was confirmed in the deposition film at a wafer temperature of 20 °C. The observed increase in poly-Si etching rate at lower temperatures was possibly caused by increased amounts of nitrogen, hydrogen, and bromine fixed to the surface with the formation of ammonium bromide.

  16. Organic Photovoltaic Cells Based on PbPc Nanocolumns Prepared by Glancing Angle Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic small material lead phthalocyanine (PbPc nanocolumns were prepared via glancing angle deposition (GLAD on indium tin oxide (ITO coated glass substrates. Organic electron acceptor materials fullerene (C60 was evaporated onto the nanocolumn PbPc thin films to prepare heterojunction structure ITO/PbPc/C60/Bphen/Al organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs. It is worthwhile to mention that C60 molecules firstly fill the voids between PbPc nanocolumns and then form impact C60 layer. The interpenetrating electron donor/acceptor structure effectively enhances interface between electron donor and electron acceptor, which is beneficial to exciton dissociation. The short circuit current density (Jsc of organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs based on PbPc nanocolumn was increased from 1.19 mA/cm2 to 1.74 mA/cm2, which should be attributed to the increase of interface between donor and acceptor. The effect of illumination intensity on the performance of OPVs was investigated by controlling the distance between light source and sample, and the Jsc of two kind of OPVs was increased along with the increase of illumination intensity.

  17. Wear Characteristics of Ni-Based Hardfacing Alloy Deposited on Stainless Steel Substrate by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Reena; Limaye, P. K.; Kumar, Santosh; Kushwaha, Ram P.; Viswanadham, C. S.; Srivastava, Dinesh; Soni, N. L.; Patel, R. J.; Dey, G. K.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, dry sliding wear characteristics of the Ni-based hardfacing alloy (Ni-Mo-Cr-Si) deposited on stainless steel SS316L substrate by laser cladding have been presented. Dry sliding wear behavior of the laser clad layer was evaluated against two different counter bodies, AISI 52100 chromium steel (~850 VHN) and tungsten carbide ball (~2200 VHN) to study both adhesive and abrasive wear characteristics, in comparison with the substrate SS316L using ball on plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance was evaluated as a function of load and sliding speed for a constant sliding amplitude and sliding distance. The wear mechanisms were studied on the basis of wear surface morphology and microchemical analysis of the wear track using SEM-EDS. Laser clad layer of Ni-Mo-Cr-Si on SS316L exhibited much higher hardness (~700 VHN) than that of substrate SS316L (~200 VHN). The laser clad layer exhibited higher wear resistance as compared to SS316L substrate while sliding against both the counterparts. However, the improvement in the wear resistance of the clad layer as compared to the substrate was much higher while sliding against AISI 52100 chromium steel than that while sliding against WC, at the same contact stress intensity.

  18. Carbon Deposition Onto Ni-Based Catalysts for Combined Steam/CO2 Reforming of Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Park, Yoon Hwa; Moon, Dong Ju; Park, Nam Cook; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-02-01

    The present study was performed to suppress carbon deposition by Ce and Fe onto Ni-based catalysts in combined steam/CO2 reforming of methane (CSCRM), which is a process for producing synthesis gas (H2:CO = 2:1) for gas-to-liquids (GTL). The catalytic reaction was evaluated at 900 degrees C and 20 bar with a reactant feed ratio CH4:CO2:H20:Ar = 1:0.8:1.3:1 and gas hourly space velocity GHSV = 25,000 h(-1). The Ce and Fe modified Ni/gamma-A120, catalyst was characterized by BET surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), H2 chemisorption, CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and SEM. Ce- and Fe-modified Ni/Al2O3 catalysts exhibited remarkable activity and stability during the CSCRM over the course of 50 hours. It suggested that the Ni(12)-Ce(5)-Fe(5)/Al2O3 catalyst shows highly dispersed Ni particles with strong metal-to-support interaction (SMSI) as well as excellent catalytic activity.

  19. Microstructure and tribological properties of cobalt-based Stellite 6 alloy coating by electro-spark deposition

    OpenAIRE

    QiFeng Jing; YeFa Tan

    2013-01-01

    The cobalt-based Stellite 6 coating with a thickness of 0.5 mm was deposited onto 45 carbon steel by electro-spark deposition technology. Microstructure, chemical composition, phase composition, microhardness distribution and wear resistance of the coating were researched by a series of experiments. The results indicate that, the coating with refined and compact microstructure is mainly composed of Co, Cr7C3, Co6W6C and CrCo. The coating makes metallurgical bonding interface with the substrat...

  20. Thermodynamics of Palladium (Pd) and Tantalum (Ta) Relevant to Secondary Copper Smelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuva, M. A. H.; Rhamdhani, M. A.; Brooks, G. A.; Masood, S. H.; Reuter, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    The slag-to-metal distribution ratios of palladium (Pd), L_{{Pd}}^{s/m} , in the range of oxygen partial pressure ( pO2) from 10-10 to 10-7 atm at 1473 K to 1623 K (1200 °C to 1350 °C); distribution ratios of tantalum (Ta), L_{{Ta}}^{s/m} , in the range of pO2 from 10-16 to 10-12 atm at 1673 K and 1873 K (1400 °C and 1600 °C), have been determined in this study. The L_{{Pd}}^{s/m} in FeO x -CaO-SiO2-MgO and copper at 1573 K (1300 °C) and pO2 = 10-8 atm is dependant strongly on basicity of slag, i.e. (CaO + MgO)/SiO2 or optical basicity. The current results suggest that Pd presents in the FeO x -CaO-SiO2-MgO slag predominantly as Pd2+. The activity coefficient of PdO in the slag at 1573 K (1300 °C) and pO2 = 10-8 atm was calculated to be in the range of 3.89 × 10-3 to 2.63 × 10-2. The L_{{Pd}}^{s/m} was also found to increase with increasing of pO2 and with decreasing of temperature. It was observed that Ta mostly partition to slag phase and very small amount of Ta was found in liquid copper at the high temperature and reduced condition studied. It can be suggested that to promote recovery of palladium from Pd-containing e-waste, a slag with lower silica content and basic flux based, high temperature with reducing atmosphere, is highly desired particularly in secondary copper smelting.

  1. Thermodynamics of Palladium (Pd) and Tantalum (Ta) Relevant to Secondary Copper Smelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuva, M. A. H.; Rhamdhani, M. A.; Brooks, G. A.; Masood, S. H.; Reuter, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The slag-to-metal distribution ratios of palladium (Pd), L_{Pd}^{s/m} , in the range of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) from 10-10 to 10-7 atm at 1473 K to 1623 K (1200 °C to 1350 °C); distribution ratios of tantalum (Ta), L_{Ta}^{s/m} , in the range of pO2 from 10-16 to 10-12 atm at 1673 K and 1873 K (1400 °C and 1600 °C), have been determined in this study. The L_{Pd}^{s/m} in FeO x -CaO-SiO2-MgO and copper at 1573 K (1300 °C) and pO2 = 10-8 atm is dependant strongly on basicity of slag, i.e. (CaO + MgO)/SiO2 or optical basicity. The current results suggest that Pd presents in the FeO x -CaO-SiO2-MgO slag predominantly as Pd2+. The activity coefficient of PdO in the slag at 1573 K (1300 °C) and pO2 = 10-8 atm was calculated to be in the range of 3.89 × 10-3 to 2.63 × 10-2. The L_{Pd}^{s/m} was also found to increase with increasing of pO2 and with decreasing of temperature. It was observed that Ta mostly partition to slag phase and very small amount of Ta was found in liquid copper at the high temperature and reduced condition studied. It can be suggested that to promote recovery of palladium from Pd-containing e-waste, a slag with lower silica content and basic flux based, high temperature with reducing atmosphere, is highly desired particularly in secondary copper smelting.

  2. Evaluation of 10V Chip Polymer Tantalum Capacitors for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Due to low ESR and safe failure mode, new technology chip polymer tantalum capacitors (CPTC) have gained popularity in the electronics design community, first in commercial applications, and now in hi-rel and space systems. The major drawbacks of these parts are high leakage currents, degradation under environmental stresses, and a relatively narrow temperature range of operating and storage conditions. Several studies have shown that a certain amount of moisture in polymer cathodes is necessary for a normal operation of the parts. This might limit applications of CPTCs in space systems and requires analysis of long-term exposure to deep vacuum conditions on their performance and reliability. High leakage currents and limited maximum operational temperature complicate accelerated testing that is necessary to assess long-term reliability and require new screening and qualification procedures for quality assurance. A better understanding of behavior of CPTCs as compared to traditional, MnO2, capacitors is necessary to develop adequate approaches for QA system for space applications. A specific of CPTCs is that different materials and processes might be used for low-voltage (10 V and less) and high-voltage (above 10 V) capacitors, so performance and degradation processes in these groups require separate analysis. In this work, that is a part of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) program, degradation of AC and DC characteristics under environmental stresses at different temperatures and voltages have been studied in nine lots of commercial and automotive grade capacitors rated to 10 V. Results of analysis of leakage currents, high temperature storage (HTS) up to 5000 hrs in vacuum and air at different temperatures, and Highly Accelerated Life Testing (HALT) in the range from 85 C to 145 C are presented. Temperature and voltage acceleration factors were calculated based on approximation of distributions of degradation rates with a general log-linear Weibull

  3. Poisoning Experiments Aimed at Discriminating Active and Less-Active Sites of Silica-Supported Tantalum Hydride for Alkane Metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Saggio, Guillaume

    2010-10-04

    Only 50% of the silica-supported tantalum hydride sites are active in the metathesis of propane. Indeed, more than 45% of the tantalum hydride can be eliminated by a selective oxygen poisoning of inactive sites with no significant decrease in the global turnover. Conversely, cyclopentane induces no such selective poisoning. Hence, the active tantalum hydride sites that show greater resistance to oxygen poisoning correspond to the νTa-H bands of higher wavenumbers, particularly that at 1860cm-1. These active tantalum hydride sites should correspond to tris- or monohydride species relatively far from silica surface oxygen atoms. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Analysis of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in tungsten carbide by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archer, M

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to measure the concentrations of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in solutions of tungsten carbide. The main advantage of the method described here lies...

  5. Graphene-based structure, method of suspending graphene membrane, and method of depositing material onto graphene membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Meyer, Jannik Christian

    2013-04-02

    An embodiment of a method of suspending a graphene membrane across a gap in a support structure includes attaching graphene to a substrate. A pre-fabricated support structure having the gap is attached to the graphene. The graphene and the pre-fabricated support structure are then separated from the substrate which leaves the graphene membrane suspended across the gap in the pre-fabricated support structure. An embodiment of a method of depositing material includes placing a support structure having a graphene membrane suspended across a gap under vacuum. A precursor is adsorbed to a surface of the graphene membrane. A portion of the graphene membrane is exposed to a focused electron beam which deposits a material from the precursor onto the graphene membrane. An embodiment of a graphene-based structure includes a support structure having a gap, a graphene membrane suspended across the gap, and a material deposited in a pattern on the graphene membrane.

  6. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  7. Effect of tellurium deposition rate on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mise, Takahiro; Nakada, Tokio

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of tellurium (Te) deposition rate on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films (Cu/In=0.30-0.31), the films were grown on both bare and Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrates at 200 °C by co-evaporation using a molecular beam epitaxy system. The microstructural properties were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystalline quality of the films was improved with increase in the deposition rate of Te, and exhibited a single CuIn 3Te 5 phase with a highly preferred (1 1 2) orientation. Te-deficient film (Te/(Cu+In)=1.07) grown with a low Te deposition rate showed a narrow bandgap of 0.99 eV at room temperature. The solar cell performance was affected by the deposition rate of Te. The best solar cell fabricated using CuIn 3Te 5 thin films grown with the highest deposition rate of Te (2.6 nm/s) yielded a total area (0.50 cm 2) efficiency of 4.4% ( Voc=309 mV, Jsc=28.0 mA/cm 2, and FF=0.509) without light soaking.

  8. Numerical investigation of diesel exhaust particle transport and deposition in the CT-scan based lung airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Saha, Suvash C.; Sauret, Emilie; Gu, Y. T.; Molla, Md Mamun

    2017-06-01

    Diesel exhaust particulates matter (DEPM) is a compound mixture of gasses and fine particles that contain more than 40 toxic air pollutants including benzene, formaldehyde, and nitrogen oxides. Exposure of DEPM to human lung airway during respiratory inhalation causes severe health hazards like diverse pulmonary diseases. This paper studies the DEPM transport and deposition in upper three generations of the realistic lung airways. A 3-D digital airway bifurcation model is constructed from the computerized tomography (CT) scan data of a healthy adult man. The Euler-Lagrange approach is used to solve the continuum and disperse phases of the calculation. Local averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to calculate the transport of the continuum phase. Lagrangian based Discrete Phase Model (DPM) is used to investigate the particle transport and deposition in the current anatomical model. The effects of size specific monodispersed particles on deposition are extensively investigated during different breathing pattern. The numerical results illustrate that particle diameter and breathing pattern have a substantial impact on particles transport and deposition in the tracheobronchial airways. The present realistic bifurcation model also depicts a new deposition hot spot which could advance the understanding of the therapeutic drug delivery system to the specific position of the respiratory airways.

  9. ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S-based buffer layer deposition for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2009-11-03

    The invention provides CBD ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S and spray deposited ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S buffer layers prepared from a solution of zinc salt, thiourea and ammonium hydroxide dissolved in a non-aqueous/aqueous solvent mixture or in 100% non-aqueous solvent. Non-aqueous solvents useful in the invention include methanol, isopropanol and triethyl-amine. One-step deposition procedures are described for CIS, CIGS and other solar cell devices.

  10. Preparation of Strontium Bismuth Tantalum (SBT) Fine Powder by Sol-Gel Process Using Bismuth Subnitrate as Bismuth Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Strontium bismuth tantalum (SBT) fine power was prepared by Sol-Gel method. Pentaethoxy tantalum, strontium acetate and bismuth subnitrate were used as raw materials, and were dissolved in proper order in ethylene glycol to form transparent sol. The mixed precursor was dried at 80°C and annealed at 800°C for 1 h. Crystallized nanometer sized SBT fine powder was obtained and characterized by XRD.

  11. 钽复合板设备制造技术%Fabrication Technology About Tantalum Composite Board Vessels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱广前

    2012-01-01

    Bring forward methods about settling welding problems about the tantalum composite board vessels and cautions during the tantalum vessels welding and fabrication.%对钽材复合板焊接中容易出现的问题进行了详细介绍,并提出了钽材复合板热交换设备中常用的几种焊接接头形式.

  12. Sulfinylcalix[4]arene-impregnated amberlite XAD-7 resin for the separation of niobium(V) from tantalum(V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Yasuno, Shizu; Iki, Nobuhiko; Miyano, Sotaro

    2005-10-07

    Amberlite XAD-7 resin was impregnated with p-tert-butylsulfinylcalix[4]arene. Niobium(V) was collected on the impregnated resin in yields of more than 90% around pH 5.4, whereas tantalum(V) was negligibly collected. The collected niobium(V) was desorbed with 9 M sulfuric acid nearly quantitatively, hence the separation of niobium(V) from tantalum(V) was successfully achieved.

  13. An aqueous route to [Ta6O19]8- and solid-state studies of isostructural niobium and tantalum oxide complexes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, May D.; Anderson, Travis Mark; Alam, Todd Michael; Rodriguez, Mark A; Joel N. Bixler; Francois Bonhomme

    2007-10-01

    Tantalate materials play a vital role in our high technology society: tantalum capacitors are found in virtually every cell phone. Furthermore, electronic characteristics and the incredibly inert nature of tantalates renders them ideal for applications such as biomedical implants, nuclear waste forms, ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics, photocatalysts and optical coatings. The inert and insoluble nature of tantalates is not fundamentally understood; and furthermore poor solubility renders fabrication of novel or optimized tantalates very difficult. We have developed a soft chemical route to water-soluble tantalum oxide clusters that can serve as both precursors for novel tantalate materials and ideal models for experimental and computational approaches to understanding the unusually inert behavior of tantalates. The water soluble cluster, [Ta6O19]8- is small, highly symmetric, and contains the representative oxygen types of a metal oxide surface, and thus ideally mimics a complex tantalate surface in a simplistic form that can be studied unambiguously. Furthermore; in aqueous solution, these highly charged and super-basic clusters orchestrate surprising acid-base behavior that most likely plays an important role in the inertness of related oxide surfaces. Our unique synthetic approach to the [Ta6O19]8- cluster allowed for unprecedented enrichment with isotopic labels (17O), enabling detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies of the behavior of cluster oxygens, as well as their acid-base behavior. This SAND report is a collection of two publications that resulted from these efforts.

  14. Sensor-based atomic layer deposition for rapid process learning and enhanced manufacturability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei

    In the search for sensor based atomic layer deposition (ALD) process to accelerate process learning and enhance manufacturability, we have explored new reactor designs and applied in-situ process sensing to W and HfO 2 ALD processes. A novel wafer scale ALD reactor, which features fast gas switching, good process sensing compatibility and significant similarity to the real manufacturing environment, is constructed. The reactor has a unique movable reactor cap design that allows two possible operation modes: (1) steady-state flow with alternating gas species; or (2) fill-and-pump-out cycling of each gas, accelerating the pump-out by lifting the cap to employ the large chamber volume as ballast. Downstream quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) sampling is applied for in-situ process sensing of tungsten ALD process. The QMS reveals essential surface reaction dynamics through real-time signals associated with byproduct generation as well as precursor introduction and depletion for each ALD half cycle, which are then used for process learning and optimization. More subtle interactions such as imperfect surface saturation and reactant dose interaction are also directly observed by QMS, indicating that ALD process is more complicated than the suggested layer-by-layer growth. By integrating in real-time the byproduct QMS signals over each exposure and plotting it against process cycle number, the deposition kinetics on the wafer is directly measured. For continuous ALD runs, the total integrated byproduct QMS signal in each ALD run is also linear to ALD film thickness, and therefore can be used for ALD film thickness metrology. The in-situ process sensing is also applied to HfO2 ALD process that is carried out in a furnace type ALD reactor. Precursor dose end-point control is applied to precisely control the precursor dose in each half cycle. Multiple process sensors, including quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and QMS are used to provide real time process information. The

  15. Microstructure and tribological properties of Zr-based amorphous-nanocrystalline coatings deposited on the surface of titanium alloys by Electrospark Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Xiang; Tan, Yefa, E-mail: tanyefa7651@163.com; Zhou, Chunhua; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Zhongwei

    2015-11-30

    Highlights: • Zr-based amorphous-nanocrystalline coatings were well prepared on TC11 titanium alloys. • High glass forming ability of alloy system and high cooling rate of Electrospark Deposition process are beneficial for the generation of amorphous phase. • A model has been applied to investigate the generation of nanocrystalline phases in amorphous coating. • Excellent wear properties obtained due to nanocrystalline phases distributed in amorphous organization. - Abstract: In order to improve the wear resistance of titanium alloys, the Zr-based amorphous-nanocrystalline coatings were prepared by Electrospark Deposition (ESD) on the surface of TC11. The microstructure of the coatings was analyzed and the tribological behavior and mechanism of the coatings were investigated. The results show that the coating is mainly composed of amorphous phase Zr{sub 55}Cu{sub 30}Al{sub 10}Ni{sub 5} and distributed a large number of nano particles with the diameter between 2 nm and 4 nm such as CuZr{sub 3}, Ni{sub 2}Zr{sub 3}, NiZr{sub 2}, etc. The new alloy system made up of molten electrode material of Zr-based alloy and TC11 substrate has a large glass forming ability, which transforms to amorphous phase in the rapid heating and cooling ESD process. The long-range diffusions of atoms such as Zr and Cu in amorphous microstructure play an important role in nano nucleation growth. The coating is dense, uniform, bonding with TC11 substrate metallurgically. The thickness of the coating is from 55 μm to 60 μm and the average microhardness is 801.3 HV{sub 0.025}. The coating has good friction-reducing and anti-wear properties. The friction coefficient of the coating changes between 0.13 and 0.21 with small fluctuation, decreasing about 60% compared to that of TC11 substrate. And the wear resistance of the coating is increased by 57% than that of TC11 substrate. The main wear mechanism of the coating is micro-cutting wear accompanied with oxidation wear.

  16. Improving Erosion Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings by Elevating the Deposition Temperature Based on the Critical Bonding Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shu-Wei; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-09-01

    Interlamellar bonding within plasma-sprayed coatings is one of the most important factors dominating the properties and performance of coatings. The interface bonding between lamellae significantly influences the erosion behavior of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings. In this study, TiO2 and Al2O3 coatings with different microstructures were deposited at different deposition temperatures based on the critical bonding temperature concept. The erosion behavior of ceramic coatings was investigated. It was revealed that the coatings prepared at room temperature exhibit a typical lamellar structure with numerous unbonded interfaces, whereas the coatings deposited at the temperature above the critical bonding temperature present a dense structure with well-bonded interfaces. The erosion rate decreases sharply with the improvement of interlamellar bonding when the deposition temperature increases to the critical bonding temperature. In addition, the erosion mechanisms of ceramic coatings were examined. The unbonded interfaces in the conventional coatings act as pre-cracks accelerating the erosion of coatings. Thus, controlling interlamellar bonding formation based on the critical bonding temperature is an effective approach to improve the erosion resistance of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings.

  17. Parameters influencing the deposition of methylammonium lead halide iodide in hole conductor free perovskite-based solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bat-El Cohen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Perovskite is a promising light harvester for use in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has been dramatically increased, making them a competitive source of renewable energy. An important parameter when designing high efficiency perovskite-based solar cells is the perovskite deposition, which must be performed to create complete coverage and optimal film thickness. This paper describes an in-depth study on two-step deposition, separating the perovskite deposition into two precursors. The effects of spin velocity, annealing temperature, dipping time, and methylammonium iodide concentration on the photovoltaic performance are studied. Observations include that current density is affected by changing the spin velocity, while the fill factor changes mainly due to the dipping time and methylammonium iodide concentration. Interestingly, the open circuit voltage is almost unaffected by these parameters. Hole conductor free perovskite solar cells are used in this work, in order to minimize other possible effects. This study provides better understanding and control over the perovskite deposition through highly efficient, low-cost perovskite-based solar cells.

  18. Parameters influencing the deposition of methylammonium lead halide iodide in hole conductor free perovskite-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Bat-El; Gamliel, Shany; Etgar, Lioz, E-mail: lioz.etgar@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Chemistry, Casali Center for Applied Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 90400 (Israel)

    2014-08-01

    Perovskite is a promising light harvester for use in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has been dramatically increased, making them a competitive source of renewable energy. An important parameter when designing high efficiency perovskite-based solar cells is the perovskite deposition, which must be performed to create complete coverage and optimal film thickness. This paper describes an in-depth study on two-step deposition, separating the perovskite deposition into two precursors. The effects of spin velocity, annealing temperature, dipping time, and methylammonium iodide concentration on the photovoltaic performance are studied. Observations include that current density is affected by changing the spin velocity, while the fill factor changes mainly due to the dipping time and methylammonium iodide concentration. Interestingly, the open circuit voltage is almost unaffected by these parameters. Hole conductor free perovskite solar cells are used in this work, in order to minimize other possible effects. This study provides better understanding and control over the perovskite deposition through highly efficient, low-cost perovskite-based solar cells.

  19. Optimization of fused deposition modeling process using teaching-learning-based optimization algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Venkata Rao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of rapid prototyping (RP processes is often measured in terms of build time, product quality, dimensional accuracy, cost of production, mechanical and tribological properties of the models and energy consumed in the process. The success of any RP process in terms of these performance measures entails selection of the optimum combination of the influential process parameters. Thus, in this work the single-objective and multi-objective optimization problems of a widely used RP process, namely, fused deposition modeling (FDM, are formulated, and the same are solved using the teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO algorithm and non-dominated Sorting TLBO (NSTLBO algorithm, respectively. The results of the TLBO algorithm are compared with those obtained using genetic algorithm (GA, and quantum behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO algorithm. The TLBO algorithm showed better performance as compared to GA and QPSO algorithms. The NSTLBO algorithm proposed to solve the multi-objective optimization problems of the FDM process in this work is a posteriori version of the TLBO algorithm. The NSTLBO algorithm is incorporated with non-dominated sorting concept and crowding distance assignment mechanism to obtain a dense set of Pareto optimal solutions in a single simulation run. The results of the NSTLBO algorithm are compared with those obtained using non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II and the desirability function approach. The Pareto-optimal set of solutions for each problem is obtained and reported. These Pareto-optimal set of solutions will help the decision maker in volatile scenarios and are useful for the FDM process.

  20. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication.

  1. The ASTARTE Mass Transport Deposits data base - a web-based reference for submarine landslide research around Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, D.; De Martini, P. M.; Lastras, G.; Patera, A.; Hunt, J.; Terrinha, P.; Noiva, J.; Gutscher, M. A.; Migeon, S.

    2015-12-01

    EU project ASTARTE (Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe, Project number: 603839) aims at reaching a higher level of tsunami resilience in the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean (NEAM) region by a combination of field work, experimental work, numerical modeling and technical development. The project is a cooperative work of 26 institutes from 16 countries and links together the description of past tsunamigenic events, the characterization of tsunami sources, the calculation of the impact of such events, and the development of adequate resilience strategies (www.astarte.eu). Within ASTARTE a web-based data base on Mass Transport Deposit (MTD) in the NEAM areas is being created that claims to be the future reference source for this kind of research in Europe. The aim is to integrate every existing scientific reference on the topic and update on new entries every 3 months, hosting information and detailed data, that are crucial e.g for tsunami modeling. A relational database managed by ArcGIS for Desktop 10.3 software has been implemented to allow all partners to collaborate through a common platform for archiving and exchanging data and interpretations, such as MTD typology (slide, slump, debris, turbidite, etc), geometric characteristcs (location, depth, thickness, volume, slope, etc), but also age and dating method and eventually tsunamigenic potential. One of the final goals of the project is the sharing of the archived datasets through a web-based map service that will allow to visualize, question, analyze, and interpret all datasets. The interactive map service will be hosted by ArcGIS Online and will deploy the cloud capabilities of the portal. Any interested users will be able to access the online GIS resources through any Internet browser or ad hoc applications that run on desktop machines, smartphones, or tablets and will be able to use the analytical tools, key tasks, and workflows of the service.

  2. New Method of Depositing the Nanostructured Amorphous Carbon for Carbon Based Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Fadzilah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured amorphous carbon (a-C solar cells were successfully deposited via a self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved efficiency ( of % for device deposited at 500°C, % for 450°C, and % for 400°C. Photoresponse characteristic was highlighted under illumination (AM 1.5 illuminations: 100 mW/cm2, 25°C, where conductivity increased when the sample was being hit by light. Transmittance spectrum exhibits a large transmittance value (85% and absorption coefficient value of  cm−1 at the visible range from 390 to 790 nm. The nanostructured a-C thin film deposited at higher temperature possesses lower transmittance due to higher absorption as a result of the higher content of sp2-bonded carbon atoms. From Tauc’s plot, optical band gap ( was determined, and decreased as deposition temperature increased (1.2 eV, 1.0 eV, 0.7 eV. On the other hand, FESEM images exhibited a nanostructured sized a-C with the particle size less than 100 nm. To the best of our knowledge, the presence of nanostructured particle of a-C by a self-prepared AACVD has not frequently been reported.

  3. Non-conventional photocathodes based on Cu thin films deposited on Y substrate by sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, A.; D'Elia, M.; Gontad, F.; Di Giulio, M.; Maruccio, G.; Cola, A.; Stankova, N. E.; Kovacheva, D. G.; Broitman, E.

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) thin films were deposited on yttrium (Y) substrate by sputtering. During the deposition, a small central area of the Y substrate was shielded to avoid the film deposition and was successively used to study its photoemissive properties. This configuration has two advantages: the cathode presents (i) the quantum efficiency and the work function of Y and (ii) high electrical compatibility when inserted into the conventional radio-frequency gun built with Cu bulk. The photocathode was investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine surface morphology. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy studies were performed to compare the structure and surface properties of the deposited film. The measured electrical resistivity value of the Cu film was similar to that of high purity Cu bulk. Film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Finally, the photoelectron performance in terms of quantum efficiency was obtained in a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. A comparison with the results obtained with a twin sample prepared by pulsed laser deposition is presented and discussed.

  4. Non-conventional photocathodes based on Cu thin films deposited on Y substrate by sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone, A. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics and University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); D’Elia, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, F., E-mail: francisco.gontad@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics and University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Di Giulio, M.; Maruccio, G. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Cola, A. [National Council Research, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Stankova, N.E. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Kovacheva, D.G. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Broitman, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) thin films were deposited on yttrium (Y) substrate by sputtering. During the deposition, a small central area of the Y substrate was shielded to avoid the film deposition and was successively used to study its photoemissive properties. This configuration has two advantages: the cathode presents (i) the quantum efficiency and the work function of Y and (ii) high electrical compatibility when inserted into the conventional radio-frequency gun built with Cu bulk. The photocathode was investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine surface morphology. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy studies were performed to compare the structure and surface properties of the deposited film. The measured electrical resistivity value of the Cu film was similar to that of high purity Cu bulk. Film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler–Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Finally, the photoelectron performance in terms of quantum efficiency was obtained in a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. A comparison with the results obtained with a twin sample prepared by pulsed laser deposition is presented and discussed.

  5. A niobium and tantalum co-doped perovskite cathode for solid oxide fuel cells operating below 500 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengran; Zhao, Mingwen; Li, Feng; Zhou, Wei; Peterson, Vanessa K.; Xu, Xiaoyong; Shao, Zongping; Gentle, Ian; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    The slow activity of cathode materials is one of the most significant barriers to realizing the operation of solid oxide fuel cells below 500 °C. Here we report a niobium and tantalum co-substituted perovskite SrCo0.8Nb0.1Ta0.1O3−δ as a cathode, which exhibits high electroactivity. This cathode has an area-specific polarization resistance as low as ∼0.16 and ∼0.68 Ω cm2 in a symmetrical cell and peak power densities of 1.2 and 0.7 W cm−2 in a Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95-based anode-supported fuel cell at 500 and 450 °C, respectively. The high performance is attributed to an optimal balance of oxygen vacancies, ionic mobility and surface electron transfer as promoted by the synergistic effects of the niobium and tantalum. This work also points to an effective strategy in the design of cathodes for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells. PMID:28045088

  6. A niobium and tantalum co-doped perovskite cathode for solid oxide fuel cells operating below 500 °C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengran; Zhao, Mingwen; Li, Feng; Zhou, Wei; Peterson, Vanessa K; Xu, Xiaoyong; Shao, Zongping; Gentle, Ian; Zhu, Zhonghua

    2017-01-03

    The slow activity of cathode materials is one of the most significant barriers to realizing the operation of solid oxide fuel cells below 500 °C. Here we report a niobium and tantalum co-substituted perovskite SrCo0.8Nb0.1Ta0.1O3-δ as a cathode, which exhibits high electroactivity. This cathode has an area-specific polarization resistance as low as ∼0.16 and ∼0.68 Ω cm(2) in a symmetrical cell and peak power densities of 1.2 and 0.7 W cm(-2) in a Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95-based anode-supported fuel cell at 500 and 450 °C, respectively. The high performance is attributed to an optimal balance of oxygen vacancies, ionic mobility and surface electron transfer as promoted by the synergistic effects of the niobium and tantalum. This work also points to an effective strategy in the design of cathodes for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  7. Electrical-breakdown and electronic current of tantalum-tantalum oxide-aqueous electrolyte systems. [Ta sub 2 O sub 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, K.C.; Katyal, P. (Dept. of Chemistry, Maharshi Dayanand Univ., Rohtak (India))

    1991-06-30

    Breakdown voltage and electronic current data for barrier anodic tantalum oxide films in contact with aqueous electrolytes of various concentrations and compositions at 298 K have been obtained. The influence of electrolyte concentration on breakdown characteristics can be broadly explained in terms of the Ikonopisov electron avalanche breakdown model. Albella and coworkers' theory explains the effect of electrolyte concentration for our results more explicitly. Various parameters of the Albella theory have been evaluated, and their dependence on electrolyte concentration has been studied. The dependence of breakdown voltage on electrolyte concentration has also been discussed in the light of the theory of Di Quarto and coworkers. (orig.).

  8. Observation- and model-based estimates of particulate dry nitrogen deposition to the oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Baker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic nitrogen (N emissions to the atmosphere have increased significantly the deposition of nitrate (NO3− and ammonium (NH4+ to the surface waters of the open ocean, with potential impacts on marine productivity and the global carbon cycle. Global-scale understanding of the impacts of N deposition to the oceans is reliant on our ability to produce and validate models of nitrogen emission, atmospheric chemistry, transport and deposition. In this work,  ∼  2900 observations of aerosol NO3− and NH4+ concentrations, acquired from sampling aboard ships in the period 1995–2012, are used to assess the performance of modelled N concentration and deposition fields over the remote ocean. Three ocean regions (the eastern tropical North Atlantic, the northern Indian Ocean and northwest Pacific were selected, in which the density and distribution of observational data were considered sufficient to provide effective comparison to model products. All of these study regions are affected by transport and deposition of mineral dust, which alters the deposition of N, due to uptake of nitrogen oxides (NOx on mineral surfaces. Assessment of the impacts of atmospheric N deposition on the ocean requires atmospheric chemical transport models to report deposition fluxes; however, these fluxes cannot be measured over the ocean. Modelling studies such as the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP, which only report deposition flux, are therefore very difficult to validate for dry deposition. Here, the available observational data were averaged over a 5° × 5° grid and compared to ACCMIP dry deposition fluxes (ModDep of oxidised N (NOy and reduced N (NHx and to the following parameters from the Tracer Model 4 of the Environmental Chemical Processes Laboratory (TM4: ModDep for NOy, NHx and particulate NO3− and NH4+, and surface-level particulate NO3− and NH4+ concentrations. As a model ensemble, ACCMIP can be

  9. A Humidity Sensor Based on Silver Nanoparticles Thin Film Prepared by Electrostatic Spray Deposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thutiyaporn Thiwawong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, thin film of silver nanoparticles for humidity sensor application was deposited by electrostatic spray deposition technique. The influence of the deposition times on properties of films was studied. The crystal structures of sample films, their surface morphology, and optical properties have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, and UV-VIS spectrophotometer, respectively. The crystalline structure of silver nanoparticles thin film was found in the orientation of (100 and (200 planes of cubic structure at diffraction angles 2θ  =  38.2° and 44.3°, respectively. Moreover, the silver nanoparticles thin films humidity sensor was fabricated onto the interdigitated electrodes. The sensor exhibited the humidity adsorption and desorption properties. The sensing mechanisms of the device were also elucidated by complex impedance analysis.

  10. Climax-Type Porphyry Molybdenum Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Steve; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Climax-type porphyry molybdenum deposits, as defined here, are extremely rare; thirteen deposits are known, all in western North America and ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to mainly Tertiary. They are consistently found in a postsubduction, extensional tectonic setting and are invariably associated with A-type granites that formed after peak activity of a magmatic cycle. The deposits consist of ore shells of quartz-molybdenite stockwork veins that lie above and surrounding the apices of cupola-like, highly evolved, calc-alkaline granite and subvolcanic rhyolite-porphyry bodies. These plutons are invariably enriched in fluorine (commonly >1 percent), rubidium (commonly >500 parts per million), and niobium-tantalum (Nb commonly >50 parts per million). The deposits are relatively high grade (typically 0.1-0.3 percent Mo) and may be very large (typically 100-1,000 million tons). Molybdenum, as MoS2, is the primary commodity in all known deposits. The effect on surface-water quality owing to natural influx of water or sediment from a Climax-type mineralized area can extend many kilometers downstream from the mineralized area. Waste piles composed of quartz-silica-pyrite altered rocks will likely produce acidic drainage waters. The potential exists for concentrations of fluorine or rare metals in surface water and groundwater to exceed recommended limits for human consumption near both mined and unmined Climax-type deposits.

  11. Zinc isotopes in sphalerite from base metal deposits in the Red Dog district, northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, K.D.; Wilkinson, J.J.; Chapman, J.B.; Crowther, H.L.; Weiss, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of sphalerite samples from shale-hosted massive sulfide and stratigraphically underlying vein breccia deposits in the Red Dog district in northern Alaska show a range ??66Zn values from zero to 0.60 per mil. The lowest values are observed in the vein breccia deposits, and the stratigraphically overlying (but structurally displaced) shale-hosted massive sulfide deposits show a systematic trend of increasing ??66Zn values from south to north (Main-Aqqaluk-Paalaaq-Anarraaq). The ??66Zn values are inversely correlated with sphalerite Fe/Mn ratio and also tend to be higher in low Cu sphalerite, consistent with precipitation of lower ??66Zn sphalerite closer to the principal hydrothermal fluid conduits. The most likely control on isotopic variation is Rayleigh fractionation during sulfide precipitation, with lighter zinc isotopes preferentially incorporated in the earliest sphalerite to precipitate from ore fluids at deeper levels (vein breccias) and close to the principal fluid conduits in the orebodies, followed by precipitation of sulfides with higher ??66Zn values in shallower and/or more distal parts of the flow path. There is no systematic variation among the paragenetic stages of sphalerite from a single deposit, suggesting an isotopically homogeneous zinc source and consistent transport-deposition conditions and/or dissolution-reprecipitation of earlier sphalerite without significant fractionation. Decoupled Zn and S isotope compositions are best explained by mixing of separate metal- and sulfur-bearing fluids at the depositional site. The results confirm that Zn isotopes may be a useful tracer for distinguishing between the central and distal parts of large hydrothermal systems as previously suggested and could therefore be of use in exploration. ?? 2009 by Economic Geology.

  12. A Model-Based Analysis of Nitrogen Deposition: Effects on Forest Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezi, S.; Medlyn, B. E.; Tonon, G.; Magnani, F.

    2009-04-01

    Over the last 150 years nitrogen deposition has increased, especially in the northern hemisphere, mainly due to the use of fossil fuels, deforestation and agricultural practices. Although the impact of this increase on the terrestrial carbon cycle is still uncertain, it is likely that this large perturbation of the global nitrogen cycle will have important effects on carbon cycling, particularly via impacts on forest carbon storage. In the present work we investigated qualitatively the overall response of forest carbon sequestration to nitrogen deposition, and the relative importance of different mechanisms that bring about this response. For this purpose we used the G'DAY forest carbon-nitrogen cycling model (Comins and McMurtrie 1993), introducing some new assumptions which focus on the effect of nitrogen deposition. Specifically the new assumptions are: (i) foliar litterfall and specific leaf area (SLA) are functions of leaf nitrogen concentration; (ii) belowground C allocation is a function of net primary production (NPP); (iii) forest canopies can directly take up nitrogen; (iv) management of forests occurs; (v) leaching occurs only for nitrate nitrogen. We investigated the effect of each assumption on net ecosystem production (NEP), with a step increase in nitrogen deposition from a steady state of 0.4 gN m-2 yr-1 to 2 gN m-2 yr-1, and then running the old and new model versions for different nitrogen deposition levels. Our analysis showed that nitrogen deposition can have a large effect on forest carbon storage at ecosystem level. In particular the effect of the assumptions (ii), (iii) and (iv) seem to be of greater importance, giving rise to a markedly higher level of forest carbon sequestration than in their absence. On the contrary assumptions (i) and (v) seem not to have any particular effect on the NEP simulated. Finally, running the models for different levels of nitrogen deposition showed that estimating forest carbon exchange without taking into

  13. A structure zone diagram including plasma based deposition and ion etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-10-14

    An extended structure zone diagram is proposed that includes energetic deposition, characterized by a large flux of ions typical for deposition by filtered cathodic arcs and high power impulse magnetron sputtering. The axes are comprised of a generalized homologous temperature, the normalized kinetic energy flux, and the net film thickness, which can be negative due to ion etching. It is stressed that the number of primary physical parameters affecting growth by far exceeds the number of available axes in such a diagram and therefore it can only provide an approximate and simplified illustration of the growth condition?structure relationships.

  14. Reproducible Matrix Deposition for MALDI MSI Based on Open-Source Software and Hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckli, Markus; Staab, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    The new open-source software and hardware matrix deposition device named iMatrixSpray was optimized and specified for homogeneity, reproducibility, and sensitivity in MS imaging experiments. The results confirm the design claims, with the device delivering uniform coatings with a constant quality from experiment to experiment. The robustness in combination with the open design allows developing and sharing of matrix deposition and sample preparation protocols between labs. This tool therefore enables researchers to enter the field of MALDI MSI without previous experience in matrix coating.

  15. Electron-microscopic examination of the transition zone of aluminum-tantalum bimetallic joints (explosion welding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, A. Yu.; Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Elkina, O. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Plotnikov, A. V.; Patselov, A. M.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    A study of the structure of an aluminum-tantalum joint and a comparison of this structure with the structures of iron-silver and copper-tantalum joints have revealed the following processes of the interpenetration of the materials that occur during explosion welding: the formation of protrusions, the injection of particles of one material into the other, and the formation of zones of local melting. Regardless of the mutual solubility of the metals being welded, two types of fragmentation occur, i.e., (1) a granulating fragmentation (GF), which includes the formation, explosion-governed (EG) dispersion, and partial consolidation of particles, and (2) the fragmentation that is usually observed during severe plastic deformation. It is important that this traditional fragmentation is not accompanied by the formation and EG dispersion of particles. This feature allows one to easily distinguish these types of fragmentation (traditional and GF fragmentation).

  16. The list of tantalum lines for wavelengths calibration of the Hamilton echelle-spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Pakhomov, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    We present solution of the problem of wavelength calibration for Hamilton Echelle spectrograph using hollow cathode lamp, which was operated at Lick Observatory Shane telescope before June 9, 2011. The spectrum of the lamp claimed to be thorium-argon, contains, in addition to the lines of thorium and argon, a number of the unrecognized lines identified by us with tantalum. Using atomic data for measured lines of tantalum and thorium, we estimated the temperature of the gas in the lamp as T=3120+/-60 K. From the atomic line database VALD3 we selected all lines of TaI and TaII which can be seen in the spectrum of the lamp and compiled a list for the use in the processing of spectral observations. We note a limitation of the accuracy of calibration due to the influence of the hyperfine line splitting.

  17. Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composite Prepared by Sol-Gel Synthesis and Spark Plasma Sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2009-02-13

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO{sub 3}) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g.cm{sup -3} or 93% relative density. In addition those parts were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus the sample retained its stored chemical energy.

  18. Synthesis, Consolidation and Characterization of Sol-gel Derived Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, O [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel (SG) derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition-tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the SG derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The SG derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO3) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g·cm-3 or 93% relative density. In addition, those samples were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus retaining their stored chemical energy.

  19. Simulation of tantalum nanocrystals under shock-wave loading: Dislocations and twinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramontina, D. R.; Hahn, E. N.; Meyers, M. A.; Bringa, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    We simulate strong shock waves in nanocrystalline tantalum using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, for particle velocities in the range 0.35-2.0 km s-1, which induce pressures in the range 20-195 GPa. Our simulations explore strain rates in the range 108 s-1 - 1010 s-1, and lead to a peak strength in the range 3-15 GPa. Nanocrystalline tantalum exposed to strong shock waves demonstrates deformation enabled by concomitant dislocations, twinning, and grain boundary activity at a variety of particle velocities. Twinning is observed for a mean grain size of 7 nm, starting at around 32 GPa, in disagreement with models which predict a Hall-Petch behavior for twinning, i.e. a twinning stress scaling with grain size d as d-0.5, and supporting the presence of an inverse Hall-Petch effect for twinning at small grain sizes.

  20. Using wire shaping techniques and holographic optics to optimize deposition characteristics in wire-based laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, N. J.; Higginson, R. L.; Tyrer, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    In laser cladding, the potential benefits of wire feeding are considerable. Typical problems with the use of powder, such as gas entrapment, sub-100% material density and low deposition rate are all avoided with the use of wire. However, the use of a powder-based source material is the industry standard, with wire-based deposition generally regarded as an academic curiosity. This is because, although wire-based methods have been shown to be capable of superior quality results, the wire-based process is more difficult to control. In this work, the potential for wire shaping techniques, combined with existing holographic optical element knowledge, is investigated in order to further improve the processing characteristics. Experiments with pre-placed wire showed the ability of shaped wire to provide uniformity of wire melting compared with standard round wire, giving reduced power density requirements and superior control of clad track dilution. When feeding with flat wire, the resulting clad tracks showed a greater level of quality consistency and became less sensitive to alterations in processing conditions. In addition, a 22% increase in deposition rate was achieved. Stacking of multiple layers demonstrated the ability to create fully dense, three-dimensional structures, with directional metallurgical grain growth and uniform chemical structure.

  1. From the Field to the Classroom: A Web-Based Teaching Tool on Depositional Environments and Landscape Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzic, M.; Watson, K.; Grand, S.; Crowley, C.; Dyanatkar, S.; Bomke, A.; Smith, S.

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between sedimentary deposits, landforms and soil profile development is difficult for students to grasp in a conventional classroom setting. The ideal way to solve this is to take the students on extended field trips; however, field trips are expensive, have to be conducted during specific time periods, and can only handle a limited number of students. The objective of this project was to bring the field to the classroom via a virtual, dynamic web-based teaching tool illustrating common depositional environments and associated landforms and soils. The teaching tool was largely based on video footage obtained in the Canadian Rocky Mountains and in the grasslands of the southern interior of British Columbia. The Canadian Rockies are undergoing rapid deglaciation and provided excellent examples of new glacial deposits and early landscape development processes. On the other hand, British Columbia's grasslands became ice-free about 10,000 years ago and were used to illustrate landscape evolution and post-glaciation soil profile development. To bring these two environments together, video footage of corresponding landforms was shot at both locations and edited into a series of short video clips illustrating the link between depositional processes, resulting landforms and soils and their post-glacial evolution. Soil scientists, survey specialists and geomorphologists provided live commentary. The teaching tool (http://soilweb.landfood.ubc.ca/landscape/) is an open-access website merging video clips, sound recordings, text, photos and graphics intended to help students situate landforms within their geomorphologic context. This online teaching resource allows students to observe, on their own time, conditions under which sediments are deposited and soils are formed, and to witness the transformation of a barren, glacial landscape into a vegetated soil landscape. The tool can be used in various geomorphology, soil, agriculture, forestry, and natural

  2. On-line separation of refractory hafnium and tantalum isotopes at the ISOCELE separator

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, C F; Obert, J; Paris, P; Putaux, J C

    1981-01-01

    By chemical evaporation technique, neutron deficient hafnium nuclei have been on-line separated at the ISOCELE facility, from the isobar rare-earth elements, in the metal-fluoride HfF/sub 3//sup +/ ion form. Half-lives of /sup 162-165/Hf have been measured. Similarly, tantalum has been selectively separated on the TaF/sub 4//sup +/ form. (4 refs) .

  3. Powder metallurgical processing and metal purity: A case for capacitor grade sintered tantalum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G S Upadhyaya

    2005-07-01

    The paper reviews the role of sintered tantalum as volumetric efficient electrical capacitor. Powder characteristics and sintering aspects are discussed. The role of impurities in influencing the electrical properties has been described. Today’s driving force behind the Ta market is the use of surface mounted versions known as chip types, for applications requiring a wide range of operational temperature, such as automotive electronics.

  4. Particle emission rates during electrostatic spray deposition of TiO2 nanoparticle-based photoactive coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Antti J; Jensen, Alexander C Ø; Kling, Kirsten I; Kling, Jens; Budtz, Hans Christian; Koponen, Ismo K; Tuinman, Ilse; Hussein, Tareq; Jensen, Keld A; Nørgaard, Asger; Levin, Marcus

    2018-01-05

    Here, we studied the particle release rate during Electrostatic spray deposition of anatase-(TiO2)-based photoactive coating onto tiles and wallpaper using a commercially available electrostatic spray device. Spraying was performed in a 20.3m(3) test chamber while measuring concentrations of 5.6nm to 31μm-size particles and volatile organic compounds (VOC), as well as particle deposition onto room surfaces and on the spray gun user hand. The particle emission and deposition rates were quantified using aerosol mass balance modelling. The geometric mean particle number emission rate was 1.9×10(10)s(-1) and the mean mass emission rate was 381μgs(-1). The respirable mass emission-rate was 65% lower than observed for the entire measured size-range. The mass emission rates were linearly scalable (±ca. 20%) to the process duration. The particle deposition rates were up to 15h(-1) for coated with carbon, and Ag particles with size ranging from 60nm to ca. 5μm. As expected, no significant VOC emissions were observed as a result of spraying. Finally, we provide recommendations for exposure model parameterization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cr13Ni5Si2-Based Composite Coating on Copper Deposited Using Pulse Laser Induction Cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Wang, Hailin; Zhu, Guangzhi; Zhu, Xiao

    2017-02-10

    A Cr13Ni5Si2-based composite coating was successfully deposited on copper by pulse laser induction hybrid cladding (PLIC), and its high-temperature wear behavior was investigated. Temperature evolutions associated with crack behaviors in PLIC were analyzed and compared with pulse laser cladding (PLC) using the finite element method. The microstructure and present phases were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Compared with continuous laser induction cladding, the higher peak power offered by PLIC ensures metallurgical bonding between highly reflective copper substrate and coating. Compared with a wear test at room temperature, at 500 °C the wear volume of the Cr13Ni5Si2-based composite coating increased by 21%, and increased by 225% for a NiCr/Cr3C2 coating deposited by plasma spray. This novel technology has good prospects for application with respect to the extended service life of copper mold plates for slab continuous casting.

  6. Successive heterolytic cleavages of H2 achieve N2 splitting on silica-supported tantalum hydrides: A DFT proposed mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Soláns, Xavier Luis

    2012-07-02

    DFT(B3PW91) calculations have been carried out to propose a pathway for the N2 cleavage by H2 in the presence of silica-supported tantalum hydride complexes [(≡ SiO)2TaHx] that forms [(≡SiO)2Ta(NH)(NH2)] (Science2007, 317, 1056). The calculations, performed on the cluster models {μ-O[(HO)2SiO] 2}TaH1 and {μ-O[(HO)2SiO] 2}TaH3, labelled as (≡SiO)2TaH x (x = 1, 3), show that the direct hydride transfers to coordinated N-based ligands in (≡SiO)2TaH(η2-N2) and (≡SiO)2TaH(η2-HNNH) have high energy barrier barriers. These high energy barriers are due in part to a lack of energetically accessible empty orbitals in the negatively charged N-based ligands. It is shown that a succession of proton transfers and reduction steps (hydride transfer or 2 electron reduction by way of dihydride reductive coupling) to the nitrogen-based ligands leads to more energetically accessible pathways. These proton transfers, which occur by way of heterolytic activation of H2, increase the electrophilicity of the resulting ligand (diazenido, N 2H-, and hydrazido, NHNH2-, respectively) that can thus accept a hydride with a moderate energy barrier. In the case of (≡SiO)2TaH(η2-HNNH), the H 2 molecule that is adding across the Ta-N bond is released after the hydride transfer step by heterolytic elimination from (≡SiO) 2TaH(NH2)2, suggesting that dihydrogen has a key role in assisting the final steps of the reaction without itself being consumed in the process. This partly accounts for the experimental observation that the addition of H2 is needed to convert an intermediate, identified as a diazenido complex [(≡SiO)2TaH(η 2-HNNH)] from its ν(N-H) stretching frequency of 3400 cm -1, to the final product. Throughout the proposed mechanism, the tantalum remains in its preferred high oxidation state and avoids redox-type reactions, which are more energetically demanding. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. EFFECT OF La2O3 ADDITION ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND WEAR BEHAVIOR OF ELECTROSPARK DEPOSITED Ni-BASED COATINGS

    OpenAIRE

    GAO YUXIN; YI JIAN

    2013-01-01

    La2O3 doped Ni-based coatings have been prepared by electrospark deposition technique. The effect of La2O3 on the microstructure, hardness and wear behavior of the as-prepared Ni-based coatings is investigated by using X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscope, wear tribometer and Vickers hardness tester. Results indicates that the microstructure, hardness and wear resistance of La2O3 doped Ni-based coatings are effectively improved as compared to the undoped one, and the coating wit...

  8. A Cationic Diode Based on Asymmetric Nafion® Film Deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Daping; Madrid, Elena; Aaronson, Barak; Fan, Lian; Doughty, James; Mathwig, Klaus; Bond, Alan M; McKeown, Neil B; Marken, Frank

    2017-01-01

    A thin film of Nafion®, of approximately 5 microm thickness, asymmetrically deposited onto a 6 microm thick film of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabricated with a 5, 10, 20, or 40 microm microhole, is shown to exhibit prominent ionic diode behaviour involving cation charge carrier ("cationic d

  9. CAMELS-based Determinants for the Credit Rating of Turkish Deposit Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Yuksel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the relationship between CAMELS ratios and credit ratings of deposit banks in Turkey. Annual data was used for the period between 2004 and 2014 in this study. Moreover, 20 deposit banks of Turkey were analyzed and 21 different ratios of CAMELS components were used. In addition to that, credit ratings of these banks were provided from Moody’s corporation or annual activity reports of the banks. After that, we created multi nominal logistic regression analysis in order to illustrate the relationship. The major finding in this study is that three components (Asset Quality, Management Quality, and Sensitivity to Market Risk of CAMELS have effects on credit ratings whereas the ratios related to Capital Adequacy and Earnings are not effective. As a result, it was recommended that Turkish deposit banks should concentrate on the percentage of fixed assets and interest income to have a better rating. Moreover, having high market share with respect to total assets and lower interest expense are also other important points for this purpose. On the other hand, Turkish deposit banks should control the proportion of financial assets and increase the amount of FX liquid assets to prevent credit ratings to decrease. Additionally, market share of banks for loans should not reach at high level for this objective.

  10. atomic layer deposition of amorphous niobium carbide-based thin film superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prolier, T.; Klug, J. A.; Elam, J. W.; Claus, H.; Becker, N. G.; Pellin, M. J. (Materials Science Division)

    2011-01-01

    Niobium carbide thin films were synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using trimethylaluminum (TMA), NbF{sub 5}, and NbCl{sub 5} precursors. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements performed at 200 and 290 C revealed controlled, linear deposition with a high growth rate of 5.7 and 4.5 {angstrom}/cycle, respectively. The chemical composition, growth rate, structure, and electronic properties of the films were studied over the deposition temperature range 125-350 C. Varying amounts of impurities, including amorphous carbon (a-C), AlF{sub 3}, NbF{sub x}, and NbCl{sub x}, were found in all samples. A strong growth temperature dependence of film composition, growth rate, and room temperature DC resistivity was observed. Increasing film density, decreasing total impurity concentration, and decreasing resistivity were observed as a function of increasing deposition temperature for films grown with either NbF{sub 5} or NbCl{sub 5}. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements down to 1.2 K revealed a superconducting transition at T{sub c} = 1.8 K in a 75 nm thick film grown at 350 C with TMA and NbF{sub 5}. The superconducting critical temperature could be increased up to 3.8 K with additional use of NH{sub 3} during ALD film growth.

  11. Atomic layer deposition of amorphous niobium carbide-based thin film superconductors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klug, J. A.; Prolier, T.; Elam, J. W.; Becker, N. G.; Pellin, M. J. (Energy Systems); ( HEP); ( MSD); (Illinois Inst. Tech.)

    2011-01-01

    Niobium carbide thin films were synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using trimethylaluminum (TMA), NbF{sub 5}, and NbCl{sub 5} precursors. In situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements performed at 200 and 290 C revealed controlled, linear deposition with a high growth rate of 5.7 and 4.5 {angstrom}/cycle, respectively. The chemical composition, growth rate, structure, and electronic properties of the films were studied over the deposition temperature range 125-350 C. Varying amounts of impurities, including amorphous carbon (a-C), AlF{sub 3}, NbF{sub x}, and NbCl{sub x}, were found in all samples. A strong growth temperature dependence of film composition, growth rate, and room temperature DC resistivity was observed. Increasing film density, decreasing total impurity concentration, and decreasing resistivity were observed as a function of increasing deposition temperature for films grown with either NbF{sub 5} or NbCl{sub 5}. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements down to 1.2 K revealed a superconducting transition at T{sub c} = 1.8 K in a 75 nm thick film grown at 350 C with TMA and NbF{sub 5}. The superconducting critical temperature could be increased up to 3.8 K with additional use of NH{sub 3} during ALD film growth.

  12. Microstructure characterization of laser-deposited titanium carbide and zirconium-based titanium metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ochonogor, OF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available produced with 10, 20, and 30 vol.% reinforcing ceramic, and Zr + TiC MMCs were fabricated with 10, 20, and 30 vol.% TiC. The deposited thin walls were analysed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy...

  13. Microstructural characterization of Co-based coating deposited by low power pulse laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farnia, A.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    A detailed microstructural study of Stellite 6 coating deposited on a low carbon ferritic steel substrate using preplaced powder method and low power Nd:YAG pulse laser is performed. The grain structure and solidification texture of the coating are investigated by orientation imaging microscopy

  14. Microstructural characterization of Co-based coating deposited by low power pulse laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farnia, A.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed microstructural study of Stellite 6 coating deposited on a low carbon ferritic steel substrate using preplaced powder method and low power Nd:YAG pulse laser is performed. The grain structure and solidification texture of the coating are investigated by orientation imaging microscopy (OIM

  15. Dry deposition model for a microscale aerosol dispersion solver based on the moment method

    CERN Document Server

    Šíp, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    A dry deposition model suitable for use in the moment method has been developed. Contributions from five main processes driving the deposition - Brownian diffusion, interception, impaction, turbulent impaction, and sedimentation - are included in the model. The deposition model was employed in the moment method solver implemented in the OpenFOAM framework. Applicability of the developed expression and the moment method solver was tested on two example problems of particle dispersion in the presence of a vegetation on small scales: a flow through a tree patch in 2D and a flow through a hedgerow in 3D. Comparison with the sectional method showed that the moment method using the developed deposition model is able to reproduce the shape of the particle size distribution well. The relative difference in terms of the third moment of the distribution was below 10\\% in both tested cases, and decreased away from the vegetation. Main source of this difference is a known overprediction of the impaction efficiency. When ...

  16. Origins of enhanced dielectric properties in titania-modified tantalum pentoxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecka, Geoffrey Lee

    Tantalum oxide (Ta2O5)-based materials are of interest for various applications, including dynamic random access memories (DRAMS) and thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TBCs, EBCs). Widespread use, however, has been limited due to practical difficulties in densification of ceramic forms, and a lack of basic understanding of structure-processing-property relationships for Ta2O5-based ceramics. The current research was designed to investigate these relationships and to determine the origins of a previously reported dielectric enhancement for TiO2 -modified Ta2O5. Rapid and expansive grain growth associated with the L⇒H-Ta 2O5 phase transformation was found to trap residual porosity, so sintering at temperatures below the transformation was required for full densification. A simple and effective solution-coated powder processing route was developed to enable reduced-temperature densification of chemically-homogeneous TiO2-modified H-Ta2O5 ceramics for the first time. A new crystal structure of H-Ta2O5 based upon extensive polyhedral edge-sharing was verified using high-resolution X-ray diffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. Simulated diffraction patterns matched data collected at up to 1500°C out to 2theta values equivalent to 110° (CuKalpha). In-situ XRD and Raman studies both revealed two distinct phase transformations during cooling from the high-temperature prototypic phase for specimens containing ≤5% TiO2, but only one transformation for specimens containing 8% TiO2, and revealed that the H-Ta2O5 form present at room temperature depended strongly upon TiO2 content. Dense and homogeneous specimens enabled the first detailed investigation into the electrical properties of TiO2-modified H-Ta2O 5 ceramics. Specimens containing 8% TiO2 exhibited dielectric constant (K) values of ˜280 at 20°C with tan delta values ˜0.01, but undoped specimens had tan delta values of ˜0.10 and DC resistivity values of <1011O·cm. Hyper-Raman spectroscopy revealed

  17. Small grain size zirconium-based coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, O., E-mail: omar.jimenez.udg@gmail.com [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, AP 307, CP 45101 Zapopan, Jal (Mexico); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Audronis, M.; Leyland, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Flores, M.; Rodriguez, E. [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, CUCEI, Universidad de Guadalajara, AP 307, CP 45101 Zapopan, Jal (Mexico); Kanakis, K.; Matthews, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-30

    Hard, partly amorphous, ZrTiB(N) coatings were deposited by Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) onto (111) silicon wafers at low substrate temperatures of 85 and 110 °C using Closed Field Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering. A segmented rectangular sputter target composed of three pieces (Zr/TiB{sub 2}/Zr) was used as the source of evaporation of coating components. Two different substrate biases (i.e. floating potential and − 50 V) and N{sub 2} reactive-gas flow rates of 2, 4 and 6 sccm were employed as the main deposition parameter variables. The chemical composition, structure, morphology and mechanical properties were investigated using a variety of analytical techniques such as Glow-Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy, cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glancing Angle X-ray Diffraction (GAXRD) and nanoindentation. With other parameters fixed, coating properties were found to be dependent on the substrate negative bias and nitrogen flow rate. Linear scan profiles and SEM imaging revealed that all coatings were smooth, dense and featureless (in fracture cross section) with no apparent columnar morphology or macro-defects. GAXRD structural analysis revealed that mostly metallic phases were formed for coatings containing no nitrogen, whereas a solid solution (Zr,Ti)N single phase nitride was found in most of the reactively deposited coatings — exhibiting a very small grain size due to nitrogen and boron grain refinement effects. Hardness values from as low as 8.6 GPa up to a maximum of 25.9 GPa are related mainly to solid solution strengthening effects. The measured elastic moduli correlated with the trends in hardness behaviour; values in the range of 120–200 GPa were observed depending on the selected deposition parameters. Also, high H/E values (> 0.1) were achieved with several of the coatings.

  18. Corrosion and wear resistance of titanium- and aluminum-based metal matrix composites fabricated by direct metal laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldera, Benjamin L.

    Titanium- and Aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) have shown favorable properties for aerospace applications such as airframes, reinforcement materials and joining elements. In this research, such coatings were developed by direct metal laser deposition with a powder-fed fiber coupled diode laser. The MMC formulations consisted of pure titanium and aluminum matrices with reinforcing powder blends of chromium carbide and tungsten carbide nickel alloy. Two powder formulations were investigated for each matrix material (Ti1, Ti2, Al1 and Al2). Titanium based composites were deposited onto a Ti6Al4V plate while aluminum composites were deposited onto AA 7075 and AA 5083 for Al1 and Al2, respectively. Microstructures of the MMCs were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and reduced Young's modulus (Er) were assessed through depth-sensing instrumented nanoindentation. microhardness (Vickers) was also analyzed for each composite. The corrosion resistance of the MMCs were compared by monitoring open circuit potential (OCP), polarization resistance (Rp) and potentiodynamic polarization in 0.5 M NaCl to simulate exposure to seawater. The Ti-MMCs demonstrated improvements in hardness between 205% and 350% over Ti6Al4V. Al-MMCs showed improvements between 47% and 79% over AA 7075 and AA 5083. The MMCs showed an increase in anodic current density indicating the formation of a less protective surface oxide than the base metals.

  19. Coupling Laser Diode Thermal Desorption with Acoustic Sample Deposition to Improve Throughput of Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarhoff, Zuzana; Wagner, Andrew; Picard, Pierre; Drexler, Dieter M; Zvyaga, Tatyana; Shou, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    The move toward label-free screening in drug discovery has increased the demand for mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis. Here we investigated the approach of coupling acoustic sample deposition (ASD) with laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). We assessed its use in a cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition assay, where a decrease in metabolite formation signifies CYP inhibition. Metabolite levels for 3 CYP isoforms were measured as CYP3A4-1'-OH-midazolam, CYP2D6-dextrorphan, and CYP2C9-4'-OH-diclofenac. After incubation, samples (100 nL) were acoustically deposited onto a stainless steel 384-LazWell plate, then desorbed by an infrared laser directly from the plate surface into the gas phase, ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and analyzed by MS/MS. Using this method, we achieved a sample analysis speed of 2.14 s/well, with bioanalytical performance comparable to the current online solid-phase extraction (SPE)-based MS method. An even faster readout speed was achieved when postreaction sample multiplexing was applied, where three reaction samples, one for each CYP, were transferred into the same well of the LazWell plate. In summary, LDTD coupled with acoustic sample deposition and multiplexing significantly decreased analysis time to 0.7 s/sample, making this MS-based approach feasible to support high-throughput screening (HTS) assays.

  20. Microstructure and tribological properties of Zr-based amorphous-nanocrystalline coatings deposited on the surface of titanium alloys by Electrospark Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiang; Tan, Yefa; Zhou, Chunhua; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Zhongwei

    2015-11-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of titanium alloys, the Zr-based amorphous-nanocrystalline coatings were prepared by Electrospark Deposition (ESD) on the surface of TC11. The microstructure of the coatings was analyzed and the tribological behavior and mechanism of the coatings were investigated. The results show that the coating is mainly composed of amorphous phase Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 and distributed a large number of nano particles with the diameter between 2 nm and 4 nm such as CuZr3, Ni2Zr3, NiZr2, etc. The new alloy system made up of molten electrode material of Zr-based alloy and TC11 substrate has a large glass forming ability, which transforms to amorphous phase in the rapid heating and cooling ESD process. The long-range diffusions of atoms such as Zr and Cu in amorphous microstructure play an important role in nano nucleation growth. The coating is dense, uniform, bonding with TC11 substrate metallurgically. The thickness of the coating is from 55 μm to 60 μm and the average microhardness is 801.3 HV0.025. The coating has good friction-reducing and anti-wear properties. The friction coefficient of the coating changes between 0.13 and 0.21 with small fluctuation, decreasing about 60% compared to that of TC11 substrate. And the wear resistance of the coating is increased by 57% than that of TC11 substrate. The main wear mechanism of the coating is micro-cutting wear accompanied with oxidation wear.

  1. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  2. Paleogeographic reconstruction of northwestern Oregon based on Eocene freshwater deposition in accreted terrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ries, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    Freshwater deposits exposed in the Coast Range of Oregon have been identified by the absence of marine organisms, significant floral remains, and the identification of a freshwater fish assemblage. These facies have been correlated with foraminiferal and lithologic horizons from test wells from the Mist Gas field of northwestern Oregon. Consistent records of inner neritic and marginal marine deposition in the Narizian stage, upper Cowlitz Formation, suggest the existence of an Eocene volcanic archipelago. Foraminiferal correlation through this stage is complicated by the absence of stratigraphically significant species in several of the wells. Floral remains from exposed sections have provided diverse elements, allowing paleogeographic reconstruction. A sea level coastal swamp was dominated by a subtropical flora consisting of Sabalites, Platanophyllum, and Equisetum. The swamp was apparently backed by higher altitude volcanic uplands dominated by a more temperate flora including Cornus, Chamaecyparis, Ailanthus, Pinus, and Picea.

  3. Silanization of Ag-deposited magnetite particles: an efficient route to fabricate magnetic nanoparticle-based Raman barcode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwan; Choi, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Hyang Bong; Shin, Kuan Soo

    2010-07-01

    Silica-coated Ag nanostructures usable as magnetic nanoparticle-based Raman barcode materials were developed. Initially, 283 nm sized spherical magnetite particles composed of 13 nm sized superparamagnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were synthesized, and silver deposition was conducted using butylamine as the reductant of AgNO(3) in ethanol. The Ag-deposited Fe(3)O(4) (Fe(3)O(4)@Ag) particles are found to be efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates with the enhancement factor at 632.8 nm excitation to be about 3 x 10(6). After SERS markers such as benzenethiol, 4-mercaptotoluene, 4-aminobenzenethiol, and 4-nitrobenzenethiol were adsorbed onto the silver surface, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) was coated onto them using the layer-by-layer deposition method such that a subsequent base-catalyzed silanization could readily form a 60 nm thick silica shell around the PAH layer by a biomimetic process. The cross-linked silica shells effectively prevented the SERS-marker molecules from being liberated from the surface of the Fe(3)O(4)@Ag particles. Although the gram magnetization decreased nearly to one-half of the initial value because of coating with silver and silica, the remaining magnetization was nonetheless strong enough for the silica-coated Fe(3)O(4)@Ag particles to be used as barcode materials operating via SERS.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of W - based layers on SiO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrova, S.; Holleman, J.; Wolters, R.A.M.; Aarnink, A.A.I.

    2003-01-01

    W and W1-xNx , where x= 15- 22 at%, thin films were grown using the ALD (Atomic Layer Deposition) principle. Growth rate of W films is about 4- 5 monolayers/ cycle at 300- 350 ºC. Growth rate of W1-xNx is 0.5 monolayer/cycle at 325- 350 ºC. Standard Deviation (STDV) of thickness is about 2%

  5. Atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Wuxi, China: estimation based on native moss analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, G Geoff; Fang, Yan-Ming

    2016-06-01

    We studied atmospheric deposition of heavy metals in Wuxi, China, using moss (Haplocladium microphyllum and H. angustifolium) as a biomonitoring agent. Moss samples were collected from 49 sites determined by a systematic sampling method. The top layer of soil on each site was also sampled. No significant correlation (P ArcGIS 9.0. A total pollution coefficient was calculated for each sampling site to identify the seriously polluted areas in the region.

  6. Reactive dynamics analysis of critical Nbsub>2sub>Osub>5sub> sputtering rate for drum-based metal-like deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shigeng; Li, Cheng; Chu, Hin On; Gibson, Des

    2017-02-01

    Drum-based metal-like film deposition for oxide was investigated using single wavelength in situ monitoring. The data were used to investigate the oxidation mechanism using combined second-order kinetic and parabolic models. A critical Nbsub>2sub>Osub>5sub> deposition rate of 0.507 nm/s was found at drum rotation of 1 rev/s. However, Nbsub>2sub>Osub>5sub> samples prepared at varying deposition rates showed that the deposition rate must be much lower than the critical deposition rate to achieve reasonable absorption. Thus simulation for the volume-fraction of metal in the oxide layer was done using effective medium approximation and a distribution function. Simulation gave high agreement with experimental results and allows the prediction of extinction coefficients at various deposition rates.

  7. Chemical resistance of thin film materials based on metal oxides grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammelselg, Väino, E-mail: vaino.sammelselg@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14a, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Netšipailo, Ivan; Aidla, Aleks; Tarre, Aivar; Aarik, Lauri; Asari, Jelena; Ritslaid, Peeter; Aarik, Jaan [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia)

    2013-09-02

    Etching rate of technologically important metal oxide thin films in hot sulphuric acid was investigated. The films of Al-, Ti-, Cr-, and Ta-oxides studied were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) method on silicon substrates from different precursors in large ranges of growth temperatures (80–900 °C) in order to reveal process parameters that allow deposition of coatings with higher chemical resistance. The results obtained demonstrate that application of processes that yield films with lower concentration of residual impurities as well as crystallization of films in thermal ALD processes leads to significant decrease of etching rate. Crystalline films of materials studied showed etching rates down to values of < 5 pm/s. - Highlights: • Etching of atomic layer deposited thin metal oxide films in hot H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was studied. • Smallest etching rates of < 5 pm/s for TiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} were reached. • Highest etching rate of 2.8 nm/s for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was occurred. • Remarkable differences in etching of non- and crystalline films were observed.

  8. Adhesion improvement of carbon-based coatings through a high ionization deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman, E.; Hultman, L.

    2012-06-01

    The deposition of highly adherent carbon nitride (CNx) films using a pretreatment with two high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) power supplies in a master-slave configuration is reviewed. SKF3 (AISI 52100) steel substrates were pretreated in the environment of a high ionized Cr+Ar plasma in order to sputter clean the surface and implant Cr metal ions. CNx films were subsequently deposited at room temperature by DC magnetron sputtering from a high purity C target in a N2/Ar plasma discharge. All processing was done in an industrial-scale CemeCon CC800 coating system. A series of depositions were obtained with samples pretreated at different bias voltages (DC and pulsed). The adhesion of CNx films, evaluated by the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C test, reaches strength quality HF1. Adhesion results are correlated to high resolution transmission electron microscopy observations confirming the formation of an optimal interfacial mixing layer of Cr and steel. The throwing power increase for HIPIMS coatings is associated to the higher ionization in the plasma discharge.

  9. Biocompatibility and mineralized nodule formation of Neo MTA Plus and an experimental tricalcium silicate cement containing tantalum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomaru-Filho, M; Andrade, A S; Rodrigues, E M; Viola, K S; Faria, G; Camilleri, J; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, J M

    2017-04-08

    To evaluate the biocompatibility and mineralized nodule formation of an experimental tricalcium silicate cement with tantalum oxide (TSC/Ta2 O5 ) as radiopacifier, Neo MTA Plus (Avalon Biomed Inc., Bradenton, FL, USA) and MTA (Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil) on human osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2). Biocompatibility was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and neutral red (NR) assays, after exposure of Saos-2 to cement extracts at 1 : 1, 1 : 2, 1 : 4 and 1 : 8 dilutions for 24 h. Bioactivity was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and calcium deposits were detected with alizarin red staining (ARS). Statistical analysis was performed with analysis of variance and Bonferroni or Tukey post-test (α = 0.05). The MTT assay revealed lower cytotoxicity for NEO and MTA (P  0.05). At 1 : 4 dilution, the TSC/Ta2 O5 cytotoxicity was similar to the control (P > 0.05). At 1 : 8 dilution, cell viability was significantly greater than the control (P MTA, NEO and TSC/Ta2 O5 . ALP activity at 1 and 3 days was similar to the control (P > 0.05). TSC/Ta2 O5 had significantly greater ALP activity at 7 days when compared with the control (P MTA and TSC/Ta2 O5 (P MTA Plus and TSC/Ta2 O5 were biocompatible and induced ALP activity in Saos-2 cells. Both materials induced mineralized nodule formation by Saos-2 with Neo MTA Plus producing significantly more. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Tantalum Nitride-Decorated Titanium with Enhanced Resistance to Microbiologically Induced Corrosion and Mechanical Property for Dental Application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Zhang

    Full Text Available Microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC of metallic devices/implants in the oral region is one major cause of implant failure and metal allergy in patients. Therefore, it is crucial to develop practical approaches which can effectively prevent MIC for broad clinical applications of these materials. In the present work, tantalum nitride (TaN-decorated titanium with promoted bio-corrosion and mechanical property was firstly developed via depositing TaN layer onto pure Ti using magnetron sputtering. The microstructure and chemical constituent of TaN coatings were characterized, and were found to consist of a hard fcc-TaN outer layer. Besides, the addition of TaN coatings greatly increased the hardness and modulus of pristine Ti from 2.54 ± 0.20 to 29.88 ± 2.59 GPa, and from 107.19 ± 6.98 to 295.46 ± 19.36 GPa, respectively. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies indicated that TaN coating exhibited higher MIC resistance in comparison to bare Ti and TiN-coated coating in two bacteria-containing artificial saliva solutions. Moreover, the biofilm experiment showed that the TaN-decorated Ti sample possessed good antibacterial performance. The SEM and XPS results after biofilm removal demonstrated that TaN film remained its integrity and stability, while TiN layer detached from Ti surface in the bio-corrosion tests, demonstrating the anti-MIC behavior and the strong binding property of TaN coating to Ti substrate. Considering all these results, TaN-decorated Ti material exhibits the optimal comprehensive performance and holds great potential as implant material for dental applications.

  11. REINTERPRETATION OF THE LATE PLEISTOCENE INGARANO CAVE DEPOSIT BASED ON THE FOSSIL BIRD ASSOCIATION (APULIA, SOUTH-EASTERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA BEDETTI

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of Late Pleistocene fossil bird remains from Ingarano (Apulia, SE Italy, based on the revision of previously published material and the study of unpublished fossils bones. New field observations make it possible to simplify the stratigraphy of the deposit compared to previous work. The systematic study of the fossil bird bones revealed the presence of 15 taxa, including two hypothetical ones: Circus aeruginosus, Buteo rufinus, Aquila chrysaëtos, Falco columbarius, Falco cherrug, Alectoris graeca, Perdix perdix, Columba livia, Otus scops, Nyctea scandiaca, Nyctea scandiaca vel Bubo bubo, Athene noctua, Pyrrhocorax graculus, Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax, Corvus corone, Corvus corone vel Corvus frugilegus, Corvus corax. Our detailed study also helps improve the taphonomical interpretation of the deposit: the remains from the lower layers were accumulated after mammalian predator activity and were transported over short distances, while the ones from the upper layers show sings of intense transport, such as fractures and surface abrasion. Two different bird assemblages were recognized, respectively from the lowermost and the upper layers of the clastic succession exposed in the Ingarano deposit; this difference is also confirmed by the fossil mammal remains. The systematic study makes it possible to make palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic reconstructions: both assemblages indicate open environments, and the taxa of the lower layers indicate the presence of woods and wetlands with colder characteristics, while birds of the upper layers indicate drier and warmer conditions. This analysis, and the dating established through geochemical analyses and study of lithic artefacts, lead us to date the formation of the Ingarano deposit to the Late Pleistocene, in particular to the MIS 3. The presence of a layer dated to the MIS 2 at the base of the succession indicated in previous works cannot be confirmed. 

  12. Atomic layer chemical vapor deposition of ZrO2-based dielectric films: Nanostructure and nanochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, S. K.; Wang, C.-G.; Tang, D.; Kim, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Werkhoven, C.; Shero, E.

    2003-04-01

    A 4 nm layer of ZrOx (targeted x˜2) was deposited on an interfacial layer (IL) of native oxide (SiO, t˜1.2 nm) surface on 200 mm Si wafers by a manufacturable atomic layer chemical vapor deposition technique at 300 °C. Some as-deposited layers were subjected to a postdeposition, rapid thermal annealing at 700 °C for 5 min in flowing oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The experimental x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy results showed that a multiphase and heterogeneous structure evolved, which we call the Zr-O/IL/Si stack. The as-deposited Zr-O layer was amorphous ZrO2-rich Zr silicate containing about 15% by volume of embedded ZrO2 nanocrystals, which transformed to a glass nanoceramic (with over 90% by volume of predominantly tetragonal-ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) and monoclinic-ZrO2 (m-ZrO2) nanocrystals) upon annealing. The formation of disordered amorphous regions within some of the nanocrystals, as well as crystalline regions with defects, probably gave rise to lattice strains and deformations. The interfacial layer (IL) was partitioned into an upper SiO2-rich Zr silicate and the lower SiOx. The latter was substoichiometric and the average oxidation state increased from Si0.86+ in SiO0.43 (as-deposited) to Si1.32+ in SiO0.66 (annealed). This high oxygen deficiency in SiOx was indicative of the low mobility of oxidizing specie in the Zr-O layer. The stacks were characterized for their dielectric properties in the Pt/{Zr-O/IL}/Si metal oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) configuration. The measured equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) was not consistent with the calculated EOT using a bilayer model of ZrO2 and SiO2, and the capacitance in accumulation (and therefore, EOT and kZr-O) was frequency dispersive, trends well documented in literature. This behavior is qualitatively explained in terms of the multilayer nanostructure and nanochemistry that

  13. Novel hierarchical tantalum oxide-PDMS hybrid coating for medical implants: One pot synthesis, characterization and modulation of fibroblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phong A; Fox, Kate; Tran, Nhiem

    2017-01-01

    Surface properties such as morphology, roughness and charge density have a strong influence on the interaction of biomaterials and cells. Hierarchical materials with a combination of micron/submicron and nanoscale features for coating of medical implants could therefore have significant potential to modulate cellular responses and eventually improve the performance of the implants. In this study, we report a simple, one pot wet chemistry preparation of a hybrid coating system with hierarchical surface structures consisting of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and tantalum oxide. Medical grade, amine functional PDMS was mixed with tantalum ethoxide which subsequently formed Ta2O5in situ through hydrolysis and condensation during coating process. The coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS, XPS, confocal scanning microscopy, contact angle measurement and in vitro cell culture. Varying PDMS and tantalum ethoxide ratios resulted in coatings of different surface textures ranging from smooth to submicro- and nano-structured. Strikingly, hierarchical surfaces containing both microscale (1-1.5μm) and nanoscale (86-163nm) particles were found on coatings synthesized with 20% and 40% (v/v) tantalum ethoxide. The coatings were similar in term of hydrophobicity but showed different surface roughness and chemical composition. Importantly, higher cell proliferation was observed on hybrid surface with hierarchical structures compared to pure PDMS or pure tantalum oxide. The coating process is simple, versatile, carried out under ambient condition and requires no special equipment.

  14. Effect of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment on ZnO-based metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetectors deposited using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yu-Chang; Lee, Hsin-Ying, E-mail: hylee@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Photonics, Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tsung-Hsin [Metal Industries Research and Development Centre, Kaohsiung 82151, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-15

    In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) films were deposited on sapphire substrates using a plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition system. Prior to deposition, the substrates were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in order to increase nucleation on the initial sapphire surface and, thus, enhance the quality of deposited ZnO films. Furthermore, x-ray diffraction spectroscopy measurements indicated that the crystallinity of ZnO films was considerably enhanced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment, with the strongest (002) diffraction peak occurring for the film pretreated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for 60 min. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also was used, and the results indicated that a high number of Zn–O bonds was generated in ZnO films pretreated appropriately with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The ZnO film deposited on a sapphire substrate with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment for 60 min was applied to metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetectors (MSM-UPDs) as an active layer. The fabricated ZnO MSM-UPDs showed improvements in dark current and ultraviolet–visible rejection ratios (0.27 μA and 1.06 × 10{sup 3}, respectively) compared to traditional devices.

  15. Mechanical properties of tantalum-tungsten interlayer between tungsten tile and thimble to prevent helium leak from He-cooled divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Shen, Weiping; Zhou, Yanan; Zhang, Qingling

    2013-03-01

    The tungsten parts made of pure tungsten tile and dispersion strengthened tungsten thimble with 3 mm interlayer of tantalum-tungsten alloy are fabricated by Spark Plasmas Sintering (SPS). The process of SPS is that the temperature is raised to 1700 °C at a rate of 100 °C/min and kept for 3 min, under a constant pressure of 50MPa along the Z-axis. The mechanical properties of the interlayer with different percent of tantalum are measured. The results show that with increasing percent of tantalum, the hardness first increases and then decreases; and as the indentation on the sample is closer to dispersion strengthened tungsten, the value of Vickers hardness is much higher. The Vickers hardness of interlayer is the highest when the content of tantalum is 50% and the indentation is next to dispersion strengthened tungsten. Bending strength drops with increasing content of tantalum, when the content of tantalum is 100% the value of bending strength is the lowest. The fracture toughness is highest as the content of tantalum is 25%, the value is 9.89MPa•m1/2. The toughening tungsten-tantalum interlayer between tungsten tile and thimble would better prevent helium leak from He-cooled divertor for DEMO.

  16. Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} solar cells based on chemical bath deposited precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Chao, E-mail: chao.gao@kit.edu [Institute of Applied Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schnabel, Thomas; Abzieher, Tobias [Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Württemberg (ZSW), 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Krämmer, Christoph [Institute of Applied Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Powalla, Michael [Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Württemberg (ZSW), 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Light Technology Institute (LTI), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kalt, Heinz; Hetterich, Michael [Institute of Applied Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    A low-cost method has been developed to fabricate Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} solar cells. By this method, firstly SnS, CuS, and ZnS layers are successively deposited on a molybdenum/soda lime glass (Mo/SLG) substrate by chemical bath deposition. The Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} thin films are obtained by annealing the precursor in a selenium atmosphere utilizing a graphite box in the furnace. The obtained Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} thin films show large crystalline grains. By optimizing the preparation process, Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} solar cells with efficiencies up to 4.5% are obtained. The results imply that the Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4}/CdS interface and the back contact may be limiting factors for solar cell efficiency. - Highlights: • A chemical bath deposition method is developed to prepare Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} thin films. • The Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} thin films show good crystallization. • Solar cells with efficiencies up to 4.5% can be prepared based on the Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} layer. • The limiting factors for the solar cell efficiency are analyzed.

  17. Corrosion Resistance of Ni-Based WC/Co Coatings Deposited by Spray and Fuse Process Varying the Oxygen Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, H.; Olaya, J. J.; Alfonso, J. E.; Mtshali, C. B.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effect of oxygen flow variation in the corrosion behavior of Ni-based WC/Co coatings deposited by spray and fuse process was investigated. The coatings were deposited on gray cast iron substrates using a Superjet Eutalloy thermal spraying gun. The morphology of the coatings was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The crystallographic phases were registered by x-ray diffraction (XRD), the diffraction patterns show the crystalline phases of the powder components with principal reflections for Ni and WC, the increase in flame temperature, due to the oxygen flow variation, generated amorphization in the nickel and an important crystallization of the planes (111) and (222) of WC as well as the decarburization of WC in W2C and W metallic. The corrosion behavior was investigated at room temperature in a 3.5% w/w aqueous solution of NaCl via potentiodynamic polarization. Electrochemical corrosion test showed that the coatings deposited under neutral flame conditions with an oxygen flow of 12.88 SCFH evidenced higher corrosion resistance. The chemical composition of the coatings and corrosion areas were analyzed by particle-induced x-ray emission, this technique permitting the corroboration of the decarburization process of WC determined by XRD and the formation of Cl structures.

  18. On the possibility to grow zinc oxide-based transparent conducting oxide films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrutis, Adulfas, E-mail: adulfas.abrutis@chf.vu.lt; Silimavicus, Laimis; Kubilius, Virgaudas; Murauskas, Tomas; Saltyte, Zita; Kuprenaite, Sabina; Plausinaitiene, Valentina [Faculty of Chemistry, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, LT-03225 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-03-15

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) was applied to grow zinc oxide (ZnO)-based transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films. Indium (In)-doped ZnO films were deposited using a cold wall pulsed liquid injection CVD system with three nichrome wires installed at a distance of 2 cm from the substrate holder. The wires were heated by an AC current in the range of 0–10 A. Zn and In 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionates dissolved in 1,2-dimethoxyethane were used as precursors. The hot wires had a marked effect on the growth rates of ZnO, In-doped ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films; at a current of 6–10 A, growth rates were increased by a factor of ≈10–20 compared with those of traditional CVD at the same substrate temperature (400 °C). In-doped ZnO films with thickness of ≈150 nm deposited on sapphire-R grown at a wire current of 9 A exhibited a resistivity of ≈2 × 10{sup −3} Ωcm and transparency of >90% in the visible spectral range. These initial results reveal the potential of HW-CVD for the growth of TCOs.

  19. An electrical conductivity based method of determining the particle deposition rate in air-liquid interface devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Harald; Meyer, Jörg; Kasper, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    A new in-situ method of determining the particle deposition rate onto cell cultures inside air-liquid interface devices is described. It is based on depositing a surrogate aerosol of salt particles onto the water filled wells of a culture plate while measuring the resulting change in electrical conductivity of the solution in situ, in order to derive the accumulated particle mass. For evaluation purposes, the wells of a six-well cell culture plate were equipped with custom designed electrodes and calibrated with a series of commercially available standard solutions. After the necessary corrections prescribed by theory, the calibration resulted in an accuracy and comparability between cells of ±3% in terms of measured conductivity. The method was then applied to a specific ALI device consisting essentially of the calibrated six-well culture plate inside an electrostatic cross-flow precipitator, and tested with submicron NaCl aerosol of defined size distribution produced by nebulization of a salt solution. 2h of particle accumulation were sufficient to accumulate between 30 and 10 μg of salt per well, depending on the location in the precipitator. Resulting deposition rates varied narrowly between the wells by about 2 ng min(-1) cm(-2). Factors affecting the overall accuracy and reproducibility are discussed.

  20. Inkjet-based deposition of polymer thin films enabled by a lubrication model incorporating nano-scale parasitics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Shrawan; Meissl, Mario J.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    Thin film lubrication theory has been widely used to model multi-scale fluid phenomena. Variations of the same have also found application in fluid-based manufacturing process steps for micro- and nano-scale devices over large areas where a natural disparity in length scales exists. Here, a novel inkjet material deposition approach has been enabled by an enhanced thin film lubrication theory that accounts for nano-scale substrate parasitics. This approach includes fluid interactions with a thin flexible superstrate towards a new process called Jet and Coat of Thin-films (JCT). Numerical solutions of the model have been verified, and also validated against controlled experiments of polymer film deposition with good agreement. Understanding gleaned from the experimentally validated model has then been used to facilitate JCT process synthesis resulting in substantial reduction in the influence of parasitics and a concomitant improvement in the film thickness uniformity. Polymer films ranging from 20 to 500 nm mean thickness have been demonstrated with standard deviation of less than 2% of the mean film thickness. The JCT process offers advantages over spin coating which is not compatible with roll-to-roll processing and large area processing for displays. It also improves over techniques such as knife edge coating, slot die coating, as they are limited in the range of thicknesses of films that can be deposited without compromising uniformity.

  1. Electromagnetic interference shielding behaviors of Zn-based conducting oxide films prepared by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-June; Kang, Kyung-Mun; Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho, E-mail: hhpark@yonsei.ac.kr

    2015-05-29

    The structural, electrical, and optical properties of undoped ZnO, F-doped ZnO (ZnO:F), and Al-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) thin films with two different thicknesses deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated to evaluate the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE). A diluted fluoride hydroxide was used as a single reactant source for F doping in a ZnO matrix, and the F doping concentration was about 1 at.% in the ZnO:F films. The fabrication of the ZnO:Al films was followed by the typical ALD method, and the Al doping concentration of about 2 at.% was adjusted by the dopant deposition intervals of the ZnO:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} precursor pulse cycle ratios, which were fixed at 19:1. The film thickness variations were controlled with 600 and 1600 total ALD cycles of approximately 100 nm and 300 nm, respectively. The carrier concentration of the films is monotonically increased in order of the undoped ZnO, ZnO:F, and ZnO:Al films. The EMI-SE values of the undoped ZnO, ZnO:F, and ZnO:Al films at 1 GHz were 0.9 dB, 2.6 dB, and 6.0 dB for ~ 100 nm, and were 2.1 dB, 9.7 dB, and 13.1 dB for ~ 300 nm, respectively. In our work, the EMI-SE value was increased by the enhancement of both the carrier concentration and film thickness due to reflection via the free carrier scattering effect. - Highlights: • Fluorine or aluminum doped ZnO thin films prepared by atomic layer deposition • Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) of ZnO thin films • Carrier concentration and film thickness enhanced the EMI-SE. • The enhancement of EMI-SE was due to reflection via free carrier scattering effect.

  2. Time variant layer control in atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition based growth of graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2013-04-01

    Graphene is a semi-metallic, transparent, atomic crystal structure material which is promising for its high mobility, strength and transparency - potentially applicable for radio frequency (RF) circuitry and energy harvesting and storage applications. Uniform (same number of layers), continuous (not torn or discontinuous), large area (100 mm to 200 mm wafer scale), low-cost, reliable growth are the first hand challenges for its commercialization prospect. We show a time variant uniform (layer control) growth of bi- to multi-layer graphene using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition system. We use Raman spectroscopy for physical characterization supported by electrical property analysis. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Wet deposition at the base of Mt Everest: Seasonal evolution of the chemistry and isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Delconte, Carlo A.; Sacchi, Elisa; Wilson, Alana M.; Williams, Mark W.; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Putero, Davide

    2016-12-01

    The chemistry of wet deposition was investigated during 2012-2014 at the Pyramid International Laboratory in the Upper Khumbu Valley, Nepal, at 5050 m a.s.l., within the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme. The main hydro-chemical species and stable isotopes of the water molecule were determined for monsoon rain (July-September) and snow samples (October-June). To evaluate the synoptic-scale variability of air masses reaching the measurement site, 5 day back-trajectories were computed for the sampling period. Ion concentrations in precipitation during the monsoon were low suggesting that they represent global regional background concentrations. The associations between ions suggested that the principal sources of chemical species were marine aerosols, rock and soil dust, and fossil fuel combustion. Most chemical species exhibited a pattern during the monsoon, with maxima at the beginning and at the end of the season, partially correlated with the precipitation amount. Snow samples exhibited significantly higher concentrations of chemical species, compared to the monsoon rainfall observations. Particularly during 2013, elevated concentrations of NO3-, SO42- and NH4+ were measured in the first winter snow event, and in May at the end of the pre-monsoon season. The analysis of large-scale circulation and wind regimes as well as atmospheric composition observations in the region indicates the transport of polluted air masses from the Himalayan foothills and Indian sub-continent up to the Himalaya region. During the summer monsoon onset period, the greater values of pollutants can be attributed to air-mass transport from the planetary boundary layer (PBL) of the Indo-Gangetic plains. Isotopic data confirm that during the monsoon period, precipitation occurred from water vapor that originated from the Indian Ocean and the Bay of Bengal; by contrast during the non-monsoon period, an isotopic signature of more continental origin appeared, indicating that the higher

  4. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of polysilanes polymer based thin films and their applications in compound semiconductors and silicon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulachgar, El Hassane

    As the semiconductors industry is moving toward nanodevices, there is growing need to develop new materials and thin films deposition processes which could enable strict control of the atomic composition and structure of thin film materials in order to achieve precise control on their electrical and optical properties. The accurate control of thin film characteristics will become increasingly important as the miniaturization of semiconductor devices continue. There is no doubt that chemical synthesis of new materials and their self assembly will play a major role in the design and fabrication of next generation semiconductor devices. The objective of this work is to investigate the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process of thin film using a polymeric precursor as a source material. This process offers many advantages including low deposition cost, hazard free working environment, and most importantly the ability to customize the polymer source material through polymer synthesis and polymer functionalization. The combination between polymer synthesis and CVD process will enable the design of new generation of complex thin film materials with a wide range of improved chemical, mechanical, electrical and optical properties which cannot be easily achieved through conventional CVD processes based on gases and small molecule precursors. In this thesis we mainly focused on polysilanes polymers and more specifically poly(dimethylsilanes). The interest in these polymers is motivated by their distinctive electronic and photonic properties which are attributed to the delocalization of the sigma-electron along the Si-Si backbone chain. These characteristics make polysilane polymers very promising in a broad range of applications as a dielectric, a semiconductor and a conductor. The polymer-based CVD process could be eventually extended to other polymer source materials such as polygermanes, as well as and a variety of other inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymers

  5. Reliability study of Zr and Al incorporated Hf based high-k dielectric deposited by advanced processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyian, Md Nasir Uddin

    Hafnium-based high-kappa dielectric materials have been successfully used in the industry as a key replacement for SiO2 based gate dielectrics in order to continue CMOS device scaling to the 22-nm technology node. Further scaling according to the device roadmap requires the development of oxides with higher kappa values in order to scale the equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) to 0.7 nm or below while achieving low defect densities. In addition, next generation devices need to meet challenges like improved channel mobility, reduced gate leakage current, good control on threshold voltage, lower interface state density, and good reliability. In order to overcome these challenges, improvements of the high-kappa film properties and deposition methods are highly desirable. In this dissertation, a detail study of Zr and Al incorporated HfO 2 based high-kappa dielectrics is conducted to investigate improvement in electrical characteristics and reliability. To meet scaling requirements of the gate dielectric to sub 0.7 nm, Zr is added to HfO2 to form Hf1-xZrxO2 with x=0, 0.31 and 0.8 where the dielectric film is deposited by using various intermediate processing conditions, like (i) DADA: intermediate thermal annealing in a cyclical deposition process; (ii) DSDS: similar cyclical process with exposure to SPA Ar plasma; and (iii) As-Dep: the dielectric deposited without any intermediate step. MOSCAPs are formed with TiN metal gate and the reliability of these devices is investigated by subjecting them to a constant voltage stress in the gate injection mode. Stress induced flat-band voltage shift (DeltaVFB), stress induced leakage current (SILC) and stress induced interface state degradation are observed. DSDS samples demonstrate the superior characteristics whereas the worst degradation is observed for DADA samples. Time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) shows that DSDS Hf1-xZrxO2 (x=0.8) has the superior characteristics with reduced oxygen vacancy, which is affiliated to

  6. Deposition of DLC Coating on Biomedical TiNi Alloys by Plasma Based Ion Implantation to Improve Surface Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon ( DLC ) -films were successfully deposited on Ti- 50.8at% Ni using plasma based ion implantation (PBII) technique. The influence of the pulsed negative bias voltage applied to the substrate from 12 kV to 40 kV on the microstructure, nano- indentation hardness and Young' s modulus, the surface characteristics and corrosion resistant property as well as hemocompatibility were investigated. The experimental results showed that C 1 s peak depended heavily on the bias voltage. With the increase of bias voltage , the ratio of sp2 / sp3 -first decreased, renching a minimum value at 20 kV, and then increased. The DLC coating deposited at20 kV showed the highest hardness and elastic modulus values as a result of lower sp2 / sp3 ratio. The RMS values first decreased from 7.202 nm( 12 kV) to 5.279 nm(20 kV), and then increased to 11.449 nm(30 kV) and7.060 nm(40 kV). The uncoated TiNi alloy showed severe pitting corrosion, due to the presence of Cl-ions in the solution. On the contrary, the DLC coated sample showed very little pitting corrosion and behaved better corrosion resistant property especially for the specimens deposited at 20 kV bias voltages. The platelet adhesion test show that the hemocompatibility of DLC coated TiNi alloy is much better than that of bare TiNi alloy, and the hemocompatibility performauce of DLC coated TiNi alloy deposited at 20 kV is superior to that of other coated specimens.

  7. Atomistic simulation of tantalum nanoindentation: Effects of indenter diameter, penetration velocity, and interatomic potentials on defect mechanisms and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruestes, C.J., E-mail: cjruestes@hotmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); CONICET, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Stukowski, A. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt 64287 (Germany); Tang, Y. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Tramontina, D.R. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Erhart, P. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Gothenburg 41296 (Sweden); Remington, B.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Urbassek, H.M. [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Meyers, M.A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Bringa, E.M. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. Nac. de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); CONICET, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina)

    2014-09-08

    Nanoindentation simulations are a helpful complement to experiments. There is a dearth of nanoindentation simulations for bcc metals, partly due to the lack of computationally efficient and reliable interatomic potentials at large strains. We carry out indentation simulations for bcc tantalum using three different interatomic potentials and present the defect mechanisms responsible for the creation and expansion of the plastic deformation zone: twins are initially formed, giving rise to shear loop expansion and the formation of sequential prismatic loops. The calculated elastic constants as function of pressure as well as stacking fault energy surfaces explain the significant differences found in the defect structures generated for the three potentials investigated in this study. The simulations enable the quantification of total dislocation length and twinning fraction. The indenter velocity is varied and, as expected, the penetration depth for the first pop-in (defect emission) event shows a strain rate sensitivity m in the range of 0.037–0.055. The effect of indenter diameter on the first pop-in is discussed. A new intrinsic length-scale model is presented based on the profile of the residual indentation and geometrically necessary dislocation theory.

  8. Deposition temperature dependence of material and Si surface passivation properties of O{sub 3}-based atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based films and stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordihn, Stefan, E-mail: s.bordihn2@q-cells.com [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands and Hanwha Q CELLS GmbH, Sonnenallee 17-21, 06766 Bitterfeld-Wolfen (Germany); Mertens, Verena; Müller, Jörg W. [Hanwha Q CELLS GmbH, Sonnenallee 17-21, 06766 Bitterfeld-Wolfen (Germany); Kessels, W. M. M., E-mail: w.m.m.kessels@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-01-15

    The material composition and the Si surface passivation of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films prepared by atomic layer deposition using Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} and O{sub 3} as precursors were investigated for deposition temperatures (T{sub Dep}) between 200 °C and 500 °C. The growth per cycle decreased with increasing deposition temperature due to a lower Al deposition rate. In contrast the material composition was hardly affected except for the hydrogen concentration, which decreased from [H] = 3 at. % at 200 °C to [H] < 0.5 at. % at 400 °C and 500 °C. The surface passivation performance was investigated after annealing at 300 °C–450 °C and also after firing steps in the typical temperature range of 800 °C–925 °C. A similar high level of the surface passivation performance, i.e., surface recombination velocity values <10 cm/s, was obtained after annealing and firing. Investigations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks complemented the work and revealed similar levels of surface passivation as single-layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, both for the chemical and field-effect passivation. The fixed charge density in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiN{sub x} stacks, reflecting the field-effect passivation, was reduced by one order of magnitude from 3·10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} to 3·10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} when T{sub Dep} was increased from 300 °C to 500 °C. The level of the chemical passivation changed as well, but the total level of the surface passivation was hardly affected by the value of T{sub Dep}. When firing films prepared at of low T{sub Dep}, blistering of the films occurred and this strongly reduced the surface passivation. These results presented in this work demonstrate that a high level of surface passivation can be achieved for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based films and stacks over a wide range of conditions when the combination of deposition temperature and annealing or firing temperature is carefully chosen.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2-nanomembrane-based photocatalysts with enhanced performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyanto Edy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, TiO2 and TiO2-ZnO nanomembranes were fabricated by atomic layer deposition using the three-dimensionally porous template and their photocatalytic properties were investigated. The nanomembranes were firstly deposited onto the surface of polyurethane porous sponge templates (sacrificial templates, followed by a calcination at 500 or 800 °C. Three-dimensionally porous structures as a replica of the porous sponge templates were thus achieved. By a pulverizing process, the porous structures were broken into small pieces, which were then employed as photocatalyst. Experimental results show that the degree of crystallinity is raised by increasing of the nanomembrane thickness due to the increase of the grain size with minimizing the number of grain boundaries in the thicker nanomembrane, which is beneficial to enhance the photocatalysis efficiency. On the other hand, the photocatalytic activity can also be improved by TiO2-ZnO composite, due to lower electron-hole recombination possibility and better carrier conductivity.

  10. Atomic layer deposition of TiO2-nanomembrane-based photocatalysts with enhanced performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edy, Riyanto; Huang, Gaoshan; Zhao, Yuting; Zhang, Jing; Mei, Yongfeng; Shi, Jianjun

    2016-11-01

    In this study, TiO2 and TiO2-ZnO nanomembranes were fabricated by atomic layer deposition using the three-dimensionally porous template and their photocatalytic properties were investigated. The nanomembranes were firstly deposited onto the surface of polyurethane porous sponge templates (sacrificial templates), followed by a calcination at 500 or 800 °C. Three-dimensionally porous structures as a replica of the porous sponge templates were thus achieved. By a pulverizing process, the porous structures were broken into small pieces, which were then employed as photocatalyst. Experimental results show that the degree of crystallinity is raised by increasing of the nanomembrane thickness due to the increase of the grain size with minimizing the number of grain boundaries in the thicker nanomembrane, which is beneficial to enhance the photocatalysis efficiency. On the other hand, the photocatalytic activity can also be improved by TiO2-ZnO composite, due to lower electron-hole recombination possibility and better carrier conductivity.

  11. Multifaceted and route-controlled "click" reactions based on vapor-deposited coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ting-Pi; Tai, Ching-Heng; Wu, Jyun-Ting; Wu, Chih-Yu; Liang, Wei-Chieh; Chen, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-02-01

    "Click" reactions provide precise and reliable chemical transformations for the preparation of functional architectures for biomaterials and biointerfaces. The emergence of a multiple-click reaction strategy has paved the way for a multifunctional microenvironment with orthogonality and precise multitasking that mimics nature. We demonstrate a multifaceted and route-controlled click interface using vapor-deposited functionalized poly-para-xylylenes. Distinctly clickable moieties of ethynyl and maleimide were introduced into poly-para-xylylenes in one step via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) copolymerization process. The advanced interface coating allows for a double-click route with concurrent copper(i)-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC) and the thiol-maleimide click reaction. Additionally, double-click reactions can also be performed in a cascade manner by controlling the initiation route to enable the CuAAC and/or thiol-yne reaction using a mono-functional alkyne-functionalized poly-para-xylylene. The use of multifaceted coatings to create straightforward and orthogonal interface properties with respect to protein adsorption and cell attachment is demonstrated and characterized.

  12. Bauxite Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨化洲

    1989-01-01

    Bauxite deposits in China,rangin in age from Late Paleozoic to Cenozoic ,are distributed mainly in Shanxi,Shandong Henan,Guizhou,Guangxi and Yunnan.Based on stratigraphic relations they can be clas-sified as 6 types:inter-system marine,inter-system continental,intra-system marine,intra-system continent-tal,weathering lateritic and weathering accumulation types.But in terms of depositional environments,only four types are distinguished,I.e.the marine deposits,continental deposits,lateritic deposits and weath-ering-accumulation deposits.These deposits have been formed in two steps:firstly,the depression of paraplatform or front basin margins in paleocontinents and secondly,the development of littoral-lagoons on the eroded surface of karstified carbonate bedrocks.The aluminum may have been derived from the carbonate rocks with which the ores are associated,or from adjacent aluminosilicate rocks.

  13. Tantalum acetabular augments in one-stage exchange of infected total hip arthroplasty: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatte, Till Orla; Kendoff, Daniel; Sabihi, Reza; Kamath, Atul F; Rueger, Johannes M; Gehrke, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    During the one-stage exchange procedure for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA), acetabular defects challenge reconstructive options. Porous tantalum augments are an established tool for addressing acetabular destruction in aseptic cases, but their utility in septic exchange is unknown. This retrospective case-control study presents the initial results of tantalum augmentation during one-stage exchange for PJI. Primary endpoints were rates of re-infection and short-term complications associated with this technique. Study patients had no higher risk of re-infection with equivalent durability at early follow-up with a re-infection rate in both groups of 4%. In conclusion, tantalum augments are a viable option for addressing acetabular defects in one-stage exchange for septic THA. Further study is necessary to assess long-term durability when compared to traditional techniques for acetabular reconstruction.

  14. Porous tantalum uncemented acetabular shells in revision total hip replacement: two to four year clinical and radiographic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Y; Greidanus, N V; Duncan, C P; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S

    2008-01-01

    In cementless revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), achieving initial implant stability and maximising host bone contact is key to the success of reconstruction. Porous tantalum acetabular shells may represent an improvement from conventional porous coated uncemented cups in revision acetabular reconstruction associated with severe acetabular bone defects. We reviewed the results of 46 acetabular revisions with Paprosky 2 and 3 acetabular bone defects done with a hemispheric, tantalum acetabular shell and multiple supplementary screws. At a mean follow-up of 40 (24-51) months, one acetabular shell had been revised in a patient with a Paprosky 3B defect. Cementless acetabular revision with the tantalum acetabular shell demonstrated excellent early clinical and radiographic results and warrants further evaluation in revision acetabular reconstruction associated with severe acetabular bone defects.

  15. Quantitative Reconstruction of Sulfur Deposition Using a Mixing Model Based on Sulfur Isotope Ratios in Tree Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takuya; Tayasu, Ichiro; Takenaka, Chisato

    2015-11-01

    Quantification of sulfur (S) deposition is critical to deciphering the environmental archive of S in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we propose a mixing model that quantifies S deposition based on the S isotope ratio (δS) in tree rings. We collected samples from Japanese cedar ( D. Don) stumps from two sites: one near Yokkaichi City (YOK), which is well known for having the heaviest S air pollution in the world, and one at Inabu-cho (INA) in central Japan, which has been much less affected by air pollution. The δS profiles at both sites are consistent with S air pollution and contributions of anthropogenic S. The minimum value in YOK is lower than the δS values of anthropogenic S or any other possible source. Because the δS in the tree rings is affected by fractionation in the forest ecosystems, we used a mixing model to account for the isotope effects and to distinguish the sources of S. Based on the model results, we infer that the peak of S emissions at YOK occurred sometime between the late 1960s and early 1970s (489 mmol m yr). This estimated value is comparable with the highest reported values in Europe. This is the first quantitative estimate of anthropogenic input of S in forest systems based on δS in tree rings. Our results suggest that tree ring data can be used when monitoring stations of atmospheric S are lacking and that estimates of S deposition using δS in tree rings will advance our understanding of the local-scale S dynamics and the effect of human activities on it.

  16. Carbon Deposition during CO2 Electrolysis in Ni-Based Solid-Oxide-Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Graves, Christopher R.; Blennow, P.

    2015-01-01

    the onset of carbon deposition. The outlet gas composition at each current step was estimated based on the inlet gas composition and the reactant conversion using Faraday's law. The increase in voltage was observed at lower outlet pCO/pCO2 ratios than that corresponding to the expected thermodynamic......The carbon formation threshold in an operating cell was investigated during electrolysis of an idealized reactant atmosphere of CO and CO2. The electrolysis current was gradually increased in steps until the cell voltage spontaneously increased, thereby indicating cell degradation and possibly...

  17. Electrostatic self-assembly of multilayer copolymeric membranes on the surface of porous tantalum implants for sustained release of doxorubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo X

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Xinming Guo1,*, Muwan Chen1,2,*, Wenzhou Feng1,*, Jiabi Liang1, Huibin Zhao1, Lin Tian1, Hui Chao3, Xuenong Zou11Orthopaedic Research institute/Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital and Department of Pharmacy, the Fifth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO, Aarhus University, Denmark; 3Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *The first three authors contributed equally to this work as co-first authorAbstract: Many studies in recent years have focused on surface engineering of implant materials in order to improve their biocompatibility and other performance. Porous tantalum implants have increasingly been used in implant surgeries, due to their biocompatibility, physical stability, and good mechanical strength. In this study we functionalized the porous tantalum implant for sustained drug delivery capability via electrostatic self-assembly of polyelectrolytes of hyaluronic acid, methylated collagen, and terpolymer on the surface of a porous tantalum implant. The anticancer drug doxorubicin was encapsulated into the multilayer copolymer membranes on the porous tantalum implants. Results showed the sustained released of doxorubicin from the functionalized porous tantalum implants for up to 1 month. The drug release solutions in 1 month all had inhibitory effects on the proliferation of chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353. These results suggest that this functionalized implant could be used in reconstructive surgery for the treatment of bone tumor as a local, sustained drug delivery system.Keywords: self-assembly, surface modification, tantalum, drug delivery system, doxorubicin, bone tumor

  18. New simple deposition model based on reassessment of global fallout data 1954 - 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Bergan, T.D. [Directorate for Civil Protection and Emergency Planning, Toensberg (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Ikaeheimonen, T.K. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Isaksson, M. [Univ. of Gothenburg. Dept. of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgren Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Nielsen, Sven P. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nutech, Roskilde (Denmark); Paatero, J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute. Observation Services, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons began in 1945 and largely ceased in 1963. This testing is the major cause of distribution of man-made radionuclides over the globe and constitutes a background that needs to be considered when effects of other sources are estimated. The main radionuclides of long term (after the first months) concern are generally assumed to be {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr. It has been known for a long time that the deposition density of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr is approximately proportional to the amount of precipitation. But the use of this proportional relationship raised some questions such as (a) over how large area can it be assumed that the concentration in precipitation is the same at any given time; (b) how does this agree with the observed latitude dependency of deposition density and (c) are the any other parameters that could be of use in a simple model describing global fallout? These issues were amongst those taken up in the NKS-B EcoDoses activity. The preliminary results for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr showed for each that the measured concentration had been similar at many European and N-American sites at any given time and that the change with time had been similar. These finding were followed up in a more thorough study in this (DepEstimates) activity. Global data (including the US EML and UK AERE data sets) from 1954 - 1976 for {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were analysed testing how well different potential explanatory variables could describe the deposition density. The best fit was obtained by not assuming the traditional proportional relationship, but instead a non-linear power function. The predictions obtained using this new model may not be significantly different from those obtained using the traditional model, when using a limited data set such as from one country as a test in this report showed. But for larger data sets and understanding of underlying processes the new model should be an improvement. (Author)

  19. Tuning the properties of visible-light-responsive tantalum (oxy)nitride photocatalysts by non-stoichiometric compositions: A first-principles viewpoint

    KAUST Repository

    Harb, Moussab

    2014-01-01

    Finding an ideal photocatalyst for achieving efficient overall water splitting still remains a great challenge. By applying accurate first-principles quantum calculations based on DFT with the screened non-local hybrid HSE06 functional, we bring rational insights at the atomic level into the influence of non-stoichiometric compositions on essential properties of tantalum (oxy)nitride compounds as visible-light-responsive photocatalysts for water splitting. Indeed, recent experiments show that such non-stoichiometry is inherent to the nitridation methods of