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Sample records for deposit impactor moudi

  1. Characterization of the Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT) for size-resolved quantitative measurements of ice nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ryan; Si, Meng; Li, Jixiao; Huffman, J. Alex; McCluskey, Christina; Levin, Ezra; Irish, Victoria; Chou, Cédric; Hill, Thomas; Ladino, Luis; Yakobi, Jacqueline; Schiller, Corinne; Abbatt, Jon; DeMott, Paul; Bertram, Allan

    2014-05-01

    Ice formation within a cloud system can significantly modify its lifetime and radiative forcing. Many current instruments for measuring atmospheric concentrations of ice nuclei (IN) are not capable of providing size-resolved information. Such knowledge is useful in identifying the sources of IN and predicting their transport in the atmosphere. Furthermore, those that use size-discrimination to identify IN typically exclude particles with an aerodynamic diameter greater than 2.5 μm from analysis. Several studies have indicated this may be an important size regime for IN, particularly with those activating at warmer temperatures. The recently developed Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT) addresses these limitations through combining sample collection by a model of cascade impactor with an established immersion freezing apparatus. Here we present a characterization of the MOUDI-DFT and the development of a modified technique which address experimental uncertainties arising from sample deposit inhomogeneity and the droplet freezing method. An intercomparison with a continuous-flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) was performed. We also show preliminary results from a campaign undertaken in a remote coastal region of western Canada. Correlations between atmospheric IN concentrations and the abundance of suspended submicron and supermicron particles, biological aerosols, carbonaceous aerosols, and prevailing meteorological conditions were investigated.

  2. The micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT for measuring concentrations of ice nucleating particles as a function of size: improvements and initial validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Mason

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT combines particle collection by inertial impaction (via the MOUDI and a microscope-based immersion freezing apparatus (the DFT to measure atmospheric concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs as a function of size and temperature. In the first part of this study we improved upon this recently introduced technique. Using optical microscopy, we investigated the non-uniformity of MOUDI aerosol deposits at spatial resolutions of 1, 0.25 mm, and for some stages when necessary 0.10 mm. The results from these measurements show that at a spatial resolution of 1 mm and less, the concentration of particles along the MOUDI aerosol deposit can vary by an order of magnitude or more. Since the total area of a MOUDI aerosol deposit ranges from 425 to 605 mm2 and the area analyzed by the DFT is approximately 1.2 mm2, this non-uniformity needs to be taken into account when using the MOUDI-DFT to determine atmospheric concentrations of INPs. Measurements of the non-uniformity of the MOUDI aerosol deposits were used to select positions on the deposits that had relatively small variations in particle concentration and to build substrate holders for the different MOUDI stages. These substrate holders improve reproducibility by holding the substrate in the same location for each measurement and ensure that DFT analysis is only performed on substrate regions with relatively small variations in particle concentration. In addition, the deposit non-uniformity was used to determine correction factors that take the non-uniformity into account when determining atmospheric concentrations of INPs. In the second part of this study, the MOUDI-DFT utilizing the new substrate holders was compared to the continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC technique of Colorado State University. The intercomparison was done using INP concentrations found by the two instruments during ambient measurements of

  3. The micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT) for measuring concentrations of ice nucleating particles as a function of size: improvements and initial validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. H.; Chou, C.; McCluskey, C. S.; Levin, E. J. T.; Schiller, C. L.; Hill, T. C. J.; Huffman, J. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-06-01

    The micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT) combines particle collection by inertial impaction (via the MOUDI) and a microscope-based immersion freezing apparatus (the DFT) to measure atmospheric concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) as a function of size and temperature. In the first part of this study we improved upon this recently introduced technique. Using optical microscopy, we investigated the non-uniformity of MOUDI aerosol deposits at spatial resolutions of 1, 0.25 mm, and for some stages when necessary 0.10 mm. The results from these measurements show that at a spatial resolution of 1 mm and less, the concentration of particles along the MOUDI aerosol deposits can vary by an order of magnitude or more. Since the total area of a MOUDI aerosol deposit ranges from 425 to 605 mm2 and the area analyzed by the DFT is approximately 1.2 mm2, this non-uniformity needs to be taken into account when using the MOUDI-DFT to determine atmospheric concentrations of INPs. Measurements of the non-uniformity of the MOUDI aerosol deposits were used to select positions on the deposits that had relatively small variations in particle concentration and to build substrate holders for the different MOUDI stages. These substrate holders improve reproducibility by holding the substrate in the same location for each measurement and ensure that DFT analysis is only performed on substrate regions with relatively small variations in particle concentration. In addition, the deposit non-uniformity was used to determine correction factors that take the non-uniformity into account when determining atmospheric concentrations of INPs. In the second part of this study, the MOUDI-DFT utilizing the new substrate holders was compared to the continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) technique of Colorado State University. The intercomparison was done using INP concentrations found by the two instruments during ambient measurements of continental

  4. Evaluation of the applicability of the MOUDI impactor for aerosol collections with subsequent multielement analysis by PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maenhaut, W.; Ducastel, G. (Inst. for Nuclear Sciences, Gent (Belgium)); Hillamo, R.E.; Pakkanen, T.A. (Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland))

    1993-04-01

    The micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) is an 8-stage impactor with cut-sizes down to 0.056 [mu]m and which allegedly provides uniform aerosol deposits for the various stages. In the present study it was examined how uniform the aerosol deposits really are for each impaction plate, and whether the uniformity is sufficient for a straightforward PIXE analysis. This was done by collecting several samples of ambient aerosol with the MOUDI and by determining the deposition pattern of various elements on the foils through a linear PIXE scan across each impaction foil. It was found that the deposits are far from uniform at the millimeter level for the stage numbers up to 6. Despite this, concentration data can easily be obtained by PIXE from such samples, provided that the analyzed area is carefully selected and appropriate correction factors for the nonuniformity are employed. Some size distribution data are presented. A comparison is also made of the size distribution data and detection limits that result from employing the MOUDI in combination with PIXE with those obtainable by PIXE analysis of some other types of cascade impactors. (orig.).

  5. Laser ablation ICP-MS of size-segregated atmospheric particles collected with a MOUDI cascade impactor: a proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marin S.; Grgić, Irena; Šelih, Vid S.; Šala, Martin; Bitsui, Marsha; van Elteren, Johannes T.

    2017-05-01

    A widely used instrument for collecting size-segregated particles is the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). In this work, a 10-stage MOUDI (cut-point diameter of 10 µm to 56 nm) was used to collect samples in Ljubljana, Slovenia, and Martinska, Croatia. Filters, collected with and without rotation, were cut in half and analyzed for nine elements (As, Cu, Fe, Ni, Mn, Pb, Sb, V, Zn) using laser ablation ICP-MS. Elemental image maps (created with ImageJ) were converted to concentrations using NIST SRM 2783. Statistical analysis of the elemental maps indicated that for submicron particles (stages 6-10), ablating 10 % of the filter (0.5 cm2, 20 min ablation time) was sufficient to give values in good agreement (±10 %) to analysis of larger parts of the filter and with good precision (RSE ICP-MS, together with image mapping, provided a fast and sensitive method for elemental analysis of size-segregated MOUDI filters, particularly for submicron particles.

  6. Comparison of particle sizes determined with impactor, AFM and SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaze, Patience; Annegarn, Harold J.; Huth, Joachim; Helas, Günter

    2007-11-01

    Particles size comparisons were made between conventional aerodynamic and mobility sizing techniques and physical geometric sizes measured by high resolution microscopes. Atmospheric particles were collected during the wet and dry seasons in the Amazonian ecosystems. Individual particles deposited on four stages of the MOUDI (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactor) were characterised for particle volumes, projected surface diameters and morphologies with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). AFM and SEM size distributions were verified against distributions derived from response functions of individual MOUDI stages as specified by Winklmayr et al. [Winklmayr, W., Wang, H.-C., John, W., 1990. Adaptation of the Twomey algorithm to the inversion of cascade impactor data. Aerosol Science and Technology 13, 322-331.]. Particles indicated inherent discrepancies in sizing techniques. Particle volumes were systematically lower than expected by factors of up to 3.6. Differences were attributed to loss of mass, presumably water adsorbed on particles. Losses were high and could not be accounted for by measured humidity growth factors suggesting significant losses of other volatile compounds as well, particularly on particles that were collected during the wet season. Microscopy results showed that for hygroscopic particles, microscopy sizes depend on the relative humidity history of particles before and after sampling. Changes in relative humidity significantly altered particle morphologies. Depending on when changes occur, such losses will bias not only microscopy particle sizes but also impactor mass distributions and number concentrations derived from collected particles.

  7. Measuring Sub-micron Size Fractionated Particulate Matter on Aluminum Impactor Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A; Zermeno, P; Hwang, H; Young, T M

    2009-07-28

    Sub-micron sized airborne particulate matter is not collected well on regular quartz or glass fiber filter papers. We used a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to size fractionate particulate matter (PM) into six size fractions and deposit it on specially designed high purity thin aluminum disks. The MOUDI separated PM into fractions 56-100 nm, 100-180 nm, 180-320 nm, 320-560 nm, 560-1000 nm, and 1000-1800 nm. Since MOUDI have low flow rates, it takes several days to collect sufficient carbon on 47 mm foil disks. The small carbon mass (20-200 microgram C) and large aluminum substrate ({approx}25 mg Al) presents several challenges to production of graphite targets for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis. The Al foil consumes large amounts of oxygen as it is heated and tends to melt into quartz combustion tubes, causing gas leaks. We describe sample processing techniques to reliably produce graphitic targets for {sup 14}C-AMS analysis of PM deposited on Al impact foils.

  8. Chromium isotope evidence in ejecta deposits for the nature of Paleoproterozoic impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougel, Bérengère; Moynier, Frédéric; Göpel, Christa; Koeberl, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Non-mass dependent chromium isotopic signatures have been successfully used to determine the presence and identification of extra-terrestrial materials in terrestrial impact rocks. Paleoproterozoic spherule layers from Greenland (Grænsesø) and Russia (Zaonega), as well as some distal ejecta deposits (Lake Superior region) from the Sudbury impact (1849 ± 0.3 Ma) event, have been analyzed for their Cr isotope compositions. Our results suggest that 1) these distal ejecta deposits are all of impact origin, 2) the Grænsesø and Zaonega spherule layers contain a distinct carbonaceous chondrite component, and are possibly related to the same impact event, which could be Vredefort (2023 ± 4 Ma) or another not yet identified large impact event from that of similar age, and 3) the Sudbury ejecta record a complex meteoritic signature, which is different from the Grænsesø and Zaonega spherule layers, and could indicate the impact of a heterogeneous chondritic body.

  9. Asteroid Kinetic Impactor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesley, Steven

    2015-08-01

    Asteroid impact missions can be carried out as a relatively low-cost add-ons to most asteroid rendezvous missions and such impact experiments have tremendous potential, both scientifically and in the arena of planetary defense.The science returns from an impactor demonstration begin with the documentation of the global effects of the impact, such as changes in orbit and rotation state, the creation and dissipation of an ejecta plume and debris disk, and morphological changes across the body due to the transmission of seismic waves, which might induce landslides and toppling of boulders, etc. At a local level, an inspection of the impact crater and ejecta blanket reveals critical material strength information, as well as spectral differences between the surface and subsurface material.From the planetary defense perspective, an impact demonstration will prove humankind’s capacity to alter the orbit of a potentially threatening asteroid. This technological leap comes in two parts. First, terminal guidance systems that can deliver an impactor with small errors relative to the ~100-200 meter size of a likely impactor have yet to be demonstrated in a deep space environment. Second, the response of an asteroid to such an impact is only understood theoretically due to the potentially significant dependence on the momentum carried by escaping ejecta, which would tend to enhance the deflection by tens of percent and perhaps as much as a factor of a few. A lack of validated understanding of momentum enhancement is a significant obstacle in properly sizing a real-world impactor deflection mission.This presentation will describe the drivers for asteroid impact demonstrations and cover the range of such concepts, starting with ESA’s pioneering Don Quijote mission concept and leading to a brief description of concepts under study at the present time, including the OSIRIS-REx/ISIS, BASiX/KIX and AIM/DART (AIDA) concepts.

  10. [Inter-comparison of WPS-TEOM-MOUDI and investigation on particle density].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jin; Wang, Tao; Wang, Wen-xing

    2007-09-01

    Three aerosol samplers and analyzers were used to characterize aerosol size and mass at two sites downwind of Shanghai and Beijing urban center in summer 2005. Inter-comparison was performed for the mass concentration determined by WPS, TEOM and MOUDI. The data got from TEOM and WPS showed the correlation factor of 0.77 and 0.79. And strong correlation has been found during the hour when coarse mode particles were dominated (R = 0.91 and 0.84). Also, comparison between data from WPS and MOUDI showed good correlation in difference size ranges (R ranged from 0.76 to 0.92) except the minimum stage. The particle densities at the two sites were determined based on the observed real time PM2.5 mass concentration and particle mass distribution data, respectively. The density of particles in Shanghai site was found to be around 1.70 g x cm(-3) while the Beijing site had a value of 1.50 g x cm(-3).

  11. Size segregated ring pattern formation in particle impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, J. R.; Fredericks, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    Typical particle impactors consist of a nozzle that directs a particle laden flow onto a plate, and is designed to capture particles greater than a cutoff diameter. Connected in series as a cascade, with each impactor designed to have a progressively smaller cutoff diameter, the particle size distribution can be measured. Typical impactors utilize a nozzle-to-plate distance S that is on the order of one nozzle diameter W, S / W 1 , and give a nominally Gaussian particle deposition pattern on the plate. We explored conditions where S / W < < 1 and observed deposition patterns consisting of very fine rings. Moreover, we found that the ring diameter increased with decreasing particle diameter and the ring thickness increased with particle diameter. These results suggest a potential method for sizing particles by using the mature technology of impactors in a different way. Potential mechanisms for how these ring patterns are formed will be discussed. We note that prior studies have observed conditions where particle deposition patterns exhibited "halos". These halos appear less distinct than the rings we have observed, and it is unclear whether they are related.

  12. Atmospheric dry deposition of trace elements measured around the urban and industrially impacted NY-NJ harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Seung-Muk; Totten, Lisa A.; Thota, Sathyapriya; Yan, Shu; Offenberg, John H.; Eisenreich, Steven J.; Graney, Joseph; Holsen, Thomas M.

    Long-term direct trace metal dry deposition measurements were made during 2001 and 2002 at two sites near the NY/NJ Harbor Estuary in New Jersey: Jersey City (JC) and New Brunswick (NB). In addition intensive dry deposition and atmospheric size distribution (ASD) measurements were made between September 2001 and June 2002. Dry deposition samples were obtained using modified MIC-B wet deposition samplers which deployed knife-edge surrogate surfaces during dry periods. ASDs were measured with micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDI) and coarse particle rotary impactors (CPRI). The fluxes of trace metals were found to be highest at the JC site and lowest at the NB site. The dry deposition fluxes ranged from 0.030 (Cd) to 3800 (Al) μg m -2 d -1 and 0.14 (Cd) to 8100 (Al) μg m -2 d -1at NB and JC sites, respectively. Metals of crustal origin were found mostly in the coarse particle fraction and anthropogenic metals were found mostly in the fine particle fraction. For the intensive experiments, overall dry deposition velocities of several trace metals were determined by dividing measured fluxes by measured concentrations in different particle size ranges. For most of the elements, the flux was highly correlated with PM 10 and coarse particle concentrations. The overall dry deposition velocities of crustal elements (Al and Mg) varied from 3.7 to 8.7 cm s -1 with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.50 to 0.84. The best-fit dry deposition velocities for anthropogenic elements (Cr, Mn, Zn, and Pb; Cu, Mo, and Ba; V and Ni) varied more than those for crustal elements (0.52-25 vs. 3.7-8.7 cm s -1). The dry deposition velocities for most elements obtained using three size ranges were statistically significant with R2 values ranging from 0.37 to 0.84 except for V and Ni (0.12).

  13. Fabrication of Machined and Shrink Fitted Impactor; Composite Liners for the Los Alamos HEDP Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randolph, B.

    1999-10-19

    Composite liners have been fabricated for the Los Alamos liner driven HEDP experiments using impactors formed by physical vapor deposition (PVD), electroplating, machining and shrink fitting. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been proposed for some ATLAS liner applications. This paper describes the processes used to fabricate machined and shrink fitted impactors which have been used for copper impactors in 1100 aluminum liners and 6061 T-6 aluminum impactors in 1100 aluminum liners. The most successful processes have been largely empirically developed and rely upon a combination of shrink fitted and light press fitting. The processes used to date will be described along with some considerations for future composite liners requirements in the HEDP Program.

  14. Emission characters of particulate concentrations and dry deposition studies for incense burning at a Taiwanese temple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chu, Chia-Chium; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Fu, Peter Pi-Cheng

    2002-05-01

    Suspended particulate concentrations were measured at the Tzu Yun Yen temple in the Taichung region of Taiwan. The temple performs traditional incense burning. A universal sampler and a micro-orifice uniform deposited impactor (MOUDI) sampler with a dry deposition plate were used to measure the particulate concentrations. The results show that the average PM2.5/PM10 ratio was 74% during the incense burning period at this temple. In addition, the average suspended particulate (PM10) element concentration of anthropogenic element Zn (495 ng/m3) was higher than the other anthropogenic elements (Pb, Mn, Ni, and Cd). Furthermore, the average mass size distribution was bimodal with major peaks occurring at 0.32-0.56 microm and 5.6-10 microm during the incense burning period. The dry deposition velocities of Cd used fine particulates (PM2.5) and suspended particulate (PM10) mode were 1.86 and 0.99 cm/s in this study, respectively.

  15. A novel graded density impactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Chapman, D. J.; Eakins, D.

    2014-05-01

    Ramp loading using graded-density-impactors as flyers in gas-gun-driven plate impact experiments can yield new and useful information about the equation of state and the strength properties of the loaded material. Selective Laser Melting, an additive manufacture technique, was used to manufacture a graded density flyer, termed the "bed of nails" (BON). A 2 mm thick × 100 mm diameter solid disc of stainless steel formed a base for an array of tapered spikes of length 6 mm and spaced 1 mm apart. The two experiments to test the concept were performed at impact velocities of 900 m/s and 1100 m/s using the 100 mm gas gun at the Institute of Shock Physics at Imperial College, London. In each experiment a BON flyer was impacted onto a copper buffer plate which helped to smooth out perturbations in the wave profile. The ramp delivered to the copper buffer was in turn transmitted to three tantalum targets of thicknesses 3, 5 and 7 mm, which were mounted in contact with the back face of the copper. Heterodyne velocimetry was used to measure the velocity-time history, at the back faces of the tantalum discs. The wave profiles display a smooth increase in velocity over a period of ~2.5 us, with no indication of a shock jump. The measured profiles have been analysed to generate a stress strain curve for tantalum. The results have been compared with the predictions of the Sandia National Laboratories hydrocode, CTH.

  16. La masa de los grandes impactores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, M. G.; Brunini, A.

    Los planetas han sido formados fundamentalmente acretando masa a través de colisiones con planetesimales sólidos. La masa más grande de la distribución de planetesimales y las masas máxima y mínima de los impactores, han sido calculadas usando los valores actuales del período y de la inclinación de los planetas (Lissauer & Safronov 1991; Parisi & Brunini 1996). Recientes investigaciones han mostrado, que las órbitas de los planetas gigantes no han sufrido variaciones con el tiempo, siendo su movimiento regular durante su evolución a partir de la finalización de la etapa de acreción (Laskar 1990, 1994). Por lo tanto, la eccentricidad actual de los planetas gigantes se puede utilizar para imponer una cota máxima a las masas y velocidades orbitales de los grandes impactores. Mediante un simple modelo dinámico, y considerando lo arriba mencionado, obtenemos la cota superior para la masa del planetesimal más grande que impactó a cada planeta gigante al final de su etapa de acreción. El resultado más importante de este trabajo es la estimación de la masa máxima permitida para impactar a Júpiter, la cúal es ~ 1.136 × 10 -1, siendo en el caso de Neptuno ~ 3.99 × 10 -2 (expresada en unidades de la masa final de cada planeta). Además, fue posible obtener la velocidad orbital máxima permitida para los impactores como una función de su masa, para cada planeta. Las cotas obtenidas para la masa y velocidad de los impactores de Saturno y Urano (en unidades de la masa y velocidad final de cada planeta respectivamente) son casi las mismas que las obtenidas para Júpiter debido a que estos tres planetas poseen similar eccentricidad actual. Nuestros resultados están en buen acuerdo con los obtenidos por Lissauer & Safronov (1991). Estas cotas podrían ser utilizadas para obtener la distribución de planetesimales en el Sistema Solar primitivo.

  17. Cascade impactor and jet plate for same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, Robert S.; Farthing, William E.; Landham Jr., Edward C.

    2004-02-03

    A sampling system and method for sampling particulate matter from a high-temperature, high-pressure gas stream. A cyclone sampler for use at high temperatures and pressures, and having threadless sacrificial connectors is disclosed. Also disclosed is an improved cascade impactor including jet plates with integral spacers, and alignment features provided for aligning the jet plates with their associated collection substrates. An activated bauxite alkali collector is disclosed, and includes an alumina liner. The sampling system can be operated remotely or locally, and can be permanently installed or configured as a portable system.

  18. Assessments of the energy, mass and size of the Chicxulub Impactor

    CERN Document Server

    Durand-Manterola, Hector Javier

    2014-01-01

    In 1980, Alvarez and colleagues proposed that, in the transition from the Cretaceous to Paleogene, a large impactor collided with Earth being the cause of the mass extinction occurred at the limit K / Pg. In 1980 there was no known impact structure, which could be responsible for this extinction. It was not until 1991 that an international group of researchers proposed that a circular structure between 180 and 200 km, buried under Tertiary deposits in the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, was the crater formed by the impact proposed by the group of Alvarez (Hildebrand et al., 1991). It is very probable that an impact of this magnitude have had large effects on the surface and in the environment. To study these effects, it is necessary to estimate the characteristics that the impactor had. The literature often mentions the nature of the impactor, and has been proposed both an asteroid and a comet, and even a comet shower that produced periodic extinctions. However, the physical parameters of the impactor are not li...

  19. Analytical electron microscopy of LDEF impactor residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Barrett, Ruth A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1995-01-01

    The LDEF contained 57 individual experiment trays or tray portions specifically designed to characterize critical aspects of meteoroid and debris environment in low-Earth orbit (LEO). However, it was realized from the beginning that the most efficient use of the satellite would be to characterize impact features from the entire surface of the LDEF. With this in mind particular interest has focused on common materials facing in all 26 LDEF facing directions; among the most important of these materials has been the tray clamps. Therefore, in an effort to better understand the nature and flux of particulates in LEO, and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impact features on LDEF tray clamp surfaces. This paper summarizes all data from 79 clamps located on Bay A & B of the LDEF. We also describe current efforts to characterize impactor residues recovered from the impact craters, and we have found that a low, but significant, fraction of these residues have survived in a largely unmelted state. These residues can be characterized sufficiently to permit resolution of the impactor origin. We have concentrated on the residue from chondritic interplanetary dust particles (micrometeoroids), as these represent the harshest test of our analytical capabilities.

  20. Quantitative analysis of cascade impactor samples - revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlić , I.; Chiam, S. Y.; Sanchez, J. L.; Tang, S. M.

    1999-04-01

    Concentrations of aerosols collected in Singapore during the three months long haze period that affected the whole South-East Asian region in 1997 are reported. Aerosol samples were continuously collected by using a fine aerosol sampler (PM2.5) and occasionally with a single orifice cascade impactor (CI) sampler. Our results show that in the fine fraction (<2.5 μm) the concentrations of two well-known biomass burning products, i.e. K and S were generally increased by a factor 2-3 compared to the non-hazy periods. However, a discrepancy was noticed, at least for elements with lower atomic number (Ti and below) between the results obtained by the fine aerosol sampler and the cascade impactor. Careful analysis by means of Nuclear Microscopy, in particular by the Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) technique, revealed that thicknesses of the lower CI stages exceeded thick target limits for 2 MeV protons. Detailed depth profiles of all CI stages were therefore measured using the STIM technique and concentrations corrected for absorption and proton energy loss. After correcting results for the actual sample thickness, concentrations of all major elements (S, Cl, K, Ca) agreed much better with the PM2.5 results. The importance of implementing thick target corrections in analysis of CI samples, especially those collected in the urban environments, is emphasized. Broad beam PIXE analysis approach is certainly not adequate in these cases.

  1. Computerized reduction of airborne foil impactor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bret A.; Musil, Dennis J.; Smith, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique for reducing data obtained from a foil impactor carried on the T-28 thunderstorm penetration aircraft is described. The technique employs a video-image processing system that was originally developed for satellite imagery and a computer-reduction program that was originally developed for determining cloud-size distributions to count and size particle impressions on the foil. This eliminates the tedious manual processing that has limited the usefulness of such devices, while at the same time improving objectivity. The technique has been applied to foil data acquired in thunderstorms in the southeastern United States during the Cooperative Huntsville Meteorological Experiment, where most of the particles were at least roughly spherical. Its usefulness for storms in which highly irregular or fragile ice particles predominate has yet to be established.

  2. A small change in the design of a slit bioaerosol impactor significantly improves its collection characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Youn; Lee, Taekhee; Reponen, Tiina

    2007-08-01

    While several methods are available for bioaerosol monitoring, impaction remains the most common one, particularly for collecting fungal spores. Earlier studies have shown that the collection efficiency of many conventional single-stage bioaerosol impactors falls below 50% for spores with an aerodynamic diameter between 1.7 and 2.5 microm because their cut-off size is 2.5 microm or greater. The cut-off size reduction is primarily done by substantially increasing the sampling flow rate or decreasing the impaction jet size, W, to a fraction of a millimetre, with both measures often impractical to implement. Some success has recently been reported on the utilization of an ultra-low jet-to-plate distance, S (S/W bioaerosol impactors, Allergenco-D and Air-O-Cell, which feature the same jet dimensions and flow rate but have some design configuration differences that were initially thought to be of low significance. The collection efficiency and the spore deposit characteristics were determined in the laboratory using real-time aerosol spectrometry and different microscopic enumeration methods as the test impactors were challenged with the non-biological polydisperse NaCl aerosol and the aerosolized fungal spores of Cladosporium cladosporioides, Aspergillus versicolor, and Penicillium melinii. The tests showed that a relatively small reduction in the jet-to-plate distance of a single-stage, single-nozzle impactor with a tapered inlet nozzle, combined with adding a straight section of sufficient length, can significantly decrease the cut-off size to the level that is sufficient to efficiently collect spores of all fungal species. Furthermore, it appears that the slit jet design may improve the application of partial spore counting methodologies with respect to those applied to circular deposits. Data from a demonstration field study, conducted with the two samplers in environments containing a variety of fungal species, supported the laboratory findings.

  3. Calibration of a modified Sierra Model 235 slotted cascade impactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, R.H.

    1979-07-01

    For measurements of ore dust in uranium concentrating mills, a Sierra Model 235 slotted cascade impactor was calibrated at a flow rate of .21 m/sup 3//min, using solid monodisperse particles and an impaction surface of Whatman No. 41 filter paper soaked in mineral oil. The reduction from the impactor's design flow rate of 1.13 m/sup 3//min (40 cfm) to 0.21 m/sup 3//min (7.5 cfm) increased the stage cut-off diameters by an average factor of 2.3, a necessary adjustment because of the anticipated large particle sizes of ore dust. The underestimation of mass median diameters, often caused by the rebound and reentrainment of solid particles from dry impaction surfaces, was virtually eliminated by using the oiled Whatman No. 41 impaction surface. Observations of satisfactory performance in the laboratory were verified by tests of the impactor in ore mills.

  4. Virtual Impactor for Sub-micron Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakov, A. A.; Strawa, A. W.; Hallar, A. G.

    2005-12-01

    The objective of a virtual impactor is to separate out the larger particles in a flow from the smaller particles in such a way that both sizes of particles are available for sampling. A jet of particle-laden air is accelerated toward a collection probe so that a small gap exists between the acceleration nozzle and the probe. A vacuum is applied to deflect a major portion of the airstream away form the collection probe. Particles larger than a certain size have sufficient momentum so that they cross the deflected streamlines and enter the collection probe, whereas smaller particles follow the deflected streamlines. The result is that the collection probe will contain a higher concentration of larger particles than is in the initial airstream. Typically, virtual impactors are high-flow devices used to separate out particles greater than several microns in diameter. We have developed a special virtual impactor to concentrate aerosol particles of diameters between 0.5 to 1 micron for the purpose of calibrating the optical cavity ring-down instrument [1]. No similar virtual impactors are commercially available. In our design, we have exploited considerations described earlier [2-4]. Performance of our virtual impactor was evaluated in an experimental set-up using TSI 3076 nebulizer and TSI 3936 scanning mobility particle size spectrometer. Under experimental conditions optimized for the best performance of the virtual impactor, we were able to concentrate the 700-nm polystyrene particles no less than 15-fold. However, under experimental conditions optimized for calibrating our cavity ring-down instrument, a concentration factor attainable was from 4 to 5. During calibration experiments, maximum realized particle number densities were 190, 300 and 1600 cm-3 for the 900-nm, 700-nm and 500-nm spheres, respectively. This paper discusses the design of the impactor and laboratory studies verifying its performance. References: 1. A.W. Strawa, R. Castaneda, T. Owano, D.S. Baer

  5. Numerical modeling of sandwich panel response to ballistic loading - energy balance for varying impactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepler, Jørgen Asbøl; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2007-01-01

    thickness but significantly smaller than panel length dimensions. Experimental data for the total loss in impactor kinetic energy and momentum and estimated damage energy are described. For a selection of impactor tip shapes, the numerical model is used to evaluate different simplified force histories...... between the impactor and the panel during penetration. The force histories are selected from a primary criterion of conservation of linear momentum in the impactor-panel system, and evaluated according to agreement with the total measured energy balance....

  6. Design of a rib impactor equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, C. R.; García, G.; Aguilar, L. A.; Martínez, L.

    2017-01-01

    The human ribs must be analyzed as long and as curved bones, due to their physiology. For the development of an experimental equipment that simulate the application of loads, over the rib in the moment of a frontal collision in an automobile with seat belt, it was applied a methodology that constituted in the identification of needs and the variables which led the design of 3D model, from this it was used the technique of fused deposition modeling for the development of the equipment pieces. The supports that hold the rib ends were design with two and three degrees of freedom that allows the simulation of rib movement with the spine and the breastbone in the breathing. For the simulation of the seat belt, it was determined to applied two loads over the front part of the rib from the sagittal and lateral plane respectively, for this it was made a displacement through a lineal actuator with a speed of 4mm/s. The outcomes shown a design of an equipment able to obtain the load parameters required to generate fractures in rib specimens. The equipment may be used for the study of specimens with nearby geometries to the rib taken as a reference.

  7. Safety assessment characteristics of pedestrian legform impactors in vehicle-front impact tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yasuhiro

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of safety assessment results of front-area vehicle impact tests carried out using the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) legform impactor and a flexible legform impactor (FLEX legform impactor). Different types of vehicles (sedan, sport utility vehicle, high-roof K-car, and light cargo van) were examined. The impact locations in the study were the center of the bumper and an extremely stiff structure of the bumper (i.e., in front of the side member) of each tested vehicle. The measured injury criteria were normalized by injury assessment reference values of each legform impactor. The test results for center and side-member impacts indicated that there were no significant differences in ligament injury assessments derived from the normalized knee ligament injury measures between the TRL legform impactor and the FLEX legform impactor. Evaluations made using the TRL legform impactor and the FLEX legform impactor are thus similar in the vehicle safety investigation for knee ligament injury. Vehicle-center impact test results revealed that the tibia fracture assessments derived from the normalized tibia fracture measures did not significantly differ between the TRL legform impactor and the FLEX legform impactor. However, for an impact against an extremely stiff structure, there was a difference in the tibia fracture assessment between the FLEX legform impactor and the TRL legform impactor owing to their different sensor types.

  8. Evidence for a second impactor at the K-Pg Boundary in Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Catharina, Amanda; Kneller, Benjamin Charles; Charao Marques, Juliana; McArthur, Adam Daniel; Kane, Ian Antony; Silvestre Cevallos Ferriz, Sergio Rafael

    2017-04-01

    reported in the surrounding areas, either in the Peninsular Ranges or the Sonora Desert, and the presence of shocked quartz and tektites in this unit compels us to believe that its origin is related to ejecta material from an impact. The distance of these thick and coarse grained deposits from the Chicxulub Impact site (c.2000 km) suggests that these deposits are not related to the Chicxulub Impactor, and therefore may have been generated by a different impact of a geologically similar age, but more proximal to this area. The occurrence of multiple impactors is not uncommon, and should be considered a possibility for the K-Pg Boundary.

  9. Characteristics Of Atmospheric Dry Deposition Of Metals To The Region Of Lake Asan And Sapgyo, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J.; Shin, H.; Lee, M.; Lim, Y.; Seo, M.; Jung, I.

    2008-12-01

    Environment includes a multi-media such as air, surface water, soil, underground water and ecosystem. Some pollutants transfer among a multi-media, posing serious threat to humans, animals and plants. Pollutants released into the environment remain for long times and transport long distances while going through physical and chemical interactions such as transports between multi-media ; air, water and soil, deposition, and absorption and release from organisms. This study assessed the amount of heavy metals transferred from air to water and soil using dry deposition plate and water surface sampler during spring (June 13 ~ 21, 2007) and winter (October 23 ~ 30 in 2007) at 9 locations including Dangjin, Pyeongtaek and Asan. Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, MOUDI was used to confirm the size distribution. The measured heavy metal deposition flux was compared with the expectation obtained with deposition model. In addition, amount of heavy metal deposition at Asan and Sapgyo lakes were evaluated to verify the water pollution state driven by atmospheric deposition. Atmospheric dry deposition flux of metals are 133.92 microgram m-2 day-1, 44.01 microgram m-2 day-1, 0.915 microgram m-2 day-1, and 0.175 microgram m-2 day-1 during spring, and 72.86 microgram m-2 day- 1, 88.14 microgram m-2 day-1, 0.991 microgram m-2 day-1, and 0.189 microgram m-2 day-1 during fall, for lead, nickel, arsenic, and cadmium, respectively. It is required to re- calculation the dry deposition flux by land use type due to possibility of underestimating the flux in case of using grease surrogate surface having low surface roughness. The cadmium, lead, and arsenic size distribution was mono-modal with the peaks in the 0.65 ~ 1.1 micrometer size range in the fine mode showing sharp peak in the condensation submode especially for cadmium and lead because of effect of primary emission. The nickel size distribution was bimodal, a typical size distribution for an urban atmosphere, showing sharp

  10. Characterization of a Regenerable Impactor Filter for Spacecraft Cabin Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2015-01-01

    Regenerable filters will play an important role in human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. Life Support Systems aboard crewed spacecrafts will have to operate reliably and with little maintenance over periods of more than a year, even multiple years. Air filters are a key component of spacecraft life support systems, but they often require frequent routine maintenance. Bacterial filters aboard the International Space Station require almost weekly cleaning of the pre-filter screen to remove large lint debris captured in the microgravity environment. The source of the airborne matter which is collected on the filter screen is typically from clothing fibers, biological matter (hair, skin, nails, etc.) and material wear. Clearly a need for low maintenance filters requiring little to no crew intervention will be vital to the success of the mission. An impactor filter is being developed and tested to address this need. This filter captures large particle matter through inertial separation and impaction methods on collection surfaces, which can be automatically cleaned after they become heavily loaded. The impactor filter can serve as a pre-filter to augment the life of higher efficiency filters that capture fine and ultrafine particles. A prototype of the filter is being tested at the Particulate Filtration Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center to determine performance characteristics, including particle cut size and overall efficiency. Model results are presented for the flow characteristics near the orifice plate through which the particle-laden flow is accelerated as well as around the collection bands.

  11. Europa's small impactor flux and seismic detection predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Teanby, Nicholas A.

    2016-10-01

    Europa is an attractive target for future lander missions due to its dynamic surface and potentially habitable sub-surface environment. Seismology has the potential to provide powerful new constraints on the internal structure using natural sources such as faults or meteorite impacts. Here we predict how many meteorite impacts are likely to be detected using a single seismic station on Europa to inform future mission planning efforts. To this end, we derive: (1) the current small impactor flux on Europa from Jupiter impact rate observations and models; (2) a crater diameter versus impactor energy scaling relation for icy moons by merging previous experiments and simulations; and (3) scaling relations for seismic signal amplitudes as a function of distance from the impact site for a given crater size, based on analogue explosive data obtained on Earth's ice sheets. Finally, seismic amplitudes are compared to predicted noise levels and seismometer performance to determine detection rates. We predict detection of 0.002-20 small local impacts per year based on P-waves travelling directly through the ice crust. Larger regional and global-scale impact events, detected through mantle-refracted waves, are predicted to be extremely rare (10-8-1 detections per year), so are unlikely to be detected by a short duration mission. Estimated ranges include uncertainties from internal seismic attenuation, impactor flux, and seismic amplitude scaling. Internal attenuation is the most significant unknown and produces extreme uncertainties in the mantle-refracted P-wave amplitudes. Our nominal best-guess attenuation model predicts 0.002-5 local direct P detections and 6 × 10-6-0.2 mantle-refracted detections per year. Given that a plausible Europa landed mission will only last around 30 days, we conclude that impacts should not be relied upon for a seismic exploration of Europa. For future seismic exploration, faulting due to stresses in the rigid outer ice shell is likely to be a

  12. OLYMPEX Counterflow Spectrometer and Impactor Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellot, Michael [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Counterflow Spectrometer and Impactor (CSI) probe was flown on the University of North Dakota Cessna Citation research aircraft during the Olympic Mountain Experiment (OLYMPEX). The field campaign took place from November 12 through December 19, 2015, over the Olympic Mountains and coastal waters of Washington State as part of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) validation campaign. The CSI was added to the Citation instrument suite to support the NASA Aerosol-Cloud Ecosystem (ACE) satellite program and flights of the NASA Lockheed Earth Resources (ER-2) aircraft. ACE funded extra ER-2 flights to focus on clouds that are weakly precipitating, which are also of interest to the DOE Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program.

  13. Experimental and Parametric Design of Petroleum Back-pressured Hydraulic Impactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Guang-jie; YAO Zhen-qiang; CHEN Ping; HUANG Wan-zhi

    2005-01-01

    Percussive-rotary drilling technology was considered many years ago as one of the best approaches for hard rock drilling. It is a key for popularizing this technology on a large scale to design and make an impactor with excellent performance. This paper presents a suit of method to design the percussive parameters for the oil or gas field by introducing the working principle of back-pressured impactor, dividing the working periods of impactor into three phases and establishing the computer emulational model of percussive parameters. It draws a comparison between the results of model calculation and experiment on the basis of analyzing the experiment results of impactor.The conclude provides credible foundation for designing and further ameliorating the impactor.

  14. Numerical modeling of sandwich panel response to ballistic loading - energy balance for varying impactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepler, Jørgen Asbøl; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2007-01-01

    A sandwich panel is described by an axisymmetric lumped mass- spring model. The panel compliance is simplified, considering only core shear deformation uniformly distributed across the core thickness. Transverse penetrating impact is modeled for impactors of diameters comparable to the panel...... thickness but significantly smaller than panel length dimensions. Experimental data for the total loss in impactor kinetic energy and momentum and estimated damage energy are described. For a selection of impactor tip shapes, the numerical model is used to evaluate different simplified force histories...... between the impactor and the panel during penetration. The force histories are selected from a primary criterion of conservation of linear momentum in the impactor-panel system, and evaluated according to agreement with the total measured energy balance....

  15. Effective dose scaling factors for use with uranium series cascade impactor data: a reassessment using the IMBA code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Pyo; Wu, Chang-Yu; Birky, Brian K; Bolch, Wesley E

    2006-10-01

    than predicted in ICRP Publication 30, but is significantly higher in the liver and other soft tissues by up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, effective dose scaling factors generated using the IMBA program are nearly identical to those calculated by the LUDEP program as their magnitude is primarily dictated by the dependence of particle deposition and lung clearance with particle size, and less by the systemic biodistribution of the radionuclide following absorption to blood. For both codes, greater than 10% re-scaling of the effective dose is required for third-stage (4.5 to 12 microm) and filter-stage (0.03 to 0.35 microm) particles in the approximation of uniform or linearly decreasing radioactivity distributions per particle stage. For linearly increasing distributions, greater than 10% corrections in the effective dose are found irregularly across impactor stage, radionuclide, and solubility class, especially for rather steep (1:5) impactor stage activity ratios.

  16. Possible Impactor Remnants on Shatter Cone Surfaces from the Steinheim Basin, SW Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, E.; Schmieder, M.

    2015-07-01

    Surfaces of Steinheim shatter cones are covered by mineral coatings that consist of Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Pt, and Au mineral assemblages. A plausible explanation is that they represent impactor matter remobilized in an impact-induced hydrothermal system.

  17. Design and Use of a Guided Weight Impactor to Impart Barely Visible Impact Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft structure is required to demonstrate satisfaction of the FAR requirements for Category 1, such as barely visible impact damage (BVID). Typical aircraft structure is impacted using a dropped weight impactor, which can impart BVID to the top surface of the structure. A recent test of a multi-bay box (MBB) composite test article, that represents an 80% scale center section of a hybrid wing body aircraft, required impact to be in a direction other than vertical from above, but still in an direction that is normal to the surface. This requirement eliminated the use of the conventional dropped weight impactor. Therefore, a design study was undertaken to determine the most effective way to efficiently and reliably impact the MBB. The chosen design was a guided weight impactor that is gravity driven. This paper describes the design of the guided weight impactor, and presents the results of its use for imparting BVID to the MBB. The guided weight impactor was seen to be a very reliable method to impart BVID, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structure that is impacted at a variety of impact energies and from a variety of directions.

  18. Mineralogical Characterization of Baptistina Asteroid Family: Implications for K/T Impactor Source

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Lazzaro, Daniela; Michtchenko, Tatiana A; Gaffey, Michael J; Kelley, Michael S; Diniz, Thais Mothé; Candal, Alvaro Alvarez; Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Cloutis, Edward A; Ryan, Erin L; 10.1016/j.icarus.2011.08.027

    2011-01-01

    Bottke et al. (2007) linked the catastrophic formation of Baptistina Asteroid Family (BAF) to the K/T impact event. This linkage was based on dynamical and compositional evidence, which suggested the impactor had a composition similar to CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. However, our recent study (Reddy et al. 2009) suggests that the composition of (298) Baptistina is similar to LL-type ordinary chondrites rather than CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. This rules out any possibility of it being related to the source of the K/T impactor, if the impactor was of CM-type composition. Mineralogical study of asteroids in the vicinity of BAF has revealed a plethora of compositional types suggesting a complex formation and evolution environment. A detailed compositional analysis of 16 asteroids suggests several distinct surface assemblages including ordinary chondrites (Gaffey SIV subtype), primitive achondrites (Gaffey SIII subtype), basaltic achondrites (Gaffey SVII subtype and V-type), and a carbonaceous chondrite. Based on ...

  19. Calibration and field application of a Sierra Model 235 cascade impactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuth, R.H.

    1984-06-01

    A Sierra Model 235 slotted impactor was used to measure the particle size distribution of ore dust in uranium concentrating mills. The impactor was calibrated at a flow rate of 0.21 m/sup 3//min, using solid monodisperse particles of methylene blue and an impaction surface of Whatman number41 filter paper soaked in mineral oil. The reduction from the impactor's design flow rate of 1.13 m/sup 3//min (40 cfm) to 0.21 m/sup 3//min (7.5 cfm), a necessary adjustment because of the anticipated large particle sizes of ore dust, increased the stage cut-off diameters by an average factor of 2.3. Evaluation of field test results revealed that the underestimation of mass median diameters, often caused by the rebound and reentrainment of solid particles from dry impaction surfaces, was virtually eliminated by using the oiled Whatman number41 impaction surface.

  20. Calibration of the QCM/SAW Cascade Impactor for Measurement of Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cassandra K.; Peterson, C. B.; Morris, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The Quartz Crystal Microbalance Surface Acoustic Wave (QCM/SAW) cascade impactor is an instrument designed to collect size-fractionated distributions of aerosols on a series of quartz crystals and employ SAW devices coated with chemical sensors for gas detection. We are calibrating the cascade impactor in our laboratory for future deployment for in-situ experiments to measure ozone. Experiments have been performed to characterize the QCM and SAW mass loading, saturation limits, mass frequency relationships, and sensitivity. The characteristics of mass loading, saturation limits, mass-frequency relationships, sensitivity, and the loss of ozone on different materials have been quantified.

  1. Analysis of cascade impactor and EPA method 29 data from the americium/curium pilot melter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    The offgas system of the Am/Cm pilot melter at TNX was characterized by measuring the particulate evolution using a cascade impactor and EPA Method 29. This sampling work was performed by John Harden of the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory, under SCUREF Task SC0056. Elemental analyses were performed by the SRTC Mobile Laboratory.Operation of the Am/Cm melter with B2000 frit has resulted in deposition of PbO and boron compounds in the offgas system that has contributed to pluggage of the High Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Sampling of the offgas system was performed to quantify the amount of particulate in the offgas system under several sets of conditions. Particulate concentration and particle size distribution were measured just downstream of the melter pressure control air addition port and at the HEME inlet. At both locations, the particulate was measured with and without steam to the film cooler while the melter was idled at about 1450 degrees Celsius. Additional determinations were made at the melter location during feeding and during idling at 1150 degrees Celsius rather than 1450 degrees Celsius (both with no steam to the film cooler). Deposition of particulates upstream of the melter sample point may have, and most likely did occur in each run, so the particulate concentrations measured do no necessarily reflect the total particulate emission at the melt surface. However, the data may be used in a relative sense to judge the system performance.

  2. Enhancing bioaerosol sampling by Andersen impactors using mineral-oil-spread agar plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenqiang; Wei, Kai; Wu, Yan; Shen, Fangxia; Chen, Qi; Li, Mingzhen; Yao, Maosheng

    2013-01-01

    As a bioaerosol sampling standard, Andersen type impactor is widely used since its invention in 1950s, including the investigation of the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001. However, its related problems such as impaction and desiccation stress as well as particle bounce have not been solved. Here, we improved its biological collection efficiencies by plating a mineral oil layer (100 µL) onto the agar plate. An Andersen six-stage sampler and a BioStage impactor were tested with mineral-oil-spread agar plates in collecting indoor and outdoor bacterial and fungal aerosols. The effects of sampling times (5, 10 and 20 min) were also studied using the BioStage impactor when sampling environmental bioaerosols as well as aerosolized Bacillus subtilis (G+) and Escherichia coli (G-). In addition, particle bounce reduction by mineral-oil-plate was also investigated using an optical particle counter (OPC). Experimental results revealed that use of mineral-oil-spread agar plate can substantially enhance culturable bioaerosol recoveries by Andersen type impactors (p-valuesmineral oil can effectively reduce the particle bounce with an average of 66% for 10 min sampling. Our work suggests that enhancements for fungal aerosols were primarily attributed to the reduced impaction stress, while for bacterial aerosols reduced impaction, desiccation and particle bounce played major roles. The developed technology can readily enhance the agar-based techniques including those high volume portable samplers for bioaerosol monitoring.

  3. An estimate of spherical impactor energy transfer for mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, L. R.; Ma, D. T.

    2016-08-01

    Vibration energy harvesters, which use the impact mechanical frequency up-conversion technique, utilize an impactor, which gains kinetic energy from low frequency ambient environmental vibrations, to excite high frequency systems that efficiently convert mechanical energy to electrical energy. To take full advantage of the impact mechanical frequency up-conversion technique, it is prudent to understand the energy transfer from the low frequency excitations, to the impactor, and finally to the high frequency systems. In this work, the energy transfer from a spherical impactor to a multi degree of freedom spring / mass system, due to Hertzian impact, is investigated to gain insight on how best to design impact mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvesters. Through this academic work, it is shown that the properties of the contact (or impact) area, i.e., radius of curvature and material properties, only play a minor role in energy transfer and that the equivalent mass of the target system (i.e., the spring / mass system) dictates the total amount of energy transferred during the impact. The novel approach of utilizing the well-known Hertzian impact methodology to gain an understanding of impact mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvesters has made it clear that the impactor and the high frequency energy generating systems must be designed together as one system to ensure maximum energy transfer, leading to efficient ambient vibration energy harvesters.

  4. An investigation into the predictive value of cascade impactor results for side effects of inhaled salbutamol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weda, M; Zanen, P; de Boer, A H; Barends, D M; Frijlink, H W

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the Multistage Liquid Impinger (MSLI) and the Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI) with respect to their power to predict differences in side effects of salbutamol delivered by a dry powder inhaler. Three preparations with the same nominal dose and the same inhaler de

  5. Characterisation and Airborne Deployment of a New Counterflow Virtual Impactor Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    Twohy et al., 1989; Hudson, 1993; Hallberg et al., 1994, 1998; Ostrom et al., 2000; Sellegri et al., 2003). Aerosol sampling from air- craft has...Heintzenberg, J., and Charlson, R. J.: Virtual impactor, US Patent No. 4,689,052, 1987. Ostrom , E., Noone, K. J., and Pockalny, R. A.: Cloud-droplet

  6. Numerical modeling of sandwich panel response to ballistic loading - energy balance for varying impactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepler, Jørgen Asbøl; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2007-01-01

    A sandwich panel is described by an axisymmetric lumped mass- spring model. The panel compliance is simplified, considering only core shear deformation uniformly distributed across the core thickness. Transverse penetrating impact is modeled for impactors of diameters comparable to the panel thic...

  7. Enhancing bioaerosol sampling by Andersen impactors using mineral-oil-spread agar plate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenqiang Xu

    Full Text Available As a bioaerosol sampling standard, Andersen type impactor is widely used since its invention in 1950s, including the investigation of the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001. However, its related problems such as impaction and desiccation stress as well as particle bounce have not been solved. Here, we improved its biological collection efficiencies by plating a mineral oil layer (100 µL onto the agar plate. An Andersen six-stage sampler and a BioStage impactor were tested with mineral-oil-spread agar plates in collecting indoor and outdoor bacterial and fungal aerosols. The effects of sampling times (5, 10 and 20 min were also studied using the BioStage impactor when sampling environmental bioaerosols as well as aerosolized Bacillus subtilis (G+ and Escherichia coli (G-. In addition, particle bounce reduction by mineral-oil-plate was also investigated using an optical particle counter (OPC. Experimental results revealed that use of mineral-oil-spread agar plate can substantially enhance culturable bioaerosol recoveries by Andersen type impactors (p-values<0.05. The recovery enhancement was shown to depend on bioaerosol size, type, sampling time and environment. In general, more enhancements (extra 20% were observed for last stage of the Andersen six-stage samplers compared to the BioStage impactor for 10 min sampling. When sampling aerosolized B. subtilis, E. coli and environmental aerosols, the enhancement was shown to increase with increasing sampling time, ranging from 50% increase at 5 min to ∼100% at 20 min. OPC results indicated that use of mineral oil can effectively reduce the particle bounce with an average of 66% for 10 min sampling. Our work suggests that enhancements for fungal aerosols were primarily attributed to the reduced impaction stress, while for bacterial aerosols reduced impaction, desiccation and particle bounce played major roles. The developed technology can readily enhance the agar-based techniques

  8. Classification of Low Velocity Impactors Using Spiral Sensing of Acousto-Ultrasonic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbasi, Chijioke Raphael

    The non-linear elastodynamics of a flat plate subjected to low velocity foreign body impacts is studied, resembling the space debris impacts on the space structure. The work is based on a central hypothesis that in addition to identifying the impact locations, the material properties of the foreign objects can also be classified using acousto-ultrasonic signals (AUS). Simultaneous localization of impact point and classification of impact object is quite challenging using existing state-of-the-art structural health monitoring (SHM) approaches. Available techniques seek to report the exact location of impact on the structure, however, the reported information is likely to have errors from nonlinearity and variability in the AUS signals due to materials, geometry, boundary conditions, wave dispersion, environmental conditions, sensor and hardware calibration etc. It is found that the frequency and speed of the guided wave generated in the plate can be quantized based on the impactor's relationship with the plate (i.e. the wave speed and the impactor's mechanical properties are coupled). In this work, in order to characterize the impact location and mechanical properties of imapctors, nonlinear transient phenomenon is empirically studied to decouple the understanding using the dominant frequency band (DFB) and Lag Index (LI) of the acousto-ultrasonic signals. Next the understanding was correlated with the elastic modulus of the impactor to predict transmitted force histories. The proposed method presented in this thesis is especially applicable for SHM where sensors cannot be widely or randomly distributed. Thus a strategic organization and localization of the sensors is achieved by implementing the geometric configuration of Theodorous Spiral Sensor Cluster (TSSC). The performance of TSSC in characterizing the impactor types are compared with other conventional sensor clusters (e.g. square, circular, random etc.) and it is shown that the TSSC is advantageous over

  9. Effective dose scaling factors for use with cascade impactor sampling data in tenorm inhalation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Pyo; Wu, Chang-Yu; Birky, Brian K; Bolch, Wesley E

    2005-10-01

    When assessing the effective dose to workers following radio-aerosol inhalation exposures, significant reductions in dose uncertainty can be achieved through direct measurement of the particle-size distribution. The University of Washington Mark III cascade impactor is one such air sampling device that permits the user to determine aerosol mass and radioactivity concentrations as a function of particle size within eight different size intervals (each corresponding to a different impactor stage or end filter). Traditionally, dose assessments made using the LUDEP code or other internal dosimetry software utilize this air sampling information by assigning the radioactivity measured at each stage as concentrated at a single representative size central to the size interval. In this study, we explore more realistic assumptions that the measured radioactivity distributes uniformly, linearly increases, or linearly decreases across the particle size interval for each impactor stage. The concept of an effective dose scaling factor, SF(E), is thus introduced whereby (1) the former approach can be used (which requires less computational effort using the LUDEP code), and (2) the resulting values of effective dose per stage can then be rescaled to values appropriate to a linear radioactivity distribution per stage. For a majority of (238)U-series radionuclides, particle size ranges, and absorption classes, differences in these two approaches are less than 10%, and thus no corrections in effective dose per particle stage are needed. Significant corrections, however, were noted in select cases. For uniform or linearly decreasing radioactivity distributions, end-filter particles (0.03 to 0.35 microm) of type F, M, or S radionuclides were assigned values of SF(E) ranging from 1.15 to 1.44, while 3(rd) stage particles (4.5 to 12 microm) of type M and S radionuclides were assigned values of SF(E) ranging from 1.11 to 1.53. When the cascade impactor measurements indicate a linear

  10. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Herein is reported activities to support the characterization of the aerosol in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) collected during the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) missions in 1994. Through a companion proposal, another group was to measure the size distribution of aerosols in the 0.008 to 2 micrometer diameter range and to collect for us impactor samples of particles larger than about 0.02 gm. In the first year, we conducted laboratory studies related to particulate deposition patterns on our collection substrates, and have performed the analysis of many ASHOE/MAESA aerosol samples from 1994 using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). We have been building an "aerosol climatology" with these data that documents the types and relative abundances of particles observed at different latitudes and altitudes. The second year (and non-funded extension periods) saw continued analyses of impactor aerosol samples, including more ASHOE/MAESA samples, some northern hemisphere samples from the NASA Stratospheric Photochemistry Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) program for comparison, and a few aerosol samples from the NASA Stratospheric TRacers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) program. A high-resolution field emission microscope was used for the analysis and re-analysis of a number of samples to determine if this instrument was superior in performance to our conventional electron microscope. In addition, some basic laboratory studies were conducted to determine the minimum detectable and analyzable particle size for different types of aerosols. In all, 61 aerosol samples were analyzed, with a total of over 30,000 individual particle analyses. In all analyzed samples, sulfate particles comprised the major aerosol number fraction. It must be stressed that particles composed of more than one species, for example sulfate and organic carbon, were classified

  11. Shock melting of the canyon diablo impactor: constraints from nickel-59 contents and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel; Pierazzo; Xue; Herzog; Masarik; Cresswell; di Tada ML; Liu; Fifield

    1999-07-02

    Two main types of material survive from the Canyon Diablo impactor, which produced Meteor Crater in Arizona: iron meteorites, which did not melt during the impact; and spheroids, which did. Ultrasensitive measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry show that the meteorites contain about seven times as much nickel-59 as the spheroids. Lower average nickel-59 contents in the spheroids indicate that they typically came from 0.5 to 1 meter deeper in the impactor than did the meteorites. Numerical modeling for an impact velocity of 20 kilometers per second shows that a shell 1.5 to 2 meters thick, corresponding to 16 percent of the projectile volume, remained solid on the rear surface; that most of the projectile melted; and that little, if any, vaporized.

  12. Survival of the impactor during hypervelocity collisions - I. An analogue for low porosity targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdellidou, C.; Price, M. C.; Delbo, M.; Ioannidis, P.; Cole, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent observations of asteroidal surfaces indicate the presence of materials that do not match the bulk lithology of the body. A possible explanation for the presence of these exogenous materials is that they are products of interasteroid impacts in the Main Belt, and thus interest has increased in understanding the fate of the projectile during hypervelocity impacts. In order to gain insight into the fate of impactor, we have carried out a laboratory programme, covering the velocity range of 0.38-3.50 km s-1, devoted to measuring the survivability, fragmentation and final state of the impactor. Forsterite olivine and synthetic basalt projectiles were fired on to low porosity (disruption, Q*, between peridot and basalt projectiles. However, we found very similar behaviour of the size frequency distributions for the hypervelocity shots (>1 km s-1). After each shot, we examined the largest peridot fragments with Raman spectroscopy and no melt or alteration in the final state of the projectile was observed.

  13. Survival of the impactor during hypervelocity collisions I: An analogue for low porosity targets

    CERN Document Server

    Avdellidou, C; Delbo, M; Ioannidis, P; Cole, M J

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of asteroidal surfaces indicate the presence of materials that do not match the bulk lithology of the body. A possible explanation for the presence of these exogenous materials is that they are products of inter-asteroid impacts in the Main Belt, and thus interest has increased in understanding the fate of the projectile during hypervelocity impacts. In order to gain insight into the fate of impactor we have carried out a laboratory programme, covering the velocity range of 0.38 - 3.50 km/s, devoted to measuring the survivability, fragmentation and final state of the impactor. Forsterite olivine and synthetic basalt projectiles were fired onto low porosity (1 km/s). After each shot, we examined the largest peridot fragments with Raman spectroscopy and no melt or alteration in the final state of the projectile was observed.

  14. The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and the Hayabusa2 Impact Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, T.; Imamura, H.; Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Takagi, Y.; Hayakawa, M.; Shirai, K.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.

    2017-07-01

    Hayabusa2 is a sample return mission of JAXA launched on 3 December 2014. Hayabusa2 is the successor of Hayabusa, which returned samples from the asteroid Itokawa to the Earth. Although the design of Hayabusa2 follows that of Hayabusa, the former is equipped with some new components. The small carry-on impactor (SCI) is one of those components. The SCI is a compact kinetic impactor designed to remove the asteroid surface regolith locally and create an artificial crater. One of the most important scientific objectives of Hayabusa2 is to investigate the chemical and physical properties of the internal materials and structures of the target body, asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa2 will attempt to observe the resultant crater with some scientific instruments and to get samples from around the crater. High kinetic energy is required to create a meaningful crater, however, the impact system design needs to fit within strict constraints. Complicated functions, such as a guidance and control system, are not permitted. A special type of shaped charge is used for the acceleration of the impactor of the SCI in order to make system simpler. Using this explosion technique makes it possible to accelerate the impactor very quickly and to hit the asteroid without a guidance system. However, the impact operation will be complicated because the explosive is very powerful and it scatters high-speed debris at the detonation. This paper describes an overview of the SCI system, the results of the development testing and an outline of the impact experiment of the Hayabusa2 mission.

  15. The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and the Hayabusa2 Impact Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, T.; Imamura, H.; Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Takagi, Y.; Hayakawa, M.; Shirai, K.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hayabusa2 is a sample return mission of JAXA launched on 3 December 2014. Hayabusa2 is the successor of Hayabusa, which returned samples from the asteroid Itokawa to the Earth. Although the design of Hayabusa2 follows that of Hayabusa, the former is equipped with some new components. The small carry-on impactor (SCI) is one of those components. The SCI is a compact kinetic impactor designed to remove the asteroid surface regolith locally and create an artificial crater. One of the most important scientific objectives of Hayabusa2 is to investigate the chemical and physical properties of the internal materials and structures of the target body, asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa2 will attempt to observe the resultant crater with some scientific instruments and to get samples from around the crater. High kinetic energy is required to create a meaningful crater, however, the impact system design needs to fit within strict constraints. Complicated functions, such as a guidance and control system, are not permitted. A special type of shaped charge is used for the acceleration of the impactor of the SCI in order to make system simpler. Using this explosion technique makes it possible to accelerate the impactor very quickly and to hit the asteroid without a guidance system. However, the impact operation will be complicated because the explosive is very powerful and it scatters high-speed debris at the detonation. This paper describes an overview of the SCI system, the results of the development testing and an outline of the impact experiment of the Hayabusa2 mission.

  16. Investigating target versus impactor influences on Martian crater morphology at the simple-complex transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Robert R.; Hynek, Brian M.

    2017-08-01

    Comparing craters of identical diameter on a planet is an empirical method of studying the effects of different target and impactor properties while holding total impact energy nearly constant. We have analyzed the Martian crater population within a narrow diameter range (7 km crater diameter crater transition using three approaches. We looked for correlations of morphology with surface geology using a global crater database and global geologic map. We examined selected regions in detail with high-resolution images to further understand the relationship between crater morphology and bulk target properties. Finally, we examined craters in close proximity to each other in order to hold target properties constant, so that we could isolate impactor effects on crater morphology. We found a strong correlation between target properties and interior crater morphology, and we found little evidence that impactor properties (other than impact angle) affect crater appearance. Central uplift and wall slumping are enhanced for less consolidated targets. Layered targets affected both the excavation and modification stages of complex crater formation; the resulting craters have pseudoterraces, flat floors, and central pits.

  17. Simulation on a novel micron-array inertial impactor for submicron and ultrafine particle separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui-Tao; Tao, Lu-Qi; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2016-08-01

    The particulate matter (PM), which was put forward in 1997 by US, had taken more and more attention due to the influence on human health. Although the mass concentration, number concentration and chemical composition of PM were still major research directions, how to collect these PMs more efficiently becomes critical. Inertial impactor is an effective separation device, however, due to different motion states of PM2.5 and PM0.3 in the flow field, the inertial impactor which can separate PM0.3 from other PMs has not been fabricated. In this work, the motion states for both submicron and ultrafine particles were studied by using classical theory of channel aerodynamic, and a novel micron-array inertial impactor was designed and simulated for the first time. Besides, the influence of some characteristic parameters (W, T, S, Dc, etc.) on particle collection efficiency were researched and discussed through simulation results. This novel structure can be easily fabricated by MEMS technology or laser direct writing and also can be widely used in particle separation or flexible sensor fields.

  18. Properties of original impactors estimated from three-dimensional analysis of whole Stardust tracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, Michael; Ebel, Denton S. (AMNH)

    2012-07-25

    The Stardust mission captured comet Wild 2 particles in aerogel at 6.1 km s{sup -1}. We performed high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and X-ray fluorescence mapping of whole cometary tracks in aerogel. We present the results of a survey of track structures using laser scanning confocal microscopy, including measurements of track volumes, entry hole size, and cross-sectional profiles. We compare various methods for measuring track parameters. We demonstrate a methodology for discerning hypervelocity particle ablation rates using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence, combined with mass and volume estimates of original impactors derived from measured track properties. Finally, we present a rough framework for reconstruction of original impactor size, and volume of volatilized material, using our measured parameters. The bulk of this work is in direct support of nondestructive analysis and identification of cometary grains in whole tracks, and its eventual application to the reconstruction of the size, shape, porosity, and chemical composition of whole Stardust impactors.

  19. The effect of the impactor diameter and temperature on low velocity impact behavior of CFRP laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evci, C.; Uyandıran, I.

    2017-02-01

    Impact damage is one of the major concerns that should be taken into account with the new aircraft and spacecraft structures which employ ever-growing use of composite materials. Considering the thermal loads encountered at different altitudes, both low and high temperatures can affect the properties and impact behavior of composite materials. This study aims to investigate the effect of temperature and impactor diameter on the impact behavior and damage development in balanced and symmetrical CFRP laminates which were manufactured by employing vacuum bagging process with autoclave cure. Instrumented drop-weight impact testing system is used to perform the low velocity impact tests in a range of temperatures ranged from 60 down to -50 °C. Impact tests for each temperature level were conducted using three different hemispherical impactor diameters varying from 10 to 20 mm. Energy profile method is employed to determine the impact threshold energies for damage evolution. The level of impact damage is determined from the dent depth on the impacted face and delamination damage detected using ultrasonic C-Scan technique. Test results reveal that the threshold of penetration energy, main failure force and delamination area increase with impactor diameter at all temperature levels. No clear influence of temperature on the critical force thresholds could be derived. However, penetration threshold energy decreased as the temperature was lowered. Drop in the penetration threshold was more obvious with quite low temperatures. Delamination damage area increased while the temperature decreased from +60 °C to -50 °C.

  20. Spherule layers, crater scaling laws, and the population of ancient terrestrial impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brandon C.; Collins, Gareth S.; Minton, David A.; Bowling, Timothy J.; Simonson, Bruce M.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-06-01

    Ancient layers of impact spherules provide a record of Earth's early bombardment history. Here, we compare different bombardment histories to the spherule layer record and show that 3.2-3.5 Ga the flux of large impactors (10-100 km in diameter) was likely 20-40 times higher than today. The E-belt model of early Solar System dynamics suggests that an increased impactor flux during the Archean is the result of the destabilization of an inward extension of the main asteroid belt (Bottke et al., 2012). Here, we find that the nominal flux predicted by the E-belt model is 7-19 times too low to explain the spherule layer record. Moreover, rather than making most lunar basins younger than 4.1 Gyr old, the nominal E-belt model, coupled with a corrected crater diameter scaling law, only produces two lunar basins larger than 300 km in diameter. We also show that the spherule layer record when coupled with the lunar cratering record and careful consideration of crater scaling laws can constrain the size distribution of ancient terrestrial impactors. The preferred population is main-belt-like up to ∼50 km in diameter transitioning to a steep distribution going to larger sizes.

  1. Next generation pharmaceutical impactor: a new impactor for pharmaceutical inhaler testing. Part III. extension of archival calibration to 15 L/min.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marple, Virgil A; Olson, Bernard A; Santhanakrishnan, Kumaragovindhan; Roberts, Daryl L; Mitchell, Jolyon P; Hudson-Curtis, Buffy L

    2004-01-01

    An extension of the archival calibration of the recently developed 30-100-L/min seven-stage impactor, the Next Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI), has been undertaken at 15 L/min. The NGI stage cut sizes are 0.98-14.1 microm aerodynamic diameter at this flow rate. This 15-L/min calibration was motivated by the desire to sample the entire aerosol produced by a nebulizer when tested in accordance with a new international standard developed by the Comite Européen de Normalisation (CEN), as well as the need to test various types of inhalers at flow rates lower than 30 L/min for pediatric applications. Measurements were undertaken with monodisperse oleic acid droplets in the range of 0.7-22 microm aerodynamic diameter following a procedure established in the original 30-100-L/min calibration study. The NGI was found to be effective for particle size separation at 15 L/min. Users should decide the most applicable configuration that meets their needs, based on the following recommendations: (1) the pre-separator should not normally be used, as its performance is significantly degraded by the influence of gravity, resulting in interference with stage 1; and (2) a filter should be inserted below the micro-orifice collector (MOC), as the size corresponding to 80% collection efficiency of the MOC becomes excessively large with decreasing flow rate, so that this component becomes ineffective as a means of collecting fine particles that penetrate beyond stage 7.

  2. Diverse impactors in Apollo 15 and 16 impact melt rocks: Evidence from osmium isotopes and highly siderophile elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingao; Sharp, Miriam; Ash, Richard D.; Kring, David A.; Walker, Richard J.

    2015-04-01

    Concentrations of highly siderophile elements (HSE) and 187Os/188Os isotopic compositions for eleven impact related rocks from the Apollo 15 and 16 landing sites are reported and combined with existing geochronological data to investigate the chemical nature and temporal changes in the large impactors implicated in the formation of the lunar basins. Data for the samples all define linear trends on plots of HSE versus Ir concentrations, whose slopes likely reflect the relative HSE compositions of the dominant impactors that formed the rocks. The inferred Imbrium basin impactor that generated Apollo 15 impact melt rocks 15445 and 15455 was characterized by modestly suprachondritic 187Os/188Os, Ru/Ir, Pt/Ir and Pd/Ir ratios. Diverse impactor components are revealed in the Apollo 16 impact melt rocks. The 187Os/188Os and HSE/Ir ratios of the impactor components in melt rocks 60635, 63595 and 68416, with reported ages meteorites, but slightly higher than ratios characterizing previously studied granulitic impactites with reported ages >4.0 Ga. By contrast, the impactor components in melt rocks 60235, 62295 and 67095, with reported ages of ∼3.9 Ga, are characterized by suprachondritic 187Os/188Os and HSE/Ir ratios similar to the Apollo 15 impact melt rocks, and may also sample the Imbrium impactor. Three lithic clasts from regolith breccias 60016 and 65095, also with ∼3.9 Ga ages, contain multiple impactor components, of which the dominant composition is considerably more suprachondritic than those implicated for Imbrium and Serenitatis (Apollo 17) impactors. The dominant composition recorded in these rocks was most likely inherited from a pre-Imbrium impactor. Consideration of composition versus age relations among lunar impact melt rocks reveals no discernable trend. Virtually all lunar impact melt rocks sampled by the Apollo missions, as well as meteorites, are characterized by 187Os/188Os and HSE/Ir ratios that, when collectively plotted, define linear trends

  3. Mixing of Impactor Liquid Cores and Planetesimals Constrained by Single Silicate Crystal Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, R. K.; Tarduno, J. A.; Nimmo, F.; Scott, E.; Ferrière, L.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of pallasites, meteorites composed mainly of intermixed FeNi metal and angular to rounded olivine crystals, has been a paradox because these components should have separated into distinct layers at their putative location of origin: the core-mantle boundary (CMB) of an asteroid. Paleomagnetic study of gem-like angular olivine bearing minute magnetic inclusions from the main group Esquel and Imilac pallasite meteorites, however, reveals the past presence of strong magnetic fields requiring a core dynamo. A CMB location is too hot for pallasites to record these magnetizations. Alternatively, the paleomagnetic field strengths, combined with cooling rate data and thermal modeling, suggest an origin for main group pallasites in the shallow mantle of a parent body, with the FeNi metal originating from the liquid core of an impactor (Tarduno et al., Science, 2012). Here, we extend this model to include the origin of main group pallasite meteorites with rounded olivine, and pallasites of the Eagle Station group. Main group pallasites with rounded olivine (e.g., Springwater) could have formed in larger intruded liquid FeNi masses relative to the thinner dikes envisioned for the formation of pallasites with angular olivine crystals. Pallasites of the Eagle Station group have an oxygen isotope composition different from that of the main group and thus require a separate parent body. Olivine from the Eagle Station pallasite also carries a paleomagnetic record; therefore pallasites from this group may have also formed by collision. Interestingly, the magnetization of the Eagle Station pallasite is multi-component and distinctly different from the main group. This signal potentially records a combination of a dynamo signal and a later shock heating event. Mesosiderites may represent a third parent body formed by impactor liquid FeNi metal injected into the crust of an asteroid. These observations suggest liquid metal intrusion from differentiated impactors may have

  4. Quantitative x-ray diffraction phase analysis of coarse airborne particulate collected by cascade impactor sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, V.; Rius, J.; Ochando, L. E.; Amigó, J. M.

    Mineralogical composition of Castellon (Spanish Mediterranean coast) atmospheric aerosol was studied by X-ray diffraction by sampling with a cascade impactor without filters. Quantitative phase analysis of natural phases present in the atmospheric coarse aerosol was performed using a modified version of the computer program MENGE, that uses the standardless X-ray method developed by Rius for the quantitative analysis of multiphase mixtures, adapted for PC running. Presence of quartz, calcite and gypsum was identified in the atmospheric aerosol and we have quantified their amounts using the standardless method.

  5. The development of a cascade impactor simulator based on adhesion force measurements to aid the development of dry powder inhalations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podczeck, F

    1997-05-01

    Adhesion and friction forces are the main physical factors determining the re-suspension of a micronized drug from carrier particles during inhalation. Hence, it appears useful to link adhesion and friction force measurements to the in vitro testing of dry powder inhalations, namely the assessment of the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) using an eight-stage Andersen cascade impactor. Interactive mixtures of micronized Salmeterol Xinafoate adhered to irrespirable lactose monohydrate carrier particles were used as model dosage forms. The adhesion force between the drug and carrier particles was assessed using a centrifuge technique, and the MMAD was determined under standardized working conditions using the Andersen-Cascade impactor (Mark II). A cascade impactor simulator (CIS), which is a computer program containing a re-suspension model to assess the amount of drug detached from the carrier particles during inhalation, was developed and validated using the experimental data. It could be shown, that the CIS provided a good estimate of the loss of drug due to adhesion to the carrier particles and the loss of drug on the cascade impactor walls. Small deviations between the theoretical and experimental mass median aerodynamic particle diameters however were found. These deviations were shown to be mainly due to the experimental error introduced by the cascade impactor, and that the error due to the experimental adhesion measurements is negligibly small. Hence, the CIS developed could be a useful tool in early development stages of dry powder inhalations to predict the in vitro aerodynamic performance of drug particles.

  6. Cataclysm No More: New Views on the Timing and Delivery of Lunar Impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Nicolle E. B.

    2017-09-01

    If properly interpreted, the impact record of the Moon, Earth's nearest neighbour, can be used to gain insights into how the Earth has been influenced by impacting events since its formation 4.5 billion years (Ga) ago. However, the nature and timing of the lunar impactors - and indeed the lunar impact record itself - are not well understood. Of particular interest are the ages of lunar impact basins and what they tell us about the proposed "lunar cataclysm" and/or the late heavy bombardment (LHB), and how this impact episode may have affected early life on Earth or other planets. Investigations of the lunar impactor population over time have been undertaken and include analyses of orbital data and images; lunar, terrestrial, and other planetary sample data; and dynamical modelling. Here, the existing information regarding the nature of the lunar impact record is reviewed and new interpretations are presented. Importantly, it is demonstrated that most evidence supports a prolonged lunar (and thus, terrestrial) bombardment from 4.2 to 3.4 Ga and not a cataclysmic spike at 3.9 Ga. Implications for the conditions required for the origin of life are addressed.

  7. Computational investigation of powder coating of nanoparticles in supersonic and hypersonic impactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nima Niksefat; Mousa Farhadi; Kurosh Sedighi; Salman Nourouzi

    2013-01-01

    In this study,numerical simulation of flow field in a supersonic/hypersonic impactor with one or two nozzles was carried out using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT.The objective was to investigate the effects of working parameters such as pressure ratio (50 < Po/Pb < 800),nozzle diameters (D=0.23,0.27,0.45 mm),nozzle to plate distance (0.5 < L/D< 50),particle diameter (1 nm< dp < 100 nm) and angle between two nozzles.A single-phase 3D unsteady-state model was implemented by the software.For this purpose,a user-defined function (UDF) was employed to implement nanoparticles for different assumptions of Cunningham correction factor.An axisymmetric form of the compressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations was used for both fluid flow and temperature;Lagrangian particle trajectory analysis was used for particle motion.Using the variable Cunningham correction factor showed suitable agreement with experimental data in comparison with other methods.Results show that increase of the distance between nozzle and impaction plate causes increase of Mach number,the distance between bow shock and impaction plate,and the collection efficiency.Maximum jet velocity,distance between bow shock and impaction plate and collection efficiency increase by using two nozzles in supersonic and hypersonic impactors.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Graded Impedance Gas Gun Impactors from Tape Cast Metal Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L P; Nguyen, J H

    2005-11-21

    Fabrication of compositionally graded structures for use as light-gas gun impactors has been demonstrated using a tape casting technique. Mixtures of metal powders in the Mg-Cu system were cast into a series of tapes with uniform compositions ranging from 100% Mg to 100% Cu. The individual compositions were fabricated into monolithic pellets for characterization by laminating multiple layers together, thermally removing the organics, and hot-pressing to near-full density. The pellets were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and measurement of density and sound wave velocity. The density and acoustic impedance were observed to vary monotonically (and nearly linearly) with composition. Graded structures were fabricated by stacking layers of different compositions in a sequence calculated to yield a desired acoustic impedance profile. The measured physical properties of the graded structures compare favorably with those predicted from the monolithic-pellet characteristics. Fabrication of graded impactors by this technique is of significant interest for providing improved control of the pressure profile in gas gun experiments.

  9. Post-mitigation impact risk assessment for NASA's DART kinetic impactor mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Hestroffer, Daniel; DART, AIM

    2016-10-01

    Field-testing kinetic impactors to deflect potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs) is essential to better understand the challenges of future asteroid impact threat mitigation. The Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment mission (AIDA, Cheng et al. 2016), a collaborative effort between NASA and ESA, offers a timely opportunity to validate kinetic impact deflection strategies. Although the main goal of NASA's kinetic impactor (DART) is to change the circumprimary orbit of (65803) Didymos' moonlet, the imparted momentum will also slightly change the heliocentric orbit of the whole binary asteroid system. Given the high degree of non-linearity of the near-Earth dynamical environment, however, even a small change in initial conditions can affect long term predictions of the encounter distances between Didymos and the Earth. Belonging to the dynamical class of PHAs, (65803) Didymos has several encounters with the Earth over the upcoming decades, some of which are closer than 20 lunar distances. In order to confirm that no planetary safety issues arise as a consequence of DART, we conducted a post-mitigation impact risk assessment (PMIRA, Eggl et al. 2015) for the currently foreseen DART impact trajectories. In this contribution we present the latest PMIRA results and discuss the role of ESA's AIM spacecraft in reducing uncertainties arising in the deflection process.

  10. A statistical dynamical study of meteorite impactors: a case study based on parameters derived from the Bosumtwi impact event

    CERN Document Server

    Galiazzo, M A; Huber, M S; Losiak, A; Dvorak, R; Koeberl, C

    2013-01-01

    The study of meteorite craters on Earth provides information about the dynamic evolution of bodies within the Solar System. Bosumtwi crater is a well studied, 10.5 km in diameter, ca. 1.07 Ma old impact structure located in Ghana. The impactor was $\\sim$ 1 km in diameter, an ordinary chondrite and struck the Earth with an angle between 30$^\\circ$ and 45$^\\circ$ from the horizontal. We have used a two phase backward integration to constrain the most probable parent region of the impactor. We find that the most likely source region is a high inclination object from the Middle Main Belt.

  11. Global distribution of large lunar craters: implications for resurfacing and impactor populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, James W; Fassett, Caleb I; Kadish, Seth J; Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Neumann, Gregory A; Mazarico, Erwan

    2010-09-17

    By using high-resolution altimetric measurements of the Moon, we produced a catalog of all impact craters ≥20 kilometers in diameter on the lunar surface and analyzed their distribution and population characteristics. The most-densely cratered portion of the highlands reached a state of saturation equilibrium. Large impact events, such as Orientale Basin, locally modified the prebasin crater population to ~2 basin radii from the basin center. Basins such as Imbrium, Orientale, and Nectaris, which are important stratigraphic markers in lunar history, are temporally distinguishable on the basis of crater statistics. The characteristics of pre- and postmare crater populations support the hypothesis that there were two populations of impactors in early solar system history and that the transition occurred near the time of the Orientale Basin event.

  12. Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment Counter-Flow Spectrometer and Impactor Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellot, Michael [University of North Dakota

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Aerial Facility (ARM AAF) counter-flow spectrometer and impactor (CSI) probe was flown on the University of North Dakota Cessna Citation research aircraft during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEX). The field campaign took place during May and June of 2014 over North Carolina and its coastal waters as part of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement validation campaign. The CSI was added to the Citation instrument suite to support the involvement of Jay Mace through the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite program and flights of the NASA ER-2 aircraft, which is a civilian version of the Air Force’s U2-S reconnaissance platform. The ACE program funded extra ER-2 flights to focus on clouds that are weakly precipitating, which are also of interest to the Atmospheric System Research program sponsored by DOE.

  13. An asteroid breakup 160 Myr ago as the probable source of the K/T impactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, William F; Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David

    2007-09-06

    The terrestrial and lunar cratering rate is often assumed to have been nearly constant over the past 3 Gyr. Different lines of evidence, however, suggest that the impact flux from kilometre-sized bodies increased by at least a factor of two over the long-term average during the past approximately 100 Myr. Here we argue that this apparent surge was triggered by the catastrophic disruption of the parent body of the asteroid Baptistina, which we infer was a approximately 170-km-diameter body (carbonaceous-chondrite-like) that broke up 160(-20)+30Myr ago in the inner main asteroid belt. Fragments produced by the collision were slowly delivered by dynamical processes to orbits where they could strike the terrestrial planets. We find that this asteroid shower is the most likely source (>90 per cent probability) of the Chicxulub impactor that produced the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) mass extinction event 65 Myr ago.

  14. Ancient impactor components preserved and reworked in martian regolith breccia Northwest Africa 7034

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goderis, Steven; Brandon, Alan D.; Mayer, Bernhard; Humayun, Munir

    2016-10-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 and paired stones represent unique samples of martian polymict regolith breccia. Multiple breccia subsamples characterized in this work confirm highly siderophile element (HSE: Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd) contents that are consistently elevated (e.g., Os ∼9.3-18.4 ppb) above indigenous martian igneous rocks (mostly HSE has masked the original nature of the admixed meteorite signatures. The present-day 187Os/188Os ratios of 0.119-0.136 record a wider variation than observed for all major chondrite types. Combined with the measured 187Re/188Os ratios of 0.154-0.994, the range in Os isotope ratios indicates redistribution of Re and Os from originally chondritic components early in the history of the regolith commencing at ∼4.4 Ga. Superimposed recent Re mobility reflects exposure and weathering at or near the martian and terrestrial surfaces. Elevated Os concentrations (38.0 and 92.6 ppb Os), superchondritic Os/HSE ratios, and 187Os/188Os of 0.1171 and 0.1197 measured for two subsamples of the breccia suggest the redistribution of impactor material at ∼1.5-1.9 Ga, possibly overlapping with a (partial) resetting event at ∼1.4 Ga recorded by U-Pb isotope systematics in the breccia. Martian alteration of the originally chondritic HSE host phases, to form Os-Ir-rich nuggets and Ni-rich pyrite, implies the influence of potentially impact-driven hydrothermal systems. Multiple generations of impactor component admixture, redistribution, and alteration mark the formation and evolution of the martian regolith clasts and matrix of NWA 7034 and paired meteorites, from the pre-Noachian until impact ejection to Earth.

  15. Direct-trauma model of posttraumatic syringomyelia with a computer-controlled motorized spinal cord impactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Johnny H Y; Song, Xin; Hemley, Sarah J; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon; Stoodley, Marcus A

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The pathogenesis of posttraumatic syringomyelia remains enigmatic and is not adequately explained by current theories. Experimental investigations require a reproducible animal model that replicates the human condition. Current animal models are imperfect because of their low reliability, severe neurological deficits, or dissimilar mechanism of injury. The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible rodent model of posttraumatic syringomyelia using a spinal cord impactor that produces an injury that more closely mimics the human condition and does not produce severe neurological deficits. METHODS The study consisted of 2 parts. Seventy animals were studied overall: 20 in Experiment 1 and 48 in Experiment 2 after two rats with severe deficits were killed early. Experiment 1 aimed to determine the optimal force setting for inducing a cystic cavity without neurological deficits using a computer-controlled motorized spinal cord impactor. Twenty animals received an impact that ranged from 50 to 150 kDyn. Using the optimal force for producing an initial cyst determined from Experiment 1, Experiment 2 aimed to compare the progression of cavities in animals with and those without arachnoiditis induced by kaolin. Forty-eight animals were killed at 1, 3, 6, or 12 weeks after syrinx induction. Measurements of cavity size and maximum anteroposterior and lateral diameters were evaluated using light microscopy. RESULTS In Experiment 1, cavities were present in 95% of the animals. The duration of limb weakness and spinal cord cavity size correlated with the delivered force. The optimal force chosen for Experiment 2 was 75 kDyn. In Experiment 2, cavities occurred in 92% of the animals. Animals in the kaolin groups developed larger cavities and more vacuolations and enlarged perivascular spaces than those in the nonkaolin groups. CONCLUSIONS This impact model reliably produces cavities that resemble human posttraumatic syringomyelia and is suitable for further

  16. Mass size distributions and size resolved chemical composition of fine particulate matter at the Pittsburgh supersite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Juan C.; Rees, Sarah; Takahama, Satoshi; Khlystov, Andrey; Pandis, Spyros N.; Davidson, Cliff I.; Robinson, Allen L.

    Size-resolved aerosol mass and chemical composition were measured during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study. Daily samples were collected for 12 months from July 2001 to June 2002. Micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDIs) were used to collect aerosol samples of fine particulate matter smaller than 10 μm. Measurements of PM 0.056, PM 0.10, PM 0.18, PM 0.32, PM 0.56, PM 1.0, PM 1.8 and PM 2.5 with the MOUDI are available for the full study period. Seasonal variations in the concentrations are observed for all size cuts. Higher concentrations are observed during the summer and lower during the winter. Comparison between the PM 2.5 measurements by the MOUDI and other integrated PM samplers reveals good agreement. Good correlation is observed for PM 10 between the MOUDI and an integrated sampler but the MOUDI underestimates PM 10 by 20%. Bouncing of particles from higher stages of the MOUDI (>PM 2.5) is not a major problem because of the low concentrations of coarse particles in the area. The main cause of coarse particle losses appears to be losses to the wall of the MOUDI. Samples were collected on aluminum foils for analysis of carbonaceous material and on Teflon filters for analysis of particle mass and inorganic anions and cations. Daily samples were analyzed during the summer (July 2001) and the winter intensives (January 2002). During the summer around 50% of the organic material is lost from the aluminum foils as compared to a filter-based sampler. These losses are due to volatilization and bounce-off from the MOUDI stages. High nitrate losses from the MOUDI are also observed during the summer (above 70%). Good agreement between the gravimetrically determined mass and the sum of the masses of the individual compounds is obtained, if the lost mass from organics and the aerosol water content are included for the summer. For the winter no significant losses of material are detected and there exists reasonable agreement between the gravimetrical mass and the

  17. Asteroid deflection using a kinetic impactor: Insights from hypervelocity impact experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerth, Tobias; Schäfer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the planned AIDA mission [1], an impactor spacecraft (DART) hits the second component of the asteroid Didymos at hypervelocity. The impact crater will be observed from the AIM spacecraft and an observation of the ejecta plume is possible [1]. This allows conclusions to be drawn about the physical properties of the target material, and the momentum transfer will be studied [1]. In preparation for this mission, hypervelocity impact experiments can provide valuable information about the outcome of an impact event as a function of impactor and target material properties and, thus, support the interpretation of the data from the DART impact. In addition, these impact experiments provide an important means to validate numerical impact simulations required to simulate large-scale impacts that cannot be studied in laboratory experiments. Impact experiments have shown that crater morphology and size, crater growth and ejecta dynamics strongly depend on the physical properties of the target material [2]. For example, porous materials like sandstone lead to a shallower and slower ejection than low-porous materials like quartzite, and the cratering efficiency is reduced in porous targets leading to a smaller amount of ejected mass [3]. These phenomena result in a reduced momentum multiplication factor (often called "beta-value"), i.e. the ratio of the change in target momentum after the impact and the momentum of the projectile is smaller for porous materials. Hypervelocity impact experiments into target materials with different porosities and densities such as quartzite (2.9 %, 2.6 g/cm3), sandstone (25.3 %, 2 g/cm3), limestone (31 %, 1.8 g/cm3), and highly porous aerated concrete (87.5 %, 0.4 g/cm3) were conducted. Projectile velocities were varied between about 3 km/s and almost 7 km/s. A ballistic pendulum was used to measure the momentum transfer. The material strength required for scaling laws was determined for all target materials. The highest

  18. Scientific Objectives of Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and Deployable Camera 3 Digital (DCAM3-D): Observation of an Ejecta Curtain and a Crater Formed on the Surface of Ryugu by an Artificial High-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Saiki, T.; Kadono, T.; Takagi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okamoto, C.; Yano, H.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakazawa, S.; Hirata, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Imamura, H.; Ogawa, K.; Sakatani, N.; Iijima, Y.; Honda, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Sawada, H.

    2016-10-01

    The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) equipped on Hayabusa2 was developed to produce an artificial impact crater on the primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) 162173 Ryugu (Ryugu) in order to explore the asteroid subsurface material unaffected by space weathering and thermal alteration by solar radiation. An exposed fresh surface by the impactor and/or the ejecta deposit excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the asteroid will be collected there. The SCI impact experiment will be observed by a Deployable CAMera 3-D (DCAM3-D) at a distance of ˜1 km from the impact point, and the time evolution of the ejecta curtain will be observed by this camera to confirm the impact point on the asteroid surface. As a result of the observation of the ejecta curtain by DCAM3-D and the crater morphology by onboard cameras, the subsurface structure and the physical properties of the constituting materials will be derived from crater scaling laws. Moreover, the SCI experiment on Ryugu gives us a precious opportunity to clarify effects of microgravity on the cratering process and to validate numerical simulations and models of the cratering process.

  19. Scientific Objectives of Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) and Deployable Camera 3 Digital (DCAM3-D): Observation of an Ejecta Curtain and a Crater Formed on the Surface of Ryugu by an Artificial High-Velocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, M.; Wada, K.; Saiki, T.; Kadono, T.; Takagi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Okamoto, C.; Yano, H.; Hayakawa, M.; Nakazawa, S.; Hirata, N.; Kobayashi, M.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.; Imamura, H.; Ogawa, K.; Sakatani, N.; Iijima, Y.; Honda, R.; Ishibashi, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Sawada, H.

    2017-07-01

    The Small Carry-on Impactor (SCI) equipped on Hayabusa2 was developed to produce an artificial impact crater on the primitive Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) 162173 Ryugu (Ryugu) in order to explore the asteroid subsurface material unaffected by space weathering and thermal alteration by solar radiation. An exposed fresh surface by the impactor and/or the ejecta deposit excavated from the crater will be observed by remote sensing instruments, and a subsurface fresh sample of the asteroid will be collected there. The SCI impact experiment will be observed by a Deployable CAMera 3-D (DCAM3-D) at a distance of ˜1 km from the impact point, and the time evolution of the ejecta curtain will be observed by this camera to confirm the impact point on the asteroid surface. As a result of the observation of the ejecta curtain by DCAM3-D and the crater morphology by onboard cameras, the subsurface structure and the physical properties of the constituting materials will be derived from crater scaling laws. Moreover, the SCI experiment on Ryugu gives us a precious opportunity to clarify effects of microgravity on the cratering process and to validate numerical simulations and models of the cratering process.

  20. Characterisation and airborne deployment of a new counterflow virtual impactor inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingler, T.; Dey, S.; Sorooshian, A.; Brechtel, F. J.; Wang, Z.; Metcalf, A.; Coggon, M.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Russell, L. M.; Jonsson, H. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-06-01

    A new counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet is introduced with details of its design, laboratory characterisation tests and deployment on an aircraft during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE). The CVI inlet addresses three key issues in previous designs; in particular, the inlet operates with: (i) negligible organic contamination; (ii) a significant sample flow rate to downstream instruments (∼15 l min-1) that reduces the need for dilution; and (iii) a high level of accessibility to the probe interior for cleaning. Wind tunnel experiments characterised the cut size of sampled droplets and the particle size-dependent transmission efficiency in various parts of the probe. For a range of counter-flow rates and air velocities, the measured cut size was between 8.7-13.1 μm. The mean percentage error between cut size measurements and predictions from aerodynamic drag theory is 1.7%. The CVI was deployed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter for thirty flights during E-PEACE to study aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions off the central coast of California in July and August 2011. Results are reported to assess the performance of the inlet including comparisons of particle number concentration downstream of the CVI and cloud drop number concentration measured by two independent aircraft probes. Measurements downstream of the CVI are also examined from one representative case flight coordinated with shipboard-emitted smoke that was intercepted in cloud by the Twin Otter.

  1. Characterization and airborne deployment of a new counterflow virtual impactor inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingler, T.; Dey, S.; Sorooshian, A.; Brechtel, F. J.; Wang, Z.; Metcalf, A.; Coggon, M.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Russell, L. M.; Jonsson, H. H.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    A new counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet is introduced with details of its design, laboratory characterization tests, and deployment on an aircraft during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE). The CVI inlet addresses three key issues in previous designs; in particular, the inlet operates with: (i) negligible organic contamination; (ii) a significant sample flow rate to downstream instruments (~15 l min-1) that reduces the need for dilution; and (iii) a high level of accessibility to the probe interior for cleaning. Wind tunnel experiments characterized the cut size of sampled droplets and the particle size-dependent transmission efficiency in various parts of the probe. For a range of counter-flow rates and air velocities, the measured cut size was between 8.7-13.1 μm. The percentage error between cut size measurements and predictions from aerodynamic drag theory are less than 13%. The CVI was deployed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter for thirty flights during E-PEACE to study aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions off the central coast of California between July and August 2011. Results are reported to assess the performance of the inlet including comparisons of particle number concentration downstream of the CVI and cloud drop number concentration measured by two independent aircraft probes. Measurements downstream the CVI are also examined from one representative case flight coordinated with shipboard-emitted smoke that was intercepted in cloud by the Twin Otter.

  2. Orbital and Physical Characteristics of Meter-scale Impactors from Airburst Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, P; Clark, D; Tagliaferri, E

    2015-01-01

    We have analysed the orbits and ablation characteristics in the atmosphere of 59 earth-impacting fireballs, produced by meteoroids one meter in diameter or larger, described here as meter-scale. Using heights at peak luminosity as a proxy for strength, we determine that there is roughly an order of magnitude spread in strengths of the population of meter-scale impactors at the Earth. We use fireballs producing recovered meteorites and well documented fireballs from ground-based camera networks to calibrate our ablation model interpretation of the observed peak height of luminosity as a function of speed. The orbits and physical strength of these objects are consistent with the majority being asteroidal bodies originating from the inner main asteroid belt. We find a lower limit of ~10-15% of our objects have a possible cometary (Jupiter-Family comet and/or Halley-type comet) origin based on orbital characteristics alone. Only half this number, however, also show evidence for weaker than average structure. Two ...

  3. Impactor flux and cratering on Ceres and Vesta: Implications for the early Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    de Elía, G C

    2011-01-01

    We study the impactor flux and cratering on Ceres and Vesta caused by the collisional and dynamical evolution of the asteroid Main Belt. We develop a statistical code based on a well-tested model for the simultaneous evolution of the Main Belt and NEA size distributions. This code includes catastrophic collisions and noncollisional removal processes such as the Yarkovsky effect and the orbital resonances. The model assumes that the dynamical depletion of the early Main Belt was very strong, and owing to that, most Main Belt comminution occurred when its dynamical structure was similar to the present one. Our results indicate that the number of D > 1 km Main Belt asteroids striking Ceres and Vesta over the Solar System history are approximately 4 600 and 1 100 respectively. The largest Main Belt asteroids expected to have impacted Ceres and Vesta had diameters of 71.7 km and 21.1 km. The number of D > 0.1 km craters on Ceres is \\sim 3.4 \\times 10^8 and 6.2 \\times 10^7 on Vesta. The number of craters with D > 1...

  4. Constraining the Flux of Impactors Postdating Heavy Bombardment Using U-Pb Ages of Impact Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Norman, M. L.; Ziegler, R. A.; Grange, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Spherules of glass varying in size from a few micrometres to a few millimetres are common in the lunar regolith. While some of these glass beads are products of pyroclastic fire fountains others originate as impact melt ejected from the target that breaks into small droplets and solidifies as spherical particles while raining back to the lunar surface. These glasses preserve information about the chemical composition of the target and often contain sufficient amount of radioactive nuclides such as 40K to enable Ar-40-Ar-39 dating of individual beads. Studies measuring the age of glass beads have been used in attempts to establish variations in the flux of impactors hitting the Moon, particularly during the period that postdates the formation of major impact basins [1,2]. These studies proposed a possibility of spike in the impact flux about 800 Ma [2] and over the last 400 Ma [1]. More recently U-Th-Pb isotopic systems have been also utilized to determine the age of impact glasses from the Apollo 17 regolith [3]. Our aim is to extend the application of the U-Pb system in impact glasses to spherules isolated from Apollo 14 soil 14163 in an attempt to further investigate the applicability of this isotopic system to the chronology of impact glass beads and gain additional information on the impact flux in the inner Solar system.

  5. Environmental continuous air monitor inlet with combined preseparator and virtual impactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, John C.

    2007-06-19

    An inlet for an environmental air monitor is described wherein a pre-separator interfaces with ambient environment air and removes debris and insects commonly associated with high wind outdoors and a deflector plate in communication with incoming air from the pre-separator stage, that directs the air radially and downward uniformly into a plurality of accelerator jets located in a manifold of a virtual impactor, the manifold being cylindrical and having a top, a base, and a wall, with the plurality of accelerator jets being located in the top of the manifold and receiving the directed air and accelerating directed air, thereby creating jets of air penetrating into the manifold, where a major flow is deflected to the walls of the manifold and extracted through ports in the walls. A plurality of receiver nozzles are located in the base of the manifold coaxial with the accelerator jets, and a plurality of matching flow restrictor elements are located in the plurality of receiver nozzles for balancing and equalizing the total minor flow among all the plurality of receiver nozzles, through which a lower, fractional flow extracts large particle constituents of the air for collection on a sample filter after passing through the plurality of receiver nozzles and the plurality of matching flow restrictor elements.

  6. Quantitative sampling and analysis of trace elements in ambient air: impactor characterization and Synchrotron-XRF mass calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, A.; Bukowiecki, N.; Lienemann, P.; Furger, M.; Weideli, B.; Fierz, M.; Minguillón, M. C.; Figi, R.; Flechsig, U.; Appel, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-06-01

    Identification of trace elements in ambient air can add substantial information to pollution source apportionment studies, although they do not contribute significantly to emissions in terms of mass. A method for quantitative size and time-resolved trace element evaluation in ambient aerosols with a rotating drum impactor and synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence is presented. The impactor collection efficiency curves and size segregation characteristics were investigated in an experiment with oil and salt particles. Cutoff diameters were determined through the ratio of size distributions measured with two particles sizers. Furthermore, an external calibration technique to empirically link fluorescence intensities to ambient concentrations was developed. Solutions of elemental standards were applied with an ink-jet printer on thin films and area concentrations were subsequently evaluated with external wet chemical methods. These customized and reusable reference standards enable quantification of different data sets analyzed under varying experimental conditions.

  7. Quantitative sampling and analysis of trace elements in atmospheric aerosols: impactor characterization and Synchrotron-XRF mass calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, A.; Bukowiecki, N.; Lienemann, P.; Furger, M.; Fierz, M.; Minguillón, M. C.; Weideli, B.; Figi, R.; Flechsig, U.; Appel, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-10-01

    Identification of trace elements in ambient air can add substantial information to pollution source apportionment studies, although they do not contribute significantly to emissions in terms of mass. A method for quantitative size and time-resolved trace element evaluation in ambient aerosols with a rotating drum impactor and synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence is presented. The impactor collection efficiency curves and size segregation characteristics were investigated in an experiment with oil and salt particles. Cutoff diameters were determined through the ratio of size distributions measured with two particle sizers. Furthermore, an external calibration technique to empirically link fluorescence intensities to ambient concentrations was developed. Solutions of elemental standards were applied with an ink-jet printer on thin films and area concentrations were subsequently evaluated with external wet chemical methods. These customized and reusable reference standards enable quantification of different data sets analyzed under varying experimental conditions.

  8. Quantitative sampling and analysis of trace elements in atmospheric aerosols: impactor characterization and Synchrotron-XRF mass calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Richard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Identification of trace elements in ambient air can add substantial information to pollution source apportionment studies, although they do not contribute significantly to emissions in terms of mass. A method for quantitative size and time-resolved trace element evaluation in ambient aerosols with a rotating drum impactor and synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence is presented. The impactor collection efficiency curves and size segregation characteristics were investigated in an experiment with oil and salt particles. Cutoff diameters were determined through the ratio of size distributions measured with two particle sizers. Furthermore, an external calibration technique to empirically link fluorescence intensities to ambient concentrations was developed. Solutions of elemental standards were applied with an ink-jet printer on thin films and area concentrations were subsequently evaluated with external wet chemical methods. These customized and reusable reference standards enable quantification of different data sets analyzed under varying experimental conditions.

  9. Quantitative sampling and analysis of trace elements in ambient air: impactor characterization and Synchrotron-XRF mass calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Richard

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification of trace elements in ambient air can add substantial information to pollution source apportionment studies, although they do not contribute significantly to emissions in terms of mass. A method for quantitative size and time-resolved trace element evaluation in ambient aerosols with a rotating drum impactor and synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence is presented. The impactor collection efficiency curves and size segregation characteristics were investigated in an experiment with oil and salt particles. Cutoff diameters were determined through the ratio of size distributions measured with two particles sizers. Furthermore, an external calibration technique to empirically link fluorescence intensities to ambient concentrations was developed. Solutions of elemental standards were applied with an ink-jet printer on thin films and area concentrations were subsequently evaluated with external wet chemical methods. These customized and reusable reference standards enable quantification of different data sets analyzed under varying experimental conditions.

  10. Neutralization of Bacterial Aerosols by Aerodynamic Shocks in a Novel Impactor System: An Integrated Computational and Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    the upstream impactor pressure at 1 atm. Nebulization The phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (BP2438-4, Fisher Scientific) suspension con- taining the...shocks on spores which are more relevant as bioterrorism threats. In laboratory settings, Bacillus subtilis var niger , reclassified as Bacillus...deceleration tube (see Fig. 5.1; parts 4 k. 5) is filled with 600 fiL of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution (BP2438-4, Fisher Scientific), which keeps

  11. Constraints on the pre-impact orbits of Theia, the Borealis impactor and the progenitor of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alan P.; Gabriel, Travis; Asphaug, Erik

    2016-10-01

    Many aspects of the current dynamical and compositional configuration of the inner Solar System, such as Mercury's large core mass fraction, the angular momentum of the Earth-Moon system, and the reorientation of Mars, have been achieved through the effects of giant impacts. It is possible to relate the impact conditions, especially the velocity, to the pre-impact orbits. This in turn provides insight into the source regions for the terrestrial planets for comparison with N-body accretion models. For example, in the case of the canonical model for the formation of the Moon, previous studies have investigated regions in which the Mars-size impactor, Theia, could be quasi-stable for millions of years. We can however obtain constraints on the orbit of an impactor immediately prior to collision simply by knowing the impact velocity. We consider the canonical Moon formation model, as well as the models of Cuk & Stewart (2012), Canup (2012) and Reufer et al. (2012), to derive from each model its constraints on the pre-impact orbit of Theia. We also consider Mars, and provide constraints on the pre-impact orbit of the impactor suggested to have formed the Borealis basin, and Mercury, namely the Benz et al. (2007) scenario for the formation of Mercury. We discuss the implication of these pre-impact orbits for the origin of the bodies and their compositions.

  12. Exploring pulse shaping for Z using graded-density impactors on gas guns (final report for LDRD project 79879).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, Michael David; Reinhart, William Dodd; Anderson, William W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Hixson, Rob (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Kipp, Marlin E.

    2005-10-01

    While isentropic compression experiment (ICE) techniques have proved useful in deducing the high-pressure compressibility of a wide range of materials, they have encountered difficulties where large-volume phase transitions exist. The present study sought to apply graded-density impactor methods for producing isentropic loading to planar impact experiments to selected such problems. Cerium was chosen due to its 20% compression between 0.7 and 1.0 GPa. A model was constructed based on limited earlier dynamic data, and applied to the design of a suite of experiments. A capability for handling this material was installed. Two experiments were executed using shock/reload techniques with available samples, loading initially to near the gamma-alpha transition, then reloading. As well, two graded-density impactor experiments were conducted with alumina. A method for interpreting ICE data was developed and validated; this uses a wavelet construction for the ramp wave and includes corrections for the ''diffraction'' of wavelets by releases or reloads reflected from the sample/window interface. Alternate methods for constructing graded-density impactors are discussed.

  13. Size-separated sampling and analysis of isocyanates in workplace aerosols. Part I. Denuder--cascade impactor sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Jakob; Spanne, Mårten; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2008-07-01

    Isocyanates in the workplace atmosphere are typically present both in gas and particle phase. The health effects of exposure to isocyanates in gas phase and different particle size fractions are likely to be different due to their ability to reach different parts in the respiratory system. To reveal more details regarding the exposure to isocyanate aerosols, a denuder-impactor (DI) sampler for airborne isocyanates was designed. The sampler consists of a channel-plate denuder for collection of gaseous isocyanates, in series with three-cascade impactor stages with cut-off diameters (d(50)) of 2.5, 1.0 and 0.5 mum. An end filter was connected in series after the impactor for collection of particles smaller than 0.5 mum. The denuder, impactor plates and the end filter were impregnated with a mixture of di-n-butylamine (DBA) and acetic acid for derivatization of the isocyanates. During sampling, the reagent on the impactor plates and the end filter is continuously refreshed, due to the DBA release from the impregnated denuder plates. This secures efficient derivatization of all isocyanate particles. The airflow through the sampler was 5 l min(-1). After sampling, the samples containing the different size fractions were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. The DBA impregnation was stable in the sampler for at least 1 week. After sampling, the DBA derivatives were stable for at least 3 weeks. Air sampling was performed in a test chamber (300 l). Isocyanate aerosols studied were thermal degradation products of different polyurethane polymers, spraying of isocyanate coating compounds and pure gas-phase isocyanates. Sampling with impinger flasks, containing DBA in toluene, with a glass fiber filter in series was used as a reference method. The DI sampler showed good compliance with the reference method, regarding total air levels. For the different aerosols studied, vast differences were revealed in the distribution of isocyanate in gas and

  14. Concentrations of nano and related ambient air pollutants at a traffic sampling site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Wen, Chih-Chung; Lin, Chi-Kwong; Huang, Shih-Han; Rau, Jui-Yeh; Lin, Chung-Po

    2005-11-01

    A micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) and a nano-MOUDI were used to measure the atmospheric coarse (PM2.5 -10), fine (PM2.5), ultrafine (PM0.056-1) and nano (ion (SO4(2-), NO3(-), NH4(+)) in particles of various sizes (nano, ultrafine, fine and coarse) were measured. Ambient air particulates generally exhibited a bimodal size distribution in the range 0.056-10 microm. The results show that the concentrations followed the order, Fe>Mg>Cr>Zn>Pb> Cu in PM10, fine, ultrafine and nano-sized particles. Moreover, the data showed that the average metallic elements Fe and Zn have similar concentration distributions: the concentration decreased as the particle size fell in the nano size range.

  15. Characterisation and airborne deployment of a new counterflow virtual impactor inlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Shingler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A new counterflow virtual impactor (CVI inlet is introduced with details of its design, laboratory characterisation tests and deployment on an aircraft during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE. The CVI inlet addresses three key issues in previous designs; in particular, the inlet operates with: (i negligible organic contamination; (ii a significant sample flow rate to downstream instruments (∼15 l min−1 that reduces the need for dilution; and (iii a high level of accessibility to the probe interior for cleaning. Wind tunnel experiments characterised the cut size of sampled droplets and the particle size-dependent transmission efficiency in various parts of the probe. For a range of counter-flow rates and air velocities, the measured cut size was between 8.7–13.1 μm. The mean percentage error between cut size measurements and predictions from aerodynamic drag theory is 1.7%. The CVI was deployed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS Twin Otter for thirty flights during E-PEACE to study aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions off the central coast of California in July and August 2011. Results are reported to assess the performance of the inlet including comparisons of particle number concentration downstream of the CVI and cloud drop number concentration measured by two independent aircraft probes. Measurements downstream of the CVI are also examined from one representative case flight coordinated with shipboard-emitted smoke that was intercepted in cloud by the Twin Otter.

  16. Characterization and airborne deployment of a new counterflow virtual impactor inlet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Shingler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new counterflow virtual impactor (CVI inlet is introduced with details of its design, laboratory characterization tests, and deployment on an aircraft during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE. The CVI inlet addresses three key issues in previous designs; in particular, the inlet operates with: (i negligible organic contamination; (ii a significant sample flow rate to downstream instruments (~15 l min−1 that reduces the need for dilution; and (iii a high level of accessibility to the probe interior for cleaning. Wind tunnel experiments characterized the cut size of sampled droplets and the particle size-dependent transmission efficiency in various parts of the probe. For a range of counter-flow rates and air velocities, the measured cut size was between 8.7–13.1 μm. The percentage error between cut size measurements and predictions from aerodynamic drag theory are less than 13%. The CVI was deployed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS Twin Otter for thirty flights during E-PEACE to study aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions off the central coast of California between July and August 2011. Results are reported to assess the performance of the inlet including comparisons of particle number concentration downstream of the CVI and cloud drop number concentration measured by two independent aircraft probes. Measurements downstream the CVI are also examined from one representative case flight coordinated with shipboard-emitted smoke that was intercepted in cloud by the Twin Otter.

  17. Dynamical sequestration of the Moon-forming impactor in co-orbital resonance with Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.; Hartmann, William K.

    2016-09-01

    Recent concerns about the giant impact hypothesis for the origin of the Moon, and an associated "isotope crisis" may be assuaged if the impactor was a local object that formed near Earth. We investigated a scenario that may meet this criterion, with protoplanets assumed to originate in 1:1 co-orbital resonance with Earth. Using N-body numerical simulations we explored the dynamical consequences of placing Mars-mass companions in various co-orbital configurations with a proto-Earth of 0.9 Earth-masses (M⊕). We modeled 162 different configurations, some with just the four terrestrial planets and others that included the four giant planets. In both the 4- and 8-planet models we found that a single Mars-mass companion typically remained a stable co-orbital of Earth for the entire 250 million year (Myr) duration of our simulations (59 of 68 unique simulations). In an effort to destabilize such a system we carried out an additional 94 simulations that included a second Mars-mass co-orbital companion. Even with two Mars-mass companions sharing Earth's orbit about two-thirds of these models (66) also remained stable for the entire 250 Myr duration of the simulations. Of the 28 2-companion models that eventually became unstable 24 impacts were observed between Earth and an escaping co-orbital companion. The average delay we observed for an impact of a Mars-mass companion with Earth was 102 Myr, and the longest delay was 221 Myr. In 40% of the 8-planet models that became unstable (10 out of 25) Earth collided with the nearly equal mass Venus to form a super-Earth (loosely defined here as mass ≥1.7 M⊕). These impacts were typically the final giant impact in the system and often occurred after Earth and/or Venus has accreted one or more of the other large objects. Several of the stable configurations involved unusual 3-planet hierarchical co-orbital systems.

  18. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves motor recovery in the rat impactor model for spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanjew Dittgen

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF improves outcome after experimental SCI by counteracting apoptosis, and enhancing connectivity in the injured spinal cord. Previously we have employed the mouse hemisection SCI model and studied motor function after subcutaneous or transgenic delivery of the protein. To further broaden confidence in animal efficacy data we sought to determine efficacy in a different model and a different species. Here we investigated the effects of G-CSF in Wistar rats using the New York University Impactor. In this model, corroborating our previous data, rats treated subcutaneously with G-CSF over 2 weeks show significant improvement of motor function.

  19. Micrometeoroid Impacts on the Hubble Sace Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2: Ion Beam Analysis of Subtle Impactor Traces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, G. W.; Webb, R. P.; Jeynes, C.; Palitsin, V. V.; Colaux, J. L.; Kearsley, A. T.; Ross, D. K.; Anz-Meador, P.; Liou, J. C.; Opiela, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of origin for particles responsible for impact damage on spacecraft such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) relies upon postflight analysis of returned materials. A unique opportunity arose in 2009 with collection of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) from HST by shuttle mission STS-125. A preliminary optical survey confirmed that there were hundreds of impact features on the radiator surface. Following extensive discussion between NASA, ESA, NHM and IBC, a collaborative research program was initiated, employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ion beam analysis (IBA) to determine the nature of the impacting grains. Even though some WFPC2 impact features are large, and easily seen without the use of a microscope, impactor remnants may be hard to find.

  20. Research on Impact Stress and Fatigue Simulation of a New Down-to-the-Hole Impactor Based on ANSYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Wang, Wei; Yao, Aiguo; Li, Yongbo; He, Wangyong; Fei, Dongdong

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, a down-to-the-hole electric hammer driven by linear motor is reported for drilling engineering. It differs from the common hydraulic or pneumatic hammers in that it can be applied to some special occasions without circulating medium due to its independence of the drilling fluid. The impact stress caused by the reciprocating motion between stator and rotor and the fatigue damage in key components of linear motor are analyzed by the ANSYS Workbench software and 3D model. Based on simulation results, the hammer's structure is optimized by using special sliding bearing, increasing the wall thickness of key and multilayer buffer gasket. Fatigue life and coefficient issues of the new structure are dramatically improved. However buffer gasket reduces the impactor's energy, different bumper structure effect on life improving and energy loss have also been elaborated.

  1. A versatile sensor performance evaluation platform with an impactor-inspired sample chamber and virtual pin grid array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christopher R.; Tamanaha, Cy R.; Woytowitz, Morgan; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2014-06-01

    We present the details necessary for building a scalable, flexible, and universal sensor performance evaluation platform with an impactor-inspired sample chamber and a virtual pin grid array for maintaining electrical connections. The system is designed to accommodate a wide range of sensors varying in physical dimensions, electrical connections, and transduction mechanisms. By integrating a switch matrix system with a commercial chip carrier, we have built a platform for rapidly screening sensors for promise in military, homeland security, and commercial applications without requiring custom circuits or packages for each sensor technology. Intuitive, graphical software is written and provided to control and monitor temperature, flow rate, and electrical connections. The system is capable of operating and interfacing with a variety of vapor delivery systems for chemical vapor detection measurements of emerging sensor technologies.

  2. New Constraints on the Asteroid 298 Baptistina, the Alleged Family Member of the K/T Impactor

    CERN Document Server

    Majaess, Daniel J; Molnar, Larry A; Haegert, Melissa J; Lane, David J; Turner, David G; Nielsen, Inga

    2008-01-01

    In their study Bottke et al. (2007) suggest that a member of the Baptistina asteroid family was the probable source of the K/T impactor which ended the reign of the Dinosaurs 65 Myr ago. Knowledge of the physical and material properties pertaining to the Baptistina asteroid family are, however, not well constrained. In an effort to begin addressing the situation, data from an international collaboration of observatories were synthesized to determine the rotational period of the family's largest member, asteroid 298 Baptistina (P_r = 16.23+-0.02 hrs). Discussed here are aspects of the terrestrial impact delivery system, implications arising from the new constraints, and prospects for future work.

  3. The abbreviated impactor measurement (AIM) concept: part 1--Influence of particle bounce and re-entrainment-evaluation with a "dry" pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI)-based formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J P; Nagel, M W; Avvakoumova, V; MacKay, H; Ali, R

    2009-01-01

    The abbreviated impactor measurement concept is a potential improvement to the labor-intensive full-resolution cascade impactor methodology for inhaler aerosol aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) measurement by virtue of being simpler and therefore quicker to execute. At the same time, improved measurement precision should be possible by eliminating stages upon which little or no drug mass is collected. Although several designs of abbreviated impactor systems have been developed in recent years, experimental work is lacking to validate the technique with aerosols produced by currently available inhalers. In part 1 of this two-part article that focuses on aerosols produced by pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs), the evaluation of two abbreviated impactor systems (Copley fast screening Andersen impactor and Trudell fast screening Andersen impactor), based on the full-resolution eight-stage Andersen nonviable cascade impactor (ACI) operating principle, is reported with a formulation producing dry particles. The purpose was to investigate the potential for non-ideal collection behavior associated with particle bounce in relation to internal losses to surfaces from which particles containing active pharmaceutical ingredient are not normally recovered. Both abbreviated impactors were found to be substantially equivalent to the full-resolution ACI in terms of extra-fine and fine particle and coarse mass fractions used as metrics to characterize the APSD of these pMDI-produced aerosols when sampled at 28.3 L/min, provided that precautions are taken to coat collection plates to minimize bounce and entrainment.

  4. Respiratory Allergy and Inflammation Due to Ambient Particles (RAIAP) Collection of Particulate Matter samples from 5 European sites with High Volume Cascade Impactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee FR; Fokkens PHB; Leseman DLAC; Bloemen HJTh; Boere AJF; MGO

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this deliverable was to perform an European-wide collection of particulate samples. With the aid of two high-volume Cascade impactor (HVCI), coarse (2.5-10 mu m ) and fine (0.1-2.5 mu m) particulate samples were collected in Amsterdam, Lodz, Oslo, Rome and the Dutch sea-side (De Zilk) dur

  5. Respiratory Allergy and Inflammation Due to Ambient Particles (RAIAP) Collection of Particulate Matter samples from 5 European sites with High Volume Cascade Impactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee FR; Fokkens PHB; Leseman DLAC; Bloemen HJTh; Boere AJF; MGO

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this deliverable was to perform an European-wide collection of particulate samples. With the aid of two high-volume Cascade impactor (HVCI), coarse (2.5-10 mu m ) and fine (0.1-2.5 mu m) particulate samples were collected in Amsterdam, Lodz, Oslo, Rome and the Dutch sea-side (De Zilk)

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics and respiratory deposition of fungal fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Sung-Chul; Schmechel, Detlef; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Reponen, Tiina

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of fungal fragments and to estimate their respiratory deposition. Fragments and spores of three different fungal species ( Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Stachybotrys chartarum) were aerosolized by the fungal spore source strength tester (FSSST). An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) measured the size distribution in real-time and collected the aerosolized fungal particles simultaneously onto 12 impactor stages in the size range of 0.3-10 μm utilizing water-soluble ZEF-X10 coating of the impaction stages to prevent spore bounce. For S. chartarum, the average concentration of released fungal fragments was 380 particles cm -3, which was about 514 times higher than that of spores. A. versicolor was found to release comparable amount of spores and fragments. Microscopic analysis confirmed that S. chartarum and A. versicolor did not show any significant spore bounce, whereas the size distribution of P. melinii fragments was masked by spore bounce. Respiratory deposition was calculated using a computer-based model, LUDEP 2.07, for an adult male and a 3-month-old infant utilizing the database on the concentration and size distribution of S. chartarum and A. versicolor aerosols measured by the ELPI. Total deposition fractions for fragments and spores were 27-46% and 84-95%, respectively, showing slightly higher values in an infant than in an adult. For S. chartarum, fragments demonstrated 230-250 fold higher respiratory deposition than spores, while the number of deposited fragments and spores of A. versicolor were comparable. It was revealed that the deposition ratio (the number of deposited fragments divided by that of deposited spores) in the lower airways for an infant was 4-5 times higher than that for an adult. As fungal fragments have been shown to contain mycotoxins and antigens, further exposure assessment should include the measurement of fungal fragments for

  7. Development and characterization of an ice-selecting pumped counterflow virtual impactor (IS-PCVI) to study ice crystal residuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Mohler, Ottmar; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Schnaiter, Martin; Vogt, Steffen; Vochezer, Paul; Jarvinen, Emma; Wagner, Robert; Bell, David M.; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Zelenyuk-Imre, Alla; Cziczo, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Separation of particles that play a role in cloud activation and ice nucleation from interstitial aerosols has become necessary to further understand aerosol-cloud interactions. The pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), which uses a vacuum pump to accelerate the particles and increase their momentum, provides an accessible option for dynamic and inertial separation of cloud elements. However, the use of a traditional PCVI to extract large cloud hydrometeors is difficult mainly due to its small cut-size diameters (< 5 µm). Here, for the first time we describe a development of an ice-selecting PCVI (IS-PCVI) to separate ice in controlled mixed-phase cloud system based on the particle inertia with the cut-off diameter ≥ 10 µm. We also present its laboratory application demonstrating the use of the impactor under a wide range of temperature and humidity conditions. The computational fluid dynamics simulations were initially carried out to guide the design of the IS-PCVI. After fabrication, a series of validation laboratory experiments were performed coupled with the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion cloud simulation chamber. In the AIDA chamber, test aerosol particles were exposed to the ice supersaturation conditions (i.e., RHice > 100 %), where a mixture of droplets and ice crystals was formed during the expansion experiment. In parallel, the flow conditions of the IS-PCVI were actively controlled, such that it separated ice crystals from a mixture of ice crystals and cloud droplets, which were of diameter ≥ 10 µm. These large ice crystals were passed through the heated evaporation section to remove the water content. Afterwards, the residuals were characterized with a suite of online and offline instruments downstream of the IS-PCVI. These results were used to assess the optimized operating parameters of the device in terms of (1) the critical cut-size diameter, (2) the transmission efficiency and (3)

  8. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070291 Gong Ping (Northern Fujian Geological Party, Shaozou 354000) Discussion on Geological Characteristics and Control Factors of the Shimen Au-polymetallic Deposit in Zhenghe County, Fujian Province (Geology of Fujian, ISSN1001-3970, CN38-1080/P, 25(1), 2006, p.18-24, 2 illus., 2 tables, 1 ref.) Key words: gold deposits, polymetallic deposits, Fujian Province

  9. High volume air sampler for environmental nanoparticles using a sharp-cut inertial filter combined with an impactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Zhao, Tianren; Takahashi, Hideaki; Hata, Mitsuhiko; Toriba, Akira; Ikeda, Takuji; Otani, Yoshio; Furuuchi, Masami

    2017-02-01

    A multi-nozzle layered mesh inertial filter, developed by the authors based on inertial filter technology for separating ultrafine particles (UFPs) at a moderate pressure drop, was investigated in an attempt to improve the steepness of the separation efficiency curve by combining an inertial filter and an impactor. In this system, the separation curves overlap each other, while maintaining about a 100 nm difference in cutoff size d p50. Such a combination, which we refer to as a ‘hybrid inertial filter’, was validated for a single nozzle geometry. Using a multi nozzle geometry, it was scaled up to a high volume air sampling flow rate of 400 l min-1 at a pressure drop of  filter using multi-nozzle geometry was confirmed. The features of the hybrid inertial filter included the suppression of the bouncing of particles with sizes  >300 nm, a steeper collection efficiency curve and less pressure drop than those of a previous type of inertial filter. The ambient PM0.13 evaluated for the present unit was found to be in good agreement with values obtained for 2 different types of cascade air samplers.

  10. Development and characterization of an ice-selecting pumped counterflow virtual impactor (IS-PCVI) to study ice crystal residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Möhler, Ottmar; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Schnaiter, Martin; Vogt, Steffen; Vochezer, Paul; Järvinen, Emma; Wagner, Robert; Bell, David M.; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zelenyuk, Alla; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    Separation of particles that play a role in cloud activation and ice nucleation from interstitial aerosols has become necessary to further understand aerosol-cloud interactions. The pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), which uses a vacuum pump to accelerate the particles and increase their momentum, provides an accessible option for dynamic and inertial separation of cloud elements. However, the use of a traditional PCVI to extract large cloud hydrometeors is difficult mainly due to its small cut-size diameters (dynamics simulations were initially carried out to guide the design of the IS-PCVI. After fabrication, a series of validation laboratory experiments were performed coupled with the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion cloud simulation chamber. In the AIDA chamber, test aerosol particles were exposed to the ice supersaturation conditions (i.e., RHice > 100 %), where a mixture of droplets and ice crystals was formed during the expansion experiment. In parallel, the flow conditions of the IS-PCVI were actively controlled, such that it separated ice crystals from a mixture of ice crystals and cloud droplets, which were of diameter ≥ 10 µm. These large ice crystals were passed through the heated evaporation section to remove the water content. Afterwards, the residuals were characterized with a suite of online and offline instruments downstream of the IS-PCVI. These results were used to assess the optimized operating parameters of the device in terms of (1) the critical cut-size diameter, (2) the transmission efficiency and (3) the counterflow-to-input flow ratio. Particle losses were characterized by comparing the residual number concentration to the rejected interstitial particle number concentration. Overall results suggest that the IS-PCVI enables inertial separation of particles with a volume-equivalent particle size in the range of ~ 10-30 µm in diameter with small inadvertent intrusion (~  5 %) of unwanted

  11. Aerosol size distributions measured in urban, rural and high-alpine air with an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, A.; Zerrath, A.; McKeon, U.; Fehrenbach, T.; Niessner, R.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Kaminski, U.; Berresheim, H.; Pöschl, U.

    An electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) was used to study atmospheric aerosol particle number, surface, and mass concentrations and size distributions over a diameter range of 7 nm-10 μm at urban, rural and high-alpine locations along an alpine altitude transect across Southern Germany. The measurements were performed in the city of Munich and at the global atmosphere watch (GAW) stations Hohenpeißenberg and Zugspitze in the years 2001-2004. To minimize particle bounce effects and enable chemical analysis of the collected particles without disturbance by grease on the impaction substrates, the sample flow was conditioned to about 75% relative humidity. The performance of the ELPI instrument was evaluated by comparison with well-established aerosol measurement techniques including condensation particle counters, scanning and differential mobility particle sizers, filter sampling, and gravimetric determination of particulate mass. In general, particle number concentrations, size distributions, and PM2.5 concentrations determined with the ELPI were in good agreement with alternative techniques (rank correlation coefficients ρ = 0.70-0.95). The ELPI filter stage data for the particle diameter range of 7-30 nm, however, appeared to be strongly biased towards high values. Long-term measurements at the rural site (Hohenpeißenberg) revealed distinct seasonal patterns with the highest number concentrations in summer (median daily average: 3100 cm -3) and the highest mass concentrations in spring and fall (median daily average PM2.5 and PM10: 21-25 and 27-35 μg m -3, respectively). In spring and fall we also observed pronounced maxima of particle surface and mass concentration in the coarse mode (peak at ˜3 μm), which are most likely due to primary biological material. Relatively clean air (PM10 urban air from Munich (NE) clearly contributed to elevated particle mass loadings (PM10 > = 10 μg m -3).

  12. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>20102406 Chen Gang(China University of Geosciences,Beijing 100083,China);Li Fengming Discussion on Geological Characteristics and Genesis of Yuquanshan Graphite Deposit of Xinjiang(Xinjiang Geology,ISSN1000-8845,CN65-1092/P,27(4),2009,p.325-329,4 illus.,4 tables,5 refs.)Key words:graphite deposit,XinjiangYuquanshan graphite deposit of Xinjiang occurs in mica-quartz schist of Xingeer Information which belongs to Xinditate Group of Lower Pt in Kuluketage Block of Tarim paleo-continent,and experiences two mineralizing periods of

  13. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140876 Gao Junbo(College of Resources and Environmental Engineering,Guizhou University,Guiyang 550025,China);Yang Ruidong Study on the Strontium Isotopic Composition of Large Devonian Barite Deposits from Zhenning,Guizhou Province(Geochimica,

  14. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>20122457 Cai Jianshe ( Fujian Institute of Geological Survey and Drawing,Fuzhou 350011,China ) On the Geologic Characteristics and Genesis of the Longtangsi Fluorite Deposit in Pucheng County,Fujian Province ( Geology of Fujian,ISSN1001-3970,CN35-1080 / P,30 ( 4 ), 2011,p.301-306,3illus.,1table,6 refs.,with English abstract ) Key words:fluorspar deposit,Fujian Province

  15. Analysis of cloud condensation nuclei composition and growth kinetics using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor and aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Slowik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method of determining the size and composition of CCN-active aerosol particles. Method utility is illustrated through a series of ambient measurements. A continuous-flow thermal-gradient diffusion chamber (TGDC, pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI, and Aerodyne time-of-flight mass spectrometer (AMS are operated in series. Ambient particles are sampled into the TGDC, where a constant supersaturation is maintained, and CCN-active particles grow to ~2.5 ± 0.5 μm. The output flow from the TGDC is directed into the PCVI, where a counterflow of dry N2 gas opposes the particle-laden flow, creating a region of zero axial velocity. This stagnation plane can only be traversed by particles with sufficient momentum, which depends on their size. Particles that have activated in the TGDC cross the stagnation plane and are entrained in the PCVI output flow, while the unactivated particles are diverted to a pump. Because the input gas is replaced by the counterflow gas with better than 99 % efficiency at the stagnation plane, the output flow consists almost entirely of dry N2 and water evaporates from the activated particles. In this way, the system yields an ensemble of CCN-active particles whose chemical composition and size are analyzed using the AMS. Measurements of urban aerosol in downtown Toronto identified an external mixture of CCN-active particles consisting almost entirely of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, with CCN-inactive particles of the same size consisting of a mixture of ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, and organics. We also discuss results from the first field deployment of the TGDC-PCVI-AMS system, conducted from mid-May to mid-June 2007 in Egbert, Ontario, a semirural site ~80 km north of Toronto influenced both by clean air masses from the north and emissions from the city. Organic-dominated particles sampled during a major biogenic event exhibited higher CCN activity and/or faster

  16. Analysis of cloud condensation nuclei composition and growth kinetics using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor and aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Slowik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method of determining the size and composition of CCN-active aerosol particles. Method utility is illustrated through a series of ambient measurements. A continuous-flow thermal-gradient diffusion chamber (TGDC, pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI, and Aerodyne time-of-flight mass spectrometer (AMS are operated in series. Ambient particles are sampled into the TGDC, where a constant supersaturation is maintained, and CCN-active particles grow to ~2.5±0.5 μm. The output flow from the TGDC is directed into the PCVI, where a counterflow of dry N2 gas opposes the particle-laden flow, creating a region of zero velocity. This stagnation plane can only be traversed by particles with sufficient momentum, which depends on their size. Particles that have activated in the TGDC cross the stagnation plane and are entrained in the PCVI output flow, while the unactivated particles are diverted to a pump. Because the input gas is replaced by the counterflow gas with better than 99% efficiency at the stagnation plane, the output flow consists almost entirely of dry N2 and water evaporates from the activated particles. In this way, the system yields an ensemble of CCN-active particles whose chemical composition and size are analyzed using the AMS. Measurements of urban aerosol in downtown Toronto identified an external mixture of CCN-active particles consisting almost entirely of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, with CCN-inactive particles of the same size consisting of a mixture of ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, and organics. We also discuss results from the first field deployment of the TGDC-PCVI-AMS system, conducted from mid-May to mid-June 2007 in Egbert, Ontario, a semirural site ~80 km north of Toronto influenced both by clean air masses from the north and emissions from the city. Organic-dominated particles sampled during a major biogenic event exhibited higher CCN activity and/or faster growth

  17. Evidence from Polymict Ureilite Meteorites for a Single "Rubble-Pile" Ureilite Parent Asteroid Gardened by Several Distinct Impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Hilary; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Kita, Noriko T.; Valley, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Ureilites are ultramafic achondrite meteorites that have experienced igneous processing whilst retaining heterogeneity in mg# and oxygen isotope ratios. Polymict ureilites represent material derived from the surface of the ureilite parent asteroid(s). Electron microprobe analysis of more than 500 olivine and pyroxene clasts in six polymict ureilites reveals that they cover a statistically identical range of compositions to that shown by all known monomict ureilites. This is considered to be convincing evidence for derivation from a single parent asteroid. Many of the polymict ureilites also contain clasts that have identical compositions to the anomalously high Mn/Mg olivines and pyroxenes from the Hughes 009 monomict ureilite (here termed the Hughes cluster ). Four of the six samples also contain distinctive ferroan lithic clasts that have been derived from oxidized impactors. The presence of several common distinctive lithologies within the polymict ureilites is additional evidence that the ureilites were derived from a single parent asteroid. Olivine in a large lithic clast of augite-bearing ureilitic has an mg# of 97, extending the compositional range of known ureilite material. Our study confirms that ureilitic olivine clasts with mg#s 85, which also show more variable Mn contents, including the melt-inclusion bearing "Hughes cluster" ureilites. We interpret this to indicate that the parent ureilite asteroid was disrupted by a major impact at a time when melt was still present in regions with a bulk mg# > 85, giving rise to the two types of ureilites: common ferroan ones that were already residual after melting and less common magnesian ones that were still partially molten when disruption occurred, some of which are the result of interaction of melts with residual mantle during disruption. A single daughter asteroid re-accreted from the disrupted remnants of the mantle of the proto-ureilite asteroid, giving rise to a "rubble-pile" body that had material of a

  18. Design and testing of a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of acute traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petteys, Rory J; Spitz, Steven M; Syed, Hasan; Rice, R Andrew; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Goodwin, C Rory; Sciubba, Daniel M; Freedman, Brett A

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes debilitating neurological dysfunction and has been observed in warfighters injured in IED blasts. Clinical benefit of SCI treatment remains elusive and better large animal models are needed to assess treatment options. Here, we describe a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of SCI. A custom spinal cord impactor and platform were fabricated for large animals (e.g., pig, sheep, dog, etc.). Impacts were generated by a voice coil actuator; force and displacement were measured with a load cell and potentiometer respectively. Labview (National Instruments, Austin, TX) software was used to control the impact cycle and import force and displacement data. Software finite impulse response (FIR) filtering was employed for all input data. Silicon tubing was used a surrogate for spinal cord in order to test the device; repeated impacts were performed at 15, 25, and 40 Newtons. Repeated impacts demonstrated predictable results at each target force. The average duration of impact was 71.2 ±6.1ms. At a target force of 40N, the output force was 41.5 ±0.7N. With a target of 25N, the output force was 23.5 ±0.6N; a target of 15Newtons revealed an output force of 15.2 ±1.4N. The calculated acceleration range was 12.5-21.2m/s(2). This custom spinal cord impactor reliably delivers precise impacts to the spinal cord and will be utilized in future research to study acute traumatic SCI in a large animal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. An Ordinary Chondrite Impactor Composition for the Bosumtwi Impact Structure, Ghana, West Africa: Discussion of Siderophile Element Contents and Os and Cr Isotope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian; Shukolyukov, Alex; Lugmair, Guenter

    2004-01-01

    Osmium isotope data had shown that Ivory Coast tektites contain an extraterrestrial component, but do not allow distinction between chondritic and iron meteorite contamination. PGE abundances of Ivory Coast tektites and impactites and target rocks from the Bosumtwi crater, the source crater of the Ivory Coast tektites, were all relatively high and did not allow to resolve the presence, or identify the nature, of the meteoritic component. However, Cr isotope analyses of an Ivory Coast tektite yielded a distinct 53Cr excess of 0.30+/-0.06, which indicates that the Bosumtwi impactor was an ordinary chondrite.

  20. Multi-elemental analysis of atmospheric pollutants and determination of particle size using the PIXE method, a cascade impactor and a filter unit constructed in Mexico; Analisis multielemental de contaminantes atmosfericos y determinacion de tamano de particula utilizando el metodo PIXE, un impactor de cascada y una unidad de filtro construidos en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldape U, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1989-01-15

    This work presents: 1) The methodology and the experimental conditions of the PIXE technique so that it is used as a better option inside the analytical methods in aerosols studies, 2) The development, tests and applications of a cascade impactor of the Batelle type built to determine particle size to use it jointly with the mentioned technique in the determination of the elements concentration according to its size.By this way is fulfilled with the first goal of this extensive project. (Author)

  1. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110947 Chen Xinglong(Guizhou Bureau of Nonferrous Metal and Nuclear Geology,Guiyang 550005,China);Gong Heqiang Endowment Factors and Development & Utilization Strategy of Bauxite Resource in North Guizhou Province(Guizhou Geology,ISSN1000-5943,CN52-1059/P,27(2),2010,p.106-110,6 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:bauxite deposit,Guizhou Province20110948 Dang Yanxia(Mineral Resource & Reservoir Evaluation Center,Urumiq 830000,China);Fan Wenjun Geological Features and a Primary Study of Metallogenesis of the Wucaiwang Zeolite Deposit,Fuyun County(Xinjiang Geology,ISSN1000-8845,CN65-1092/P,28(2),2010,p.167-170,2 illus.,1 table,5 refs.)Key words:zeolite deposit,Xinjiang Nearly all zeolite deposits in the world result from low-temperature-alteration of glass-bearing volcanic rocks.The southern slope of the Kalamali Mountain is one of the regions where medium to acid volcanics are major lithological type,thus it is a preferred area to look for zeolite deposit.The Wucaiwang zeolite ore district consists of mainly acid volcanic-clastic rocks.

  2. Atmospheric Deposition of Phosphorus to the Everglades: Concepts, Constraints, and Published Deposition Rates for Ecosystem Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth W. Redfield

    2002-01-01

    with these standard collectors in a region will not reduce the large uncertainty in rates derived from existing data. Calibrated surface accumulation methods hold promise as a primary means to estimate P flux in future monitoring. New methods for long-term P deposition monitoring will require an intercomparison of P flux estimates from surrogate surfaces, impactor sampling of particle concentrations combined with deposition models, and “throughfall” estimates for natural canopies. With better sampling methods and more long-term monitoring data, the importance of atmospheric P deposition in ecosystem dynamics and management can be better understood and predicted.

  3. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091594 Bao Yafan(The Third Geologic Survey of Jilin Province,Siping 136000,China);Liu Yanjun Relations between Bashenerxi Granite,West Dongkunlun and Baiganhu Tungsten-Tin Deposit(Jilin Geology,ISSN1001-2427,CN22-1099/P,27(3),2008,p.56-59,67,5 illus.,2 tables,7 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:tungsten ores,tin ores,monzogranite,Kunlun Mountains20091595 Chen Fuwen(Yichang Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources,China Geological Survey,Yichang 443003,China);Dai Pingyun Metallogenetic and Isotopic Chronological Study on the Shenjiaya Gold Deposit in Xuefeng Mountains,Hunan Province(Acta Geologica Sinica,ISSN0001-5717,CN11-1951/P,82(7),2008,p.906-911,3 illus.,2 tables,30 refs.)Key words:gold ores,HunanThe Shenjiaya gold deposit is a representative one

  4. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111705 An Junbo(Team 603,Bureau of Nonferrous Metals Geological Exploration of Jilin Province,Hunchun 133300,China);Xu Renjie Geological Features and Ore Genesis of Baishilazi Scheelite Deposit in Yanbian Area(Jilin Geology,ISSN1001-2427,CN22-1099/P,29(3),2010,p.39-43,2 illus.,2 tables,7 refs.)Key words:tungsten ores,Jilin ProvinceThe Baishilazi scheelite deposit is located in contacting zone between the marble of the Late Palaeozoic Qinglongcun Group and the Hercynian biotite granite.The vein and lenticular major ore body is obviously controlled by NE-extending faults and con

  5. Analysis of ejecta fate from proposed man-made impactors into near-Earth objects --- a NEOShield study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, S.; Michel, P.; Jutzi, M.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids measuring 100 meters across tend to impact the Earth once every 5,000 years on average [1]. Smaller bodies enter into the Earth's atmosphere more frequently, but may detonate before reaching the surface. Conversely, impacts from larger bodies are more rare [2], but can come with devastating global consequences to living species. In 2005, a United States Congressional mandate called for NASA to detect, by 2020, 90 percent of near-Earth objects (NEOs) having diameters of 140 meters or greater [3]. One year prior, ESA's Near-Earth Object Mission Advisory Panel (NEOMAP) recommended the study of a kinetic impactor mission as a priority in the framework of NEO risk assessment [4]. A ''Phase-A'' study of such a mission, Don Quixote, took place at ESA until 2007. In accordance with NEOMAP and with the Target NEO Global Community's recommendations in 2011 [5], the NEOShield Project is being funded for 3.5 years by the European Commission in its FP7 program. NEOShield began in 2012 and is primarily, but not exclusively, a European consortium of research institutions and engineering industries that aims to analyze promising mitigation options and provide solutions to the critical scientific and technical obstacles involved in confronting threats posed by the small bodies in the neighborhood of the Earth's orbit [6]. To further explore the NEO threat mitigation via the strategy of kinetic impact, building upon the Don Quixote study, the idea is to target a specific NEO for impact and attempt to quantify the response. How long do ejecta remain aloft and where do they end up? Fragments that are ejected at high speeds escape, but what about material moving at or near the escape speed of the NEO or that suffer energy-dissipating collisions after being ejected? Where would be a ''safe'' location for an observing spacecraft during and subsequent to the impact? Here, we outline the early phases of an ongoing numerical investigation of the fate of the material ejected from a

  6. Potential trajectory design for a lunar CubeSat impactor deployed from a HEPO using only a small separation delta-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Joo; Lee, Donghun; Jin, Ho; Kim, Bang-Yeop

    2017-01-01

    Potential impact trajectories for a lunar CubeSat impactor mission are designed and analyzed under the condition that only a small delta-V from the mechanical separation mechanism from the mother-ship is available. The orbit of the mother-ship from which the CubeSat is deployed is assumed to be a Highly Elliptical Polar Orbit (HEPO) around the Moon, and candidate peri- and aposelene altitudes are investigated. The resultant trajectory parameters for the CubeSat impactor are also analyzed. The impact footprint dispersion characteristics are roughly estimated considering the uncertainties that may arise at the moment of CubeSat deployment. As a result, a set of HEPO shapes that can successfully impact the lunar surface using a deployment delta-V of only 2 m/s is discovered. The delta-V required to separate the CubeSat, which is up to tens of m/s, can be greatly reduced depending on the geometry between the Earth and the orientation of the HEPO of the mother-ship at the moment of deployment. The dispersion characteristics of the impact footprint are more sensitive to the uncertainties in the velocity than in the position at the time of separation. From the point of view of the current proposed trajectory design, an uncertainty of less than several tens of cm/s in the velocity should be guaranteed for successful impact within a radius of several tens of kilometers of the target.

  7. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090243 Chen Zhibin (Hebei Institute of Geological Survey, Shijiazhuang 050081, China) Ore-Controlling Factors of the Beichagoumen Ag-Polymetallic Deposits in Northern Hebei Province (Geological Survey and Research, ISSN1672-4135, CN12-1353/P, 31(1), 2008, p.1-5, 3 illus., 10 refs.)

  8. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131565 Cai Lianyou(No.332 Geological Team,Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources Exploration of Anhui Province,Huangshan 245000,China);Weng Wangfei Geological Characteristics and Genesis Analysis of Guocun Navajoite Deposit in South Anhui Province(Mineral Resources and Geology,

  9. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>20102341 Bao Peisheng(Institute of Geology,Chinese Academy of Geological Science,Beijing 100037,China)Further Discussion on the Genesis of the Podiform Chromite Deposits in the Ophiolites-Questioning about the Rock:Melt Interaction Metallogeny(Geological Bulletin of China,ISSN1671-2552,CN11-4648/P,28(12),2009,p.1741-1761

  10. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131601 Gao Junbo(College of Resources and Environmental Engineering,Guizhou University,Guiyang 550003,China);Yang Ruidong Hydrothermal Venting-Flowing Sedimentation Characteristics of Devonian Barite Deposits from Leji,Zhenning County,Guizhou Province(Acta Sedimentologica Sinica,ISSN1000-0550,CN62-1038/P,30(3),

  11. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>20122389 Cai Lianyou ( No.332 Geological Team,Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources Exploration of Anhui Province,Huangshan 245000,China );Weng Wangfei Geologic Characteristic and Ore-Control Factors of the Nanshan W-Mo Polymetallic Ore Deposit in South Anhui Province ( Geological Survey and Research,ISSN1672-4135,CN12-1353 / P,34 ( 4 ), 2011,p.290-298,3 illus.,1table,14refs. ) Key words:tungsten ores,molybdenum ores,ore guide of prospecting,Anhui Province

  12. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110165 Chen Jiawei(The 3rd Geological Team,Henan Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources,Xinyang 464000,China)Ore Control Conditions and Genetic Model for the Bodaoling Ag-Au Deposit in Guangshan,Henan Province(Acta Geologica Sichuan,ISSN1006-0995,CN51-1273/P,30(1),2010,p.28-30,5 illus.,1 ref.,with English abstract)Key words:gold ores,Henan Province20110166 Chen Mingquan(Geological Team 306,Yunnan Bureau of Nonferrous Geology,Kunming 650216,Ch

  13. A computational study of particle deposition patterns from a circular laminar jet

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, James Q

    2016-01-01

    Particle deposition patterns on the plate of inertial impactor with circular laminar jet are investigated numerically with a Lagrangian solver implemented within the framework of the OpenFOAM$^{\\circledR}$ CFD package. Effects of taper angle of the nozzle channel and jet-to-plate distance are evaluated. The results show that tapered nozzle tends to deposit more particles toward the circular spot edge than straight nozzle. At jet Reynolds number $Re = 1132$, a tapered nozzle deposits particles to form a pattern with a high density ring toward the deposition spot edge, especially for particle Stokes number $St > St_{50}$, which is absent with a straight nozzle. Increasing the jet-to-plate distance tends to reduce the value of particle density peak near deposition spot edge. Reducing $Re$ to $283$ (e.g., for $300$ ccm flow through a $1.5$ mm diameter jet nozzle) yields particle deposition patterns without the high density ring at the deposition spot edge when the same tapered nozzle is used. The particle deposit...

  14. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20111761 Chen Hua(115 Geological Party,Guizhou Bureau of Geology and Mineral Exploration & Development,Guiyang 551400,China);Deng Chao Analysis on the Metallogenic Environment of Maochang Bauxite in Guizhou Province(Guizhou Geology,ISSN1000-5943,CN52-1059/P,27(3),2010,p.198-201,2 illus.,1 table,8 refs.)Key words:bauxite deposit,Guizhou Province By long time physical and chemical process,the carbonate rock after Central Guizhou uplidft,becomes red clay,after further weathering,the red clay decomposed into the oxide,hydroxide of Al and Fe,in the dissolution hole and depression,it concentrates primary fragmentary tight and earthy karst bauxite ore.Because the variation of landform,it decomposes and cracks again,affords the material source

  15. Indoor deposition and the protective effect of houses against airborne pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, C.

    1995-05-01

    The protective value of a house during a release of toxic materials has been investigated to the atmosphere. A review of the relevant literature revealed wide agreement on dose reduction factors from 0.5 to 0.2. According to the literature indoor deposition rather than filtration by the building envelope was the main cause of the reduction, but very little information on indoor deposition exists. The main topic for this work has been the measurement of indoor deposition using monodisperse particles in the size range 0.5 to 5.5 {mu}m, labelled with neutron activable tracers. The decay of aerosol concentration was measured and average deposition velocities were recorded in four houses. The results were consistent with increasing deposition velocities for increasing particle size and increasing degree of furnishing. Neutron activable particles have been used for measurements of skin deposition velocities to a human volunteer. The deposition velocity was found to be 7.4{+-}1.1 x 10{sup -4} ms{sup -+} for the 0.5 {mu}m particles and 57{sup +}-{sup 1}4 x 10{sup -4} ms{sup -1} for the 2.5 {sup m}u{sup m} particles values of skin deposition velocities imply that the amount of pollutants deposited to the skin of a dressed person is more than an order of magnitude larger than the amount deposited in the lungs, and that skin deposition is an important pathway for toxics that can penetrate through the skin. Beryllium-7 was used as a tracer in a series of experiments. The activity distribution of this isotope was determined using a Berne low pressure impactor. Median diameters ranged from 0.7 to 1.1 {mu}m and it was found that the activity distribution followed the mass distribution of the accumulation mode for atmospheric particles. I/O measurements have been made with two impactors. The results showed that the reduction in indoor air concentration was largest for supra micron particles. (au) 26 tabs., 46 ills., 87 refs.

  16. Separation and sampling of ice nucleation chamber generated ice particles by means of the counterflow virtual impactor technique for the characterization of ambient ice nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Ludwig; Mertes, Stephan; Kästner, Udo; Schmidt, Susan; Schneider, Johannes; Frank, Fabian; Nillius, Björn; Worringen, Annette; Kandler, Konrad; Ebert, Martin; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    In 2011, the German research foundation (DFG) research group called Ice Nuclei Research Unit (INUIT (FOR 1525, project STR 453/7-1) was established with the objective to achieve a better understanding concerning heterogeneous ice formation. The presented work is part of INUIT and aims for a better microphysical and chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosol particles that have the potential to act as ice nuclei (IN). For this purpose a counterflow virtual impactor (Kulkarni et al., 2011) system (IN-PCVI) was developed and characterized in order to separate and collect ice particles generated in the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH; Bundke et al., 2008) and to release their IN for further analysis. Here the IN-PCVI was used for the inertial separation of the IN counter produced ice particles from smaller drops and interstitial particles. This is realized by a counterflow that matches the FINCH output flow inside the IN-PCVI. The choice of these flows determines the aerodynamic cut-off diameter. The collected ice particles are transferred into the IN-PCVI sample flow where they are completely evaporated in a particle-free and dry carrier air. In this way, the aerosol particles detected as IN by the IN counter can be extracted and distributed to several particle sensors. This coupled setup FINCH, IN-PCVI and aerosol instrumentation was deployed during the INUIT-JFJ joint measurement field campaign at the research station Jungfraujoch (3580m asl). Downstream of the IN-PCVI, the Aircraft-based Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ALABAMA; Brands et al., 2011) was attached for the chemical analysis of the atmospheric IN. Also, number concentration and size distribution of IN were measured online (TROPOS) and IN impactor samples for electron microscopy (TU Darmstadt) were taken. Therefore the IN-PCVI was operated with different flow settings than known from literature (Kulkarni et al., 2011), which required a further characterisation of its cut

  17. Deposition pattern of inhaled radon progeny size distribution in human lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Mohamed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the important factors controlling the distribution of radiation dose to the different portions of the human respiratory tract is the deposition pattern of radon progeny containing aerosol. Based on the activity size distribution parameters of radon progeny, which were measured in Minia University, the deposition behavior of radon progeny (attached and unattached has been studied by using a stochastic deposition model. The attached fraction was collected using a low pressure Berner cascade impactor technique. A screen diffusion battery was used for collecting the unattached fraction. Most of the attached activities for 222Rn progeny were associated with aerosol particles of the accumulation mode. The bronchial deposition fraction of particles in the size range of attached radon progeny was found to be lower than those of unattached progeny. The effect of radon progeny deposition by adult male has been also studied for various levels of physical exertion. An increase in the breathing rate was found to decrease the fraction with which inhaled progeny were deposited in the bronchi. As the ventilation rate increases from 0.54 to 1.5 m3 h−1, the average deposition fraction of airway generation 1 through 8 are expected to decrease by 22% for 1.4 nm particles and by 38% for 150 nm particles.

  18. Particle and gas emissions from a simulated coal-burning household fire pit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linwei Tian; Donald Lucas; Susan L. Fischer; S. C. Lee; S. Katharine Hammond; Catherine P. Koshland [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

    2008-04-01

    An open fire was assembled with firebricks to simulate the household fire pit used in rural China, and 15 different coals from this area were burned to measure the gaseous and particulate emissions. Particle size distribution was studied with a microorifice uniform-deposit impactor (MOUDI). Over 90% of the particulate mass was attributed to sub-micrometer particles. The carbon balance method was used to calculate the emission factors. Emission factors for four pollutants (particulate matter, CO{sub 2}, total hydrocarbons, and NOx) were 2-4 times higher for bituminous coals than for anthracites. In past inventories of carbonaceous emissions used for climate modeling, these two types of coal were not treated separately. The dramatic emission factor difference between the two types of coal warrants attention in the future development of emission inventories. 25 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanism is a major contributor to the formation of important uranium deposits both close to centers of eruption and more distal as a result of deposition of ash with leachable uranium. Hydrothermal fluids that are driven by magmatic heat proximal to some volcanic centers directly form some deposits. These fluids leach uranium from U-bearing silicic volcanic rocks and concentrate it at sites of deposition within veins, stockworks, breccias, volcaniclastic rocks, and lacustrine caldera sediments. The volcanogenic uranium deposit model presented here summarizes attributes of those deposits and follows the focus of the International Atomic Energy Agency caldera-hosted uranium deposit model. Although inferred by some to have a volcanic component to their origin, iron oxide-copper-gold deposits with economically recoverable uranium contents are not considered in this model.

  20. Metals and metalloids in atmospheric dust: Use of lead isotopic analysis for source apportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix Villar, Omar I.

    Mining activities generate aerosol in a wide range of sizes. Smelting activities produce mainly fine particles ( 1 microm). The adverse effects of aerosols on human health depend mainly on two key characteristics: size and chemical composition. One of the main objectives of this research is to analyze the size distribution of contaminants in aerosol produced by mining operations. For this purpose, a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) was utilized. Results from the MOUDI samples show higher concentrations of the toxic elements like lead and arsenic in the fine fraction (Mitigation strategies could be developed if the source of contamination is well defined. Environmental conditions as wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity and precipitation have an important role in the concentration of atmospheric dust. Dry environments with low relative humidity are ideal for the transport of aerosols. Results obtained from this research show the relationship between dust concentrations and meteorological parameters. Dust concentrations are highly correlated with relative humidity and wind speed. With all the data collected on site and the analysis of the meteorological parameters, models can be develop to predict the transport of particles as well as the concentration of contaminants at a specific point. These models were developed and are part of the results shown in this dissertation.

  1. Metal and Metalloid Contaminants in Atmospheric Aerosols from Mining Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csavina, Janae; Landázuri, Andrea; Wonaschütz, Anna; Rine, Kyle; Rheinheimer, Paul; Barbaris, Brian; Conant, William; Sáez, A Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A

    2011-10-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, with potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Fine particulates such as those resulting from smelting operations may disperse more readily into the environment than coarser tailings dust. Fine particles also penetrate more deeply into the human respiratory system, and may become more bioavailable due to their high specific surface area. In this work, we report the size-fractionated chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosols sampled over a period of a year near an active mining and smelting site in Arizona. Aerosols were characterized with a 10-stage (0.054 to 18 μm aerodynamic diameter) multiple orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and a total suspended particulate (TSP) collector. The MOUDI results show that arsenic and lead concentrations follow a bimodal distribution, with maxima centered at approximately 0.3 and 7.0 μm diameter. We hypothesize that the sub-micron arsenic and lead are the product of condensation and coagulation of smelting vapors. In the coarse size, contaminants are thought to originate as aeolian dust from mine tailings and other sources. Observation of ultrafine particle number concentration (SMPS) show the highest readings when the wind comes from the general direction of the smelting operations site.

  2. Metal and Metalloid Contaminants in Airborne Dust Associated with Mining Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betterton, E. A.; Csavina, J. L.; Field, J. P.; Landázuri, A. C.; Felix Villar, O.; Rine, K. P.; Sáez, A.; Pence, J.; Shayan, H.; Russell, M.

    2011-12-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, with potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. In this work, we report the size-resolved chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosols sampled near an inactive Superfund site and at an active mining and smelting site in Arizona. Aerosols were characterized with 10-stage (0.054 to 18 μm aerodynamic diameter) multiple orifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDI), Dustrack monitors, and total suspended particulate (TSP) collectors. The MOUDI results show that arsenic and lead concentrations follow a bimodal distribution, with maxima centered at approximately 0.3 and 7.0 μm aerodynamic diameter. We hypothesize that the sub-micron arsenic and lead are the product of condensation and coagulation of smelting vapors. In the coarse size, contaminants are thought to originate as aeolian dust from mine tailings and other sources.

  3. Detailed mass size distributions of elements and species, and aerosol chemical mass closure during fall 1999 at Gent, Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenhaut, Willy; Cafmeyer, Jan; Dubtsov, Sergei; Chi, Xuguang

    2002-04-01

    A 10-stage microorifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) and a 12-stage small deposit area low pressure impactor (SDI) were operated at Gent from 6 September to 30 October 1999. Thirty-four parallel samples (of typically 24 h) were collected. The MOUDI samples were analysed for the particulate mass (PM) by weighing, and for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) by a thermal-optical transmission technique. The SDI samples were analysed for 27 elements by PIXE. PM and OC exhibited typically a rather similar bimodal size distribution, with most of their mass in the submicrometer size range. EC was predominantly associated with fine particles, with maximum typically at around 0.2 μm equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD). Sulphur was also mainly in the fine size range, but with maximum at 0.5 μm EAD. Other elements with mainly a fine mode were V, Ni, As, Se and Pb. The crustal elements (Al, Si, Ti, Fe, Zr) exhibited mostly a unimodal coarse mode size distribution, with maximum at about 4 μm EAD. Other elements with mainly a coarse mode were Na, Mg, P, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, Ga and Sr. The elements K, Zn and Rb were generally bimodal. Aerosol chemical mass closure calculations indicated that organic aerosol and crustal matter were the major aerosol types in the supermicrometer size range, and that the dominant aerosol types in the submicrometer fraction were organic aerosol and sulphate. On average, 74% of the gravimetric PM was accounted for by the aerosol types considered.

  4. Source apportionment of size-segregated atmospheric particles based on the major water-soluble components in Lecce (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contini, D., E-mail: d.contini@isac.cnr.it [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy); Cesari, D. [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy); Genga, A.; Siciliano, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche e Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Ielpo, P. [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy); Istituto di Ricerca Sulle Acque, IRSA-CNR, Bari (Italy); Guascito, M.R. [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche e Ambientali, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Conte, M. [Istituto di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e del Clima, ISAC-CNR, Lecce (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have potential effects on human health, on the radiation balance, on climate, and on visibility. The understanding of these effects requires detailed knowledge of aerosol composition and size distributions and of how the different sources contribute to particles of different sizes. In this work, aerosol samples were collected using a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Measurements were taken between February and October 2011 in an urban background site near Lecce (Apulia region, southeast of Italy). Samples were analysed to evaluate the concentrations of water-soluble ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Cl{sup −}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}) and of water-soluble organic and inorganic carbon. The aerosols were characterised by two modes, an accumulation mode having a mass median diameter (MMD) of 0.35 ± 0.02 μm, representing 51 ± 4% of the aerosols and a coarse mode (MMD = 4.5 ± 0.4 μm), representing 49 ± 4% of the aerosols. The data were used to estimate the losses in the impactor by comparison with a low-volume sampler. The average loss in the MOUDI-collected aerosol was 19 ± 2%, and the largest loss was observed for NO{sub 3}{sup −} (35 ± 10%). Significant losses were observed for Ca{sup 2+} (16 ± 5%), SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} (19 ± 5%) and K{sup +} (10 ± 4%), whereas the losses for Na{sup +} and Mg{sup 2+} were negligible. Size-segregated source apportionment was performed using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), which was applied separately to the coarse (size interval 1–18 μm) and accumulation (size interval 0.056–1 μm) modes. The PMF model was able to reasonably reconstruct the concentration in each size-range. The uncertainties in the source apportionment due to impactor losses were evaluated. In the accumulation mode, it was not possible to distinguish the traffic contribution from other combustion sources. In the coarse mode, it was not possible to

  5. 液压冲击器氮气室预充压力对冲击性能的影响研究%Influence of Precharge Pressure of Nitrogen Chamber on Hydraulic Impactor's Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁翠平; 杨国平; 王亮; 丁冲冲

    2011-01-01

    Based on analyzing the working principle and characteristics of hydraulic impactor, the nonlinear mathematical model of a hydraulic impactor system was established. By using MATLAB/ Simulink, the simulation of two processes including the accelerated return stroke and travel stroke of the hydraulic impactor were researched, and the influence of precharge pressure of nitrogen chamber on the percussion performance was analyzed. The results show that: if the precharge pressure of nitrogen chamber is too Large , it will result in hydraulic fluid can not move the piston to return, and hydraulic impactor can not start up; if the pressure is too small, it will induce difficulty to raise the impacting pressure, and the impacting energy will be small.%在分析液压冲击器工作原理及特点的基础上,建立液压冲击器系统的非线性数学模型.运用MATLAB/Simulink 分别对液压冲击器的回程加速过程和冲程过程进行仿真研究,分析氮气室预充压力对冲击器冲击性能的影响程度.结果表明:氮气室预充压力过大,会导致液压油不能推动活塞进行回程,液压冲击器起动不了;压力过小,则很容易使冲击压力升不上去,冲击能小.

  6. Real-world operation conditions and on-road emissions of Beijing diesel buses measured by using portable emission measurement system and electric low-pressure impactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihua; Ge, Yunshan; Johnson, Kent C; Shah, Asad Naeem; Tan, Jianwei; Wang, Chu; Yu, Linxiao

    2011-03-15

    On-road measurement is an effective method to investigate real-world emissions generated from vehicles and estimate the difference between engine certification cycles and real-world operating conditions. This study presents the results of on-road measurements collected from urban buses which propelled by diesel engine in Beijing city. Two widely used Euro III emission level buses and two Euro IV emission level buses were chosen to perform on-road emission measurements using portable emission measurement system (PEMS) for gaseous pollutant and Electric Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI) for particulate matter (PM) number emissions. The results indicate that considerable discrepancies of engine operating conditions between real-world driving cycles and engine certification cycles have been observed. Under real-world operating conditions, carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions can easily meet their respective regulations limits, while brake specification nitrogen oxide (bsNO(x)) emissions present a significant deviation from its corresponding limit. Compared with standard limits, the real-world bsNO(x) emission of the two Euro III emission level buses approximately increased by 60% and 120% respectively, and bsNO(x) of two Euro IV buses nearly twice standard limits because Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system not active under low exhaust temperature. Particle mass were estimated via particle size distribution with the assumption that particle density and diameter is liner. The results demonstrate that nanometer size particulate matter make significant contribution to total particle number but play a minor role to total particle mass. It is suggested that specific certified cycle should be developed to regulate bus engines emissions on the test bench or use PEMS to control the bus emissions under real-world operating conditions.

  7. Assessment of exposure to composite nanomaterials and development of a personal respiratory deposition sampler for nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, Lorenzo

    2011-12-01

    The overall goals of this doctoral dissertation are to provide knowledge of workers' exposure to nanomaterials and to assist in the development of standard methods to measure personal exposure to nanomaterials in workplace environments. To achieve the first goal, a field study investigated airborne particles generated from the weighing of bulk carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. This study also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood and biosafety cabinet) for control of exposure to particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured with direct-read instruments, and particle morphology was determined by electron microscopy. Sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites released respirable size airborne particles with protruding CNTs very different in morphology from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in clusters (>1mum). Respirable mass concentrations in the operator's breathing zone were significantly greater when sanding took place in the custom hood (p values and those estimated with the model. Compared to the original theory, the SSE calculated using the modified theory was at least threefold lower for all screens and flow rates. Since nylon fibers produce no significant spectral interference when ashed for spectrometric examination, the ability to accurately estimate collection efficiency of submicrometer particles makes nylon mesh screens an attractive collection substrate for nanoparticles. In the third study, laboratory experiments were conducted to develop a novel nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler that selectively collects nanoparticles in a worker's breathing zone apart from larger particles. The NRD sampler consists of a respirable cyclone fitted with an impactor and a diffusion stage containing eight nylon-mesh screens. A sampling criterion for nano

  8. Influence of gas-particle partitioning on ammonia and nitric acid fluxes above a deciduous forest in the Midwestern USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Hornsby, Karen E.;

    are measured by eddy covariance using a closed-path Licor LI-7500, while two MSP MOUDI-110 impactors are used to measure the 24-hourly average inorganic and 48 hourly averaged organic ion concentrations in 11 size bins, respectively, just above the canopy level (28 m). The results of this field campaign...

  9. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  10. Geochemistry of impact glasses and target rocks from the Zhamanshin impact structure, Kazakhstan: Implications for mixing of target and impactor matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonášová, Šárka; Ackerman, Lukáš; Žák, Karel; Skála, Roman; Ďurišová, Jana; Deutsch, Alexander; Magna, Tomáš

    2016-10-01

    Internal structure and element chemistry including contents of highly siderophile elements (HSE) and Os isotope ratios have been studied in target rocks and several groups of impact glasses of the Zhamanshin impact structure, Kazakhstan. These include larger irregularly-shaped fragments and blocks of impact glass (zhamanshinites), and three types of tektite-like splash-form glasses, part of fallback ejecta. These glassy objects typically are up to 30 mm large and are shaped as teardrops, irregularly bent and curved glass rods and fibers. They can be subdivided into acidic types (irghizites; typically 69-76 wt.% SiO2), basic splash-forms (typically 53-56 wt.% SiO2), and rarely occurring highly inhomogeneous composites with abundant mineral inclusions. A comparison with the target rocks shows that zhamanshinites and basic splash-forms usually have no detectable admixture of the projectile matter, indicated by major and trace elements as well as highly siderophile element contents, with the exception of one sample containing Fe-, Cr-, Ni- and Ti-enriched particles and elevated HSE contents. In contrast, irghizites exhibit clear admixture of the projectile matter, which was incorporated by complex processes accompanied by strong element fractionations. Microscopic investigations confirm that irghizites were formed mainly by coalescence of smaller molten glass droplets sized typically below 1 mm. Irghizites exhibit significant enrichments in Ni, Co and Cr, whose concentrations are locally elevated in the rims of the original small droplets. A portion of these elements and also part of Fe and Mn and other elements were derived from the impactor, most likely a Ni-rich carbonaceous chondrite. The contents of HSE are low and strongly fractionated, with moderate depletions of Pt and Pd and strong depletions of other HSE with respect to chondritic element ratios. Osmium shows the strongest depletion, likely related to the presence of oxygen in the post-impact atmosphere

  11. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, P. C.; Campbell, A. A.; Tarasevich, B. J.; Fryxell, G. E.; Bentjen, S. B.

    1991-04-01

    Surfaces derivatized with organic functional groups were used to promote the deposition of thin films of inorganic minerals. These derivatized surfaces were designed to mimic the nucleation proteins that control mineral deposition during formation of bone, shell, and other hard tissues in living organisms. By the use of derivatized substrates control was obtained over the phase of mineral deposited, the orientation of the crystal lattice and the location of deposition. These features are of considerable importance in many technically important thin films, coatings, and composite materials. Methods of derivatizing surfaces are considered and examples of controlled mineral deposition are presented.

  12. Bauxite Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨化洲

    1989-01-01

    Bauxite deposits in China,rangin in age from Late Paleozoic to Cenozoic ,are distributed mainly in Shanxi,Shandong Henan,Guizhou,Guangxi and Yunnan.Based on stratigraphic relations they can be clas-sified as 6 types:inter-system marine,inter-system continental,intra-system marine,intra-system continent-tal,weathering lateritic and weathering accumulation types.But in terms of depositional environments,only four types are distinguished,I.e.the marine deposits,continental deposits,lateritic deposits and weath-ering-accumulation deposits.These deposits have been formed in two steps:firstly,the depression of paraplatform or front basin margins in paleocontinents and secondly,the development of littoral-lagoons on the eroded surface of karstified carbonate bedrocks.The aluminum may have been derived from the carbonate rocks with which the ores are associated,or from adjacent aluminosilicate rocks.

  13. Shedding of ash deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zbogar, Ana; Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2009-01-01

    Ash deposits formed during fuel thermal conversion and located on furnace walls and on convective pass tubes, may seriously inhibit the transfer of heat to the working fluid and hence reduce the overall process efficiency. Combustion of biomass causes formation of large quantities of troublesome...... ash deposits which contain significant concentrations of alkali, and earth-alkali metals. The specific composition of biomass deposits give different characteristics as compared to coal ash deposits, i.e. different physical significance of the deposition mechanisms, lower melting temperatures, etc....... Low melting temperatures make straw ashes especially troublesome, since their stickiness is higher at lower temperatures, compared to coal ashes. Increased stickiness will eventually lead to a higher collection efficiency of incoming ash particles, meaning that the deposit may grow even faster...

  14. ElectroSpark Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-25

    ElectroSpark Deposition Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Joint Cadmium Alternatives Team Canadian Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Joint Group on Pollution...00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ElectroSpark Deposition 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Processes, Inc. ElectroSpark Deposition (ESD) Results of Materials Testing and Technology Insertion January 25, 2007 Advanced Surfaces And Processes, Inc. 3

  15. MAPLE deposition of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P., E-mail: annapaola.caricato@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arima, V.; Catalano, M. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cesaria, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P.D. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, A.; Rella, R. [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, IMM-CNR, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Scarfiello, R. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Zacheo, A. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    The matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has been recently exploited for depositing films of nanomaterials by combining the advantages of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles and laser-based techniques. MAPLE-deposition of nanomaterials meeting applicative purposes demands their peculiar properties to be taken into account while planning depositions to guarantee a congruent transfer (in terms of crystal structure and geometric features) and explain the deposition outcome. In particular, since nanofluids can enhance thermal conductivity with respect to conventional fluids, laser-induced heating can induce different ablation thermal regimes as compared to the MAPLE-treatment of soft materials. Moreover, nanoparticles exhibit lower melting temperatures and can experience pre-melting phenomena as compared to their bulk counterparts, which could easily induce shape and or crystal phase modification of the material to be deposited even at very low fluences. In this complex scenario, this review paper focuses on examples of MAPLE-depositions of size and shape controlled nanoparticles for different applications highlights advantages and challenges of the MAPLE-technique. The influence of the deposition parameters on the physical mechanisms which govern the deposition process is discussed.

  16. Solid on liquid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charmet, J., E-mail: jerome.charmet@he-arc.c [Institut des Microtechnologies Appliquees ARC, HES-SO Arc, Eplatures-Grise 17, 2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Banakh, O.; Laux, E.; Graf, B.; Dias, F.; Dunand, A.; Keppner, H. [Institut des Microtechnologies Appliquees ARC, HES-SO Arc, Eplatures-Grise 17, 2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland); Gorodyska, G.; Textor, M. [BioInterface group, ETHZ, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, ETH Hoenggerberg HCI H 525 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Noell, W.; Rooij, N.F. de [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Institute of Microengineering, Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems laboratory, Rue Jaquet Droz 1, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Neels, A.; Dadras, M.; Dommann, A.; Knapp, H. [Centre Suisse d' Electronique et de Microtechnique SA, Rue Jacquet-Droz 1, 2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Borter, Ch.; Benkhaira, M. [COMELEC SA, Rue de la Paix 129, 2300 La Chaux-de-Fonds (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    A process for the deposition of a solid layer onto a liquid is presented. The polymer poly-di-chloro-para-xylylene, also known as Parylene C, was grown on low vapour pressure liquids using the conventional low pressure chemical vapour deposition process. A reactor was built and a process developed to enable the deposition of Parylene C at atmospheric pressure over high vapour pressure liquids. It was used to deposit Parylene C over water among others. In all cases Parylene C encapsulated the liquid without influencing its initial shape. The results presented here show also that the Parylene C properties are not affected by its growth on liquid templates and the roughness of the Parylene C surface in contact with the liquid during the deposition is extremely low.

  17. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  18. Tsunami Deposit Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, B. H.; Wanink, M.

    2007-05-01

    A digital database has been established describing tsunami deposits around the world (3 phases; 15 months). The projects involved the review and tabulation of data derived from books, catalogs, journals, preprints, citations and abstracts (currently 1000 references), into a database designed to provide a comprehensive review of the types of tsunami deposits, their geographic distribution and location, sedimentary characteristics, fossil content, age, preservation, run-up, wave height and inundation observations, etc. (34 parameters). The tsunami occurrences can be divided into many subjects, e.g., Volcanogenic (N=375), Seismites (N=49), Co-seismic (N=258), K/T Boundary Impact-triggered debris flows (N=97), Landslides (N=43), etc. Numerous publications compare tsunami deposits to storm deposits (N=38), or analyze the origin of megaboulders (N=22). Tsunami deposits occur throughout geologic time (Pre-Cambrian to present day), and because of plate tectonics, they occur along plate margins (primarily subduction zones) as well as interior to plates. In addition, they occur in epi-continental seas, fjords, etc. Few publications describe depositional processes. Deposits generated by tsunamis occur in multiple environments such as the marine, fresh water, and subaerial. Common characteristics of tsunami deposits include: 1) Deposition of thin sand sheets (can be normal, massive, inversely graded, chaotic or bimodal). 2) Erosional: basal uncomformity, mud balls, rip-up clasts, reworked fossils produced by scouring. 3) Lithology: Stacks of couplets reflecting marine incursions (often sands) into fresh water or subaerial environments (mud, soil, peat). 4) Fossil: Couplets reflects marine fossils, fresh water fossils or a mixed assemblage. 5) Geomorphology: The sand sheets taper landward and can rise in elevation. 6) Deformation: syn-depositional (soft sediments) and intraformational (stiff sediments).

  19. Measurements of Ice Nuclei at a Remote Coastal Site in Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, M.; Mason, R.; Li, J.; Dickie, R.; Chou, C.; Ladino Moreno, L.; Yakobi-Hancock, J.; Schiller, C. L.; Jones, K.; Leaitch, W. R.; Desiree, T. S.; Abbatt, J.; Huffman, J. A.; Bertram, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles are abundant in the atmosphere, and they can influence climate by modifying the formation of ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Understanding the sources of ice nuclei (IN) should lead to better predictions of climate. Many current instruments for measuring atmospheric concentrations of IN are not capable of providing size-resolved information. Such knowledge is useful in identifying the sources of IN. The recently developed micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT) provides size-resolved information by combining an established immersion freezing apparatus with a cascade impactor for sample collection. Here we show results from a field study undertaken at a remote coastal site in Western Canada in August, 2013 using this technique. The size distributions of IN will be presented. A recent study suggested that the IN population in remote marine regions might be dominated by primary biogenic particles. To address the sources of IN from this campaign, correlations between IN concentrations and biological aerosols, carbonaceous aerosols, and other possible IN sources will be discussed.

  20. Podiform chromite deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Location and characteristics of 1,124 individual mineral deposits of this type, with grade and tonnage models for chromium as well as several related elements.

  1. Speleothem (Cave Deposit) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, and other aspects of climate derived from mineral deposits found in caves. Parameter keywords describe what was measured...

  2. Alluvial Deposits in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This coverage maps alluvial deposits throughout Iowa. This generally would include areas of alluvial soils associated with modern streams that are identified on...

  3. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  4. Chemically deposited tin sulphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkari, A., E-mail: anis.akkari@ies.univ-montp2.f [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis El Manar, Tunisie 2092 (Tunisia); Institut d' Electronique du Sud, Unite Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i), Universite Montpellier 2, Place Eugene Bataillon, CC 082, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Guasch, C. [Institut d' Electronique du Sud, Unite Mixte de Recherche 5214 UM2-CNRS (ST2i), Universite Montpellier 2, Place Eugene Bataillon, CC 082, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Kamoun-Turki, N. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis El Manar, Tunisie 2092 (Tunisia)

    2010-02-04

    SnS thin films were deposited on glass substrates after multi-deposition runs by chemical bath deposition from aqueous solution containing 30 ml triethanolamine (TEA) (C{sub 6}H{sub 15}NO{sub 3}) (50%), 10 ml thioacetamide (CH{sub 3}CSNH{sub 2}), 8 ml ammonia (NH{sub 3}) solution and 10 ml of Sn{sup 2+}(0.1 M). These films were characterised with X-ray diffraction (XRD), with scanning electron microscopy, and with spectrophotometric measurements. The obtained thin films exhibit the zinc blend structure, the crystallinity seems to be improved as the film thickness increases and the band gap energy is found to be about 1.76 eV for film prepared after six depositions runs.

  5. Electrospark deposition coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheely, W. F.

    1986-11-01

    Hard surfacing for wear resistant and low-friction coatings has been improved by means of advances in the computer controls in electronic circuitry of the electrospark deposition (ESD) process. coatings of nearly any electrically conductive metal alloy or cermet can be deposited on conductive materials. Thickness is usually two mils or less, but can be as high as 10 mils. ESD coatings can quadrupole cutting tool life.

  6. Gemstone deposits of Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinović, Zoran; Simić, Vladimir; Jelenković, Rade; Ilić, Miloje

    2016-06-01

    Gemstone minerals in Serbia have never been regarded as an interesting and significant resource. Nevertheless, more than 150 deposits and occurrences have been recorded and some of them preliminarily explored in the last 50 years. The majority of deposits and occurrences are located within the Serbo-Macedonian metallogenic province and the most significant metallogenic units at the existing level of knowledge are the Fruska Gora ore district, Cer ore district, Sumadija metallogenic zone, Kopaonik metallogenic zone and Lece-Halkidiki metallogenic zone. The most important genetic type of deposits is hydrothermal, particularly in case of serpentinite/peridotite as host/parent rock. Placer deposits are also economically important. The dominant gemstones are silica minerals: chalcedony (Chrysoprase, carnelian, bluish chalcedony etc.), jasper (picture, landscape, red etc.), common opal (dendritic, green, milky white etc.), silica masses (undivided), and quartz (rock crystal, amethyst etc.). Beside silica minerals significant gemstones in Serbia include also beryl (aquamarine), garnet (almandine and pyrope), tourmaline, fluorite, rhodochrosite, carbonate-silica breccia, carbonate-silica onyx, silicified wood, howlite, serpentinite, marble onyx, and kyanite. This paper aims to present an overview of Serbian gemstone deposits and occurrences and their position based on a simplified gemstone metallogenic map of Serbia, as well as genetic-industrial classification of gemstone deposits and gemstone varieties.

  7. Gemstone deposits of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miladinović Zoran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gemstone minerals in Serbia have never been regarded as an interesting and significant resource. Nevertheless, more than 150 deposits and occurrences have been recorded and some of them preliminarily explored in the last 50 years. The majority of deposits and occurrences are located within the Serbo-Macedonian metallogenic province and the most significant metallogenic units at the existing level of knowledge are the Fruska Gora ore district, Cer ore district, Sumadija metallogenic zone, Kopaonik metallogenic zone and Lece-Halkidiki metallogenic zone. The most important genetic type of deposits is hydrothermal, particularly in case of serpentinite/peridotite as host/parent rock. Placer deposits are also economically important. The dominant gemstones are silica minerals: chalcedony (Chrysoprase, carnelian, bluish chalcedony etc., jasper (picture, landscape, red etc., common opal (dendritic, green, milky white etc., silica masses (undivided, and quartz (rock crystal, amethyst etc.. Beside silica minerals significant gemstones in Serbia include also beryl (aquamarine, garnet (almandine and pyrope, tourmaline, fluorite, rhodochrosite, carbonate-silica breccia, carbonate-silica onyx, silicified wood, howlite, serpentinite, marble onyx, and kyanite. This paper aims to present an overview of Serbian gemstone deposits and occurrences and their position based on a simplified gemstone metallogenic map of Serbia, as well as genetic-industrial classification of gemstone deposits and gemstone varieties.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  9. Reactive polymer fused deposition manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Rios, Orlando; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad E.; Johs, Alexander

    2017-05-16

    Methods and compositions for additive manufacturing that include reactive or thermosetting polymers, such as urethanes and epoxies. The polymers are melted, partially cross-linked prior to the depositing, deposited to form a component object, solidified, and fully cross-linked. These polymers form networks of chemical bonds that span the deposited layers. Application of a directional electromagnetic field can be applied to aromatic polymers after deposition to align the polymers for improved bonding between the deposited layers.

  10. Water-soluble inorganic ions in airborne particulates from the nano to coarse mode: a case study of aerosol episodes in southern region of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Peng; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chang, Kai-Lun; Lin, Jim Juimin

    2008-06-01

    In 2004, airborne particulate matter (PM) was collected for several aerosol episodes occurring in the southern region of Taiwan. The particulate samples were taken using both a MOUDI (Micro-orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor) and a nano-MOUDI sampler. These particulate samples were analyzed for major water-soluble ionic species with an emphasis to characterize the mass concentrations and distributions of these ions in the ambient ultrafine (PM0.1, diameter particles. Particles collected at the sampling site (the Da-Liao station) on the whole exhibited a typical tri-modal size distribution on mass concentration. The mass concentration ratios of PMnano/PM2.5, PM0.1/PM2.5, and PM1/PM2.5 on average were 1.8, 2.9, and 71.0%, respectively. The peak mass concentration appeared in the submicron particle mode (0.1 microm Particles smaller than 0.1 microm were essentially basic, whereas those greater than 2.5 microm were neutral or slightly acidic. The neutralization ratio (NR) was close to unity for airborne particles with diameters ranging from 0.18 to 1 microm. The NRs of these airborne particles were found strongly correlated with their sizes, at least for samples taken during the aerosol episodes under study. Insofar as this study is exploratory in nature, as only a small number of particulate samples were used, there appears to be a need for further research into the chemical composition, source contribution, and formation of the nano and ultrafine mode airborne particulates.

  11. Effects of amines on particle growth observed in new particle formation events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Ye, Xingnan; Jiang, Shuqing; Yang, Xin; Chen, Jianmin; Xie, Yuanyuan; Wang, Ruyu

    2016-01-01

    Particle size distributions in the range of 0.01-10 µm were measured in urban Shanghai in the summer of 2013 using a Wide-range Particle Spectrometer (WPS). Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected concurrently using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI), which aided our in-depth understanding of the new particle formation (NPF) mechanism in the polluted Yangtze River Delta area. During the observations, 16 NPF events occurred at high temperatures (~34.7°C) on clear and sunny days. In the ammonium-poor PM1.0 (particulate matter less than 1.0 µm), sulfate and ammonium accounted for 92% of the total water-soluble inorganic species. Six aminiums were detected in these MOUDI samples, among which the group of diethylaminium and trimethylaminium (DEAH+ + TMAH+) was the most abundant. The very high level of aminiums (average concentration up to 86.4 ng m-3 in PM1.8), together with highly acidic aerosols, provided insight into the frequent NPF events. The high mass ratio of total aminiums to NH4+ (>0.2 for PM0.056) further highlighted the important role of amines in promoting NPF. The concentration of DEAH+ + TMAH+ in new particles below 180 nm was strongly correlated with aerosol phase acidity, indicating that acid-base reactions dominated the aminium formation in NPF events. The unexpected enhancement of DEAH+ + TMAH+ on a nonevent day was attributed to the transportation of an SO2 plume. Our results reveal that the heterogeneous uptake of amines is dominated by the acid-base reaction mechanism, which can effectively contribute to particle growth in NPF events.

  12. In situ acidity and pH of size-fractionated aerosols during a recent smoke-haze episode in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Sailesh N; Cheng, Jinping; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of aerosol acidity has received increased attention in recent years due to its influence on atmospheric visibility, climate change and human health. Distribution of water soluble inorganic (WSI) ions in 12 different size fractions of aerosols was investigated under two different atmospheric conditions (smoke-haze and non-haze periods) in 2012 using the Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) and nano-MOUDI for the first time in Singapore. To estimate the in situ acidity ([H(+)]Ins) and in situ aerosol pH (pHIS), the Aerosol Inorganic Model version-IV under deliquescent mode of airborne particles was used at prevailing ambient temperature and relative humidity. The study revealed an increase in the levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) mass and concentrations of WSI ions for all size fractions during the smoke-haze period, which was caused by the trans-boundary transport of biomass burning-impacted air masses from Indonesia. A bimodal distribution was observed for concentrations of SO4(2-), NO3(-), Cl(-), K(+) and Na(+), whereas concentrations of NH4(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) showed a single mode distribution. The concentration of WSI ions in PM1.8 during the smoke-haze period increased by 3.8 (for SO4(2-)) to 10.5 (for K(+)) times more than those observed during the non-haze period. The pHIS were observed to be lower during the smoke-haze period than that during the non-haze period for all size fractions of PM, indicating that atmospheric aerosols were more acidic due to the influence of biomass burning emissions. The particles in the accumulation mode were more acidic than those in the coarse mode.

  13. Granitoid intrusions and related deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟良义; 李绪俊

    1996-01-01

    Taking the Bainaimiao copper and gold deposits, Inner Mongolia and the Wushan copper deposits, Jiangxi Province as examples, a discussion is devoted to the relationship between the granitoid intrusions and related deposits from different lines of evidence: the spatial distribution, country rocks and alteration of the deposits, trace element contents and vertical zoning of elements in deposits, the metallogenic preference of granitoid intrusions, the metallogenic models and stable isotopic geology. It is concluded that the ore-bearing fluids mainly come from granitoid magmas and granitoid intrusions are closely associated with the related deposits in space.

  14. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the Act in the amount fixed by the Office under the regulations in this part shall deposit any... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees' Benefits... negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or...

  15. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  16. Physicochemical Characterization of Cloud Drop Residual Particles in Eastern Pacific Marine Stratocumulus: Airborne Measurements Downstream of a Newly-Developed Counterflow Virtual Impactor Inlet during the 2011 E-PEACE Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorooshian, A.; Shingler, T.; Dey, S.; Brechtel, F. J.; Jonsson, H.; Metcalf, A. R.; Craven, J. S.; Coggon, M.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    The aerosol nuclei that are the seeds of cloud drops are a critically important component of the atmosphere as they influence radiative transfer, visibility, and cloud microphysics. Aircraft must employ special inlets to exclusively sample cloud drops, which involves rejecting the smaller interstitial aerosol in clouds, and then subsequently drying the drops to leave only the residual particles. A new counterflow virtual impactor inlet (CVI) was recently deployed on the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter during the 2011 Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE). Several state-of-the-art instruments sampling downstream of the CVI characterized the physical and chemical properties of the droplet residual particles including measurements of composition, size distribution, optical properties, and water-uptake properties. This work will summarize CVI measurements from over 25 flights during the E-PEACE campaign off the central coast of California between July and August. The flights specifically targeted aerosol-cloud interactions in a region where stratocumulus clouds are perturbed by emissions from ship traffic. New findings related to the physicochemical properties of drop residual particles will be highlighted in addition to a characterization of CVI performance.

  17. Inhalation and deposition of nebulized sodium cromoglycate in two different particle size distributions in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerbrink, O L; Lindström, M; Meurling, L; Svartengren, M

    2002-11-01

    The relative deposition of two inhaled droplet size distributions of sodium cromoglycate produced by a Hudson Updraft II nebulizer was evaluated, using a setup modified from the proposed Comité Européen Normalisé (CEN) standard prEN 13544-1. The modified setup comprised an Andersen 296 impactor and a Spira Electro 2 dosimeter. The setup was characterized prior to use in children with sodium cromoglycate (SCG) and sodium fluoride as tracer aerosol. The main in vivo study was designed to allow nine children with a mean age of 10 years to inhale SCG aerosol at two different relative humidities (RH), a high RH (> 90%) and a low RH (13%), which in turn resulted in two different droplet size distributions. The nebulizer/dosimeter was set to provide 1-sec nebulization during 50 inhalations. Throughout the exposures, the children were instructed to inhale in a consistent manner with target tidal volumes (0.5 L) and inhalation flows (0.4 L/sec). Blood samples were taken at predefined time intervals, and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. A lung deposition program, TGLD2, was used to calculate the expected deposition, using the droplet sizes and inhalation parameters obtained during in vivo exposures. The in vivo monitoring of droplet size distribution during the exposure showed that the low, intermediate (room air), and high RHs gave a mean droplet size distribution with a mass median aerosol diameter (MMAD) of 1.2, 1.7, and 2.0 microm, respectively. The average tidal volume over all exposures was 0.51 +/- 0.12 L. The total deposition fraction was 33.4% of the estimated nebulizer output. A correlation was found between tidal volume and the calculated deposited fraction. The results indicate that there is a difference in total deposition, depending on the size of the droplet size distribution, with the larger droplet size distribution (MMAD, 2.0 microm) having a higher total deposition than the smaller droplet size distribution (MMAD, 1.2 microm). The

  18. Market Discipline and Deposit Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Peresetsky,Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    The paper examines Russian banks’ household deposit interest rates for the transition period of setting up the deposit insurance system. Monthly observations of Russian banks’ interest rates and balance sheets are used in a fixed effects panel data model. It is shown market discipline has been significantly diminished after switching to the deposit insurance.

  19. Database of recent tsunami deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a database of sedimentary characteristics of tsunami deposits derived from published accounts of tsunami deposit investigations conducted shortly after the occurrence of a tsunami. The database contains 228 entries, each entry containing data from up to 71 categories. It includes data from 51 publications covering 15 tsunamis distributed between 16 countries. The database encompasses a wide range of depositional settings including tropical islands, beaches, coastal plains, river banks, agricultural fields, and urban environments. It includes data from both local tsunamis and teletsunamis. The data are valuable for interpreting prehistorical, historical, and modern tsunami deposits, and for the development of criteria to identify tsunami deposits in the geologic record.

  20. Acidic deposition ("acid rain")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, R. Kent; LaRoe, Edward T.; Farris, Gaye S.; Puckett, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.; Mac, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Acidic deposition, or "acid rain," describes any form of precipitation, including rain, snow, and fog, with a pH of 5.5 or below (Note: pH values below 7 are acidic; vinegar has a pH of 3). It often results when the acidity of normal precipitation is increased by sulfates and nitrates that are emitted into the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. This form of airborne contamination is considered harmful, both directly and indirectly, to a host of plant and animal species.Although acid rain can fall virtually anywhere, ecological damages in environmentally sensitive areas downwind of industrial and urban emissions are a major concern. This includes areas that have a reduced capacity to neutralize acid inputs because of low alkalinity soils and areas that contain species with a low tolerance to acid conditions. To determine the distribution of acidic deposition and evaluate its biological effects, research and monitoring are being conducted by the federal government with support from states, universities, and private industry.            The national extent of the acid rain problem has been estimated by sampling water from 3,000 lakes and 500 streams (Irving 1991), representing more than 28,000 lakes and 56,000 stream reaches with a total of 200,000 km (125,000 mi). Some particularly sensitive areas, such as the Adirondack Mountain region, have been more intensively sampled and the biota examined in detail for effects from acidity.         To identify trends in aquatic ecosystems, present and historical survey data on water chemistry and associated biota are compared. In lakes, the chemical and biological history and pH trends may be inferred or reconstructed in some cases by examining assemblages of fossil diatoms and aquatic invertebrates in the sediment layers. In terrestrial ecosystems, vegetation damage is surveyed and effects of acidic deposition to plants and animals are determined from laboratory and field exposure experiments. Natural

  1. FDIC Summary of Deposits (SOD) Download File

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation — The FDIC's Summary of Deposits (SOD) download file contains deposit data for branches and offices of all FDIC-insured institutions. The Federal Deposit Insurance...

  2. Exposure Hazard to Bisphenol A for Labor and Particle Size Dis-tribution at Polycarbonate Molding Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchan CHAO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: This research provides an insight into exposure information and particle size distributions of Bisphenol A (BPA, a common environmental hormone, at polycarbonate (PC molding plants in southern Taiwan.Methods: The inhalable dust sampler as IOM and the micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI were used for samples collection to evaluate the level and particle size distribution of BPA in PC molding plants. All col-lected samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC for BPA concentrations.Results: BPA concentrations detected from the plant using optical grade PC material ranged from 32.28 to 44.97 μg/m3, which were significantly higher than BPA concentrations (16.16 to 19.39 μg/m3 detected from the plant using food grade PC material. Under working environment, the particle size distribution showed a single mode distribution, with a MMAD of 0.84μm and a GSD of 1.97. Emission of BPA increased during heating process and most of BPA particles deposited in the nasal cavity (63.37%, following by alveolus (30.7%, and trachea-bronchus (5.93%.Discussion: It is of importance that proper personal protection should be taken upon the BPA particulates released during the molding process at PC molding plants.

  3. Acid deposition in Asia: Emissions, deposition, and ecosystem effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lei; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zifa; Pan, Yuepeng; Larssen, Thorjørn; Tang, Jie; Mulder, Jan

    2016-12-01

    We review and synthesize the current state of knowledge regarding acid deposition and its environmental effects across Asia. The extent and magnitude of acid deposition in Asia became apparent only about one decade after this issue was well described in Europe and North America. In addition to the temperate zone, much of eastern and southern Asia is situated in the tropics and subtropics, climate zones hitherto little studied with respect to the effects of high loads of acid deposition. Surface waters across Asia are generally not sensitive to the effects of acid deposition, whereas soils in some regions are sensitive to acidification due to low mineral weathering. However, soil acidification was largely neutralized by such processes as base cation deposition, nitrate (NO3-) denitrification, and sulfate (SO42-) adsorption. Accompanying the decrease in S deposition in recent years, N deposition is of increasing concern in Asia. The acidifying effect of N deposition may be more important than S deposition in well drained tropical/subtropical soils due to high SO42- adsorption. The risk of regional soil acidification is a major threat in Eastern Asia, indicated by critical load exceedance in large areas.

  4. Analysis of sulfur in deposited aerosols by thermal decomposition and sulfur dioxide analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masatoshi

    2005-07-15

    A thermal decomposition method that measures aerosol sulfur at the nanogram level directly from the collection substrate is described. A thermal decomposition apparatus was designed. A stainless steel strip was used as the aerosol collection substrate. A 0.1 mol/L MnCl2 solution was added as the thermal decomposition catalyst. Currents were passed through the strip where aerosol particles had been deposited. In this way, the strip was heated at 780 +/- 10 degrees C, and particulate sulfur was evaporated. A sulfur dioxide analyzer (SDA) with flame photometric detector (FPD) was used to detect gaseous sulfur. High sulfur recoveries from (NH4)2SO4 and other inorganic sulfates, such as NH4HSO4, K2SO4, MgSO4, and CaSO4, were obtained. From the sulfur blank and the calibration, a lower limited detection of 0.2 ng of sulfur and the determination range of 3.3-167 ng of sulfur were estimated. The method is effective for measuring the sulfate size distributions of urban aerosols in a small sample air volume of 50-60 L. The method is applicable to measuring the sulfur in aqueous extracts of size-segregated urban aerosols collected by impactor and comparing the results with the sulfate data measured by ion chromatography.

  5. Some characteristics of electrospark deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesnjak, A. [Q-Techna, Krsko (Sierra Leone); Tusek, J. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Ljubljana (Sierra Leone)

    2003-11-01

    The paper deals with some characteristics of electrospark deposition. A relevant device and the process are described, the material transfer is shown schematically, and the average droplet mass, the thickness of deposited layer, and the layer roughness are determined. Two types of substrate (tool steel, austenitic stainless steel), two types of shielding gas, (Ar, He), and three types of filler material, (WC, TiC, Stellite 6) were used. With some deposit, chemical analyses of deposit surfaces were performed and with some others through-thickness chemical analyses. Among the final conclusions the most important one is that the addition of a shielding gas results in a considerable increase in deposit quality. The device manufacturer, however, recommends deposition without the addition of a shielding gas. (orig.)

  6. The deposit size frequency method for estimating undiscovered uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, R.B.; Finch, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    The deposit size frequency (DSF) method has been developed as a generalization of the method that was used in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program to estimate the uranium endowment of the United States. The DSF method overcomes difficulties encountered during the NURE program when geologists were asked to provide subjective estimates of (1) the endowed fraction of an area judged favorable (factor F) for the occurrence of undiscovered uranium deposits and (2) the tons of endowed rock per unit area (factor T) within the endowed fraction of the favorable area. Because the magnitudes of factors F and T were unfamiliar to nearly all of the geologists, most geologists responded by estimating the number of undiscovered deposits likely to occur within the favorable area and the average size of these deposits. The DSF method combines factors F and T into a single factor (F??T) that represents the tons of endowed rock per unit area of the undiscovered deposits within the favorable area. Factor F??T, provided by the geologist, is the estimated number of undiscovered deposits per unit area in each of a number of specified deposit-size classes. The number of deposit-size classes and the size interval of each class are based on the data collected from the deposits in known (control) areas. The DSF method affords greater latitude in making subjective estimates than the NURE method and emphasizes more of the everyday experience of exploration geologists. Using the DSF method, new assessments have been made for the "young, organic-rich" surficial uranium deposits in Washington and idaho and for the solution-collapse breccia pipe uranium deposits in the Grand Canyon region in Arizona and adjacent Utah. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  7. Momentum Deposition in Curvilinear Coordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleveland, Mathew Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lowrie, Robert Byron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rockefeller, Gabriel M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thompson, Kelly Glen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wollaber, Allan Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The momentum imparted into a material by thermal radiation deposition is an important physical process in astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations. In recent work we presented a new method of evaluating momentum deposition that relies on the combination of a time-averaged approximation and a numerical integration scheme. This approach robustly and efficiently evaluates the momentum deposition in spherical geometry. Future work will look to extend this approach to 2D cylindrical geometries.

  8. Enhanced nitrogen deposition over China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Ying; Han, Wenxuan; Tang, Aohan; Shen, Jianlin; Cui, Zhenling; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Fusuo [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Vitousek, Peter [Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Erisman, Jan Willem [VU University Amsterdam, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goulding, Keith [The Sustainable Soils and Grassland Systems Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden AL5 2JQ (United Kingdom); Fangmeier, Andreas [Institute of Landscape and Plant Ecology, University of Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-02-28

    China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen. These emissions result in the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with implications for human and ecosystem health, greenhouse gas balances and biological diversity. However, information on the magnitude and environmental impact of N deposition in China is limited. Here we use nationwide data sets on bulk N deposition, plant foliar N and crop N uptake (from long-term unfertilized soils) to evaluate N deposition dynamics and their effect on ecosystems across China between 1980 and 2010. We find that the average annual bulk deposition of N increased by approximately 8 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare (P < 0.001) between the 1980s (13.2 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare) and the 2000s (21.1 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare). Nitrogen deposition rates in the industrialized and agriculturally intensified regions of China are as high as the peak levels of deposition in northwestern Europe in the 1980s, before the introduction of mitigation measures. Nitrogen from ammonium (NH4+) is the dominant form of N in bulk deposition, but the rate of increase is largest for deposition of N from nitrate (NO3-), in agreement with decreased ratios of NH3 to NOx emissions since 1980. We also find that the impact of N deposition on Chinese ecosystems includes significantly increased plant foliar N concentrations in natural and semi-natural (that is, non-agricultural) ecosystems and increased crop N uptake from long-term-unfertilized croplands. China and other economies are facing a continuing challenge to reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen, N deposition and their negative effects on human health and the environment.

  9. Core science: Stratified by a sunken impactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Miki

    2016-10-01

    There is potential evidence for a stratified layer at the top of the Earth's core, but its origin is not well understood. Laboratory experiments suggest that the stratified layer could be a sunken remnant of the giant impact that formed the Moon.

  10. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  11. A Micrometeorological Perspective on Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto

    1981-01-01

    An expression for the dry deposition velocity is given in terms of constant flux layer scaling. Numerical values of upper bounds on the deposition velocity is given for a typical situation. Some remarks are then offered on the relative merits of various ways in which the combined diffusion...

  12. A remote coal deposit revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen-Kofoed, Jørgen A.; Kalkreuth, Wolfgang; Petersen, Henrik I.

    2012-01-01

    In 1908, members of the “Danmark Expedition” discovered a coal deposit in a very remote area in western Germania Land, close to the margin of the inland ice in northeast Greenland. The deposit was, however, neither sampled nor described, and was revisited in 2009 for the first time since its disc...

  13. Liquefier Dynamics in Fused Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellini, Anna; Guceri, Selcuk; Bertoldi, Maurizio

    2004-01-01

    Layered manufacturing (LM) is an evolution of rapid prototyping (RP) technology whereby a part is built in layers. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a particular LM technique in which each section is fabricated through vector style deposition of building blocks, called roads, which...

  14. Deposition and Resuspension of Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lengweiler, P.; Nielsen, Peter V.; Moser, A.

    A new experimental set-up to investigate the physical process of dust deposition and resuspension on and from surfaces is introduced. Dust deposition can reduce the airBorne dust concentration considerably. As a basis for developing methods to eliminate dust related problems in rooms, there is a ...

  15. Geotechnical Description of Mineral Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasvári Tibor

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Performing various mineral deposits extraction methods requires thorough knowledge of the rock masses` geomechanical parameters. In the geotechnical description of mineral deposits there is proposed a methodical approarch at the collection, registration, and evaluation of rock masses` geological properties for geotechnics being applied within the mining industry.

  16. 20 CFR 703.207 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... amount fixed by the Office under the regulations in this part shall deposit any negotiable securities... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.207 Section 703.207 Employees' Benefits... AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Insurance Carrier Security Deposit Requirements § 703.207...

  17. Polonium in size fractionated mainstream cigarette smoke, predicted deposition and associated internal radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, M; Sahu, S K; Bhangare, R C; Pandit, G G

    2016-10-01

    In this study, size fractionated mass and (210)Po activity concentrations in mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) were monitored for three popular cigarette brands. Size segregated collection of MCS was carried out using a cascade type impactor, while mass and (210)Po activity concentration were analyzed gravimetrically and alpha spectrometry (following the radiochemical separation) respectively. Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry (MPPD V2.11) model is used for prediction of deposition fraction calculations for the MCS deposition in different compartment of human respiratory tract. The activity concentration of (210)Po is founds 10.56 ± 2.46 mBq per cigarette for the tested cigarette brands. (210)Po size distribution indicates most of this associates with fine fraction (Dp < 2.23 μm) of cigarette smoke. The committed annual effective dose to smokers (smoking on an average 20 cigarette a day), considering the (210)Po and (210)Pb concentrations (assuming it is in secular equilibrium with (210)Po) in MCS, was estimated between 0.22 and 0.40 mSv, with mean value of 0.30 mSv for tested cigarette brands. Considering the risk factor of fatal cancer due to radiation exposure of lung (exposure time of 30 years); the average collective estimated fatal cancer risk is estimated as 1.5 × 10(-4) due to (210)Po and (210)Pb exposure to smokers. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

    2003-10-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two

  19. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  20. Geological classification of coal deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretsnaidr, P.

    1985-02-01

    A new classification of coal deposits developed by the author is evaluated. The classification considers only selected factors which characterize a coal deposit. Each factor is described by a number of points ranging from 0 to 10. Geologic structure (deposits with one or more seams or with seam groups) is described using from 1 to 10 points. Secondary deformation of a coal deposit (e.g. tectonics) and hydrogeology (aquifers, filtration properties, etc.) are described using a 10 point scale. Coal seam structure (with or without partings) is characterized using 1 to 5 points. Coal seam thickness and its stability (4 thickness classes from 0.4 to 1.0 m, 1 to 3 m, 3 to 10 m and above 10 m) is described using 0 to 5 points. Coal seam quality (ash content, calorific value and coking properties) is described using 0 to 5 points. Other factors are characterized using a 10 point scale. Use of this deposit classification is explained using four examples: the Merkur surface mine (uncomplicated conditions), the Nosek surface mine (relatively complicated conditions), the Slany deposit (with complicated conditions) and the Jan Sverma deposit (with extremely complicated conditions).

  1. 78 FR 11604 - Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... States banks often operate foreign branches to provide banking, foreign currency, and payment services to... required to repay a deposit in a foreign branch if it cannot do so because of ``war, insurrection, or civil...

  2. TSUNAMI_DEPOSITS - Tsunami Deposits at Seaside, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a point shapefile representing tsunami deposits within the Seaside, Oregon region obtained by Brooke Fiedorowicz and Curt Peterson in 1997 and Bruce...

  3. 76 FR 21265 - Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... in the subject line of the message. Mail: Robert E. Feldman, Executive Secretary, Attention: Comments... Deposit Insurance Corporation. Robert E. Feldman, Executive Secretary. BILLING CODE 6714-01-P...

  4. TSUNAMI_DEPOSITS - Tsunami Deposits at Seaside, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a point shapefile representing tsunami deposits within the Seaside, Oregon region obtained by Brooke Fiedorowicz and Curt Peterson in 1997 and Bruce...

  5. Atmospheric deposition 2000. NOVA 2003; Atmosfaerisk deposition 2000. NOVA 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellermann, T.; Hertel, O.; Hovmand, M.F.; Kemp, K.; Skjoeth, C.A.

    2001-11-01

    This report presents measurements and calculations from the atmospheric part of NOVA 2003 and covers results for 2000. It summarises the main results concerning concentrations and depositions of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur compounds related to eutrophication and acidification. Depositions of atmospheric compounds to Danish marine waters as well as land surface are presented. Measurements: In 2000 the monitoring program consisted of eight stations where wet deposition of ammonium, nitrate, phosphate (semi quantitatively) and sulphate were measured using bulk precipitation samplers. Six of the stations had in addition measurements of atmospheric content of A, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulphur compounds in gas and particulate phase carried out by use of filter pack samplers. Filters were analysed at the National Environmental Research Institute. Furthermore nitrogen dioxide were measured using nitrogen dioxide filter samplers and monitors. Model calculations: The measurements in the monitoring program were supplemented with model calculations of concentrations and depositions of nitrogen and sulphur compounds to Danish land surface, marine waters, fjords and bays using the ACDEP model (Atmospheric Chemistry and Deposition). The model is a so-called trajectory model and simulates the physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere using meteorological and emission data as input. The advantage of combining measurements with model calculations is that the strengths of both methods is obtained. Conclusions concerning: 1) actual concentration levels at the monitoring stations, 2) deposition at the monitoring stations, 3) seasonal variations and 4) long term trends in concentrations and depositions are mainly based on the direct measurements. These are furthermore used to validate the results of the model calculations. Calculations and conclusions concerning: 1) depositions to land surface and to the individual marine water, 2) contributions from different emission

  6. DIMENSION STONE DEPOSITS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Crnković

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available The geology, petrographycal composition and properties of dimension stone deposits in Croatia are described. Dimension stone deposits in the conception of mobilistic view of the genesis and structure of Dinarides, as well as after stratigraphic units, are considered. Valuation of the dimension stones of the active quarries is exposed. The marketable categories of dimension stone in Croatia are different varietes of limestones and calcareous clastites, primarly of Cretaceous age, and to lesser degree of Jurassic and Paleogene. The greatest part of deposits is concentrated in the Adriatic carbonate platform or Adriaticum.

  7. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark Raymond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  8. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on

  9. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY (1)METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20082280 An Fang(School of Earth and Space Sciences,Peking University,Beijing 100871,China);Zhu Yongfeng Studies on Geology and Geochemistry of Alteration- Type Ore in Hatu Gold Deposit(Western Junggar),Xinjiang,NW China(Mineral Deposits,ISSN0258—7106,CN11—1965/ P,26(6),2007,p.621—633,7 illus.,2 tables,48 refs.,with English abstract) Key words:gold deposits,Junggar Basin 20082281 An Guobao(No.212 Geological Party,Gansu Bureau of Nuclear Geology,

  10. Particle size distribution and anion content at a traffic site in Sha-Lu, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K F; Fang, G C; Lu, C S; Bai, H L

    2001-11-01

    Ambient air particle concentrations were sampled by two total suspended particle (TSP) samplers, PM10/PM2.5 specific sampler and micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) during July-October 2000 at a traffic sampling site in central Taiwan. The average TSP concentration (194 microg/m3) was about a factor of two higher than that of the fraction size class size distribution was bimodal in the ambient air at the traffic site. The major peaks appear at particle diameters between 0.56-1.0 and 3.2-5.6 microm. The percentages of anions contained in TSP were 0.24% F-, 13.7% Cl, 0.52% Br, 12.0% NO-, 18.9% NO2-, and 54.6% SO2-. The Cl-, NO2-, and NO3- size distributions were all unimodal and the major peaks appeared at 3.2-5.6 microm. The SO2 size distribution was bimodal, with major peaks at 0.32-0.56 and 3.2-5.6.

  11. Size-resolved measurements of ice nucleating particles at North American and European sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R.; Si, M.; Chou, C.; Irish, V.; Dickie, R.; Elizondo, P.; Wong, R.; Brintnell, M.; Elsasser, M.; Lassar, W.; Pierce, K.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A. M.; Platt, A.; Desiree, T. S.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Schiller, C. L.; Suski, K. J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Abbatt, J.; Huffman, J. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are a small fraction of the total aerosol population capable of catalyzing ice formation under atmospheric conditions, and may therefore influence the albedo and lifetime of mixed-phase and ice clouds. Compared to ambient measurements of the total number concentration of INPs, relatively little data exists on the size distribution of INPs in the atmosphere. Information on the size of INPs may be useful in source identification, modeling their transport in the atmosphere, and determining the degree to which common INP instrumentation captures the full atmospheric INP population. Measured using the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT), we report immersion-mode INP number concentrations as a function of particle size at ground-level sites in North America and Europe, including Arctic, alpine, coastal, marine, agricultural, and suburban environments. On average, more than 91 % of INPs active at -15 °C were found to be supermicron in size and 62 % were in the coarse mode (> 2.5 μm). While these percentages decreased with decreasing freezing temperature, many INPs remained in the supermicron with nearly half of those active at -25 °C belonging to the coarse mode.

  12. Characteristics of mass distributions of aerosol particle and its inorganic water-soluble ions in summer over a suburb farmland in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng; ZHU Tong; LIANG Baosheng; HU Min; KANG Ling; GONG Jicheng

    2007-01-01

    Agricultural activity is one of the most important sources of aerosol particles.To understand the mass distribution and sources of aerosol particles and their inorganic water-soluble ions in a suburb farmland of Beijing,particle samples were collected using a microoririce uniform deposit impactor(MOUDI)in the summer of 2004 in a suburb vegetable field.The distribution of the particles and their inorganic water-soluble ions in the diameter range of 0.18-18 μm were measured.The dominant fine particle ions were SO42-,NO3-,and NH4+.The association of day-to-day variation of the concentration of these ions with temperature,humidity,and solar radiation suggested that they ate formed by the reaction of NH3 released from the vegetable field with the acid species produced from photochemical reactions.Fine particle K+ is likely from vegetation emission and biomass burning.Coarse particles like Ca2+,Mg2+,NO3-,and SO42- are suggested to come from the mechanical process by which the soil particle entered the atmosphere,and from the reaction of the acid species at the surface of the soil particle.The results show that fertilizer and soil are important factors determining the aerosol particle over agricultural fields,and vegetable fields in suburban Beijing contribute significantly to the aerosol particle.

  13. Co-release of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and Nano- and microparticles from thermal cutting of polystyrene foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Gerecke, Andreas C; Wang, Jing

    2012-10-16

    Polystyrene foam is a very important insulation material, and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is frequently used as its flame retardant. HBCD is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic, and therefore workplace exposure and environmental emission should be avoided. In this study, we investigated the co-release of HBCD and aerosol particles during the thermal cutting of expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) and extruded polystyrene foam (XPS). The generated particles were simultaneously measured by a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and collected by a cascade impactor (NanoMoudi). In the breathing zone of a cutting worker, the number concentration of aerosol particles was above 1 × 10(12) particles m(-3), and the air concentration of HBCD was more than 50 μg m(-3). Most of the released HBCD was partitioned into particles with an aerodynamic diameter at the nanometer scale. The average concentrations of HBCD in these submicrometer particles generated from the thermal cutting of EPS and XPS were 13 times and 15 times higher than the concentrations in raw foams, respectively. An occupational exposure assessment indicated that more than 60% of HBCD and 70% of particles deposited in the lung of cutting worker would be allocated to the alveolar region. The potential subchronic (or chronic) toxicity jointly caused by the particles and HBCD calls for future studies.

  14. Atomic layer deposition for semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-01-01

    This edited volume discusses atomic layer deposition (ALD) for all modern semiconductor devices, moving from the basic chemistry of ALD and modeling of ALD processes to sections on ALD for memories, logic devices, and machines.

  15. The zeolite deposits of Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hall, A.; Hein, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Zeolites are present in altered pyroclastic rocks at many localities in Greece, and large deposits of potential economic interest are present in three areas: (1) the Evros region of the province of Thrace in the north-eastern part of the Greek mainland; (2) the islands of Kimolos and Poliegos in the western Aegean; and (3) the island of Samos in the eastern Aegean Sea. The deposits in Thrace are of Eocene-Oligocene age and are rich in heulandite and/or clinoptilolite. Those of Kimolos and Poliegos are mainly Quaternary and are rich in mordenite. Those of Samos are Miocene, and are rich in clinoptilolite and/or analcime. The deposits in Thrace are believed to have formed in an open hydrological system by the action of meteoric water, and those of the western Aegean islands in a similar way but under conditions of high heat flow, whereas the deposits in Samos were formed in a saline-alkaline lake.

  16. Electrospark deposition for die repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tušek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrospark deposition is a process for surfacing of hard metal alloys, e.g. carbides and stellites, on the surfaces of new or old machine elements. In this process, a high current is conducted through an oscillating electrode and a substrate for a very short period of time. In the paper, the process is described and the thickness of deposited layer, chemical composition, dilution rate and the layer roughness are determined.

  17. Electrospark deposition for die repair

    OpenAIRE

    J. Tušek; Kosec, L.; Lešnjak, A.; T. Muhič

    2012-01-01

    The electrospark deposition is a process for surfacing of hard metal alloys, e.g. carbides and stellites, on the surfaces of new or old machine elements. In this process, a high current is conducted through an oscillating electrode and a substrate for a very short period of time. In the paper, the process is described and the thickness of deposited layer, chemical composition, dilution rate and the layer roughness are determined.

  18. Thin Film Deposition Techniques (PVD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeiss, E.

    The most interesting materials for spin electronic devices are thin films of magnetic transition metals and magnetic perovskites, mainly the doped La-manganites [1] as well as several oxides and metals for passivating and contacting the magnetic films. The most suitable methods for the preparation of such films are the physical vapor deposition methods (PVD). Therefore this report will be restricted to these deposition methods.

  19. Seasonal size distribution of airborne culturable bacteria and fungi and preliminary estimation of their deposition in human lungs during non-haze and haze days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Jia, Ruizhi; Qiu, Tianlei; Han, Meilin; Song, Yuan; Wang, Xuming

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, haze events in Beijing have significantly increased in frequency. On haze days, airborne microorganisms are considered to be a potential risk factor for various health concerns. However, limited information on bioaerosols has prevented our proper understanding of the possible threat to human health due to these bioaerosols. In this study, we used a six-stage impactor for sampling culturable bioaerosols and the LUDEP 2.07 computer-based model for calculating their deposition on human lungs to investigate seasonal concentration, size distribution, and corresponding deposition efficiency and flux in the human respiratory tract during different haze-level events. The current results of the analysis of 398 samples over four seasons indicate that the concentration of culturable airborne bacteria decreased with increasing haze severity. The bioaerosol concentration ratio was skewed towards larger particle sizes on heavy haze days leading to larger bioaerosol aerodynamic diameters than on non-haze days. During nasal breathing by an adult male engaged in light exercise in an outdoor environment, the total deposition efficiency of culturable bioaerosols is 80-90% including approximately 70% in the upper respiratory tract, 5-7% in the alveoli, and about 3% in the bronchial couple with bronchiolar regions. Although the difference in culturable bioaerosol aerodynamic diameters at different haze levels was not large enough to cause obvious differences in lung deposition efficiency, the deposition fluxes clearly varied with the degree of haze owing to the varied concentration of culturable airborne bacteria and fungi. The results here could improve our understanding of the seasonal health threat due to culturable bioaerosols during non-haze and haze days.

  20. Energy deposition of thermal tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, E.

    2015-12-01

    The main role of vertically propagating waves in the general circulation is to transfer pseudo momentum from the region of generation to the region of wave breaking. The most prominent examples in atmospheric dynamics are planetary Rossby waves forced in the troposphere, which drive a poleward residual circulation in the winter stratosphere, and mesoscale gravity waves with tropospheric origin, which drive a summer-to-winter-pole circulation in the mesopasue region. In addition, the role of energy deposition by gravity waves has long been recognized to contribute substantially to the energy budget above the stratopause. In atmospheric circulation models, gravity waves are usually parameterized. Their energy deposition can be computed along with the momentum deposition and the turbulent diffusivity associated with wave breaking. In particular, the energy deposition is expressed in terms of secondary moments of the parameterized waves. Therefore, one is tempted to assume that the energy deposition of waves that are resolved in circulation models, e.g., Rossby waves and thermal tides, is automatically taken into account. This assumption is, however, flawed. We show that the energy deposition by resolved waves corresponds to the shear production (frictional heating) of the subgrid-scale turbulence model by which these waves are damped. Computational results from an atmospheric circulation model with energetically consistent treatment of momentum diffusion and frictional heating show that the energy deposition of thermal tides is substantial above the mesopause. This effect is either incomplete or even ignored in conventional atmospheric models that resolve the mesopause region. An idealized sensitivity experiment furthermore shows that thermal tides lead to a significant downward shift of gravity-wave breaking in the upper mesosphere.

  1. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    CERN Document Server

    Guiseppe, V E; Hime, A; Rielage, K; Westerdale, S

    2011-01-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly Rn-222) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of Pb-210 on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to depos...

  2. Combustion iron distribution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao; Mahowald, N.; Bond, T.; Chuang, P. Y.; Artaxo, P.; Siefert, R.; Chen, Y.; Schauer, J.

    2008-03-01

    Iron is hypothesized to be an important micronutrient for ocean biota, thus modulating carbon dioxide uptake by the ocean biological pump. Studies have assumed that atmospheric deposition of iron to the open ocean is predominantly from mineral aerosols. For the first time we model the source, transport, and deposition of iron from combustion sources. Iron is produced in small quantities during fossil fuel burning, incinerator use, and biomass burning. The sources of combustion iron are concentrated in the industrialized regions and biomass burning regions, largely in the tropics. Model results suggest that combustion iron can represent up to 50% of the total iron deposited, but over open ocean regions it is usually less than 5% of the total iron, with the highest values (ocean biogeochemistry the bioavailability of the iron is important, and this is often estimated by the fraction which is soluble (Fe(II)). Previous studies have argued that atmospheric processing of the relatively insoluble Fe(III) occurs to make it more soluble (Fe(II)). Modeled estimates of soluble iron amounts based solely on atmospheric processing as simulated here cannot match the variability in daily averaged in situ concentration measurements in Korea, which is located close to both combustion and dust sources. The best match to the observations is that there are substantial direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion processes. If we assume observed soluble Fe/black carbon ratios in Korea are representative of the whole globe, we obtain the result that deposition of soluble iron from combustion contributes 20-100% of the soluble iron deposition over many ocean regions. This implies that more work should be done refining the emissions and deposition of combustion sources of soluble iron globally.

  3. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

    2004-06-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

  4. Nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王强斌; 高芒来; 张嗣伟

    2000-01-01

    The nanofriction properties of Au substrate and monolayer molecular deposition film and multilayer molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the molecular deposition films modified with alkyl-terminal molecule have been investigated by using an atomic force microscope. It is concluded that ( i ) the deposition of molecular deposition films on Au substrate and the modification of alkyl-terminal molecule to the molecular deposition films can reduce the frictional force; (ii) the molecular deposition films with the same terminal exhibit similar nanofriction properties, which has nothing to do with the molecular chain-length and the layer number; (iii) the unstable nanofriction properties of molecular deposition films are contributed to the active terminal of the molecular deposition film, which can be eliminated by decorating the active molecular deposition film with alkyl-terminal molecule, moreover, the decoration of alkyl-terminal molecule can lower the frictional force conspicuously; (iv) the relat

  5. Analysing the Cenozoic depositional record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goledowski, Bartosz; Clausen, O.R.; Nielsen, S.B.

    It is well known that sediment deposition in the North Sea and on the Norwegian Shelf varied significantly during the Cenozoic as a consequence of varying erosion rate mainly in Western Scandinavia, in Scotland and in the Alps. Recent results have demonstrated that a causal relationship exists...... of variations in erosion rates. Here we present the rationale behind the project, the data available and some preliminary results. The dense seismic and well coverage in the area makes it possible to estimate the rate of deposition of matrix mass. Assuming that sediment storage is not important, this provides...

  6. Bank deposits, notions and features of accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta MELNIC

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bank deposits are the main method of raising capital and short-term available savings. The opening and using of the bank deposits is the main function of banks. In 2004 the Deposit Guarantee Fund was set up in the Republic of Moldova of Deposit Guarantee Fund and for the first time there was established a guaranteed bank minimum in case of bank insolvency which is currently 6,000 lei for the deposit of each natural person.

  7. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  8. Systems for Guaranteeing Bank Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Florin Untaru

    2013-01-01

    The advent of the financial crisis and the latest event that occurred in Cyprus bring new light to how states intervene when commercial banks are facing the risk of bankruptcy. While until now institutions had a clear traditional role to protect depositors, currently there is a trend to transfer damage to companies and individuals that hold deposits.

  9. Chemical-vapor-deposition reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, S.

    1979-01-01

    Reactor utilizes multiple stacked trays compactly arranged in paths of horizontally channeled reactant gas streams. Design allows faster and more efficient deposits of film on substrates, and reduces gas and energy consumption. Lack of dead spots that trap reactive gases reduces reactor purge time.

  10. Electro-spark deposition technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated critical to the life and economy of the advanced fossil energy systems as the higher temperatures and corrosive environments exceed the limits of known structural materials to accommodate the service conditions. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. A new development is the demonstration of advanced aluminide-based ESD coatings for erosion and wear applications. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that yields an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Achieving this regime has required the development of advanced ESD electronic capabilities. Development is now focused on further improvements in deposition rates, system reliability when operating at process extremes, and economic competitiveness.

  11. Nitrogen deposition and terrestrial biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher M. Clark; Yongfei Bai; William D. Bowman; Jane M. Cowles; Mark E. Fenn; Frank S. Gilliam; Gareth K. Phoenix; Ilyas Siddique; Carly J. Stevens; Harald U. Sverdrup; Heather L. Throop

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen deposition, along with habitat losses and climate change, has been identified as a primary threat to biodiversity worldwide (Butchart et al., 2010; MEA, 2005; Sala et al., 2000). The source of this stressor to natural systems is generally twofold: burning of fossil fuels and the use of fertilizers in modern intensive agriculture. Each of these human...

  12. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY (2)NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20082329 Chen Wang(China University of Geosciences,Beijing 100083,China) Control Factors on Distribution of Carboniferous Bauxite Deposits in Western Henan Province (Geotectonica et Metallogenia,ISSN1001—1552,CN44—1595/P,31(4),2007,p.452—456,1 illus.,10 refs.) Key words:bauxite,mineralization con- trols,Henan Province

  13. Titania Deposition on PMR-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Mary B.; Sutter, James K.; Pizem, Hillel; Gershevitz, Olga; Goffer, Yossi; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Milhet, Xavier; McIlwain, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The formation, degree of crystallinity and adherence of dense titania (TiO2) thin film coatings on a high-temperature polyimide resin (PMR-15) can be influenced by the chemical composition of the polymer surface. Furthermore, solution deposition conditions can be adjusted to provide additional control over the morphology and crystallinity of the titania films. Recipes for solution-based titania deposition that used a slowly-hydrolyzing titanium fluoride salt in the presence of boric acid as a fluoride scavenger allowed growth of films up to 750 nm thick in 22 h. By adjusting solution pH and temperature, either amorphous titania or oriented crystalline anatase films could be formed. Surface sulfonate groups enhance the adhesion of solution-deposited oxide thin film coatings. While most sulfonation procedures severely damaged the PMR-15 surface, the use of chlorosulfonic acid followed by hydrolysis of the installed chlorosulfonyl groups provided effective surface sulfonation without significant surface damage. In some cases, the oxide deposition solution caused partial hydrolysis of the polymer surface, which itself was sufficient to allow adhesion of the titania film through chelation of titanium ions by exposed benzoic acid groups on the polymer surface.

  14. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  15. Deposition and Resuspension of Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lengweiler, P.; Nielsen, Peter V.; Moser, A.

    To investigate the physical process of deposition and resuspension of particles in the indoor environment, scale experiments are used and a sampling method is established. The influences of surface orientation and turbulence and velocity of the air on the dust load on a surface are analysed....

  16. Soot Deposit Properties in Practical Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preciado, Ignacio [University of Utah; Eddings, Eric G. [University of Utah; Sarofim, Adel F. [University of Utah; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Soot deposition from hydrocarbon flames was investigated in order to evaluate the evolution of the deposits during the transient process of heating an object that starts with a cold metal surface that is exposed to a flame. The study focused on the fire/metal surface interface and the critical issues associated with the specification of the thermal boundaries at this interface, which include the deposition of soot on the metal surface, the chemical and physical properties of the soot deposits and their subsequent effect on heat transfer to the metal surface. A laboratory-scale device (metallic plates attached to a water-cooled sampling probe) was designed for studying soot deposition in a laminar ethylene-air premixed flame. The metallic plates facilitate the evaluation of the deposition rates and deposit characteristics such as deposit thickness, bulk density, PAH content, deposit morphology, and thermal properties, under both water-cooled and uncooled conditions. Additionally, a non-intrusive Laser Flash Technique (in which the morphology of the deposit is not modified) was used to estimate experimental thermal conductivity values for soot deposits as a function of deposition temperature (water-cooled and uncooled experiments), location within the flame and chemical characteristics of the deposits. Important differences between water-cooled and uncooled surfaces were observed. Thermophoresis dominated the soot deposition process and enhanced higher deposition rates for the water-cooled experiments. Cooler surface temperatures resulted in the inclusion of increased amounts of condensable hydrocarbons in the soot deposit. The greater presence of condensable material promoted decreased deposit thicknesses, larger deposit densities, different deposit morphologies, and higher thermal conductivities.

  17. Constructing deposition chronologies for peat deposits using radiocarbon dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Piotrowska

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon dating is one of the main methods used to establish peat chronologies. This article reviews the basis of the method and its application to dating of peat deposits. Important steps in the radiocarbon dating procedure are described, including selection and extraction of material (and fractions for dating, chemical and physical preparation of media suitable for measurements, measurements of 14C activity or concentration, calculations, calibration of results and age-depth modelling.

  18. Iron-sulfide crystals in probe deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming

    1998-01-01

    Iron-sulfides were observed in deposits collected on a probe inserted at the top of the furnace of a coal-fired power station in Denmark. The chemical composition of the iron-sulfides is equivalent to pyrrhotite (FeS). The pyrrhotites are present as crystals and, based on the shape of the crystals......, it was deduced that they were not deposited but instead grew within the deposit. The presence of unburned char particles within the deposits supports the concept that a reducing environment existed in the deposits. Two processes are proposed for explaining the existence of pyrrhotite crystals within a deposit...

  19. films using atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervinskii, Semen; Matikainen, Antti; Dergachev, Alexey; Lipovskii, Andrey A.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2014-08-01

    We fabricated self-assembled silver nanoisland films using a recently developed technique based on out-diffusion of silver from an ion-exchanged glass substrate in reducing atmosphere. We demonstrate that the position of the surface plasmon resonance of the films depends on the conditions of the film growth. The resonance can be gradually shifted up to 100 nm towards longer wavelengths by using atomic layer deposition of titania, from 3 to 100 nm in thickness, upon the film. Examination of the nanoisland films in surface-enhanced Raman spectrometry showed that, in spite of a drop of the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) signal after the titania spacer deposition, the Raman signal can be observed with spacers up to 7 nm in thickness. Denser nanoisland films show slower decay of the SERS signal with the increase in spacer thickness.

  20. Electro-spark deposition technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated as one of the enabling technologies for advanced energy systems. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that promises an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Since this regime borders on and exceeds the normal operating limits of existing ESD electronic equipment, development is in progress to produce equipment that can consistently and reliably achieve these conditions for a broad range of materials. Progress so far has resulted in a consistent 500% increase in deposition rates, and greater rates still are anticipated. Technology transfer activities are a significant portion of the ESD program effort. Notable successes now include the start-up of a new business to commercialize the ESD technology, the incorporation of the process into the operations of a major gas turbine manufacturer, major new applications in gas turbine blade and steam turbine blade protection and repair, and in military, medical, metal-working, and recreational equipment applications.

  1. Complexing and hydrothermal ore deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Helgeson, Harold C

    1964-01-01

    Complexing and Hydrothermal Ore Deposition provides a synthesis of fact, theory, and interpretative speculation on hydrothermal ore-forming solutions. This book summarizes information and theory of the internal chemistry of aqueous electrolyte solutions accumulated in previous years. The scope of the discussion is limited to those aspects of particular interest to the geologist working on the problem of hydrothermal ore genesis. Wherever feasible, fundamental principles are reviewed. Portions of this text are devoted to calculations of specific hydrothermal equilibriums in multicompone

  2. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Insured Banks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Summary of Deposits (SOD) is the annual survey of branch office deposits for all FDIC-insured institutions including insured U.S. branches of foreign banks. Data...

  3. Isotropic metal deposition technique for metamaterials fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    In this work we will present the first steps taken towards isotropic deposition of thin metallic layers on dielectric substrates. The deposition takes place in aqueous environment thus making it both cheap and easy to be implemented....

  4. Stability of nanocrystalline electrochemically deposited layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The technological demand for manufacturing components with complex geometries of micrometer or sub-micrometer dimensions and ambitions for ongoing miniaturization have attracted particular attention to electrochemical deposition methods. Thin layers of electrochemically deposited metals and alloys...

  5. Isotropic metal deposition technique for metamaterials fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    In this work we will present the first steps taken towards isotropic deposition of thin metallic layers on dielectric substrates. The deposition takes place in aqueous environment thus making it both cheap and easy to be implemented....

  6. CTD_DATABASE - Cascadia tsunami deposit database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have...

  7. Mineral deposits in western Saudi Arabia; a preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ralph Jackson; Greenwood, William R.; Worl, Ronald G.; Dodge, F.C.W.; Kiilsgaard, Thor H.

    1975-01-01

    Mineral deposits in Saudi Arabia include a variety of deposits which were formed in many geologic environments. These include magmatic and late magmatic deposits in igneous masses, contact metamorphic deposits along the margins of igneous bodies, and stratiform sulfide deposits and veins. Notable deposits of sedimentary origin include deposits of iron oxides and phosphate.

  8. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The results reveal the effect of temperature, ash/deposit composition......, sintering duration, and steel type on the adhesion strength....

  9. 39 CFR 955.17 - Depositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Depositions. 955.17 Section 955.17 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE BEFORE THE POSTAL SERVICE BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS § 955.17 Depositions. (a) When depositions permitted. After an appeal has been docketed and...

  10. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  11. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  12. DEPOSITION OF PARTICLES IN TURBULENT PIPE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaowei Luo; Suyuan Yu

    2006-01-01

    The deposition of particles in turbulent pipe flow was investigated in terms of two mechanisms, turbulent and thermophoretic. A general equation incorporating these two mechanisms was formulated to calculate the deposition efficiency of aerosol particles in turbulent pipe flow together with thermophoretic deposition. The validity of the equation was confirmed by good agreement between calculated and measured results.

  13. Organic composition of PM 2.5 and size-segregated aerosols and their sources during the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Raphaël T.; Riemer, Daniel D.; Zika, Rod G.

    PM 2.5 and size-segregated aerosols were collected in May 2002 as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA. Aerosol organic composition was used to estimate sources of a series of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using chemical indices, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and a chemical mass balance receptor model (CMB). Aerosols were collected on quartz fiber filters (QFF) using a PM 2.5 high volume sampler and on aluminum foil discs using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI, 50% aerodynamic cut diameters were 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.315 and 0.171 μm). Target compounds included alkanes and PAHs and were solvent extracted using a mixture of dichloromethane, acetone and hexane, concentrated and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The target compounds in PM 2.5 were dominated by six sources during the study period: mobile sources (39±5%), coal burning (33±5%), biogenic primary emission (20±2%), oil combustion (5±2%), biomass burning (1.0±0.3%) and an unidentified source (3±2%). Results obtained from the chemical indices, HCA and CMB were in very good agreement with each other. PAH size distributions are presented for days dominated by a same source. Seventy-five percent and 50% of the PAH were found below 1.8 and 0.56 μm, respectively (monthly PAH geometric diameters averaged 0.43 μm). Coarse size PAHs were observed on 1 day (15 May) and were correlated with nitrate and sodium size distribution. It is hypothesized that the PAHs, sodium and nitrate were internally mixed and that the PAHs deposited onto a pre-existing marine aerosol. This transfer process has significant implications for PAH deposition and lifetime and warrants further study.

  14. Extraterrestrial Impact Event Recorded in the Late Triassic Deep-Sea Deposits from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H.; Shirai, N.; Ebihara, M.; Nozaki, T.; Suzuki, K.; Onoue, T.; Kiyokawa, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Late Triassic is marked by the formation of several large impact structures on the Earth, including the 90-km-diameter Manicouagan crater in Canada (Spray and Kelly, 1998). Anomalously high platinum group element (PGE) concentrations have been reported from the Upper Triassic deep-sea deposits in Japan, which have been interpreted to be derived from an extraterrestrial impact event forming the Manicouagan crater (Onoue et al., 2012; Sato et al., 2013). However, previous studies have not clarified the composition of the projectile. Here we report the PGE element ratios and osmium (Os) isotopic compositions of the Upper Triassic ejecta layers in Japan in order to understand the projectile component. Evidence for the Late Triassic impact event has been discovered in the deep-sea claystone layers at four bedded chert sections in the Japanese accretionary complex. The claystone layers contain microspherules, Ni-rich magnetite grains and high abundance of PGEs (Onoue et al., 2012). Biostratigraphic analysis of radiolarian fossils from the studied sections revealed that the claystone layers occur embedded in the upper middle Norian (Sugiyama, 1997; Onoue et al., 2012). Identification of the projectile is attempted by comparing the isotope and elemental ratios of the ejecta deposit with similar data obtained from meteorites. The Ru/Ir and Pt/Ir ratios of all the claystone samples from the study sites are plotted along the mixing line between chondrites and upper continental crust. Although chondrites cannot be distinguished from iron meteorites by using PGE/Ir ratios, the claystone layers have Cr/Ir ratios between 104-105, indicating that the claystone layers are clearly contaminated by chondritic material. The Os isotope data show an abrupt and marked negative excursion from an initial Os isotope ratio of ~0.477 to unradiogenic values of ~0.126 in a claystone layer within a middle Norian bedded chert, indicating the input of chondrite-derived Os into seawater. The

  15. Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    In the current report, a design and capabilities of a cluster implantation and deposition apparatus (CIDA) involving two different cluster sources are described. The clusters produced from gas precursors (Ar, N etc.) by PuCluS-2 can be used to study cluster ion implantation in order to develop...... contributions to the theory of cluster stopping in matter as well as for practical applications requiring ultra-shallow implantation and modification of surfaces on the nanoscale. Metal clusters from the magnetron cluster source are of interest for the production of optical sensors to detect specific biological...

  16. Deposit Reserve Rate No Panacea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark; A.DeWeaver

    2006-01-01

    To rein in runaway investment, China's central bank, the People's Bank of China (PBOC), took several measures in mid-June, including the most dramatic step of raising the deposit reserve rate by 0.5 percentage point According to Mark A. DeWeaver, who manages Quantrarian Asia Hedge, a fund that invests in Asian equities, the PBOC's measures may lower money supply growth in the short term; that is, the effect of these measures "may be only temporary." He believes that "attempts to slow money supply growth ...

  17. Metal deposition using seed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hsein-Ping; Chen, Gang; Bo, Yu; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Shuo; Poudel, Bed

    2013-11-12

    Methods of forming a conductive metal layers on substrates are disclosed which employ a seed layer to enhance bonding, especially to smooth, low-roughness or hydrophobic substrates. In one aspect of the invention, the seed layer can be formed by applying nanoparticles onto a surface of the substrate; and the metallization is achieved by electroplating an electrically conducting metal onto the seed layer, whereby the nanoparticles serve as nucleation sites for metal deposition. In another approach, the seed layer can be formed by a self-assembling linker material, such as a sulfur-containing silane material.

  18. Energetic deposition of thin metal films

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Busaidy, M S K

    2001-01-01

    deposited films. The primary aim of this thesis was to study the physical effect of energetic deposition metal thin films. The secondary aim is to enhance the quality of the films produced to a desired quality. Grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) measurements from a high-energy synchrotron radiation source were carried out to study and characterise the samples. Optical Profilers Interferometery, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Medium energy ion spectroscopy (MEIS), and the Electron microscope studies were the other main structural characterisation tools used. AI/Fe trilayers, as well as multilayers were deposited using a Nordico planar D.C. magnetron deposition system at different voltage biases and pressures. The films were calibrated and investigated. The relation between energetic deposition variation and structural properties was intensely researched. Energetic deposition refers to the method in which the deposited species possess higher kinetic energy and impact ...

  19. Thermoluminescence dating of the british coversand deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, M. D.

    Coversand deposits, thought to be of Lateglacial age are found in Britain in North Lincolnshire, South-West Lancashire and Central East Anglia. A comprehensive dating study of them, using thermoluminescence (TL) techniques, is currently underway in an attempt to link the British coversand deposits to the European coversand chronology. Initial results from four of the British coversand sites sampled are presented. The 26 TL dates from 14 samples show that in Lincolnshire aeolian deposition took place from 12.5 ka to I1 ka. Cessation of the initial sand deposition was synchronous with this in Lancashire, but sand deposition occurred significantly earlier in East Anglia. The upper layers of aeolian sand in Lancashire are much younger and are attributed to Holocene reworking. On the basis of these dates, Lincolnshire and Lancashire coversand deposition occurred at a similar time to the Younger Coversand II, whilst East Anglian coversand deposition coincided with the Younger Coversand I phase in the European coversand chronology.

  20. Size distributions, sources and source areas of water-soluble organic carbon in urban background air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Timonen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the results of one year long measurement period of the size distributions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC, inorganic ions and gravimetric mass of particulate matter. Measurements were done at an urban background station (SMEAR III by using a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI. The site is located in northern European boreal region in Helsinki, Finland. The WSOC size distribution measurements were completed with the chemical analysis of inorganic ions, organic carbon (OC and monosaccharide anhydrides from the filter samples (particle aerodynamic diameter smaller than 1 μm, PM1. Gravimetric mass concentration varied during the MOUDI samplings between 3.4 and 55.0 μg m−3 and the WSOC concentrations were between 0.3 and 7.4 μg m−3. On average, water-soluble particulate organic matter (WSPOM, WSOC multiplied by 1.6 to convert the analyzed carbon mass to organic matter mass comprised 25±7.7% and 7.5±3.4% of aerosol PM1 mass and the PM1–10 mass, respectively. Inorganic ions contributed 33±12% and 28±19% of the analyzed PM1 and PM1–10 aerosol mass.

    Five different aerosol categories corresponding to different sources or source areas were identified (long-range transport aerosols, biomass burning aerosols from wild land fires and from small-scale wood combustion, aerosols originating from marine areas and from the clean arctic areas. Categories were identified mainly using levoglucosan concentration level for wood combustion and air mass backward trajectories for other groups. Clear differences in WSOC concentrations and size distributions originating from different sources or source areas were observed, although there are also many other factors which might affect the results. E.g. the local conditions and sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs and aerosols as well as various transformation processes are likely

  1. The relationship between various exposure metrics for elongate mineral particles (EMP) in the taconite mining and processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jooyeon; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Raynor, Peter C; Alexander, Bruce H; Mandel, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    Different dimensions of elongate mineral particles (EMP) have been proposed as being relevant to respiratory health end-points such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. In this article, a methodology for converting personal EMP exposures measured using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) 7400/7402 methods to exposures based on other size-based definitions has been proposed and illustrated. Area monitoring for EMP in the taconite mines in Minnesota's Mesabi Iron Range was conducted using a Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) size-fractionating sampler. EMP on stages of the MOUDI were counted and sized according to each EMP definition using an indirect-transfer transmission electron microscopy (ISO Method 13794). EMP were identified using energy-dispersive x-ray and electron diffraction analysis. Conversion factors between the EMP counts based on different definitions were estimated using (1) a linear regression model across all locations and (2) a location-specific ratio of the count based on each EMP definition to the NIOSH 7400/7402 count. The highest fractions of EMP concentrations were found for EMP that were 1-3 μm in length and 0.2-0.5 μm in width. Therefore, the current standard NIOSH Method 7400, which only counts EMP >5 μm in length and ≥ 3 in aspect ratio, may underestimate amphibole EMP exposures. At the same time, there was a high degree of correlation between the exposures estimated according to the different size-based metrics. Therefore, the various dimensional definitions probably do not result in different dose-response relationships in epidemiological analyses. Given the high degree of correlation between the various metrics, a result consistent with prior research, a more reasonable metric might be the measurement of all EMP irrespective of size. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the

  2. Comparative measurements of ambient atmospheric concentrations of ice nucleating particles using multiple immersion freezing methods and a continuous flow diffusion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, Paul J.; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Petters, Markus D.; Bertram, Allan K.; Tobo, Yutaka; Mason, Ryan H.; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; McCluskey, Christina S.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Schill, Gregory P.; Boose, Yvonne; Rauker, Anne Marie; Miller, Anna J.; Zaragoza, Jake; Rocci, Katherine; Rothfuss, Nicholas E.; Taylor, Hans P.; Hader, John D.; Chou, Cedric; Huffman, J. Alex; Pöschl, Ulrich; Prenni, Anthony J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2017-09-01

    A number of new measurement methods for ice nucleating particles (INPs) have been introduced in recent years, and it is important to address how these methods compare. Laboratory comparisons of instruments sampling major INP types are common, but few comparisons have occurred for ambient aerosol measurements exploring the utility, consistency and complementarity of different methods to cover the large dynamic range of INP concentrations that exists in the atmosphere. In this study, we assess the comparability of four offline immersion freezing measurement methods (Colorado State University ice spectrometer, IS; North Carolina State University cold stage, CS; National Institute for Polar Research Cryogenic Refrigerator Applied to Freezing Test, CRAFT; University of British Columbia micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique, MOUDI-DFT) and an online method (continuous flow diffusion chamber, CFDC) used in a manner deemed to promote/maximize immersion freezing, for the detection of INPs in ambient aerosols at different locations and in different sampling scenarios. We also investigated the comparability of different aerosol collection methods used with offline immersion freezing instruments. Excellent agreement between all methods could be obtained for several cases of co-sampling with perfect temporal overlap. Even for sampling periods that were not fully equivalent, the deviations between atmospheric INP number concentrations measured with different methods were mostly less than 1 order of magnitude. In some cases, however, the deviations were larger and not explicable without sampling and measurement artifacts. Overall, the immersion freezing methods seem to effectively capture INPs that activate as single particles in the modestly supercooled temperature regime (> -20 °C), although more comparisons are needed in this temperature regime that is difficult to access with online methods. Relative to the CFDC method, three immersion freezing

  3. Arc-related porphyry molybdenum deposit model: Chapter D in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan D.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a descriptive model for arc-related porphyry molybdenum deposits. Presented within are geological, geochemical, and mineralogical characteristics that differentiate this deposit type from porphyry copper and alkali-feldspar rhyolite-granite porphyry molybdenum deposits. The U.S. Geological Survey's effort to update existing mineral deposit models spurred this research, which is intended to supplement previously published models for this deposit type that help guide mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments.

  4. Legal Deposit of Digital Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Oltmans

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital publishing is causing a real paradigm shift for research institutions and publishers, as well as for libraries. As a consequence these institutions have to develop new policies, new business models and new infrastructures and techniques. A major problem is that, at the same rate at which our world is becoming digital, the digital information is threatened. New types of hardware, computer applications and file formats supersede each other, making our recorded digital information inaccessible in the long-term. In the past years libraries and archives have undertaken several actions and studies on digital preservation issues. For instance the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (KB has jointly with IBM developed a standard-based deposit system: Digital Information Archiving System ( DIAS. Using DIAS the KB realised in 2002 an electronic deposit (the e-Depot and signed archiving agreements with major science publishers for permanent keeping of their digital materials. In this paper I will discuss the fully operational e-Depot at the KB. I will focus on the data flow of processing the digital publications, and I will address the issue of digital preservation in detail.

  5. Physiopathology of intratendinous calcific deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva Francesco

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In calcific tendinopathy (CT, calcium deposits in the substance of the tendon, with chronic activity-related pain, tenderness, localized edema and various degrees of decreased range of motion. CT is particularly common in the rotator cuff, and supraspinatus, Achilles and patellar tendons. The presence of calcific deposits may worsen the clinical manifestations of tendinopathy with an increase in rupture rate, slower recovery times and a higher frequency of post-operative complications. The aetiopathogenesis of CT is still controversial, but seems to be the result of an active cell-mediated process and a localized attempt of the tendon to compensate the original decreased stiffness. Tendon healing includes many sequential processes, and disturbances at different stages of healing may lead to different combinations of histopathological changes, diverting the normal healing processes to an abnormal pathway. In this review, we discuss the theories of pathogenesis behind CT. Better understanding of the pathogenesis is essential for development of effective treatment modalities and for improvement of clinical outcomes.

  6. BREAKTHROUGH INDEX AND SPECIFIC DEPOSIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awatif Soaded Al-Saqqar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The dual filter was tested in this study to improve the performance of the filtration process in water treatment plants. Porcelanite rocks were selected to be the dual media with sand in the experimental work. The work required installing a pilot filtration unit in the location of the filters in one of the water treatment plants. The pilot filtration consists of three plastic column filters, acting parallel and simultaneously. The first contains 70 cm sand, the second and third were dual filters (porcelanite with sand of different types. The dual media was tested at different filtration rates (5, 7.5, 10, and 15 m/hr. The results showed that the dual filters had better performance than sand filters and reduced the specific deposit (σ and the breakthrough index (BI. In the dual filters the specific deposit was about (16 to 65 % less than in sand filters and the breakthrough index (BI was specified weak for rates 5 and 7 m/hr, light at 10 m/hr, and medium at 15 m/hr.

  7. Extrinsic lactose fines improve dry powder inhaler formulation performance of a cohesive batch of budesonide via agglomerate formation and consequential co-deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Hanne; Hebbink, Gerald; Peters, Harry; Huck, Deborah; Makein, Lisa; Price, Robert

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate how the fine particle content of lactose carriers prepared with different types of lactose fines regulates dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation performance of a cohesive batch of micronised budesonide. Budesonide formulations (0.8 wt%) were prepared with three different lactose carriers (Lactohale (LH) LH100, 20 wt% LH210 in LH100 and 20 wt% LH300 in LH100). Fine particle fraction of emitted dose (FPFED) and mean mass aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of budesonide was assessed with a Next Generation Impactor (NGI) using a Cyclohaler at 90 l/min. Morphological and chemical characteristics of particles deposited on Stage 2 were determined using a Malvern Morphologi G3-ID. The results indicate that increasing concentration of lactose fines (lactose particles were available the more agglomerates of budesonide and lactose were delivered to Stage 2. These results suggest drug-fines agglomerate formation is an important mechanism for how lactose fines improve and regulate DPI formulation performance.

  8. Atmospheric aerosol in an urban area: Comparison of measurement instruments and methodologies and pulmonary deposition assessment; Aerosol atmosferico in area urbanae di misura e valutazione di deposizione polmonare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Luciani, A.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-07-01

    In March 1995 a measurement campaign of atmospheric aerosol in the Bologna urban area (Italy) was carried out. A transportable laboratory, set up by ENEA (Italian national Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) Environmental Department (Bologna), was utilized with instruments for measurement of atmospheric aerosol and meteorological parameters. The aim of this campaign was of dual purpose: to characterize aerosol in urban area and to compare different instruments and methodologies of measurements. Mass concentrations measurements, evaluated on a 23-hour period with total filter, PM10 dichotomous sampler and low pressure impactor (LPI Berner), have provided information respectively about total suspended particles, respirable fraction and granulometric parameters of aerosol. Eight meteorologic parameters, number concentration of submicromic fraction of aerosol and mass concentration of micromic fraction have been continually measured. Then, in a daytime period, several number granulometries of atmospheric aerosol have also been estimated by means of diffusion battery system. Results related to different measurement methodologies and granulometric characteristics of aerosol are presented here. Pulmonary deposition of atmospheric aerosol is finally calculated, using granulometries provided by LPI Brener and ICRP 66 human respiratory tract model.

  9. Tungsten chemical vapor deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kiichi; Takeda, Nobuo.

    1993-07-13

    A tungsten chemical vapor deposition method is described, comprising: a first step of selectively growing a first thin tungsten film of a predetermined thickness in a desired region on the surface of a silicon substrate by reduction of a WF[sub 6] gas introduced into an atmosphere of a predetermined temperature containing said silicon substrate; and a second step of selectively growing a second tungsten film of a predetermined thickness on said first thin tungsten film by reduction of said WF[sub 6] with a silane gas further introduced into said atmosphere, wherein the surface state of said substrate is monitored by a pyrometer and the switching from said first step to said second step is performed when the emissivity of infrared light from the substrate surfaces reaches a predetermined value.

  10. Preliminary Model of Porphyry Copper Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Byron R.; Ayuso, Robert A.; Wynn, Jeffrey C.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program develops mineral-deposit models for application in USGS mineral-resource assessments and other mineral resource-related activities within the USGS as well as for nongovernmental applications. Periodic updates of models are published in order to incorporate new concepts and findings on the occurrence, nature, and origin of specific mineral deposit types. This update is a preliminary model of porphyry copper deposits that begins an update process of porphyry copper models published in USGS Bulletin 1693 in 1986. This update includes a greater variety of deposit attributes than were included in the 1986 model as well as more information about each attribute. It also includes an expanded discussion of geophysical and remote sensing attributes and tools useful in resource evaluations, a summary of current theoretical concepts of porphyry copper deposit genesis, and a summary of the environmental attributes of unmined and mined deposits.

  11. Uranium in cassiterites of tin deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagruzina, I.A.; Pinskij, Eh.M.; Savinova, I.B.

    1986-01-01

    For the purpose of elucidation of physico-chemical features of uranium and tin behaviour in ore deposition zones uranium determinations (1000 determ) in cassiterite grains from 55 tin-ore deposits of different formation types of several separate regions are carried out by means of fission radiography. It is shown that uranium content in cassiterites is a genetic sign. Peculiarities of uranium concentration and migration in tin deposits permit to use them as prognostic radiogeochemical criteria. Radiogeochemical prognostic-search signs confirm the antagonism between uranium and tin deposits of cassiterite-silicate and cassiterite-sulfide formations and paragenetic of certain types of uranium hydrothermal deposits with tin deposits of cassiterite-quartz formation.

  12. Water evaporation in silica colloidal deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixinho, Jorge; Lefèvre, Grégory; Coudert, François-Xavier; Hurisse, Olivier

    2013-10-15

    The results of an experimental study on the evaporation and boiling of water confined in the pores of deposits made of mono-dispersed silica colloidal micro-spheres are reported. The deposits are studied using scanning electron microscopy, adsorption of nitrogen, and adsorption of water through attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy. The evaporation is characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. Optical microscopy is used to observe the patterns on the deposits after evaporation. When heating at a constant rate and above boiling temperature, the release of water out of the deposits is a two step process. The first step is due to the evaporation and boiling of the surrounding and bulk water and the second is due to the desorption of water from the pores. Additional experiments on the evaporation of water from membranes having cylindrical pores and of heptane from silica deposits suggest that the second step is due to the morphology of the deposits.

  13. Engineering vapor-deposited polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Feng-Yu

    The vapor deposition polymerization (VDP) of PMDA-ODA polyimide was studied parametrically to produce microcapsules and thin films with desirable properties and quality for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. The mechanical properties and gas permeability were determined at temperatures from 10 to 573 K. The VDP polyimide possessed distinct properties including lower gas permeability and stronger tensile properties from those of solution-cast Kapton, which were attributed to the presence of cross-linking. Processing parameters determining the properties of the VDP polyimide were identified: (1) utilizing air instead of nitrogen as the atmosphere of imidization increased the permeability by 140%, lowered the activation energy for permeation, and reduced the tensile strength by 30% without affecting the Young's modulus; (2) imidizing at faster heating rates increased the permeability by up to 50% and reduced the activation energy for permeation with 50% lowered tensile strength and impervious Young's modulus; (3) bi-axial stretching increased the permeability by up to three orders of magnitude. Analyses via IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density measurement revealed that the effects of the processing parameters were results of the modifications in the crystallinity and molecular weight. The VDP polyimide underwent minor degradation in the tensile strength and elongation at break with unaffected Young's modulus and permeability upon absorbing 120 MGy of beta-radiation. Substituting a fluorinated dianhydride monomer, 6FDA, for PMDA in the optimized VDP process yielded 6FDA-ODA polyimide microcapsules and films with 50-fold increased permeability and comparable mechanical properties. The results of this study enable the production of polyimide microcapsules that will greatly facilitate the ICF experiments, and will broaden the applications of vapor-deposited polyimides in other technology fields.

  14. Electrochemical Deposition of Ni-W Gradient Deposit and Its Structural Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏智; 姚素薇; 张卫国

    2003-01-01

    The Ni-W gradient deposit with nano-structure was prepared by an electrochemical deposition method.X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) indicate that the crystallite size of the deposit decreases from 10.3nm to 1.5nm and the crystal grating aberrance increases with the increase of W content in the growing direction of the deposit. The structure of deposit changes from crystalline to amorphous stepwise with associated increase of crystal grating aberrance, and presents gradient distribution. These show that the deposit isgradient with nano-structure.

  15. Laboratory Deposition Apparatus to Study the Effects of Wax Deposition on Pipe Magnetic Field Leakage Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mohd Fauzi Abd

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate technique for wax deposition detection and severity measurement on cold pipe wall is important for pipeline cleaning program. Usually these techniques are validated by conventional techniques on laboratory scale wax deposition flow loop. However conventional techniques inherent limitations and it is difficult to reproduce a predetermine wax deposit profile and hardness at designated location in flow loop. An alternative wax deposition system which integrates modified pour casting method and cold finger method is presented. This system is suitable to reproduce high volume of medium hard wax deposit in pipe with better control of wax deposit profile and hardness.

  16. Bilateral Pseudoexfoliation Deposits on Intraocular Lens Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Bonafonte Marquez; Sergio Bonafonte Royo

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of bilateral pseudoexfoliative deposits on both intraocular lens (IOL) implants in an 83-year-old woman with no other associated pathology, 5 years after cataract surgery. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is the most common cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide and these deposits are usually found on the natural lens. The fact that pseudoexfoliative deposits have been found on IOL implants implies the need for a thorough examination in pseudophakic patients, for i...

  17. FTIR analysis of aviation fuel deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmick, L. S.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    Five modes of operation of the Nicolet 7199 Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometer have been evaluated for application in analysis of the chemical structure of accelerated storage/thermal deposits produced by jet fuels. Using primarily the absorption and emission modes, the effects of fuel type, stress temperature, stress time, type of spiking agent, spiking agent concentration, fuel flow, and post-depositional treatment on the chemical nature of fuel deposits have been determined.

  18. Surface Finish after Laser Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, M.; Maes, G.; Hendrix, W.; Delarbre, E.; Motmans, F.

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technology for the fabrication of metal parts through layerwise deposition and laser induced melting of metal powder. The poor surface finish presents a major limitation in LMD. This study focuses on the effects of surface inclination angle and strategies to improve the surface finish of LMD components. A substantial improvement in surface quality of both the side and top surfaces has been obtained by laser remelting after powder deposition.

  19. Information problems and deposit constraints at banks

    OpenAIRE

    Jith Jayaratne; Donald Morgan

    1997-01-01

    Following the investment-cash flow literature, we test whether bank lending is constrained by the availability of insured deposits--a necessary condition for the existence of bank lending channel of monetary policy. We treat insured deposits as a type of "internal fund," similar to cash flows. We use a simple model to sort out the possible identification issues in interpreting a lending-deposit correlation, including reverse causality and omitted variable bias. To minimize the latter, we spli...

  20. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger J Narayan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials.

  1. Boron deposition from fused salts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.L.

    1980-08-01

    A partial evaluation of the feasibility of a process to electrodeposit pure coherent coatings of elemental boron from molten fluorides has been performed. The deposit produced was powdery and acicular, unless the fluoride melt was purified to have very low oxygen concentration. When the oxygen activity was reduced in the melt by addition of crystalline elemental boron, dense, amorphous boron deposit was produced. The boron deposits produced had cracks but were otherwise pure and dense and ranged up to 0.35 mm thick. Information derived during this project suggests that similar deposits might be obtained crack-free up to 1.00 mm thick by process modifications and improvements.

  2. Structural characterization of MAPLE deposited lipase biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronne, Antonio [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Ausanio, Giovanni; Bloisi, Francesco [CNR-SPIN and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Calabria, Raffaela [Istituto Motori-CNR, via G. Marconi 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Califano, Valeria, E-mail: v.califano@im.cnr.it [Istituto Motori-CNR, via G. Marconi 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Fanelli, Esther [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Massoli, Patrizio [Istituto Motori-CNR, via G. Marconi 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Vicari, Luciano R.M. [CNR-SPIN and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Lipase from Candida Rugosa was deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) on KBr pellets, mica and glass substrate. • The deposited film was characterized morphologically and structurally by optical microscopy, SEM and FTIR analysis. • Results of characterization underlined a phenomenon of aggregation taking place. • The aggregation phenomenon was reversible since lipase showed activity in the transesterification reaction between soybean oil and isopropyl alcohol once detached from the substrate. - Abstract: Lipases (triacylglycerol ester hydrolases) are enzymes used in several industrial applications. Enzymes immobilization can be used to address key issues limiting widespread application at industrial level. Immobilization efficiency is related to the ability to preserve the native conformation of the enzyme. MAPLE (Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation) technique, a laser deposition procedure for treating organic/polymeric/biomaterials, was applied for the deposition of lipase enzyme in an ice matrix, using near infrared laser radiation. Microscopy analysis showed that the deposition occurred in micrometric and submicrometric clusters with a wide size distribution. AFM imaging showed that inter-cluster regions are uniformly covered with smaller aggregates of nanometric size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for both recognizing the deposited material and analyzing its secondary structure. Results showed that the protein underwent reversible self-association during the deposition process. Actually, preliminary tests of MAPLE deposited lipase used for soybean oil transesterification with isopropyl alcohol followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry gave results consistent with undamaged deposition of lipase.

  3. Mass deposition from inspired polydisperse aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolf, G.; Gebhart, J.; Heyder, J.; Scheuch, G.; Stahlhofen, W. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung m.b.H., Frankfurt (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Biophysikalische Strahlenforschung)

    1988-01-01

    Mass deposition of polydisperse hydrophobic aerosol particles in various regions of the human respiratory tract has been calculated using a semi-empirical deposition model and assuming lognormal particle size distributions. The effects of polydispersity, breathing mode (nose versus mouth breathing), breathing pattern, particle size and density upon mass deposition are discussed. Significant differences are found from the model predictions of the ICRP TASK GROUP ON LUNG DYNAMICS (1966) and later ICRP recommendations. The influence of the geometric standard deviation of the size distribution upon mass deposition depends on particle size, and a simple explanation of this effect is introduced. (author).

  4. 47 CFR 32.4040 - Customers' deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.4040 Customers' deposits... for the payment for telecommunications service. (b) Advance payments made by prospective customers...

  5. Solubility of deposited airborne heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Sibel C.; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2008-09-01

    Toxic effects of heavy metals in water and soil environments are important. Quantifying the heavy metal concentrations and their solubilities in dry and wet deposition samples is part of atmospheric research. Soluble fractions of the deposited air pollutants are important in food chain mechanisms as heavy metals may cause ecotoxic impacts. In this study, the solubilities of Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, and Ni were investigated in deposition samples for total, dissolved, and suspended fractions after collection in a surrogate, water-surface sampler in Izmir, Turkey, during October 2003 to June 2004. To find overall solubility of each metal in dry and wet deposition samples, concentrations in soluble and suspended phases of aqueous solutions were analyzed separately. Ratios between total and dissolved forms and the metals in the same forms were analyzed and evaluated statistically. It was found that the deposited metal fluxes were significantly correlated in wet deposition with the highest correlation between Cd and Pb in the soluble and total forms. Comparatively smaller correlations were found between these metal fluxes in dry deposition samples. Results of this study showed the importance of metal pollution, especially ecotoxic properties of heavy metals in wet deposition far more than dry deposition.

  6. Deposition, clearance, and shortening of Kevlar para-aramid fibrils in acute, subchronic, and chronic inhalation studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, D P; Merriman, E A; Kennedy, G L; Lee, K P

    1993-10-01

    The deposition and clearance of lung-deposited Kevlar para-aramid fibrils (subfibers) have been investigated as part of a subchronic and chronic inhalation toxicity testing program. Fibrils recovered from lung tissue in para-aramid-exposed Sprague-Dawley rats were microscopically counted and measured after exposures to airborne fibrils which were about 12 microns median length (ML) and < 0.3 micron median diameter. In each of three studies lung-recovered fibrils were progressively shorter with increasing residence time in the lungs. Twenty-eight days after a single 6-hr exposure at 400 respirable fibrils per cubic centimeter (f/cm3) the ML of recovered fibrils decreased to about 5 microns. Twenty-four months after a 3-week exposure to 25 or 400 f/cm3, fibrils reached about 2 microns ML. After 2 years of continuous exposure at 2.5, 25, or 100 f/cm3 or 1 year exposure plus 1 year recovery at 400 f/cm3, fibril ML approached 4 microns. In the 2-year study, the lung-fiber accumulation rate/exposure concentration was similar for the three highest concentrations and was about 3 x greater than that seen at 2.5 f/cm3, indicating that concentrations of about 25 f/cm3 or more may overwhelm clearance mechanisms. Time required for fibrils to be reduced to < 5 microns in the lung was markedly less at lower exposure concentration and shorter exposure time. The primary shortening mechanism is proposed to be long fibril cutting by enzymatic attack at fibril defects. However, length-selective fibril deposition and clearance may contribute to shortening in the first few days after exposure. The enzymatic cutting hypothesis is supported by measured increases in numbers of short fibers following cessation of exposures, continued shortening of the fibril length distribution up to 2 years following exposure, and in vitro fibril shortening after 3 months in a proteolytic enzyme preparation. The conclusion is that para-aramid fibrils are less durable in the lungs of rats than expected from

  7. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S.; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A. K.; Ghosh, J.; Choudhary, K. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS.

  8. In Vitro Tests for Aerosol Deposition. V: Using Realistic Testing to Estimate Variations in Aerosol Properties at the Trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiangyin; Hindle, Michael; Delvadia, Renishkumar R; Byron, Peter R

    2017-03-23

    The dose and aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of drug aerosols' exiting models of the mouth and throat (MT) during a realistic inhalation profile (IP) may be estimated in vitro and designated Total Lung Dose, TLDin vitro, and APSDTLDin vitro, respectively. These aerosol characteristics likely define the drug's regional distribution in the lung. A general method was evaluated to enable the simultaneous determination of TLDin vitro and APSDTLDin vitro for budesonide aerosols' exiting small, medium and large VCU-MT models. Following calibration of the modified next generation pharmaceutical impactor (NGI) at 140 L/min, variations in aerosol dose and size exiting MT were determined from Budelin(®) Novolizer(®) across the IPs reported by Newman et al., who assessed drug deposition from this inhaler by scintigraphy. Values for TLDin vitro from the test inhaler determined by the general method were found to be statistically comparable to those using a filter capture method. Using new stage cutoffs determined by calibration of the modified NGI at 140 L/min, APSDTLDin vitro profiles and mass median aerodynamic diameters at the MT exit (MMADTLDin vitro) were determined as functions of MT geometric size across Newman's IPs. The range of mean values (n ≥ 5) for TLDin vitro and MMADTLDin vitro for this inhaler extended from 6.2 to 103.0 μg (3.1%-51.5% of label claim) and from 1.7 to 3.6 μm, respectively. The method enables reliable determination of TLDin vitro and APSDTLDin vitro for aerosols likely to enter the trachea of test subjects in the clinic. By simulating realistic IPs and testing in different MT models, the effects of major variables on TLDin vitro and APSDTLDin vitro may be studied using the general method described in this study.

  9. Research on depositing Ni45 alloy on titanium alloy surface by electrospark deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Guiqiao

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Taking Ni45 bar as electrode, a strengthened layer of thickness up to 50 μm was built up on BT20 titanium alloy matrix by means of electrospark deposition. Results of phase analysis by using of X-ray diffraction confirmed that the deposition layer was composed mostly of three phases, NiTi, NiTi2 and Ti. The surface microhardness of the deposition layer was up to 910 HV0.05, about 2.7 times as high as that of the matrix. The hardness at the cross-section of the entire deposition layer showed a gradient distribution. The effects of capacitance and deposition time on thickness of deposition layer were also studied, and results showed that with relatively low capacity and short deposition time the deposition layer without cracks can be obtained.

  10. Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition as a Method for the Deposition of Peptide Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    peptide nanotubes, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, nano assembly 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...Using physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) well-ordered assemblies of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) composed of dipeptide subunits are obtained on various...for the deposition of thin films (Figure 1b). A. B. Figure 1. (a) Illustration of physical vapor deposition ( PVD ) process of diphenylalanine

  11. The Underpotential Deposition of Copper on Pt(311): Site Selective Deposition and Anion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-14

    AD-A278 022 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH CONTRACT N00014-84-k-0656/PP0002 R & T Code 4133034 Technical Report #36 The Underpotential Deposition of Copper...Include Security Clauffication) The Underpotential Deposition of Copper on Pt(311): Site Selective Deposition and Anion Effects 𔃼 OERSONAL AUTHOR(S...Alacant, Spain ABSTRACT The underpotential deposition of copper on Pt(31 1)=Pt[2(111 )x(100)] stepped surfaces has been studied and the results are compared

  12. The mechanical properties of thin alumina film deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Gellings, P.J.; Vendel, van de D.; Metselaar, H.S.C.; Corbach, van H.D.; Fransen, T.

    1995-01-01

    Amorphous alumina films were deposited by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) on stainless steel, type AISI 304. The MOCVD experiments were performed in nitrogen at low and atmospheric pressures. The effects of deposition temperature, growth rate and film thickness on the mechanical pro

  13. Ultrafast deposition of silicon nitride and semiconductor silicon thin films by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Verlaan, V.; Rath, J.K.; Li, H. B. T.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) or Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (Cat-CVD) has made great progress during the last couple of years. This review discusses examples of significant progress. Specifically, silicon nitride deposition by HWCVD (HW-SiNx) is highlighted, a

  14. Colloid Deposit Morphology and Clogging in Porous Media: Fundamental Insights Through Investigation of Deposit Fractal Dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Eric J; Gilbert, Benjamin; Mays, David C

    2015-10-20

    Experiments reveal a wide discrepancy between the permeability of porous media containing colloid deposits and the available predictive equations. Evidence suggests that this discrepancy results, in part, from the predictive equations failing to account for colloid deposit morphology. This article reports a series of experiments using static light scattering (SLS) to characterize colloid deposit morphology within refractive index matched (RIM) porous media during flow through a column. Real time measurements of permeability, specific deposit, deposit fractal dimension, and deposit radius of gyration, at different vertical positions, were conducted with initially clean porous media at various ionic strengths and fluid velocities. Decreased permeability (i.e., increased clogging) corresponded with higher specific deposit, lower fractal dimension, and smaller radius of gyration. During deposition, fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability decreased with increasing specific deposit. During flushing with colloid-free fluid, these trends reversed, with increased fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability. These observations suggest a deposition scenario in which large and uniform aggregates become deposits, which reduce porosity, lead to higher fluid shear forces, which then decompose the deposits, filling the pore space with small and dendritic fragments of aggregate.

  15. 39 CFR 3001.33 - Depositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Depositions. 3001.33 Section 3001.33 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Rules of General... witness. (g) Objections. The officer before whom the deposition is taken shall not have the power to rule...

  16. 12 CFR 19.170 - Discovery depositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... hearing. (b) Notice. A party desiring to take a deposition shall give reasonable notice in writing to the... proceeding instituted under or subject to the provisions of subpart A of this part, a party may take the... take depositions at any time after the commencement of the proceeding, but no later than ten...

  17. Fuzzy Comprehensive Appraisal of Concealed Ore Deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the transformation from the fuzzy to the accurate process is exemplified by the Jiaodong gold ore deposits concentrated region where the mathematical analysis is used to appraise and forecast regional concealed gold ore deposits. In this sense, this paper presents a new way to the appraisal of the non-traditional mineral resources.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  19. Rising interest rates, bank loans, and deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Hesna Genay; Darrin Halcomb

    2004-01-01

    The authors show how the relationships between interest rate changes, deposit growth rates, and loan growth rates have changed in the last ten years, discuss some possible reasons, and assess the likely impact of rising interest rates on loans and deposits going forward.

  20. A Simplified Diffusion-Deposition Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto

    1980-01-01

    The use of a simple top hat plume model facilitates an analytical treatment of the deposition problem. A necessary constraint, however, is that the diffusion velocity (e.g., in terms of the plume growth-rate) is large compared to the deposition velocity. With these limitations, explicit formulae...

  1. Review of Gaussian diffusion-deposition models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    The assumptions and predictions of several Gaussian diffusion-deposition models are compared. A simple correction to the Chamberlain source depletion model is shown to predict ground-level airborne concentrations and dry deposition fluxes in close agreement with the exact solution of Horst.

  2. Goudafzettingen in Suriname (Gold deposits in Surinam)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinck, J.W.

    1956-01-01

    THE GOLD DEPOSITS IN SURINAM AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF CONCESSIONS THROUGH THE COUNTRY The fieldwork on the occurrence of primary and secondary gold deposits in Surinam on which this thesis is based was carried out by order of the Welfare Fund Surinam (Welvaarts Fonds Suriname) during the periods

  3. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    During the current report experimental studies of upper respiratory deposition of radon progeny aerosols and stimulant aerosols were carried out in replicate casts of nasal and oral passages of adults and children. Additionally, preliminary studies of nasal passage deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles was carried out in four human subjects. Data on nasal inspiratory deposition in replicate models of adults and infants from three collaborating laboratories were compared and a best-fit curve of deposition efficiency for both attached and unattached particles was obtained, showing excellent inter-laboratory agreement. This curve demonstrates that nasal inspiratory deposition of radon progeny is weakly dependent upon flow rate over physiologically realistic ranges of flow, does not show a significant age effect, and is relatively independent of nasal passage dimensions for a given age range. Improved replicate models of the human adult oral passage extending to the mid-trachea were constructed for medium and higher flow mouth breathing states; these models were used to assess the deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles during oronasal breathing in the oral passage and demonstrated lower deposition efficiency than the nasal passage. Measurements of both Po{sup 218} particle and attached fraction particle size deposition were performed in replicate nasal passage of a four week old infant. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Plant responses to insect egg deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilker, M.; Fatouros, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    Plants can respond to insect egg deposition and thus resist attack by herbivorous insects from the beginning of the attack, egg deposition. We review ecological effects of plant responses to insect eggs and differentiate between egg-induced plant defenses that directly harm the eggs and indirect

  5. Goudafzettingen in Suriname (Gold deposits in Surinam)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinck, J.W.

    1956-01-01

    THE GOLD DEPOSITS IN SURINAM AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF CONCESSIONS THROUGH THE COUNTRY The fieldwork on the occurrence of primary and secondary gold deposits in Surinam on which this thesis is based was carried out by order of the Welfare Fund Surinam (Welvaarts Fonds Suriname) during the periods Dece

  6. Deposition and Investigation of Hydrophobic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safonov Aleksey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluoropolymer coatings of different morphologies are deposited by the HWCVD (Hot Wire CVD method. The effect of activator filament temperature on the structure of fluoropolymer coating is shown. The results of studying the hydrophobic fluoropolymer coatings with different structures, deposited by the HWCVD method, are presented.

  7. Goudafzettingen in Suriname (Gold deposits in Surinam)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinck, J.W.

    1956-01-01

    THE GOLD DEPOSITS IN SURINAM AND THE DISTRIBUTION OF CONCESSIONS THROUGH THE COUNTRY The fieldwork on the occurrence of primary and secondary gold deposits in Surinam on which this thesis is based was carried out by order of the Welfare Fund Surinam (Welvaarts Fonds Suriname) during the periods Dece

  8. Large Nonferrous Metals Deposits Found in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>According to the Department of Land and Resources of Yunnan, Yunnan has made great achievements since implementation of the geological prospecting action plan. 5 ultra-large deposits and several large deposits have been found, and a group of key areas with favorable ore-forming prospect have been pinpointed.

  9. Ranking welding intensity in pyroclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quane, Steven L.; Russell, James K.

    2005-02-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits involves flattening of glassy pyroclasts under a compactional load at temperatures above the glass transition temperature. Progressive welding is recorded by changes in the petrographic (e.g., fabric) and physical (e.g., density) properties of the deposits. Mapping the intensity of welding can be integral to studies of pyroclastic deposits, but making systematic comparisons between deposits can be problematical. Here we develop a scheme for ranking welding intensity in pyroclastic deposits on the basis of petrographic textural observations (e.g., oblateness of pumice lapilli and micro-fabric orientation) and measurements of physical properties, including density, porosity, point load strength and uniaxial compressive strength. Our dataset comprises measurements on 100 samples collected from a single cooling unit of the Bandelier Tuff and parallel measurements on 8 samples of more densely welded deposits. The proposed classification comprises six ranks of welding intensity ranging from unconsolidated (Rank I) to obsidian-like vitrophyre (Rank VI) and should allow for reproducible mapping of subtle variations in welding intensity between different deposits. The application of the ranking scheme is demonstrated by using published physical property data on welded pyroclastic deposits to map the total accumulated strain and to reconstruct their pre-welding thicknesses.

  10. Plant responses to insect egg deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilker, M.; Fatouros, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    Plants can respond to insect egg deposition and thus resist attack by herbivorous insects from the beginning of the attack, egg deposition. We review ecological effects of plant responses to insect eggs and differentiate between egg-induced plant defenses that directly harm the eggs and indirect def

  11. ECONOMIC GEOLOGY (2)NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20071073 Huang Tiedong(No.1 Geological Team of Xinjiang Bureau of Exploration and Mining,Changji,Xinjiang 831100,China) Formation of the Salt Lake and KNO3 Ore in the Kumishi Block-Falling Basin in Xin- jiang(Hydrogeology & Engineering Geology, ISSN1000-3665,CN11-2202/P,32(6), 2005,p.20-24,4 illus.,3 tables,8 refs.) Key words:niter,salt deposits,Xinjiang The Kumishi Basin,a Cenozoic block- falling basin,has been controlled by a dry continental climate and continuously under- went a concentration process due to evapora- tion.The rock salt began to form in the late Pliocene to Pleistocene(35 ka B.P.).The thick rock salt bodies assembled in the late Holocene(4.5 ka B.P.)because of the stable crust and the continuous dry climate.With the evolution into the dry salt lake stage,the brines occurring in the crystals further con- centrated and the liquid-phase KNO3 formed,which is overlain by K-rich rock salt.

  12. The geomicrobiology of bauxite deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiluo Hao; Kwunlun Leung; Rucheng Wang; Weidong Sun; Yiliang Li

    2010-01-01

    Bauxite deposits are studied because of their economic value and because they play an important role in the study of paleoclimate and paleogeography of continents. They provide a rare record of the weathering and evolution of continental surfaces. Geomicrobiological analysis makes it possible to verify that microorganisms have played a critical role during the formation of bauxite with the possibility already intimated in previous studies. Ambient temperature, abundance of water, organic carbon and bioavailable iron and other metal substrates provide a suitable environment for microbes to inhabit. Thiobacillus, Leptospirilum, Thermophilic bacteria and Heterotrophs have been shown to be able to oxidize ferrous iron and to reduce sulfate-generating sulfuric acid, which can accelerate the weathering of aluminosilicates and precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides. Microorganisms referred to the genus Bacillus can mediate the release of alkaline metals. Although the dissimilatory iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in bauxites have not yet been identified, some recorded authigenic carbonates and "bacteriopyrites" that appear to be unique in morphology and grain size might record microbial activity. Typical bauxite minerals such as gibbsite, kaolinite, covellite, galena, pyrite, zircon, calcium ptagioclase, orthoclase, and albite have been investigated as part of an analysis of microbial mediation. The paleoecologyof such bauxitic microorganisms inhabiting continental (sub) surfaces, revealed through geomicrobiological analysis, will add a further dimension to paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental studies.

  13. Discovery of Minoan tsunami deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoura, K.; Imamura, F.; Kuran, U.; Nakamura, T.; Papadopoulos, G. A.; Takahashi, T.; Yalciner, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    The Hellenic arc is a terrane of extensive Quaternary volcanism. One of the main centers of explosive eruptions is located on Thera (Santorini), and the eruption of the Thera volcano in late Minoan time (1600 1300 B.C.) is considered to have been the most significant Aegean explosive volcanism during the late Holocene. The last eruptive phase of Thera resulted in an enormous submarine caldera, which is believed to have produced tsunamis on a large scale. Evidence suggesting seawater inundation was found previously at some archaeological sites on the coast of Crete; however, the cause of the tsunami and its effects on the area have not been well understood. On the Aegean Sea coast of western Turkey (Didim and Fethye) and Crete (Gouves), we have found traces of tsunami deposits related to the Thera eruption. The sedimentological consequences and the hydraulics of a Thera-caused tsunami indicate that the eruption of Thera volcano was earlier than the previous estimates and the tsunami did not have disruptive influence on Minoan civilization.

  14. The geomicrobiology of bauxite deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiluo Hao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bauxite deposits are studied because of their economic value and because they play an important role in the study of paleoclimate and paleogeography of continents. They provide a rare record of the weathering and evolution of continental surfaces. Geomicrobiological analysis makes it possible to verify that microorganisms have played a critical role during the formation of bauxite with the possibility already intimated in previous studies. Ambient temperature, abundance of water, organic carbon and bioavailable iron and other metal substrates provide a suitable environment for microbes to inhabit. Thiobacillus, Leptospirilum, Thermophilic bacteria and Heterotrophs have been shown to be able to oxidize ferrous iron and to reduce sulfate-generating sulfuric acid, which can accelerate the weathering of aluminosilicates and precipitation of iron oxyhydroxides. Microorganisms referred to the genus Bacillus can mediate the release of alkaline metals. Although the dissimilatory iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in bauxites have not yet been identified, some recorded authigenic carbonates and “bacteriopyrites” that appear to be unique in morphology and grain size might record microbial activity. Typical bauxite minerals such as gibbsite, kaolinite, covellite, galena, pyrite, zircon, calcium plagioclase, orthoclase, and albite have been investigated as part of an analysis of microbial mediation. The paleoecology of such bauxitic microorganisms inhabiting continental (sub surfaces, revealed through geomicrobiological analysis, will add a further dimension to paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental studies.

  15. Innovations in marketing of deposit services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Vasylieva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is recent studies of global trends in marketing of innovative deposit services. The results of the analysis. Summing up the general, it should be noted that, according to our goal, we systematized the theoretical basis of innovation in marketing services and deposit rated their performance justified the specific marketing innovation support domestic banks in the deposit market. Conclusions and directions of further researches. Deposit market is an important resource base for the banking sector of any country. Increased competition there between financial institutions in the post-crisis period is an incentive to find and implement various marketing innovation in deposit services that would help attract additional financial resources. Today, many analysts have focused on the fact that any further activities on the deposit market, including marketing, must take account of three important factors: 1. «Online competition». In this case it means the access to the financial market in order to attract temporarily free funds of non-banking institutions (insurance brokerage companies, world leaders providing IT services. These institutions are deploying a fierce fight for every customer, using global information space – the Internet. Given all modern premise, it planned to expand the presence of such companies in the online space with lucrative offers favorable interest rates on deposits with new loyalty programs relative to individual customer needs. 2. Shortage of alternatives to ensure liquidity. Since banks are limited in their ability to write off loans from their balance through exercise securitization and financing transactions in the wholesale financial markets, as they continue to feel the need to attract customer funds. This, in turn, will contribute to increased competition in the struggle for each new customer and promote the development of innovation in marketing deposit services. 3. Presence of non-national sources

  16. Tax evasion and Swiss bank deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Bank deposits in offshore financial centers may be used to evade taxes on interest income. A recent EU reform limits the scope for this type of tax evasion by introducing a withholding tax on interest income earned by EU households in Switzerland and several other offshore centers. This paper...... quarters immediately before and after the tax was introduced. We also present evidence suggesting that the drop in Swiss bank deposits was driven by behavioral responses aiming to escape the tax - such as the transfer of funds to bank accounts in other offshore centers and the transfer of formal ownership...... estimates the impact of the withholding tax on Swiss bank deposits held by EU residents while using non-EU residents who were not subject to the tax as a comparison group. We present evidence that Swiss bank deposits owned by EU residents declined by 30–40% relative to other Swiss bank deposits in two...

  17. A lithium deposition system for tokamak devices*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziul, Christopher; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Hoffman, Daniel; Timberlake, John; Card, David

    2002-11-01

    The production of a lithium deposition system using commercially available components is discussed. This system is intended to provide a fresh lithium wall coating between discharges in a tokamak. For this purpose, a film 100-200 Å thick is sufficient to ensure that the plasma interacts solely with the lithium. A test system consisting of a lithium evaporator and a deposition monitor has been designed and constructed to investigate deposition rates and coverage. A Thermionics 3kW e-gun is used to rapidly evaporate small amounts of solid lithium. An Inficon XTM/2 quartz deposition monitor then measures deposition rate at varying distances, positions and angles relative to the e-gun crucible. Initial results from the test system will be presented. *Supported by US DOE contract #DE-AC02-76CH-03073

  18. A preliminary deposit model for lithium brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight; Munk, LeeAnn; Jochens, Hillary; Hynek, Scott; Labay, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    This report is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to update existing mineral deposit models and to develop new ones. The global transition away from hydrocarbons toward energy alternatives increases demand for many scarce metals. Among these is lithium, a key component of lithium-ion batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Lithium brine deposits account for about three-fourths of the world’s lithium production. Updating an earlier deposit model, we emphasize geologic information that might directly or indirectly help in exploration for lithium brine deposits, or for assessing regions for mineral resource potential. Special attention is given to the best-known deposit in the world—Clayton Valley, Nevada, and to the giant Salar de Atacama, Chile.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  20. Solution deposition of nanometer scale silver films as an alternative to vapor deposition for plasmonic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Derek S.; Sathish, R. Sai; Kostov, Yordan [Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Rao, Govind, E-mail: grao@umbc.ed [Center for Advanced Sensor Technology and Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States)

    2010-05-03

    We report the attainment of surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) from highly uniform thin silver films, solution-deposited on glass substrates by a wet chemistry approach. The surface morphology of these films was characterized by atomic force microscopy. The SPCE emission enhancements, polarization and angularity obtained from solution-deposited silver on BK7 glass were comparable to that achieved from conventional SPCE slides prepared via vapor deposition. This facile, wet chemistry procedure for the deposition of SPCE films provides an inexpensive, low maintenance alternative to vapor deposition for SPCE substrate preparation. This would allow the fluorescence observation technique to become more readily available for high sensitivity, low cost applications.

  1. Effects of deposition time in chemically deposited ZnS films in acidic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, H.; Chelouche, A., E-mail: azeddinechelouche@gmail.com; Talantikite, D.; Merzouk, H.; Boudjouan, F.; Djouadi, D.

    2015-08-31

    We report an experimental study on the synthesis and characterization of zinc sulfide (ZnS) single layer thin films deposited on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition technique in acidic solution. The effect of deposition time on the microstructure, surface morphology, optical absorption, transmittance, and photoluminescence (PL) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), UV-Vis–NIR spectrophotometry and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The results showed that the samples exhibit wurtzite structure and their crystal quality is improved by increasing deposition time. The latter, was found to affect the morphology of the thin films as showed by SEM micrographs. The optical measurements revealed a high transparency in the visible range and a dependence of absorption edge and band gap on deposition time. The room temperature PL spectra indicated that all ZnS grown thin films emit a UV and blue light, while the band intensities are found to be dependent on deposition times. - Highlights: • Single layer ZnS thin films were deposited by CBD in acidic solution at 95 °C. • The effect of deposition time was investigated. • Coexistence of ZnS and ZnO hexagonal structures for time deposition below 2 h • Thicker ZnS films were achieved after monolayer deposition for 5 h. • The highest UV-blue emission observed in thin film deposited at 5 h.

  2. Particle-Bound PAH Emission from the Exhaust of Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari Lamjiri, M.; Medrano, Y. S.; Guillaume, D. W.; Khachikian, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are harmful, semi-volatile organic compounds which are generated due to the incomplete combustion of organic substances. PAHs are of concern as a pollutant because some of these compounds are carcinogenic and mutagenic even at low levels. Most of the PAHs are recalcitrant and persistent in the environment. The PAHs carcinogenic potential can be increased by the adsorption onto small size particles (jet engine are evaluated. The engine was operated at different swirl numbers (S; the ratio of tangential air flow to axial air flow) to investigate the effect of this parameter on the effluent of combustion chamber. The samples were collected using two instruments simultaneously: a particle analyzer and a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposited Impactor (MOUDI). Particle analyzer was used to count the number of particles in different sizes and MOUDI was used to collect particles with respect to their size as they were emitted from the exhaust. The MOUDI's aluminum substrates were weighed before and after the experiment in order to measure the mass of particles that were collected during the sampling period. The concentration of PAHs associated with the particles was measured by extracting the particles with dichloromethane followed by analysis via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In general, lower molecular weight PAHs emitted from the exhaust of combustion chamber are mostly in gas phase while PAHs of higher molecular weight are adsorbed onto particles. Preliminary results from GC/MS confirm the presence of higher molecular weight PAHs like Benzo[a]pyrene in most of the samples. Better recirculation between air and fuel in higher swirl numbers results in better combustion. In higher swirl numbers, the temperature of the combustion process increases which leads to a more complete combustion. Another result of higher swirl number is a longer residence time which allows the organic substances in the fuel to remain in the

  3. Research on depositing Ni45 alloy on titanium alloy surface by electrospark deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Tao; Zhang Chunhui; Su Guiqiao; Yan Ping

    2008-01-01

    Taking Ni45 bar as electrode, a strengthened layer of thickness up to 50 pm was built up on BT20 titanium alloy matrix by means of electrospark deposition. Results of phase analysis by using of X-ray diffraction confirmed that the deposition layer was composed mostly of three phases, NiTi, NiTi2layer was up to 910 HV0.05, about 2.7 times as high as that of the matrix. The hardness at the cross-section of the entire deposition layer showed a gradient distribution. The effects of capacitance and deposition time on thickness of deposition layer were also studied, and results showed that with relatively low capacity and short deposition time the deposition layer without cracks can be obtained.

  4. 24 CFR 886.315 - Security and utility deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security and utility deposits. 886... utility deposits. (a) Amount of deposits. If at the time of the initial execution of the Lease the Owner... security deposits and utility deposits from its resources and/or other public or private sources. (b)...

  5. Dust deposits on Mars: The 'parna' analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Williams, Steven H.

    1994-07-01

    Parna is an Australian aboriginal word meaning 'sandy dust'. It has been applied to deposits of clay, silt, and sand which were initially transported by the wind as aggregates, or pellets, of sand size. Parna is distinguished by its silt and clay content, which in some cases exceeds 85% of the total volume of the deposit. Much of the fine-grained playa silt and clay is incorporated into the parna as sand-sized aggregates, which greatly facilitate their transportation and reworking by the wind. Rain following aggregate emplacement can cause their disintegration, rendering the parna immobile by the wind, yet some pellets can survive several wetting/drying episodes. Parna deposits on Earth occur both as dune forms and as sheet deposits which mantle older terrains. In both cases the deposits are typically derived from lacustrine (lake) beds, such as playas. There is substantial evidence to suggest that bodies of water existed on Mars in the past. Thus, the potential is high for lacustrine deposits and the formation of parna on Mars. Although no parna dunes have been identified, it is suggested that the deposits derived from White Rock (-8 deg, 335 deg W), near Mamers Valles (34 deg, 343 deg W), and elsewhere on Mars may represent sheet parna. Data obtained from Mars-94/96 missions and potential landed spacecraft may provide additional evidence for the existence of parna on Mars.

  6. Particle deposition in industrial duct bends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas M; Leith, David

    2004-07-01

    A study of particle deposition in industrial duct bends is presented. Particle deposition by size was measured by comparing particle size distributions upstream and downstream of bends that had geometries and flow conditions similar to those used in industrial ventilation. As the interior surface of the duct bend was greased to prevent particle bounce, the results are applicable to liquid drops and solid particles where duct walls are sticky. Factors investigated were: (i) flow Reynolds number (Re = 203 000, 36 000); (ii) particle Reynolds number (10 vertical); and (vii) construction technique (smooth, gored, segmented). Measured deposition was compared with models developed for bends in small diameter sampling lines (Re 20 microm, deposition was slightly greater in the horizontal-to-horizontal orientation than in the horizontal-to-vertical orientation due to gravitational settling. Penetration was not a multiplicative function of bend angle as theory predicts, due to the developing nature of turbulent flow in bends. Deposition in a smooth bend was similar to that in a gored bend; however, a tight radius segmented bend (R0 = 1.7) exhibited much lower deposition. For more gradual bends (3 < R0 < 12), curvature ratio had negligible effect on deposition.

  7. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Tammie L., E-mail: Tammie.Gerke@miamioh.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States); Little, Brenda J., E-mail: brenda.little@nrlssc.navy.mil [Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 (United States); Barry Maynard, J., E-mail: maynarjb@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Geology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0013 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+}) and hollandite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+}), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality. - Highlights: • Oxidation and deposition of Mn deposits in drinking water distribution pipes • In-situ synchrotron-based μ-XANES and μ-XRF mapping • Toxic metal sorption in Mn deposits.

  8. Wet deposition in the northeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J; Mohnen, V; Kadlecek, J

    1980-12-01

    Attempts are made to examine concentration and wet deposition of pollutant material at selected stations within the northeastern United States and to characterize as many events as possible with respect to air mass origin. Further attempts are made to develop a regional pattern for the deposition of dominant ion species. MAP3S (US Multistate Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study) data for 1977 to 1979 are used to determine concentration and deposition on an event basis from which monthly, seasonal, annual, and cumulative averages are developed. The ARL-ATAD trajectory model is used to characterize individual events as to air mass origin. Case studies are examined to illustrate variability in the chemical composition of precipitation originating from distinctly different air mass trajectories. A difference in concentration of pollution-related ions in precipitation is noted between Midwest/Ohio Valley and Great Lakes/Canadian air mass origins for carefully selected cases. Total deposition of the major ions is examined in an effort to develop a regional pattern for deposition over a period of at least one year. For that purpose, total deposition is normalized to remove the variability in precipitation amounts for inter-station comparison. No marked gradient is noted in the normalized deposition totals within the northeast of the United States. The Adirondack region exhibited the lowest normalized ion deposition value, while the Illinois station showed the highest of the MAP3S network. The data analysis suggest that the acid rain phenomena covers the entire northeast. The concept of large scale mixing emerges to account for the lack of a significant gradient in the normalized deposition.

  9. Wet deposition in the northeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J; Mohnen, V; Kadlecek, J

    1980-12-01

    Attempts are made to examine concentration and wet deposition of pollutant material at selected stations within the northeastern United States and to characterize as many events as possible with respect to air mass origin. Further attempts are made to develop a regional pattern for the deposition of dominant ion species. MAP3S (US Multistate Atmospheric Power Production Pollution Study) data for 1977 to 1979 are used to determine concentration and deposition on an event basis from which monthly, seasonal, annual, and cumulative averages are developed. The ARL-ATAD trajectory model is used to characterize individual events as to air mass origin. Case studies are examined to illustrate variability in the chemical composition of precipitation originating from distinctly different air mass trajectories. A difference in concentration of pollution-related ions in precipitation is noted between Midwest/Ohio Valley and Great Lakes/Canadian air mass origins for carefully selected cases. Total deposition of the major ions is examined in an effort to develop a regional pattern for deposition over a period of at least one year. For that purpose, total deposition is normalized to remove the variability in precipitation amounts for inter-station comparison. No marked gradient is noted in the normalized deposition totals within the northeast of the United States. The Adirondack region exhibited the lowest normalized ion deposition value, while the Illinois station showed the highest of the MAP3S network. The data analysis suggest that the acid rain phenomena covers the entire northeast. The concept of large scale mixing emerges to account for the lack of a significant gradient in the normalized deposition.

  10. Summary of Results from Analyses of Deposits of the Deep-Ocean Impact of the Eltanin Asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    impact south and west of the seamounts, as the deposit was buried beyond the reach of our 25 m piston corer. We estimate that ground zero was in the region just north, or northwest, of the seamounts. There is no evidence that the impactor penetrated the ocean floor or formed a crater. The composition of the melted ejecta is inconsistent with mixing between projectile and terrestrial materials other than seawater salts. X-ray radiographs of sediments reveal details not seen in earlier cores. The uppermost impact unit is well-preserved in several cores, found as much as 50 km from the seamounts to the east, north, and west of the seamounts, where at least 25 cm of this unit is preserved. At greater distances burrowing organisms have mixed the sediments so if this unit did exist, it was too thin to survive bioturbation. These finegrained sediments are clearly laminated, and show alternating layers of low- and high-density (meteoritic) sediments, consistent with ripple formation in an energetic flow regime. We have extracted 35 g of meteoritic melt rock and 3 g of meteorite fragments from sieved sediments. Additionally a 9 g, 2.2 cm meteorite was recovered during opening of one core. The fact that 9\\% of the coarse ejecta is unmelted meteorites may be characteristic of deep-ocean impacts. This may have significance for delivery of organic matter to the early Earth by small impacts into primordial oceans, where actual meteorite fragments can survive in significant amounts. However, a large portion of the meteoritic debris is buried rapidly by the sediments disturbed by the impact.

  11. Templates for Deposition of Microscopic Pointed Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugel, Diane E.

    2008-01-01

    Templates for fabricating sharply pointed microscopic peaks arranged in nearly regular planar arrays can be fabricated by a relatively inexpensive technique that has recently been demonstrated. Depending on the intended application, a semiconducting, insulating, or metallic film could be deposited on such a template by sputtering, thermal evaporation, pulsed laser deposition, or any other suitable conventional deposition technique. Pointed structures fabricated by use of these techniques may prove useful as photocathodes or field emitters in plasma television screens. Selected peaks could be removed from such structures and used individually as scanning tips in atomic force microscopy or mechanical surface profiling.

  12. Characteristics that distinguish types of epithermal deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayba, D.O.; Foley, N.K.; Heald-Wetlaufer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Three distinctive groupings of epithermal deposits were recognized from a literature study of fifteen well-described precious- and base-metal epithermal districts, supplemented by L. J. Buchanan's 1981 compilation of data from 47 less completely documented deposits. The three groups are distinguished primarily by the type of alteration and the sulfur fugacity indicated by the vein mineral assemblage. Additional discriminating criteria include composition of the host rock, timing of ore deposition relative to emplacement of the host, and relative abundances of gold, silver, and base metals.

  13. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...... controlled arm. Higher sintering temperatures resulted in greater adhesion strengths, with a sharp increase observed near the melting point of the ash. Repetition of experiments with fixed operation conditions revealed considerable variation in the obtained adhesion strengths, portraying the stochastic...

  14. Bilateral Pseudoexfoliation Deposits on Intraocular Lens Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bonafonte Marquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of bilateral pseudoexfoliative deposits on both intraocular lens (IOL implants in an 83-year-old woman with no other associated pathology, 5 years after cataract surgery. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is the most common cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide and these deposits are usually found on the natural lens. The fact that pseudoexfoliative deposits have been found on IOL implants implies the need for a thorough examination in pseudophakic patients, for it could be the only sign of secondary glaucoma.

  15. Nitrogen deposition in California forests: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bytnerowicz, A; Fenn, M E

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations and deposition of the major nitrogenous (N) compounds and their biological effects in California forests are reviewed. Climatic characteristics of California are summarized in light of their effects on pollutant accumulation and transport. Over large areas of the state dry deposition is of greater magnitude than wet deposition due to the arid climate. However, fog deposition can also be significant in areas where seasonal fogs and N pollution sources coincide. The dominance of dry deposition is magnified in airsheds with frequent temperature inversions such as occur in the Los Angeles Air Basin. Most of the deposition in such areas occurs in summer as a result of surface deposition of nitric acid vapor (HNO3) as well as particulate nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Internal uptake of gaseous N pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), ammonia (NH3), and others provides additional N to forests. However, summer drought and subsequent lower stomatal conductance of plants tend to limit plant utilization of gaseous N. Nitrogen deposition is much greater than S deposition in California. In locations close to photochemical smog source areas, concentrations of oxidized forms of N (NO2, HNO3, PAN) dominate, while in areas near agricultural activities the importance of reduced N forms (NH3, NH4+) significantly increases. Little data from California forests are available for most of the gaseous N pollutants. Total inorganic N deposition in the most highly-exposed forests in the Los Angeles Air Basin may be as high as 25-45 kg ha(-1) year(-1). Nitrogen deposition in these highly-exposed areas has led to N saturation of chaparral and mixed conifer stands. In N saturated forests high concentrations of NO3- are found in streamwater, soil solution, and in foliage. Nitric oxide emissions from soil and foliar N:P ratios are also high in N saturated sites. Further research is needed to determine the

  16. Hybrid fall deposits in the Bishop Tuff, California: A novel pyroclastic depositional mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C.J.N.; Hildreth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Hybrid fall deposits in the Bishop Tuff show features common to both archetypal fall and surge deposits. Like normal-fall deposits, they have an overall plane-parallel bedding and flat-lying pumice clasts but also, like surge deposits, they show variable development of cross-bedding, some crystal and pumice sorting, and some rounding of pumice clasts. All variations exist from normal-fall deposits, through streaky material with incipient development of cross-bedding, to the hybrid fall deposits with well-developed cross-bedding. The streaky and hybrid deposits are interpreted as fall material contemporaneously redeposited by strong (up to 40 m/s) swirling winds, comparable to firestorm whirlwinds, generated by air currents associated with coeval emplacement of pyroclastic flows. Recognition of hybrid fall deposits is important in interpreting the dynamics of explosive eruptions and correctly assessing volcanic hazards. However, although such deposits may be commonly produced by explosive eruptions, especially where pyroclastic flows accompany fall activity, they are likely to be overlooked, or wrongly interpreted as surge deposits or secondary, reworked material.

  17. Platinum-ruthenium bimetallic clusters on graphite: a comparison of vapor deposition and electroless deposition methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhenage, Randima P; Xie, Kangmin; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John Meynard M; Seuser, Grant S; Monnier, John R; Chen, Donna A

    2015-11-14

    Bimetallic Pt-Ru clusters have been grown on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces by vapor deposition and by electroless deposition. These studies help to bridge the material gap between well-characterized vapor deposited clusters and electrolessly deposited clusters, which are better suited for industrial catalyst preparation. In the vapor deposition experiments, bimetallic clusters were formed by the sequential deposition of Pt on Ru or Ru on Pt. Seed clusters of the first metal were grown on HOPG surfaces that were sputtered with Ar(+) to introduce defects, which act as nucleation sites for Pt or Ru. On the unmodified HOPG surface, both Pt and Ru clusters preferentially nucleated at the step edges, whereas on the sputtered surface, clusters with relatively uniform sizes and spatial distributions were formed. Low energy ion scattering experiments showed that the surface compositions of the bimetallic clusters are Pt-rich, regardless of the order of deposition, indicating that the interdiffusion of metals within the clusters is facile at room temperature. Bimetallic clusters on sputtered HOPG were prepared by the electroless deposition of Pt on Ru seed clusters from a Pt(+2) solution using dimethylamine borane as the reducing agent at pH 11 and 40 °C. After exposure to the electroless deposition bath, Pt was selectively deposited on Ru, as demonstrated by the detection of Pt on the surface by XPS, and the increase in the average cluster height without an increase in the number of clusters, indicating that Pt atoms are incorporated into the Ru seed clusters. Electroless deposition of Ru on Pt seed clusters was also achieved, but it should be noted that this deposition method is extremely sensitive to the presence of other metal ions in solution that have a higher reduction potential than the metal ion targeted for deposition.

  18. Effect of layer thickness setting on deposition characteristics in direct energy deposition (DED) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Do-Sik; Baek, Gyeong-Yun; Seo, Jin-Seon; Shin, Gwang-Yong; Kim, Kee-Poong; Lee, Ki-Yong

    2016-12-01

    Direct energy deposition is an additive manufacturing technique that involves the melting of metal powder with a high-powered laser beam and is used to build a variety of components. In laser-assisted metal deposition, the mechanical and metallurgical properties achieved are influenced by many factors. This paper addresses methods for selecting an appropriate layer thickness setting, which is an important parameter in layer-by-layer deposition manufacturing. A new procedure is proposed for determining the layer thickness setting for use in slicing of a part based on the single-layer height for a given depositing condition. This procedure was compared with a conventional method that uses an empirically determined layer thickness and with a feedback control method. The micro-hardness distribution, location of the melting pool, and microstructures of the deposited layers after deposition of a simple target shape were investigated for each procedure. The experimental results show that even though the feedback control method is the most effective method for obtaining the desired geometry, the deposited region was characterized by inhomogeneity of micro-hardness due to the time-variable depositing conditions involved. The largest dimensional error was associated with the conventional deposition procedure, which produced a rise in the melting zone due to over-deposition with respect to the slicing thickness, especially at the high laser power level considered. In contrast, the proposed procedure produced a stable melting zone position during deposition, which resulted in the deposited part having reasonable dimensional accuracy and uniform micro-hardness throughout the deposited region.

  19. NOAA/WDC Global Tsunami Deposits Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Discover where, when and how severely tsunamis affected Earth in geologic history. Information regarding Tsunami Deposits and Proxies for Tsunami Events complements...

  20. ROE Total Nitrogen Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of nitrogen in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991 at a set of point locations across the...

  1. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition 2009-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2009 to 2011. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  2. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  3. ROE Total Sulfur Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of sulfur in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991 at a set of point locations across the...

  4. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  5. ROE Total Nitrogen Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of nitrogen in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013 at a set of point locations across the...

  6. ROE Total Sulfur Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of sulfur in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013 at a set of point locations across the...

  7. Contemporary depositional environments of the Omo delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, K W

    1970-05-02

    Geomorphological and sedimentological studies of depositional environments of the modern Omo River delta and floodplain are essential to an understanding of the Pliocene to Pleistocene Mursi, Nkalabong and Kibish Formations of the Lower Omo Basin (southwestern Ethiopia).

  8. Porphyry copper deposits of the world

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Information on porphyry copper deposits from around the world with grade and tonnage models, a general classification based on geologic setting, mineralogy, with...

  9. Rare earth element mines, deposits, and occurrences

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains location, geologic and mineral economic data for world rare earth mines, deposits, and occurrences. The data in this compilation were derived...

  10. Source replenishment device for vacuum deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    A material source replenishment device for use with a vacuum deposition apparatus. The source replenishment device comprises an intermittent motion producing gear arrangement disposed within the vacuum deposition chamber. An elongated rod having one end operably connected to the gearing arrangement is provided with a multiarmed head at the opposite end disposed adjacent the heating element of the vacuum deposition apparatus. An inverted U-shaped source material element is releasably attached to the outer end of each arm member whereby said multiarmed head is moved to locate a first of said material elements above said heating element, whereupon said multiarmed head is lowered to engage said material element with the heating element and further lowered to release said material element on the heating element. After vaporization of said material element, second and subsequent material elements may be provided to the heating element without the need for opening the vacuum deposition apparatus to the atmosphere.

  11. On Biochemical Formation of Salt Deposits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A water/salt system in an evaporative environment is both a physicochemical region and a biological one. All the parameters of the system, such as the salinity, temperature and CO2 partial pressure, are affected by halophilic bacteria. The system controls salt deposition but is modified by an accompanying ecological system; therefore it should be called a water/salt/biological system. Salt minerals result from accumulation of the remains of bacteria/algae, namely, bacteria/algae formation; whereas biological, biophysical and biochemical processes provide full evidence for organic involvement. Consequently, salt deposits should not be called purely chemical but biological/chemical ones. This new argument supplements and develops the traditional idea and helps perfect the mineralization theory of salts and even general deposits, thus giving guidance to prospecting for salt deposits.

  12. Capillary deposition of advected floating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Debaisieux, Aymeric; Gregori, Federico

    2016-11-01

    The deposition and aggregation of particles flowing through a confined environment can dramatically hinder the transport of suspensions. Yet, the mechanisms responsible for the deposition of particles in shear flow are not fully understood. Here, we use an experimental model system in which floating particles are advected on the surface of a water channel and deposited on fixed obstacles through attractive capillary effects. By varying the flow rate of the liquid, the wetting properties and size of the particles and obstacles, we can tune the magnitude of the capillary and hydrodynamic forces that determine the probability of deposition and the equilibrium position on the substrate. We show that arrays of obstacles can be designed to efficiently capture the floating particles advected by the flow.

  13. Tax Evasion and Swiss Bank Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Niels

    Bank deposits in jurisdictions with banking secrecy constitute an effective tool to evade taxes on interest income. A recent EU reform reduces the scope for this type of tax evasion by introducing a source tax on interest income earned by EU residents in Switzerland and several other jurisdictions...... with banking secrecy. In this paper, we estimate the impact of the source tax on Swiss bank deposits held by EU residents while using that non-EU residents were not subject to the tax to apply a natural experiment methodology. We find that the 15% source tax caused Swiss bank deposits of EU residents to drop...... by more than 40% with most of the response occurring in two quarters immediately before and after the source tax was introduced. The estimates imply an elasticity of Swiss deposits with respect to the net-of-source-tax-rate in the range 2.5-3....

  14. Deposition of contaminant aerosol on human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Kasper Grann; Roed, Jørn; Byrne, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Over recent years, it has been established that deposition of various types of pollutant aerosols (e.g., radioactive) on human skin can have serious deleterious effects on health. However. only few investigations in the past have been devoted to measurement of deposition velocities on skin...... of particles of the potentially problematic sizes. An experimental programme has shown the deposition velocities on skin of particles in the ca. 0.5-5 mu m AMAD range to be high and generally associated with great variations. A series of investigations have been made to identify some of the factors that lead...... to this variation. Part of the variation was found to be caused by differences between individuals, whereas another part was found to be related to environmental factors, The identification of major influences on skin contaminant deposition is important in estimating health effects as well as in identifying means...

  15. An Introduction to Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Vivek H.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition has been instrumental in providing a deposition method for multiple space flight applications. It is well known that ALD is a cost effective nanoadditive-manufacturing technique that allows for the conformal coating of substrates with atomic control in a benign temperature and pressure environment. Through the introduction of paired precursor gases, thin films can be deposited on a myriad of substrates from flat surfaces to those with significant topography. By providing atomic layer control, where single layers of atoms can be deposited, the fabrication of metal transparent films, precise nano-laminates, and coatings of nano-channels, pores and particles is achievable. The feasibility of this technology for NASA line of business applications range from thermal systems, optics, sensors, to environmental protection. An overview of this technology will be presented.

  16. Major mineral deposits of the world

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Regional locations and general geologic setting of known deposits of major nonfuel mineral commodities. Originally compiled in five parts by diverse authors,...

  17. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2001-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  18. Chicxulub Ejecta Blanket Deposits From Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Chicxulub impact into a thick sequence of carbonates and sulfates released over a trillion tons of volatiles. The importance of the explosive release of such a large mass of volatiles has been greatly underestimated in studies of ejecta depositional processes. Proximal Chicxulub ejecta blanket deposits recent discovered on Albion Island in Belize provide a key to understanding the role of volatile-rich target material during large impact events.

  19. Making Lightweight Structures By Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goela, Jitendra S.; Pickering, Michael A.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1990-01-01

    Technique developed for fabrication of stiff, strong, lightweight structures of silicon carbide or other materials by any of several deposition processes. Structures made by method can have complicated shapes. Ability to manufacture complex shape from pure deposited SiC useful and leads to new products in several fields. These lightweight structures used as backup structures for optical components, as structural components in automotive, aerospace, and outer space applications, and as lightweight parts of furniture for outer space.

  20. Perovskite Thin Films via Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Sutherland, Brandon R.

    2014-10-30

    © 2014 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. (Graph Presented) A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm-1.

  1. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roback, R.; Szetela, E. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study deposit formation in hydrocarbon fuels under flow conditions that exist in high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. A high pressure fuel coking test apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition (coking) limits and carbon deposition rates in heated copper tubes for two hydrocarbon rocket fuels, RP-1 and commercial-grade propane. Tests were also conducted using JP-7 and chemically-pure propane as being representative of more refined cuts of the baseline fuels. A parametric evaluation of fuel thermal stability was performed at pressures of 136 atm to 340 atm, bulk fuel velocities in the range 6 to 30 m/sec, and tube wall temperatures in the range 422 to 811 K. Results indicated that substantial deposit formation occurs with RP-1 fuel at wall temperatures between 600 and 800 K, with peak deposit formation occurring near 700 K. No improvements were obtained when deoxygenated JP-7 fuel was substituted for RP-1. The carbon deposition rates for the propane fuels were generally higher than those obtained for either of the kerosene fuels at any given wall temperature. There appeared to be little difference between commercial-grade and chemically-pure propane with regard to type and quantity of deposit. Results of tests conducted with RP-1 indicated that the rate of deposit formation increased slightly with pressure over the range 136 atm to 340 atm. Finally, lating the inside wall of the tubes with nickel was found to significantly reduce carbon deposition rates for RP-1 fuel.

  2. Focused helium-ion-beam-induced deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkemade, P.F.A.; Miro, H. [Delft University of Technology, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    The recent introduction of the helium ion microscope (HIM) offers new possibilities for materials modification and fabrication with spatial resolution below 10 nm. In particular, the specific interaction of He{sup +} ions in the tens of keV energy range with materials - i.e., minimal deflection and mainly energy loss via electronic excitations - renders the HIM a special tool for ion-beam-induced deposition. In this work, an overview is given of all studies of helium-ion-beam-induced deposition (He-IBID) that appeared in the literature before summer 2014. Continuum models that describe the deposition processes are presented in detail, with emphasis on precursor depletion and replenishment. In addition, a Monte Carlo model is discussed. Basic experimental He-IBID studies are critically examined. They show deposition rates of up to 0.1 nm{sup 3}/ion. Analysis by means of a continuum model yields the precursor diffusion constant and the cross sections for beam-induced precursor decomposition and beam-induced desorption. Moreover, it is shown that deposition takes place only in a small zone around the beam impact point. Furthermore, the characterization of deposited materials is discussed in terms of microstructure and resistivity. It is shown that He-IBID material resembles more electron-beam-induced-deposition (EBID) material than Ga-ion-beam-induced-deposition (Ga-IBID) material. Nevertheless, the spatial resolution for He-IBID is in general better than for EBID and Ga-IBID; in particular, proximity effects are minimal. (orig.)

  3. Removal of External Deposits on Boiler Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. De

    1970-07-01

    Full Text Available The superheater tubes in Port and Starboard boilers were found to have completely clogged by heavy deposits, which on analysis mainly vanadium pentoxide and sodium sulphmatter. The cleaning of the deposits was accomplished by alternate spraying with 15-20 per cent hydrogen peroxide and washing with hot water jets. Over the past two years, since the date of cleaning, the IN ship is operating without any trouble in the boilers.

  4. Ultramafic-Hosted Talc-Magnesite Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson,, Gilpin R.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Foley, Nora K.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation on the geology of ultramafic-hosted talc-magnesite deposits was given at the 42nd Forum on the Geology of Industrial Minerals, May 7-13, 2006, in Asheville, North Carolina (USA). Talc is a soft inert industrial mineral commodity commonly used as a component or filler in ceramic, paint, paper, plastic, roofing, and electrical applications. Ultramafic-hosted talc-magnesite deposits are important sources of talc.

  5. Factors that Affect the Lung Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankhala, Shweta; Singh, H. S.; Singh, S. K.; Lalwani, Gautam

    The lung is an external organ forming the site of unwanted material or particles. In order to protect it, the airways have to be highly effective filters and if the particle deposit they need to be cleared. Inhaled particles can cause a variety of diseases. There are various factors on which the prediction of depositing particles depends, such as age, particle size, flow rate gender, the physics of the particles, the anatomy of the respiratory tract etc.

  6. Evolution of ore deposits on terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Ore deposits on terrestrial planets materialized after core formation, mantle evolution, crustal development, interactions of surface rocks with the hydrosphere and atmosphere, and, where life exists on a planet, the involvement of biological activity. Core formation removed most of the siderophilic and chalcophilic elements, leaving mantles depleted in many of the strategic and noble metals relative to their chondritic abundances. Basaltic magma derived from partial melting of the mantle transported to the surface several metals contained in immiscible silicate and sulfide melts. Magmatic ore deposits were formed during cooling, fractional crystallization and density stratification from the basaltic melts. Such ore deposits found in earth's Archean rocks were probably generated during early histories of all terrestrial planets and may be the only types of igneous ores on Mars. Where plate tectonic activity was prevalent on a terrestrial planet, temporal evolution of ore deposits took place. Repetitive episodes of subduction modified the chemical compositions of the crust and upper mantles, leading to porphyry copper and molybdenum ores in calc-alkaline igneous rocks and granite-hosted tin and tungsten deposits. Such plate tectonic-induced mineralization in relatively young igneous rocks on earth may also have produced hydrothermal ore deposits on Venus in addition to the massive sulfide and cumulate chromite ores associated with Venusian mafic igneous rock. Sedimentary ore deposits resulting from mechanical and chemical weathering in reducing atmospheres in Archean earth included placer deposits (e.g., uraninite, gold, pyrite ores). Chromite, ilmenite, and other dense unreactive minerals could also be present on channel floors and in valley networks on Mars, while banded iron formations might underlie the Martian northern plains regions. As oxygen evolved in earth's atmosphere, so too did oxide ores. By analogy, gossans above sulfide ores probably occur on Mars

  7. An Introduction to Copper Deposits in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    There are 11 genetic types of copper deposit in China, three of which (porphyry,contact metasomatic and VMS types) are the most important. The copper deposits distribute widely both temporally and spatially in China. The features of copper ores in China are mostly poor in copper tenor and complex in metal associated. The copper metallogeny in China predominantly occurs in three metallogenic megadomains, namely the circum-Pacific, the paleo-Asian and the Tethys-Himalayan.

  8. Evolution of ore deposits on terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Ore deposits on terrestrial planets materialized after core formation, mantle evolution, crustal development, interactions of surface rocks with the hydrosphere and atmosphere, and, where life exists on a planet, the involvement of biological activity. Core formation removed most of the siderophilic and chalcophilic elements, leaving mantles depleted in many of the strategic and noble metals relative to their chondritic abundances. Basaltic magma derived from partial melting of the mantle transported to the surface several metals contained in immiscible silicate and sulfide melts. Magmatic ore deposits were formed during cooling, fractional crystallization and density stratification from the basaltic melts. Such ore deposits found in earth's Archean rocks were probably generated during early histories of all terrestrial planets and may be the only types of igneous ores on Mars. Where plate tectonic activity was prevalent on a terrestrial planet, temporal evolution of ore deposits took place. Repetitive episodes of subduction modified the chemical compositions of the crust and upper mantles, leading to porphyry copper and molybdenum ores in calc-alkaline igneous rocks and granite-hosted tin and tungsten deposits. Such plate tectonic-induced mineralization in relatively young igneous rocks on earth may also have produced hydrothermal ore deposits on Venus in addition to the massive sulfide and cumulate chromite ores associated with Venusian mafic igneous rock. Sedimentary ore deposits resulting from mechanical and chemical weathering in reducing atmospheres in Archean earth included placer deposits (e.g., uraninite, gold, pyrite ores). Chromite, ilmenite, and other dense unreactive minerals could also be present on channel floors and in valley networks on Mars, while banded iron formations might underlie the Martian northern plains regions. As oxygen evolved in earth's atmosphere, so too did oxide ores. By analogy, gossans above sulfide ores probably occur on Mars

  9. Major Brazilian gold deposits - 1982 to 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorman, Charles H.; DeWitt, Ed; Maron, Marcos A.; Ladeira, Eduardo A.

    2001-07-01

    Brazil has been a major but intermittent producer of gold since its discovery in 1500. Brazil led the world in gold production during the 18th and early 19th centuries. From the late 19th century to the late 20th century, total mining company and garimpeiro production was small and relatively constant at about 5 to 8 t/year. The discovery of alluvial deposits in the Amazon by garimpeiros in the 1970s and the opening of eight mines by mining companies from 1983 to 1990 fueled a major boom in Brazil's gold production, exceeding 100 t/year in 1988 and 1989. However, garimpeiro alluvial production decreased rapidly in the 1990s, to about 10 t/year by 1999. Company production increased about tenfold from about 4 t/year in 1982 to 40 t in 1992. Production from 1992 to the present remained relatively stable, even though several mines were closed or were in the process of closing and no new major mines were put into production during that period. Based on their production history from 1982-1999, 17 gold mines are ranked as major (>20 t) and minor (3-8 t) mines. From 1982-1999, deposits hosted in Archean rocks produced 66% of the gold in Brazil, whereas deposits in Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic rocks accounted for 19% and 15%, respectively. Deposits in metamorphosed sedimentary rocks, especially carbonate-rich rocks and carbonate iron-formation, yielded the great bulk of the gold. Deposits in igneous rocks were of much less importance. The Archean and Paleoproterozoic terranes of Brazil largely lack base-metal-rich volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, porphyry deposits, and polymetallic veins and sedimentary exhalative deposits. An exception to this is in the Carajás Mineral Province.

  10. Fabrication of Micro Components by Electrochemical Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben

    The main issue of this thesis is the combination of electrochemical deposition of metals and micro machining. Processes for electroplating and electroless plating of nickel and nickel alloys have been developed and optimised for compatibility with microelectronics and silicon based micromechanics...... of electrochemical machining and traditional machining is compared to micro machining techniques as performed in the field of microelectronics. Various practical solutions and equipment for electrochemical deposition of micro components are demonstrated, as well as the use and experience obtained utilising...

  11. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  12. IMMUNOGLOBULIN DEPOSITIONS IN PERIPHERAL NERVES IN POLYMYOSITIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李越星; 陈清棠; 吴丽娟; 贾钟; 张秋荣; 左越焕

    1995-01-01

    An immunocytochemical study was performed in 6 peripheral nerve specimens from 6 cases of polymyositis.The results revealed that depositions of IgG,IgM,IgA and C3 were found in the epineurium,perineurium and the walls of capillaries.These findings demonstrated that depositions of immonoglobulins and the complement-mediated immunoreaction may play an important role in pathogenesis of polymyositis with peripheral nerfve involvements.

  13. Deposits, Loans and Banking: Clarifying the Debate

    OpenAIRE

    Bagus, Philipp; Howden, David; Block, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between banking deposits and loans remains a contentious topic. While the defense of a 100 percent reserve clause to eliminate fractional reserves has commonly been asserted on economic and ethical grounds, new legal arguments found in Jesús Huerta de Soto (2006) remain largely ignored. We address Michael S. Rozeff’s (2010) recent article as a case in point of this ignorance. Contrary to supporters of fractional reserve demand deposits, we show that such a contract – one trea...

  14. A Game Theory Approach of Deposit Insurance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hong-xun; QIU Wan-hua; MING Ming

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic game theory approach for deposit insurance. We formulate a deposit insurance problem as an incomplete information game theory model, which deduces the expression of Capital Charge Ratio for national central bank. The main contribution of the paper however is that we then extrapolate the declared value of the bank in best its policy. Finally a numerical example is used to illustrate the approach proposed in this paper.

  15. Perovskite thin films via atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Brandon R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Adachi, Michael M; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Wong, Chris T O; McDowell, Jeffrey J; Xu, Jixian; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Ning, Zhijun; Houtepen, Arjan J; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    A new method to deposit perovskite thin films that benefit from the thickness control and conformality of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is detailed. A seed layer of ALD PbS is place-exchanged with PbI2 and subsequently CH3 NH3 PbI3 perovskite. These films show promising optical properties, with gain coefficients of 3200 ± 830 cm(-1) .

  16. Mercury's Pyroclastic Deposits and their spectral variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Sebastien; Doressoundiram, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Observations of the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury have shown that volcanism is a very important process that has shaped the surface of the planet, in particular in its early history.In this study, we use the full range of the MASCS spectrometer (300-1400nm) to characterize the spectral properties of the pyroclastic deposits. Analysis of deposits within the Caloris Basin, and on other location of Mercury's surface (e.g., Hesiod, Rachmaninoff, etc.) show two main results: 1) Spectral variability is significant in the UV and VIS range between the deposits themselves, and also with respect to the rest of the planet and other features like hollows, 2) Deposits exhibit a radial variability similar to those found with the lunar pyroclastic deposits of floor fractured craters.These results are put in context with the latest analysis of other instruments of the MESSENGER spacecraft, in particular the visible observations from the imager MDIS, and the elemental composition given by the X-Ray spectrometer. Although all together, the results do not allow pointing to compositional variability of the deposits for certain, information on the formation mechanisms, the weathering and the age formation can be extrapolated from the radial variability and the elemental composition.

  17. Plasma deposited fluorinated films on porous membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gancarz, Irena [Department of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Wrocław University of Technology, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland); Bryjak, Marek, E-mail: marek.bryjak@pwr.edu.pl [Department of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Wrocław University of Technology, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland); Kujawski, Jan; Wolska, Joanna [Department of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Wrocław University of Technology, 50-370 Wrocław (Poland); Kujawa, Joanna; Kujawski, Wojciech [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Chemistry, 7 Gagarina St., 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2015-02-01

    75 KHz plasma was used to modify track etched poly(ethylene terephthalate) membranes and deposit on them flouropolymers. Two fluorine bearing monomers were used: perflourohexane and hexafluorobenzene. The modified surfaces were analyzed by means of attenuated total reflection infra-red spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and wettability. It was detected that hexaflourobenxene deposited to the larger extent than perflourohaxane did. The roughness of surfaces decreased when more fluoropolymer was deposited. The hydrophobic character of surface slightly disappeared during 20-days storage of hexaflourobenzene modified membrane. Perfluorohexane modified membrane did not change its character within 120 days after modification. It was expected that this phenomenon resulted from post-reactions of oxygen with radicals in polymer deposits. The obtained membranes could be used for membrane distillation of juices. - Highlights: • Plasma deposited hydrophobic layer of flouropolymers. • Deposition degree affects the surface properties. • Hydrohilization of surface due to reaction of oxygen with entrapped radicals. • Possibility to use modified porous membrane for water distillation and apple juice concentration.

  18. Deposition uniformity inspection in IC wafer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. C.; Lin, Y. T.; Jeng, J. J.; Chang, C. L.

    2014-03-01

    This paper focuses on the task of automatic visual inspection of color uniformity on the surface of integrated circuits (IC) wafers arising from the layering process. The oxide thickness uniformity within a given wafer with a desired target thickness is of great importance for modern semiconductor circuits with small oxide thickness. The non-uniform chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a wafer surface will proceed to fail testing in Wafer Acceptance Test (WAT). Early detection of non-uniform deposition in a wafer surface can reduce material waste and improve production yields. The fastest and most low-priced inspection method is a machine vision-based inspection system. In this paper, the proposed visual inspection system is based on the color representations which were reflected from wafer surface. The regions of non-uniform deposition present different colors from the uniform background in a wafer surface. The proposed inspection technique first learns the color data via color space transformation from uniform deposition of normal wafer surfaces. The individual small region statistical comparison scheme then proceeds to the testing wafers. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively detect the non-uniform deposition regions on the wafer surface. The inspection time of the deposited wafers is quite compatible with the atmospheric pressure CVD time.

  19. MICRO ELECTRICAL DISCHARGE MACHINING DEPOSITION IN AIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Baidong; ZHAO Wansheng; WANG Zhenlong; CAO Guohui

    2006-01-01

    A new deposition method is described using micro electrical discharge machining (EDM)to deposit tool electrode material on workpiece in air. The basic principles of micro electrical discharge deposition (EDD) are analyzed and the realized conditions are predicted. With an ordinary EDM shaping machine, brass as the electrode, high-speed steel as the workpiece, a lot of experiments are carried out on micro EDD systematically and thoroughly. The effects of major processing parameters, such as the discharge current, discharge duration, pulse interval and working medium, are obtained. As a result, a micro cylinder with 0.19 mm in diameter and 7.35 mm in height is deposited.By exchanging the polarities of the electrode and workpiece the micro cylinder can be removed selectively. So the reversible machining of deposition and removal is achieved, which breaks through the constraint of traditional EDM. Measurements show that the deposited material is compact and close to workpiece base, whose components depend on the tool electrode material.

  20. Deposition fluxes of terpenes over grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, I.; HöRtnagl, L.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Müller, M.; Graus, M.; Karl, T.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Hansel, A.

    2011-07-01

    Eddy covariance flux measurements were carried out for two subsequent vegetation periods above a temperate mountain grassland in an alpine valley using a proton-transfer-reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a PTR time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF). In 2008 and during the first half of the vegetation period 2009 the volume mixing ratios (VMRs) for the sum of monoterpenes (MTs) were typically well below 1 ppbv and neither MT emission nor deposition was observed. After a hailstorm in July 2009 an order of magnitude higher amount of terpenes was transported to the site from nearby coniferous forests causing elevated VMRs. As a consequence, deposition fluxes of terpenes to the grassland, which continued over a time period of several weeks without significant reemission, were observed. For days without precipitation the deposition occurred at velocities close to the aerodynamic limit. In addition to monoterpene uptake, deposition fluxes of the sum of sesquiterpenes (SQTs) and the sum of oxygenated terpenes (OTs) were detected. Considering an entire growing season for the grassland (i.e., 1 April to 1 November 2009), the cumulative carbon deposition of monoterpenes reached 276 mg C m-2. This is comparable to the net carbon emission of methanol (329 mg C m-2), which is the dominant nonmethane volatile organic compound (VOC) emitted from this site, during the same time period. It is suggested that deposition of monoterpenes to terrestrial ecosystems could play a more significant role in the reactive carbon budget than previously assumed.

  1. Climax-Type Porphyry Molybdenum Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Steve; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Climax-type porphyry molybdenum deposits, as defined here, are extremely rare; thirteen deposits are known, all in western North America and ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to mainly Tertiary. They are consistently found in a postsubduction, extensional tectonic setting and are invariably associated with A-type granites that formed after peak activity of a magmatic cycle. The deposits consist of ore shells of quartz-molybdenite stockwork veins that lie above and surrounding the apices of cupola-like, highly evolved, calc-alkaline granite and subvolcanic rhyolite-porphyry bodies. These plutons are invariably enriched in fluorine (commonly >1 percent), rubidium (commonly >500 parts per million), and niobium-tantalum (Nb commonly >50 parts per million). The deposits are relatively high grade (typically 0.1-0.3 percent Mo) and may be very large (typically 100-1,000 million tons). Molybdenum, as MoS2, is the primary commodity in all known deposits. The effect on surface-water quality owing to natural influx of water or sediment from a Climax-type mineralized area can extend many kilometers downstream from the mineralized area. Waste piles composed of quartz-silica-pyrite altered rocks will likely produce acidic drainage waters. The potential exists for concentrations of fluorine or rare metals in surface water and groundwater to exceed recommended limits for human consumption near both mined and unmined Climax-type deposits.

  2. Modes in the size distributions and neutralization extent of fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols observed at Canadian rural locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Yao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the 192 samples of size-segregated water-soluble inorganic ions collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI at eight rural locations in Canada, ten samples were identified to have gone through fog processing. The supermicron particle modes of ammonium salt aerosols were found to be the fingerprint of fog processed aerosols. However, the patterns and the sizes of the supermicron modes varied with ambient temperature (T and particle acidity and also differed between inland and coastal locations. Under T > 0 °C condition, fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols were completely neutralized and had a dominant mode at 1–2 μm and a minor mode at 5–10 μm if particles were in neutral condition, and ammonium sulfate was incompletely neutralized and only had a 1–2 μm mode if particles were in acidic conditions. Under T < 0 °C at the coastal site, fog-processed aerosols exhibited a bi-modal size distribution with a dominant mode of incompletely-neutralized ammonium sulfate at about 3 μm and a minor mode of completely-neutralized ammonium sulfate at 8–9 μm. Under T < 0 °C condition at the inland sites, fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols were sometimes completely neutralized and sometimes incompletely neutralized, and the size of the supermicron mode was in the range from 1 to 5 μm. Overall, fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols under T < 0 °C condition were generally distributed at larger size (e.g., 2–5 μm than those under T > 0 °C condition (e.g., 1–2 μm.

  3. Size Distributions of Aerosol Sulfates and Nitrates in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games: Impacts of Pollution Control Measures and Regional Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinfeng; WANG Tao; Ravi Kant PATHAK; Mattias HALLQUIST; GAO Xiaomei; NIE Wei; XUE Likun

    2013-01-01

    For the 2008 Olympic Games,drastic control measures were implemented on industrial and urban emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2),nitrogen oxides (NOx) and other pollutants to address the issues of poor air quality in Beijing.To investigate the effects of SO2 and NOx reductions on the particulate sulfate and nitrate concentrations as well as their size distributions,size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDIs) at urban and downwind rural sites in Beijing before and after full-scale controls.During the sampling period,the mass concentrations of fine particles (PM1.8) at the urban and rural sites were 94.0 and 85.9 μg m-3,respectively.More than 90% of the sulfates and ~60%of nitrates formed as fine particles.Benefiting from the advantageous meteorological conditions and the source controls,sulfates were observed in rather low concentrations and primarily in condensation mode during the Olympics.The effects of the control measures were separately analyzed for the northerly and the southerly air-mass-dominated days to account for any bias.After the control measures were implemented,PM,sulfates,and nitrates were significantly reduced when the northerly air masses prevailed,with a higher percentage of reduction in larger particles.The droplet mode particles,which dominated the sulfates and nitrates before the controls were implemented,were remarkably reduced in mass concentration after the control measures were implemented.Nevertheless,when the polluted southerly air masses prevailed,the local source control measures in Beijing did not effectively reduce the ambient sulfate concentration due to the enormous regional contribution from the North China Plain.

  4. Water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and ω-oxocarboxylic acids in size-segregated aerosols over northern Japan during spring: sources and formation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Dhananjay Kumar; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kobayashi, Minoru; Gowda, Divyavani

    2016-04-01

    Seven sets (AF01-AF07) of size-segregated aerosol (12-sizes) samples were collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in Sapporo, Japan during the spring of 2001 to understand the sources and atmospheric processes of water-soluble organic aerosols in the outflow region of Asian dusts. The samples were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12) and ω-oxocarboxylic acids as well as inorganic ions. The molecular distribution of diacids showed the predominance of oxalic acid (C2) followed by malonic and succinic acids whereas ω-oxoacids showed the predominance of glyoxylic acid (ωC2) in size-segregated aerosols. SO42- and NH4+ are enriched in submicron mode whereas NO3- and Ca2+ are in supermicron mode. Most of diacids and ω-oxoacids are enriched in supermicron mode in the samples (AF01-AF03) influenced by the long-range transport of mineral dusts whereas enhanced presence in submicron mode was observed in other sample sets. The strong correlations of C2 with Ca2+ (r = 0.95-0.99) and NO3- (r = 0.96-0.98) in supermicron mode in the samples AF01-AF03 suggest the adsorption or production of C2 diacid via heterogeneous reaction on the surface of mineral dust during long-range atmospheric transport. The preferential enrichment of diacids and ω-oxoacids in mineral dust has important implications for the solubility and cloud nucleation properties of the dominant fraction of water-soluble organic aerosols. This study demonstrates that biofuel and biomass burning and mineral dust originated in East Asia are two major factors to control the size distribution of diacids and related compounds over northern Japan.

  5. Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model v5.0 against size-resolved measurements of inorganic particle composition across sites in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Nolte

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates particle size-composition distributions simulated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model using Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI measurements at 18 sites across North America. Size-resolved measurements of particulate SO42−, NO3−, NH4+, Na+, Cl−, Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+ are compared to CMAQ model output for discrete sampling periods between 2002 and 2005. The observation sites were predominantly in remote areas (e.g. National Parks in the United States and Canada, and measurements were typically made for a period of roughly one month. For SO42− and NH4+, model performance was consistent across the US and Canadian sites, with the model slightly overestimating the peak particle diameter and underestimating the peak particle concentration compared to the observations. Na+ and Mg2+ size distributions were generally well represented at coastal sites, indicating reasonable simulation of emissions from sea spray. CMAQ is able to simulate the displacement of Cl− in aged sea spray aerosol, though the extent of Cl− depletion relative to Na+ is often underpredicted. The model performance for NO3− exhibited much more site-to-site variability than that of SO42− and NH4+, with the model ranging from an underestimation to overestimation of both the peak diameter and peak particle concentration across the sites. Computing PM2.5 from the modeled size distribution parameters rather than by summing the masses in the Aitken and accumulation modes resulted in differences in daily averages of up to 1 μg m−3 (10%, while the difference in seasonal and annual model performance compared to observations from the IMPROVE, CSN and AQS networks was very small. Two updates to the CMAQ aerosol model – changes to the assumed size and mode width of emitted particles and the implementation of gravitational settling – resulted in small improvements in modeled size distributions.

  6. Metal and metalloid contaminants in atmospheric aerosols from mining operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csavina, Janae

    Mining operations, including crushing, grinding, smelting, refining, and tailings management, are a significant source of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants such as As, Pb, Cd and other potentially toxic elements. Dust particles emitted from mining operations can accumulate in surrounding soils, natural waters and vegetation at relatively high concentrations through wind and water transport. Human exposure to the dust can occur through inhalation and, especially in the case of children, incidental dust ingestion, particularly during the early years when children are likely to exhibit pica. Furthermore, smelting operations release metals and metalloids in the form of fumes and ultra-fine particulate matter, which disperses more readily than coarser soil dusts. Of specific concern, these fine particulates can be transported to the lungs, allowing contaminants to be transferred into the blood stream. The main aim of this research is to assess the role of atmospheric aerosol and dust in the transport of metal and metalloid contaminants from mining operations to assess the deleterious impacts of these emissions to ecology and human health. In a field campaign, ambient particulates from five mining sites and four reference sites were examined utilizing micro-orifice deposit impactors (MOUDI), total suspended particulate (TSP) collectors, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and Dusttrak optical particle counters for an understanding of the fate and transport of atmospheric aerosols. One of the major findings from size-resolved chemical characterization at three mining sites showed that the majority of the contaminant concentrations were found in the fine size fraction (fraction when compared to reference sites. Additionally, with dust events being a growing concern because of predicted climate change and mine tailings being a significant source for dust, high wind conditions around mine tailings were studied for dust generation. Relative humidity was found

  7. Low molecular weight organic acids in aerosol particles from Rondônia, Brazil, during the biomass-burning, transition and wet periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Artaxo

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Particles from biomass burning and regional haze were sampled in Rondônia, Brazil, during dry, transition and wet periods from September to November 2002, as part of the LBA-SMOCC (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall, and Climate field campaign. Water soluble organic and inorganic compounds in bulk (High Volume and Stacked Filter Unit sampler and size-resolved (Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit ImpactorMOUDI smoke samples were determined by ion chromatography. It was found that low molecular weight polar organic acids account for a significant fraction of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC in biomass burning aerosols (C2-C6 dicarboxylic acids reached up to 3.7% and one-ring aromatic acids reached up to 2% of fine fraction WSOC during burning period. Short dicarboxylic (C2-C6 acids are dominated by oxalic acid followed by malonic and succinic acids. The largest ionic species is ammonium sulfate (60–70% of ionic mass. It was found that most of the ionic mass is concentrated in submicrometer-sized particles. Based on the size distribution and correlations with K+, a known biomass burning tracer, it is suggested that many of the organic acids are directly emitted by vegetation fires. It is concluded that the dicarboxylic acids are mostly confined to the particulate phase, and no evidence for semi-volatile behavior was observed. Finally, it is shown that the distribution of water soluble species shifts to larger aerosols sizes as the aerosol population ages and mixes with other aerosol types in the atmosphere.

  8. Low molecular weight organic acids in aerosol particles from Rondônia, Brazil, during the biomass-burning, transition and wet periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Falkovich

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Particles from biomass burning and regional haze were sampled in Rondônia, Brazil, during dry, transition and wet periods from September to November 2002, as part of the LBA-SMOCC (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall, and Climate field campaign. Water soluble organic and inorganic compounds in bulk (High Volume and Stacked Filter Unit sampler and size-resolved (Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit ImpactorMOUDI smoke samples were determined by ion chromatography. It was found that low molecular weight polar organic acids account for a significant fraction of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC in biomass burning aerosols (C2-C6 dicarboxylic acids reached up to 3.7% and one-ring aromatic acids reached up to 2% of fine fraction WSOC during burning period. Short dicarboxylic (C2-C6 acids are dominated by oxalic acid followed by malonic and succinic acids. The largest ionic species is ammonium sulfate (60–70% of ionic mass. It was found that most of the ionic mass is concentrated in submicrometer-sized particles. Based on the size distribution and correlations with K+, a known biomass burning tracer, it is suggested that many of the organic acids are directly emitted by vegetation fires. Concentrations of dicarboxylic acids in the front and back filters of high volume sampler were determined. Based on these measurements, it was concluded that in the neutral or slightly basic smoke particles typical of this region, dicarboxylic acids are mostly confined to the particulate phase. Finally, it is shown that the distribution of water soluble species shifts to larger aerosols sizes as the aerosol population ages and mixes with other aerosol types in the atmosphere.

  9. Morphological and semi-quantitative characteristics of diesel soot agglomerates emitted from commercial vehicles and a dynamometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Chin-Hsiang; LEE Whei-May; LIAW Jiun-Jian

    2009-01-01

    Diesel soot aggregates emitted from a model dynamometer and 11 on-road vehicles were segregated by a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). The elemental contents and morphological parameters of the aggregates were then examined by scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and combined with a fractional Brownian motion (fBm) processor. Two mode-size distributions of aggregates collected from diesel vehicles were confirmed. Mean mass concentration of 339 mg/m3 (dC/dlogdp) existed in the dominant mode (180-320 nm). A relatively high proportion of these aggregates appeared in PM1, accentuating the relevance regarding adverse health effects. Furthermore, the fBm processor directly parameterized the SEM images of fractal like aggregates and successfully quantified surface texture to extract Hurst coefficients (H) of the aggregates. For aggregates from vehicles equipped with a universal cylinder number, the H value was independent of engine operational conditions. A small H value existed in emitted aggregates from vehicles with a large number of cylinders. Generally, this study found that aggregate fractal dimension related to H was in the range of 1.641-1.775, which is in agreement with values reported by previous TEM-based experiments. According to EDS analysis, carbon content ranged in a high level of 30%-50% by weight for diesel soot aggregates. The presence of Na and Mg elements in these sampled aggregates indicated the likelihood that some engine enhancers composed of biofuel or surfactants were commonly used in on-road vehicles in Taiwan. In particular, the morphological H combined with carbon content detection can be useful for characterizing chain-like or cluster diesel soot aggregates in the atmosphere.

  10. Size distribution and sources of aerosol in Launceston, Australia, during winter 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keywood, M D; Ayers, G P; Gras, J L; Gillett, R W; Cohen, D D

    2000-03-01

    As part of a pilot study into the chemical and physical properties of Australian fine particles, a suite of aerosol samples was collected at Ti Tree Bend in Launceston, Tasmania, during June and July 1997. This period represents midwinter in the Southern Hemisphere, a period when aerosol sources in Launceston are dominated by smoke from domestic wood burning. This paper describes the results from this measurement campaign, with the aim of assessing the effect of wood smoke on the chemical and physical characteristics of ambient aerosol. A micro orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) was used to measure the size distributions of the aerosol from 0.05 to 20 microns aerodynamic diameter. Continuous measurements of fine particle mass were made using a PM2.5 tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) and light scattering coefficients at 530 nm were measured with nephelometers. Mass size distributions tended to be bimodal, with the diameter of the dominant mode tending to smaller sizes with increases in total mass. Non-sea salt potassium and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were used as chemical tracers for wood smoke. Wood smoke was found to increase absolute particle mass (enough to regularly exceed air quality standards), and to concentrate mass in a single mode below 1 micron aerodynamic diameter. The acid-base equilibrium of the aerosol was altered by the wood smoke source, with free acidity hydrogen ion, non-sea salt sulfate, and ammonium concentrations being higher and the concentration of all species, including nitrate (to differing extents), focused in the fine particle size ranges. The wood smoke source also heavily influenced the aerosol scattering efficiency, adding to a strong diurnal cycle in both mass concentration and light scattering.

  11. Characterization of particle size distribution from diesel engines fueled with palm-biodiesel blends and paraffinic fuel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Chia-Fon; Fang, Tiegang

    Biodiesels are promoted as alternative fuels and their applications in diesel engines have been investigated by many researchers. However, the particle size distribution emitted from heavy-duty diesel engines fueled with palm-biodiesel blended with premium diesel fuel and paraffinic fuel blended with palm-biodiesel has seldom been addressed. Thus, five test fuels were used in this work to study the particle size distribution: D100 (premium diesel fuel), B100 (100% palm-biodiesel), B20 (20 vol% palm-biodiesel+80 vol% D100), BP9505 (95 vol% paraffinic fuel+5 vol% palm-biodiesel) and BP8020 (80 vol% paraffinic fuel+20 vol% palm-biodiesel). A Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) equipped with aluminum filters was used to collect size-resolved samples. Experimental results indicated that palm-biodiesel blends and paraffinic fuel blends could improve combustion efficiency in diesel engines, but pure palm-biodiesel could cause incomplete combustion. Adding palm-biodiesel to diesel fuel would slightly increase particles with diameter matter of BP9505 and BP8020 existed in coarse particles (diameter: 2.5-10 μm). Energy efficiency also increases significantly by 12.3-15.1% with the introduction of paraffinic fuel blends into the engine. Nevertheless, paraffinic fuel blends also reduce the emission of particulate matters by 36.0-38.4%. Carbon monoxide was decreased by 36.8-48.5%. Total hydrocarbon is 39.6-41.7% less than diesel fuel combustion. Nitrogen oxides emission is about 5% lower for paraffinic fuel. These results show that paraffinic fuel can be very competitive and replaced diesel fuels in the future.

  12. Size-resolved measurements of ice-nucleating particles at six locations in North America and one in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Chou, C.; Irish, V. E.; Dickie, R.; Elizondo, P.; Wong, R.; Brintnell, M.; Elsasser, M.; Lassar, W. M.; Pierce, K. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; MacDonald, A. M.; Platt, A.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Schiller, C. L.; Suski, K. J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Huffman, J. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Bertram, A. K.

    2016-02-01

    Detailed information on the size of ice-nucleating particles (INPs) may be useful in source identification, modeling their transport in the atmosphere to improve climate predictions, and determining how effectively or ineffectively instrumentation used for quantifying INPs in the atmosphere captures the full INP population. In this study we report immersion-mode INP number concentrations as a function of size at six ground sites in North America and one in Europe using the micro-orifice uniform-deposit impactor droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT), which combines particle size-segregation by inertial impaction and a microscope-based immersion freezing apparatus. The lowest INP number concentrations were observed at Arctic and alpine locations and the highest at suburban and agricultural locations, consistent with previous studies of INP concentrations in similar environments. We found that 91 ± 9, 79 ± 17, and 63 ± 21 % of INPs had an aerodynamic diameter > 1 µm at ice activation temperatures of -15, -20, and -25 °C, respectively, when averaging over all sampling locations. In addition, 62 ± 20, 55 ± 18, and 42 ± 17 % of INPs were in the coarse mode (> 2.5 µm) at ice activation temperatures of -15, -20, and -25 °C, respectively, when averaging over all sampling locations. These results are consistent with six out of the nine studies in the literature that have focused on the size distribution of INPs in the atmosphere. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that supermicron and coarse-mode aerosol particles are a significant component of the INP population in many different ground-level environments. Further size-resolved studies of INPs as a function of altitude are required since the size distribution of INPs may be different at high altitudes due to size-dependent removal processes of atmospheric particles.

  13. Size distributions of aerosol sulfates and nitrates in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games: Impacts of pollution control measures and regional transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Tao; Pathak, Ravi Kant; Hallquist, Mattias; Gao, Xiaomei; Nie, Wei; Xue, Likun; Gao, Jian; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Wenxing; Wang, Shulan; Chai, Fahe; Chen, Yizhen

    2013-03-01

    For the 2008 Olympic Games, drastic control measures were implemented on industrial and urban emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and other pollutants to address the issues of poor air quality in Beijing. To investigate the effects of SO2 and NO x reductions on the particulate sulfate and nitrate concentrations as well as their size distributions, size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDIs) at urban and downwind rural sites in Beijing before and after full-scale controls. During the sampling period, the mass concentrations of fine particles (PM1.8) at the urban and rural sites were 94.0 and 85.9 μg m-3, respectively. More than 90% of the sulfates and ˜60% of nitrates formed as fine particles. Benefiting from the advantageous meteorological conditions and the source controls, sulfates were observed in rather low concentrations and primarily in condensation mode during the Olympics. The effects of the control measures were separately analyzed for the northerly and the southerly air-mass-dominated days to account for any bias. After the control measures were implemented, PM, sulfates, and nitrates were significantly reduced when the northerly air masses prevailed, with a higher percentage of reduction in larger particles. The droplet mode particles, which dominated the sulfates and nitrates before the controls were implemented, were remarkably reduced in mass concentration after the control measures were implemented. Nevertheless, when the polluted southerly air masses prevailed, the local source control measures in Beijing did not effectively reduce the ambient sulfate concentration due to the enormous regional contribution from the North China Plain.

  14. Cloud Formation Potential of Biomass Burning Aerosol Surrogate-Particles Chemically Aged by OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R. M.; Wang, J.; Li, Z. Q.; Knopf, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous or multiphase reactions between trace gases such as OH and atmospheric aerosol can influence physicochemical properties of the particles including composition, morphology and lifetime. In this work, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) exposed to OH radicals is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type and OH exposure ([OH]×time) using a CCN counter coupled to a custom-built aerosol flow reactor (AFR). The composition of particles collected by a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) first subjected to different OH exposures is analyzed by Raman and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative compounds found in BBA that have different hygroscopicity, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals. BBA surrogate-particles are generated following atomization of aqueous solutions with mass ratios LEV:MNC:KS of 1:0:0, 0:1:0, 0:0:1, 1:1:0, 0:1:1, 1:0:1, 1:1:1, and 1:0.03:0.3. OH radicals are generated in the AFR following photolysis of O3 in the presence of H2O using a variable intensity ultra-violet (UV) lamp, which allows equivalent atmospheric OH exposures from days to weeks. In addition, we investigate how κ changes i) in response to varying [O3] with and without OH, and ii) at a fixed OH exposure while varying RH. The impact of OH exposure on the CCN activity of BBA will be presented and its atmospheric implications will be discussed.

  15. Competitive growth model involving random deposition and random deposition with surface relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Claudio M.; Monetti, Roberto A.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2001-06-01

    A deposition model that considers a mixture of random deposition with surface relaxation and a pure random deposition is proposed and studied. As the system evolves, random deposition with surface relaxation (pure random deposition) take place with probability p and (1{minus}p), respectively. The discrete (microscopic) approach to the model is studied by means of extensive numerical simulations, while continuous equations are used in order to investigate the mesoscopic properties of the model. A dynamic scaling ansatz for the interface width W(L,t,p) as a function of the lattice side L, the time t and p is formulated and tested. Three exponents, which can be linked to the standard growth exponent of random deposition with surface relaxation by means of a scaling relation, are identified. In the continuous limit, the model can be well described by means of a phenomenological stochastic growth equation with a p-dependent effective surface tension.

  16. Stratiform chromite deposit model: Chapter E in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2012-01-01

    A new descriptive stratiform chromite deposit model was prepared which will provide a framework for understanding the characteristics of stratiform chromite deposits worldwide. Previous stratiform chromite deposit models developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have been referred to as Bushveld chromium, because the Bushveld Complex in South Africa is the only stratified, mafic-ultramafic intrusion presently mined for chromite and is the most intensely researched. As part of the on-going effort by the USGS Mineral Resources Program to update existing deposit models for the upcoming national mineral resource assessment, this revised stratiform chromite deposit model includes new data on the geological, mineralogical, geophysical, and geochemical attributes of stratiform chromite deposits worldwide. This model will be a valuable tool in future chromite resource and environmental assessments and supplement previously published models used for mineral resource evaluation.

  17. Deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henley, W.B.; Sacks, G.J. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Center of Microelectronics

    1997-03-01

    Use of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for electrochromic WO{sub 3} film deposition is investigated. Oxygen, hydrogen, and tungsten hexafluoride were used as source gases. Reactant gas flow was investigated to determine the effect on film characteristics. High quality optical films were obtained at deposition rates on the order of 100 {angstrom}/s. Higher deposition rates were attainable but film quality and optical coherence degraded. Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES), was used to provide an in situ assessment of the plasma deposition chemistry. Through AES, it is shown that the hydrogen gas flow is essential to the deposition of the WO{sub 3} film. Oxygen gas flow and tungsten hexafluoride gas flow must be approximately equal for high quality films.

  18. [Monitoring nitrogen deposition on temperate grassland in Inner Mongolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ju; Kang, Rong-hua; Zhao, Bin; Huang, Yong-mei; Ye, Zhi-xiang; Duan, Lei

    2013-09-01

    Nitrogen deposition on temperate steppe was monitored from November 2011 to October 2012 in Taipusi County, Inner Mongolia. The dry deposition of gaseous nitrogen compounds was calculated based on online-monitored atmospheric concentrations of NH3 and NO2 and dry deposition velocity simulated by CMAQ model. The wet deposition, dry deposition of particle, and throughfall deposition were also estimated by collecting rainfall, dust fall, and throughfall samples and the chemical analysis of NH4+ and NO3-concentrations. Results showed that the total deposition of nitrogen was up to 3.43 g x (m2 x a)(-1), which might be harmful to the ecosystem. The wet deposition accounted for about 44% of the total deposition, while dry deposition of gases and particle accounted for 38% and 18%, respectively. Since the deposition contributed more than wet deposition, a great attention should be paid on dry deposition monitoring. However, the very simple method for total deposition monitoring based on throughfall seemed not suitable for grassland because the monitored throughfall deposition was much lower than the total deposition. In addition, reduced nitrogen (NH4+ and NH3) contributed to 71% of the total deposition, while oxidation nitrogen (NO3- and NO2) was only 29%. Therefore, NH3 emission reduction should be considered as important as nitrogen oxides (NO3x) for controlling nitrogen deposition.

  19. Phanerozoic Rifting Phases And Mineral Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassaan, Mahmoud

    2016-04-01

    In North Africa occur Mediterranean and Red Sea metallogenic provinces. In each province distribute 47 iron- manganese- barite and lead-zinc deposits with tectonic-structural control. The author presents in this paper aspects of position of these deposits in the two provinces with Phanerozoic rifting . The Mediterranean Province belongs to two epochs, Hercynian and Alpine. The Hercynian Epoch manganese deposits in only Moroccoa- Algeria belong to Paleozoic tectonic zones and Proterozoic volcanics. The Alpine Epoch iron-manganese deposits are of post-orogenic exhalative-sedimentary origin. Manganese deposits in southern Morocco occur in Kabil-Rief quartz-chalcedony veins controlled by faults in andesitic sheets and in bedded pelitic tuffs, strata-form lenses and ore veins, in Precambrian schist and in Triassic and Cretaceous dolomites. Disseminated manganese with quartz and barite and effusive hydrothermal veins are hosted in Paleocene volcanics. Manganese deposits in Algeria are limited and unrecorded in Tunisia. Strata-form iron deposits in Atlas Heights are widespread in sub-rift zone among Jurassic sediments inter-bedding volcanic rocks. In Algeria, Group Beni-Saf iron deposits are localized along the Mediterranean coast in terrigenous and carbonate rocks of Jurassic, Cretaceous and Eocene age within faults and bedding planes. In Morocco strata-form hydrothermal lead-zinc deposits occur in contact zone of Tertiary andesite inter-bedding Cambrian shale, Lias dolomites and Eocene andesite. In both Algeria and Tunisia metasomatic Pb-Zn veins occur in Campanian - Maastrichtian carbonates, Triassic breccia, Jurassic limestone, Paleocene sandstones and limestone and Neogene conglomerates and sandstones. The Red Sea metallogenic province belongs to the Late Tertiary-Miocene times. In Wadi Araba hydrothermal iron-manganese deposits occur in Cretaceous sediments within 320°and 310 NW faults related to Tertiary basalt. Um-Bogma iron-manganese deposits are closely

  20. The copper deposits of Bor, eastern Serbia: Geology and origin of the deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonijević Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The copper deposits of Bor, volcanic activities in the area and relationship of minerals through time are presented by formations within the Cenomanian-Turonian range. Geology and age of the deposits are given in the geological-time order based on superposition of the Timok mineral-ore Formation and the underlying (Cenomanian and fossiliferous overlying (Senonian strata. The concept of dating Bor deposits the Turonian is discussed in this context. Bor deposits lie between the Cenomanian Krivelj Formation and the Senonian epiclastic Metovnica Formation. Embedded between the two formations is the Timok volcanogenic Formation. Described in this paper are principal members of the Timok Formation strata: volcanogenic and subvolcanogenic- intrusive rocks, a zone of hydrothermally altered rocks and main types of the Bor ore deposits: (a Deposits of massive sulphide coppers; (b Vein and stockwork-disseminated type of mineralisation; (c Porphyry mineralisation; and (d Reworked ore-clasts of copper sulphides of the Novo Okno deposit. Identified deposits, according to the Bor Geological Service records and published works, are systematized and summarized into three geographic units: (1 Group of deposits Severozapad (Brezanik; (2 Central Bor Deposits (Tilva Roš, Čoka Dulkan, Tilva Mika, Borska Reka, and Veliki Krivelj and many ore bodies; (3 Copper deposits Jugoistok (ore bodies X and J and olistostrome deposit Novo Okno. Information given in this paper, the discussion on relative geologic age of the Bor deposit’s floor and roof in particular, support our concept that the process ceased before the Upper Turonian, and that age of the primary copper mineralization is Turonian.

  1. CTS and CZTS for solar cells made by pulsed laser deposition and pulsed electron deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettlinger, Rebecca Bolt

    , which make them promising alternatives to the commercially successful solar cell material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Complementing our group's work on pulsed laser deposition of CZTS, we collaborated with IMEM-CNR in Parma, Italy, to deposit CZTS by pulsed electron deposition for the first...... time. We compared the results of CZTS deposition by PLD at DTU in Denmark to CZTS made by PED at IMEM-CNR, where CIGS solar cells have successfully been fabricated at very low processing temperatures. The main results of this work were as follows: Monoclinic-phase CTS films were made by pulsed laser...

  2. Electrophoretic deposition of titania nanoparticles: Wet density of deposits during EPD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Morteza Farrokhi-Rad; Taghi Shahrabi; Shirin Khanmohammadi

    2014-08-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of titania nanoparticles was performed at different voltages and times. The wet density of deposits was calculated according to the Archimedes’ principle. The wet density as well as the electric field over the deposits increased with time and attained the plateau at longer times. The velocity at which particles attach to the deposit, strongly influences its wet density at initial times. However, the effect of electro-osmotic flow is dominant at longer times. The coating with higher wet density had the higher corrosion resistance in Ringer’s solution at 37.5 °C due to its closely packed and crack free microstructure.

  3. Research on depositing Ni45 alloy on titanium alloy surface by electrospark deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Su Guiqiao; You Tao; Zhang Chunhui

    2008-01-01

    Taking Ni45 bar as electrode, a strengthened layer of thickness up to 50 μm was built up on BT20 titanium alloy matrix by means of electrospark deposition. Results of phase analysis by using of X-ray diffraction confirmed that the deposition layer was composed mostly of three phases, NiTi, NiTi2 and Ti. The surface microhardness of the deposition layer was up to 910 HV0.05, about 2.7 times as high as that of the matrix. The hardness at the cross-section of the entire deposition layer showed a...

  4. Novel photochemical vapor deposition reactor for amorphous silicon solar cell deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.; Hegedus, Steven S.; Buchanan, Wayne A.; Jackson, Scott C.

    1987-07-01

    A novel photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) reactor having a flexible ultraviolet-transparent Teflon curtain and a secondary gas flow to eliminate deposition on the window has been used to deposit amorphous silicon films and p-i-n solar cells. The background levels of atmospheric contaminants (H2O, CO2, N2) depend strongly on the vacuum procedures but not on the presence of a Teflon curtain in the reactor. Intrinsic films with a midgap density of states of 3×1015 eV-1 cm-3 and all-photo-CVD pin solar cells with efficiencies of 8.5% have been deposited.

  5. Aerosol Deposition and Solar Panel Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, W. P.; Rollings, A.; Taylor, S. J.; Parks, J.; Barnard, J.; Holmes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Passive and active solar collector farms are often located in relatively dry desert regions where cloudiness impacts are minimized. These farms may be susceptible to reduced performance due to routine or episodic aerosol deposition on collector surfaces. Intense episodes of wind blown dust deposition may negatively impact farm performance, and trigger need to clean collector surfaces. Aerosol deposition rate depends on size, morphology, and local meteorological conditions. We have developed a system for solar panel performance testing under real world conditions. Two identical 0.74 square meter solar panels are deployed, with one kept clean while the other receives various doses of aerosol deposition or other treatments. A variable load is used with automation to record solar panel maximum output power every 10 minutes. A collocated sonic anemometer measures wind at 10 Hz, allowing for both steady and turbulent characterization to establish a link between wind patterns and particle distribution on the cells. Multispectral photoacoustic instruments measure aerosol light scattering and absorption. An MFRSR quantifies incoming solar radiation. Solar panel albedo is measured along with the transmission spectra of particles collected on the panel surface. Key questions are: At what concentration does aerosol deposition become a problem for solar panel performance? What are the meteorological conditions that most strongly favor aerosol deposition, and are these predictable from current models? Is it feasible to use the outflow from an unmanned aerial vehicle hovering over solar panels to adequately clean their surface? Does aerosol deposition from episodes of nearby forest fires impact performance? The outlook of this research is to build a model that describes environmental effects on solar panel performance. Measurements from summer and fall 2015 will be presented along with insights gleaned from them.

  6. Information system of mineral deposits in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hribernik, K.; Rokavec, D.; Šinigioj, J.; Šolar, S.

    2010-03-01

    At the Geologic Survey of Slovenia the need for complex overview and control of the deposits of available non-metallic mineral raw materials and of their exploitations became urgent. In the framework of the Geologic Information System we established the Database of non-metallic mineral deposits comprising all important data of deposits and concessionars. Relational database is built with program package MS Access, but in year 2008 we plan to transfer it on SQL server. In the evidence there is 272 deposits and 200 concessionars. The mineral resources information system of Slovenia, which was started back in 2002, consists of two integrated parts, mentioned relational database of mineral deposits, which relates information in tabular way so that rules of relational algebra can be applied, and geographic information system (GIS), which relates spatial information of deposits. . The complex relationships between objects and the concepts of normalized data structures, lead to the practical informative and useful data model, transparent to the user and to better decision-making by allowing future scenarios to be developed and inspected. Computerized storage, and display system is as already said, developed and managed under the support of Geological Survey of Slovenia, which conducts research on the occurrence, quality, quantity, and availability of mineral resources in order to help the Nation make informed decisions using earth-science information. Information about deposit is stored in records in approximately hundred data fields. A numeric record number uniquely identifies each site. The data fields are grouped under principal categories. Each record comprise elementary data of deposit (name, type, location, prospect, rock), administrative data (concessionar, number of decree in official paper, object of decree, number of contract and its duration) and data of mineral resource produced amount and size of exploration area). The data can also be searched, sorted and

  7. Rocky Mountain Carbonate Spring Deposit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Dustin Kyle

    Relict Holocene carbonate spring deposits containing diverse biotic and abiotic depositional textures are present at Fall Creek cold sulphur springs, Alberta, Fairmont Hot Springs, British Columbia, and Hot Creek cold springs, British Columbia. The relict deposits are formed mainly of low-magnesium crystalline calcite contained in laterally continuous strata. Paleo-flow regimes were characterized by extensive sheet flow that increased the surface area of spring water exposed to the atmosphere. Calcite precipitated inorganically from spring water that attained CaCO3 supersaturation through agitation-induced CO2 degassing that was facilitated by elevated flow rates and a large surface area as spring water flowed down-slope. Thus, the deposits contain only minor amounts of detrital, mechanically deposited, and biogenic carbonate. Evaporation was only a minor contributor to CaCO3 supersaturation, mainly in quiescent environments. Photosynthetic CO2 removal did not measurably contribute to CaCO3 supersaturation. Calcite crystals precipitated in biotic facies formed from low to moderately supersaturated spring water, whereas abiotic dendrite crystals formed rapidly from highly supersaturated spring water. Calcite passively nucleated on cyanobacteria, bryophytes and macrophytes, and was probably facilitated by cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances. Cyanobacterial filaments and stromatolites are integral parts of all three deposits, whereas bryophytes were restricted to the Fall Creek and Hot Creek deposits. Diagenetic microbial degradation of crystalline calcite was common to all three deposits, but recrystallization was limited to the Fall Creek deposit. The amount and location of calcite precipitation relative to the vents was controlled by the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- in solution, and discharge volume fluctuations. Spring water with high [Ca2+] and [HCO 3-] precipitated large amounts of calcite proximal to the vents (e.g. Fairmont), whereas spring

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of pepsin thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecskemeti, G. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)]. E-mail: kega@physx.u-szeged.hu; Kresz, N. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Smausz, T. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Hopp, B. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences and University of Szeged, Research Group on Laser Physics, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Nogradi, A. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Szeged, H-6720, Szeged, Koranyi fasor 10-11 (Hungary)

    2005-07-15

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of organic and biological thin films has been extensively studied due to its importance in medical applications among others. Our investigations and results on PLD of a digestion catalyzing enzyme, pepsin, are presented. Targets pressed from pepsin powder were ablated with pulses of an ArF excimer laser ({lambda} = 193 nm, FWHM = 30 ns), the applied fluence was varied between 0.24 and 5.1 J/cm{sup 2}. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 2.7 x 10{sup -3} Pa. The thin layers were deposited onto glass and KBr substrates. Our IR spectroscopic measurements proved that the chemical composition of deposited thin films is similar to that of the target material deposited at 0.5 and 1.3 J/cm{sup 2}. The protein digesting capacity of the transferred pepsin was tested by adapting a modified 'protein cube' method. Dissolution of the ovalbumin sections proved that the deposited layers consisted of catalytically active pepsin.

  9. Applications of graphene electrophoretic deposition. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Valdez, A; Shaffer, M S P; Boccaccini, A R

    2013-02-14

    This Review summarizes research progress employing electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to fabricate graphene and graphene-based nanostructures for a wide range of applications, including energy storage materials, field emission devices, supports for fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors and sensors, among others. These carbonaceous nanomaterials can be dispersed in organic solvents, or more commonly in water, using a variety of techniques compatible with EPD. Most deposits are produced under constant voltage conditions with deposition time also playing an important role in determining the morphology of the resulting graphene structures. In addition to simple planar substrates, it has been shown that uniform graphene-based layers can be deposited on three-dimensional, porous, and even flexible substrates. In general, electrophoretically deposited graphene layers show excellent properties, e.g., high electrical conductivity, large surface area, good thermal stability, high optical transparency, and robust mechanical strength. EPD also enables the fabrication of functional composite materials, e.g., graphene combined with metallic nanoparticles, with other carbonaceous materials (e.g., carbon nanotubes) or polymers, leading to novel nanomaterials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. In summary, the analysis of the available literature reveals that EPD is a simple and convenient processing method for graphene and graphene-based materials, which is easy to apply and versatile. EPD has, therefore, a promising future for applications in the field of advanced nanomaterials, which depend on the reliable manipulation of graphene and graphene-containing systems.

  10. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the surface alloys were formed by exchanging sites between the cluster and substrate atoms, and the cluster atoms rearranged following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up in the deposition course. The ability and scope of the structural reconstruction are largely determined by both the size and incident energy of the impacted cluster.

  11. Hard Carbon Films Deposited under Various Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M.-K.; Chen, S.-C.; Wu, T. C.; Lee, Sanboh

    1998-03-01

    Using a carbon target ablated with an XeCl-excimer laser under various gas atmospheres at different pressures, hard carbon was deposited on silicon, iron and tungsten carbide substrates. The hardness, friction coefficient, and wear rate of the film against steel are better than pure substrate material, respectively, so that it has potential to be used as a protective coating for micromechanical elements. The influences of gas pressure, gas atmosphere, and power density of laser irradiation on the thermal stability of film were analyzed by means of Raman-spectroscope, time-of-flight method, and optical emission spectrum. It was found that the film deposited under higher pressure has less diamond-like character. The film deposited under rest gas or argon atmosphere was very unstable and looked like a little graphite-like character. The film deposited at high vacuum (10-5 mbar rest gas) was the most stable and looked like the most diamond-like character. The film deposited at higher power density was more diamond-like than that at lower power density.

  12. Intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercin, Ersin; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2012-01-16

    High levels of uric acid cause accumulation of monosodium urate crystals. This formation of masses is called tophus. Intraosseous tophus deposits are rare, even for patients with gout. We report an unusual case of intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum. The patient presented with ankle pain with no previous history of gout. On examination, tenderness on the posterior aspect of his ankle and limitation of plantarflexion was noted. Laboratory values were normal, except for an elevated serum uric acid value. Radiographs of the right ankle showed the presence of a large os trigonum with osteosclerotic changes, whereas magnetic resonance imaging showed intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum. Conservative therapy failed, and the patient was admitted for an endoscopic resection of the os trigonum.Intraosseous chalky crystals were detected during endoscopic resection of the os trigonum. The histological diagnosis was tophaceous gout. The underlying pathological mechanism of intraosseous tophi is uncertain. Penetration of urate crystals from the joint due to hyperuricemia may be the mechanism of deposition in this patient.When a patient with hyperuricemia presents with posterior ankle impingement symptoms, intraosseous tophus deposits should be included in the differential diagnosis. Posterior endoscopic excision may be an option for treating intraosseous lesions of the os trigonum because of good visualization, satisfactory excision, and rapid recovery time.

  13. Polydisperse suspensions: Erosion, deposition, and flow capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Hogg, A. J.; Pritchard, D.

    2013-09-01

    Deposition from particle-laden flows is often described in terms of the capacity and competence of the flow, but robust definitions of these terms have proved elusive. In this paper we provide a mathematical modeling framework within which erosion and deposition of polydisperse sediment, and thus flow capacity and competence, can be rigorously defined. This framework explicitly captures the coupling between the suspension and an active layer of sediment at the top of the bed, and is capable of describing both depositional and erosional flows over both erodible and nonerodible beds. Crucially, the capacity of a flow is shown to depend on the erosional and depositional history because these processes determine the composition of the active layer. This dependence is explored within models of bidisperse and polydisperse suspensions. It is further demonstrated that monodisperse representations of suspended sediment transport may severely underpredict actual flow capacity. The polydisperse model is validated against recent experimental studies of the evolution of suspended material in waning turbulent flows, and is used to demonstrate that loss of capacity is the principal driver of sediment deposition.

  14. Deposition of carbonyl sulphide to soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluczewski, S. M.; Brown, K. A.; Bel, J. N. B.

    Carbonyl sulphide (COS) is a trace constituent of the atmosphere and is also the main form in which 35S is released from CO 2-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of its deposition velocity ( Vg) are therefore important for validating radiological dose models and for interpreting the role of COS in the global S cycle. The Vg of [ 35S]COS to thin layers of several contrasting soils was measured in a through-flow fumigation system. Deposition velocity was not significantly affected by soil type, although deposition to moist soil was significantly greater ( P dried soils, mean values being 5.71 × 10 -6 ms -1 and 3.06 × 10 -6 ms -1, respectively. The results obtained are about three orders of magnitude smaller than published Vg values for SO 2 to similar soils, which suggests that uptake by soils is not a major sink for atmospheric COS. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that deposition to soil of [ 35S]COS from nuclear reactors is unlikely to contribute significantly to radiation dose from the food chain pathway. The reduction in Vg observed in heat-treated soils indicates a microbial involvement in uptake. However, it seems unlikely that microbial metabolism is the rate-controlling step, since stimulation of the microflora by the addition of nutrients did not increase COS deposition.

  15. Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A unified treatment of the theories, data, and technologies underlying physical vapor deposition methods With electronic, optical, and magnetic coating technologies increasingly dominating manufacturing in the high-tech industries, there is a growing need for expertise in physical vapor deposition of thin films. This important new work provides researchers and engineers in this field with the information they need to tackle thin film processes in the real world. Presenting a cohesive, thoroughly developed treatment of both fundamental and applied topics, Physical Vapor Deposition of Thin Films incorporates many critical results from across the literature as it imparts a working knowledge of a variety of present-day techniques. Numerous worked examples, extensive references, and more than 100 illustrations and photographs accompany coverage of: * Thermal evaporation, sputtering, and pulsed laser deposition techniques * Key theories and phenomena, including the kinetic theory of gases, adsorption and condensation, high-vacuum pumping dynamics, and sputtering discharges * Trends in sputter yield data and a new simplified collisional model of sputter yield for pure element targets * Quantitative models for film deposition rate, thickness profiles, and thermalization of the sputtered beam

  16. The Effect of Deposition Time on Textured Magnesium Diboride Thick Films Fabricated by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. G. Mutia

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available MgB2 powders suspended in ethanol were electrophoretically deposited on high-purity molybdenum substrates having dimensions of 1 x 0.3 x 0.01 cm. The said substrate was set as the cathode and was placed 0.5 cm away from a graphite rod anode. A current density of ~0.02 mA/cm2 and a voltage of 600 V were applied. The effect of deposition time was studied by varying it as follows: 15 s, 30 s, 1 min, and 2 min. Heat treatment at 950 oC for 3 h was done after deposition. MgB2 thick films were successfully fabricated for the deposition carried out for 2 min. Deposition times less than 2 min resulted in insufficient deposited powder; hence formation of MgB2 was not facilitated. Films deposited at 15 and 30 s have good surface characteristics, wherein no microcracks were present. X-ray diffraction and surface image analysis reveal that the deposited films have a preferred orientation along the (10l direction.

  17. Controlling the resistivity gradient in chemical vapor deposition-deposited aluminum-doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Verheijen, M. A.; Keuning, W.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) generally exhibit a major drawback, i.e., a gradient in resistivity extending over a large range of film thickness. The present contribution addresses the plasma-enhanced CVD deposition of ZnO: Al layers by focusing on the control

  18. A special issue devoted to gold deposits in northern Nevada: Part 2. Carlin-type Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, Albert H.; John, David A.; Theodore, Ted G.

    2003-01-01

    This is the second of two special issues of Economic Geology devoted to gold deposits in northern Nevada. Readers interested in a general overview of these deposits, their economic significance, their context within the tectonic evolution of the region, and synoptic references on each gold deposit type are directed to the preface of the first special issue (John et al., 2003). Volume 98, issue 2, contains five papers that address regional aspects important to the genesis of gold deposits in northern Nevada and five papers that present detailed studies of epithermal deposits and districts. All of the regional papers are pertinent to Carlin-type gold deposits, because they address the age of mineralization (Arehart et al., 2003), origin and evolutionary history of the northwest-striking mineral belts that localize many deposits (Grauch et al., 2003), nature of the middle and lower crust below these mineral belts (Howard, 2003), district- to deposit-scale stream sediment and lithogeochemical anomalies (Theodore et al., 2003), and stratigraphy and structure of a district located along a northeast-striking lineament (Peters et al., 2003).

  19. Spatial atomic layer deposition: a route towards further industrialization of atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poodt, P.W.G.; Cameron, D.C.; Dickey, E.; George, S.M.; Kuznetsov, V.; Parsons, G.N.; Roozeboom, F.; Sundaram, G.; Vermeer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a technique capable of producing ultrathin conformal films with atomic level control over thickness. A major drawback of ALD is its low deposition rate, making ALD less attractive for applications that require high throughput processing. An approach to overcome this

  20. Tandem solar cells deposited using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, M.K. van

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, the application of the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) technique for the deposition of silicon thin films is described. The HWCVD technique is based on the dissociation of silicon-containing gasses at the catalytic surface of a hot filament. Advantages of this technique ar

  1. Exploring the deposition of oxides on silicon for photovoltaic cells by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, Lianne M.; Moor, de Hugo H.C.; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, Dave H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Since most commercially available solar cells are still made from silicon, we are exploring the introduction of passivating qualities in oxides, with the potential to serve as an antireflection coating. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to deposit TiO2 and SrTiO3 coatings on silicon substrates.

  2. Ash Deposition Trials at Three Power Stations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming; Larsen, Ole Hede

    1998-01-01

    the probe temperature did influence the composition of deposits for coals with medium ash deposition propensities. These results may indicate that coals with medium to high ash deposition propensities in existing boilers may cause increasing ash deposit formation in future boilers with higher steam...

  3. 24 CFR 882.414 - Security and utility deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security and utility deposits. 882... Moderate Rehabilitation-Basic Policies § 882.414 Security and utility deposits. (a) If at the time of the... security deposits and utility deposits from its resources and/or other public or private sources. (b) If...

  4. 24 CFR 884.115 - Security and utility deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security and utility deposits. 884... Security and utility deposits. (a) An Owner may require Families to pay a security deposit in an amount... security and utility deposits, if required, from their own resources and/or other private or public sources....

  5. 24 CFR 886.116 - Security and utility deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security and utility deposits. 886... utility deposits. (a) An Owner may require Families to pay a security deposit in an amount up to, but not... utility deposits, if required, from their own resources and/or other private or public sources....

  6. 5 CFR 842.307 - Deposits for military service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deposits for military service. 842.307... Deposits for military service. (a) Eligibility to make a deposit. (1) An employee or Member subject to FERS may make a deposit for any distinct period of military service by filing an application in a...

  7. 37 CFR 1.807 - Viability of deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Viability of deposit. 1.807... Biological Material § 1.807 Viability of deposit. (a) A deposit of biological material that is capable of... term of deposit. Viability may be tested by the depository. The test must conclude only that...

  8. Nanocrystalline Diamond Films Deposited by Electron Assisted Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished Si wafer surface with electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition at 1 kPa gas pressure, the deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and semiconductor characterization system. The results show that when 8 A bias current is applied for 5 h, the surface roughness decreases to 28.5 nm. After 6 and 8 A bias current are applied for 1 h, and the nanocrystalline films deposition continue for 4 h with 0 A bias current at 1 kPa gas pressure. The nanocrystalline diamond films with 0.5×109 and 1×1010 Ω·cm resistivity respectively are obtained. It is demonstrated that electron bombardment plays an important role of nucleation to deposit diamond films with smooth surface and high resistivity.

  9. Structural and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited Silver Oxide Thin Films: Role of Deposition Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nwanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates at a temperature of 50°C by chemical bath deposition technique under different deposition times using pure AgNO3 precursor and triethanolamine as the complexing agent. The chemical analysis based on EDX technique shows the presence of Ag and O at the appropriate energy levels. The morphological features obtained from SEM showed that the AgxO structures varied as the deposition time changes. The X-ray diffraction showed the peaks of Ag2O and AgO in the structure. The direct band gap and the refractive index increased as the deposition time increased and was in the range of 1.64–1.95 eV and 1.02–2.07, respectively. The values of the band gap and refractive index obtained indicate possible applications in photovoltaic and photothermal systems.

  10. Influence of deposition time on the properties of chemical bath deposited manganese sulfide thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar Kassim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Manganese sulfide thin films were chemically deposited from an aqueous solution containing manganese sulfate, sodium thiosulfate and sodium tartrate. The influence of deposition time (2, 3, 6 and 8 days on the properties of thin films was investigated. The structure and surface morphology of the thin films were studied by X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, respectively. In addition, in order to investigate the optical properties of the thin films, the UV-visible spectrophotometry was used. The XRD results indicated that the deposited MnS2 thin films exhibited a polycrystalline cubic structure. The number of MnS2 peaks on the XRD patterns initially increased from three to six peaks and then decreased to five peaks, as the deposition time was increased from 2 to 8 days. From the AFM measurements, the film thickness and surface roughness were found to be dependent on the deposition time.

  11. Sol-gel deposited electrochromic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozer, N.; Lampert, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    Electrochromic devices have increasing application in display devices, switchable mirrors and smart windows. A variety of vacuum deposition technologies have been used to make electrochromic devices. The sol- gel process offers an alternative approach to the synthesis of optical quality and low cost electrochromic device layers. This study summarizes the developments in sol-gel deposited electrochromic films. The sol-gel process involves the formation of oxide networks upon hydrolysis-condensation of alkoxide precursors. In this study we cover the sol-gel deposited oxides of WO[sub 3], V[sub 2]O[sub 5], TiO[sub 2], Nb[sub 2]O[sub 5], and NiO[sub x].

  12. Amyloid deposition in 2 feline thymomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrough, E R; Myers, R K; Hostetter, S J; Fox, L E; Bayer, B J; Felz, C L; Waller, K R; Whitley, E M

    2012-07-01

    Two cases of feline thymoma with amyloid deposition were encountered between 1982 and 2010. Neoplastic cells were separated by abundant, pale eosinophilic, homogeneous material that was congophilic and birefringent. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were connected by desmosomes, and the extracellular deposits were composed of nonbranching, hollow-cored fibrils, 8-10 nm in diameter. In the case with sufficient archived tissue for additional sections, the amyloid remained congophilic following potassium permanganate incubation, and the neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for pancytokeratin. The histologic, histochemical, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features of both neoplasms are consistent with epithelial-predominant thymoma with the unusual feature of intratumoral amyloid deposition. The affinity of the amyloid for Congo red following potassium permanganate incubation is consistent with non-AA amyloid. The ultrastructural findings were consistent with amyloid production by the neoplastic epithelial cells.

  13. Multi-Constituent Simulation of Thrombus Deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wagner, William R; Antaki, James F

    2016-01-01

    Based on the transport model of Sorensen et al. (1999), an improved mathematical model describing the process of thrombus deposition and growth was developed. Blood is treated as a multi-constituent mixture comprised of a linear fluid phase and a thrombus phase. The transport and reactions of 10 chemical and biological species are modeled using a system of coupled convection-reaction-diffusion (CRD) equations. These represent three main processes: initiation, propagation and stabilization. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations using the libraries of OpenFOAM were performed for two illustrative benchmark problems: mural thrombus growth in an injured blood vessel and thrombus deposition in a small (125 x 95 micros) crevice observed in vitro. For both problems, the simulated thrombus deposition agreed very well with experimental observations, both spatially and temporally. These promising results encourage further simulations to investigate clinical conditions and design factors that affect the risk of t...

  14. Sputtering. [as deposition technique in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper primarily reviews the potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. Since sputtering is not regulated by classical thermodynamics, new multicomponent materials can be developed in any possible chemical composition. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter-deposition is described in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter-etching, target geometry (coating complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also described are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter-deposition techniques.

  15. Sputtering. [as deposition technique in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper primarily reviews the potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. Since sputtering is not regulated by classical thermodynamics, new multicomponent materials can be developed in any possible chemical composition. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter-deposition is described in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter-etching, target geometry (coating complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also described are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter-deposition techniques.

  16. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  17. Silver deposition on chemically treated carbon monolith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Zoran M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monolith was treated with HNO3, KOH and H2O2. Effects of these treatments on the surface functional groups and on the amount of silver deposited on the CM surface were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. As a result of chemical treatment there was an increase in the amount of surface oxygen complexes. The increase in the amount of silver deposit is proportional to the amount of surface groups that produce CO under decomposition. However, the high amount of CO groups, decomposing above 600°C, induces the smaller Ag crystallite size. Therefore, the high temperature CO evolving oxides are, most likely, the initial centers for Ag deposition.

  18. Deposit Money Creation in Search Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Keiichiro Kobayashi

    2002-01-01

    The endogenous creation of bank credit and of deposit money is modeled. If banks have a limited ability to commit to making interbank loans, then, in order for bank deposits to be accepted as liquid assets, an upper bound is placed upon the size of each bank's asset portfolio, where the bound is determined as a certain multiple of the bank's capital. In our search model, the Central Limit Theorem implies that the multiplier is a non-linear function of the aggregate level of bank assets. Thus ...

  19. Uranium deposit in Kumsan area (1979)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jong Yun; Kim, Jeong Taek; Kim, Dai Oap [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The survey on the nuclear raw mineral (uranium) deposits had been carried out for a long time from early 1960`s to late 1980`s by the Geological and Mineral Institute of Energy and Resources. Unpublished data of the uranium ore deposits of Kumsan area is published on this paper. Geology on the Ogcheon System have been controversial by many geologists, therefore we have reviewed on the geology and stratigraphy. Particularly, we have interpreted the host root rock on the magnetite bearing banded gneiss, which is named so called Kyemeongsan Formation. (author). 5 maps.

  20. Uranium deposit in Yongyuri Miwon area (1978)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Taek; Han, Jong Yun; Kim, Dai Oap; Im Hyun Chul [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The survey on the nuclear raw mineral (uranium) deposits had been carried out for a long time from early 1960`s to late 1980`s by the Geological and Mineral Institute of Energy and Resources. Unpublished data of the uranium ore deposit of Yongyuri Miwon area is published on this paper. Geology on the Ogcheon System have been controversial by many geologists, therefore we have reviewed on the geology and stratigraphy. Particularly, we have interpreted the host root rock on the magnetite bearing banded gneiss, which is named so called Kyemeongsan Formation. (author). 5 refs., 1 tab., 2 maps.

  1. Uranium deposit in Yiheonri area (1978)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Taek; Kim, Dai Oap [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The survey on the nuclear raw mineral (uranium) deposits had been carried out for a long time from early 1960`s to late 1980`s by the Geological and Mineral Institute of Energy and Resources. Unpublished data of the uranium ore deposit of Yiheonri area is published on this paper. Geology on the Ogcheon System have been controversial by many geologists, therefore we have reviewed on the geology and stratigraphy. Particularly, we have interpreted the host root rock on the magnetite bearing banded gneiss, which is named so called Kyemeongsan Formation. (author). 4 tabs., 3 maps.

  2. Uranium deposit in Geosan B area (1978)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gil Seung; Kim, Dai Oap; Kim, Jong Hwan [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The survey on the nuclear raw mineral (uranium) deposits had been carried out for a long time from early 1960`s to late 1980`s by the Geological and Mineral Institute of Energy and Resources. Unpublished data of the uranium ore deposit of Goesan Deokpyeongri B area is published on this paper. Geology on the Ogcheon System have been controversial by many geologists, therefore we have reviewed on the geology and stratigraphy. Particularly, we have interpreted the host root rock on the magnetite bearing banded gneiss, which is named so called Kyemeongsan Formation. (author). 8 maps.

  3. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  4. Selective Electroless Silver Deposition on Graphene Edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durhuus, D.; Larsen, M. V.; Andryieuski, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    on silica substrate and thus potentially restoring electric connectivity with minimal influence on the overall graphene electrical and optical properties. The presented technique could find applications in graphene based transparent conductors as well as selective edge functionalization and can be extended......We demonstrate a method of electroless selective silver deposition on graphene edges or between graphene islands without covering the surface of graphene. Modifications of the deposition recipe allow for decoration of graphene edges with silver nanoparticles or filling holes in damaged graphene...

  5. Response of agricultural soils to acid deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, M.F.; Wagner, C.K.

    1982-07-01

    Proceedings of the workshop, Response of Agricultural Soils to Acid Deposition, which was held May 12-13 1981, in Columbus, Ohio, and which evaluated the potential beneficial and harmful impacts of atmospheric acid deposition on agricultural soils are presented. Those issues requiring further research are also identified. Five working papers and a literature review prepared by soils specialists are included as is a summary of conclusions reached by the participants. Each of the five working papers has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

  6. Oleophobic optical coating deposited by magnetron PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernt, D.; Ponomarenko, V.; Pisarev, A.

    2016-09-01

    Thin oxinitride films of Zn-Sn-O-N and Si-Al-O-N were deposited on glass by reactive magnetron sputtering at various nitrogen-to-oxygen ratios. Nitrogen added to oxygen led to decrease of the surface roughness and increase of oleophobic properties studied by the oil-drop test. The best oleophobity was obtained for Zn-Sn-O-N oxinitride at Zn:Sn=1:1 and N:O=1:2. Improved oleophobic properties were also demonstrated if the oxinitride film was deposited on top of the multilayer coating as the final step in the industrial cycle of production of energy efficient glass.

  7. Underpotential deposition: From planar surfaces to nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, O. A.; Vélez, P.; Macagno, V. A.; Leiva, E. P. M.

    2015-01-01

    An overview is given of selected theoretical, experimental and computer simulation research on thermodynamic modeling applied to the metal underpotential deposition. Focus is made mainly on the last 20 years. The upd-theory on planar surfaces is revisited and the thermodynamic framework is extended to consider underpotential deposition on nanoparticles and to include anion coadsorption, solvation and double layer charging. Results from molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations are shown for systems of experimental interest. At the end some perspectives for further advanced modeling of the present problem are given.

  8. Surface Acoustic Wave Atomizer and Electrostatic Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  9. Wax deposition in crude oil pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assuncao, Pablo Morelato; Rodrigues, Lorennzo Marrochi Nolding [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil). Centro Universitario Norte do Espirito Santo. Engenharia de Petroleo; Romero, Mao Ilich [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute], e-mail: mromerov@uwyo.edu

    2010-07-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons which consists of aromatics, paraffins, naphthenics, resins asphaltenes, etc. When the temperature of crude oil is reduced, the heavy components, like paraffin, will precipitate and deposit on the pipe internal wall in the form of a wax-oil gel. The gel deposit consists of wax crystals that trap some amount of oil. As the temperature gets cooler, more wax will precipitate and the thickness of the wax gel will increase, causing gradual solidification of the crude and eventually the oil stop moving inside the offshore pipeline. Crude oil may not be able to be re-mobilized during re-startup. The effective diameter will be reduced with wax deposition, resulting in several problems, for example, higher pressure drop which means additional pumping energy costs, poor oil quality, use of chemical components like precipitation inhibitors or flowing facilitators, equipment failure, risk of leakage, clogging of the ducts and process equipment. Wax deposition problems can become so sever that the whole pipeline can be completely blocked. It would cost millions of dollars to remediate an offshore pipeline that is blocked by wax. Wax solubility decreases drastically with decreasing temperature. At low temperatures, as encountered in deep water production, is easy to wax precipitate. The highest temperature below which the paraffins begins to precipitate as wax crystals is defined as wax appearance temperature (WAT). Deposition process is a complex free surface problem involving thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, mass and heat transfer. In this work, a numerical analysis of wax deposition by molecular diffusion and shear dispersion mechanisms in crude oil pipeline is studied. Diffusion flux of wax toward the wall is estimated by Fick's law of diffusion, in similar way the shear dispersion; wax concentration gradient at the solid-liquid interface is obtained by the volume fraction conservation equation; and since the wax deposition

  10. Plasma transferred arc deposition of beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, K.; Bartram, B.; Withers, J.; Storm, R.; Massarello, J.

    2006-12-01

    The exceptional properties of beryllium (Be), including low density and high elastic modulus, make it the material of choice in many defense and aerospace applications. However, health hazards associated with Be material handling limit the applications that are suited for its use. Innovative solutions that enable continued use of Be in critical applications while addressing worker health concerns are highly desirable. Plasma transferred arc solid free-form fabrication is being evaluated as a Be fabrication technique for civilian and military space-based components. Initial experiments producing Be deposits are reported here. Deposit shape, microstructure, and mechanical properties are reported.

  11. Electrochemical Deposition Of Thiolate Monolayers On Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Marc D.; Weissharr, Duane E.

    1995-01-01

    Electrochemical method devised for coating metal (usually, gold) surfaces with adherent thiolate monolayers. Affords greater control over location and amount of material deposited and makes it easier to control chemical composition of deposits. One important potential use for this method lies in fabrication of chemically selective thin-film resonators for microwave oscillators used to detect pollutants: monolayer formulated to bind selectively pollutant chemical species of interest, causing increase in mass of monolayer and corresponding decrease in frequency of resonance. Another important potential use lies in selective chemical derivatization for purposes of improving adhesion, lubrication, protection against corrosion, electrocatalysis, and electroanalysis.

  12. Atomic Layer Deposition from Dissolved Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanlin; Döhler, Dirk; Barr, Maïssa; Oks, Elina; Wolf, Marc; Santinacci, Lionel; Bachmann, Julien

    2015-10-14

    We establish a novel thin film deposition technique by transferring the principles of atomic layer deposition (ALD) known with gaseous precursors toward precursors dissolved in a liquid. An established ALD reaction behaves similarly when performed from solutions. "Solution ALD" (sALD) can coat deep pores in a conformal manner. sALD offers novel opportunities by overcoming the need for volatile and thermally robust precursors. We establish a MgO sALD procedure based on the hydrolysis of a Grignard reagent.

  13. The EU Deposit Insurance Directive: Does One Size Fit All?

    OpenAIRE

    Huizinga, Harry

    2005-01-01

    The EU deposit insurance directive requires member states to maintain deposit insurance with a minimum insured amount of 20,000 euros. This paper reviews the rationale for international coordination of deposit insurance policies. For international externalities of deposit insurance policies to exist, there has to be international ownership of either bank deposits or bank shares. On both counts, EU banking markets are currently highly integrated. The minimum coverage of 20,000 euros imposes co...

  14. Bank core deposits and the mitigation of monetary policy

    OpenAIRE

    Lamont K. Black; Diana Hancock; Wayne Passmore

    2007-01-01

    We consider the business strategy of some banks that provide relationship loans (where they have loan origination and monitoring advantages relative to capital markets) with core deposit funding (where they can pass along the benefit of a sticky price on deposits). These "traditional banks" tend to lend out less than the deposits they take in, so they have a "buffer stock" of core deposits. This buffer stock of core deposits can be used to mitigate the full effect of tighter monetary policy o...

  15. Crustal Rock: Recorder of Oblique Impactor Meteoroid Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2005-07-01

    Oblique impact experiments in which 2g lead bullets strike samples of San Marcos granite and Bedford limestone at 1.2 km/s induce zones of increased crack density (termed shocked damage) which result in local decreases in bulk and shear moduli that results in maximum decreases of 30-40% in compressional and shear wave velocity (Budianski and O'Connell). Initial computer simulation of oblique impacts of meteorites (Pierazzo and Melosh) demonstrate the congruence of peak shock stress trajectory with the pre-impact meteoroid trajectory. We measure (Ai and Ahrens) via multi-beam (˜ 300) tomographic inversion, the sub-impact surface distribution of damage from the decreases in compressional wave velocity in the 20 x 20 x 15 cm rock target. The damage profiles for oblique impacts are markedly asymmetric (in plane of pre-impact meteoroid pre-impact trajectory) beneath the nearly round excavated craters. Thus, meteorite trajectory information can be recorded in planetary surfaces. Asymmetric sub-surface seismic velocity profiles beneath the Manson (Iowa) and Ries (Germany) impact craters demonstrate that pre-impact meteoroid trajectories records remain accessible for at least ˜ 10 ^ 8 years.

  16. Determining Chondritic Impactor Size from the Marine Osmium Isotope Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquay, François S.; Ravizza, Gregory E.; Dalai, Tarun K.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard

    2008-04-01

    Decreases in the seawater 187Os/188Os ratio caused by the impact of a chondritic meteorite are indicative of projectile size, if the soluble fraction of osmium carried by the impacting body is known. Resulting diameter estimates of the Late Eocene and Cretaceous/Paleogene projectiles are within 50% of independent estimates derived from iridium data, assuming total vaporization and dissolution of osmium in seawater. The variations of 187Os/188Os and Os/Ir across the Late Eocene impact-event horizon support the main assumptions required to estimate the projectile diameter. Chondritic impacts as small as 2 kilometers in diameter should produce observable excursions in the marine osmium isotope record, suggesting that previously unrecognized impact events can be identified by this method.

  17. Geochemical identification of impactor for Lonar crater, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mishra, S.; Newsom, H.E.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Geissman, J.W.; Dube, A.; Sengupta, D.

    1 , M. SHYAM PRASAD 2 , John W. GEISSMAN 3 , Anand DUBE 4 , and Debashish SENGUPTA 5 1 Institute of Meteoritics and Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, MSC03 2040, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA 2 National... Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403004, India 3 Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, MSC03 2040, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131, USA 4 P 147/3, Janak Road, Kolkata-700 029, India 5 Department of Geology...

  18. Identification of the giant impactor Theia in lunar rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Pack, Andreas; Friedrichs, Bjarne; Bischoff, Addi

    2014-06-01

    The Moon was probably formed by a catastrophic collision of the proto-Earth with a planetesimal named Theia. Most numerical models of this collision imply a higher portion of Theia in the Moon than in Earth. Because of the isotope heterogeneity among solar system bodies, the isotopic composition of Earth and the Moon should thus be distinct. So far, however, all attempts to identify the isotopic component of Theia in lunar rocks have failed. Our triple oxygen isotope data reveal a 12 ± 3 parts per million difference in Δ17O between Earth and the Moon, which supports the giant impact hypothesis of Moon formation. We also show that enstatite chondrites and Earth have different Δ17O values, and we speculate on an enstatite chondrite-like composition of Theia. The observed small compositional difference could alternatively be explained by a carbonaceous chondrite-dominated late veneer.

  19. Identification of the giant impactor Theia in lunar rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Pack, Andreas; Friedrichs, Bjarne; Bischoff, Addi

    2014-06-06

    The Moon was probably formed by a catastrophic collision of the proto-Earth with a planetesimal named Theia. Most numerical models of this collision imply a higher portion of Theia in the Moon than in Earth. Because of the isotope heterogeneity among solar system bodies, the isotopic composition of Earth and the Moon should thus be distinct. So far, however, all attempts to identify the isotopic component of Theia in lunar rocks have failed. Our triple oxygen isotope data reveal a 12 ± 3 parts per million difference in Δ(17)O between Earth and the Moon, which supports the giant impact hypothesis of Moon formation. We also show that enstatite chondrites and Earth have different Δ(17)O values, and we speculate on an enstatite chondrite-like composition of Theia. The observed small compositional difference could alternatively be explained by a carbonaceous chondrite-dominated late veneer.

  20. Cloud condensation nucleus counter by impactor sampling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, T.

    1981-01-01

    Unlike typical CCN counters, this device counts the numbers of water droplets condensed on aerosol particles sampled on a microcover glass at various different relative humidities. The relative humidities ranged from 75 percent to a calculated value of 110 percent. A schematic of the apparatus is shown. The individual CCN can be identified in an optical micrograph and scanning electron micrograph and may be inspected for their chemical composition later.

  1. LCROSS Lunar Impactor - Lessons Learned from a Small Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) launched with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) on June 18, 2009. While the science function of the LCROSS mission was to determine the presence of water-ice in a permanently-shadowed crater on the moon, the operational purpose was to be a pioneer for future low-cost, risk-tolerant small satellite NASA missions. Recent strategic changes at the Agency level have only furthered the importance of small satellite missions. NASA Ames Research Center and its industry partner, Northrop-Grumman, initiated this spacecraft project two-years after its co-manifest mission had started, with less than one-fifth the budget. With a $79M total cost cap (including operations and reserves) and 31-months until launch, LCROSS needed a game-changing approach to be successful. At the LCROSS Confirmation Review, the ESMD Associate Administrator asked the Project team to keep a close record of lessons learned through the course of the mission and share their findings with the Agency at the end of the mission. This paper summarizes the Project, the mission, its risk position, and some of the more notable lessons learned.

  2. Volumetric Collection Efficiency and Droplet Sizing Accuracy of Rotary Impactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    slide. The DropVision software returns results in the form of DV50, DV10, and DV90 as well as, the cu ‐ mulative droplet size distribution and coverage...field samplers for monitoring spray drift. Crop Prot. 15(3): 249‐257. Fox, R. D., R. C. Derksen, H. Zhu, R. A. Downer, and R. D. Brazee . 2004. Airborne

  3. 12 CFR 347.203 - Deposit insurance required for all branches of foreign banks engaged in domestic retail deposit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... foreign banks engaged in domestic retail deposit activity in the same State. 347.203 Section 347.203 Banks... engaged in domestic retail deposit activity in the same State. The FDIC will not insure deposits in any... foreign bank in the same state that engages in domestic retail deposit activity will be an insured branch....

  4. Intercomparison and closure calculations using measurements of aerosol species and optical properties during the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, William C.; Day, Derek E.; Carrico, Christian; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; McMeeking, Gavin; Lee, Taehyoung; Carrillo, Jacqueline; Schichtel, Bret

    2005-07-01

    Physical and optical properties of inorganic aerosols have been extensively studied, but less is known about carbonaceous aerosols, especially as they relate to the non-urban settings such as our nation's national parks and wilderness areas. Therefore an aerosol characterization study was conceived and implemented at one national park that is highly impacted by carbonaceous aerosols, Yosemite. The primary objective of the study was to characterize the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a carbon-dominated aerosol, including the ratio of total organic matter weight to organic carbon, organic mass scattering efficiencies, and the hygroscopic characteristics of a carbon-laden ambient aerosol, while a secondary objective was to evaluate a variety of semi-continuous monitoring systems. Inorganic ions were characterized using 24-hour samples that were collected using the URG and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) monitoring systems, the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) cascade impactor, as well as the semi-continuous particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) technology. Likewise, carbonaceous material was collected over 24-hour periods using IMPROVE technology along with the thermal optical reflectance (TOR) analysis, while semi-continuous total carbon concentrations were measured using the Rupprecht and Patashnick (R&P) instrument. Dry aerosol number size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and optical particle counter, scattering coefficients at near-ambient conditions were measured with nephelometers fitted with PM10 and PM2.5 inlets, and "dry" PM2.5 scattering was measured after passing ambient air through Perma Pure Nafion® dryers. In general, the 24-hour "bulk" measurements of various aerosol species compared more favorably with each other than with the semi-continuous data. Semi-continuous sulfate measurements correlated well with the 24-hour measurements, but were biased low by

  5. State-of-the-art Pb photocathodes deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontad, F., E-mail: Francisco.gontad@le.infn.it; Perrone, A.

    2014-05-21

    In this article we present and discuss the current status of thin film Pb photocathodes deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with different laser parameters, such as laser fluence, wavelength or pulse duration. The PLD technique appears very efficient for the fabrication of pure Pb photocathodes, providing good adherence and respectable quantum efficiency. The films deposited on the picosecond and subpicosecond regimes are practically free of big droplets and fragments, whereas in the nanosecond regime their presence cannot be neglected. All the films present a granular structure and polycrystalline character with preferential orientation along the (111) crystalline planes, irrespective of the laser pulse duration or wavelength. The main results obtained from the photoemission performance of Pb thin films deposited by PLD demonstrate their chemical stability under vacuum conditions and respectable quantum efficiency with a maximum of 7.3×10{sup −5} for films deposited on the subpicosecond regime. The photoemission properties confirm that Pb thin films deposited by PLD are a notable alternative for the fabrication of photocathodes for superconductive radio-frequency electron guns. - Highlights: • Lead samples were grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition at different laser parameters • All films present a granular morphology • Lead films grow preferentially along the 111 crystalline planes of the cubic net • A maximum quantum efficiency of 7.3 × 10-5 has been found.

  6. Stress control of silicon nitride films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-ling; Feng, Xiao-fei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Shang, Zheng-guo; She, Yin

    2016-07-01

    Stress controllable silicon nitride (SiNx) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are reported. Low stress SiNx films were deposited in both high frequency (HF) mode and dual frequency (HF/LF) mode. By optimizing process parameters, stress free (-0.27 MPa) SiNx films were obtained with the deposition rate of 45.5 nm/min and the refractive index of 2.06. Furthermore, at HF/LF mode, the stress is significantly influenced by LF ratio and LF power, and can be controlled to be 10 MPa with the LF ratio of 17% and LF power of 150 W. However, LF power has a little effect on the deposition rate due to the interaction between HF power and LF power. The deposited SiNx films have good mechanical and optical properties, low deposition temperature and controllable stress, and can be widely used in integrated circuit (IC), micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and bio-MEMS.

  7. Local plasma deposition on polymer components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, P.J.; Theelen, M.J.; Habets, D.; Winands, G.J.J.; Staemmler, L.

    2011-01-01

    For the modification of the surface energy of polymers, organosilicon coatings provide good optical and mechanical properties and are excellent candidates for the modification of the surface energy of polymers. These coatings can be deposited by plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO)

  8. New Mexico Known Mineral Deposit Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset contains all Known Mineral Deposit Areas in the state of New Mexico. It is in a vector digital structure digitized from a 1:500,000 scale map of the...

  9. Pulsed laser deposition of tantalum pentoxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.-Y.; Boyd, I. W.

    We report thin tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) films grown on quartz and silicon substrates by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique employing a Nd:YAG laser (wavelength λ=532 nm) in various O2 gas environments. The effect of oxygen pressure, substrate temperature, and annealing under UV irradiation using a 172-nm excimer lamp on the properties of the grown films has been studied. The optical properties determined by UV spectrophotometry were also found to be a sensitive function of oxygen pressure in the chamber. At an O2 pressure of 0.2 mbar and deposition temperatures between 400 and 500 °C, the refractive index of the films was around 2.18 which is very close to the bulk Ta2O5 value of 2.2, and an optical transmittance around 90% in the visible region of the spectrum was obtained. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the as-deposited films were amorphous at temperatures below 500 °C and possessed an orthorhombic (β-Ta2O5) crystal structure at temperatures above 600 °C. The most significant result of the present study was that oxygen pressure could be used to control the composition and modulate optical band gap of the films. It was also found that UV annealing can significantly improve the optical and electrical properties of the films deposited at low oxygen pressures (<0.1 mbar).

  10. Theory of Cast Formation in Electrophoretic Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P. Maarten; Verweij, Henk

    1999-01-01

    The rate of cast formation in electrophoretic deposition is described by a combination of the equation of continuity for the suspension phase with expressions for the particle velocity and the movement of the cast-suspension boundary. The assumptions necessary to arrive at the well-known equations o

  11. 37 CFR 2.208 - Deposit accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... upon receipt of the statement to cover the value of items or services charged to the account and thus... COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Fees and Payment of Money in Trademark Cases § 2.208 Deposit accounts. (a) For the convenience of attorneys, and the general public in paying any fees due, in...

  12. 37 CFR 1.25 - Deposit accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... receipt of the statement to cover the value of items or services charged to the account and thus restore... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES General Provisions Fees and Payment of Money § 1.25 Deposit accounts. (a) For the convenience of attorneys, and the general public in paying any fees due,...

  13. Deposition of grids on plastic detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Birabeau, J P; Mendola, Onofrio

    1972-01-01

    In order to facilitate the locating of tracks of charged particles in cellulose-nitrate and polycarbonate (Makrofol, Lexan) foils, a method has been developed for the photo-deposition of translucent coordinate grids on these materials. The grids are resistant to the strongly caustic solutions used in developing tracks in plastic foils. (9 refs) .

  14. Deposition of biopolymer films on micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jensen, Marie P.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of various parameters on the spray-coating of thin films of poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) was investigated. The optimized processing conditions were used for deposition of the biodegradable polymer on arrays of SU-8 microcantilevers. The resonance frequency of the cantilevers before and af...

  15. Tax Evasion and Swiss Bank Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Niels

    Bank deposits in jurisdictions with banking secrecy constitute an effective tool to evade taxes on interest income. A recent EU reform reduces the scope for this type of tax evasion by introducing a source tax on interest income earned by EU residents in Switzerland and several other jurisdictions...

  16. Lifetime obtained by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakaroun, M. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France); Antony, R. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)], E-mail: remi.antony@unilim.fr; Taillepierre, P.; Moliton, A. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)

    2007-09-15

    We have fabricated green organic light-emitting diodes based on tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (Alq3) thin films. In order to favor the charge carriers transport from the anode, we have deposited a N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis (3-methylphenyl)-1,1'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine (TPD) layer (hole transport layer) on a ITO anode. Cathode is obtained with a calcium layer covered with a silver layer. This silver layer is used to protect the other layers against oxygen during the OLED use. All the depositions are performed under vacuum and the devices are not exposed to air during their realisation. In order to improve the silver layer characteristics, we have realized this layer with the ion beam assisted deposition process. The aim of this process is to densify the layer and then reduce the permeation of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. We have used argon ions to assist the silver deposition. All the OLEDs optoelectronic characterizations (I = f(V), L = f(V)) are performed in the ambient air. We compare the results obtained with the assisted layer with those obtained with a classical cathode realized by thermal unassisted evaporation. We have realized lifetime measurements in the ambient air and we discuss about the assisted layer influence on the OLEDs performances.

  17. Panel 1 - comparative evaluation of deposition technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, G.R.; Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Benson, D.K.; Pitts, R.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bhat, D.G. [GTE Valenite Corp., Troy, MI (United States); Yulin Chen [Allison Gas Turbine Division, GM, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Gat, R.; Sunkara, M.K. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Kelly, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Lawler, J.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Nagle, D.C. [Martin Marietta Labs., Baltimore, MD (United States); Outka, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Revankar, G.S. [Deere & Co., Moline, IL (United States); Subramaniam, V.V. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States); Wilbur, P.J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States); Mingshow Wong [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Woolam, W.E. [Southwest Research Inst., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This working group attempted to evaluate/compare the different types of deposition techniques currently under investigation for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. A table lists the broad types of techniques that were considered for depositing diamond and diamond-like carbon films. After some discussion, it was agreed that any evaluation of the various techniques would be dependent on the end application. Thus the next action was to list the different areas where diamond and DLC films could find applications in transportation. These application areas are listed in a table. The table intentionally does not go into great detail on applications because that subject is dealt with specifically by Panel No. 4 - Applications To Transportation. The next action concentrated on identifying critical issues or limitations that need to be considered in evaluating the different processes. An attempt was then made to rank different broad categories of deposition techniques currently available or under development based on the four application areas and the limitations. These rankings/evaluations are given for diamond and DLC techniques. Finally, the working group tried to identify critical development and research issues that need to be incorporated into developing a long-term program that focuses on diamond/DLC coatings for transportation needs. 5 tabs.

  18. 20 CFR 901.46 - Depositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depositions. 901.46 Section 901.46 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Suspension or Termination of...

  19. 31 CFR 223.4 - Deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deposits. 223.4 Section 223.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE SURETY COMPANIES DOING BUSINESS WITH THE UNITED...

  20. DRY DEPOSITION OF POLLUTANTS TO FORESTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report on the results of an extensive field campaign to measure dry deposition of ozone and sulfur dioxide to a sample of forest types in the United States. Measurements were made for full growing seasons over a deciduous forest in Pennsylvania and a mixed deciduous-conifer...

  1. Modeling of dust deposition in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The deposition of dust particles has a significant influence on the global bio-geochemical cycle. Currently, the lack of spatiotemporal data creates great uncertainty in estimating the global dust budget. To improve our understanding of the fate, transport and cycling of airborne dust, there is a ne...

  2. Templated Chemically Deposited Semiconductor Optical Fiber Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Justin R.; Sazio, Pier J. A.; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Badding, John V.

    2013-07-01

    Chemical deposition is a powerful technology for fabrication of planar microelectronics. Optical fibers are the dominant platform for telecommunications, and devices such as fiber lasers are forming the basis for new industries. High-pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) allows for conformal layers and void-free wires of precisely doped crystalline unary and compound semiconductors inside the micro-to-nanoscale-diameter pores of microstructured optical fibers (MOFs). Drawing the fibers to serve as templates into which these semiconductor structures can be fabricated allows for geometric design flexibility that is difficult to achieve with planar fabrication. Seamless coupling of semiconductor optoelectronic and photonic devices with existing fiber infrastructure thus becomes possible, facilitating all-fiber technological approaches. The deposition techniques also allow for a wider range of semiconductor materials compositions to be exploited than is possible by means of preform drawing. Gigahertz bandwidth junction-based fiber devices can be fabricated from doped crystalline semiconductors, for example. Deposition of amorphous hydrogenated silicon, which cannot be drawn, allows for the exploitation of strong nonlinear optical function in fibers. Finally, crystalline compound semiconductor fiber cores hold promise for high-power infrared light-guiding fiber devices and subwavelength-resolution, large-area infrared imaging.

  3. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Glad, Aslaug Clemmensen; Pedersen, Gunver Krarup

    2017-01-01

    -preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal...

  4. Depositing Materials on the Micro- and Nanoscale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mar, Mikkel Dysseholm; Herstrøm, Berit; Shkondin, Evgeniy

    2014-01-01

    on sequential introduction of precursor pulses with intermediate purging steps. The process proceeds by specific surface ligand-exchange reactions and this leads to layer-by-layer growth control. No other thin film deposition technique can approach the conformity achieved by ALD on high aspect ratio structures...

  5. Nanostructured Antibacterial Silver Deposited on Polypropylene Nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Bo, Wang; Jin-Yan, Wang; Qu-Fu, Wei; Jian-Han, Hong; Xiao-Yan, Zhao

    Nanostructured silver films were deposited on polypropylene (PP) nonwovens by RF magnetron sputter coating to obtain the antibacterial properties. Shake flask test was used to evaluate the antibacterial properties of the materials. Atomic force microscope (AFM) was utilized to observe the surface morphology. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) was also employed to analyze the surface elemental compositions. The antibacterial results indicated that the prolonged deposition time led to a significant improvement in antibacterial effect, and sputtering power and argon pressure did not show obvious effect on antibacterial performance. It is believed that the total amount of silver ions released from the silver coating was increased as the deposition time increased. AFM images and quantitative analysis of EDX, respectively revealed that increase in deposition time led to the increased coverage of silver film and the increased silver weight percentage per unit surface, which provided evidences for the increased release rate of silver ions from the coating. Moreover, it was found that the optimum silver coating thickness was about 3 nm, taking antibacterial effect and cost of production into account.

  6. Deposition and Characterization of TRISO Coating Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. K.; Choi, D. J.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, J. H.; Chun, J. H. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Zirconium carbide has been chosen and studied as an advanced material of silicon carbide. In order to collect data on the basic properties and characteristics of Zirconium carbide, studies have been conducted using various methods. As a result of chemically vapor deposed subliming zirconium tetrachloride(ZrCl4) and using methane(CH4) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere, graphite film is deposited.. Zirconium carbide was deposited on the sample where silicon carbide was deposited on a graphite substrate using Zirconium sponge as a Zirconium source. In terms of physical characteristics, the deposited Zirconium carbide showed higher strength, but slightly lower elastic modulus than silicon carbide. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of a coating layer in pre-irradiation step, internal pressure induced method and direct strength measurement method is carried out. In the internal pressure induced method, in order to produce the requirement pressure, pressure media is used. In the direct strength measurement method, the indentation experiment that indent on a hemisphere shell with plate indenter is conducted. For this method, the finite element analysis is used and the analysis is verified by indentation experiments. To measure the strength of TRISO particle SiC coating, SiC hemisphere shell is performed through grinding and heat treatment. Through the finite element analysis, strength evaluation equation is suggested. Using suggested equation, Strength evaluation is performed and the strength value shows 1025MPa as a result of statistical analysis.

  7. Hydrogen release from deposited beryllium layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestakov, V.P.; Klepikov, A.Kh.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Tazhibaeva, I.L. [NIIETF of Al Farabi Kazakh State Univ., Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2000-04-01

    The analysis of hydrogen retained in deposited beryllium layers deposited by magnetron sputtering was carried out by means of thermodesorption (TDS) technique. Two hydrogen release peaks were clearly seen on the thermodesorption curves at the temperatures 760-800 K and 920-970 K. Hydrogen concentrations in the deposited beryllium layers were calculated from the gas release curves corresponding to the number of Be atoms in the beryllium layer of 100% theoretical density. Average hydrogen concentration in the beryllium samples loaded in the process of magnetron sputtering was equal to 3800{+-}200 appm. The experiments with beryllium layers, enriched with carbon, revealed the increase of retained hydrogen concentration up to 9600{+-}200 appm. Assuming that gas release can be described within the framework of model of diffusion from layer system BeO-Be-BeO, hydrogen diffusion coefficient in BeO and the trapping and detrapping constants for the traps appearing in beryllium in the process of deposition were evaluated. (orig.)

  8. Atomic layer deposition of nanoporous biomaterials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R. J.; Adiga, S. P.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Stafslien, S.; Chisholm, B.; Monteiro-Riviere, N. A.; Brigmon, R. L.; Elam, J. W.; Univ. of North Carolina; North Carolina State Univ.; Eastman Kodak Co.; North Dakota State Univ.; SRL

    2010-03-01

    Due to its chemical stability, uniform pore size, and high pore density, nanoporous alumina is being investigated for use in biosensing, drug delivery, hemodialysis, and other medical applications. In recent work, we have examined the use of atomic layer deposition for coating the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes. Zinc oxide coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes using atomic layer deposition. The zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These results suggest that atomic layer deposition is an attractive technique for modifying the surfaces of nanoporous alumina membranes and other nanostructured biomaterials. Nanoporous alumina, also known as anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), is a nanomaterial that exhibits several unusual properties, including high pore densities, straight pores, small pore sizes, and uniform pore sizes. In 1953, Keller et al. showed that anodizing aluminum in acid electrolytes results in a thick layer of nearly cylindrical pores, which are arranged in a close-packed hexagonal cell structure. More recently, Matsuda & Fukuda demonstrated preparation of highly ordered platinum and gold nanohole arrays using a replication process. In this study, a negative structure of nanoporous alumina was initially fabricated and a positive structure of a nanoporous metal was subsequently fabricated. Over the past fifteen years, nanoporous alumina membranes have been used as templates for growth of a variety of nanostructured materials, including nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods, and nanoporous membranes.

  9. Solid Organic Deposition During Gas Injection Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandekar, Abhijit Y.; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2000-01-01

    Recently a series of first contact miscibility (swelling) experiments have been performed on undersaturated light and heavy oils using LPG rich and methane rich injection gases, in which solid organic deposition was observed. A compositional gradient in the oils during the gas injection process w...

  10. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality.

  11. Micromorphology of modern tills in southwestern Spitsbergen – insights into depositional and post-depositional processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skolasińska Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Textural properties and microstructures are commonly used properties in the analysis of Pleistocene and older glacial deposits. However, contemporary glacial deposits are seldom studied, particularly in the context of post-depositional changes. This paper presents the results of a micromorphological study of recently deposited tills in the marginal zones of Hansbreen and Torellbreen, glaciers in southwestern Spitsbergen. The main objectives of this study were to compare modern tills deposited in subglacial and supraglacial conditions, as well as tills that were freshly released from ice with those laid down several decades ago. The investigated tills are primarily composed of large clasts of metamorphic rocks and represent coarse-grained, matrix-supported diamictons. The tills reveal several characteristic features for ductile (e.g. turbate structures and brittle (e.g. lineations, microshears deformations, which have been considered to be indicative of subglacial conditions. In supraglacial tills, the same structures are common as in the subglacial deposits, which points to the preservation of the primary features, though the sediment was transferred up to the glacier surface due to basal ice layer deformation and redeposited as slumps, or to formation of similar structures due to short-distance sediment re-deposition by mass flows. This study revealed that it might not be possible to distinguish subglacial and supraglacial tills on the basis of micromorphology if the latter are derived from a subglacial position. The only noted difference was the presence of iron oxide cementation zones and carbonate dissolution features in supraglacial tills. These features were found in tills that were deposited at least a few years ago and are interpreted to be induced by early post-depositional processes involving porewater/sediment interactions.

  12. Properties of N-rich Silicon Nitride Film Deposited by Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Pei-Ci; Lu, Chi-Pin; Shieh, Jung-Yu; Yang, Ling-Wu; Yang, Tahone; Chen, Kuang-Chao; Lu, Chih-Yuan

    2017-07-01

    An N-rich silicon nitride film, with a lower refractive index (RI) than the stoichiometric silicon nitride (RI = 2.01), was deposited by alternating the exposure of dichlorosilane (DCS, SiH2Cl2) and that of ammonia (NH3) in a plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process. In this process, the plasma ammonia was easily decomposed to reactive radicals by RF power activating so that the N-rich silicon nitride was easily formed by excited ammonia radicals. The growth kinetics of N-rich silicon nitride were examined at various deposition temperatures ranging from 400 °C to 630 °C; the activation energy (Ea) decreased as the deposition temperature decreased below 550 °C. N-rich silicon nitride film with a wide range of values of refractive index (RI) (RI = 1.86-2.00) was obtained by regulating the deposition temperature. At the optimal deposition temperature, the effects of RF power, NH3 flow rate and NH3 flow time were on the characteristics of the N-rich silicon nitride film were evaluated. The results thus reveal that the properties of the N-rich silicon nitride film that was formed by under plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) are dominated by deposition temperature. In charge trap flash (CTF) study, an N-rich silicon nitride film was applied to MAONOS device as a charge-trapping layer. The films exhibit excellent electron trapping ability and favor a fresh cell data retention performance as the deposition temperature decreased.

  13. Uranium deposits of the world. Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlkamp, Franz J.

    2016-07-01

    Uranium Deposits of the World, in three volumes, comprises an unprecedented compilation of data and descriptions of the uranium regions in Asia, USA, Latin America and Europe structured by countries. With this third, the Europe volume, Uranium Deposits of the World presents the most extensive data collection of the set. It covers about 140 uranium regions in more than 20 European countries with nearly 1000 mentioned uranium deposits. Each country and region receives an analytical overview followed by the geologically- and economically-relevant synopsis of the individual regions and fields. The presentations are structured in three major sections: (a) location and magnitude of uranium regions, districts, and deposits, (b) principal features of regions and districts, and (c) detailed characteristics of selected ore fields and deposits. This includes sections on geology, alteration, mineralization, shape and dimensions of deposits, isotopes data, ore control and recognition criteria, and metallogenesis. Beside the main European uranium regions, for example in the Czech Republic, Eastern Germany, France, the Iberian Peninsula or Ukraine, also small regions an districts to the point of singular occurrences of interest are considered. This by far the most comprehensive presentation of European uranium geology and mining would not be possible without the author's access to extensive information covering the countries of the former Eastern Bloc states, which was partly not previously available. Abundantly illustrated with information-laden maps and charts throughout, this reference work is an indispensable tool for geologists, mining companies, government agencies, and others with an interest in European key natural resources. A great help for the reader's orientation are the substantial bibliography of uranium-related publications and the indices, latter containing about 3900 entries in the geographical part alone. The three volumes of Uranium Deposits of the

  14. Atmospheric deposition of organic carbon via precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavorivska, Lidiia; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; DeWalle, David R.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the major pathway for removal of organic carbon (OC) from the atmosphere, affecting both atmospheric and landscape processes. Transfers of OC from the atmosphere to land occur as wet deposition (via precipitation) and as dry deposition (via surface settling of particles and gases). Despite current understanding of the significance of organic carbon inputs with precipitation to carbon budgets, transfers of organic matter between the atmosphere and land are not explicitly included in most carbon cycle models due to limited data, highlighting the need for further information. Studies regarding the abundance of OC in precipitation are relatively sparse, in part due to the fact that concentrations of organics in precipitation and their associated rates of atmospheric deposition are not routinely measured as a part of major deposition monitoring networks. Here, we provide a new data synthesis from 83 contemporary studies published in the peer reviewed literature where organic matter in precipitation was measured around the world. We compiled data regarding the concentrations of organic carbon in precipitation and associated rates of atmospheric deposition of organic carbon. We calculated summary statistics in a common set of units, providing insights into the magnitude and regional variability of OC in precipitation. A land to ocean gradient is evident in OC concentrations, with marine sites generally showing lower values than continental sites. Our synthesis highlights gaps in the data and challenges for data intercomparison. There is a need to concentrate sampling efforts in areas where anthropogenic OC emissions are on the rise (Asia, South America), as well as in remote sites suggesting background conditions, especially in Southern Hemisphere. It is also important to acquire more data for marine rainwater at various distances from the coast in order to assess a magnitude of carbon transfer between the land and the ocean. Our integration of

  15. Integrated Historical Tsunami Event and Deposit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, P. K.; McCullough, H. L.

    2010-12-01

    The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) provides integrated access to historical tsunami event, deposit, and proxy data. The NGDC tsunami archive initially listed tsunami sources and locations with observed tsunami effects. Tsunami frequency and intensity are important for understanding tsunami hazards. Unfortunately, tsunami recurrence intervals often exceed the historic record. As a result, NGDC expanded the archive to include the Global Tsunami Deposits Database (GTD_DB). Tsunami deposits are the physical evidence left behind when a tsunami impacts a shoreline or affects submarine sediments. Proxies include co-seismic subsidence, turbidite deposits, changes in biota following an influx of marine water in a freshwater environment, etc. By adding past tsunami data inferred from the geologic record, the GTD_DB extends the record of tsunamis backward in time. Although the best methods for identifying tsunami deposits and proxies in the geologic record remain under discussion, developing an overall picture of where tsunamis have affected coasts, calculating recurrence intervals, and approximating runup height and inundation distance provides a better estimate of a region’s true tsunami hazard. Tsunami deposit and proxy descriptions in the GTD_DB were compiled from published data found in journal articles, conference proceedings, theses, books, conference abstracts, posters, web sites, etc. The database now includes over 1,200 descriptions compiled from over 1,100 citations. Each record in the GTD_DB is linked to its bibliographic citation where more information on the deposit can be found. The GTD_DB includes data for over 50 variables such as: event description (e.g., 2010 Chile Tsunami), geologic time period, year, deposit location name, latitude, longitude, country, associated body of water, setting during the event (e.g., beach, lake, river, deep sea), upper and lower contacts, underlying and overlying material, etc. If known, the tsunami source mechanism

  16. SnS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition, dip coating and SILAR techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    The SnS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD), dip coating and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. In them, the CBD thin films were deposited at two temperatures: ambient and 70 °C. The energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the thin films. The electrical transport properties studies on the as-deposited thin films were done by measuring the I-V characteristics, DC electrical resistivity variation with temperature and the room temperature Hall effect. The obtained results are deliberated in this paper.

  17. Characterization of copper selenide thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamun; Islam, A. B. M. O.

    2004-11-01

    A low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique has been used for the preparation of Cu2-xSe thin films onto glass substrates and deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Good quality thin films of smooth surface of copper selenide thin films were deposited using sodium selenosulfate as a source of selenide ions. The structural and optical behaviour of the films are discussed in the light of the observed data.

  18. Properties of CdTe layers deposited by a novel method -Pulsed Plasma Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Ancora, C.; Nozar, P.; Mittica, G.; Prescimone, F.; A. Neri; Contaldi, S.; Milita, S.; Albonetti, C.; Corticelli, F.; Brillante, A.; Bilotti, I.; Tedeschi, G.; Taliani, C.

    2011-01-01

    CdTe and CdS are emerging as the most promising materials for thin film photovoltaics in the quest of the achievement of grid parity. The major challenge for the advancement of grid parity is the achievement of high quality at the same time as low fabrication cost. The present paper reports the results of the new deposition technique, Pulsed Plasma Deposition (PPD), for the growth of the CdTe layers on CdS/ZnO/quartz and quartz substrates. The PPD method allows to deposit at low temperature. ...

  19. Low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride nanoparticles by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Soo; Youn, Woong-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Seol, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2009-07-01

    The nanocrystalline alpha silicon nitride (α-Si 3N 4) was deposited on a silicon substrate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at the substrate temperature of 700 °C under 4 and 40 Torr at the wire temperatures of 1430 and 1730 °C, with a gas mixture of SiH 4 and NH 3. The size and density of crystalline nanoparticles on the substrate increased with increasing wire temperature. With increasing reactor pressure, the crystallinity of α-Si 3N 4 nanoparticles increased, but the deposition rate decreased.

  20. The Nopal 1 Uranium Deposit: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calas, G.; Allard, T.; Galoisy, L.

    2007-05-01

    The Nopal 1 natural analogue is located in the Pena Blanca uranium district, about 50 kms north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit is hosted in tertiary ignimbritic ash-flow tuffs, dated at 44 Ma (Nopal and Colorados formations), and overlying the Pozos conglomerate formation and a sequence of Cretaceous carbonate rocks. The deposit is exposed at the ground surface and consists of a near vertical zone extending over about 100 m with a diameter of 40 m. An interesting characteristic is that the primary mineralization has been exposed above the water table, as a result of the uplift of the Sierra Pena Blanca, and subsequently oxidized with a remobilization of hexavalent uranium. The primary mineralization has been explained by various genetic models. It is associated to an extensive hydrothermal alteration of the volcanic tuffs, locally associated to pyrite and preserved by an intense silicification. Several kaolinite parageneses occur in fissure fillings and feldspar pseudomorphs, within the mineralized breccia pipe and the barren surrounding rhyolitic tuffs. Smectites are mainly developed in the underlying weakly welded tuffs. Several radiation-induced defect centers have been found in these kaolinites providing a unique picture of the dynamics of uranium mobilization (see Allard et al., this session). Another evidence of this mobilization is given by the spectroscopy of uranium-bearing opals, which show characteristic fluorescence spectra of uranyl groups sorbed at the surface of silica. By comparison with the other uranium deposits of the Sierra Pena Blanca and the nearby Sierra de Gomez, the Nopal 1 deposit is original, as it is one of the few deposits hving retained a reduced uranium mineralization.