WorldWideScience

Sample records for deployments mobilizing support

  1. A demonstration of mobile phone deployment to support the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A demonstration of mobile phone deployment to support the treatment of acutely ill children under five in Bushenyi district, Uganda. Jerome Kabakyenga, Celestine Barigye, Jennifer Brenner, Samuel Maling, Denise Buchner, Alberto Nettle-Aquirre, Nalini Singhal, Teddy Kyomuhangi, David Tumusiime, Janet Finch, Stuart ...

  2. Discursive Deployments: Mobilizing Support for Municipal and Community Wireless Networks in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Rosio; Rodriguez, Juana Maria

    2008-08-16

    This paper examines Municipal Wireless (MW) deployments in the United States. In particular, the interest is in understanding how discourse has worked to mobilize widespread support for MW networks. We explore how local governments discursively deploy the language of social movements to create a shared understanding of the networking needs of communities. Through the process of"framing" local governments assign meaning to the MW networks in ways intended to mobilize support anddemobilize opposition. The mobilizing potential of a frame varies and is dependent on its centrality and cultural resonance. We examine the framing efforts of MW networks by using a sample of Request for Proposals for community wireless networks, semi-structured interviews and local media sources. Prominent values that are central to a majority of the projects and others that are culturally specific are identified and analyzed for their mobilizing potency.

  3. A demonstration of mobile phone deployment to support the treatment of acutely ill children under five in Bushenyi district, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabakyenga, Jerome; Barigye, Celestine; Brenner, Jennifer; Maling, Samuel; Buchner, Denise; Nettle-Aquirre, Alberto; Singhal, Nalini; Kyomuhangi, Teddy; Tumusiime, David; Finch, Janet; MacLeod, Stuart

    2016-03-01

    Benefits of mobile phone deployment for children mobile phone use. Impact was assessed by quantitative measures and qualitative evaluation through household surveys, focus group discussions, and key informant interviews. CHWs in targeted sites improved child healthcare through mobile phone use coupled with iCCM. Of acutely ill children, 92.6% were correctly managed. Significant improvements in clinical outcomes compared to those obtained by CHWs with enhanced iCCM training alone were unproven in this limited demonstration. Nonetheless, qualitative evaluation showed gains in treatment planning, supply management, and logistical efficiency. Provider confidence and communications were enhanced as was ease and accuracy of record keeping. Mobile phones appear synergistic with iCCM to bolster basic supportive care for acutely ill children provided by CHWs. The full impact of expanded mobile phone deployment warrants further evaluation prior to scaling up in low-resource settings.

  4. Rapidly Deployable Mobile Security Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Chapter V, but Android provides default onboard encryption and it is an optional feature for removable media. Wipe the device (to scrub its stored...Mobile Data Solution Since Android has removed the ability to control mobile data, and it is unknown if a creative solution to shut this feature...down exists, then some exploration on this topic is warranted. Android removed the access to this feature under the auspices of preventing

  5. Optimization Techniques for 3D Graphics Deployment on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Timo; Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko

    2015-03-01

    3D Internet technologies are becoming essential enablers in many application areas including games, education, collaboration, navigation and social networking. The use of 3D Internet applications with mobile devices provides location-independent access and richer use context, but also performance issues. Therefore, one of the important challenges facing 3D Internet applications is the deployment of 3D graphics on mobile devices. In this article, we present an extensive survey on optimization techniques for 3D graphics deployment on mobile devices and qualitatively analyze the applicability of each technique from the standpoints of visual quality, performance and energy consumption. The analysis focuses on optimization techniques related to data-driven 3D graphics deployment, because it supports off-line use, multi-user interaction, user-created 3D graphics and creation of arbitrary 3D graphics. The outcome of the analysis facilitates the development and deployment of 3D Internet applications on mobile devices and provides guidelines for future research.

  6. Security Support in Continuous Deployment Pipeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Faheem; Raft, Adam Johannes; Shahin, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Continuous Deployment (CD) has emerged as a new practice in the software industry to continuously and automatically deploy software changes into production. Continuous Deployment Pipeline (CDP) supports CD practice by transferring the changes from the repository to production. Since most of the CDP...... penetration tools. Our findings indicate that the applied tactics improve the security of the major components (i.e., repository, continuous integration server, main server) of a CDP by controlling access to the components and establishing secure connections....

  7. Autonomous Deployment and Restoration of Sensor Network using Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Suzuki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an autonomous deployment and restoration of a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN using mobile robots. The authors have been developing an information-gathering system using mobile robots and WSNs in underground spaces in post-disaster environments. In our system, mobile robots carry wireless sensor nodes (SN and deploy them into the environment while measuring Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI values to ensure communication, thereby enabling the WSN to be deployed and restored autonomously. If the WSN is disrupted, mobile robots restore the communication route by deploying additional or alternate SNs to suitable positions. Utilizing the proposed method, a mobile robot can deploy a WSN and gather environmental information via the WSN. Experimental results using a verification system equipped with a SN deployment and retrieval mechanism are presented.

  8. Autonomous Deployment and Restoration of Sensor Network using Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Suzuki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an autonomous deployment and restoration of a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN using mobile robots. The authors have been developing an information-gathering system using mobile robots and WSNs in underground spaces in post-disaster environments. In our system, mobile robots carry wireless sensor nodes (SN and deploy them into the environment while measuring Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI values to ensure communication, thereby enabling the WSN to be deployed and restored autonomously. If the WSN is disrupted, mobile robots restore the communication route by deploying additional or alternate SNs to suitable positions. Utilizing the proposed method, a mobile robot can deploy a WSN and gather environmental information via the WSN. Experimental results using a verification system equipped with a SN deployment and retrieval mechanism are presented.

  9. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A Resource for Community Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2015-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction and validation of the NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the future. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs will be designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to ~ 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs will be comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach.

  10. Deployment Support Leading to Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E E

    1997-10-01

    cause lateral distribution of the water. The large tank that accommodates the sand bed and the necessary plumbing to simulate various well configurations was received. The monitoring equipment and the sensors are currently being installed. The experimental procedures for Phase II experiments are under further investigation and will be initiated upon installation of CATC and assembly of the monitoring system. Due to insufficient operating funds, the large scale experiments will not be done this year. Task No. 1.3: Technical Support - Development of Standard Test Protocols and Barrier Design Models for In Situ Formed Barriers (B. Overbey & D. Locke, BDM Federal): The Operating Permit Renewal Request for bench scale operations in the FETC B-17 building was submitted to the FETC Lab Safety Committee for approval on 8/14/97. A review of the revised NEPA documents prepared last year indicates that these documents are still applicable for the current work. The initial design and specifications for the CATC vessel were prepared. Construction of the CATC was initiated in early July, the vessel was received August 15, 1997, and on-site work was completed this quarter.

  11. Deployment of Mobile Learning Course Materials to Android Powered Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to facilitate mobile teaching and learning by providing an alternative course material deployment method. This article suggests a course material deployment platform for small universities or individual instructors. Different from traditional course material deployment methods, the method discussed deploys course…

  12. Design and Deployment of Mobile FSO Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Alheadary, Wael Ghazy

    2017-05-08

    As a potential solution to many applications, we developed a mobile free-space optical (FSO) system that achieves 1Gbps with transmission distance of 70 m. This system needs minimal preparation to be deployed within an hour.

  13. Design and Deployment of Mobile FSO Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Alheadary, Wael Ghazy; Guo, Yong; Stegenburgs, Edgars; Park, Kihong; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    As a potential solution to many applications, we developed a mobile free-space optical (FSO) system that achieves 1Gbps with transmission distance of 70 m. This system needs minimal preparation to be deployed within an hour.

  14. Sunrise deploys mobile network for CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Sunrise, the alternative telecoms provider in Switzerland, is finalizing the installation of a mobile network comprising about forty sites located around the new particle accelerator at CERN (1 paragraph)

  15. Mobile Support For Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    support wireless capabilities, such as Wi-Fi or LTE -based 4G cellular infrastructures, into the DOD’s enterprise software, GCSS-MC could be a large...fielded mobile devices through ViaSat Inc. ViaSat’s goal is to provide secure communications over 3G/4G/ LTE cellular and Wi-Fi networks, secure...or commercial carrier network. While these measures are not all encompassing for protecting mobile devices, they are a ways that drastically improve

  16. Mobile Adaptive Communication Support for Vocabulary Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Carrie Demmans

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the use of an adaptive mobile tool for language learning. A school-based deployment study showed that the tool supported learning. A second study is being conducted in informal learning environments. Current work focuses on building models that increase our understanding of the relationship between application usage and learning.

  17. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A Resource for Community Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2017-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction of the five NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the near future. Additionally, we include information (i.e. timelines and procedures) on requesting MDPs for PI led projects. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs are designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs are comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach. More specifically, the MDPs include the capability to make tower based measures of ecosystem exchange, radiation, and precipitation in conjunction with baseline soils data such as CO2 flux, and soil temperature and moisture. An aquatics module is also available with the MDP to facilitate research integrating terrestrial and aquatic processes. Ultimately, the NEON MDPs provide a tool for linking PI led research to the continental scale data sets collected by NEON.

  18. Hybrid deployable support truss designs for LDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, J.

    1988-01-01

    Concepts for a 20-meter diameter Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) deployable truss backup structure, and analytical predictions of its structural characteristics are discussed. The concept shown is referred to as the SIXPAC; It is a combination of the PACTRUSS concept and a single-fold beam, which would make up the desired backup structure. One advantage of retaining the PACTRUSS concept is its packaging density and its capability for synchronous deployment. Various 2-meter hexagonal panel arrangements are possible for this Hybrid PACTRUSS structure depending on the panel-to-structure attachment strategies used. Static analyses of the SIXPAC using various assumptions for truss designs and panel masses of 10 kg sq meters were performed to predict the tip displacement of the structure when supported at the center. The tip displacement ranged from 0.20 to 0.44 mm without the panel mass, and from 0.9 to 3.9 mm with the panel mass (in a 1-g field). The data indicate that the structure can be adequately ground tested to validate its required performance in space, assuming the required performance in space is approximately 100 microns. The static displacement at the tip of the structure when subjected to an angular acceleration of 0.001 rad/sec squared were estimated to range from 0.8 to 7.5 microns, depending on the type of truss elements.

  19. An ARM Mobile Facility Designed for Marine Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiscombe, W. J.

    2007-05-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy's ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) Program is designing a Mobile Facility exclusively for marine deployments. This marine facility is patterned after ARM's land Mobile Facility, which had its inaugural deployment at Point Reyes, California, in 2005, followed by deployments to Niger in 2006 and Germany in 2007 (ongoing), and a planned deployment to China in 2008. These facilities are primarily intended for the study of clouds, radiation, aerosols, and surface processes with a goal to include these processes accurately in climate models. They are preferably embedded within larger field campaigns which provide context. They carry extensive instrumentation (in several large containers) including: cloud radar, lidar, microwave radiometers, infrared spectrometers, broadband and narrowband radiometers, sonde-launching facilities, extensive surface aerosol measurements, sky imagers, and surface latent and sensible heat flux devices. ARM's Mobile Facilities are designed for 6-10 month deployments in order to capture climatically-relevant datasets. They are available to any scientist, U.S. or international, who wishes to submit a proposal during the annual Spring call. The marine facility will be adapted to, and ruggedized for, the harsh marine environment and will add a scanning two-frequency radar, a boundary-layer wind profiler, a shortwave spectrometer, and aerosol instrumentation adapted to typical marine aerosols like sea salt. Plans also include the use of roving small UAVs, automated small boats, and undersea autonomous vehicles in order to address the point-to-area-average problem which is so crucial for informing climate models. Initial deployments are planned for small islands in climatically- interesting cloud regimes, followed by deployments on oceanic platforms (like decommissioned oil rigs and the quasi-permanent platform of this session's title) and eventually on large ships like car carriers plying routine routes.

  20. Design and Development of Mobile Phone Using Quality Function Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ullah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents design and development of mobile phone using Quality Function Deployment. Quality Function Deployment is one of the total quality management tools used to convert customers’ needs into design specifications. A market survey is conducted to find out the voice of customer. The Voice of the Customer is converted into customers’ needs. Relative importance is assigned to customers’ needs. A list of technical requirements that could fulfill the customers’ needs is produced. A relationship matrix is developed between the customers’ needs and the technical requirements. The relationship matrix is converted into the House of Quality. Output from the House of Quality is used in concept generation of mobile phone. Concept generation is followed by concept selection. Final improved model of the mobile phone is presented.

  1. Supporting Knowledge Transfer in IS Deployment Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönström, Mikael

    To deploy new information systems is an expensive and complex task, and does seldom result in successful usage where the system adds strategic value to the firm (e.g. Sharma et al. 2003). It has been argued that innovation diffusion is a knowledge integration problem (Newell et al. 2000). Knowledge about business processes, deployment processes, information systems and technology are needed in a large-scale deployment of a corporate IS. These deployments can therefore to a large extent be argued to be a knowledge management (KM) problem. An effective deployment requires that knowledge about the system is effectively transferred to the target organization (Ko et al. 2005).

  2. Mobile computing deployment and management real world skills for Comptia Mobility+ certification and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Bartz, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computing skills are becoming standard in the IT industry Mobile Computing Deployment and Management: Real World Skills for CompTIA Mobility+ Certification and Beyond is the ultimate reference for mobile computing. Certified Wireless Network Expert Robert J. Bartz guides IT and networking professionals through the fundamental and advanced concepts of mobile computing, providing the information and instruction necessary to get up to speed on current technology and best practices. The book maps to the CompTIA Mobility+ (MB0-001) exam, making it an ideal resource for those s

  3. Military Families: Child Care Support During Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... temporary caregiver far in advance will make your children feel more secure. Try to have the caregiver connect prior to deployment through visits, phone calls, or social media. If you will be relocating to a family ...

  4. Impact of different cloud deployments on real-time video applications for mobile video cloud users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kashif A.; Wang, Qi; Luo, Chunbo; Wang, Xinheng; Grecos, Christos

    2015-02-01

    The latest trend to access mobile cloud services through wireless network connectivity has amplified globally among both entrepreneurs and home end users. Although existing public cloud service vendors such as Google, Microsoft Azure etc. are providing on-demand cloud services with affordable cost for mobile users, there are still a number of challenges to achieve high-quality mobile cloud based video applications, especially due to the bandwidth-constrained and errorprone mobile network connectivity, which is the communication bottleneck for end-to-end video delivery. In addition, existing accessible clouds networking architectures are different in term of their implementation, services, resources, storage, pricing, support and so on, and these differences have varied impact on the performance of cloud-based real-time video applications. Nevertheless, these challenges and impacts have not been thoroughly investigated in the literature. In our previous work, we have implemented a mobile cloud network model that integrates localized and decentralized cloudlets (mini-clouds) and wireless mesh networks. In this paper, we deploy a real-time framework consisting of various existing Internet cloud networking architectures (Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure and Eucalyptus Cloud) and a cloudlet based on Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud over wireless mesh networking technology for mobile cloud end users. It is noted that the increasing trend to access real-time video streaming over HTTP/HTTPS is gaining popularity among both research and industrial communities to leverage the existing web services and HTTP infrastructure in the Internet. To study the performance under different deployments using different public and private cloud service providers, we employ real-time video streaming over the HTTP/HTTPS standard, and conduct experimental evaluation and in-depth comparative analysis of the impact of different deployments on the quality of service for mobile video cloud users. Empirical

  5. Hydrogen: it's now. Hydrogen, essential today, indispensable tomorrow. Power-to-Gas or how to meet the challenge of electricity storage. To develop hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen production modes and scope of application of the IED directive - Interview. Regulatory evolutions needed for an easier deployment of hydrogen energy technologies for a clean mobility. Support of the Community's policy to hydrogen and to fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauberger, Pascal; Boucly, Philippe; Quint, Aliette; Pierre, Helene; Lucchese, Paul; Bouillon-Delporte, Valerie; Chauvet, Bertrand; Ferrari, Fabio; Boivin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Published by the French Association for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells (AFHYPAC), this document first outlines how hydrogen can reduce our dependence on fossil energies, how it supports the development of electric mobility to reduce CO 2 emissions by transports, how it enables a massive storage of energy as a support to renewable energies deployment and integration, and how hydrogen can be a competitiveness driver. Then two contributions address technical solutions, the first one being Power-to-Gas as a solution to energy storage (integration of renewable energies, a mean for massive storage of electricity, economic conditions making the first deployments feasible, huge social and economical benefits, necessity of creation of an adapted legal and economic framework), and the second one being the development of hydrogen-powered mobility (a major societal concern for air quality, strategies of car manufacturers in the world, necessity of a favourable framework, the situation of recharging infrastructures). Two contributions address the legal framework regarding hydrogen production modes and the scope of application of the European IED directive on industrial emissions, and the needed regulatory evolutions for an easier deployment of Hydrogen-energy technologies for a clean mobility. A last article comments the evolution of the support of European policies to hydrogen and fuel cells through R and d programs, presents the main support program (FCH JU) and its results, other European financing and support policy, and discusses perspectives, notably for possible financing mechanisms

  6. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heather D. Medema; Ronald K. Farris

    2012-09-01

    This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants’ (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making, planning, and preparation of a business case.

  7. An ICMP-Based Mobility Management Approach Suitable for Protocol Deployment Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Yueng Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobility management is one of the important tasks on wireless networks. Many approaches have been proposed in the past, but none of them have been widely deployed so far. Mobile IP (MIP and Route Optimization (ROMIP, respectively, suffer from triangular routing problem and binding cache supporting upon each node on the entire Internet. One step toward a solution is the Mobile Routing Table (MRT, which enables edge routers to take over address binding. However, this approach demands that all the edge routers on the Internet support MRT, resulting in protocol deployment difficulties. To address this problem and to offset the limitation of the original MRT approach, we propose two different schemes, an ICMP echo scheme and an ICMP destination-unreachable scheme. These two schemes work with the MRT to efficiently find MRT-enabled routers that greatly reduce the number of triangular routes. In this paper, we analyze and compare the standard MIP and the proposed approaches. Simulation results have shown that the proposed approaches reduce transmission delay, with only a few routers supporting MRT.

  8. Mechanical deployment system on aries an autonomous mobile robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocheleau, D.N.

    1995-01-01

    ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System) is under development for the Department of Energy (DOE) to survey and inspect drums containing low-level radioactive waste stored in warehouses at DOE facilities. This paper focuses on the mechanical deployment system-referred to as the camera positioning system (CPS)-used in the project. The CPS is used for positioning four identical but separate camera packages consisting of vision cameras and other required sensors such as bar-code readers and light stripe projectors. The CPS is attached to the top of a mobile robot and consists of two mechanisms. The first is a lift mechanism composed of 5 interlocking rail-elements which starts from a retracted position and extends upward to simultaneously position 3 separate camera packages to inspect the top three drums of a column of four drums. The second is a parallelogram special case Grashof four-bar mechanism which is used for positioning a camera package on drums on the floor. Both mechanisms are the subject of this paper, where the lift mechanism is discussed in detail

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2011-11-08

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are beinglhave been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan [1]. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE MOBILE ARM RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (MARS) - 12187

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURKE CA; LANDON MR; HANSON CE

    2012-01-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing and deploying Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) technologies solutions to support retrieval of radioactive and chemical waste from underground single shell storage tanks (SST) located at the Hanford Site, which is near Richland, Washington. WRPS has developed the MARS using a standardized platform that is capable of deploying multiple retrieval technologies. To date, WRPS, working with their mentor-protege company, Columbia Energy and Environmental Services (CEES), has developed two retrieval mechanisms, MARS-Sluicing (MARS-S) and MARS-Vacuum (MARS-V). MARS-S uses pressurized fluids routed through spray nozzles to mobilize waste materials to a centrally located slurry pump (deployed in 2011). MARS-V uses pressurized fluids routed through an eductor nozzle. The eductor nozzle allows a vacuum to be drawn on the waste materials. The vacuum allows the waste materials to be moved to an in-tank vessel, then extracted from the SST and subsequently pumped to newer and safer double shell tanks (DST) for storage until the waste is treated for disposal. The MARS-S system is targeted for sound SSTs (i.e., non leaking tanks). The MARS-V is targeted for assumed leaking tanks or those tanks that are of questionable integrity. Both versions of MARS are being/have been developed in compliance with WRPS's TFC-PLN-90, Technology Development Management Plan. TFC-PLN-90 includes a phased approach to design, testing, and ultimate deployment of new technologies. The MARS-V is scheduled to be deployed in tank 241-C-105 in late 2012.

  11. Heterogeneous Deployment Analysis for Cost-Effective Mobile Network Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coletti, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    network coverage and boosting network capacity in traffic hot-spot areas. The thesis deals with the deployment of both outdoor small cells and indoor femto cells. Amongst the outdoor solution, particular emphasis is put on relay base stations as backhaul costs can be reduced by utilizing LTE spectrum...... statistical models of deployment areas, the performance analysis is carried out in the form of operator case studies for large-scale deployment scenarios, including realistic macro network layouts and inhomogeneous spatial traffic distributions. Deployment of small cells is performed by means of proposed...... heuristic deployment algorithms, which combine network coverage and spatial user density information. As a secondary aspect, deployment solutions achieving the same coverage performance are compared in terms of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO), in order to investigate the viability of different deployment...

  12. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Jebaseeli Samuelraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6 is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node’s mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node’s mobility should be modified to support group nodes’ mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point.

  13. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelraj, Ananthi Jebaseeli; Jayapal, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6) is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node's mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO) in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node's mobility should be modified to support group nodes' mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point.

  14. Problems With Deployment of Multi-Domained, Multi-Homed Mobile Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2008-01-01

    This document describes numerous problems associated with deployment of multi-homed mobile platforms consisting of multiple networks and traversing large geographical areas. The purpose of this document is to provide insight to real-world deployment issues and provide information to groups that are addressing many issues related to multi-homing, policy-base routing, route optimization and mobile security - particularly those groups within the Internet Engineering Task Force.

  15. SUPL support for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narisetty, Jayanthi; Soghoyan, Arpine; Sundaramurthy, Mohanapriya; Akopian, David

    2012-02-01

    Conventional Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers operate well in open-sky environments. But their performance degrades in urban canyons, indoors and underground due to multipath, foliage, dissipation, etc. To overcome such situations, several enhancements have been suggested such as Assisted GPS (A-GPS). Using this approach, orbital parameters including ephemeris and almanac along with reference time and coarse location information are provided to GPS receivers to assist in acquisition of weak signals. To test A-GPS enabled receivers high-end simulators are used, which are not affordable by many academic institutions. This paper presents an economical A-GPS supplement for inexpensive simulators which operates on application layer. Particularly proposed solution is integrated with National Instruments' (NI) GPS Simulation Toolkit and implemented using NI's Labview environment. This A-GPS support works for J2ME and Android platforms. The communication between the simulator and the receiver is in accordance with the Secure User Plane Location (SUPL) protocol encapsulated with Radio Resource Location Protocol (RRLP) applies to Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) and Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) cellular networks.

  16. A Multiobjective Fuzzy Inference System based Deployment Strategy for a Distributed Mobile Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol P. Bhondekar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensor deployment scheme highly governs the effectiveness of distributed wireless sensor network. Issues such as energy conservation and clustering make the deployment problem much more complex. A multiobjective Fuzzy Inference System based strategy for mobile sensor deployment is presented in this paper. This strategy gives a synergistic combination of energy capacity, clustering and peer-to-peer deployment. Performance of our strategy is evaluated in terms of coverage, uniformity, speed and clustering. Our algorithm is compared against a modified distributed self-spreading algorithm to exhibit better performance.

  17. Strategies to facilitate stakeholder and regulator support for technology deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burford, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    Implementation and deployment of new and innovative environmental technologies is impossible without regulator, enduser and stakeholder support. Technologies being developed for different needs require different strategies to facilitate this endorsement. Areas addressed will include technologies developed to meet site specific cleanup needs and those developed for multiple site applications. A third area deals with using site specific technologies at previously unidentified locations. In order to expand the application of these technologies to other sites a plan to include potential site regulators and stakeholders early in the development process should be considered. The Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area has developed a Stakeholder Communication Plan. This plan, in addition to lessons learned from current technology development projects that have successfully obtained this type of support, will provide the basis for the information provided in this paper. The object of this paper is to suggest strategies that could facilitate the implementation and deployment of technologies at environmental sites by involving regulators and stakeholders at the proper time for various applications

  18. Self-deployable mobile sensor networks for on-demand surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lidan; Qi, Hairong; Wang, Feiyi

    2005-05-01

    This paper studies two interconnected problems in mobile sensor network deployment, the optimal placement of heterogeneous mobile sensor platforms for cost-efficient and reliable coverage purposes, and the self-organizable deployment. We first develop an optimal placement algorithm based on a "mosaicked technology" such that different types of mobile sensors form a mosaicked pattern uniquely determined by the popularity of different types of sensor nodes. The initial state is assumed to be random. In order to converge to the optimal state, we investigate the swarm intelligence (SI)-based sensor movement strategy, through which the randomly deployed sensors can self-organize themselves to reach the optimal placement state. The proposed algorithm is compared with the random movement and the centralized method using performance metrics such as network coverage, convergence time, and energy consumption. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the mosaic placement and the SI-based movement.

  19. Mobility support for ubiquitous Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Heijenk, Geert

    2000-01-01

    This document describes an architecture that is providing Internet access to mobile hosts, by allowing them to access this architecture through various access points and using various wireless technologies. In particular, this deliverable focuses on QoS and mobility between various IP subnetworks

  20. NEON's Mobile Deployment Platform: A research tool for integrating ecological processes across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclements, M.

    2016-12-01

    Here we provide an update on construction of the five NEON Mobile Deployment Platforms (MDPs) as well as a description of the infrastructure and sensors available to researchers in the near future. Additionally, we include information (i.e. timelines and procedures) on requesting MDPs for PI led projects. The MDPs will provide the means to observe stochastic or spatially important events, gradients, or quantities that cannot be reliably observed using fixed location sampling (e.g. fires and floods). Due to the transient temporal and spatial nature of such events, the MDPs are designed to accommodate rapid deployment for time periods up to 1 year. Broadly, the MDPs are comprised of infrastructure and instrumentation capable of functioning individually or in conjunction with one another to support observations of ecological change, as well as education, training and outreach. More specifically, the MDPs include the capability to make tower based measures of ecosystem exchange, radiation, and precipitation in conjunction with baseline soils data such as CO2 flux, and soil temperature and moisture. An aquatics module is also available with the MDP to facilitate research integrating terrestrial and aquatic processes. Ultimately, the NEON MDPs provides a tool for linking PI led research to the continental scale data sets collected by NEON.

  1. Separations technologies supporting the development of a deployable ATW system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laidler, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    A program has been initiated for the purpose of developing the chemical separations technologies necessary to support a large Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) system capable of dealing with the projected inventory of spent fuel from the commercial nuclear power stations in the United States. The first several years of the program will be directed toward an elucidation of related technical issues and to the establishment, by means of comprehensive trade studies, of an optimum configuration of the elements of the chemical processing infrastructure required for support of the total ATW system. By adopting this sort of disciplined systems engineering approach, it is expected that development and demonstration costs can be minimized and that it will be possible to deploy an ATW system that is an environmentally sound and economically viable venture

  2. EPRI activities in support of new nuclear plant deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulford, T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the challenges to new plant deployment in the United States and discusses the role of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in efforts to address these challenges. These technical challenges include completing remaining design work, licensing review, and standardization required to ensure that new LWRs are a competitive near-term option. The costs for construction, licensing, and operation of new nuclear plants are uncertain and this uncertainty, along with concerns about construction schedule form a financial challenge to investment. Because the new process for licensing nuclear power plants in the United States has not been fully demonstrated, regulatory concerns also serve as a challenge to near-term commitments to build new nuclear power plants. EPRI is working in concert with utilities and vendors to upgrade certified LWR designs and obtain certification of new LWR designs. Specific technical areas being addressed by EPRI projects include updating the Utility Requirements Document (URD), seismic resolution, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, the development of utility planning tools, and staff optimization. EPRI's key on-going project, the New Plant Deployment Program Model (NPDPM), is designed to help prospective and actual new nuclear plant managers and staff to identify schedule and resource requirements from the point of the decision to build a plant through to the start of commercial operation. This model will describe and organize key activities and assess schedule, activity duration, logic relationships and critical path analysis. The new plant licensing and deployment process is a five to ten year activity representing a significant financial investment that requires coordination with federal and state regulators, designers, architect engineers, and numerous other contributing organizations. Planning is crucial to schedule and budget control. EPRI has also supported projects to quantify the environmental

  3. Virtual instrumentation on mobile devices for deployment in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Marcos Santana; Santos, Isaac Jose A. Luquetti dos; Jesus, Miller F. de; Sant'Anna, Claudio Reis de; Szabo, Andre Pedro; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R. de

    2013-01-01

    The virtual instrumentation can be defined as a layer of software and hardware, added to a general purpose computer, so that users can interact with the computer in the same way that they interacted with traditional electronic instruments such as oscilloscopes, multi-meters and signal generators, and may add other functions defined by software. The virtual instrumentation gets a new integration environment, little explored yet, with the great growth that occurred in the mobile devices area. Nowadays it is possible to take measurements in more places by combining mobile devices with data acquisition hardware to create extremely portable and interconnected measurement systems. This paper shows the development of software and hardware that make possible the use of instrumentation on mobile devices for monitoring nuclear installations. It's presented the hardware and the application software for data acquisition of radiation monitors, developed to iOS devices. It's also shown the possibilities of hardware and software to develop near real-time data transfer to and from the field in nuclear installations, with benefits in efficiency, safety and productivity. (author)

  4. Deploying IPv6 in 3GPP networks evolving mobile broadband from 2G to LTE and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Korhonen, Jouni; Soininen, Jonne

    2013-01-01

    Deploying IPv6 in 3GPP Networks - Evolving Mobile Broadband from 2G to LTE and Beyond  A practical guide enabling mobile operators to deploy IPv6 with confidence The most widely used cellular mobile broadband network technology is based on the 3GPP standards. The history and background of the 3GPP technology is in the Global Mobile Service (GSM) technology and the work done in European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI). This primary voice service network has evolved to be the dominant mobile Internet access technology. Deploying IPv6 in

  5. Method of public support evaluation for advanced NPP deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zezula, L.; Hermansky, B.

    2005-01-01

    Public support of nuclear power could be fully recovered only if the public would, from the very beginning of the new power source selection process, receive transparent information and was made a part of interactive dialogue. The presented method was developed with the objective to facilitate the complex process of the utilities - public interaction. Our method of the public support evaluation allows to classify designs of new nuclear power plants taking into consideration the public attitude to continued nuclear power deployment in the Czech Republic as well as the preference of a certain plant design. The method is based on the model with a set of probabilistic input metrics, which permits to compare the offered concepts with the reference one, with a high degree of objectivity. This method is a part of the more complex evaluation procedure applicable for the new designs assessment that uses the computer code ''Potencial'' developed at the NRI Rez plc. The metrics of the established public support criteria are discussed. (author)

  6. Service platform for rapid development and deployment of context-Aware, mobile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pokraev, S.; Koolwaaij, Johan; van Setten, Mark; Broens, Tom; Dockhorn Costa, Patrícia; Wibbels, Martin; Ebben, Peter; Strating, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a web services-based platform that facilitates and speeds up the development and deployment of context-aware, integrated mobile speech and data applications. The platform is capable of handling different types of context and offers sophisticated personalization mechanisms.

  7. Rule-Based vs. Behavior-Based Self-Deployment for Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales, Cristina; Aguilera, Francisco; González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Sandoval, Francisco

    2016-07-07

    In mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN), nodes are allowed to move autonomously for deployment. This process is meant: (i) to achieve good coverage; and (ii) to distribute the communication load as homogeneously as possible. Rather than optimizing deployment, reactive algorithms are based on a set of rules or behaviors, so nodes can determine when to move. This paper presents an experimental evaluation of both reactive deployment approaches: rule-based and behavior-based ones. Specifically, we compare a backbone dispersion algorithm with a social potential fields algorithm. Most tests are done under simulation for a large number of nodes in environments with and without obstacles. Results are validated using a small robot network in the real world. Our results show that behavior-based deployment tends to provide better coverage and communication balance, especially for a large number of nodes in areas with obstacles.

  8. Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Group, Family Advocacy, Child and Family Behavioral Health, Soldier Readiness Program (SRP), Family Life Chaplain Training Center, Fort Hood Housing ...resilience and child well-being, Soldier and non-deploying parents must successfully meet the challenges of caregiving throughout the deployment cycle ...reintegration program to reduce parenting stress and promote family resilience in Active Duty military families through all phases of the deployment cycle

  9. Efficient Deployment of Key Nodes for Optimal Coverage of Industrial Mobile Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Li, Di; Dong, Zhijie; Hu, Yage; Liu, Chengliang

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, industrial wireless networks (IWNs) have been transformed by the introduction of mobile nodes, and they now offer increased extensibility, mobility, and flexibility. Nevertheless, mobile nodes pose efficiency and reliability challenges. Efficient node deployment and management of channel interference directly affect network system performance, particularly for key node placement in clustered wireless networks. This study analyzes this system model, considering both industrial properties of wireless networks and their mobility. Then, static and mobile node coverage problems are unified and simplified to target coverage problems. We propose a novel strategy for the deployment of clustered heads in grouped industrial mobile wireless networks (IMWNs) based on the improved maximal clique model and the iterative computation of new candidate cluster head positions. The maximal cliques are obtained via a double-layer Tabu search. Each cluster head updates its new position via an improved virtual force while moving with full coverage to find the minimal inter-cluster interference. Finally, we develop a simulation environment. The simulation results, based on a performance comparison, show the efficacy of the proposed strategies and their superiority over current approaches. PMID:29439439

  10. Efficient Deployment of Key Nodes for Optimal Coverage of Industrial Mobile Wireless Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Li, Di; Dong, Zhijie; Hu, Yage; Liu, Chengliang

    2018-02-10

    In recent years, industrial wireless networks (IWNs) have been transformed by the introduction of mobile nodes, and they now offer increased extensibility, mobility, and flexibility. Nevertheless, mobile nodes pose efficiency and reliability challenges. Efficient node deployment and management of channel interference directly affect network system performance, particularly for key node placement in clustered wireless networks. This study analyzes this system model, considering both industrial properties of wireless networks and their mobility. Then, static and mobile node coverage problems are unified and simplified to target coverage problems. We propose a novel strategy for the deployment of clustered heads in grouped industrial mobile wireless networks (IMWNs) based on the improved maximal clique model and the iterative computation of new candidate cluster head positions. The maximal cliques are obtained via a double-layer Tabu search. Each cluster head updates its new position via an improved virtual force while moving with full coverage to find the minimal inter-cluster interference. Finally, we develop a simulation environment. The simulation results, based on a performance comparison, show the efficacy of the proposed strategies and their superiority over current approaches.

  11. Keeping engaged during deployment : The interplay between self-efficacy, family support, and threat exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delahaij, R.; Kamphuis, W.; Berg, C.E. van den

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the importance of 2 resilience resources for service members’ ability to deal with threat during deployment. Military self-efficacy and family support were measured before deployment and related to work engagement and burnout levels of service members during deployment. We

  12. Development and deployment of a Desktop and Mobile application on grid for GPS studie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntumba, Patient; Lotoy, Vianney; Djungu, Saint Jean; Fleury, Rolland; Petitdidier, Monique; Gemünd, André; Schwichtenberg, Horst

    2013-04-01

    GPS networks for scientific studies are developed all other the world and large databases, regularly updated, like IGS are also available. Many GPS have been installed in West and Central Africa during AMMA (African Monsoon Multiplidisciplinary Analysis), IHY (International heliophysical Year)and many other projects since 2005. African scientists have been educated to use those data especially for meteorological and ionospheric studies. The annual variations of ionospheric parameters for a given station or map of a given region are very intensive computing. Then grid or cloud computing may be a solution to obtain results in a relatively short time. Real time At the University of Kinshasa the chosen solution is a grid of several PCs. It has been deployed by using Globus Toolkit on a Condor pool in order to support the processing of GPS data for ionospheric studies. To be user-friendly, graphical user interfaces(GUI) have been developed to help the user to prepare and submit jobs. One is a java GUI for desktop client, the other is an Android GUI for mobile client. The interest of a grid is the possibility to send a bunch of jobs with an adequate agent control in order to survey the job execution and result storage. After the feasibility study the grid will be extended to a larger number of PCs. Other solutions will be in parallel explored.

  13. MOBILE PHONE APPLICATION TO SUPPORT THE ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Panou

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant increase of the elderly population worldwide, which is accompanied with a rise of the number of people living alone. Moreover, many citizens are at risk due to geographic and social isolation in combination with specific chronic conditions. ICT offers new opportunities in the healthcare area, therefore, within the REMOTE research project, several services have been developed and interconnected (targeted at patients with chronic diseases available on Symbian OS mobile platforms and computers. This paper presents the Guardian Angel service on the mobile phone, in order to monitor (unobtrusively the health of the user on the move and alert the medical centre in case of an emergency. The prototype has been evaluated by 30 elderly users and 5 experts, indicating a possible deployment of the application in the healthcare market, but also proposing further improvements for increased usability.

  14. Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment Lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS) Conference. Chicago, IL. 2. Kritikos*, T.K. & DeVoe, E.R. Relationship quality of recently deployed military...prevention and family orientation of the study . We continue to have impact on multiple disciplinary areas, including social work, psychology , and public...resilience in Active Duty military families through all phases of the deployment cycle. The study will be conducted in three phases. In phase 1

  15. The Determinants of the Global Mobile Telephone Deployment: An Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Taher ABU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the global mobile phones by examining the instruments stimulating the diffusion pattern. A rigorous demand model is estimated using global mobile telecommu-nications panel dataset comprised with 51 countries classified in order to World Bank income categories from 1990-2007. In particular, the paper examines what factors contribute the most to the deployment of global mobile telephones. To construct an econometric model, the number of subscribers to mobile phone per 100 inhabitants is taken as dependent variable, while the following groups of variables (1 GDP per capita income and charges, (2 competition policies (3 telecom infrastructure (4 technological innovations (5 others are selected as independent variables. Estimation results report the presence of substantial disparity among groups. Additionally GDP per capita income and own-price elasticity comprised with call rate, subscription charges, are reported. The analysis of impulse responses for price, competition policies, and technological innovations such as digitalization of mobile network, mobile network coverage indicates that substantial mobile telephone growth is yet to be realized especially in developing countries. A new and important empirical finding is that there are still many opportunities available for mobile phone development in the world pro-poor nations by providing better telecom infrastructure.

  16. Efficient Mobile Client Caching Supporting Transaction Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IlYoung Chung

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available In mobile client-server database systems, caching of frequently accessed data is an important technique that will reduce the contention on the narrow bandwidth wireless channel. As the server in mobile environments may not have any information about the state of its clients' cache(stateless server, using broadcasting approach to transmit the updated data lists to numerous concurrent mobile clients is an attractive approach. In this paper, a caching policy is proposed to maintain cache consistency for mobile computers. The proposed protocol adopts asynchronous(non-periodic broadcasting as the cache invalidation scheme, and supports transaction semantics in mobile environments. With the asynchronous broadcasting approach, the proposed protocol can improve the throughput by reducing the abortion of transactions with low communication costs. We study the performance of the protocol by means of simulation experiments.

  17. Exploiting the oil-GDP effect to support renewables deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awerbuch, Shimon; Sauter, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    The empirical evidence from a growing body of academic literature clearly suggests that oil price increases and volatility dampen macroeconomic growth by raising inflation and unemployment and by depressing the value of financial and other assets. Surprisingly, this issue seems to have received little attention from energy policy makers. In percentage terms, the oil-GDP effect is relatively small, producing losses in the order of 0.5% of GDP for a 10% oil price increase. In absolute terms however, even a 10% oil price rise-oil has risen at least 50% in the last year alone-produces GDP losses that, could they have been averted, would significantly offset the cost of increased RE deployment. This paper draws on the empirical oil-GDP literature, which we summarize, to show that (i) by displacing gas and oil, renewable energy investments can help nations avoid costly macroeconomic losses produced by the oil-GDP effect and (ii) that these avoided losses represent a significant external macroeconomic benefit of such investments. We show that a 10% increase in RE share avoids GDP losses in the range of $29-$53 billion in the US and the EU ($49-$90 billion for OECD). These avoided losses offset one-fifth of the RE investment needs projected by the EREC and half the OECD investment projected by a G-8 Task Force. For the US, the figures further suggest that each additional kW of renewables, on average, avoids $250-$450 in GDP losses, a figure that varies across technologies as a function of annual capacity factors. We approximate that the offset is worth $200/kW for wind and solar and $800/kW for geothermal and biomass. While we focus only on renewables, the GDP offset will apply in some measure to other non-fossil technologies including energy efficiency, DSM and nuclear. The societal valuation of non-fossil alternatives must reflect these avoided GDP losses, whose benefit is not fully captured by private investors. This said, we fully recognize that wealth created in this

  18. Exploiting the oil-GDP effect to support renewables deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awerbuch, S.; Sauter, R.

    2006-01-01

    The empirical evidence from a growing body of academic literature clearly suggests that oil price increases and volatility dampen macroeconomic growth by raising inflation and unemployment and by depressing the value of financial and other assets. Surprisingly, this issue seems to have received little attention from energy policy makers. In percentage terms, the oil-GDP effect is relatively small, producing losses in the order of 0.5% of GDP for a 10% oil price increase. In absolute terms however, even a 10% oil price rise-oil has risen at least 50% in the last year alone-produces GDP losses that, could they have been averted, would significantly offset the cost of increased RE deployment. This paper draws on the empirical oil-GDP literature, which we summarize, to show that (i) by displacing gas and oil, renewable energy investments can help nations avoid costly macroeconomic losses produced by the oil-GDP effect and, (ii) that these avoided losses represent a significant external macroeconomic benefit of such investments. We show that a 10% increase in RE share avoids GDP losses in the range of $29-$53 billion in the US and the EU ($49-$90 billion for OECD). These avoided losses offset one-fifth of the RE investment needs projected by the EREC and half the OECD investment projected by a G-8 Task Force. For the US, the figures further suggest that each additional kW of renewables, on average, avoids $250-$450 in GDP losses, a figure that varies across technologies as a function of annual capacity factors. We approximate that the offset is worth $200/kW for wind and solar and $800/kW for geothermal and biomass. While we focus only on renewables, the GDP offset will apply in some measure to other non-fossil technologies including energy efficiency, DSM and nuclear. The societal valuation of non-fossil alternatives must reflect these avoided GDP losses, whose benefit is not fully captured by private investors. This said, we fully recognize that wealth created in this

  19. Supporting Children Facing the Deployment of a Parent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahill, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    As the cycle of deployments to war zones by military service members and other federal government employees continue, school psychologists likely have encountered or will encounter children in their schools who have been dealing with an absence of a parent for extended periods of time. While some school psychologists who live and work near major…

  20. Connected Vehicle Pilot Deployment Program Independent Evaluation: Mobility, Environmental, and Public Agency Efficiency Refined Evaluation Plan - New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a refined evaluation plan detailing the approach to be used by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute Connected Vehicle Pilot Deployment Evaluation Team for evaluating the mobility, environmental, and public a...

  1. Supporting Micro-services Deployment in a Safer Way: a Static Analysis and Automated Rewriting Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Benni , Benjamin; Mosser , Sébastien; Collet , Philippe; Riveill , Michel

    2018-01-01

    International audience; The SOA ecosystem has drastically evolved since its childhood in the early 2000s. From monolithic services, micro–services now cooperate together in ultra-large scale systems. In this context, there is a tremendous need to deploy frequently new services, or new version of existing services. Container–based technologies (e.g., Docker) emerged recently to tool such deployments, promoting a black-box reuse mechanism to support off-the-shelf deployments. Unfortunately, fro...

  2. Policies to Support Wind Power Deployment: Key Considerations and Good Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Baring-Gould, Ian [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Oteri, Frank A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Esterly, Sean [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Forsyth, Trudy [Wind Advisors Team, Golden, CO (United States); Baranowski, Ruth [High Desert Technical Communications LLC, Crestone, CO (United States)

    2015-05-19

    Policies have played an important role in scaling up wind deployment and increasing its economic viability while also supporting country-specific economic, social, and environmental development goals. Although wind power has become cost-competitive in several contexts, challenges to wind power deployment remain. Within the context of country-specific goals and challenges, policymakers are seeking

  3. Mobile Contextualized learning games for decision support training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland

    2014-01-01

    This interactive workshop session introduces mobile serious games as situated, contextualized learning games. Example cases for mobile serious games for decision support training are introduced and discussed. Participants will get to know contextualization techniques used in modern mobile devices

  4. Mobile Contextualized learning games for decision support training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Börner, Dirk; Suarez, Angel; Schneider, Jan; Antonaci, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    This interactive workshop session introduces mobile serious games as situated, contextualized learning games. Example cases for mobile serious games for decision support training are introduced and discussed. Participants will get to know contextualization techniques used in modern mobile

  5. Creation and Global Deployment of a Mobile, Application-Based Cognitive Simulator for Cardiac Surgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Zachary E; Ogden, William David; Fann, James I; Burdon, Thomas A; Sheikh, Ahmad Y

    Several modern learning frameworks (eg, cognitive apprenticeship, anchored instruction, and situated cognition) posit the utility of nontraditional methods for effective experiential learning. Thus, development of novel educational tools emphasizing the cognitive framework of operative sequences may be of benefit to surgical trainees. We propose the development and global deployment of an effective, mobile cognitive cardiac surgical simulator. In methods, 16 preclinical medical students were assessed. Overall, 4 separate surgical modules (sternotomy, cannulation, decannulation, and sternal closure) were created utilizing the Touch Surgery (London, UK) platform. Modules were made available to download free of charge for use on mobile devices. Usage data were collected over a 6-month period. Educational efficacy of the modules was evaluated by randomizing a cohort of medical students to either module usage or traditional, reading-based self-study, followed by a multiple-choice learning assessment tool. In results, downloads of the simulator achieved global penetrance, with highest usage in the USA, Brazil, Italy, UK, and India. Overall, 5368 unique users conducted a total of 1971 hours of simulation. Evaluation of the medical student cohort revealed significantly higher assessment scores in those randomized to module use versus traditional reading (75% ± 9% vs 61% ± 7%, respectively; P < 0.05). In conclusion, this study represents the first effort to create a mobile, interactive cognitive simulator for cardiac surgery. Simulators of this type may be effective for the training and assessment of surgical students. We investigated whether an interactive, mobile-computing-based cognitive task simulator for cardiac surgery could be developed, deployed, and validated. Our findings suggest that such simulators may be a useful learning tool. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM Mobile Facility Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; hide

    2015-01-01

    Capsule: A 21-month deployment to Graciosa Island in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean is providing an unprecedented record of the clouds, aerosols and meteorology in a poorly-sampled remote marine environment The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009- December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1- 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a

  7. Mobile/Modular Deployment Project-Enhancing Efficiencies within the National Transuranic Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Basabilvazo, G.B.; Countiss, S.; Moody, D.C.; Behrens, R.G.; Lott, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, the National Transuranic (TRU) Waste Program (NTP) achieved two significant milestones. First, the Waste Isolation Plant (WIPP) opened in March for the permanent disposal of TRU waste generated by, and temporarily stored at, various sites supporting the nation's defense programs. Second, the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, issued by the New Mexico Environment Department, for WIPP became effective in November. While the opening of WIPP brought to closure a number of scientific, engineering, regulatory, and political challenges, achieving this major milestone led to a new set of challenges-how to achieve the Department of Energy's (DOE's) NTP end-state vision: All TRU waste from DOE sites scheduled for closure is removed All legacy TRU waste from DOE sites with an ongoing nuclear mission is disposed 0 All newly generated TRU waste is disposed as it is generated The goal is to operate the national TRU waste program safely, cost effectively, in compliance with applicable regulations and agreements, and at full capacity in a fully integrated mode. The existing schedule for TRU waste disposition would achieve the NTP vision in 2034 at an estimated life-cycle cost of $16B. The DOE's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) seeks to achieve this vision early-by at least 10 years- while saving the nation an estimated $48 to $6B. CBFO's approach is to optimize, or to make as functional as possible, TRU waste disposition. That is, to remove barriers that impede waste disposition, and increase the rate and cost efficiency of waste disposal at WIPP, while maintaining safety. The Mobile/Modular Deployment Project (MMDP) is the principal vehicle for implementing DOE's new commercial model of using best business practices of national authorization basis, standardization, and economies of scale to accelerate the completion of WIPP's mission. The MMDP is one of the cornerstones of the National TRU Waste System Optimization Project (1). The objective of the MMDP is to increase TRU

  8. USDA Research in Support of Deployed Military Troops

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US Department of Agriculture has a long history of collaborating with the US military to conduct research in support of war efforts. The predecessor laboratory of the current USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) located in Gainesville, Florida has a history...

  9. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An Arm Mobile Facility Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Rémillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O’Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-03-01

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) 38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009-December 2010) 39 comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric 40 Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is 41 to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the 42 marine boundary layer. 43 Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the 44 Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and 45 cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus 46 occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar 47 echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-48 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide 49 range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of 50 sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way 51 interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation 52 and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. 53 The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety 54 of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they 55 reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, 56 but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to 57 be a long-term ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  10. Environmental feasibility study for deployment and construction of mobile gas turbine power plants in urbanized areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryukhan Fedor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the view of current electrical shortage in some regions of Russia, mobile gas turbine power plants (MGTPP have become urgent in recent years. Usually they are used as back-up power sources to cover peak loads in power networks and to ensure uninterrupted power supply to consumers. This paper deals with environmental feasibility study for deployment and construction of the MGTPP in an urban setting. Technogehic factors of the MGTPP impact on the environment have been assessed and possibility of the MGTPP deployment at various sites in different regions of Russia has been identified. The necessity of using the technology of water injection into the gas turbine units combustion chamber to suppress nitrogen oxides in some cases is mentioned. Quantitative assessments of the MGTPP technogehic impact on the environment components have been performed using standard techniques. The calculations have revealed that the MGTPP specifications ensure the levels of technogehic impacts within the standard limits. The results have ensured preparation of pre-design and design documentation related to protection of the environment against the MGTPP complex technogehic impact.

  11. High-Temperature Superconductors as Electromagnetic Deployment and Support Structures in Spacecraft. [NASA NIAC Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getliffe, Gwendolyn V.; Inamdar, Niraj K.; Masterson, Rebecca; Miller, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This report, concluding a one-year NIAC Phase I study, describes a new structural and mechanical technique aimed at reducing the mass and increasing the deployed-to-stowed length and volume ratios of spacecraft systems. This technique uses the magnetic fields generated by electrical current passing through coils of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) to support spacecraft structures and deploy them to operational configurations from their stowed positions inside a launch vehicle fairing.

  12. Evolution towards a Cloud Deployed Business Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan DRAGAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although less known outside strictly specialized environments, Business Support Systems (BSS are highly complex and the subject of their installation in cloud implementations is less addressed. This paper presents a short history of BSS evolution, starting from basic voice and messaging services and ending up to 4G and M2M services, presenting new features and their new challenges. Moreover, we present, as a baseline for future developments, a study based on direct interviews with representatives of telecom operators about their vision of possible future BSS solutions depending on the services they will provide. This area of investigation has a certain number of challenges that require collaboration between providers and operators; in this context, we have been established a framework of requirements which will be handled and studied individually.

  13. Deployment-related mental health support: comparative analysis of NATO and allied ISAF partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Vermetten

    2014-08-01

    members. Conclusion: This analysis demonstrated that in all five partners state-of-the-art preventative mental healthcare was included in the last deployment in Afghanistan, including a positive approach towards strengthening the mental resilience, a focus on self-regulatory skills and self-empowerment, and several initiatives that were well-integrated in a military context. These initiatives were partly/completely implemented by the military/colleagues/supervisors and applicable during several phases of the deployment cycle. Important new developments in operational mental health support are recognition of the role of social leadership and enhancement of operational peer support. This requires awareness of mental problems that will contribute to reduction of the barriers to care in case of problems. Finally, comparing mental health support services across countries can contribute to optimal preparation for the challenges of military deployment.

  14. Deployment of military mothers: supportive and nonsupportive military programs, processes, and policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Petra; Turner, Annette; Agazio, Janice; Throop, Meryia; Padden, Diane; Greiner, Shawna; Hillier, Shannon L

    2013-07-01

    Military mothers and their children cope with unique issues when mothers are deployed. In this article, we present mothers' perspectives on how military resources affected them, their children, and their caregivers during deployment. Mothers described beneficial features of military programs such as family readiness groups and behavioral health care, processes such as unit support, and policies on length and timing of deployments. Aspects that were not supportive included inflexibility in family care plans, using personal leave time and funds for transporting children, denial of release to resolve caretaker issues, and limited time for reintegration. We offer recommendations for enhanced support to these families that the military could provide. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. The Value of Privacy and Surveillance Drones in the Public Domain : Scrutinizing the Dutch Flexible Deployment of Mobile Cameras Act

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerdo Kuiper; Quirine Eijkman

    2017-01-01

    The flexible deployment of drones in the public domain, is in this article assessed from a legal philosophical perspective. On the basis of theories of Dworkin and Moore the distinction between individual rights and collective security policy goals is discussed. Mobile cameras in the public domain

  16. An Energy-Efficient Secure Routing and Key Management Scheme for Mobile Sinks in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Deployment Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Xuan Hung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available For many sensor network applications such as military or homeland security, it is essential for users (sinks to access the sensor network while they are moving. Sink mobility brings new challenges to secure routing in large-scale sensor networks. Previous studies on sink mobility have mainly focused on efficiency and effectiveness of data dissemination without security consideration. Also, studies and experiences have shown that considering security during design time is the best way to provide security for sensor network routing. This paper presents an energy-efficient secure routing and key management for mobile sinks in sensor networks, called SCODEplus. It is a significant extension of our previous study in five aspects: (1 Key management scheme and routing protocol are considered during design time to increase security and efficiency; (2 The network topology is organized in a hexagonal plane which supports more efficiency than previous square-grid topology; (3 The key management scheme can eliminate the impacts of node compromise attacks on links between non-compromised nodes; (4 Sensor node deployment is based on Gaussian distribution which is more realistic than uniform distribution; (5 No GPS or like is required to provide sensor node location information. Our security analysis demonstrates that the proposed scheme can defend against common attacks in sensor networks including node compromise attacks, replay attacks, selective forwarding attacks, sinkhole and wormhole, Sybil attacks, HELLO flood attacks. Both mathematical and simulation-based performance evaluation show that the SCODEplus significantly reduces the communication overhead, energy consumption, packet delivery latency while it always delivers more than 97 percent of packets successfully.

  17. E-mobility: European Energy and Transport Policies at cross-roads. The challenge of infrastructure deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure Schuyer, Aurelie

    2016-01-01

    European clean transport policy envisages the development of charging infrastructures for electric vehicles within a European e-mobility framework. After the downturns of the Volkswagen scandal and the prevailing low European carbon price, the EU is bringing forward car passenger transport electrification. This requires new business models based on inter-operability. In supporting the objective of deployment of 8 million electric vehicles in 2020 and ensuring e-mobility services throughout the European Union (EU), the European strategy for low-emission mobility reminds Member States of their obligation to install publicly accessible infrastructures for electric vehicles by the end of the decade, as defined in Directive 2014/94. The strategy points towards an extension beyond the 2020 horizon of low-emission policies not only in car transportation, but also in goods transport (lorries), in public passenger transport (buses), and international aviation. It comes in the context of two major policy downturns. First, the Volkswagen scandal last October 2015 put a blow on the European cars manufacturing industry, as much as on the EU's oversight role in car emissions standards. Second, the sustained low prevailing carbon price is signaling that no emission abatement is taking place in the EU carbon market (European Emission Trading Scheme) covering power plants and industrial facilities. In car passenger transport, emissions can indeed be abated with electric vehicle, if the underlying system from which electricity is drawn is de-carbonized. As part of the Clean Power Transport Package, the European Strategy for low-emission mobility leans upon the Directive 2014/94 on Alternative Fuels Infrastructure, which requires Member States to roll out an infrastructure connecting electric vehicles (EVs). However, it is not giving any additional requirements for natural gas vehicle nor hydrogen-based vehicles (fuel cells). Among all forms of low emission vehicles (EVs, Compressed

  18. Remote mobile communication in safety support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Kanji; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Hatanaka, Takahiro; Sakuma, Akira; Fukumoto, Akira; Ikeda, Jun

    1999-01-01

    Safety Support System (SSS) is a computerized operator support system for nuclear power plants, which is now under development. The concept of SSS covers 1) earlier detection of failure symptom and prediction of its influence to the plant operation, 2) improved transparency and robustness of plant control systems, 3) advanced human-machine interface and communication. The authors have been working on the third concept and proposed a remote mobile communication system called Plant Communication System (PCS). PCS aims to realize convenient communication between main control room and other areas such as plant local areas and site offices, using Personal Handyphone System (PHS) and wireless LAN (Local Area Network). PCS can transmit not only data but also graphic displays and dynamic video displays between the main control room and plant local areas. MPEG4 (Moving Picture Experts Group 4) technology is utilized in video data compression and decompression. The authors have developed the special multiplexing unit that connects PHS Cell Stations (CSs) and exiting coaxial cables. Voice recognition and announcement capability is also realized in the system, which enables verbal retrieval of information in the computer systems in the main control room from local areas. (author)

  19. Mobile 3D Viewer Supporting RFID System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J J; Yang, S W; Choi, Y [Chungang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    As hardware capabilities of mobile devices are being rapidly enhanced, applications based upon mobile devices are also being developed in wider areas. In this paper, a prototype mobile 3D viewer with the object identification through RFID system is presented. To visualize 3D engineering data such as CAD data, we need a process to compute triangulated data from boundary based surface like B-rep solid or trimmed surfaces. Since existing rendering engines on mobile devices do not provide triangulation capability, mobile 3D programs have focused only on an efficient handling with pre-tessellated geometry. We have developed a light and fast triangulation process based on constrained Delaunay triangulation suitable for mobile devices in the previous research. This triangulation software is used as a core for the mobile 3D viewer on a PDA with RFID system that may have potentially wide applications in many areas.

  20. Mobile 3D Viewer Supporting RFID System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. J.; Yang, S. W.; Choi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    As hardware capabilities of mobile devices are being rapidly enhanced, applications based upon mobile devices are also being developed in wider areas. In this paper, a prototype mobile 3D viewer with the object identification through RFID system is presented. To visualize 3D engineering data such as CAD data, we need a process to compute triangulated data from boundary based surface like B-rep solid or trimmed surfaces. Since existing rendering engines on mobile devices do not provide triangulation capability, mobile 3D programs have focused only on an efficient handling with pre-tessellated geometry. We have developed a light and fast triangulation process based on constrained Delaunay triangulation suitable for mobile devices in the previous research. This triangulation software is used as a core for the mobile 3D viewer on a PDA with RFID system that may have potentially wide applications in many areas

  1. Research on knowledge support technology for product innovation design based on quality function knowledge deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of the relationship between the process of product innovation design and knowledge, this article proposes a theoretical model of quality function knowledge deployment. In order to link up the product innovation design and the knowledge required by the designer, the iterative method of quality function knowledge deployment is refined, as well as the knowledge retrieval model and knowledge support model based on quality function knowledge deployment are established. In the whole life cycle of product design, in view of the different requirements for knowledge in conceptual design stage, components’ configuration stage, process planning stage, and production planning stage, the quality function knowledge deployment model could link up the required knowledge with the engineering characteristics, component characteristics, process characteristics, and production characteristics in the four stages using the mapping relationship between the function characteristics and the knowledge and help the designer to track the required knowledge for realizing product innovation design. In this article, an instance about rewinding machine is given to demonstrate the practicability and validity of product innovation design knowledge support technology based on quality function knowledge deployment.

  2. Promoting parenting to support reintegrating military families: after deployment, adaptive parenting tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; Pinna, Keri L M; Hanson, Sheila K; Brockberg, Dustin

    2014-02-01

    The high operational tempo of the current conflicts and the unprecedented reliance on National Guard and Reserve forces highlights the need for services to promote reintegration efforts for those transitioning back to civilian family life. Despite evidence that parenting has significant influence on children's functioning, and that parenting may be impaired during stressful family transitions, there is a dearth of empirically supported psychological interventions tailored for military families reintegrating after deployment. This article reports on the modification of an empirically supported parenting intervention for families in which a parent has deployed to war. A theoretical rationale for addressing parenting during reintegration after deployment is discussed. We describe the intervention, After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT), and report early feasibility and acceptability data from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial of ADAPT, a 14-week group-based, Web-enhanced parenting training program. Among the first 42 families assigned to the intervention group, participation rates were high, and equal among mothers and fathers. Satisfaction was high across all 14 sessions. Implications for psychological services to military families dealing with the deployment process are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Development of urban solar infrastructure to support low-carbon mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Joan-Manuel F.; Sanyé-Mengual, Esther; Angrill, Sara; García-Lozano, Raúl; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Josa, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The provision of an adequate network of urban infrastructures is essential to create clean and energy-efficient urban mobility systems. However, the urban infrastructure to support sustainable mobility can produce a substantial environmental burden if no life cycle environmental criteria are applied in its design and management. This paper demonstrates the potential to support energy-efficient and CO 2 -free pedestrian and electric bike (e-bike) mobility through the ecological design (eco-design) of urban elements. An eco-design approach is applied to reconceptualize a conventional pergola toward an eco-product (solar pergola). The solar pergola generates surplus photovoltaic electricity that provides a multifunctional character. According to the end-use of this energy, different scenarios are analyzed for robust decision-making. The deployment of solar pergolas can contribute to save from 2,080 kg to over 47,185 kg of CO 2 eq. and from 350,390 MJ to over 692,760 MJ eq. in 10 years, depending on the geographic emplacement (solar radiation and electricity grid system). These savings are equivalent to charging 2–9 e-bikes per day using clean energy. Instead of maximizing infrastructure deployment to shift to environmentally friendly modes of mobility, the implementation of multifunctional urban elements represents a key area of action in the context of smart city development. -- Highlights: •Infrastructure eco-design is key to mitigate environmental impacts of urban mobility. •Solar pergolas can support pedestrian and e-bike mobility with no environmental cost. •Over 47 tons of CO 2 and 692 GJ can be avoided in 10 years per implemented pergola. •Each pergola can support daily charging of 2–9 e-bikes by supplying clean energy. •Multifunctional infrastructure is key to support sustainable multimodal mobility

  4. Designing, developing, and deploying systems to support human-robot teams in disaster response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, G.J.M.; Kruijff-Korbayová, I.; Keshavdas, S.; Larochelle, B.; Janíček, M.; Colas, F.; Liu, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Siegwart, R.; Neerincx, M.A.; Looije, R.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Mioch, T.; Diggelen, J. van; Pirri, F.; Gianni, M.; Ferri, F.; Menna, M.; Worst, R.; Linder, T.; Tretyakov, V.; Surmann, H.; Svoboda, T.; Reinštein, M.; Zimmermann, K.; Petříček, T.; Hlaváč, V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes our experience in designing, developing and deploying systems for supporting human-robot teams during disaster response. It is based on R&D performed in the EU-funded project NIFTi. NIFTi aimed at building intelligent, collaborative robots that could work together with humans in

  5. Mobile Affordances and Learning Theories in Supporting and Enhancing Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Kathryn; Day, Stephanie; Skelton, David; Verhaart, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Mobile technology promises to enhance and better support students' learning. The exploration and adoption of appropriate pedagogies that enhance learning is crucial for the wider adoption of mobile learning. An increasing number of studies have started to address how existing learning theory can be used to underpin and better frame mobile learning…

  6. Do Military Peacekeepers Want to Talk about Their Experiences? Perceived Psychological Support of UK Military Peacekeepers on Return from Deployment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenberg, Neil

    2006-01-01

    ...: To investigate the perceived psychological support requirements for service personnel on peacekeeping deployments when they return home from operations and examine their views on the requirement...

  7. Deployment Experiences of British Army Wives Before, During and After Deployment: Satisfaction with Military Life and Use of Support Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandeker, Christopher; French, Claire; Birtles, Catherine; Wessely, S

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: During deployments, Service wives have to adapt to being alone and taking sole responsibility for their families and house-holds whilst dealing with the additional stress about whether their loved ones will return...

  8. Assessment of a Post-deployment Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program for National Guard Members and Supporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Jeffrey F.; Widner, Greg; Shroff, Manan; Matthieu, Monica; Balan, Sundari; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; Price, Rumi Kato

    2014-01-01

    The Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program (YRRP) was created to meet the needs of National Guard members and their families throughout the deployment cycle. This study examined the perceived utility of the YRRP’s delivery of information and assistance during the post-deployment reintegration period by National Guard members and accompanying supporters who were mostly spouses. Over 22 months, from 10 YRRP events, 683 service members and 411 supporters completed questionnaires immediately after the YRRP. We analyzed questions on information and help provision, timeliness and concerns related to education, employment, legal, family, and health. Service members and supporters most often endorsed education needs being met (76.8% and 78.2% respectively) and were least likely to endorse legal needs being met (63.5% and 60% respectively). Significantly more supporters than service members (p family. Results suggest the YRRP fills gaps in supporter knowledge and provides needed information and resources to most National Guard families 2-4 months after a deployment. PMID:25373071

  9. Gender differences among veterans deployed in support of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Amy E; Gradus, Jaimie L; Giasson, Hannah L; Vogt, Dawne; Resick, Patricia A

    2013-07-01

    The changing scope of women's roles in combat operations has led to growing interest in women's deployment experiences and post-deployment adjustment. To quantify the gender-specific frequency of deployment stressors, including sexual and non-sexual harassment, lack of social support and combat exposure. To quantify gender-specific post-deployment mental health conditions and associations between deployment stressors and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), to inform the care of Veterans returning from the current conflicts. National mail survey of OEF/OIF Veterans randomly sampled within gender, with women oversampled. The community. In total, 1,207 female and 1,137 male Veterans from a roster of all Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Veterans. Response rate was 48.6 %. Deployment stressors (including combat and harassment stress), PTSD, depression, anxiety and alcohol use, all measured via self-report. Women were more likely to report sexual harassment (OR = 8.7, 95% CI: 6.9, 11) but less likely to report combat (OR = 0.62, 95 % CI: 0.50, 0.76). Women and men were equally likely to report symptoms consistent with probable PTSD (OR = 0.87, 95 % CI: 0.70, 1.1) and symptomatic anxiety (OR = 1.1, 9 5% CI: 0.86, 1.3). Women were more likely to report probable depression (OR = 1.3, 95 % CI: 1.1, 1.6) and less likely to report problematic alcohol use (OR = 0.59, 9 5% CI: 0.47, 0.72). With a five-point change in harassment stress, adjusted odds ratios for PTSD were 1.36 (95 % CI: 1.23, 1.52) for women and 1.38 (95 % CI: 1.19, 1.61) for men. The analogous associations between combat stress and PTSD were 1.31 (95 % CI: 1.24, 1.39) and 1.31 (95 % CI: 1.26, 1.36), respectively. Although there are important gender differences in deployment stressors-including women's increased risk of interpersonal stressors-and post-deployment adjustment, there are also significant similarities. The post-deployment adjustment of our nation's growing population of

  10. A Social Potential Fields Approach for Self-Deployment and Self-Healing in Hierarchical Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva González-Parada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous mobile nodes in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN allow self-deployment and self-healing. In both cases, the goals are: (i to achieve adequate coverage; and (ii to extend network life. In dynamic environments, nodes may use reactive algorithms so that each node locally decides when and where to move. This paper presents a behavior-based deployment and self-healing algorithm based on the social potential fields algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, nodes are attached to low cost robots to autonomously navigate in the coverage area. The proposed algorithm has been tested in environments with and without obstacles. Our study also analyzes the differences between non-hierarchical and hierarchical routing configurations in terms of network life and coverage.

  11. A Social Potential Fields Approach for Self-Deployment and Self-Healing in Hierarchical Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Parada, Eva; Cano-García, Jose; Aguilera, Francisco; Sandoval, Francisco; Urdiales, Cristina

    2017-01-09

    Autonomous mobile nodes in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN) allow self-deployment and self-healing. In both cases, the goals are: (i) to achieve adequate coverage; and (ii) to extend network life. In dynamic environments, nodes may use reactive algorithms so that each node locally decides when and where to move. This paper presents a behavior-based deployment and self-healing algorithm based on the social potential fields algorithm. In the proposed algorithm, nodes are attached to low cost robots to autonomously navigate in the coverage area. The proposed algorithm has been tested in environments with and without obstacles. Our study also analyzes the differences between non-hierarchical and hierarchical routing configurations in terms of network life and coverage.

  12. MOIDSS?- Mobile Online Intelligent Decision Support System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — GRID has had a successfully completed Phase I 'Mobile Online Intelligent Decision Support System' (MOIDSS). The system developed into a total solution that supports...

  13. Mobile Apps to Support and Assess Foreign Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Anke; Palomo-Duarte, Manuel; Dodero, Juan Manuel; Ruiz-Ladrón, Juan Miguel; Márquez, Andrea Calderón

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades there have been many attempts to integrate all kinds of mobile devices and apps to support formal as well as informal learning processes. However, most of the available apps still support mainly individual learning, using mobile devices to deliver content rather than providing learners with the opportunity to interact with…

  14. Supporting deployed operations: are military nurses gaining the relevant experience from MDHUs to be competent in deployed operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Steven P; Allan, Helen T

    2014-01-01

    To explore how peacetime employment of military nurses in the UK National Health Service Medical Defence Hospital Units prepares them to be competent to practise in their role on deployment. Military secondary care nurses are employed within UK National Health Service Trusts to gain clinical experience that will be relevant to their military nursing role. A two-stage grounded theory study using mixed methods: postal questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews. In stage one a postal questionnaire was distributed to all serving military nurses. Stage two involved 12 semi-structured interviews. The data from both parts of the study were analysed using grounded theory. Four categories and one core category were identified, which suggested that participants did not feel fully prepared for deployment. Their feelings of preparedness increased with deployment experience and decreased when the nature of injuries seen on deployment changed. Respondents argued that even when unprepared, they did not feel incompetent. The findings suggest that the peacetime clinical experience gained in the National Health Service did not always develop the necessary competencies to carry out roles as military nurses on deployment. This study highlights the unique role of military nurses. We discuss these findings in the light of the literature on competency and expertise. The military nurses in this study did not feel fully prepared for deployed operations. We propose a new model for how military nurses could gain relevant experience from their National Health Service placements. National Health Service clinical placements need to be reassessed regularly to ensure that they are meeting military nurses' clinical requirements. Experiences of nurses returning from deployment could be shared and used as a basis for reflection and learning within National Health Service Trusts and also inform decisions regarding the appropriateness of clinical placements for qualified military nurses. © 2012

  15. The Deployment, Training and Teacher Relationships of Teaching Assistants Supporting Pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) in Mainstream Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symes, Wendy; Humphrey, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Growing numbers of pupils with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) are attending mainstream schools, and increasing numbers of additional staff are being deployed to support them. Recent research has cast doubt on the effectiveness of this support, by highlighting issues relating to deployment and training, and to relationships with class teachers.…

  16. FY1995 community support by mobile agents; 1995 nendo mobile agent ni yoru community keisei shien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The purpose is to develop fundamental technologies for navigation systems and mobile computing systems in museums, theme parks and cities. Concretely, we implement software agents into the mobile computing environment which consists of PHS, mobile computers and mobile robots, and realize various functions to access regional information. We have studied on Communityware which supports human activities and communities by using mobile agents implemented into mobile computers and town robots. The mobile agents, which intelligently process information obtained in physical and virtual worlds, access regional information which is omnipresent in the environment. With respect to the approach using mobile computers, we have provided one hundred mobile computers in the international conference on multiagent systems 1996 and carried out the first experimentation of mobile computing in the world. The mobile computer has two functions: Community Viewer which displays interactions between members of communities and Social Matchmaker which supports to hold meetings by searching for people who have common interests. With respect to the approach using town robots, we have developed a robot system which can robustly behave in a complex outdoor environment by using vision agents embedded in the environment. The system aims at support of people in streets. (NEDO)

  17. Supporting Collaborative Model and Data Service Development and Deployment with DevOps

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, O.

    2016-12-01

    Adopting DevOps practices for model service development and deployment enables a community to engage in service-oriented modeling and data management. The Cloud Services Integration Platform (CSIP) developed the last 5 years at Colorado State University provides for collaborative integration of environmental models into scalable model and data services as a micro-services platform with API and deployment infrastructure. Originally developed to support USDA natural resource applications, it proved suitable for a wider range of applications in the environmental modeling domain. While extending its scope and visibility it became apparent community integration and adequate work flow support through the full model development and application cycle drove successful outcomes.DevOps provide best practices, tools, and organizational structures to optimize the transition from model service development to deployment by minimizing the (i) operational burden and (ii) turnaround time for modelers. We have developed and implemented a methodology to fully automate a suite of applications for application lifecycle management, version control, continuous integration, container management, and container scaling to enable model and data service developers in various institutions to collaboratively build, run, deploy, test, and scale services within minutes.To date more than 160 model and data services are available for applications in hydrology (PRMS, Hydrotools, CFA, ESP), water and wind erosion prediction (WEPP, WEPS, RUSLE2), soil quality trends (SCI, STIR), water quality analysis (SWAT-CP, WQM, CFA, AgES-W), stream degradation assessment (SWAT-DEG), hydraulics (cross-section), and grazing management (GRAS). In addition, supporting data services include soil (SSURGO), ecological site (ESIS), climate (CLIGEN, WINDGEN), land management and crop rotations (LMOD), and pesticides (WQM), developed using this workflow automation and decentralized governance.

  18. Mobile Technology to Support the Interactive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardoun, Habib M.; Awada, Hachem

    2017-01-01

    At the current classrooms, teachers continue using traditional techniques for monitoring the class. However, there are more participation of mobile devices, and concretely, the tablets. In addition, the network access by both students and teachers in daily life is something usual and a routine work. For this reason, the authors propose the…

  19. A Middleware Based Approach to Dynamically Deploy Location Based Services onto Heterogeneous Mobile Devices Using Bluetooth in Indoor Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Pampa; Sen, Rijurekha; Das, Pradip K.

    Several methods for providing location based service (LBS) to mobile devices in indoor environment using wireless technologies like WLAN, RFID and Bluetooth have been proposed, implemented and evaluated. However, most of them do not focus on heterogeneity of mobile platforms, memory constraint of mobile devices, the adaptability of client or device to the new services it discovers whenever it reaches a new location. In this paper, we have proposed a Middleware based approach of LBS provision in the indoor environment, where a Bluetooth enabled Base Station (BS) detects Bluetooth enabled mobile devices and pushes a proper client application only to those devices that belong to some registered subscriber of LBS. This dynamic deployment enables the mobile clients to access any new service without having preinstalled interface to that service beforehand and thus the client's memory consumption is reduced. Our proposed work also addresses the other issues like authenticating the clients before providing them LBSs and introducing paid services. We have evaluated its performance in term of file transfer time with respect to file size and throughput with respect to distance. Experimental results on service consumption time by the mobile client for different services are also presented.

  20. Meeting fronthaul challenges of future mobile network deployments — The HARP approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittmann, Lars; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann; Checko, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    In future mobile networks aggregation at different levels is necessary but at the same time imposes challenges that mandate looking into new architectures. This paper presents the design consideration approach for a C-RAN based mobile aggregation network used in the EU HARP project....... With this architecture fronthaul aggregation is performed which might be an option for future generation of mobile networks....

  1. State Support for Clean Energy Deployment. Lessons Learned for Potential Future Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubert, Charles [Clean Energy States Alliance, Montpelier, VT (United States); Sinclair, Mark [Clean Energy States Alliance, Montpelier, VT (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Proposed federal clean energy initiatives and climate legislation have suggested significant increases to federal funding for clean energy deployment and investment. Many states and utilities have over a decade of experience and spend billions of public dollars every year to support EE/RE deployment through programs that reduce the cost of technologies, provide financing for EE/RE projects, offer technical assistance, and educate market participants. Meanwhile, constraints on public expenditures at all levels of government continue to call upon such programs to demonstrate their value. This report reviews the results of these programs and the specific financial incentives and financing tools used to encourage clean energy investment. Lessons from such programs could be used to inform the future application of EE/RE incentives and financing tools. These lessons learned apply to use of distributed resources and the historical focus of these EE/RE programs.

  2. State Support for Clean Energy Deployment: Lessons Learned for Potential Future Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubert, C.; Sinclair, M.

    2011-04-01

    Proposed federal clean energy initiatives and climate legislation have suggested significant increases to federal funding for clean energy deployment and investment. Many states and utilities have over a decade of experience and spend billions of public dollars every year to support EE/RE deployment through programs that reduce the cost of technologies, provide financing for EE/RE projects, offer technical assistance, and educate market participants. Meanwhile, constraints on public expenditures at all levels of government continue to call upon such programs to demonstrate their value. This report reviews the results of these programs and the specific financial incentives and financing tools used to encourage clean energy investment. Lessons from such programs could be used to inform the future application of EE/RE incentives and financing tools. These lessons learned apply to use of distributed resources and the historical focus of these EE/RE programs.

  3. Supporting mobile applications developer through Java IDE using contextual inquiry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Samuel, OO

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available (IDEs) for developing mobile applications. Described is the approach of this method to support mobile application developers, through the use of an IDE (NetBeans IDE in the context of this research). CI provides useful data on the typical problems found...

  4. Optimization Modeling and Decision Support for Wireless Infrastructure Deployment in Disaster Planning and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartolacci, Michael R.; Mihovska, Albena D.; Ozceylan, Dilek

    2013-01-01

    Natural disasters and emergencies create the need for communication between and among the affected populace and emergency responders as well as other parties such as governmental agencies and aid organizations. Such communications include the dissemination of key information such as evacuation...... orders and locations of emergency shelters. In particular, the coordination of efforts between responding organizations require additional communication solutions that typically rely heavily on wireless communications to complement fixed line infrastructure due to the ease of use and portability. While...... the deployment of temporary mobile networks and other wireless equipment following disasters has been successfully accomplished by governmental agencies and network providers following previous disasters, there appears to be little optimization effort involved with respect to maximizing key performance measures...

  5. Knowledge mobilized by a critical thinking process deployed by nursing students in practical care situations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechasseur, Kathleen; Lazure, Ginette; Guilbert, Louise

    2011-09-01

    This paper is a report of a qualitative study of mobilization of knowledge within the critical thinking process deployed by female undergraduate nursing students in practical care situations. Holistic practice is based on variety of knowledge mobilized by a critical thinking process. Novices and, more specifically, students experience many difficulties in this regard. Therefore, a better understanding of the knowledge they mobilize in their practice is important for nurse educators. A qualitative study, guided by grounded theory, was carried out. Sixteen nursing students, registered in an undergraduate programme in an Eastern Canadian university, were recruited. Descriptions of practical care situations were obtained through explicitation interviews in 2007. A sociodemographic questionnaire, semi-structured interviews and field notes were also used. Data were analysed using an approach based on grounded theory. An additional stage of analysis involved data condensation. Various types of knowledge guide nursing students' practice. These include intrapersonal, interpersonal, perceptual, moral/ethical, experiential, practical, scientific and contextual knowledge. The mobilization of these types of knowledge is only possible when the process of critical thinking has attained a higher level, giving rise to a new knowledge that we have termed combinational constructive knowledge rather than aesthetic knowledge. Clarification of the types of knowledge guiding the practice of student nurses and of the role of critical thinking in their mobilization could lead to innovative educational strategies. The findings provide guidance for the revision and development of both academic and clinical training programmes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Sensor proxy mobile IPv6 (SPMIPv6)--a novel scheme for mobility supported IP-WSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Motaharul; Huh, Eui-Nam

    2011-01-01

    IP based Wireless Sensor Networks (IP-WSNs) are gaining importance for their broad range of applications in health-care, home automation, environmental monitoring, industrial control, vehicle telematics and agricultural monitoring. In all these applications, mobility in the sensor network with special attention to energy efficiency is a major issue to be addressed. Host-based mobility management protocols are not suitable for IP-WSNs because of their energy inefficiency, so network based mobility management protocols can be an alternative for the mobility supported IP-WSNs. In this paper we propose a network based mobility supported IP-WSN protocol called Sensor Proxy Mobile IPv6 (SPMIPv6). We present its architecture, message formats and also evaluate its performance considering signaling cost, mobility cost and energy consumption. Our analysis shows that with respect to the number of IP-WSN nodes, the proposed scheme reduces the signaling cost by 60% and 56%, as well as the mobility cost by 62% and 57%, compared to MIPv6 and PMIPv6, respectively. The simulation results also show that in terms of the number of hops, SPMIPv6 decreases the signaling cost by 56% and 53% as well as mobility cost by 60% and 67% as compared to MIPv6 and PMIPv6 respectively. It also indicates that proposed scheme reduces the level of energy consumption significantly.

  7. Application of the Quality Functional Deployment Method in Mobility Aid Securement System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The Independent Locking Securement System Project (ILS System Project) is a : successful attempt to respond to the transportation community's need for a : "universal" securement/restraint system that will accommodate most wheeled : mobility aids, inc...

  8. From demonstration to deployment: An economic analysis of support policies for carbon capture and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahé, Max; Heidug, Wolf; Ward, John; Smale, Robin

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that an integrated policy architecture consisting of multiple policy phases and economic instruments is needed to support the development of carbon capture and storage (CCS) from its present demonstration phase to full-scale deployment. Building on an analysis of the different types of policy instruments to correct market failures specific to CCS in its various stages of development, we suggest a way to combine these into an integrated policy architecture. This policy architecture adapts to the need of a maturing technology, meets the requirement of policymakers to maintain flexibility to respond to changing circumstances while providing investors with the policy certainty that is needed to encourage private sector investment. This combination of flexibility and predictability is achieved through the use of ‘policy gateways’ which explicitly define rules and criteria for when and how policy settings will change. Our findings extend to bioenergy-based CCS applications (BECCS), which could potentially achieve negative emissions. We argue that within a framework of correcting the carbon externality, the added environmental benefits of BECCS should be reflected in an extra incentive. - Highlights: • Sensible aim of current climate policy: secure option of future CCS deployment. • But policy makers require flexibility while private investors require predictability. • Integrating CCS policy into an overall policy architecture can overcome this antinomy. • We describe the key features of a good policy architecture and give an example

  9. Adherence to internet-based mobile-supported stress management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarski, A C; Lehr, D.; Berking, M.

    2016-01-01

    of this study was to investigate the influence of different guidance formats (content-focused guidance, adherence-focused guidance, and administrative guidance) on adherence and to identify predictors of nonadherence in an Internet-based mobile-supported stress management intervention (ie, GET.ON Stress......) for employees. Methods: The data from the groups who received the intervention were pooled from three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the efficacy of the same Internet-based mobile-supported stress management intervention (N=395). The RCTs only differed in terms of the guidance format...... of the predictors significantly predicted nonadherence. Conclusions: Guidance has been shown to be an influential factor in promoting adherence to an Internet-based mobile-supported stress management intervention. Adherence-focused guidance, which included email reminders and feedback on demand, was equivalent...

  10. Analyzing mobile WiMAX base station deployment under different frequency planning strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, M. K.; Ahmad, R. B.; Ali, Ziad G.; Aldhaibani, Jaafar A.; Fayadh, Rashid A.

    2015-05-01

    The frequency spectrum is a precious resource and scarce in the communication markets. Therefore, different techniques are adopted to utilize the available spectrum in deploying WiMAX base stations (BS) in cellular networks. In this paper several types of frequency planning techniques are illustrated, and a comprehensive comparative study between conventional frequency reuse of 1 (FR of 1) and fractional frequency reuse (FFR) is presented. These techniques are widely used in network deployment, because they employ universal frequency (using all the available bandwidth) in their base station installation/configuration within network system. This paper presents a network model of 19 base stations in order to be employed in the comparison of the aforesaid frequency planning techniques. Users are randomly distributed within base stations, users' resource mapping and their burst profile selection are based on the measured signal to interference plus-noise ratio (SINR). Simulation results reveal that the FFR has advantages over the conventional FR of 1 in various metrics. 98 % of downlink resources (slots) are exploited when FFR is applied, whilst it is 81 % at FR of 1. Data rate of FFR has been increased to 10.6 Mbps, while it is 7.98 Mbps at FR of 1. The spectral efficiency is better enhanced (1.072 bps/Hz) at FR of 1 than FFR (0.808 bps/Hz), since FR of 1 exploits all the Bandwidth. The subcarrier efficiency shows how many data bits that can be carried by subcarriers under different frequency planning techniques, the system can carry more data bits under FFR (2.40 bit/subcarrier) than FR of 1 (1.998 bit/subcarrier). This study confirms that FFR can perform better than conventional frequency planning (FR of 1) which made it a strong candidate for WiMAX BS deployment in cellular networks.

  11. An Open Platform for the Creation and Deployment of Transport-Related Mobile Data Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Torp, Kristian; Wind, Rico

    2007-01-01

    Advanced mobile computing devices with wireless communication and geo-positioning capabilities are finding increasingly widespread use in Europe and beyond. Example devices include smart phones, PDA phones, and navigation systems. It is thus becoming increasingly relevant and attractive to utiliz...

  12. The Role of Natural Support Systems in the Post-deployment Adjustment of Active Duty Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Janet A; Olson, Jonathan; Perkins, Daniel F; Travis, Wendy J; Ormsby, LaJuana

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the relations among three different types of naturally occurring social support (from romantic partners, friends and neighbors, and unit leaders) and three indices of service member well-being (self reports of depressive symptoms, satisfaction with military life, and perceptions of unit readiness) for service members who did and did not report negative experiences associated with military deployment. Data were drawn from the 2011 Community Assessment completed anonymously by more than 63,000 USAF personnel. Regression analyses revealed that higher levels of social support was associated with better outcomes regardless of negative deployment experiences. Evidence of moderation was also noted, with all forms of social support moderating the impact of negative deployment experiences on depressive symptoms and support from unit leaders moderating the impact of negative deployment experience on satisfaction with military life. No moderation was found for perceptions of unit readiness. Subgroup analyses revealed slightly different patterns for male and female service members, with support providing fewer moderation effects for women. These findings may have value for military leaders and mental health professionals working to harness the power of naturally occurring relationships to maximize the positive adjustment of service members and their families. Implications for practices related to re-integration of post-deployment military personnel are discussed.

  13. Child maltreatment among U.S. Air Force parents deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenhorst, Mandy M; McCarthy, Randy J; Thomsen, Cynthia J; Milner, Joel S; Travis, Wendy J; Colasanti, Marie P

    2015-02-01

    This study examined child maltreatment perpetration among 99,697 active-duty U.S. Air Force parents who completed a combat deployment. Using the deploying parent as the unit of analysis, we analyzed whether child maltreatment rates increased postdeployement relative to predeployment. These analyses extend previous research that used aggregate data and extend our previous work that used data from the same period but used the victim as the unit of analysis and included only deploying parents who engaged in child maltreatment. In this study, 2% (n = 1,746) of deploying parents perpetrated child maltreatment during the study period. Although no overall differences were found in child maltreatment rates postdeployment compared to predeployment, several maltreatment-related characteristics qualified this finding. Rates for emotional abuse and mild maltreatment were lower following deployment, whereas child maltreatment rates for severe maltreatment were higher following deployment. The finding that rates of severe child maltreatment, including incidents involving alcohol use, were higher postdeployment suggests a need for additional support services for parents following their return from combat deployment, with a focus on returning parents who have an alcohol use problem. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Network-aware support for mobile distributed teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleij, R. van der; Jong, A. de; Brake, G.M. te; Greefe, T.E.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment evaluated network-aware support to increase understanding of the factors that are important for successful teamwork in mobile geographically dispersed teams of first responders. Participants performed a simulated search and rescue team task and were equipped with a digitized map and

  15. A Textual Case-Based Mobile Phone Diagnosis Support System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a Mobile Phone Diagnosis Support System is presented as an extension to jCOLIBRI which accepts a problem and reasons with cases to provide a solution related to a new given problem. Experimental evaluation using some set of problems shows that the developed system predicts the solution that is ...

  16. CINR Performance of Downlink Mobile WiMAX IEEE 802.16e Deployed Using Coexistence Cellular Terrestrial and HAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Iskandar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Deploying WiMAX through High Altitude Platform Station (HAPS system is a new means of wireless delivery method and thus attracting much the attention in a telecommunication society. However delivering WiMAX through the terrestrial network has already been started a few years ago. Therefore, we need to look at the scenario of coexistence system both of HAPS and terrestrial in delivering WiMAX services. This paper evaluates the performance of coexistence system between cellular HAPS and terrestrial for the downlink scenario when they are transmitting WiMAX mobile 802.16e services. Our evaluation is based on the performance simulation of coexistence model using two methods. First method is a footprint exchange between the two systems.The second method is a combination of footprint exchange and HAPS footprint enhancement. The proposed methodsare then evaluated by computer simulation in terms of carrier to interference plus noise ratio (CINR performance. In general, both methods resulting performance enhancement in CINR quality compared with coexistence deployment with normal scenario of the cell configuration used by HAPS and terrestrial. The method of combining footprint exchange and HAPS footprint enhancement is able to improve CINR more than 10 dB compared with the normal footprint configuration for all users location inside the coverage.

  17. Aspects of High-Q Tunable Antennas and Their Deployment for 4G Mobile Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahramzy, Pevand; Jagielski, Ole; Svendsen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Tunable antennas are very promising for future generations of mobile communications, where broad frequency coverage will be required increasingly. This work describes the design of small high-Quality factor (Q) tunable antennas based on Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), which are capable...... of operation in the frequency ranges 600 - 960 MHz and 1710 - 2690 MHz. Some aspects of high-Q tunable antennas are investigated through experimental measurements and the result are presented. Results show that more than -30 dB of isolation can be achieved between the Transmit (Tx) and Receive (Rx) antennas...

  18. Mobility Sensitivity Analysis for LTE-Advanced HetNet Deployments with Dual Connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbera, Simone; Gimenez, Lucas Chavarria; Sanchez, Maria Laura Luque

    2015-01-01

    A mobility performance sensitivity analysis is presented for Dual Connectivity cases where the users can be served simultaneously by a macro and a small cell. The performance is assessed for the 3GPP generic simulation scenario and for two site specific cases, with the aim of comparing the results...... coming from these different scenarios. The site-specific scenarios are based on detailed topography map data and advanced ray-tracing techniques. It is generally found that the first order statistics and overall conclusions are in good alignment for the considered environments. However, there are also...

  19. Study of customer acquisition support system for mobile operators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mobile operators are struggling for improving the market share and the revenues.One important method is to acquire the potential customers from the competitors.This article presents a whole acquisition process and an integrated framework for customer acquisition support system (CASS).The core of the system is the customer acquisition identification models which are built based on data mining technologies.The CASS can automate the acquisition process and decrease the cost and implement precise marketing strategy for mobile operators.

  20. Mobility support and networking for women in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellis, Giovanna; Didenkulova, Ira

    2017-04-01

    Mobility support for women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) career is an increasingly important issue in today's world. Cutting edge research tends to be undertaken via international collaboration, often within networks built up by moving to a new country. In addition, many of today's funding opportunities are geared towards international cooperation. There have been quite a few debates and several projects based on extended surveys to understand the role and impact of mobility on a scientific career. Although in general it is true that these issues are sensitive to the country and the scientific field for example, it is believed by the scientific community at least, that there is a connection between mobility and scientific excellence. Rewarding mobility is becoming a concern at the European level because mechanisms to measure in the best and objective way possible scientific excellence are not homogeneous. But still mobility is a key issue to strengthen a researcher's scientific curriculum and be recognised at the international level. Women have been widely recognised as a source of untapped potential. Different steps have been taken so far for a deeper understanding of barriers and different obstacles faced by women in the Science field. Present calls in the Science in Society panel in HORIZON 2020 deal with the horizontal and vertical segregation experienced by women in their careers and best practices to manage these issues. The general aim is to foster women participation in all scientific fields with particular regard to male dominated disciplines as STEM and increase the number and the effective representation of women in decision-making positions, to help also speed up the whole process. Mobility has demonstrated to be partly gender sensitive and this needs to be addressed in some way in order to ensure at least equal opportunities to male and female scientists regarding possibilities and benefits offered by mobility programmes

  1. A field-deployable mobile molecular diagnostic system for malaria at the point of need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gihoon; Song, Daniel; Shrestha, Sony; Miao, Jun; Cui, Liwang; Guan, Weihua

    2016-11-01

    In response to the urgent need of a field-deployable and highly sensitive malaria diagnosis, we developed a standalone, "sample-in-answer-out" molecular diagnostic system (AnyMDx) to enable quantitative molecular analysis of blood-borne malaria in low resource areas. The system consists of a durable battery-powered analyzer and a disposable microfluidic compact disc loaded with reagents ready for use. A low power thermal module and a novel fluorescence-sensing module are integrated into the analyzer for real-time monitoring of loop-mediated isothermal nucleic acid amplification (LAMP) of target parasite DNA. With 10 μL of raw blood sample, the AnyMDx system automates the nucleic acid sample preparation and subsequent LAMP and real-time detection. Under laboratory conditions with whole-blood samples spiked with cultured Plasmodium falciparum, we achieved a detection limit of ∼0.6 parasite per μL, much lower than those for the conventional microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (∼50-100 parasites per μL). The turnaround time from sample to answer is less than 40 minutes. The AnyMDx is user-friendly requiring minimal technological training. The analyzer and the disposable reagent compact discs are cost-effective, making AnyMDx a potential tool for malaria molecular diagnosis under field settings for malaria elimination.

  2. Supporting seamless mobility for P2P live streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunsam; Kim, Sangjin; Lee, Choonhwa

    2014-01-01

    With advent of various mobile devices with powerful networking and computing capabilities, the users' demand to enjoy live video streaming services such as IPTV with mobile devices has been increasing rapidly. However, it is challenging to get over the degradation of service quality due to data loss caused by the handover. Although many handover schemes were proposed at protocol layers below the application layer, they inherently suffer from data loss while the network is being disconnected during the handover. We therefore propose an efficient application-layer handover scheme to support seamless mobility for P2P live streaming. By simulation experiments, we show that the P2P live streaming system with our proposed handover scheme can improve the playback continuity significantly compared to that without our scheme.

  3. Supporting Seamless Mobility for P2P Live Streaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsam Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With advent of various mobile devices with powerful networking and computing capabilities, the users' demand to enjoy live video streaming services such as IPTV with mobile devices has been increasing rapidly. However, it is challenging to get over the degradation of service quality due to data loss caused by the handover. Although many handover schemes were proposed at protocol layers below the application layer, they inherently suffer from data loss while the network is being disconnected during the handover. We therefore propose an efficient application-layer handover scheme to support seamless mobility for P2P live streaming. By simulation experiments, we show that the P2P live streaming system with our proposed handover scheme can improve the playback continuity significantly compared to that without our scheme.

  4. Opportunistic Mobility Support for Resource Constrained Sensor Devices in Smart Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Granlund

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of wireless sensor devices and technologies are being developed and deployed in cities all over the world. Sensor applications in city environments may include highly mobile installations that span large areas which necessitates sensor mobility support. This paper presents and validates two mechanisms for supporting sensor mobility between different administrative domains. Firstly, EAP-Swift, an Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP-based sensor authentication protocol is proposed that enables light-weight sensor authentication and key generation. Secondly, a mechanism for handoffs between wireless sensor gateways is proposed. We validate both mechanisms in a real-life study that was conducted in a smart city environment with several fixed sensors and moving gateways. We conduct similar experiments in an industry-based anechoic Long Term Evolution (LTE chamber with an ideal radio environment. Further, we validate our results collected from the smart city environment against the results produced under ideal conditions to establish best and real-life case scenarios. Our results clearly validate that our proposed mechanisms can facilitate efficient sensor authentication and handoffs while sensors are roaming in a smart city environment.

  5. Opportunistic mobility support for resource constrained sensor devices in smart cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, Daniel; Holmlund, Patrik; Åhlund, Christer

    2015-03-02

    A multitude of wireless sensor devices and technologies are being developed and deployed in cities all over the world. Sensor applications in city environments may include highly mobile installations that span large areas which necessitates sensor mobility support. This paper presents and validates two mechanisms for supporting sensor mobility between different administrative domains. Firstly, EAP-Swift, an Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)-based sensor authentication protocol is proposed that enables light-weight sensor authentication and key generation. Secondly, a mechanism for handoffs between wireless sensor gateways is proposed. We validate both mechanisms in a real-life study that was conducted in a smart city environment with several fixed sensors and moving gateways. We conduct similar experiments in an industry-based anechoic Long Term Evolution (LTE) chamber with an ideal radio environment. Further, we validate our results collected from the smart city environment against the results produced under ideal conditions to establish best and real-life case scenarios. Our results clearly validate that our proposed mechanisms can facilitate efficient sensor authentication and handoffs while sensors are roaming in a smart city environment.

  6. Apps and Mobile Support Services in Canadian Academic Medical Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Grynoch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine how Canadian academic medical libraries are supporting mobile apps, what apps are currently being provided by these libraries, and what types of promotion are being used. Methods: A survey of the library websites for the 17 medical schools in Canada was completed. For each library website surveyed, the medical apps listed on the website, any services mentioned through this medium, and any type of app promotion events were noted. When Facebook and Twitter accounts were evident, the tweets were searched and the past two years of Facebook posts scanned for mention of medical apps or mobile services/events. Results: All seventeen academic medical libraries had lists of mobile medical apps with a large range in the number of medical relevant apps (average=31, median= 23. A total of 275 different apps were noted and the apps covered a wide range of subjects. Five of the 14 Facebook accounts scanned had posts about medical apps in the past two years while 11 of the 15 Twitter accounts had tweets about medical apps. Social media was only one of the many promotional methods noted. Outside of the app lists and mobile resources guides, Canadian academic medical libraries are providing workshops, presentations, and drop-in sessions for mobile medical apps. Conclusion: While librarians cannot simply compare mobile services and resources between academic medical libraries without factoring in a number of other circumstances, librarians can learn from mobile resources strategies employed at other libraries, such as using research guides to increase medical app literacy.

  7. Washington state--British Columbia international mobility and trade corridor (IMTC) : ITS-CVO border crossing deployment, evaluation draft report : executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The Washington state-British Columbia international mobility and trade corridor (IMTC) ITS-CVO Border Crossing Deployment is allowing for the completion of a bi-national freight border crossing ITS system at the border, and is a follow-on effort t...

  8. Supportive intervention using a mobile phone in behavior modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hareva, David H; Okada, Hiroki; Kitawaki, Tomoki; Oka, Hisao

    2009-04-01

    The authors previously developed a mobile ecological momentary assessment (EMA) system as a real-time data collection device using a mobile phone. In this study, a real-time advice function and real-time reporting function were added to the previous system as a supportive intervention. The improved system was found to work effectively and was applied to several clinical cases, including patients with depressive disorder, dizziness, smoking habit, and bronchial asthma. The average patient compliance rate was high (89%) without the real-time advice and higher (93%) with the advice. The trends in clinical data for patients using a mobile EMA with/without the new function were analyzed for up to several months. In the case of dizziness, an improving trend in its clinical data was observed after applying the real-time advice, and in the case of depressive disorder, a stabilizing trend was observed. The mobile EMA system with the real-time advice function could be useful as a supportive intervention in behavior modification and for motivating patients in self-management of their disease.

  9. Disruption of Darna pallivitta (Lepidoptera: Limacodidae) by Conventional and Mobile Pheromone Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siderhurst, Matthew S; Jang, Eric B; Carvalho, Lori A F N; Nagata, Janice T; Derstine, Nathan T

    2015-01-01

    Identification of the Darna pallivitta (Moore) pheromone component n-butyl (E)-7,9-decadienoate (E7,9-10:COOn-Bu) has made it possible to investigate communication disruption to control this lepidopteran pest. Conventional communication disruption trials showed marked decreases in the mean number of male moths captured in E7,9-10:COOnBu-treated fields compared with control fields. For traps baited with E7,9-10:COOnBu, percent disruptions were 94.4% and 92.1% for septa (1 g pheromone/ha, 1-wk trial duration) and spirals (6 g pheromone/ha, 8-wk trial duration) respectively. For traps baited with virgin female moths, percent disruption was 73.3% using septa disruptors (1 g pheromone/ha, 1-wk trial duration). Mobile communication disruption using Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) as carriers for E7,9-10:COOn-Bu was evaluated in the following three areas: fly survivorship, attraction of male moths to treated flies, and moth disruption in a small-scale field trial. Topical application of E7,9-10:COOnBu showed no significant decrease in survivorship at 50 and 80 µg/fly. However, decreased survivorship was observed at 100 µg/fly and linear regression showed E7,9-10:COOnBu dose was significantly correlated with B. cucurbitae survivorship. Traps containing honey-pheromone-fed flies attracted and caught D. pallivitta over a 1-wk period, demonstrating the attractiveness of the carrier. Releasing E7,9-10:COOnBu-fed B. cucurbitae (∼2 g pheromone/ha, 1-wk trial duration) resulted in significantly reduced trap catches in treatment fields compared with control fields on the first 2 d of the field trial. Percent disruptions were 84.7% (day 1) and 56.0% (day 2). These results suggest that both conventional communication disruption and mobile communication disruption have potential to control D. pallivitta. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  10. In formation: Support for flexibility, mobility, collaboration, and coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büscher, Monika; Kramp, Gunnar; Krogh, Peter Gall

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes support for flexibility, mobility and collaboration in engaging with, and making sense of, information. Our focus lies on the transitions people make between different, dynamic configurations of digital and physical materials, technologies, people and spaces. The technologies...... we describe have been developed in partnership with landscape architects over the past two years. We show that appliances and people can come together in a way that creates scope for such transitions, collaboration, and the emergence of new ways of working.......This paper describes support for flexibility, mobility and collaboration in engaging with, and making sense of, information. Our focus lies on the transitions people make between different, dynamic configurations of digital and physical materials, technologies, people and spaces. The technologies...

  11. Development and Validation of a Portable Platform for Deploying Decision-Support Algorithms in Prehospital Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, A. T.; Khitrov, M. Y.; Chen, L.; Blood, A.; Wilkins, K.; Doyle, W.; Wilcox, S.; Denison, T.; Reifman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Advanced decision-support capabilities for prehospital trauma care may prove effective at improving patient care. Such functionality would be possible if an analysis platform were connected to a transport vital-signs monitor. In practice, there are technical challenges to implementing such a system. Not only must each individual component be reliable, but, in addition, the connectivity between components must be reliable. Objective We describe the development, validation, and deployment of the Automated Processing of Physiologic Registry for Assessment of Injury Severity (APPRAISE) platform, intended to serve as a test bed to help evaluate the performance of decision-support algorithms in a prehospital environment. Methods We describe the hardware selected and the software implemented, and the procedures used for laboratory and field testing. Results The APPRAISE platform met performance goals in both laboratory testing (using a vital-sign data simulator) and initial field testing. After its field testing, the platform has been in use on Boston MedFlight air ambulances since February of 2010. Conclusion These experiences may prove informative to other technology developers and to healthcare stakeholders seeking to invest in connected electronic systems for prehospital as well as in-hospital use. Our experiences illustrate two sets of important questions: are the individual components reliable (e.g., physical integrity, power, core functionality, and end-user interaction) and is the connectivity between components reliable (e.g., communication protocols and the metadata necessary for data interpretation)? While all potential operational issues cannot be fully anticipated and eliminated during development, thoughtful design and phased testing steps can reduce, if not eliminate, technical surprises. PMID:24155791

  12. Establishing an independent mobile health programme for chronic disease self-management support in Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Piette

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile health (m-health work in low and middle-income countries (LMICs mainly consists of pilot programmes with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD self-management support in Bolivia. Methods: 364 primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. 165 of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly Interactive Voice Response (IVR calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Results: 37% of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home, and 38% had six or fewer years of education. 82% had a mobile phone; half (45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR programme participants completed 1007 self-management support calls, with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients’ ethnicity, health status or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during baseline interviews. Patients’ likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health via IVR increased during programme participation, and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the programme, with 19/20 (95% reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusions: By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programmes can be transferred from higher-resource centres to LMICs and implemented in ways that improve access to self-management support among people

  13. Establishing an independent mobile health program for chronic disease self-management support in bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D; Valverde, Helen; Marinec, Nicolle; Jantz, Rachel; Kamis, Kevin; de la Vega, Carlos Lazo; Woolley, Timothy; Pinto, Bismarck

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health (m-health) work in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) mainly consists of small pilot programs with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD) self-management support in Bolivia. Three hundred sixty-four primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. One hundred sixty-five of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly interactive voice response (IVR) calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Thirty-seven percent of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home and 38% had six or fewer years of education. Eighty-two percent had a mobile phone, 45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR program participants completed 1007 self-management support calls with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients' ethnicity, health status, or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during in-person baseline interviews. Patients' likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health) via IVR increased during program participation and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the program, with 19/20 (95%) reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programs can be transferred from higher-resource centers to LMICs and implemented in ways that improve access to self-management support among

  14. A comprehensive remote automated mobile robot framework for deployment of compact radiation sensors and campaign management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, J.K.

    2005-01-01

    Remote controlled on-line sensing with compact radiation sensors for interactive, fast contamination mapping and source localization needs integrated command control and machine intelligence supported operation. The combination of remote operation capability and automation of sensing needs a comprehensive framework encompassing precision real-time remote controlled agent, reliable remote communication techniques for unified command and sensory data exchange with optimized bandwidth allocation between the real time low volume as well as moderate speed bulk data transfer and data abstraction for seamless multi-domain abstraction in single environment. The paper describes an indigenously developed comprehensive framework that achieves vertical integration of layered services complex functions, explains its implementation and details its operation with examples of on-line application sessions. Several important features like precise remote control of sensor trajectory generation in real time by digital signal processing, prediction and visualization of remote agent locus and attitude, spatial modeling of fixed features of the monitored region and localization of activity source over mapped region have been dealt with. (author)

  15. Computer-mediated mobile messaging as collaboration support for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpati, Peter; Toussaint, Pieter Jelle; Nytrø, Oystein

    2009-01-01

    Collaboration in hospitals is coordinated mainly by communication, which currently happens by face-to-face meetings, phone calls, pagers, notes and the electronic patient record. These habits raise problems e.g., delayed notifications and unnecessary interruptions. Dealing with these problems could save time and improve the care. Therefore we designed and prototyped a mobile messaging solution based on two specific scenarios coming from observations at a cardiology department of a Norwegian hospital. The main focus was on supporting the work of nurses. One prototype supported patient management while another one dealt with messages related to medication planning. The evaluation of the prototypes suggested that messaging-based collaboration support is worth to explore and also gave ideas for improvement.

  16. Kinect Technology Game Play to Mimic Quake Catcher Network (QCN) Sensor Deployment During a Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilb, D. L.; Yang, A.; Rohrlick, D.; Cochran, E. S.; Lawrence, J.; Chung, A. I.; Neighbors, C.; Choo, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Kinect technology allows for hands-free game play, greatly increasing the accessibility of gaming for those uncomfortable using controllers. How it works is the Kinect camera transmits invisible near-infrared light and measures its "time of flight" to reflect off an object, allowing it to distinguish objects within 1 centimeter in depth and 3 mm in height and width. The middleware can also respond to body gestures and voice commands. Here, we use the Kinect Windows SDK software to create a game that mimics how scientists deploy seismic instruments following a large earthquake. The educational goal of the game is to allow the players to explore 3D space as they learn about the Quake Catcher Network's (QCN) Rapid Aftershock Mobilization Program (RAMP). Many of the scenarios within the game are taken from factual RAMP experiences. To date, only the PC platform (or a Mac running PC emulator software) is available for use, but we hope to move to other platforms (e.g., Xbox 360, iPad, iPhone) as they become available. The game is written in programming language C# using Microsoft XNA and Visual Studio 2010, graphic shading is added using High Level Shader Language (HLSL), and rendering is produced using XNA's graphics libraries. Key elements of the game include selecting sensor locations, adequately installing the sensor, and monitoring the incoming data. During game play aftershocks can occur unexpectedly, as can other problems that require attention (e.g., power outages, equipment failure, and theft). The player accrues points for quickly deploying the first sensor (recording as many initial aftershocks as possible), correctly installing the sensors (orientation with respect to north, properly securing, and testing), distributing the sensors adequately in the region, and troubleshooting problems. One can also net points for efficient use of game play time. Setting up for game play in your local environment requires: (1) the Kinect hardware ( $145); (2) a computer

  17. A Survey on Mobility Support in Wireless Body Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom-Su Kim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs have attracted research interests from the community, as more promising healthcare applications have a tendency to employ them as underlying network technology. While taking design issues, such as small size hardware as well as low power computing, into account, a lot of research has been proposed to accomplish the given tasks in WBAN. However, since most of the existing works are basically developed by assuming all nodes in the static state, these schemes therefore cannot be applied in real scenarios where network topology between sensor nodes changes frequently and unexpectedly according to human moving behavior. However, as far as the authors know, there is no survey paper to focus on research challenges for mobility support in WBAN yet. To address this deficiency, in this paper, we present the state-of-the-art approaches and discuss the important features of related to mobility in WBAN. We give an overview of mobility model and categorize the models as individual and group. Furthermore, an overview of networking techniques in the recent literature and summary are compiled for comparison in several aspects. The article also suggests potential directions for future research in the field.

  18. Supporting Middle School Students Whose Parents Are Deployed: Challenges and Strategies for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Middle school students from military families face unique challenges, especially when their parents are deployed. Among the challenges they experience are frequent relocations; issues that affect academic achievement; uncertainty; and changes in roles, responsibilities, and relationships at home. Reunification involves issues of the returning…

  19. Acceptability, Usability, and Views on Deployment of Peek, a Mobile Phone mHealth Intervention for Eye Care in Kenya: Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhia, Vaishali; Karanja, Sarah; Lees, Shelley; Bastawrous, Andrew

    2016-05-09

    The Portable Eye Examination Kit (Peek) is a mobile phone-based ophthalmic testing system that has been developed to perform comprehensive eye examinations. Shortages in ophthalmic personnel, the high cost, and the difficulty in transporting equipment have made it challenging to offer services, particularly in rural areas. Peek offers a solution for overcoming barriers of limited access to traditional ophthalmic testing methods and has been pilot tested on adults in Nakuru, Kenya, and compared with traditional eye examination tools. This qualitative study evaluated the acceptability and usability of Peek in addition to perceptions regarding its adoption and nationwide deployment. Semistructured interviews were conducted with patients and analyzed using a framework approach. This included analysis of interviews from 20 patients, 8 health care providers (HCPs), and 4 key decision makers in ophthalmic health care provision in Kenya. The participants were purposefully sampled. The coding structure involved predefined themes for assessing the following: (1) the context, that is, environment, user, task, and technology; (2) patient acceptability, that is, patients' perceived benefits, patient preference, and patient satisfaction; (3) usability, that is, efficiency, effectiveness, learnability, and flexibility and operability of Peek; and (4) the benefits of Peek in strengthening eye care provision, that is, capabilities enhancer, opportunity creator, social enabler, and knowledge generator. Emerging themes relating to the objectives were explored from the data using thematic analysis. Patients found Peek to be acceptable because of its benefits in overcoming the barriers to accessing ophthalmic services. Most thought it to be fast, convenient, and able to reach a large population. All patients expressed being satisfied with Peek. The HCPs perceived it to satisfy the criteria for usability and found Peek to be acceptable based on the technology acceptance model. Peek was

  20. Concept-Development of a Structure Supported Membrane for Deployable Space Applications - From Nature to Manufacture and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Martin; Belvin, W. K.

    2012-01-01

    Current space applications of membrane structures include large area solar power arrays, solar sails, antennas, and numerous other large aperture devices like the solar shades of the new James Webb Space Telescope. These expandable structural systems, deployed in-orbit to achieve the desired geometry, are used to collect, reflect and/or transmit electromagnetic radiation. This work, a feasibility study supporting a diploma thesis, describes the systematic process for developing a biologically inspired concept for a structure supported (integrated) membrane, that features a rip stop principle, makes self-deployment possible and is part of an ultra-light weight space application. Novel manufacturing of membrane prototypes and test results are presented for the rip-stop concepts. Test data showed that the new membrane concept has a higher tear resistance than neat film of equivalent mass.

  1. MobiNET: A framework for supporting Java mobile application developers through contextual inquiry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ogunleye, S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors develop a concept for mobile programming. Mobile tools for Hetbeans (MobiNET) design would support the development of mobile applications for various mobile phones. The authors evaluate Netbeans as a development tool...

  2. The Effects of Mobile-Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: Meta-Analysis and Critical Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yao-Ting; Yang, Je-Ming; Lee, Han-Yueh

    2017-01-01

    One of the trends in collaborative learning is using mobile devices for supporting the process and products of collaboration, which has been forming the field of mobile-computer-supported collaborative learning (mCSCL). Although mobile devices have become valuable collaborative learning tools, evaluative evidence for their substantial…

  3. HyPR Device: Mobile Support for Hybrid Patient Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2014-01-01

    The patient record is one of the central artifacts in medical work that is used to organize, communicate and coordinate important information related to patient care. In many hospitals a double record consisting of an electronic and paper part is maintained. This practice introduces a number of c......PR device decreases configuration work, supports mobility in clinical work and increases awareness on patient data.......The patient record is one of the central artifacts in medical work that is used to organize, communicate and coordinate important information related to patient care. In many hospitals a double record consisting of an electronic and paper part is maintained. This practice introduces a number...... introduce the HyPR Device, a device that merges the paper and electronic patient record into one system. We provide results from a clinical simulation with eight clinicians and discuss the functional, design and infrastructural requirements of such hybrid patient records. Our study suggests that the Hy...

  4. Use of Mobile Phones to Support Coursework: Evidence from Wa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Information and Communication Technology ... improve network stability during school sessions for students to effectively use mobile .... interactive mobile-learning programmes at all levels of education can help address or.

  5. Use of Mobile Phones to Support Coursework: Evidence from Wa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Information and Communication Technology. Wa Polytechnic .... A smartphone is a mobile phone with more advanced computing capability and ..... Use of mobile phones for project based learning by undergraduate students of ...

  6. Mobile Augmented Note-taking to Support Operating Physical Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Liu , Can; Diehl , Jonathan; Huot , Stéphane; Borchers , Jan

    2011-01-01

    Mobile Augmented Reality: Design Issues and Opportunities - 1st Workshop on Mobile Augmented Reality, MobileHCI 2011; In this paper we propose an approach to assist operating physical devices with mobile augmented reality techniques. We propose ideas of interaction techniques, which allow users to put self-authored information as notes onto physical objects. We present the design of two example applications aiming at solving problems from different aspects of physical operations.

  7. Mobile emergency, an emergency support system for hospitals in mobile devices: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Pierfrancesco; Boncinelli, Sergio; Grossi, Francesco; Mangini, Marco; Nesi, Paolo; Sequi, Leonardo

    2013-05-23

    Hospitals are vulnerable to natural disasters, man-made disasters, and mass causalities events. Within a short time, hospitals must provide care to large numbers of casualties in any damaged infrastructure, despite great personnel risk, inadequate communications, and limited resources. Communications are one of the most common challenges and drawbacks during in-hospital emergencies. Emergency difficulties in communicating with personnel and other agencies are mentioned in literature. At the moment of emergency inception and in the earliest emergency phases, the data regarding the true nature of the incidents are often inaccurate. The real needs and conditions are not yet clear, hospital personnel are neither efficiently coordinated nor informed on the real available resources. Information and communication technology solutions in health care turned out to have a great positive impact both on daily working practice and situations. The objective of this paper was to find a solution that addresses the aspects of communicating among medical personnel, formalizing the modalities and protocols and the information to guide the medical personnel during emergency conditions with a support of a Central Station (command center) to cope with emergency management and best practice network to produce and distribute intelligent content made available in the mobile devices of the medical personnel. The aim was to reduce the time needed to react and to cope with emergency organization, while facilitating communications. The solution has been realized by formalizing the scenarios, extracting, and identifying the requirements by using formal methods based on unified modeling language (UML). The system and was developed using mobile programming under iOS Apple and PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor My Structured Query Language (PHP MySQL). Formal questionnaires and time sheets were used for testing and validation, and a control group was used in order to estimate the reduction of time needed

  8. Sensor Proxy Mobile IPv6 (SPMIPv6)—A Novel Scheme for Mobility Supported IP-WSNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Motaharul; Huh, Eui-Nam

    2011-01-01

    IP based Wireless Sensor Networks (IP-WSNs) are gaining importance for their broad range of applications in health-care, home automation, environmental monitoring, industrial control, vehicle telematics and agricultural monitoring. In all these applications, mobility in the sensor network with special attention to energy efficiency is a major issue to be addressed. Host-based mobility management protocols are not suitable for IP-WSNs because of their energy inefficiency, so network based mobility management protocols can be an alternative for the mobility supported IP-WSNs. In this paper we propose a network based mobility supported IP-WSN protocol called Sensor Proxy Mobile IPv6 (SPMIPv6). We present its architecture, message formats and also evaluate its performance considering signaling cost, mobility cost and energy consumption. Our analysis shows that with respect to the number of IP-WSN nodes, the proposed scheme reduces the signaling cost by 60% and 56%, as well as the mobility cost by 62% and 57%, compared to MIPv6 and PMIPv6, respectively. The simulation results also show that in terms of the number of hops, SPMIPv6 decreases the signaling cost by 56% and 53% as well as mobility cost by 60% and 67% as compared to MIPv6 and PMIPv6 respectively. It also indicates that proposed scheme reduces the level of energy consumption significantly. PMID:22319386

  9. Sensor Proxy Mobile IPv6 (SPMIPv6—A Novel Scheme for Mobility Supported IP-WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Motaharul Islam

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available IP based Wireless Sensor Networks (IP-WSNs are gaining importance for their broad range of applications in health-care, home automation, environmental monitoring, industrial control, vehicle telematics and agricultural monitoring. In all these applications, mobility in the sensor network with special attention to energy efficiency is a major issue to be addressed. Host-based mobility management protocols are not suitable for IP-WSNs because of their energy inefficiency, so network based mobility management protocols can be an alternative for the mobility supported IP-WSNs. In this paper we propose a network based mobility supported IP-WSN protocol called Sensor Proxy Mobile IPv6 (SPMIPv6. We present its architecture, message formats and also evaluate its performance considering signaling cost, mobility cost and energy consumption. Our analysis shows that with respect to the number of IP-WSN nodes, the proposed scheme reduces the signaling cost by 60% and 56%, as well as the mobility cost by 62% and 57%, compared to MIPv6 and PMIPv6, respectively. The simulation results also show that in terms of the number of hops, SPMIPv6 decreases the signaling cost by 56% and 53% as well as mobility cost by 60% and 67% as compared to MIPv6 and PMIPv6 respectively. It also indicates that proposed scheme reduces the level of energy consumption significantly.

  10. Autonomous mobile robotic system for supporting counterterrorist and surveillance operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Marek; Bulandra, Kazimierz; Moczulski, Wojciech

    2017-10-01

    Contemporary research on mobile robots concerns applications to counterterrorist and surveillance operations. The goal is to develop systems that are capable of supporting the police and special forces by carrying out such operations. The paper deals with a dedicated robotic system for surveillance of large objects such as airports, factories, military bases, and many others. The goal is to trace unauthorised persons who try to enter to the guarded area, document the intrusion and report it to the surveillance centre, and then warn the intruder by sound messages and eventually subdue him/her by stunning through acoustic effect of great power. The system consists of several parts. An armoured four-wheeled robot assures required mobility of the system. The robot is equipped with a set of sensors including 3D mapping system, IR and video cameras, and microphones. It communicates with the central control station (CCS) by means of a wideband wireless encrypted system. A control system of the robot can operate autonomously, and under remote control. In the autonomous mode the robot follows the path planned by the CCS. Once an intruder has been detected, the robot can adopt its plan to allow tracking him/her. Furthermore, special procedures of treatment of the intruder are applied including warning about the breach of the border of the protected area, and incapacitation of an appropriately selected very loud sound until a patrol of guards arrives. Once getting stuck the robot can contact the operator who can remotely solve the problem the robot is faced with.

  11. Establishing an Independent Mobile Health Program for Chronic Disease Self-Management Support in Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D.; Valverde, Helen; Marinec, Nicolle; Jantz, Rachel; Kamis, Kevin; de la Vega, Carlos Lazo; Woolley, Timothy; Pinto, Bismarck

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mobile health (m-health) work in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) mainly consists of small pilot programs with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD) self-management support in Bolivia. Methods: Three hundred sixty-four primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. One hundred sixty-five of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly interactive voice response (IVR) calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Results: Thirty-seven percent of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home and 38% had six or fewer years of education. Eighty-two percent had a mobile phone, 45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR program participants completed 1007 self-management support calls with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients’ ethnicity, health status, or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during in-person baseline interviews. Patients’ likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health) via IVR increased during program participation and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the program, with 19/20 (95%) reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusion: By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programs can be transferred from higher-resource centers to LMICs and implemented in ways that

  12. Development and deployment of a low-cost, mobile-ready, air quality sensor system: progress toward distributed networks and autonomous aerial sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, S. P.; DiVerdi, R.; Gadtaula, P.; Sheneman, T.; Flores, K.; Chen, Y. H.; Jayne, J. T.; Cross, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    Throughout the 2016-2017 academic year, a new partnership between Olin College of Engineering and Aerodyne Research, Inc. developed an affordable, self-contained air quality monitoring instrument called Modulair. The Modulair instrument is based on the same operating principles as Aerodyne's newly-developed ARISense integrated sensor system, employing electrochemical sensors for gas-phase measurements of CO, NO, NO2, and O3 and an off-the-shelf optical particle counter for particle concentration, number, and size distribution information (0.4 backend with a mobile, cloud-based data management system for real-time data posting and analysis. Open source tools and software were utilized in the development of the instrument. All initial work was completed by a team of undergraduate students as part of the Senior Capstone Program in Engineering (SCOPE) at Olin College. Deployment strategies for Modulair include distributed, mobile measurements and drone-based aerial sampling. Design goals for the drone integration include maximizing airborne sampling time and laying the foundation for software integration with the drone's autopilot system to allow for autonomous plume sampling across concentration gradients. Modulair and its flexible deployments enable real-time mapping of air quality data at exposure-relevant spatial scales, as well as regular, autonomous characterization of sources and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants. We will present an overview of the Modulair instrument and results from benchtop and field validation, including mobile and drone-based plume sampling in the Boston area.

  13. "Tree Investigators": Supporting Families' Scientific Talk in an Arboretum with Mobile Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Heather Toomey; Land, Susan M.; McClain, Lucy R.; Mohney, Michael R.; Choi, Gi Woong; Salman, Fariha H.

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the "Tree Investigators" project to support science learning with mobile devices during family public programmes in an arboretum. Using a case study methodology, researchers analysed video records of 10 families (25 people) using mobile technologies with naturalists at an arboretum to understand how mobile devices…

  14. Supporting Collaboration and Creativity Through Mobile P2P Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Adam; Datta, Anwitaman; Żaczek, Łukasz; Rzadca, Krzysztof

    Among many potential applications of mobile P2P systems, collaboration applications are among the most prominent. Examples of applications such as Groove (although not intended for mobile networks), collaboration tools for disaster recovery (the WORKPAD project), and Skype's collaboration extensions, all demonstrate the potential of P2P collaborative applications. Yet, the development of such applications for mobile P2P systems is still difficult because of the lack of middleware.

  15. A Multiple Mobility Support Approach (MMSA Based on PEAS for NCW in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Joo Koo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs can be implemented as one of sensor systems in Network Centric Warfare (NCW. Mobility support and energy efficiency are key concerns for this application, due to multiple mobile users and stimuli in real combat field. However, mobility support approaches that can be adopted in this circumstance are rare. This paper proposes Multiple Mobility Support Approach (MMSA based on Probing Environment and Adaptive Sleeping (PEAS to support the simultaneous mobility of both multiple users and stimuli by sharing the information of stimuli in WSNs. Simulations using Qualnet are conducted, showing that MMSA can support multiple mobile users and stimuli with good energy efficiency. It is expected that the proposed MMSA can be applied to real combat field.

  16. Mobile Immersion: An Experiment Using Mobile Instant Messenger to Support Second-Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Immersion has been an acclaimed approach for second-language acquisition, but is not available to most students. The idea of this study was to create a mobile immersion environment on a smartphone using a mobile instant messenger, WhatsApp™. Forty-five Form-1 (7th grade) students divided into the Mobile Group and Control Group participated in a…

  17. Developing Mobile Clinical Decision Support for Nursing Home Staff Assessment of Urinary Tract Infection using Goal-Directed Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Wallace; Drake, Cynthia; Mack, David; Reeder, Blaine; Trautner, Barbara; Wald, Heidi

    2017-06-20

    Unique characteristics of nursing homes (NHs) contribute to high rates of inappropriate antibiotic use for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a benign condition. A mobile clinical decision support system (CDSS) may support NH staff in differentiating urinary tract infections (UTI) from ASB and reducing antibiotic days. We used Goal-Directed Design to: 1) Characterize information needs for UTI identification and management in NHs; 2) Develop UTI Decide, a mobile CDSS prototype informed by personas and scenarios of use constructed from Aim 1 findings; 3) Evaluate the UTI Decide prototype with NH staff. Focus groups were conducted with providers and nurses in NHs in Denver, Colorado (n= 24). Qualitative descriptive analysis was applied to focus group transcripts to identify information needs and themes related to mobile clinical decision support for UTI identification and management. Personas representing typical end users were developed; typical clinical context scenarios were constructed using information needs as goals. Usability testing was performed using cognitive walk-throughs and a think-aloud protocol. Four information needs were identified including guidance regarding resident assessment; communication with providers; care planning; and urine culture interpretation. Design of a web-based application incorporating a published decision support algorithm for evidence-based UTI diagnoses proceeded with a focus on nursing information needs during resident assessment and communication with providers. Certified nursing assistant (CNA) and registered nurse (RN) personas were constructed in 4 context scenarios with associated key path scenarios. After field testing, a high fidelity prototype of UTI Decide was completed and evaluated by potential end users. Design recommendations and content recommendations were elicited. Goal-Directed Design informed the development of a mobile CDSS supporting participant-identified information needs for UTI assessment and communication

  18. A decision analysis framework to support long-term planning for nuclear fuel cycle technology research, development, demonstration and deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowder, A.G.; Machiels, A.J.; Dykes, A.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    To address challenges and gaps in nuclear fuel cycle option assessment and to support research, develop and demonstration programs oriented toward commercial deployment, EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) is seeking to develop and maintain an independent analysis and assessment capability by building a suite of assessment tools based on a platform of software, simplified relationships, and explicit decision-making and evaluation guidelines. As a demonstration of the decision-support framework, EPRI examines a relatively near-term fuel cycle option, i.e., use of reactor-grade mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) in U.S. light water reactors. The results appear as a list of significant concerns (like cooling of spent fuels, criticality risk...) that have to be taken into account for the final decision

  19. Waste-to-Energy Decision Support Method for Forward Deployed Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Throughout history , the availability of logistical support has played a key role in success of military operations. Logistics operations in the...Thermochemical Technologies for Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) Treatment." Venice , Italy, . CENTCOM. 2012. CENTCOM Contingency Environmental Standards

  20. Mobile Phone Dependence, Social Support and Impulsivity in Chinese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Songli; Chai, Jingxin; Wang, Shi-Bin; Ng, Chee H.; Ungvari, Gabor S.; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the frequency of mobile phone dependence in Chinese university students and explored its association with social support and impulsivity. Altogether, 909 university students were consecutively recruited from a large university in China. Mobile phone use, mobile phone dependence, impulsivity, and social support were measured with standardized instruments. The frequency of possible mobile phone use and mobile phone dependence was 78.3% and 7.4%, respectively. Multinomial logistic regression analyses revealed that compared with no mobile phone dependence, possible mobile phone dependence was significantly associated with being male (p = 0.04, OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.4–0.98), excessive mobile phone use (p mobile phone dependence was associated with length of weekly phone use (p = 0.01, OR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2–5.0), excessive mobile phone use (p mobile phone dependence and mobile phone dependence was high in this sample of Chinese university students. A significant positive association with impulsivity was found, but not with social support. PMID:29533986

  1. Supporting context-aware mobile applications : an infrastructure approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sinderen, Marten J.; van Halteren, Aart; Wegdam, M.; Meeuwissen, H.B.; Eertink, E.H.; Eertink, E.H.

    Mobile phones and PDAs are converging into mobile lifestyle devices that offer a wide range of applications to end users. Many of these applications will have the ability to adapt themselves to the user’s situation, commonly referred to as context awareness. We argue that an infrastructure is needed

  2. Challenges of Using Learning Analytics Techniques to Support Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Marco; Fulantelli, Giovanni; Taibi, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of Mobile Learning remains an open research issue, especially as regards the activities that take place outside the classroom. In this context, Learning Analytics can provide answers, and offer the appropriate tools to enhance Mobile Learning experiences. In this poster we introduce a task-interaction framework, using learning analytics…

  3. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Mobility Support of Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Winfried

    2015-08-24

    The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within "MOBIL" we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in "compliance data storage" as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC) were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period. Therefore the

  4. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Mayr

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulator for neuromuscular electrical stimulation for mobility support of elderly is not very complicated, but for application within "MOBIL" we have some additional demands to fulfill. First we have specific safety issues for this user group. A powerful compliance management system is crucial not only to guide daily application, but for creating hard data for the scientific outcome. We also need to assure easy handling of the stimulator, because the subjects are generally not able to cope with too difficult and complex motor skills. So, we developed five generations of stimulators and optimizing solutions after field tests. We are already planning the sixth generation with wireless control of the stimulation units by the central main handheld control unit. In a prototype, we have implemented a newly available high capacity memory, a breakthrough in “compliance data storage” as they offer the necessary high storage capacity and fast data handling for an affordable prize. The circuit also contains a 3D accelerometer sensor which acts as a further important safety features: if the control unit drops, this event is detected automatically by the sensor and activates an emergency switch-off that disables the stimulation to avoid associated risks. Further, we have implemented a hardware emergence shutdown and other safety measures. Finally, in the last example muscle torque measurements are referenced with compliance data. In the study normalized maximum voluntary contraction (MVC and maximum stimulation induced contraction (MSC were assessed in regular check-ups along the training period. With additional consideration of adjusted stimulation intensity for training out of the compliance data records we are able to estimate the induced contraction strength, which turned out to amount in average 11% of MVC. This value may seem on a first sight rather low, and ought to be considered in relation to the results at the end of the training period

  5. Development and Deployment of Mobile Emissions Laboratory for Continuous Long-Term Unattended Measurements of Greenhouse Gases, Fluxes, Isotopes and Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, A.; Baer, D. S.; Owano, T. G.; Provencal, R. A.; Gupta, M.; Parsotam, V.; Graves, P.; Goldstein, A.; Guha, A.

    2010-12-01

    Development and Deployment of Mobile Emissions Laboratory for Continuous Long-Term Unattended Measurements of Greenhouse Gases, Fluxes, Isotopes and Pollutants A. Gardner(1), D. Baer (1), T. Owano (1), R. Provencal (1), V. Parsotam (1), P. Graves (1), M. Gupta (1), Allen Goldstein (2), Abhinav Guha (2) (1) Los Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, CA 94041-1529 (2) Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California at Berkeley Quantifying the Urban Fossil Fuel Plume: Convergence of top-down and bottom-up approaches (Session A54). We report on the design, development and deployment of a novel Mobile Emissions Laboratory, consisting of innovative laser-based gas analyzers, for rapid measurements of multiple greenhouse gases and pollutants. Designed for real-time mobile and stationery emissions monitoring, the Mobile Emissions Laboratory was deployed at several locations during 2010, including CalNEX 2010, Caldecott Tunnel (Oakland, CA), and Altamont Landfill (Livermore, CA), to record real-time continuous measurements of isotopic CO2 (δ13C, CO2), methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon monoxide (CO), and isotopic water vapor (H2O; δ18O, δ2H). The commercial gas analyzers are based on novel cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy. The portable analyzers provide measurements in real time, require about 150 watts (each) of power and do not need liquid nitrogen to operate. These instruments have been applied in the field for applications that require high data rates (for eddy correlation flux), wide dynamic range (e.g., for chamber flux and other applications with concentrations that can be 10-1000 times higher than typical ambient levels) and highest accuracy (atmospheric monitoring stations). The Mobile Emissions Laboratory, which contains onboard batteries for long-term unattended measurements without access to mains power, can provide regulatory agencies, monitoring stations

  6. A Prospective Study of Lupus and Rheumatoid Arthritis in Relation to Deployment in Support of Iraq and Afghanistan: The Millennium Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to prospectively assess the association between deployment in support of the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and newly reported lupus and rheumatoid arthritis while also considering the effects of demographic, behavioral, and occupational characteristics. A total of 77,047 (2001–2003 and 31,110 (2004–2006 participants completed the baseline Millennium Cohort questionnaire and were resurveyed approximately every 3 years. Longitudinal analyses were used to assess the adjusted association between deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan with and without combat exposures and newly reported disease. After adjusting, deployment was not significantly associated with newly reported lupus compared with nondeployers. However, compared with nondeployers, deployers with and without combat exposures were significantly less likely to newly report rheumatoid arthritis. Women, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic participants had a significantly elevated risk for both diseases. Overall, deployment was not associated with an increased risk of newly reported lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. The development and deployment of low-carbon energy technologies: The role of economic interests and cultural worldviews on public support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, Todd L.; García, Jorge H.; Kallbekken, Steffen; Torvanger, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale deployment of low-carbon energy technologies is crucial to mitigating climate change, and public support is an important barrier to policies and projects that facilitate deployment. This paper provides insights to the origins of public opposition that can impede the adoption of low-carbon technologies by investigating how perceptions are shaped by local economic interests and individual cultural worldviews. The research considers both carbon capture and storage and wind energy technologies because they differ in maturity, economic impact and resource base. Further, for each technology, the research examines support for two types of policies: deployment in local community and public funding for research and development. Results indicate the influence of economic interests and cultural worldviews is policy specific. Individual cultural worldviews do not affect support for the deployment of technology, but they do significantly influence a person's support for publicly funded research and development. Conversely, local economic interests have a significant role in determining support for deployment, while they do not affect support for research and development. - Highlights: • We investigate factors that shape public support for low-carbon energy technologies. • We consider two low-carbon energy technologies and two stages of implementation. • Economic interests and cultural worldviews influence support but in different stages

  8. Post Cold War transformation of the medical function in support of the deployed soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekerdi, Zoltan

    2013-12-01

    This article summarises the changes that resulted in, and still act towards, final implementation of a separate medical function in operational medical support. This article is not intended to represent an historical account, but to provide concise supplemental material for decision makers to position medical under the commander, which enables medical staff to support and care for the troops and which can be used in the best possible way as an image forming factor for the force. The aim of this article is to clearly articulate the necessity for independence of the medical and logistic functions, while recognising the need for continued close coordination.

  9. Randomized Trial of a Smartphone Mobile Application Compared to Text Messaging to Support Smoking Cessation

    OpenAIRE

    Buller, David B.; Borland, Ron; Bettinghaus, Erwin P.; Shane, James H.; Zimmerman, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Text messaging has successfully supported smoking cessation. This study compares a mobile application with text messaging to support smoking cessation. Materials and Methods: Young adult smokers 18–30 years old (n=102) participated in a randomized pretest–posttest trial. Smokers received a smartphone application (REQ-Mobile) with short messages and interactive tools or a text messaging system (onQ), managed by an expert system. Self-reported usability of REQ-Mobile and qu...

  10. Africa needs streamlined regulation to support the deployment of GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Howard J; Roderick, Hugh; Tripathi, Leena

    2015-08-01

    Future food security in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) requires enhancement of its crop production. Transgenic crops with a poverty focus can enhance harvests and are available for staples such as cooking bananas and plantains. One constraint is optimisation of national biosafety processes to support rapid and safe uptake of such beneficial crops. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Framework to parameterize and validate APEX to support deployment of the nutrient tracking tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelines have been developed to parameterize and validate the Agricultural Policy Environmental eXtender (APEX) to support the Nutrient Tracking Tool (NTT). This follow-up paper presents 1) a case study to illustrate how the developed guidelines are applied in a headwater watershed located in cent...

  12. Allocation Anatomy: How District Policies That Deploy Resources Can Support (or Undermine) District Reform Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, Marguerite

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the effects of micro-budgeting decisions and show how they might support or hamper district reform strategies. The study draws on public and private sector resource allocation literature to identify key elements of resource allocation decisions. These elements are used to highlight different allocation…

  13. How an existing telecommunications network can support the deployment of smart meters in a water utility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel de Barros Moraes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This case study, based on interviews and technical analysis of a Brazilian water utility with more than 10 million clients, aims to understand what kind of adjusts on a telecommunications network, developed for operational and corporate use, demands to support a smart metering system, identifying this synergies and challenges.

  14. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  15. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusheng Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI. In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG, forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI and a congestion game with capacity (CGC. For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE. Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  16. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-09-18

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  17. Integrated Control Strategies Supporting Autonomous Functionalities in Mobile Robots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sights, B; Everett, H. R; Pacis, E. B; Kogut, G; Thompson, M

    2005-01-01

    High-level intelligence allows a mobile robot to create and interpret complex world models, but without a precise control system, the accuracy of the world model and the robot's ability to interact...

  18. LoWMob: Intra-PAN Mobility Support Schemes for 6LoWPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Wha Yoo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobility in 6LoWPAN (IPv6 over Low Power Personal Area Networks is being utilized in realizing many applications where sensor nodes, while moving, sense and transmit the gathered data to a monitoring server. By employing IEEE802.15.4 as a baseline for the link layer technology, 6LoWPAN implies low data rate and low power consumption with periodic sleep and wakeups for sensor nodes, without requiring them to incorporate complex hardware. Also enabling sensor nodes with IPv6 ensures that the sensor data can be accessed anytime and anywhere from the world. Several existing mobility-related schemes like HMIPv6, MIPv6, HAWAII, and Cellular IP require active participation of mobile nodes in the mobility signaling, thus leading to the mobility-related changes in the protocol stack of mobile nodes. In this paper, we present LoWMob, which is a network-based mobility scheme for mobile 6LoWPAN nodes in which the mobility of 6LoWPAN nodes is handled at the network-side. LoWMob ensures multi-hop communication between gateways and mobile nodes with the help of the static nodes within a 6LoWPAN. In order to reduce the signaling overhead of static nodes for supporting mobile nodes, LoWMob proposes a mobility support packet format at the adaptation layer of 6LoWPAN. Also we present a distributed version of LoWMob, named as DLoWMob (or Distributed LoWMob, which employs Mobility Support Points (MSPs to distribute the traffic concentration at the gateways and to optimize the multi-hop routing path between source and destination nodes in a 6LoWPAN. Moreover, we have also discussed the security considerations for our proposed mobility schemes. The performance of our proposed schemes is evaluated in terms of mobility signaling costs, end-to-end delay, and packet success ratio.

  19. LoWMob: Intra-PAN Mobility Support Schemes for 6LoWPAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Gargi; Raza, Muhammad Taqi; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Yoo, Seung-Wha

    2009-01-01

    Mobility in 6LoWPAN (IPv6 over Low Power Personal Area Networks) is being utilized in realizing many applications where sensor nodes, while moving, sense and transmit the gathered data to a monitoring server. By employing IEEE802.15.4 as a baseline for the link layer technology, 6LoWPAN implies low data rate and low power consumption with periodic sleep and wakeups for sensor nodes, without requiring them to incorporate complex hardware. Also enabling sensor nodes with IPv6 ensures that the sensor data can be accessed anytime and anywhere from the world. Several existing mobility-related schemes like HMIPv6, MIPv6, HAWAII, and Cellular IP require active participation of mobile nodes in the mobility signaling, thus leading to the mobility-related changes in the protocol stack of mobile nodes. In this paper, we present LoWMob, which is a network-based mobility scheme for mobile 6LoWPAN nodes in which the mobility of 6LoWPAN nodes is handled at the network-side. LoWMob ensures multi-hop communication between gateways and mobile nodes with the help of the static nodes within a 6LoWPAN. In order to reduce the signaling overhead of static nodes for supporting mobile nodes, LoWMob proposes a mobility support packet format at the adaptation layer of 6LoWPAN. Also we present a distributed version of LoWMob, named as DLoWMob (or Distributed LoWMob), which employs Mobility Support Points (MSPs) to distribute the traffic concentration at the gateways and to optimize the multi-hop routing path between source and destination nodes in a 6LoWPAN. Moreover, we have also discussed the security considerations for our proposed mobility schemes. The performance of our proposed schemes is evaluated in terms of mobility signaling costs, end-to-end delay, and packet success ratio.

  20. Automation support for mobile app quality assurance - a tool landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Susanne; Elberzhager, Frank; Holl, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Competitive pressure in app stores, as well as direct and transparent feedback of app store reviews have resulted in an increased demand for outstanding app quality and user experience. At the same time, reduced time-to-market, decreased budgets and time available for quality assurance, and careful user experience design have to be considered. In response, an enormous market for mobile app quality and user experience measurement tools has grown around the mobile app store ecosystems. Develope...

  1. Supporting Privacy of Computations in Mobile Big Data Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Nandha Premnath

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing systems enable clients to rent and share computing resources of third party platforms, and have gained widespread use in recent years. Numerous varieties of mobile, small-scale devices such as smartphones, red e-health devices, etc., across users, are connected to one another through the massive internetwork of vastly powerful servers on the cloud. While mobile devices store “private information” of users such as location, payment, health data, etc., they may also contribute “semi-public information” (which may include crowdsourced data such as transit, traffic, nearby points of interests, etc. for data analytics. In such a scenario, a mobile device may seek to obtain the result of a computation, which may depend on its private inputs, crowdsourced data from other mobile devices, and/or any “public inputs” from other servers on the Internet. We demonstrate a new method of delegating real-world computations of resource-constrained mobile clients using an encrypted program known as the garbled circuit. Using the garbled version of a mobile client’s inputs, a server in the cloud executes the garbled circuit and returns the resulting garbled outputs. Our system assures privacy of the mobile client’s input data and output of the computation, and also enables the client to verify that the evaluator actually performed the computation. We analyze the complexity of our system. We measure the time taken to construct the garbled circuit as well as evaluate it for varying number of servers. Using real-world data, we evaluate our system for a practical, privacy preserving search application that locates the nearest point of interest for the mobile client to demonstrate feasibility.

  2. Providing Logistics Support to CDC-Deployed Staff for the Ebola Response in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopson, Stephanie A; Rodriguez, Rockie; Rouse, Edward N

    2015-11-01

    The first Ebola cases in West Africa were reported by the Guinea Ministry of Health on March 23, 2014, and by June it became the largest recorded Ebola outbreak. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention field teams were deployed to West Africa, including in-country logistics staff who were critical for ensuring the movement of staff, equipment, and supplies to locations where public health knowledge and experience were applied to meet mission-related requirements. The logistics role was critical to creating the support for epidemiologists, medical doctors, laboratory staff, and health communicators involved in health promotion activities to successfully respond to the epidemic, both in the capital cities and in remote villages. Logistics personnel worked to procure equipment, such as portable video projectors, and have health promotion materials printed. Logistics staff also coordinated delivery of communication and health promotion materials to the embassy and provided assistance with distribution to various partners. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. Communication, Coping, and Connections: Campers’ and Parents’ Perspectives of Self-Efficacy and Benefits of Participation in Deployment Support Camps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy D. Clary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Military youth have unique challenges, particularly when a parent is deployed. Camp participation has been linked to multiple positive outcomes, thus camps have become popular as a setting for addressing these youth’s unique needs. With limited existing research on outcomes related to participation, this study explored to what extent participation in OMK camps affected military youth’s self-efficacy for communication, coping, and social skills. Participants responded to an online instrument three months after camp. Both campers and parents reported the largest increase in self-efficacy for communication skills, followed by social skills, and then coping skills. Open-ended responses overwhelmingly supported that developing friendships was one of the greatest benefits of attending a camp. The results are consistent with the literature regarding the importance of connectedness. Recommendations for conducting camps are offered. These finding may also be useful to those working with other special populations in the camp setting.

  4. Psychological Support Across the Deployment Cycle (L’aide psychologique au cours du cycle de deploiement)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    les meilleures pratiques de l’aide psychologique – avant, pendant et après les opérations –, et inventorié les instruments disponibles pour analyser le...moral d’une unité ainsi que les outils cliniques utilisés par les nations de l’OTAN et du PfP en vue d’évaluer, d’informer et d’intervenir auprès...practices in psychological support before, during and after operations, inventories of instruments used to survey unit morale as well and an

  5. A Design Support Framework through Dynamic Deployment of Hypothesis and Verification in the Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomaguch, Yutaka; Fujita, Kikuo

    This paper proposes a design support framework, named DRIFT (Design Rationale Integration Framework of Three layers), which dynamically captures and manages hypothesis and verification in the design process. A core of DRIFT is a three-layered design process model of action, model operation and argumentation. This model integrates various design support tools and captures design operations performed on them. Action level captures the sequence of design operations. Model operation level captures the transition of design states, which records a design snapshot over design tools. Argumentation level captures the process of setting problems and alternatives. The linkage of three levels enables to automatically and efficiently capture and manage iterative hypothesis and verification processes through design operations over design tools. In DRIFT, such a linkage is extracted through the templates of design operations, which are extracted from the patterns embeded in design tools such as Design-For-X (DFX) approaches, and design tools are integrated through ontology-based representation of design concepts. An argumentation model, gIBIS (graphical Issue-Based Information System), is used for representing dependencies among problems and alternatives. A mechanism of TMS (Truth Maintenance System) is used for managing multiple hypothetical design stages. This paper also demonstrates a prototype implementation of DRIFT and its application to a simple design problem. Further, it is concluded with discussion of some future issues.

  6. Overview of IAEA Activities in Support of Fast Reactors Development and Deployment & Objectives of this Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    FRs in a closed fuel cycle represent the only available nuclear technology able to guarantee the full sustainability of nuclear energy (virtually unlimited natural resources of nuclear fuel and drastic reduction of the requirements of the geological repository). FR technology has been brought to high level of maturity by the design, construction and operation of several experimental, demonstrative and power fast reactors worldwide. The largest experience is for SFR with oxide and metal fuel. Safety features of FRs are rather different compared to thermal reactors due to the fast spectrum and the different plant configuration. Reactivity effects play an important role in the design of innovative FRs: they represent the first safety system provided by the intrinsic physical configuration of the core. IAEA is supporting Member States representing a platform to share knowledge and identify technology gaps and R&D needs. Within the TWG-FR, different CRPs aimed at the improvement of FR safety design have been carrying out

  7. Mobile Phone Dependence, Social Support and Impulsivity in Chinese University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Songli; Chai, Jingxin; Wang, Shi-Bin; Ng, Chee H; Ungvari, Gabor S; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2018-03-13

    This study examined the frequency of mobile phone dependence in Chinese university students and explored its association with social support and impulsivity. Altogether, 909 university students were consecutively recruited from a large university in China. Mobile phone use, mobile phone dependence, impulsivity, and social support were measured with standardized instruments. The frequency of possible mobile phone use and mobile phone dependence was 78.3% and 7.4%, respectively. Multinomial logistic regression analyses revealed that compared with no mobile phone dependence, possible mobile phone dependence was significantly associated with being male ( p = 0.04, OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.4-0.98), excessive mobile phone use ( p phone dependence was associated with length of weekly phone use ( p = 0.01, OR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2-5.0), excessive mobile phone use ( p phone dependence and mobile phone dependence was high in this sample of Chinese university students. A significant positive association with impulsivity was found, but not with social support.

  8. Developing support schemes for electric renewable energy in France: how to reconcile integration and deployment challenges?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Mathilde; Ruedinger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The reform for a greater integration of support schemes in the electricity market is not a marginal development, and should allow for a transition period for market actors to adapt. Lessons from the experience of neighboring countries will be valuable, especially in view of greater regional harmonization in the future. Better integration of solutions for reducing demand and greater system flexibility would also be advisable going forward. Finally, it is also essential to evaluate the impact of the reform on the risk of electricity market concentration and a reduced diversity of actors; as well as of the potential increase in barriers to entry which could hinder the emergence of collaborative or citizen projects, as these are crucial for improving project acceptance and sharing RES costs. Through stronger exposure to market signals, market premia can assist the technical and economic integration of renewable energy (RES). The resultant advantages in terms of improvements in forecasting and marketing tools, negative price management and support for more valuable technologies and practices in the system closely depends, however, on the precise calibration of the mechanisms involved. To address this, it seems essential to learn from the experiences of neighboring countries and to plan an adequate transition period for all actors to adapt to the change in regulation. The rise in transaction costs and risk premia can lead to additional costs under the new mechanisms. Direct costs, which are linked to the marketing of electricity and to rules aimed at curtailing negative prices, remain limited. However, a cost-benefit analysis must consider the impact of changes in regulation on risk perception and the cost of capital for financing projects - a determinant factor in the economic viability of the project. This further implies a need to consider complementary measures aimed at reducing the financial risks to limit production costs and incremental costs for society. The push

  9. Supporting University Learning Through Mobile Technologies: A Global Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gitumu Mugo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The workplace in the modern world continues to demand higher qualifications and refined competencies. In the recent past, workers would respond to such demands through learning by correspondence. When the Internet and e-Learning emerged, it received widespread accolade as a solution to the challenges experienced by distant learners. The technology was also seen as an opportunity for educational institutions to leverage their technological uptake to benefit regular students. However, desktop computers and Internet connectivity, which were the drivers of e-learning technologies, were expensive, bulky and scarce. So when mobile technologies emerged, educationist saw an opportunity for addressing the limitations associated with correspondence, “e” and tethered learning. Mobile devices being cheap, portable and reliable received widespread acceptance and possession. So, educators, hardware designers and program developers started to design hardware and applications that would infuse learning content into the devices. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the potential of mobile technologies in the education market place, highlighting global initiatives and trends. The paper will also review how universities around the world, Africa and in Kenya have oriented themselves for learning with mobile technologies. The study was a documentary analysis of virtual documents stored electronically for access through the Internet, text books, archival repositories and encyclopedias. The study observed a significant high global mobile ownership and usage rates, but was able to demonstrate that despite its pedagogical advantages, the use of the technology for learning purposes at university level is still at the infantry. Keywords: Mobile, Technologies, Universities, adoption, ICT, eLearning

  10. [Mobile laboratories for rapid deployment and their contribution to the containment of emerging diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa, illustrated by the example of Ebola virus disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, J; Kouriba, B; Ladan Fofana, L; Fleischmann, E; Starke, M; Diallo, S; Babin, F-X; von Bonin, J; Wölfel, R

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola virus, which became a global health concern in 2014, is an example of an emerging pathogen. Ebola virus disease can only be diagnosed in biosafety level 3 and 4 laboratories, which provide the security required to avoid exposure of both the staff and the environment to the pathogen. These laboratories are often far from the site of outbreaks, which may occur in rural areas or border regions (when the disease is imported from a neighboring country). Rapidly deployable laboratory units can bring the diagnosis closer to the outbreak site and thus significantly shorten the time to delivery of results, thus facilitating epidemic containment. Here we report our experience from the first months of implementation in Mali of a mobile laboratory unit of the same type as the European mobile labs and we describe the workflow in the laboratory as well as the training of its Malian staff. Based on our experience and the reports of other projects, we propose a framework in which these mobile laboratory units can strengthen epidemiological surveillance and contribute to containing outbreaks of emerging diseases in sub-Saharan Africa.

  11. Analyzing policy support instruments and regulatory risk factors for wind energy deployment-A developers' perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luethi, Sonja; Praessler, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A transition to a renewable energy system is high on the policy agenda in many countries. A promising energy source for a low-carbon energy future is wind. Policy-makers can attract wind energy development by providing attractive policy frameworks. This paper argues that apart from the level of financial support, both the risks stemming from the regulatory environment (legal security, administrative process and grid access) and the ability to finance projects play a critical role in determining the attractiveness of the development environment. It sheds light on how project developers trade off these different aspects and to what extent the attractiveness of a certain policy framework increases with the introduction of specific measures. Conjoint analysis is employed to provide empirical evidence on the preference of wind energy developers in the EU and the US. The analysis shows that developers' preferences are very similar across the studied regions and for different types of developers. Which policy measures could be most valuable depends on the specific existing environment. In some southeastern European countries, a reduction of administrative process duration may yield the highest utility gains, whereas, in the US, improvements in grid access regulation and an increase in remuneration levels may be more effective. - Highlights: → Paper suggests conjoint analysis as scenario tool for estimating potential effects of specific policy measures. → It provides a quantitative, empirical dataset of 119 onshore wind energy developers' preferences. → Results suggest that the aspects 'Legal security' and 'Remuneration' are important attributes. → Cluster analyses yields slightly different preferences for developers from EU and US.

  12. Activity-Based Support for Mobility and Collaboration in Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jacob Eyvind

    2004-01-01

    is to: (1) support human activity by managing its collection of work tasks on a computer, (2) support mobility by distributing activities across heterogeneous computing environments, (3) support asynchronous collaboration by allowing several people to participate in an activity, and (4) support...

  13. Investigation of Using Analytics in Promoting Mobile Learning Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visali, Videhi; Swami, Niraj

    2013-01-01

    Learning analytics can promote pedagogically informed use of learner data, which can steer the progress of technology mediated learning across several learning contexts. This paper presents the application of analytics to a mobile learning solution and demonstrates how a pedagogical sense was inferred from the data. Further, this inference was…

  14. Using a Mobile Application to Support Children's Writing Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanala, Sari; Nousiainen, Tuula; Kankaanranta, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of the prototype of a mobile application for the enhancement of children's motivation for writing. The results are explored from students' and experts' perspectives. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on a field trial and expert evaluations of a prototype of a mobile…

  15. Using Mobile Technology to Support Literacy Coaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, C. C.; Martin, Aqueasha

    2013-01-01

    This article examines literacy coaches' (n = 7) digital note-taking practices using mobile technology and their influence on reflective practice. The study, which employed a design-based approach, investigated the coaches' transition from note-taking by paper and pencil to the note-taking application Evernote. Data included interviews with the…

  16. Architectural support for mobile context-aware applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dockhorn Costa, P.; Ferreira Pires, Luis; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Khalil Ibrahim, I.

    2006-01-01

    Context-awareness has emerged as an important and desirable feature in distributed mobile systems, since it benefits from the changes in the user's context to dynamically tailor services to the user's current situation and needs. This chapter presents our efforts on designing a flexible

  17. A Learning Activity Design Framework for Supporting Mobile Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the Learning Activity Design (LEAD framework for the development and implementation of mobile learning activities in primary schools. The LEAD framework draws on methodological perspectives suggested by design-based research and interaction design in the specific field of technology-enhanced learning (TEL. The LEAD framework is grounded in four design projects conducted over a period of six years. It contributes a new understanding of the intricacies and multifaceted aspects of the design-process characterizing the development and implementation of mobile devices (i.e. smart phones and tablets in curricular activities conducted in Swedish primary schools. This framework is intended to provide both designers and researchers with methodological tools that take account of the pedagogical foundations of technologically-based educational interventions, usability issues related to the interaction with the mobile application developed, multiple data streams generated during the design project, multiple stakeholders involved in the design process and sustainability aspects of the mobile learning activities implemented in the school classroom.

  18. Designing a diabetes mobile application with social network support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomutare, Taridzo; Tatara, Naoe; Årsand, Eirik; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Although mobile applications and social media have emerged as important facets of the Internet, their role in healthcare is still not well-understood. We present design artefacts, inspired by persuasive technology concepts, from a study of social media as part of a diabetes mHealth application. We used the design science approach for mobile application design, and real-life user testing and focus group meetings to test the application over a 12-week period with 7 participants. Based on the System Usability Score (SUS), the mobile application scored an average of 84.6 (SD=13.2), which represents a fairly high usability score compared to the literature. Regression analysis on the daily blood glucose levels showed significant decreases for some patients, and although the study is not powered, the HbA1c showed a promising trend, and self-efficacy marginally increased. Incorporating persuasive elements such as blood glucose tracking and visualisation, and social media access directly from the mobile application produced promising results that warrant a larger study of behaviour change for people with diabetes.

  19. Using mobile phone technology to provide recovery support for women offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christy K; Johnson, Kimberly; Dennis, Michael L

    2013-10-01

    Mobile technology holds promise as a recovery tool for people with substance use disorders. However, some populations who may benefit the most may not have access to or experience with mobile phones. Incarcerated women represent a group at high risk for recidivism and relapse to substance abuse. Cost-effective mechanisms must be in place to support their recovery upon release. This study explores using mobile technology as a recovery management tool for women offenders residing in the community following release from jail. This study surveyed 325 minority women offenders with substance use disorders to determine whether or not they use cell phones, their comfort with texting and search features, and the social networks that they access from mobile phones. We found that 83% of survey subjects had cell phones; 30% of those were smartphones. Seventy-seven percent of the women reported access to supportive friends, and 88% had close family members they contacted regularly using mobile technology. Results indicated that most of the women were comfortable using a mobile phone, although the majority of them had prepaid minutes rather than plans, and most did currently use smartphones or have the capability to download applications or access social networks via their phones. Most women reported that they would be comfortable using a mobile phone to text, e-mail, and answer surveys. The high rate of adoption of mobile technology by women offenders makes them a promising target for recovery support delivered via mobile phone.

  20. MYPLAN - A Mobile Phone Application for Supporting People at Risk of Suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard Larsen, Jette L; Frandsen, Hanne; Erlangsen, Annette

    2016-01-01

    describes MYPLAN, a mobile phone application designed to support people at risk of suicide by letting them create a safety plan. METHOD: MYPLAN was developed in collaboration with clinical psychiatric staff at Danish suicide preventive clinics. The mobile application lets the user create an individualized......BACKGROUND: Safety plans have been suggested as an intervention for people at risk of suicide. Given the impulsive character of suicidal ideation, a safety plan in the format of a mobile phone application is likely to be more available and useful than traditional paper versions. AIMS: The study......,000 times. Users at risk of suicide as well as clinical staff have provided positive feedback on the mobile application. CONCLUSION: Support via mobile phone applications might be particularly useful for younger age groups at risk of suicide as well as in areas or countries where support options are lacking...

  1. Promises and Pitfalls of Computer-Supported Mindfulness: Exploring a Situated Mobile Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Vacca

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer-supported mindfulness (CSM is a burgeoning area filled with varied approaches such as mobile apps and EEG headbands. However, many of the approaches focus on providing meditation guidance. The ubiquity of mobile devices may provide new opportunities to support mindfulness practices that are more situated in everyday life. In this paper, a new situated mindfulness approach is explored through a specific mobile app design. Through an experimental design, the approach is compared to traditional audio-based mindfulness meditation, and a mind wandering control, over a one-week period. The study demonstrates the viability for a situated mobile mindfulness approach to induce mindfulness states. However, phenomenological aspects of the situated mobile approach suggest both promises and pitfalls for computer-supported mindfulness using a situated approach.

  2. Mobile Augmented Reality in Supporting Peer Assessment: An Implementation in a Fundamental Design Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chung-Hsien; Chao, Stefan; Kinshuk; Chao, Kuo-Hung

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a conceptual framework for supporting mobile peer assessment by incorporating augmented reality technology to eliminate limitation of reviewing and assessing. According to the characteristics of mobile technology and augmented reality, students' work can be shown in various ways by considering the locations and situations. This…

  3. Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2013, 23 September). Apps4CPR: A review study of mobile applications for cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and support. Presentation given during the 6th World Congress on Social Media, Mobile Apps and Internet/Web 2.0 in Medicine, Health, and Biomedical Research, London, UK.

  4. Initial Evaluation of a Mobile Scaffolding Application That Seeks to Support Novice Learners of Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbogo, Chao; Blake, Edwin; Suleman, Hussein

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the use of an application that scaffolds the constructions of programs on a mobile device. The application was developed to support novice learners of programming outside the classroom. This paper reports on results of a first experiment conducted to evaluate the mobile application. The main research questions…

  5. From Particular to Popular: Facilitating EFL Mobile-Supported Cooperative Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Ju; Sung, Yao-Ting; Chang, Kuo-En

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an action research-based study that adapted a mobile-supported cooperative reading system into regular English as a foreign language (EFL) classes at one Taiwanese elementary school. The current study was comprised of two stages: adaptation and evaluation. During the adaptation stage, a mobile-supported…

  6. Lab-on-a-Drone: Toward Pinpoint Deployment of Smartphone-Enabled Nucleic Acid-Based Diagnostics for Mobile Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priye, Aashish; Wong, Season; Bi, Yuanpeng; Carpio, Miguel; Chang, Jamison; Coen, Mauricio; Cope, Danielle; Harris, Jacob; Johnson, James; Keller, Alexandra; Lim, Richard; Lu, Stanley; Millard, Alex; Pangelinan, Adriano; Patel, Neal; Smith, Luke; Chan, Kamfai; Ugaz, Victor M

    2016-05-03

    We introduce a portable biochemical analysis platform for rapid field deployment of nucleic acid-based diagnostics using consumer-class quadcopter drones. This approach exploits the ability to isothermally perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a single heater, enabling the system to be operated using standard 5 V USB sources that power mobile devices (via battery, solar, or hand crank action). Time-resolved fluorescence detection and quantification is achieved using a smartphone camera and integrated image analysis app. Standard sample preparation is enabled by leveraging the drone's motors as centrifuges via 3D printed snap-on attachments. These advancements make it possible to build a complete DNA/RNA analysis system at a cost of ∼$50 ($US). Our instrument is rugged and versatile, enabling pinpoint deployment of sophisticated diagnostics to distributed field sites. This capability is demonstrated by successful in-flight replication of Staphylococcus aureus and λ-phage DNA targets in under 20 min. The ability to perform rapid in-flight assays with smartphone connectivity eliminates delays between sample collection and analysis so that test results can be delivered in minutes, suggesting new possibilities for drone-based systems to function in broader and more sophisticated roles beyond cargo transport and imaging.

  7. Agent Based Framework Architecture for Supporting Content Adaptation for Mobile Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Omar Al-Sakran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid spread of smart mobile technology that supports internet access is transforming the way governments provide services to their citizens. Mobile devices have different capabilities based on the manufacturers and models. This paper proposes a new framework for adapting the content of M-government services using mobile agent technology. The framework is based on a mediation architecture that uses multiple mobile agents and XML as semi-structure mediation language. The flexibility of the mediation and XML provide an adaptive environment to stream data based on the capabilities of the device sending the query to the system.

  8. Mobile Sensing and Support for People With Depression: A Pilot Trial in the Wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Fabian; Kowatsch, Tobias; Fleisch, Elgar; Rufer, Michael; Weidt, Steffi

    2016-09-21

    Depression is a burdensome, recurring mental health disorder with high prevalence. Even in developed countries, patients have to wait for several months to receive treatment. In many parts of the world there is only one mental health professional for over 200 people. Smartphones are ubiquitous and have a large complement of sensors that can potentially be useful in monitoring behavioral patterns that might be indicative of depressive symptoms and providing context-sensitive intervention support. The objective of this study is 2-fold, first to explore the detection of daily-life behavior based on sensor information to identify subjects with a clinically meaningful depression level, second to explore the potential of context sensitive intervention delivery to provide in-situ support for people with depressive symptoms. A total of 126 adults (age 20-57) were recruited to use the smartphone app Mobile Sensing and Support (MOSS), collecting context-sensitive sensor information and providing just-in-time interventions derived from cognitive behavior therapy. Real-time learning-systems were deployed to adapt to each subject's preferences to optimize recommendations with respect to time, location, and personal preference. Biweekly, participants were asked to complete a self-reported depression survey (PHQ-9) to track symptom progression. Wilcoxon tests were conducted to compare scores before and after intervention. Correlation analysis was used to test the relationship between adherence and change in PHQ-9. One hundred twenty features were constructed based on smartphone usage and sensors including accelerometer, Wifi, and global positioning systems (GPS). Machine-learning models used these features to infer behavior and context for PHQ-9 level prediction and tailored intervention delivery. A total of 36 subjects used MOSS for ≥2 weeks. For subjects with clinical depression (PHQ-9≥11) at baseline and adherence ≥8 weeks (n=12), a significant drop in PHQ-9 was observed

  9. Supporting cancer patients in illness management: usability evaluation of a mobile app.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkovic, Jelena; Kaufman, David R; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-08-13

    Mobile phones and tablets currently represent a significant presence in people's everyday lives. They enable access to different information and services independent of current place and time. Such widespread connectivity offers significant potential in different app areas including health care. Our goal was to evaluate the usability of the Connect Mobile app. The mobile app enables mobile access to the Connect system, an online system that supports cancer patients in managing health-related issues. Along with symptom management, the system promotes better patient-provider communication, collaboration, and shared decision making. The Connect Mobile app enables access to the Connect system over both mobile phones and tablets. The study consisted of usability tests of a high fidelity prototype with 7 cancer patients where the objectives were to identify existing design and functionality issues and to provide patients with a real look-and-feel of the mobile system. In addition, we conducted semistructured interviews to obtain participants' feedback about app usefulness, identify the need for new system features and design requirements, and measure the acceptance of the mobile app and its features within everyday health management. The study revealed a total of 27 design issues (13 for mobile apps and 14 for tablet apps), which were mapped to source events (ie, errors, requests for help, participants' concurrent feedback, and moderator observation). We also applied usability heuristics to identify violations of usability principles. The majority of violations were related to enabling ease of input, screen readability, and glanceability (15 issues), as well as supporting an appropriate match between systems and the real world (7 issues) and consistent mapping of system functions and interactions (4 issues). Feedback from participants also showed the cancer patients' requirements for support systems and how these needs are influenced by different context-related factors

  10. 75 FR 32984 - Policy on the Retention of Supporting Documents and the Use of Electronic Mobile Communication...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ...-0168] Policy on the Retention of Supporting Documents and the Use of Electronic Mobile Communication... changes regarding the retention of supporting documents and the use of electronic mobile communication... electronic mobile communication/tracking records to be supporting documents, as they record the time, date...

  11. Monitoring Exposure to Ebola and Health of U.S. Military Personnel Deployed in Support of Ebola Control Efforts - Liberia, October 25, 2014-February 27, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardile, Anthony P; Murray, Clinton K; Littell, Christopher T; Shah, Neel J; Fandre, Matthew N; Drinkwater, Dennis C; Markelz, Brian P; Vento, Todd J

    2015-07-03

    In response to the unprecedented Ebola virus disease (Ebola) outbreak in West Africa, the U.S. government deployed approximately 2,500 military personnel to support the government of Liberia. Their primary missions were to construct Ebola treatment units (ETUs), train health care workers to staff ETUs, and provide laboratory testing capacity for Ebola. Service members were explicitly prohibited from engaging in activities that could result in close contact with an Ebola-infected patient or coming in contact with the remains of persons who had died from unknown causes. Military units performed twice-daily monitoring of temperature and review of exposures and symptoms ("unit monitoring") on all persons throughout deployment, exit screening at the time of departure from Liberia, and post-deployment monitoring for 21 days at segregated, controlled monitoring areas on U.S. military installations. A total of 32 persons developed a fever during deployment from October 25, 2014, through February 27, 2015; none had a known Ebola exposure or developed Ebola infection. Monitoring of all deployed service members revealed no Ebola exposures or infections. Given their activity restrictions and comprehensive monitoring while deployed to Liberia, U.S. military personnel constitute a unique population with a lower risk for Ebola exposure compared with those working in the country without such measures.

  12. Mobil4D platform: A mobile learning opportunity and support for nursing education

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ogunleye, OS

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available and Development explorations using it as proof of concept. Demos of some of the pilot services being developed on Mobi4D will also be presented showing how such platform can help address challenges faced in nursing education through using mobile communication....

  13. Renewable energy (green ICT) support for mobile communications in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsivor, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, the telecommunication and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) industry has grown very fast with increasing appetites for modern value added services and gadgets which function without any break, delay or interferences. Currently, total worldwide mobile subscription......). This growth therefore requires more reliable and sustainable energy for effective operation. However, about nearly 1.6 billion people in the world do not have access to electricity and about 99 percent of this figure is from developing countries. This shows that about 1.3 billion people from Sub...

  14. Life Course Stage and Social Support Mobilization for End-of-Life Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaValley, Susan A; Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth A

    2018-04-01

    Caregivers of terminally ill patients are at risk for anxiety, depression, and social isolation. Social support from friends, family members, neighbors, and health care professionals can potentially prevent or mitigate caregiver strain. While previous research documents the importance of social support in helping end-of-life caregivers cope with caregiving demands, little is known about differences in social support experiences among caregivers at different life course stages. Using life course theory, this study analyzes data from in-depth interviews with 50 caregivers of patients enrolled in hospice services to compare barriers to mobilizing social support among caregivers at two life course stages: midlife caregivers caring for parents and older adult caregivers caring for spouses/partners. Older adult caregivers reported different barriers to mobilizing social support compared with midlife caregivers. Findings enhance the understanding of how caregivers' life course stage affects their barriers to mobilization of social support resources.

  15. Supporting Information Access in a Hospital Ward by a Context-Aware Mobile Electronic Patient Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mikael B.; Høegh, Rune Thaarup

    2006-01-01

    Context-awareness holds promise for improving the utility of software products. Context-aware mobile systems encompass the ability to automatically discover and react to changes in an environment. Most contemporary context-aware mobile systems aim to support users in private situations, for example......Ward is to support nurses in conducting morning procedures in a hospital ward. MobileWard is context-aware as it is able to discover and react autonomously according to changes in the environment and since it integrates the ability to provide information and services to the user where the relevancy depends....... Implications and limitations of the proposed solution are further discussed....

  16. Supporting Local Mobility in Healthcare by Application Roaming among Heterogeneous Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jacob Eyvind; Kjær, Thomas A.K.; Nielsen, Christina

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results from a research project aiming at developing an architecture supporting local mobility within hospitals. The architecture is based on fieldwork and design workshops within a large Danish hospital and it has been implemented and evaluated after a pilot phase. Our...... fieldwork has emphasised the differences between remote mobility, where users travel over long distances, and local mobility, where users walk around within a fixed set of buildings and/or places. Based on our field studies and our design work, we conclude that local mobility puts up three requirements...... for computer support; (i) it should integrate into the existing infrastructure, (ii) it should support the use of various heterogeneous devices, and (iii) it should enable seamless application roaming between these devices. The paper describes how these requirements were realized in an architecture for local...

  17. Integrated Control Strategies Supporting Autonomous Functionalities in Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Sights

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available High-level intelligence allows a mobile robot to create and interpret complex world models, but without a precise control system, the accuracy of the world model and the robot's ability to interact with its surroundings are greatly diminished. This problem is amplified when the environment is hostile, such as in a battlefield situation where an error in movement or a slow response may lead to destruction of the robot. As the presence of robots on the battlefield continues to escalate and the trend toward relieving the human of the low-level control burden advances, the ability to combine the functionalities of several critical control systems on a single platform becomes imperative.

  18. The Challenges Associated with Accounting for the Army's Force Provider (FP) System when Deployed in Support of Military Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Correia, Carlos A; Horner, Allen; McLaughlin, James; Stewardson, Donald

    2008-01-01

    .... The analysis will address the inherent challenges associated with accountability of the FP System when deployed and decommissioned to undergo RESET, the lack of a singular management and decision...

  19. What Do Capacity Deployment Rates Tell Us about the Efficiency of Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy Sources Support Measures in Greece?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiris Papadelis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of fiscal support for electricity generation from renewable energy sources (RES-E is a multifaceted notion that cannot be adequately described by a single metric. Efficiency is related to the ability of a policy measure to support deployment without creating negative feedback effects. These negative effects may stem from saturation of the grid’s ability to absorb an increased amount of RES-E power, the inability of regulatory bodies to cope with the larger workload due to the increased number of projects requesting permits or from rent-seeking behavior. Furthermore, the primary rationale for feed-in tariffs (FITs and other fiscal support schemes is that increased deployment of RES-E technologies will lead to reductions in costs and increases in efficiency. As a result, the efficiency of an RES-E support policy should be also judged by its ability to capitalize on cost reductions. Overall, we present an approach to facilitate ongoing assessments of the efficiency of support measures for RES-E deployment. We demonstrate the proposed approach using the FIT support policy in Greece as a case study. In particular, the RES-E support policy in Greece has been recently revised through tariff cuts and a moratorium on new production licenses. We aim to demonstrate that if publicly available data are appropriately monitored, a policy revision can take place in a timelier and less disruptive manner.

  20. Design, Implementation, and Performance Evaluation of Efficient PMIPv6 Based Mobile Multicast Sender Support Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6 is proposed as a promising network-based mobility management protocol, which does not need any participation of mobile nodes. PMIPv6 does not support the multicast well and most of the current research concentrates on the mobile multicast receiver. However, the mobile multicast sender is also very important and challenging, which has not been addressed well. Therefore, in this paper we propose two efficient PMIPv6 based mobile multicast sender support schemes which are PMIP bidirectional tunneling (PMIP-BT and PMIP direct routing (PMIP-DR. In the PMIP-BT, the multicast traffic can be delivered through the PMIPv6 bidirectional tunnel, while, in the PMIP-DR, the multicast data can be transmitted via an optimized direct multicast routing. Both of them can support the multicast sender mobility transparently enabled in the PMIPv6 networks. We evaluate the performance of the proposed schemes by theoretical analysis, and the numerical results show that the proposed schemes have a better performance in terms of the signaling cost than the current schemes. Meanwhile, the proposed schemes are also implemented on the test bed, and the experimental results not only verify the validity and feasibility of our proposed schemes, but also conclude the different scenarios to which they are applicable.

  1. Mobilizing for the Lilongwe Diabetes Peer Support Programme in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acceptance as a solution for improving diabetes self-management. In this programme ... in Chichewa, 5) motivation and a willingness to accept the roles and ... support programme will hopefully lead to expansion of this model to other regions ...

  2. Climate finance: Mobilizing the private sector to support adaptation ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... Find out about the knowledge, innovation, and solutions we are bringing ... The Private Finance Gap: Challenges and Opportunities in Funding Adaptation ... IDRC supports results-based research that has real impacts on the ...

  3. Feasibility Study and Experimental Verification of Simplified Fiber-Supported 60-GHz Picocell Mobile Backhaul Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedev, Alexander; Pang, Xiaodan; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a fiber-wireless transmission system for optimized delivery of 60-GHz radio frequency (RF) signals through picocell mobile backhaul connections. We identify advantages of 60-GHz links for utilization in short-range mobile backhaul through feasibility...... the wireless transmission distance from 4 m to a few hundred meters has been taken into account in the setup design, and the techniques to extend the wireless distance are analyzed....... analysis and comparison with an alternative E-band (60–90 GHz) technology. The 60-GHz fiber-wireless-fiber setup is then introduced: two spans of up to 20 km of optical fiber are deployed and bridged by up to 4 m of wireless distance. The 60-GHz radio-over-fiber technology is utilized in the first span...

  4. Deploying response surface methodology (RSM) and glowworm swarm optimization (GSO) in optimizing warpage on a mobile phone cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, X. N.; Fathullah, M.; Shayfull, Z.; Nasir, S. M.; Hazwan, M. H. M.; Shazzuan, S.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic injection moulding is a popular manufacturing method not only it is reliable, but also efficient and cost saving. It able to produce plastic part with detailed features and complex geometry. However, defects in injection moulding process degrades the quality and aesthetic of the injection moulded product. The most common defect occur in the process is warpage. Inappropriate process parameter setting of injection moulding machine is one of the reason that leads to the occurrence of warpage. The aims of this study were to improve the quality of injection moulded part by investigating the optimal parameters in minimizing warpage using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and Glowworm Swarm Optimization (GSO). Subsequent to this, the most significant parameter was identified and recommended parameters setting was compared with the optimized parameter setting using RSM and GSO. In this research, the mobile phone case was selected as case study. The mould temperature, melt temperature, packing pressure, packing time and cooling time were selected as variables whereas warpage in y-direction was selected as responses in this research. The simulation was carried out by using Autodesk Moldflow Insight 2012. In addition, the RSM was performed by using Design Expert 7.0 whereas the GSO was utilized by using MATLAB. The warpage in y direction recommended by RSM were reduced by 70 %. The warpages recommended by GSO were decreased by 61 % in y direction. The resulting warpages under optimal parameter setting by RSM and GSO were validated by simulation in AMI 2012. RSM performed better than GSO in solving warpage issue.

  5. Mobile Context-Aware Support for Public Transportation Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Buchwald, Esben; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Murray-Smith, Roderick

    2012-01-01

    compass bearing, in addition to a distance range chosen by a physical gesture. The main application tested in this paper is a system to support public transport users in Copenhagen. Users can point at any bus-stop or train station and be given timetables, next departure times, and buy a ticket via SMS...

  6. Personalised mobile services supporting the implementation of clinical guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; Gay, Valerie; Leijdekkers, Peter; Rienks, Rienk; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Grasso, F; Paris, C

    2009-01-01

    Telemonitoring is emerging as a compelling application of Body Area Networks (BANs). We describe two health BAN systems developed respectively by a European team and an Australian team and discuss some issues encountered relating to formalization of clinical knowledge to support real-time analysis

  7. Tool-Supported User-Centred Prototyping of Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leichtenstern, Karin; André, Elisabeth; Rehm, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    the process both cost-effective and time-effective. In this paper we cover that problem and provide insights in so-called user-centered prototyping (UCP) tools which support the production of prototypes as well as their evaluation with end-users. In particular, we introduce our UCP tool called Mo...

  8. Supporting Knowledge Mobilization and Research Impact Strategies in Grant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, David; Jensen, Krista E.; Johnny, Michael; Poetz, Anneliese

    2016-01-01

    Each application to the National Science Foundation (NSF) must contain a Broader Impact (BI) strategy. Similarly, grant applications for most research funders in Canada and the UK require strategies to support the translation of research into impacts on society; however, the guidance provided to researchers is too general to inform the specific…

  9. Technology Trends in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning in Elementary Education from 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapina, Mia; Boticki, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses mobile computer supported collaborative learning in elementary education worldwide focusing on technology trends for the period from 2009 to 2014. The results present representation of device types used to support collaborative activities, their distribution per users (1:1 or 1:m) and if students are learning through or around…

  10. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen; Muhl, Thuy

    2017-01-01

    For use of metal supported SOFC in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast start up, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the support layer thickness of 313 μm...

  11. Evaluation of QoS supported in Network Mobility NEMO environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussien, L F; Abdalla, A H; Habaebi, M H; Khalifa, O O; Hassan, W H

    2013-01-01

    Network mobility basic support (NEMO BS) protocol is an entire network, roaming as a unit which changes its point of attachment to the Internet and consequently its reachability in the network topology. NEMO BS doesn't provide QoS guarantees to its users same as traditional Internet IP and Mobile IPv6 as well. Typically, all the users will have same level of services without considering about their application requirements. This poses a problem to real-time applications that required QoS guarantees. To gain more effective control of the network, incorporated QoS is needed. Within QoS-enabled network the traffic flow can be distributed to various priorities. Also, the network bandwidth and resources can be allocated to different applications and users. Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) working group has proposed several QoS solutions for static network such as IntServ, DiffServ and MPLS. These QoS solutions are designed in the context of a static environment (i.e. fixed hosts and networks). However, they are not fully adapted to mobile environments. They essentially demands to be extended and adjusted to meet up various challenges involved in mobile environments. With existing QoS mechanisms many proposals have been developed to provide QoS for individual mobile nodes (i.e. host mobility). In contrary, research based on the movement of the whole mobile network in IPv6 is still undertaking by the IETF working groups (i.e. network mobility). Few researches have been done in the area of providing QoS for roaming networks. Therefore, this paper aims to review and investigate (previous /and current) related works that have been developed to provide QoS in mobile network. Consequently, a new proposed scheme will be introduced to enhance QoS within NEMO environment, achieving by which seamless mobility to users of mobile network node (MNN)

  12. Randomized trial of a smartphone mobile application compared to text messaging to support smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Borland, Ron; Bettinghaus, Erwin P; Shane, James H; Zimmerman, Donald E

    2014-03-01

    Text messaging has successfully supported smoking cessation. This study compares a mobile application with text messaging to support smoking cessation. Young adult smokers 18-30 years old (n = 102) participated in a randomized pretest-posttest trial. Smokers received a smartphone application (REQ-Mobile) with short messages and interactive tools or a text messaging system (onQ), managed by an expert system. Self-reported usability of REQ-Mobile and quitting behavior (quit attempts, point-prevalence, 30-day point-prevalence, and continued abstinence) were assessed in posttests. Overall, 60% of smokers used mobile services (REQ-Mobile, 61%, mean of 128.5 messages received; onQ, 59%, mean of 107.8 messages), and 75% evaluated REQ-Mobile as user-friendly. A majority of smokers reported being abstinent at posttest (6 weeks, 53% of completers; 12 weeks, 66% of completers [44% of all cases]). Also, 37% (25%of all cases) reported 30-day point-prevalence abstinence, and 32% (22% of all cases) reported continuous abstinence at 12 weeks. OnQ produced more abstinence (ptext messaging. Text messaging may work better because it is simple, well known, and delivered to a primary inbox. These advantages may disappear as smokers become more experienced with new handsets. Mobile phones may be promising delivery platforms for cessation services using either smartphone applications or text messaging.

  13. An architecture to support design of context-aware mobile applications

    OpenAIRE

    Stoica, George Adrian

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with the problem of interaction with context-aware mobile applications in digitally augmented physical spaces. The term "mobile application" is used as an umbrella term for any piece of software that can run on a mobile device in order to support a human task. “Context-aware” refers to the ability of such applications to use information about the environment or the user to adapt their behaviour accordingly. A "physical hyperlink" is a mechanism that associates a physical obj...

  14. THE INSPECTION AND THE ANALYSIS OF DISPLACEMENTS ON MOBILE SUPPORTING PARTS OF BEAMS FRAMEWORKS OF RAILWAY BRIDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Tarasenko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of inspection of supporting parts, the calculation of setting of mobile supporting parts at erecting of spans and detecting of deformations of supports on the additional displacements on mobile supporting parts are presented in the article.

  15. Using Mobile Phone Technology to Support Young Liver Transplant Recipients Moving to Adult Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Toft, Alex; Claridge, Lee; Ferguson, James; Hind, Jonathon; Jones, Rebecca; McClean, Patricia; McKiernan, Patrick; Samyn, Marianne; Taylor, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    The process and preparation of moving from child to adult services (transition) is a challenging period of time for young people and represents significant changes in care and support systems. The proliferation of mobile phone applications for health purposes suggests that it is an area for further investigation. The review explores the potential to use mobile phone technology to help support young liver transplant recipients moving to adult services. It represents the first review conducted in this specialism and considers a new model of support for young liver patients. A systematic rapid review of the published peer-reviewed literature. Two searches were conducted: Search 1: the use of technology to support transition to adult services (6 studies) and Search 2: how best to support liver transplant recipients during transition (6 studies). Research shows that to achieve positive transition young people need information about their condition and transition. The process needs to be guided by transition readiness, rather than the young persons' age. Although parents and support networks should be in place and are valued, transition should build upon self-management and independence. Results suggest that there appears to be scope to use mobile phone technology to support transition. This is the first time a review has explored the types of issues or concerns facing liver transplant patients and how these can be addressed through mobile phone technology.

  16. Supporting Activity-Based Computingusing Dynamically (De)Composable Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Schougaard, Kari Rye

    2004-01-01

    the document-centered paradigm for pervasive computing: it crosscuts work with different kinds of entities and sets the focus on the user and the user's tasks. In domain such as healthcare, activities are fundamentally mobile: doctors and nurses move throughout the hospital as their work progresses. Hence......, the computer must support mobility of activities. For this reason, we consider it important to investigate whether a computing platform that embraces mobility at a fundamental level supports implementing software for this new paradigm. This paper describes our initial design ideas for supporting activity......-centered computing in the Pervasive Object Model Project (POMP), a project which concerns the development of a platform for pervasive computing applications. We first describe POMP, the present the notion of activity-based computing, and last investigate how activity-based computing can be implemented in POMP....

  17. Scorebox extraction from mobile sports videos using Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonjun; Park, Jimin; Kim, Changick

    2008-08-01

    Scorebox plays an important role in understanding contents of sports videos. However, the tiny scorebox may give the small-display-viewers uncomfortable experience in grasping the game situation. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to extract the scorebox from sports video frames. We first extract candidates by using accumulated intensity and edge information after short learning period. Since there are various types of scoreboxes inserted in sports videos, multiple attributes need to be used for efficient extraction. Based on those attributes, the optimal information gain is computed and top three ranked attributes in terms of information gain are selected as a three-dimensional feature vector for Support Vector Machines (SVM) to distinguish the scorebox from other candidates, such as logos and advertisement boards. The proposed method is tested on various videos of sports games and experimental results show the efficiency and robustness of our proposed method.

  18. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    evaluating the deployment repeatability builds upon the testing or analysis of deployment kinematics (Chapter 6) and adds repetition. Introduction...material yield or failure during a test. For the purposes of this chapter, zero shift will refer to permanent changes in the structure, while reversible ...the content of other chapters in this book: Gravity Compensation (Chapter 4) and Deployment Kinematics and Dynamics (Chapter 6). Repeating the

  19. Implementation of a Mobile Clinical Decision Support Application to Augment Local Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brian M; Ford, Diana C; Ince, Dilek; Ernst, Erika J; Livorsi, Daniel J; Heintz, Brett H; Masse, Vincent; Brownlee, Michael J; Ford, Bradley A

    2018-01-01

    Medical applications for mobile devices allow clinicians to leverage microbiological data and standardized guidelines to treat patients with infectious diseases. We report the implementation of a mobile clinical decision support (CDS) application to augment local antimicrobial stewardship. We detail the implementation of our mobile CDS application over 20 months. Application utilization data were collected and evaluated using descriptive statistics to quantify the impact of our implementation. Project initiation focused on engaging key stakeholders, developing a business case, and selecting a mobile platform. The preimplementation phase included content development, creation of a pathway for content approval within the hospital committee structure, engaging clinical leaders, and formatting the first version of the guide. Implementation involved a media campaign, staff education, and integration within the electronic medical record and hospital mobile devices. The postimplementation phase required ongoing quality improvement, revision of outdated content, and repeated staff education. The evaluation phase included a guide utilization analysis, reporting to hospital leadership, and sustainability and innovation planning. The mobile application was downloaded 3056 times and accessed 9259 times during the study period. The companion web viewer was accessed 8214 times. Successful implementation of a customizable mobile CDS tool enabled our team to expand beyond microbiological data to clinical diagnosis, treatment, and antimicrobial stewardship, broadening our influence on antimicrobial prescribing and incorporating utilization data to inspire new quality and safety initiatives. Further studies are needed to assess the impact on antimicrobial utilization, infection control measures, and patient care outcomes.

  20. Introduction of Mobile Health Tools to Support Ebola Surveillance and Contact Tracing in Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Jilian A; Zehe, Elizabeth; Redick, Cindil; Bah, Alhoussaine; Cowger, Kai; Camara, Mamady; Diallo, Aboubacar; Gigo, Abdel Nasser Iro; Dhillon, Ranu S; Liu, Anne

    2015-11-12

    Challenges in data availability and quality have contributed to the longest and deadliest Ebola epidemic in history that began in December 2013. Accurate surveillance data, in particular, has been difficult to access, as it is often collected in remote communities. We describe the design, implementation, and challenges of implementing a smartphone-based contact tracing system that is linked to analytics and data visualization software as part of the Ebola response in Guinea. The system, built on the mobile application CommCare and business intelligence software Tableau, allows for real-time identification of contacts who have not been visited and strong accountability of contact tracers through timestamps and collection of GPS points with their surveillance data. Deployment of this system began in November 2014 in Conakry, Guinea, and was expanded to a total of 5 prefectures by April 2015. To date, the mobile system has not replaced the paper-based system in the 5 prefectures where the program is active. However, as of April 30, 2015, 210 contact tracers in the 5 prefectures were actively using the mobile system to collectively monitor 9,162 contacts. With proper training, some investment in technical hardware, and adequate managerial oversight, there is opportunity to improve access to surveillance data from difficult-to-reach communities in order to inform epidemic control strategies while strengthening health systems to reduce risk of future disease outbreaks. © Liu et al.

  1. Mobile Display of Information about Aggregated Antibiotic Resistance in the Hospital Setting Supported by Near Field Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Philipp; Fehre, Karsten; Rappelsberger, Andrea; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a heterogeneous phenomenon. It does not only differ between countries or states, but also between wards of hospitals, where different resistance patterns have been found. To support clinicians in administering empiric antibiotic therapy, we developed software to present information about antibiotic resistance using a mobile concept. A pre-existing infrastructure was deployed as the server component. The systems analyze and aggregate data from laboratory information systems, generating statistical data on antibiotic resistance. The information is presented to the Android client using a Representational State Transfer (REST) interface. Geographical localization is performed using near field communication (NFC) tags. The prototype provides tabulated data concerning antibiotic resistance patterns in the wards of a hospital. Using Android, NFC, and data caching, the usability of the system is estimated to be high. We hypothesize that antibiotic stewardship in hospitals can be supported by this software, thus improving medical monitoring of antibiotic resistance. Future studies in a productive environment are needed to measure the impact of the system on the outcome of patient care.

  2. MYPLAN - A Mobile Phone Application for Supporting People at Risk of Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard Larsen, Jette L; Frandsen, Hanne; Erlangsen, Annette

    2016-05-01

    Safety plans have been suggested as an intervention for people at risk of suicide. Given the impulsive character of suicidal ideation, a safety plan in the format of a mobile phone application is likely to be more available and useful than traditional paper versions. The study describes MYPLAN, a mobile phone application designed to support people at risk of suicide by letting them create a safety plan. MYPLAN was developed in collaboration with clinical psychiatric staff at Danish suicide preventive clinics. The mobile application lets the user create an individualized safety plan by filling in templates with strategies, actions, and direct links to contact persons. MYPLAN was developed in 2013 and is freely available in Denmark and Norway. It is designed for iPhone and android platforms. As of December 2015, the application has been downloaded almost 8,000 times. Users at risk of suicide as well as clinical staff have provided positive feedback on the mobile application. Support via mobile phone applications might be particularly useful for younger age groups at risk of suicide as well as in areas or countries where support options are lacking. Yet, it is important to examine the effectiveness of this type of intervention.

  3. The Impact of Supported and Annotated Mobile Learning on Achievement and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadiev, Rustam; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Huang, Yueh-Min; Liu, Tzu-Yu

    2015-01-01

    We designed activities for learning English as a foreign language in a mobile learning environment with familiar authentic support for this study. Students learned at school and then applied their newly gained knowledge to solve daily life problems by first using a tablet to take pictures of objects they wished to learn about, then describing them…

  4. Mobile Augmented Reality Support for Architects Based on Feature Tracking Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang Nielsen, Michael; Kramp, Gunnar; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a mobile AR system called the SitePack supporting architects in annotating and visualizing models in real-time. We describe examples of how the SitePack visualization techniques help architects making decisions on site. One example is the effect of vegetation heights on the ho...

  5. Mobile Augmented Reality Support for Architects based on feature Tracking Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Nielsen, Mikkel Bang; Kramp, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a mobile Augmented Reality (AR) system called the SitePack supporting architects in visualizing 3D models in real-time on site. We describe how vision based feature tracking techniques can help architects making decisions on site concerning visual impact assessment. The AR sys...

  6. A quality-of-data aware mobile decision support system for patients with chronic illnesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larburu Rubio, Nekane; van Schooten, B.W.; Shalom, Erez; Fung, L.S.N.; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Jones, Valerie M.; Riano, David; Lenz, Richard; Miksch, Silvia; Peleg, Mor; Reichert, M.U.; ten Teije, Annette

    2015-01-01

    We present a mobile decision support system (mDSS) which runs on a patient Body Area Network consisting of a smartphone and a set of biosensors. Quality-of-Data (QoD) awareness in decision making is achieved by means of a component known as the Quality-of-Data Broker, which also runs on the

  7. Towards Mobile Learning Support for the Transition from School to the Workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glahn, Christian; Specht, Marcus; Wishart, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Glahn, C., Specht, M., & Wishart J. (2010). Towards Mobile Learning Support for the Transition from School to the Workplace. Paper presented at the MATEL Workshop in conjunction with the 5th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2010): Sustaining TEL: From Innovation to

  8. How to capitalise on mobility, proximity and motion analytics to support formal and informal education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Maldonado, R.; Echeverria, V.; Yacef, K.; Dos Santos, A.D.P.; Pechenizkiy, M.

    2017-01-01

    Learning Analytics and similar data-intensive approaches aimed at understanding and/or supporting learning have mostly focused on the analysis of students' data automatically captured by personal computers or, more recently, mobile devices. Thus, most student behavioural data are limited to the

  9. A Living Laboratory Exploring Mobile Support for Everyday Life with Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bjerge, Kim; Kristensen, Jens E.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the set up of a Living Laboratory in a city of North Denmark exploring mobile support for everyday life with diabetes. Background and definitions of the living lab method is presented together with descriptions of the technical setup, applications and explorations. The living l...

  10. Capitalizing on Mobile Technology to Support Healthy Eating in Ethnic Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F.; Pernal, Wendy; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Shiyko, Mariya; Intille, Stephen; Franko, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capacity of a mobile technology-based intervention to support healthy eating among ethnic minority female students. Participants: Forty-three African American and Hispanic female students participated in a 3-week intervention between January and May 2013. Methods: Participants photographed their meals using their smart…

  11. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa H.; Muhl, Thuy Thanh

    2018-01-01

    For use of metal supported solid oxide fuel cell (MS-SOFC) in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast startup, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the Technical...

  12. Usability evaluation of mobile ICT support used at the building construction site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansson, Per; Svidt, Kjeld

    2006-01-01

    The paper summarizes findings from field evaluations and controlled laboratory usability evaluations of new mobile Information and Communication Technology, ICT, support used by craftsmen at construction sites as well as a discussion of methodologies for user centred ICT tools design. The finding...

  13. How Can Mobile SMS Communication Support and Enhance a First Year Undergraduate Learning Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Geraldine; Edwards, Gabriele; Reid, Alan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a case study investigating how the academic and personal development of first year students on an undergraduate sports education degree can be supported and enhanced with mobile SMS (Short Message Service) communication. SMS-based technologies were introduced in response to students' particular needs (in transition to…

  14. 78 FR 45071 - Annual Report for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Record Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Record Retention, adopted as part of the Connect America Fund & Intercarrier Compensation Reform Order... Communications Commission released a Report and Order in the Universal Service Fund & Intercarrier Compensation... for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Record Retention AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission...

  15. Blood glucose level prediction based on support vector regression using mobile platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymann, Maximilian P; Dorschky, Eva; Groh, Benjamin H; Martindale, Christine; Blank, Peter; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2016-08-01

    The correct treatment of diabetes is vital to a patient's health: Staying within defined blood glucose levels prevents dangerous short- and long-term effects on the body. Mobile devices informing patients about their future blood glucose levels could enable them to take counter-measures to prevent hypo or hyper periods. Previous work addressed this challenge by predicting the blood glucose levels using regression models. However, these approaches required a physiological model, representing the human body's response to insulin and glucose intake, or are not directly applicable to mobile platforms (smart phones, tablets). In this paper, we propose an algorithm for mobile platforms to predict blood glucose levels without the need for a physiological model. Using an online software simulator program, we trained a Support Vector Regression (SVR) model and exported the parameter settings to our mobile platform. The prediction accuracy of our mobile platform was evaluated with pre-recorded data of a type 1 diabetes patient. The blood glucose level was predicted with an error of 19 % compared to the true value. Considering the permitted error of commercially used devices of 15 %, our algorithm is the basis for further development of mobile prediction algorithms.

  16. ARTEFACT MOBILE DATA MODEL TO SUPPORT CULTURAL HERITAGE DATA COLLECTION AND INTERPRETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. S. Mohamed-Ghouse

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the limitation of existing data structures in mobile mapping applications to support archaeologists to manage the artefact (any object made or modified by a human culture, and later recovered by an archaeological endeavor details excavated at a cultural heritage site. Current limitations of data structure in the mobile mapping application allow archeologist to record only one artefact per test pit location. In reality, more than one artefact can be excavated from the same test pit location. A spatial data model called Artefact Mobile Data Model (AMDM was developed applying existing Relational Data Base Management System (RDBMS technique to overcome the limitation. The data model was implemented in a mobile database environment called SprintDB Pro which was in turn connected to ArcPad 7.1 mobile mapping application through Open Data Base Connectivity (ODBC. In addition, the design of a user friendly application built on top of AMDM to interpret and record the technology associated with each artefact excavated in the field is also discussed in the paper. In summary, the paper discusses the design and implementation of a data model to facilitate the collection of artefacts in the field using integrated mobile mapping and database approach.

  17. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to social networks, personal identities, and our relationship to the built environment. The omnipresence of mobilities within everyday life, high politics, technology, and tourism (to mention but a few) all point to a key insight harnessed by the ‘mobilities turn’. Namely that mobilities is much more than......The world is on the move. This is a widespread understanding by many inhabitants of contemporary society across the Globe. But what does it actually mean? During over one decade the ‘mobilities turn’ within the social sciences have provided a new set of insights into the repercussions of mobilities...... and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues of power, social exclusion...

  18. Energy-Efficient Region Shift Scheme to Support Mobile Sink Group in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Yongbin; Kim, Kyong Hoon; Aldwairi, Monther; Kim, Ki-Il

    2017-12-30

    Mobile sink groups play crucial roles to perform their own missions in many wireless sensor network (WSN) applications. In order to support mobility of such sink groups, it is important to design a mechanism for effective discovery of the group in motion. However, earlier studies obtain group region information by periodic query. For that reason, the mechanism leads to significant signaling overhead due to frequent flooding for the query regardless of the group movement. Furthermore, the mechanism worsens the problem by the flooding in the whole expected area. To deal with this problem, we propose a novel mobile sink group support scheme with low communication cost, called Region-Shift-based Mobile Geocasting Protocol (RSMGP). In this study, we utilize the group mobility feature for which members of a group have joint motion patterns. Thus, we could trace group movement by shifting the region as much as partial members move out of the previous region. Furthermore, the region acquisition is only performed at the moment by just deviated members without collaboration of all members. Experimental results validate the improved signaling overhead of our study compared to the previous studies.

  19. The use of mobile learning by 6th-year medical students in a minimally-supported environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Masters; Zahra Al-Rawahi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The study aims to identify the impact of minimal support on medical students' mobile learning activities. Methods: The study was performed at the Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, on 129 medical students in their 7th year. The study consisted of a quantitative survey of the students, focussing on their mobile learning activities during their 6th year, while using their own mobile devices (such as smart phones) for mobile learning activities. In addition, their perceptions of barrier...

  20. Technologies to Support Community-Dwelling Persons With Dementia: A Position Paper on Issues Regarding Development, Usability, Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness, Deployment, and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Anthea; Mountain, Gail; Robinson, Louise; van der Roest, Henriëtte; García-Casal, J Antonio; Gove, Dianne; Thyrian, Jochen René; Evans, Shirley; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Kelly, Fiona; Kurz, Alexander; Casey, Dympna; Szcześniak, Dorota; Dening, Tom; Craven, Michael P; Span, Marijke; Felzmann, Heike; Tsolaki, Magda; Franco-Martin, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Background With the expected increase in the numbers of persons with dementia, providing timely, adequate, and affordable care and support is challenging. Assistive and health technologies may be a valuable contribution in dementia care, but new challenges may emerge. Objective The aim of our study was to review the state of the art of technologies for persons with dementia regarding issues on development, usability, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, deployment, and ethics in 3 fields of application of technologies: (1) support with managing everyday life, (2) support with participating in pleasurable and meaningful activities, and (3) support with dementia health and social care provision. The study also aimed to identify gaps in the evidence and challenges for future research. Methods Reviews of literature and expert opinions were used in our study. Literature searches were conducted on usability, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and ethics using PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO databases with no time limit. Selection criteria in our selected technology fields were reviews in English for community-dwelling persons with dementia. Regarding deployment issues, searches were done in Health Technology Assessment databases. Results According to our results, persons with dementia want to be included in the development of technologies; there is little research on the usability of assistive technologies; various benefits are reported but are mainly based on low-quality studies; barriers to deployment of technologies in dementia care were identified, and ethical issues were raised by researchers but often not studied. Many challenges remain such as including the target group more often in development, performing more high-quality studies on usability and effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, creating and having access to high-quality datasets on existing technologies to enable adequate deployment of technologies in dementia care, and ensuring that ethical

  1. Mobile group blogging in learning: a case study of supporting cultural transition

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Yinjuan

    2010-01-01

    A mobile group blog is an example of a Web 2.0 social space, as well as a tool for the instant collection of contextual information, the immediate sharing of information and later reflection. Records in the form of multimedia created through mobile blogging can assist people to keep a versatile representation of artefacts they encounter on the move in everyday life. Overseas students are an example of a large group of people whose cultural learning could be supported by this technology. They ...

  2. Evolving the Design of a Mobile Application to Support Transition to Tertiary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Students’ transition to tertiary education plays a critical role in their overall post-secondary experience. Even though educational institutions have designed and implemented various transition support programs, most of them still struggle to collect detailed information and provide tailored and timely support to students. With the high adoption rate of smart phones among university students, mobile applications can be used as a platform to provide personalized support throughout the transition, which has the potential to address the shortcomings of existing programs. Moreover, the use of mobile applications to support the transition to tertiary education can benefit from emerging techniques to design applications to support individuals through transition processes. In this paper, we present the design and development process of myUniMate, a mobile application that allows students to track and reflect on information from multiple aspects of their university lives. The paper describes the user-centered design approach used in the design, the implementation process, and how the initial version evolved based on our previous study. We conducted a 4-week field trial with first year university students to validate our design.

  3. Mobile clinical decision support systems and applications: a literature and commercial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The latest advances in eHealth and mHealth have propitiated the rapidly creation and expansion of mobile applications for health care. One of these types of applications are the clinical decision support systems, which nowadays are being implemented in mobile apps to facilitate the access to health care professionals in their daily clinical decisions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to make a review of the current systems available in the literature and in commercial stores. Secondly, to analyze a sample of applications in order to obtain some conclusions and recommendations. Two reviews have been done: a literature review on Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Web of Knowledge and PubMed and a commercial review on Google play and the App Store. Five applications from each review have been selected to develop an in-depth analysis and to obtain more information about the mobile clinical decision support systems. Ninety-two relevant papers and 192 commercial apps were found. Forty-four papers were focused only on mobile clinical decision support systems. One hundred seventy-one apps were available on Google play and 21 on the App Store. The apps are designed for general medicine and 37 different specialties, with some features common in all of them despite of the different medical fields objective. The number of mobile clinical decision support applications and their inclusion in clinical practices has risen in the last years. However, developers must be careful with their interface or the easiness of use, which can impoverish the experience of the users.

  4. Meta-design Approach for Mobile Platforms Supporting Creative Tourism Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tussyadiah, Iis P.

    2013-01-01

    with and interpretations of the local attributes of tourism destinations. The mobile system will integrate the sensory stimuli, the intense contact with cultural nuances and social network, the brand-based reputation, and the creative communities at tourism destinations into the iterative process of perception, conception......This paper conceptualizes the application of meta-design approach in the development of a mobile system supporting creative experiences for tourists. Specifically, for those working in creative industries, adaptive mobile system will facilitate effective tourists' interactions......, and expression of creative ideas among tourists. For destinations trying to highlight their unique characteristics as their value proposition, the development of such system may benefit them from a heightened sense of place due to on-going value co-creation. Individuals will benefit from such system from...

  5. Supporting User Generated Content for Mobile News Services: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos K. Georgiadis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 applications encourage users to contribute to the production of richer content. In this context, our work mainly focuses on providing mobile users the ability to share content and to support user generated content production. Specifically, in our case study, features both for a mobile Web and for a mobile native application are implemented, capable of providing news services enriched with indicative social networking elements. The results of our work are largely related to the understanding of the required proper solutions, based on the investigation of serious technical challenges: the XML‐RPC library for the Android platform is exploited, as well as a specific Backend Joomla! component is built (Rsstoa to handle consistently external content sources, such as feeds and multipart emails.

  6. 77 FR 33097 - Application To Participate in an Auction for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Application for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... America Fund & Intercarrier Compensation Reform Order (Order), FCC 11-161 and a Bureau Order, DA 12-147...-147] Application To Participate in an Auction for Mobility Fund Phase I Support and Application for Mobility Fund Phase I Support AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule; announcement...

  7. Learner Open Modeling in Adaptive Mobile Learning System for Supporting Student to Learn English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Cong Pham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents a personalized context-aware mobile learning architecture for supporting student to learn English as foreign language in order to prepare for TOEFL test. We consider how to apply open learner modeling techniques to adapt contents for different learners based on context, which includes location, amount of time to learn, the manner as well as learner's knowledge in learning progress. Through negotiation with system, the editable learner model will be updated to support adaptive engine to select adaptive contents meeting learner's demands. Empirical testing results for students who used application prototype indicate that interaction user modeling is helpful in supporting learner to learn adaptive materials.

  8. Deployment of hydrogen supply chain for fuel market in 2050: Design and development of a decision support system for scenarios analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patay, E.

    2008-07-01

    The deployment of a market for hydrogen energy is a new problem, considered by governments, industrialists and scientists to meet global targets of greenhouse gases emissions reduction and to ensure security in energy supply. In this context, the optimization problem of scheduling the deployment until 2050 of the hydrogen supply chain for fuel market throughout a country has been the object of our study. We get support of Air Liquide Company, his experience and experts in production and distribution of industrial hydrogen, to build an approach to the problem meeting the requirements of an industrial context. After defining and characterizing the optimization problem through a systemic analysis of the distribution infrastructure, we proposed a method suited to its resolution. Monte Carlo simulations enabled us to develop cost functions. Then we developed a heuristic algorithm for approximate optimization of these cost functions. Our approach has necessitated the definition of simulation rules, a design of experiment and a regression method, as well as a heuristic algorithm adapted to the structure of the problem. The specification, development and use of software tools have helped to validate the chosen methodology for the optimization of the uncertain problem of our study. The scenario of evolution has created a reference to validate the model and provide some analysis for early studies of deployment. (author)

  9. Characteristics of Adults Seeking Health Care Provider Support Facilitated by Mobile Technology: Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Kelly; Park, Shin Hye

    2017-12-21

    Mobile health technology is rapidly evolving with the potential to transform health care. Self-management of health facilitated by mobile technology can maximize long-term health trajectories of adults. Little is known about the characteristics of adults seeking Web-based support from health care providers facilitated by mobile technology. This study aimed to examine the following: (1) the characteristics of adults who seek human support from health care providers for health concerns using mobile technology rather than from family members and friends or others with similar health conditions and (2) the use of mobile health technology among adults with chronic health conditions. Findings of this study were interpreted in the context of the Efficiency Model of Support. We first described characteristics of adults seeking Web-based support from health care providers. Using chi-square tests for categorical variables and t test for the continuous variable of age, we compared adults seeking Web-based and conventional support by demographics. The primary aim was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression to examine whether chronic health conditions and demographic factors (eg, sex, income, employment status, race, ethnicity, education, and age) were associated with seeking Web-based support from health care providers. The sample included adults (N=1453), the majority of whom were female 57.60% (837/1453), white 75.02% (1090/1453), and non-Hispanic 89.13% (1295/1453). The age of the participants ranged from 18 to 92 years (mean 48.6, standard deviation [SD] 16.8). The majority 76.05% (1105/1453) of participants reported college or higher level of education. A disparity was found in access to health care providers via mobile technology based on socioeconomic status. Adults with annual income of US $30,000 to US $100,000 were 1.72 times more likely to use Web-based methods to contact a health care provider, and adults with an annual income above US $100,000 were 2.41 to

  10. The Effects of Mobile-Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: Meta-Analysis and Critical Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yao-Ting; Yang, Je-Ming; Lee, Han-Yueh

    2017-08-01

    One of the trends in collaborative learning is using mobile devices for supporting the process and products of collaboration, which has been forming the field of mobile-computer-supported collaborative learning (mCSCL). Although mobile devices have become valuable collaborative learning tools, evaluative evidence for their substantial contributions to collaborative learning is still scarce. The present meta-analysis, which included 48 peer-reviewed journal articles and doctoral dissertations written over a 16-year period (2000-2015) involving 5,294 participants, revealed that mCSCL has produced meaningful improvements for collaborative learning, with an overall mean effect size of 0.516. Moderator variables, such as domain subject, group size, teaching method, intervention duration, and reward method were related to different effect sizes. The results provided implications for future research and practice, such as suggestions on how to appropriately use the functionalities of mobile devices, how to best leverage mCSCL through effective group learning mechanisms, and what outcome variables should be included in future studies to fully elucidate the process and products of mCSCL.

  11. Implementation and Evaluation of a JSON Binding for Mobile Web Services with IMS Integration Support

    OpenAIRE

    Murtaza, Shahid

    2012-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture SOA is a well recognized and immensely applied reference model for service oriented computing, both in industry and research. Because of its fastidious features, such as reusability, interoperability, scalability and flexibility a Web Based SOA is adopted, in the areas like Enterprise Application Integration EAI. These days the Web Based Services, such as XML Web Services are not limited to fixed servers but can also be deployed on mobile devices in order to enha...

  12. The International Database of Efficient Appliances (IDEA): A new tool to support appliance energy-efficiency deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerke, Brian F.; McNeil, Michael A.; Tu, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •IDEA collects, organizes, and stores data on appliance features and efficiency. •Data can be gathered for any appliance type on any international market. •IDEA enables new approaches to efficiency deployment and monitoring. •Techniques are developed for cross-market comparison of energy-savings potential. •We find significant cost-effective energy-savings potential from efficiency for Indian and Chinese refrigerators. -- Abstract: Appliance energy-efficiency programs are a central component of many countries’ energy-policy portfolios. A major barrier to optimal implementation of these programs is lack of data to determine market baselines, assess the potential for cost-effective energy savings, and track markets over time to evaluate and verify program impacts. To address this gap, we have developed the International Database of Efficient Appliances (IDEA), a suite of software tools that automatically gathers data that is currently dispersed across various online sources and compiles it into a unified repository of information on efficiency, price, and features for a diversity of appliances and devices in markets around the world. In this article we describe the framework and functionality of IDEA, and we demonstrate its power as a resource for research and policy development related to appliance energy efficiency. Using IDEA data for refrigerators in China and India, we assess the potential for cost-effective energy savings within each market by computing robust indicators that can also be easily compared across different appliances and markets. We find that significant cost-effective savings are available on both markets. We discuss implications for the development of future energy-efficiency deployment programs.

  13. Theory-based Support for Mobile Language Learning: Noticing and Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Kukulska-Hulme

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the issue of 'noticing' in second language acquisition, and argues for the potential of handheld devices to: (i support language learners in noticing and recording noticed features 'on the spot', to help them develop their second language system; (ii help language teachers better understand the specific difficulties of individuals or those from a particular language background; and (iii facilitate data collection by applied linguistics researchers, which can be fed back into educational applications for language learning. We consider: theoretical perspectives drawn from the second language acquisition literature, relating these to the practice of writing language learning diaries; and the potential for learner modelling to facilitate recording and prompting noticing in mobile assisted language learning contexts. We then offer guidelines for developers of mobile language learning solutions to support the development of language awareness in learners.

  14. A Survey of Online and Mobile Technology Use at Peer Support Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Naslund, John A; Grinley, Thomas; Bienvenida, John Carlo M; Bartels, Stephen J; Brunette, Mary

    2018-01-04

    Understanding how individuals with mental illness who receive services at peer support agencies use technology can inform the development of online and mobile health interventions tailored for users in these non-traditional mental health settings. The purpose of this study was to assess the use of technology among individuals with mental illness at peer support agencies. A survey delivered within peer support agencies (PSAs) in one state assessed technology use among individuals ages 18 and over with a self-identified mental illness receiving services at these agencies. In total, 195 individuals from 10 PSAs completed the survey. Eighty-two percent of respondents used the internet, with 63% of respondents connected to the internet at the PSAs. Eighty one percent of respondents owned a cell phone, 70% used text messaging, 58% owned smartphones, 61% used mobile applications, and 72% used social media. PSA users under age 55 were significantly more likely to own a smartphone than PSA users age 55 and older. Among internet users, 71% had searched for health information online and 57% had searched for mental health information online. Many individuals who receive services at PSAs have access to online and mobile technologies. These technologies may be leveraged to expand the reach of evidence-based health and mental health programs to individuals in these non-traditional mental health settings. Future research should explore the feasibility of intervention strategies that involve PSAs as a resource for linking people with mental illness to online and mobile support for their health and wellness goals.

  15. MobiGroup: Enabling Lifecycle Support to Social Activity Organization and Suggestion with Mobile Crowd Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Bin; Yu, Zhiwen; Chen, Liming; Zhou, Xingshe; Ma, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. This paper presents a group-aware mobile crowd sensing system called MobiGroup, which supports group activity organization in real-world settings. Acknowledging the complexity and diversity of group activities, this paper introduces a formal concept model to characterize group activities and classifies them into four organizational stages. We t...

  16. Delivering "Just-In-Time" Smoking Cessation Support Via Mobile Phones: Current Knowledge and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Felix

    2016-05-28

    Smoking lapses early on during a quit attempt are highly predictive of failing to quit. A large proportion of these lapses are driven by cravings brought about by situational and environmental cues. Use of cognitive-behavioral lapse prevention strategies to combat cue-induced cravings is associated with a reduced risk of lapse, but evidence is lacking in how these strategies can be effectively promoted. Unlike most traditional methods of delivering behavioral support, mobile phones can in principle deliver automated support, including lapse prevention strategy recommendations, Just-In-Time (JIT) for when a smoker is most vulnerable, and prevent early lapse. JIT support can be activated by smokers themselves (user-triggered), by prespecified rules (server-triggered) or through sensors that dynamically monitor a smoker's context and trigger support when a high risk environment is sensed (context-triggered), also known as a Just-In-Time Adaptive Intervention (JITAI). However, research suggests that user-triggered JIT cessation support is seldom used and existing server-triggered JIT support is likely to lack sufficient accuracy to effectively target high-risk situations in real time. Evaluations of mobile phone cessation interventions that include user and/or server-triggered JIT support have yet to adequately assess whether this improves management of high risk situations. While context-triggered systems have the greatest potential to deliver JIT support, there are, as yet, no impact evaluations of such systems. Although it may soon be feasible to learn about and monitor a smoker's context unobtrusively using their smartphone without burdensome data entry, there are several potential advantages to involving the smoker in data collection. This commentary describes the current knowledge on the potential for mobile phones to deliver automated support to help smokers manage or cope with high risk environments or situations for smoking, known as JIT support. The article

  17. Acceptance of a Mobile Application Supporting Nurses Workflow at Patient Bedside: Results from a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrler, Frederic; Ducloux, Pascal; Wu, Danny T Y; Lovis, Christian; Blondon, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Supporting caregivers' workflow with mobile applications (apps) is a growing trend. At the bedside, apps can provide new ways to support the documentation process rather than using a desktop computer in a nursing office. Although these applications show potential, few existing reports have studied the real impact of such solutions. At the University Hospitals of Geneva, we developed BEDside Mobility, a mobile application supporting nurses' daily workflow. In a pilot study, the app was trialed in two wards for a period of one month. We collected data of the actual usage of the app and asked the users to complete a tailored technology acceptance model questionnaire at the end of the study period. Results show that participation remain stable with time with participants using in average the tool for almost 29 minutes per day. The technology acceptance questionnaires revealed a high usability of the app and good promotion from the institution although users did not perceive any increase in productivity. Overall, intent of use was divergent between promoters and antagonist. Furthermore, some participants considered the tool as an addition to their workload. This evaluation underlines the importance of helping all end users perceive the benefits of a new intervention since coworkers strong influence each other.

  18. Spatial Characterization of Radio Propagation Channel in Urban Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Environments to Support WSNs Deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Granda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular ad hoc Networks (VANETs enable vehicles to communicate with each other as well as with roadside units (RSUs. Although there is a significant research effort in radio channel modeling focused on vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V, not much work has been done for vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I using 3D ray-tracing tools. This work evaluates some important parameters of a V2I wireless channel link such as large-scale path loss and multipath metrics in a typical urban scenario using a deterministic simulation model based on an in-house 3D Ray-Launching (3D-RL algorithm at 5.9 GHz. Results show the high impact that the spatial distance; link frequency; placement of RSUs; and factors such as roundabout, geometry and relative position of the obstacles have in V2I propagation channel. A detailed spatial path loss characterization of the V2I channel along the streets and avenues is presented. The 3D-RL results show high accuracy when compared with measurements, and represent more reliably the propagation phenomena when compared with analytical path loss models. Performance metrics for a real test scenario implemented with a VANET wireless sensor network implemented ad-hoc are also described. These results constitute a starting point in the design phase of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs radio-planning in the urban V2I deployment in terms of coverage.

  19. Fully distributed monitoring architecture supporting multiple trackees and trackers in indoor mobile asset management application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seol Young; Jo, Hyeong Gon; Kang, Soon Ju

    2014-03-21

    A tracking service like asset management is essential in a dynamic hospital environment consisting of numerous mobile assets (e.g., wheelchairs or infusion pumps) that are continuously relocated throughout a hospital. The tracking service is accomplished based on the key technologies of an indoor location-based service (LBS), such as locating and monitoring multiple mobile targets inside a building in real time. An indoor LBS such as a tracking service entails numerous resource lookups being requested concurrently and frequently from several locations, as well as a network infrastructure requiring support for high scalability in indoor environments. A traditional centralized architecture needs to maintain a geographic map of the entire building or complex in its central server, which can cause low scalability and traffic congestion. This paper presents a self-organizing and fully distributed indoor mobile asset management (MAM) platform, and proposes an architecture for multiple trackees (such as mobile assets) and trackers based on the proposed distributed platform in real time. In order to verify the suggested platform, scalability performance according to increases in the number of concurrent lookups was evaluated in a real test bed. Tracking latency and traffic load ratio in the proposed tracking architecture was also evaluated.

  20. Sensor-based supporting mobile system Parkinson disease clinical tests utilising biomedical and RFID technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewski Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses method and tool for assisting clinical tests of pharmaceutical drugs utilising sensors and mobile technologies. Emerging sensor and mobile technologies deliver new opportunities to gather and process medical data. Presented analytical approach implements such observations and delivers new, convenient means for remote patient monitoring. Clinical tests are highly specialised process requiring methodology and tools to support such research. Currently available methods rely mostly on analogue approach (booklets, requiring the clinical test participant to fill in health state daily. Such approach often can be biased by unpunctual, not precise reporting. The mobile device can support this process by automatic scheduling and recording an actual time of reports and most of all it can record the inertial and biometric sensor data during the survey process. Presented analytical method (tremors recognition and mobile tool offers consistent approach to clinical test assistance transforming and Android smartphone into remote reporting and notification tool. The tool offers additionally features for sensor based diagnostics support for PD tremor recognition as well as specific clonic and tonic symptoms (dedicated for further system extensions towards epilepsy. Capabilities of the system delivers also RFID mechanisms for efficient on-site clinical test authorisation and configuration. This feature simplifies application installation and automatic set-up considering the participant, clinical test configuration, schedule, smartphone and sensor data. Such a composition delivers convenient and reliable tool which can assist patients and medical staff during the process objectifying the clinical tests results and helping to ensure good quality of the data, quickly available and easily accessible.

  1. Technologies to Support Community-Dwelling Persons With Dementia: A Position Paper on Issues Regarding Development, Usability, Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness, Deployment, and Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiland, Franka; Innes, Anthea; Mountain, Gail; Robinson, Louise; van der Roest, Henriëtte; García-Casal, J Antonio; Gove, Dianne; Thyrian, Jochen René; Evans, Shirley; Dröes, Rose-Marie; Kelly, Fiona; Kurz, Alexander; Casey, Dympna; Szcześniak, Dorota; Dening, Tom; Craven, Michael P; Span, Marijke; Felzmann, Heike; Tsolaki, Magda; Franco-Martin, Manuel

    2017-01-16

    With the expected increase in the numbers of persons with dementia, providing timely, adequate, and affordable care and support is challenging. Assistive and health technologies may be a valuable contribution in dementia care, but new challenges may emerge. The aim of our study was to review the state of the art of technologies for persons with dementia regarding issues on development, usability, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, deployment, and ethics in 3 fields of application of technologies: (1) support with managing everyday life, (2) support with participating in pleasurable and meaningful activities, and (3) support with dementia health and social care provision. The study also aimed to identify gaps in the evidence and challenges for future research. Reviews of literature and expert opinions were used in our study. Literature searches were conducted on usability, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and ethics using PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO databases with no time limit. Selection criteria in our selected technology fields were reviews in English for community-dwelling persons with dementia. Regarding deployment issues, searches were done in Health Technology Assessment databases. According to our results, persons with dementia want to be included in the development of technologies; there is little research on the usability of assistive technologies; various benefits are reported but are mainly based on low-quality studies; barriers to deployment of technologies in dementia care were identified, and ethical issues were raised by researchers but often not studied. Many challenges remain such as including the target group more often in development, performing more high-quality studies on usability and effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, creating and having access to high-quality datasets on existing technologies to enable adequate deployment of technologies in dementia care, and ensuring that ethical issues are considered an important topic

  2. Exploring the Usability of Mobile Apps Supporting Radiologists' Training in Diagnostic Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Soon; Aro, Michael R; Lage, Kraig J; Ingalls, Kevin L; Sindhwani, Vivek; Markey, Mia K

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a usability evaluation of mobile apps for supporting education and training in radiologic diagnostic decision-making processes. Of 381 mobile apps available at two major stores (Google Play and iTunes), eight iOS apps were selected for laboratory-based usability tests. Six staff radiologists completed eight app-specific task sets, using a think-aloud strategy. The triangular methods approach included quantitative performance measures, System Usability Scale (SUS), and qualitative thematic analysis using heuristic usability principles of usability issues. Overall, radiologists achieved higher than 70% success, with favorable SUS scores, in completing the tasks for seven of the eight apps. However, task success rate and SUS score had a weak relation (r = 0.23), indicating that the perceived usability may not reflect the holistic usability of the app. Task analysis and self-report revealed 108 usability issues, which were condensed to 55 unique issues and categorized by nine usability themes and mapped to ten usability heuristics. Nonintuitive functionality (eg, nonintuitive or misleading labels) was the most frequent theme observed, leading to inefficient navigation. These usability findings were consistent with the 13 improvements the radiologists suggested. This study demonstrates the feasibility of usability evaluation of radiology mobile apps and suggests potential improvements in the development of radiology mobile apps. This study also suggests that proficiency with mobile devices may not be equivalent to being an expert user, proficient in using the apps. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of mobile computers in a measuring system supporting examination of posture diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarski, Jacek; Klimiec, Ewa; Zaraska, Wiesław

    2013-07-01

    Measuring system designed and manufactured by the authors and based on mobile computers (smartphones and tablets) working as data recorders has been invented to support diagnosis of orthopedic, especially feet, diseases. The basic idea is to examine a patient in his natural environment, during the usual activities (such as walking or running). The paper describes the proposed system with sensors manufactured from piezoelectric film (PVDF film) and placed in the shoe insole. The mechanical reliability of PVDF film is excellent, though elimination of the pyroelectric effect is required. A possible solution of the problem and the test results are presented in the paper. Data recording is based on wireless transmission to a mobile device used as a data logger.

  4. Using Mobile Health to Support the Chronic Care Model: Developing an Institutional Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu Nundy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Self-management support and team-based care are essential elements of the Chronic Care Model but are often limited by staff availability and reimbursement. Mobile phones are a promising platform for improving chronic care but there are few examples of successful health system implementation. Program Development. An iterative process of program design was built upon a pilot study and engaged multiple institutional stakeholders. Patients identified having a “human face” to the pilot program as essential. Stakeholders recognized the need to integrate the program with primary and specialty care but voiced concerns about competing demands on clinician time. Program Description. Nurse administrators at a university-affiliated health plan use automated text messaging to provide personalized self-management support for member patients with diabetes and facilitate care coordination with the primary care team. For example, when a patient texts a request to meet with a dietitian, a nurse-administrator coordinates with the primary care team to provide a referral. Conclusion. Our innovative program enables the existing health system to support a de novo care management program by leveraging mobile technology. The program supports self-management and team-based care in a way that we believe engages patients yet meets the limited availability of providers and needs of health plan administrators.

  5. Advanced Networks in Motion Mobile Sensorweb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced mobile networking technology applicable to mobile sensor platforms was developed, deployed and demonstrated. A two-tier sensorweb design was developed. The first tier utilized mobile network technology to provide mobility. The second tier, which sits above the first tier, utilizes 6LowPAN (Internet Protocol version 6 Low Power Wireless Personal Area Networks) sensors. The entire network was IPv6 enabled. Successful mobile sensorweb system field tests took place in late August and early September of 2009. The entire network utilized IPv6 and was monitored and controlled using a remote Web browser via IPv6 technology. This paper describes the mobile networking and 6LowPAN sensorweb design, implementation, deployment and testing as well as wireless systems and network monitoring software developed to support testing and validation.

  6. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-31

    large cohort of trials to spot unusual cases. However, deployment repeatability is inherently a nonlinear phenomenon, which makes modeling difficult...and GEMS tip position were both tracked during ground testing by a laser target tracking system. Earlier SAILMAST testing in 2005 [8] used...recalls the strategy used by SRTM, where a constellation of lights was installed at the tip of the boom and a modified star tracker was used to track tip

  7. Context-Aware Middleware Support for the Nomadic Mobile Services on Multi-homed Handheld Mobile Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawar, Pravin; van Beijnum, Bert-Jan; Peddemors, Arjan; van Halteren, Aart

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, a variety ofhandheld mobile devices are capable of connecting to the Internet using multiple network interfaces. This is referred to as multi-homing. In addition to this, enriched computation resources allow them to host nomadic mobile services and provide these services to the clients

  8. Research Managers at Jamaica's National University Are Strategically Deploying a Modest Research Development Fund in Support of Impactful Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Paul W.; Henry, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight, using examples, how the University of Technology, Jamaica (UTech, Jamaica) is strategically using a modest internal research development fund, which is managed by the research managers in its research and innovation management office, to support impactful research projects. Critical reflection and the…

  9. On the mobility of carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles towards unveiling cathode degradation in water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciok, Paul; Schalenbach, Maximilian; Carmo, Marcelo; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the influence of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) overpotential on the mobility of carbon-supported platinum particles. The migration of the platinum over the carbon support was analyzed by means of identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM). While at potentials of 0.1 and 0 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), no changes to the Pt/C material were observed. With a decrease of the overpotential to -0.1 V vs. RHE, an increase in the quantity of migrating platinum particles took place. At -0.2 V vs. RHE, a further rise in the particle migration was observed. The effect of the overpotential on the migration was explained by a higher hydrogen generation rate, the formation of a hydrogen monolayer on the platinum and the resulting changes of the platinum support distance. The mechanisms revealed in this study could describe a relevant source of degradation of PEM water electrolyzers.

  10. Communicative Competence as a Professional Mobility Factor of Teachers Supporting for Disabled People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziuba E.M.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper discribes experience in the implementation of a new educational module “Philosophical and Socio-legal Bases of Supporting for Disabled People” developed by a professional team of Nizhny Novgorod State Pedagogical Minin University. Forming the communicative competency of disabled people supporting specialist is one of the main tasks of the module. Program developers believe that the structure and content of the educational subjects and practical training programs enables graduates to be prepared for variative communication forms providing educational, social, and cultural support of disable people as well as in the professional field as a whole. The ability of the graduate to communicate efficiently and effectively is required for professional mobility in teaching and non-teaching areas; so this module is a multi-purpose educational development.

  11. Observation on the uses of Mobile Phones to Support Informal Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Azlishah Othman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how a group of undergraduate students in one of the university in South of Malaysian use their mobile phones to perform informal learning activities related to the content of their courses outside the classroom. The paper also addresses the usefulness of informal learning activities to support students’ learning. The study adopts an exploratory case study design and uses two methods of data collection including questionnaires and interviews. Main findings suggest that students performed informal learning activities mostly from office, home, interacting mainly with classmates. It also shows that students were in control of their informal learning activities without tutor or SMEs’ input. However, it was found that students used only a limited number of applications but these were considered useful to their learning. The paper contributes to a discussion of the implications of training and instructional support to help students to take more advantage of mobile phone applications to support informal learning. The conclusion is discussed about the further research in this domain.

  12. Supporting patient adherence to antiretrovirals using mobile phone reminders: patient responses from South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidney, Kristi; Antony, Jimmy; Rodrigues, Rashmi; Arumugam, Karthika; Krishnamurthy, Shubha; D'souza, George; De Costa, Ayesha; Shet, Anita

    2012-01-01

    There has been exponential growth in the use of mobile phones in India over the last few years, and their potential benefits as a healthcare tool has raised tremendous interest. We used mobile phone reminders to help support adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients at an infectious disease clinic in a tertiary hospital in Bangalore. Between March and June 2010, 139 adult HIV patients taking regular ART for at least a month received weekly reminders to support adherence. These reminders consisted of a weekly interactive call and a non-interactive neutral pictorial short message service (SMS). After four weeks of the intervention, participants were interviewed to study perceptions on preference, usefulness, potential stigma and privacy concerns associated with this intervention. Majority of the participants were urban (89%), and had at least a secondary education (85%). A total of 744 calls were made, 545 (76%) of which were received by the participants. In addition, all participants received the weekly pictorial SMS reminder. A month later, 90% of participants reported the intervention as being helpful as medication reminders, and did not feel their privacy was intruded. Participants (87%) reported that they preferred the call as reminders, just 11% favoured SMS reminders alone. Only 59% of participants viewed all the SMSs that were delivered, while 15% never viewed any at all. Participants also denied any discomfort or stigma despite 20% and 13%, respectively, reporting that another person had inadvertently received their reminder call or SMS. Mobile phone interventions are an acceptable way of supporting adherence in this setting. Voice calls rather than SMSs alone seem to be preferred as reminders. Further research to study the influence of this intervention on adherence and health maintenance is warranted.

  13. Forced residential mobility and social support: impacts on psychiatric disorders among Somali migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhui Kamaldeep

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somali migrants fleeing the civil war in their country face punishing journeys, the loss of homes, possessions, and bereavement. On arrival in the host country they encounter poverty, hostility, and residential instability which may also undermine their mental health. Methods An in-depth and semi-structured interview was used to gather detailed accommodation histories for a five year period from 142 Somali migrants recruited in community venues and primary care. Post-codes were verified and geo-mapped to calculate characteristics of residential location including deprivation indices, the number of moves and the distances between residential moves. We asked about the reasons for changing accommodation, perceived discrimination, asylum status, traumatic experiences, social support, employment and demographic factors. These factors were assessed alongside characteristics of residential mobility as correlates of ICD-10 psychiatric disorders. Results Those who were forced to move homes were more likely to have an ICD-10 psychiatric disorder (OR = 2.64, 1.16-5.98, p = 0.02 compared with those moving through their own choice. A lower risk of psychiatric disorders was found for people with larger friendship networks (0.35, 0.14-0.84, p = 0.02, for those with more confiding emotional support (0.42, 0.18-1.0, p = 0.05, and for those who had not moved during the study period (OR = 0.21, 0.07-0.62, p = 0.01. Conclusions Forced residential mobility is a risk factor for psychiatric disorder; social support may contribute to resilience against psychiatric disorders associated with residential mobility.

  14. A Guide to Interagency Support for DoD: Military Force Deployment, Civilian Noncombatant Repatriation, and Military Patient Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    organizations for facility support of bulk petrole - um products if necessary. Military construction of petroleum storage terminals is a joint responsibili...and MSC in arranging for domestic transport of petrole - um products. These two TOAs have specific responsibilities, depending on the type of vehicle...Military Liaison Office, Kuwait U.S. Liaison Office, Tunisia U.S. Mutual Defense Assistance Office U.S. Military Group U.S. Military Liaison Office U.S

  15. Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Acid-base Balance Diagnosis and Treatment Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzuka, Mensur; Begic, Edin; Boskovic, Dusanka; Begic, Zijo; Masic, Izet

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents mobile application implementing a decision support system for acid-base disorder diagnosis and treatment recommendation. The application was developed using the official integrated development environment for the Android platform (to maximize availability and minimize investments in specialized hardware) called Android Studio. The application identifies disorder, based on the blood gas analysis, evaluates whether the disorder has been compensated, and based on additional input related to electrolyte imbalance, provides recommendations for treatment. The application is a tool in the hands of the user, which provides assistance during acid-base disorders treatment. The application will assist the physician in clinical practice and is focused on the treatment in intensive care.

  16. Development of maintenance support system using portable device and mobile agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hisashi; Ito, Yo; Takahashi, Makoto; Kitamura, Masaharu; Ohi, Tadashi; Wu, Wei

    2004-01-01

    The framework of intelligent support system for the maintenance of nuclear power plant is proposed in this paper with emphasis on the combined use of a portable device and intelligent information processing. The purpose of this system is the realization of flexible inspection process and effective diagnosis process to be performed on-site. The prototype system has been implemented for the experimental facility with mobile-agent technology and PDA (personal digital assistant) to show the basic functionality of the proposed framework. The results of the scenario-based and function-based evaluation showed that the proposed framework is effective for the data management for the maintenance activities. (author)

  17. mDurance: A Novel Mobile Health System to Support Trunk Endurance Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oresti Banos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal condition. This disorder constitutes one of the most common causes of disability worldwide, and as a result, it has a severe socioeconomic impact. Endurance tests are normally considered in low back pain rehabilitation practice to assess the muscle status. However, traditional procedures to evaluate these tests suffer from practical limitations, which potentially lead to inaccurate diagnoses. The use of digital technologies is considered here to facilitate the task of the expert and to increase the reliability and interpretability of the endurance tests. This work presents mDurance, a novel mobile health system aimed at supporting specialists in the functional assessment of trunk endurance by using wearable and mobile devices. The system employs a wearable inertial sensor to track the patient trunk posture, while portable electromyography sensors are used to seamlessly measure the electrical activity produced by the trunk muscles. The information registered by the sensors is processed and managed by a mobile application that facilitates the expert’s normal routine, while reducing the impact of human errors and expediting the analysis of the test results. In order to show the potential of the mDurance system, a case study has been conducted. The results of this study prove the reliability of mDurance and further demonstrate that practitioners are certainly interested in the regular use of a system of this nature.

  18. Using Mobile Tools to Support Meaningful Work-based Learning in Vocational Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Vuojärvi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This case study focused on meaningful work-based learning (WBL and the pedagogical use of mobile information and communication technologies (ICTs in vocational tourism education. The aim was to reveal how teaching/tutoring and learning are realized and how the use of smartphones supports the realization of meaningful learning characteristics during WBL periods in highly versatile environments. Within a design-based research framework, the data was collected through learning journals written by students and qualitative interviews. The results of thematic analysis were used to develop a practice-oriented pedagogical model for meaningful WBL. The model visualizes the roles of students, teachers, and companies involved in WBL, the meaningful learning characteristics that can be amplified through the use of mobile ICTs, and the outcomes for each stakeholder. The model suggests structuring WBL through four negotiations involving a student, a teacher, and a company to assure that each student has clearly formulated learning goals and possibilities to pursue those goals regardless of the mobility of their work or facilities during their WBL period.

  19. Decision support systems and applications in ophthalmology: literature and commercial review focused on mobile apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Martínez-Pérez, Borja; López-Coronado, Miguel; Díaz, Javier Rodríguez; López, Miguel Maldonado

    2015-01-01

    The growing importance that mobile devices have in daily life has also reached health care and medicine. This is making the paradigm of health care change and the concept of mHealth or mobile health more relevant, whose main essence is the apps. This new reality makes it possible for doctors who are not specialist to have easy access to all the information generated in different corners of the world, making them potential keepers of that knowledge. However, the new daily information exceeds the limits of the human intellect, making Decision Support Systems (DSS) necessary for helping doctors to diagnose diseases and also help them to decide the attitude that has to be taken towards these diagnoses. These could improve the health care in remote areas and developing countries. All of this is even more important in diseases that are more prevalent in primary care and that directly affect the people's quality of life, this is the case in ophthalmological problems where in first patient care a specialist in ophthalmology is not involved. The goal of this paper is to analyse the state of the art of DSS in Ophthalmology. Many of them focused on diseases affecting the eye's posterior pole. For achieving the main purpose of this research work, a literature review and commercial apps analysis will be done. The used databases and systems will be IEEE Xplore, Web of Science (WoS), Scopus, and PubMed. The search is limited to articles published from 2000 until now. Later, different Mobile Decision Support System (MDSS) in Ophthalmology will be analyzed in the virtual stores for Android and iOS. 37 articles were selected according their thematic (posterior pole, anterior pole, Electronic Health Records (EHRs), cloud, data mining, algorithms and structures for DSS, and other) from a total of 600 found in the above cited databases. Very few mobile apps were found in the different stores. It can be concluded that almost all existing mobile apps are focused on the eye's posterior

  20. Supporting adherence to antiretroviral therapy with mobile phone reminders: results from a cohort in South India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Rodrigues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence is central to the success of antiretroviral therapy. Supporting adherence has gained importance in HIV care in many national treatment programs. The ubiquity of mobile phones, even in resource-constrained settings, has provided an opportunity to utilize an inexpensive, contextually feasible technology for adherence support in HIV in these settings. We aimed to assess the influence of mobile phone reminders on adherence to antiretroviral therapy in South India. Participant experiences with the intervention were also studied. This is the first report of such an intervention for antiretroviral adherence from India, a country with over 800 million mobile connections. METHODS: STUDY DESIGN: Quasi-experimental cohort study involving 150 HIV-infected individuals from Bangalore, India, who were on antiretroviral therapy between April and July 2010. The intervention: All participants received two types of adherence reminders on their mobile phones, (i an automated interactive voice response (IVR call and (ii A non-interactive neutral picture short messaging service (SMS, once a week for 6 months. Adherence measured by pill count, was assessed at study recruitment and at months one, three, six, nine and twelve. Participant experiences were assessed at the end of the intervention period. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 38 years, 27% were female and 90% urban. Overall, 3,895 IVRs and 3,073 SMSs were sent to the participants over 6 months. Complete case analysis revealed that the proportion of participants with optimal adherence increased from 85% to 91% patients during the intervention period, an effect that was maintained 6 months after the intervention was discontinued (p = 0.016. Both, IVR calls and SMS reminders were considered non-intrusive and not a threat to privacy. A significantly higher proportion agreed that the IVR was helpful compared to the SMS (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Mobile phone reminders may improve

  1. Nuclear power supports sensible entry into electric mobility; Kernenergie unterstuetzt den sinnvollen Einstieg in die Elektromobilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuczera, Bernhard

    2010-10-15

    The German federal government established the environmental goal of reducing carbon emissions from 1,033 million t in 1990 by 40% to 620 million t/a by 2020. The Federal Environmental Office reports a reduction by 26% for the past economic crisis year of 2009 over the reference year. Consequently, further efforts are needed along these lines if the objective is to be reached in 2020. Towards this end, the German government and industry founded the National Electric Mobility Platform on May 3, 2010 in an effort to make Germany a lead market for electric mobility and have one million electric vehicles operate on German roads by 2020. Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel in addition demands mobility in future to be ''more independent of resources, less pollutant to the environment, and more sustainable.'' These target criteria basically are met in the power supply sector when nuclear power is used to generate electricity. Against this backdrop, perspectives of electric mobility are outlined in terms of their environmental characteristics, and various approaches to achieving adequate electricity supply are explained. In view of the boundary conditions in power technology and power economy, the agreement reached by the present coalition government on September 6, 2010 about extending the plant life of the 17 German nuclear power plants supports the objective referred to above. This compromise of coalition politics exercises a bridge function in providing for an average plant life extension of 12 years over the current plant life limitations. The federal government considers this plant life extension a key feature of its new overall energy concept, which is to be more independent of resources, less polluting to the environment, and more sustainable than the current status quo. (orig.)

  2. Multi-purpose HealthCare Telemedicine Systems with mobile communication link support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karayiannis D

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The provision of effective emergency telemedicine and home monitoring solutions are the major fields of interest discussed in this study. Ambulances, Rural Health Centers (RHC or other remote health location such as Ships navigating in wide seas are common examples of possible emergency sites, while critical care telemetry and telemedicine home follow-ups are important issues of telemonitoring. In order to support the above different growing application fields we created a combined real-time and store and forward facility that consists of a base unit and a telemedicine (mobile unit. This integrated system: can be used when handling emergency cases in ambulances, RHC or ships by using a mobile telemedicine unit at the emergency site and a base unit at the hospital-expert's site, enhances intensive health care provision by giving a mobile base unit to the ICU doctor while the telemedicine unit remains at the ICU patient site and enables home telemonitoring, by installing the telemedicine unit at the patient's home while the base unit remains at the physician's office or hospital. The system allows the transmission of vital biosignals (3–12 lead ECG, SPO2, NIBP, IBP, Temp and still images of the patient. The transmission is performed through GSM mobile telecommunication network, through satellite links (where GSM is not available or through Plain Old Telephony Systems (POTS where available. Using this device a specialist doctor can telematically "move" to the patient's site and instruct unspecialized personnel when handling an emergency or telemonitoring case. Due to the need of storing and archiving of all data interchanged during the telemedicine sessions, we have equipped the consultation site with a multimedia database able to store and manage the data collected by the system. The performance of the system has been technically tested over several telecommunication means; in addition the system has been clinically validated in three

  3. Using mobile phones and social media to facilitate education and support for rural-based midwives in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Jennifer; Pimmer, Christoph; Brysiewicz, Petra; Walters, Fiona; Linxen, Sebastian; Ndebele, Thandi; Gröhbiel, Urs

    2015-12-14

    Empirical studies show the value of mobile phones as effective educational tools to support learning in the nursing profession, predominantly in high income countries. The rapidly increasing prevalence of mobile phone technology in Africa nourishes hopes that these tools could be equally effective in lowly resourced contexts, specifically in efforts to achieve the health-related Millennium Development goals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perception and use of mobile phones as educational and professional tools by nurses in lowly resourced settings. A quantitative survey using self-administered questionnaires was conducted of rural advanced midwives. Fifty-six nurses (49.6%) from the 113 rural-based midwives attending an advanced midwifery training programme at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, filled in a questionnaire. The results showed that, whilst nurses regarded their technology competences as low and although they received very little official support from their educational and professional institutions, the majority frequently used mobile functions and applications to support their work and learning processes. They perceived mobile devices with their voice, text, and email functions as important tools for the educational and professional activities of searching for information and engaging with facilitators and peers from work and study contexts. To a lesser extent, the use of social networks, such as WhatsApp and Facebook, were also reported. It is concluded that educational institutions should support the appropriate use of mobile phones more systematically; particularly in relation to the development of mobile network literacy skills.

  4. Ideas and enhancements related to mobile applications to support type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulman, Andy; Taylor, Jacqui; Galvin, Kathleen; Masding, Mike

    2013-07-25

    Mobile devices have become increasingly important to young people who now use them to access a wide variety of health-related information. Research and policy related to the integration of health information and support with this technology do not effectively consider the viewpoint of a younger patient. Views of young people with type 1 diabetes are vital in developing quality services and improving their own health-related quality of life (HRQOL), yet research on their lifestyle and use of Web and mobile technology to support their condition and in non-health-related areas is sparse. To develop insight into young people with type 1 diabetes and their current use of Web and mobile technology and its potential impact on HRQOL. This can be achieved by constructing an in-depth picture of their day-to-day experiences from qualitative interviewing and exploring how they make use of technology in their lives and in relation to their condition and treatment. The goal was then to build something to help them, using the researcher's technical expertise and seeking users' opinions during the design and build, utilizing sociotechnical design principles. Data were collected by semistructured, in-depth qualitative interviews (N=9) of young people with type 1 diabetes aged 18-21. Interviews were transcribed and loaded onto NVivo for theme identification. Data analysis was undertaken during initial interviews (n=4) to locate potential ideas and enhancements for technical development. Latter interviews (n=5) assisted in the iterative sociotechnical design process of the development and provided additional developmental ideas. Six themes were identified providing an understanding of how participants lived with and experienced their condition and how they used technology. Four technological suggestions for improvement were taken forward for prototyping. One prototype was developed as a clinically approved app. A number of ideas for new mobile apps and enhancements to currently

  5. Lessons from the organisation of the UK medical services deployed in support of Operation TELIC (Iraq) and Operation HERRICK (Afghanistan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricknell, Martin C M; Nadin, M

    2017-08-01

    This paper provides the definitive record of the UK Defence Medical Services (DMS) lessons from the organisation of medical services in support of Operation (Op) TELIC (Iraq) and Op HERRICK (Afghanistan). The analysis involved a detailed review of the published academic literature, internal post-operational tour reports and post-tour interviews. The list of lessons was reviewed through three Military Judgement Panel cycles producing the single synthesis ' the golden thread ' and eight ' silver bullets ' as themes to institutionalise the learning to deliver the golden thread. One additional theme, mentoring indigenous healthcare systems and providers, emerged as a completely new capability requirement. The DMS has established a programme of work to implement these lessons. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. A mobile and ubiquitous approach for supporting frailty assessment in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecha, Jesús; Hervás, Ramon; Bravo, José; Navarro, Fco Javier

    2013-09-04

    Frailty is a health condition related to aging and dependence. A reduction in or delay of the frailty state can improve the quality of life of the elderly. However, providing frailty assessments can be difficult because many factors must be taken into account. Usually, measurement of these factors is performed in a noncentralized manner. Additionally, the lack of quantitative methods for analysis makes it impossible for the diagnosis to be as complete or as objective as it should be. To develop a centralized mobile system to conduct elderly frailty assessments in an accurate and objective way using mobile phone capabilities. The diagnosis of frailty includes two fundamental aspects: the analysis of gait activity as the main predictor of functional disorders, and the study of a set of frailty risk factors from patient records. Thus, our system has several stages including gathering information about gait using accelerometer-enabled mobile devices, collecting values of frailty factors, performing analysis through similarity comparisons with previous data, and displaying the results for frailty on the mobile devices in a formalized way. We developed a general mechanism to assess the frailty state of a group of elders by using mobile devices as supporting tools. In collaboration with geriatricians, two studies were carried out on a group of 20 elderly patients (10 men and 10 women), previously selected from a nursing home. Frailty risk factors for each patient were collected at three different times over the period of a year. In the first study, data from the group of patients were used to determine the frailty state of a new incoming patient. The results were valuable for determining the degree of frailty of a specific patient in relation to other patients in an elderly population. The most representative similarity degrees were between 73.4% and 71.6% considering 61 frailty factors from 64 patient instances. Additionally, from the provided results, a physician could

  7. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  8. Analyzing policy support instruments and regulatory risk factors for wind energy deployment-A developers' perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luethi, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.luethi@unisg.ch [University of St. Gallen, 9000 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Praessler, Thomas [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    A transition to a renewable energy system is high on the policy agenda in many countries. A promising energy source for a low-carbon energy future is wind. Policy-makers can attract wind energy development by providing attractive policy frameworks. This paper argues that apart from the level of financial support, both the risks stemming from the regulatory environment (legal security, administrative process and grid access) and the ability to finance projects play a critical role in determining the attractiveness of the development environment. It sheds light on how project developers trade off these different aspects and to what extent the attractiveness of a certain policy framework increases with the introduction of specific measures. Conjoint analysis is employed to provide empirical evidence on the preference of wind energy developers in the EU and the US. The analysis shows that developers' preferences are very similar across the studied regions and for different types of developers. Which policy measures could be most valuable depends on the specific existing environment. In some southeastern European countries, a reduction of administrative process duration may yield the highest utility gains, whereas, in the US, improvements in grid access regulation and an increase in remuneration levels may be more effective. - Highlights: > Paper suggests conjoint analysis as scenario tool for estimating potential effects of specific policy measures. > It provides a quantitative, empirical dataset of 119 onshore wind energy developers' preferences. > Results suggest that the aspects 'Legal security' and 'Remuneration' are important attributes. > Cluster analyses yields slightly different preferences for developers from EU and US.

  9. Applying SDN/OpenFlow in Virtualized LTE to support Distributed Mobility Management (DMM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimzadeh Motallebi Azar, Morteza; Valtulina, Luca; Karagiannis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Distributed Mobility Management (DMM) is a mobility management solution, where the mobility anchors are distributed instead of being centralized. The use of DMM can be applied in cloud-based (virtualized) Long Term Evolution (LTE) mobile network environments to (1) provide session continuity to

  10. Psychological Impact of Deploying in Support of the U.S. Response to Ebola: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Past Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Kartavya J; Delaney, Eileen M; Webb-Murphy, Jennifer A; Johnston, Scott L

    2016-11-01

    To examine the potential psychological impact of deploying in support of the U.S. response to Ebola in west Africa by systematic review and meta-analysis. Peer-reviewed articles published between January 2000 and December 2014 were identified using PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science. Thirty-two studies involving 26,869 persons were included in the systematic review; 13 studies involving 7,785 persons were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Reflecting the sociodemographics of the military, those who are younger, single, not living with family, have fewer years of work experience, lower education, and lower income are at increased risk for psychological distress, alcohol/drug misuse, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and/or anxiety as a result of their perceived risk of infection. Effect sizes for post-traumatic stress disorder, depressive, and anxiety symptoms were considered small (SMD = 0.12, 95% CI = -0.23 to 0.47), moderate (SMD = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.24-0.51), and small (SMD = 0.08, 95% CI = -0.09 to 0.25), respectively; however, only the effect size for depressive symptoms was statistically significant. Deployed service members may return with clinically significant problems, the most notable of which is depression. Delivering resilience training and fostering altruistic acceptance may protect service members from developing mental health disorders. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. Mediator Effects of Positive Emotions on Social Support and Depression among Adolescents Suffering from Mobile Phone Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menglong; Jiang, Xia; Ren, Yujia

    2017-06-01

    Depression is a common mental disorder that is widely seen among adolescents suffering from mobile phone addiction. While it is well known that both positive emtions in adolescents wiotions and social support can have a positive impact by helping individuals to maintain a positive attitude, the correlation between positive emotions, social support, and depression among these adolescents remains to be investigated. This study examined the mediator effects of positive emotions on the relationship between social support and depression among adolescents suffering from mobile phone addiction. For this study, conducted in 2016, we selected 1,346 adolescent students from three middle schools (ranging from Junior Grade One to Senior Grade Three) in Hunan Province of China, to participate in the survey. Participants were selected using the stratified cluster random sampling method, and all participants remained anonymous throughout the study. Each participant completed the Self-made General Situation Questionnaire, the Social Support Rating Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the Mobile Phone Addiction Tendency Scale. There was significant positive correlation between positive emotions and social support. Both positive emotions and social support demonstrated significant negative correlation with depression. Positive emotions had partial mediator effects on the relationship between social support and depression (Pphone addiction. Social support contributes to positive emoth mobile phone addiction, thereby reducing their levels of depression. These findings suggest that more support and care should be given to this particular adolescent population.

  12. Current trends in using Internet and mobile technology to support the treatment of substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucciare, Michael A; Weingardt, Kenneth R; Greene, Carolyn J; Hoffman, Julia

    2012-09-01

    By allowing for the efficient delivery of instructional content and the secure collection of self-report data regarding substance use and related problems, the Internet has tremendous potential to improve the effectiveness and accessibility of Substance Use Disorder (SUD) treatment and recovery-oriented services. This article discusses some of the ways in which Internet and mobile technology can facilitate, complement and support the process of traditional clinician-delivered treatment for individuals with SUDs. Internet applications are being used to support a range of activities including (a) the assessment and feedback process that constitutes a key feature of brief motivational interventions; and (b) the concurrent monitoring of patients who are receiving treatment for SUDs, to support continuing care, and the ongoing recovery of SUD patients who have completed face-to-face treatment. Internet technology is also being used to (c) support efficient delivery of clinical training in evidence-based practices for treating individuals who may have SUDs. This emerging body of literature suggests that SUD treatment providers and program administrators can enhance the quality of clinician-delivered treatment by incorporating internet applications into existing processes of care and recovery oriented services. Internet applications provide an unparalleled opportunity to engage patients in the treatment process, incorporate real-time data into treatment planning, prevent relapse, and promote evidence-based treatment approaches.

  13. Optimization of mobile IPv6-based handovers to support VoIP services in wireless heterogeneous networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathi, Hanane; Chakraborty, Shyam; Prasad, Ramjee

    2007-01-01

    The support of the voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services in next-generation wireless systems requires the coupling of mobility with quality of service. The mobile node can experience disruptions or even intermittent disconnections of an ongoing real-time session due to handovers. The durat......The support of the voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) services in next-generation wireless systems requires the coupling of mobility with quality of service. The mobile node can experience disruptions or even intermittent disconnections of an ongoing real-time session due to handovers...... at layer 3. Using analytical models, the authors evaluate MIPv4, MIPv6, fast MIPv6 (FMIPv6), and hierarchical MIPv6 (HMIPv6) and compare their performances in terms of handover delay for VoIP services. To optimize the handover delay, the authors propose to use the adaptive retransmission timer described...

  14. Observing, recording, and reviewing: Using mobile phones in support of science inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoo, Elaine; Williams, John; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Teaching science can be challenging, particularly if it involves the incorporation of inquiry approaches. Collaboration and co-construction of ideas and understandings requires changing teaching and learning practices to allow students to learn how to collaborate ‘inquiry style’. There is increas......Teaching science can be challenging, particularly if it involves the incorporation of inquiry approaches. Collaboration and co-construction of ideas and understandings requires changing teaching and learning practices to allow students to learn how to collaborate ‘inquiry style...... will be presented. The findings illustrate how student use of mobile phones to video record practical group investigations was valuable in providing multimodal opportunities to expand their critical observational skills to reflect on and talk about science. Student reviewed recordings prompted the pursuit of new......’. There is increasing evidence that the use of mobile learning devices can support inquiry learning by increasing the opportunities for student participation and collaboration in the learning process. This paper reports on the preliminary findings from a New Zealand Teaching and Learning Initiative funded project...

  15. Mobile phone-assisted basic life support augmented with a metronome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paal, Peter; Pircher, Iris; Baur, Thomas; Gruber, Elisabeth; Strasak, Alexander M; Herff, Holger; Brugger, Hermann; Wenzel, Volker; Mitterlechner, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Basic life support (BLS) performed by lay rescuers is poor. We developed software for mobile phones augmented with a metronome to improve BLS. To assess BLS in lay rescuers with or without software assistance. Medically untrained volunteers were randomized to run through a cardiac arrest scenario with ("assisted BLS") or without ("non-assisted BLS") the aid of a BLS software program installed on a mobile phone. Sixty-four lay rescuers were enrolled in the "assisted BLS" and 77 in the "non-assisted BLS" group. The "assisted BLS" when compared to the "non-assisted BLS" group, achieved a higher overall score (19.2 ± 7.5 vs. 12.9 ± 5.7 credits; p metronome resulted in a higher overall score and a better chest compression rate when compared to "non-assisted BLS." However, in the "assisted BLS" group, time to call the dispatch center and to start chest compressions was longer. In both groups, lay persons did not ventilate satisfactorily during this cardiac arrest scenario. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Mobile Early Stimulation Program to Support Children with Developmental Delays in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raquel da Luz; Silva, Kátia Cristina Correa Guimarães; Lima, Marcela Raquel de Oliveira; Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2018-01-01

    Developmental delay is a deviation development from the normative milestones during the childhood and it may be caused by neurological disorders. Early stimulation is a standardized and simple technique to treat developmental delays in children (aged 0-3 years), allowing them to reach the best development possible and to mitigate neuropsychomotor sequelae. However, the outcomes of the treatment depending on the involvement of the family, to continue the activities at home on a daily basis. To empower and educate parents of children with neurodevelopmental delays to administer standardized early stimulation programs at home, we developed a mobile early stimulation program that provides timely and evidence-based clinical decision support to health professionals and a personalized guidance to parents about how to administer early stimulation to their child at home.

  17. Capitalizing on mobile technology to support healthy eating in ethnic minority college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Pernal, Wendy; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Shiyko, Mariya; Intille, Stephen; Franko, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the capacity of a mobile technology-based intervention to support healthy eating among ethnic minority female students. Forty-three African American and Hispanic female students participated in a 3-week intervention between January and May 2013. Participants photographed their meals using their smart phone camera and received motivational text messages 3 times a day. At baseline, postintervention, and 10 weeks after the intervention, participants reported on fruit, vegetable, and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Participants were also weighed at baseline. Among participants with body mass index (BMI) ≥25, fruit and vegetable consumption increased with time (p technology-based interventions could facilitate healthy eating among female ethnic minority college students, particularly those with higher BMI.

  18. A MOBILE-DEVICE-SUPPORTED PEER-ASSISTED LEARNING SYSTEM FOR COLLABORATIVE EARLY EFL READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ju Lan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning methods which emphasize peer interaction have been widely applied to increase the intensity and effectiveness of EFL reading programs. However, simply grouping students heterogeneously and assigning them group goals does not guarantee that effective collaborative learning will ensue. The present research includes two studies. In Study One, the weaknesses of collaborative learning in a traditional EFL setting were observed. Then, in Study Two, a mobile-device-supported peer-assisted learning (MPAL system was developed for the purpose of addressing the identified weaknesses. Two classes of twenty-six third grade students participated in the present research to examine the unique contribution of MPAL to collaborative EFL reading activities. The collaborative behavior of elementary EFL learners was videotaped and analyzed. Detailed analysis of the videotaped behavior indicated that MPAL helped improve collaboration in elementary school level EFL learners and promotes their reading motivation.

  19. Meal support using mobile technology in Anorexia Nervosa. Contextual differences between inpatient and outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardi, Valentina; Lounes, Naima; Kan, Carol; Treasure, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of a "supported eating" intervention using mobile technology in patients with Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Twenty Inpatients and 18 Outpatients with AN underwent a test meal on two occasions, whilst listening to either a short video-clip ('vodcast'), or music delivered on an MP4 player. Self-report and behavioural measures were collected before and after each test meal. Differences were found between the inpatient and outpatient settings. Inpatients drank more of the test meal and had increased levels of vigilance to food after the test meal, in both conditions. When the support conditions (Vodcast vs. Music) were compared, inpatients seemed to benefit more from listening to music (reduced distress and more smoothie drunk), whereas outpatients benefitted more from using the vodcast (reduced distress, more smoothie drunk, and reduced vigilance to food). The context in which the intervention was delivered had an impact on self-report and behavioural measures collected during the test meal. This suggests that the form of meal support in AN needs to match the context. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    2002. Sister services, the Navy and the Air Force, are constructed around their modes of transportation. They take themselves to the battle around...The vessels returned to Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean and transloaded all of the equipment to vessels small enough to be received at Mogadishu ...of their response time, though. Marines and Navy Seals were in Mogadishu before a port assessment had ever been done. Forces were committed without

  1. The Potential of a Mobile Group Blog to Support Cultural Learning among Overseas Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yinjuan; Crook, Charles

    2015-01-01

    We explored the use of mobile social software, in the form of a mobile group blog, to assist cultural learning. The potential of using this technology for cultural adaptation among overseas students was examined as those students adapted to the everyday life of studying abroad. Two pilot studies and a successful field study of a mobile group blog…

  2. Using mobile phones and social media to facilitate education and support for rural-based midwives in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Chipps

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empirical studies show the value of mobile phones as effective educational tools to support learning in the nursing profession, predominantly in high income countries. Problem statement: The rapidly increasing prevalence of mobile phone technology in Africa nourishes hopes that these tools could be equally effective in lowly resourced contexts, specifically in efforts to achieve the health-related Millennium Development goals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perception and use of mobile phones as educational and professional tools by nurses in lowly resourced settings. Methodology: A quantitative survey using self-administered questionnaires was conducted of rural advanced midwives. Results: Fifty-six nurses (49.6% from the 113 rural-based midwives attending an advanced midwifery training programme at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, filled in a questionnaire. The results showed that, whilst nurses regarded their technology competences as low and although they received very little official support from their educational and professional institutions, the majority frequently used mobile functions and applications to support their work and learning processes. They perceived mobile devices with their voice, text, and email functions as important tools for the educational and professional activities of searching for information and engaging with facilitators and peers from work and study contexts. To a lesser extent, the use of social networks, such as WhatsApp and Facebook, were also reported. Conclusion and recommendation: It is concluded that educational institutions should support the appropriate use of mobile phones more systematically; particularly in relation to the development of mobile network literacy skills.

  3. Considerations for the Development of Mobile Phone Apps to Support Diabetes Self-Management: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, Mary D; Malabu, Usman H; Callander, Emily J; Malau-Aduli, Aduli Eo; Malau-Aduli, Bunmi S

    2018-06-21

    There is increased research interest in the use of mobile phone apps to support diabetes management. However, there are divergent views on what constitute the minimum standards for inclusion in the development of mobile phone apps. Mobile phone apps require an evidence-based approach to development which will consequently impact on their effectiveness. Therefore, comprehensive information on developmental considerations could help designers and researchers to develop innovative and effective patient-centered self-management mobile phone apps for diabetes patients. This systematic review examined the developmental considerations adopted in trials that engaged mobile phone applications for diabetes self-management. A comprehensive search strategy was implemented across 5 electronic databases; Medline, Scopus, Social Science Citation Index, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINALHL) and supplemented by reference list from identified studies. Study quality was evaluated using the Joanna Briggs Critical appraisal checklist for trials. Information on developmental factors (health behavioral theory, functionality, pilot testing, user and clinical expert involvements, data privacy and app security) were assessed across experimental studies using a template developed for the review. A total of 11 studies (10 randomized controlled trials and 1 quasi-experimental trial) that fitted the inclusion criteria were identified. All the included studies had the functionality of self-monitoring of blood glucose. However, only some of them included functions for data analytics (7/11, 63.6%), education (6/11, 54.5%) and reminder (6/11, 54.5%). There were 5/11(45.5%) studies with significantly improved glycosylated hemoglobin in the intervention groups where educational functionality was present in the apps used in the 5 trials. Only 1 (1/11, 9.1%) study considered health behavioral theory and user involvement

  4. Analysis of mobile devices as a support tool for professional medical education in the university school

    OpenAIRE

    Briz Ponce, Laura; Juanes Méndez, Juan Antonio; García-Peñalvo, Francisco José

    2014-01-01

    [EN] According to the report of International Telecommunications Union (ITU), there are approximately 6.800 millions of users in the world with a mobile device. The fast evolution of these mobile devices for the last two decades has made the mobile phone become a minicomputer with a data connection. Because of the use of these mobile phones, the mobile applications appeared just one year later that the launching of the first iPhone and now the number of these applications reach more than 1 mi...

  5. A Mobile Health Strategy to Support Adherence to Antiretroviral Preexposure Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Jonathan D; Stojanovski, Kristefer; Vittinghoff, Eric; McMahan, Vanessa M; Hosek, Sybill G; Amico, K Rivet; Kouyate, Aminta; Gilmore, Hailey J; Buchbinder, Susan P; Lester, Richard T; Grant, Robert M; Liu, Albert Y

    2018-03-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis is a highly protective HIV prevention strategy, yet nonadherence can significantly reduce its effectiveness. We conducted a mixed methods evaluation of a mobile health intervention (iText) that utilized weekly bidirectional text or e-mail support messages to encourage preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) adherence among participants in the multi-site iPrEx open-label extension study. A convenience sample of PrEP users from the San Francisco and Chicago sites participated in a 12-week pilot study. Fifty-six men who have sex with men were enrolled; a quarter of them were less than 30 years of age, 13% were black/African American, 11% were Latino, and most (88%) completed some college. Two-thirds opted for text message delivery. Of the 667 messages sent, only 1 individual requested support; initial nonresponse was observed in 22% and was higher among e-mail compared to text message recipients. Poststudy, a majority of participants would recommend the intervention to others, especially during PrEP initiation. Moreover, younger participants and men of color were more likely to report that they would use the iText strategy if it were available to them. Several participants commented that while they were aware that the messages were automated, they felt supported and encouraged that "someone was always there." Study staff reported that the intervention is feasible to administer and can be incorporated readily into clinic flow. A pre-post intervention regression discontinuity analysis using clinic-based pill counts showed a 50% reduction in missed doses [95% confidence interval (CI) 16-71; p = 0.008] and 77% (95% CI 33-92; p = 0.007) when comparing pill counts at quarterly visits just before and after iText enrollment. A mobile health intervention using weekly bidirectional messaging was highly acceptable and demonstrated promising effects on PrEP adherence warranting further evaluation for efficacy in a randomized controlled trial.

  6. Wearable devices and mobile technologies for supporting behavioral weight loss among people with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Scherer, Emily A; McHugo, Gregory J; Marsch, Lisa A; Bartels, Stephen J

    2016-10-30

    Promoting physical activity is essential for addressing elevated cardiovascular risk and high obesity rates affecting people with serious mental illness. Numerous challenges interfere with exercise participation in this high-risk group including mental health symptoms, low motivation, and limited access to safe and affordable options for physical activity. Wearable devices and mobile health technologies may afford new opportunities for promoting physical activity and supporting behavioral weight loss efforts. This exploratory study examined whether daily step count measured using Fitbit wearable devices was associated with weight loss and improved fitness among individuals with serious mental illness enrolled in a 6-month lifestyle program. Participants (n=34) had a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (23.5%), major depression (50.0%), or bipolar disorder (26.5%), and wore Fitbits most of the days (M=86.2%; SD=18.4%) they were enrolled in the study. At 6-months, higher average daily step count was associated with greater weight loss (F=5.07; df=1,32; p=0.0314), but not improved fitness (F=1.92; df=1,31; p=0.176). These findings demonstrate that encouraging participants with serious mental illness enrolled in lifestyle interventions to collect more steps may contribute to greater weight loss. This suggests that wearable devices may offer a feasible and potentially effective strategy for supporting behavioral weight loss in community mental health settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Introducing StatHand: A cross-platform mobile application to support students’ statistical decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter James Allen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although essential to professional competence in psychology, quantitative research methods are a known area of weakness for many undergraduate psychology students. Students find selecting appropriate statistical tests and procedures for different types of research questions, hypotheses and data types particularly challenging, and these skills are not often practiced in class. Decision trees (a type of graphic organizer are known to facilitate this decision making process, but extant trees have a number of limitations. Furthermore, emerging research suggests that mobile technologies offer many possibilities for facilitating learning. It is within this context that we have developed StatHand, a free cross-platform application designed to support students’ statistical decision making. Developed with the support of the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, StatHand guides users through a series of simple, annotated questions to help them identify a statistical test or procedure appropriate to their circumstances. It further offers the guidance necessary to run these tests and procedures, then interpret and report their results. In this Technology Report we will overview the rationale behind StatHand, before describing the feature set of the application. We will then provide guidelines for integrating StatHand into the research methods curriculum, before concluding by outlining our road map for the ongoing development and evaluation of StatHand.

  8. Mobile application for guidance and provision of toddler's nutrition to support e-PKK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochimah, S.; Sianipar, F. Y.; Anggraini, R. N. E.

    2016-01-01

    Pembinaan Kesejahteraan Keluarga(PKK)is an Indonesian community with women as its member, especially housewife. It has many purposes, such ascollaborating the knowledges among members, monitoring children's health, supporting healthy life style in the family. This article is part of our research in building e-PKK, an integrated application to support many activities in PKK's business processes. In this paper we build a module to guide and provise toddler's nutrition to be used by mother. This application is very useful since baby's growth phase is an important phase to be noticed by mother.Using this application, mother can easily obtain baby's growth information whenever and wherever they are via their smartphone. This mobile device applications using backward chaining and forward chaining method. Backward chaining method is a method that uses a goal-based approach, while the forward chaining conducting a set of data for later inference process to find optimal conclusion. Moreover, this apllication provides recommendations of groceries, recipes, as well as the suitability of foodstuffs according to the age of early baby's growth and the type of baby's allergic. In addition, it also provide information about baby's nutrition, growth benchmarks, and first aid. Besides, the application can be used to monthly baby growth record like Kartu Menuju Sehat (KMS) or Growth Monitoring Card, storing toddlers weighing, immunization and provision of vitamin A. An additional feature of this application is the complaints system, where other can ask directly to health care center about toddlers’ growth.

  9. Introducing StatHand: A Cross-Platform Mobile Application to Support Students' Statistical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Peter J; Roberts, Lynne D; Baughman, Frank D; Loxton, Natalie J; Van Rooy, Dirk; Rock, Adam J; Finlay, James

    2016-01-01

    Although essential to professional competence in psychology, quantitative research methods are a known area of weakness for many undergraduate psychology students. Students find selecting appropriate statistical tests and procedures for different types of research questions, hypotheses and data types particularly challenging, and these skills are not often practiced in class. Decision trees (a type of graphic organizer) are known to facilitate this decision making process, but extant trees have a number of limitations. Furthermore, emerging research suggests that mobile technologies offer many possibilities for facilitating learning. It is within this context that we have developed StatHand, a free cross-platform application designed to support students' statistical decision making. Developed with the support of the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, StatHand guides users through a series of simple, annotated questions to help them identify a statistical test or procedure appropriate to their circumstances. It further offers the guidance necessary to run these tests and procedures, then interpret and report their results. In this Technology Report we will overview the rationale behind StatHand, before describing the feature set of the application. We will then provide guidelines for integrating StatHand into the research methods curriculum, before concluding by outlining our road map for the ongoing development and evaluation of StatHand.

  10. Recent mobile health interventions to support medication adherence among HIV-positive MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessig, Kathryn E; LeGrand, Sara; Horvath, Keith J; Bauermeister, José A; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2017-09-01

    We describe recent mobile health (mHealth) interventions supporting antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication adherence among HIV-positive MSM. Keyword searches (1 January 2016-13 May 2017) identified 721 citations. Seven publications reporting on six studies met inclusion criteria. Five studies focused on MSM. Interventions primarily employed text messaging (n = 4), whereas two focused on smartphone apps and one on social media. Three studies measured intervention impact on adherence and found increased ART use intentions (n = 1), self-reported adherence (n = 1), and viral suppression (n = 1, no control group). Other mHealth interventions for HIV-positive MSM focused on status disclosure and reducing sexual risk. mHealth interventions to support ART adherence among MSM show acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary efficacy. No recent mHealth interventions for MSM measured impact on viral suppression compared with a control condition despite earlier (pre-2015) evidence for efficacy. Studies are underway that include multiple features designed to improve adherence within complex smartphone or internet-based platforms. Areas for future growth include overcoming measurement and engagement challenges, developing tools for coordinating patient and provider adherence data, testing combination interventions, and adapting efficacious interventions for new languages and geographic settings.

  11. [MOSS- Mobile Sensing and Support Detection of depressive moods with an app and help those affected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidt, Steffi; Wahle, Fabian; Rufer, Michael; Hörni, Anja; Kowatsch, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    Major depression is regarded as a significant and serious disease with an increasing prevalence worldwide. However, not all individuals with depressive pressive symptoms seek help for their problems. These untreated "hidden" individuals with depressive symptoms require the design and dissemination of evidence-based, /ow-cost and scalable mental health interventions. Such interventions provided by mobile applications are promising as they have the potential to support people in their everyday life. However, as of today it is unclear how to design mental health applications that are effective and motivating yet non-intrusive. In addressing this problem, the MOSS application is a recent endeavor of a Swiss project team from Universitiitsspital Zurich, ETH Zurich, University of St. Gallen and makora AG, to support people with depressive symptoms. In particular, evidence-based micro-interventions are recommended and triggered by individual characteristics that are derived from self-reports, smartphone interactions and sensor data. After one year of development, the study team now conducts a first empirical study and thus, recruits people affected by depressive symptoms to improve not only the application as such but with it, the delivery of mental health interventions in the long run.

  12. Investigation of Doppler Effects on high mobility OFDM-MIMO systems with the support of High Altitude Platforms (HAPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, H. A.; Sibley, M. J. N.; Mather, P. J.

    2012-05-01

    The merging of Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) with Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is a promising mobile air interface solution for next generation wireless local area networks (WLANs) and 4G mobile cellular wireless systems. This paper details the design of a highly robust and efficient OFDM-MIMO system to support permanent accessibility and higher data rates to users moving at high speeds, such as users travelling on trains. It has high relevance for next generation wireless local area networks (WLANs) and 4G mobile cellular wireless systems. The paper begins with a comprehensive literature review focused on both technologies. This is followed by the modelling of the OFDM-MIMO physical layer based on Simulink/Matlab that takes into consideration high vehicular mobility. Then the entire system is simulated and analysed under different encoding and channel estimation algorithms. The use of High Altitude Platform system (HAPs) technology is considered and analysed.

  13. Investigation of Doppler Effects on high mobility OFDM-MIMO systems with the support of High Altitude Platforms (HAPs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, H A; Sibley, M J N; Mather, P J

    2012-01-01

    The merging of Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) with Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is a promising mobile air interface solution for next generation wireless local area networks (WLANs) and 4G mobile cellular wireless systems. This paper details the design of a highly robust and efficient OFDM-MIMO system to support permanent accessibility and higher data rates to users moving at high speeds, such as users travelling on trains. It has high relevance for next generation wireless local area networks (WLANs) and 4G mobile cellular wireless systems. The paper begins with a comprehensive literature review focused on both technologies. This is followed by the modelling of the OFDM-MIMO physical layer based on Simulink/Matlab that takes into consideration high vehicular mobility. Then the entire system is simulated and analysed under different encoding and channel estimation algorithms. The use of High Altitude Platform system (HAPs) technology is considered and analysed.

  14. Treatment Deployment Evaluation Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. A. Rynearson; M. M. Plum

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the final disposition of legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF). As a response, DOE's National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) has been given the responsibility for the disposition of DOE-owned SNF. Many treatment technologies have been identified to treat some forms of SNF so that the resulting treated product is acceptable by the disposition site. One of these promising treatment processes is the electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) currently in development; a second is an Acid Wash Decladding process. The NSNFP has been tasked with identifying possible strategies for the deployment of these treatment processes in the event that a treatment path is deemed necessary. To support the siting studies of these strategies, economic evaluations are being performed to identify the least-cost deployment path. This model (tool) was developed to consider the full scope of costs, technical feasibility, process material disposition, and schedule attributes over the life of each deployment alternative. Using standard personal computer (PC) software, the model was developed as a comprehensive technology economic assessment tool using a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis methodology. Model development was planned as a systematic, iterative process of identifying and bounding the required activities to dispose of SNF. To support the evaluation process, activities are decomposed into lower level, easier to estimate activities. Sensitivity studies can then be performed on these activities, defining cost issues and testing results against the originally stated problem

  15. Mobile Health Technology for Atrial Fibrillation Management Integrating Decision Support, Education, and Patient Involvement: mAF App Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yutao; Chen, Yundai; Lane, Deirdre A; Liu, Lihong; Wang, Yutang; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-12-01

    Mobile Health technology for the management of patients with atrial fibrillation is unknown. The simple mobile AF (mAF) App was designed to incorporate clinical decision-support tools (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc [Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 years, Diabetes Mellitus, Prior Stroke or TIA, Vascular disease, Age 65-74 years, Sex category], HAS-BLED [Hypertension, Abnormal renal/liver function, Stroke, Bleeding history or predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drugs/alcohol concomitantly], SAMe-TT 2 R 2 [Sex, Age Mobile Health technology in patients with atrial fibrillation, demonstrating that the mAF App, integrating clinical decision support, education, and patient-involvement strategies, significantly improved knowledge, drug adherence, quality of life, and anticoagulation satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessing the impacts of deploying a shared self-driving urban mobility system: An agent-based model applied to the city of Lisbon, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Martinez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the changes that might result from the large-scale uptake of a shared and self-driving fleet of vehicles in a mid-sized European city. The work explores two different self-driving vehicle concepts – a ridesharing system (Shared Taxi, which emulates a taxi-like system where customers accept small detours from their original direct path and share part of their ride with others and a dynamic bus-like service with minibuses (Taxi-Bus, where customers pre-book their service at least 30 min in advance (permanent bookings for regular trips should represent most requests and walk short distances to a designated stop. Under the premise that the “upgraded” system should as much as possible deliver the same trips as today in terms of origin, destination and timing, and that it should also replace all car and bus trips, it looks at impacts on car fleet size, volume of travel and parking requirements. Mobility output and CO2 emissions are also detailed in two different time scales (24 h. average and peak-hour only. The obtained results suggest that a full implementation scenario where the existing metro service is kept and private car, bus and taxi mobility would be replaced by shared modes would significantly reduce travelled vehicle.kilometres and CO2 emissions.

  17. Women's views and experiences of a mobile phone-based intervention to support post-abortion contraception in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris; Ly, Sokhey; Uk, Vannak; Warnock, Ruby; Free, Caroline

    2017-06-12

    The MObile Technology for Improved Family Planning (MOTIF) trial assessed a mobile phone-based intervention comprising voice messages and counsellor support to increase post-abortion contraception at four Marie Stopes International clinics in Cambodia. The aim of this process evaluation was to assess women's views and experiences of receiving the MOTIF intervention, gain insights into the mechanism of action of the intervention and seek recommendations for improvements. We conducted a qualitative study comprising15 semi-structured interviews with women who had received the intervention and undertook a simple thematic analysis. We identified themes relating to communication via mobile phone, supporting contraception use, broader post-abortion care, interaction with family and friends and suggestions for improvement. The majority of women were positive about the mobile phone-based intervention to support contraception use and reported it to be a convenient way to ask questions or get advice without going to a health centre, although a few women found the voice messages intrusive. The intervention supported contraception use by provision of information, encouragement, reminders to return to clinic, reassurance and advice for problems and had a positive effect on contraceptive uptake and continuation. Women reported a sense of being cared for and received support for additional physical and emotional issues. Most women thought that the duration of the intervention and frequency of messages were acceptable. The majority of women were positive about the mobile phone-based intervention which provided support for contraception use as well as additional physical and emotional issues. The study provides some insights into how the intervention might have worked and considers how the intervention could be improved.

  18. Tech Select Decision Aide: A Mobile Application to Facilitate Just-in-Time Decision Support for Instructional Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbagh, Nada; Fake, Helen

    2017-01-01

    With the ubiquitous use of mobile technologies and the increasing demand for just-in-time training, there is a need to prepare and support instructional designers and educators to meet the pedagogical and technological development requirements of their target audience in the most effective and efficient way. This paper reviews the iterative…

  19. Support given to lecturers when providing mobile centric services in teaching and learning: a policy analysis perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chipangura, B

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to examine the status of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) policies in supporting lecturers when providing mobile centric services to students. The research was undertaken as a single case study within the Open...

  20. Guideline-based decision support for the mobile patient incorporating data streams from a body sensor network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung, L.S.N.; Jones, Valerie M.; Bults, Richard G.A.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a mobile decision support system (mDSS) which helps patients adhere to best clinical practice by providing pervasive and evidence-based health guidance via their smartphones. Similar to some existing clinical DSSs, the mDSS is designed to execute clinical guidelines, but it operates on

  1. Opportunity, risk, and success recognizing, addressing, and balancing multiple factors crucial to the success of a project management system deployed to support multi-lateral decommissioning programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, Greg; Longsworth, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses the factors involved in effectively implementing a world-class program/project management information system funded by multiple nations. Along with many other benefits, investing in and utilizing such systems improves delivery and drive accountability for major expenditures. However, there are an equally large number of impediments to developing and using such systems. To be successful, the process requires a dynamic combining of elements and strategic sequencing of initiatives. While program/project-management systems involve information technologies, software and hardware, they represent only one element of the overall system.. Technology, process, people and knowledge must all be integrated and working in concert with one another to assure a fully capable system. Major system implementations occur infrequently, and frequently miss established targets in relatively small organizations (with the risk increasing with greater complexity). The European Bank of Reconstruction (EBRD) is midway through just such an implementation. The EBRD is using funds from numerous donor countries to sponsor development of an overarching program management system. The system will provide the Russian Federation with the tools to effectively manage prioritizing, planning, and physically decommissioning assets i n northwest Russia to mitigate risks associated the Soviet era nuclear submarine program. Project-management delivery using world-class techniques supported by aligned systems has been proven to increase the probability of delivering on-time and on-budget, assuring those funding such programs optimum value for money. However, systems deployed to manage multi-laterally funded projects must be developed with appropriate levels of consideration given to unique aspects such as: accommodation of existing project management methods, consideration for differences is management structures and organizational behaviors, incorporation of unique strengths, and subtle

  2. MEDIATOR EFFECTS OF POSITIVE EMOTIONS ON SOCIAL SUPPORT AND DEPRESSION AMONG ADOLESCENTS SUFFERING FROM MOBILE PHONE ADDICTION

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Menglong; Jiang, Xia; Ren, Yujia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common mental disorder that is widely seen among adolescents suffering from mobile phone addiction. While it is well known that both positive emtions in adolescents wiotions and social support can have a positive impact by helping individuals to maintain a positive attitude, the correlation between positive emotions, social support, and depression among these adolescents remains to be investigated. This study examined the mediator effects of positive emoti...

  3. ETSI-Standard Reconfigurable Mobile Device for Supporting the Licensed Shared Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunghoon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order for a Mobile Device (MD to support the Licensed Shared Access (LSA, the MD should be reconfigurable, meaning that the configuration of a MD must be adaptively changed in accordance with the communication standard adopted in a given LSA system. Based on the standard architecture for reconfigurable MD defined in Working Group (WG 2 of the Technical Committee (TC Reconfigurable Radio System (RRS of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI, this paper presents a procedure to transfer control signals among the software entities of a reconfigurable MD required for implementing the LSA. This paper also presents an implementation of a reconfigurable MD prototype that realizes the proposed procedure. The modem and Radio Frequency (RF part of the prototype MD are implemented with the NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan Graphic Processing Unit (GPU and the Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP N210, respectively. With a preset scenario that consists of five time slots from different signal environments, we demonstrate superb performance of the reconfigurable MD in comparison to the conventional nonreconfigurable MD in terms of the data receiving rate available in the LSA band at 2.3–2.4 GHz.

  4. Mobile magnetic particles as solid-supports for rapid surface-based bioanalysis in continuous flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, Sally A; Iles, Alexander; Pamme, Nicole

    2009-11-07

    An extremely versatile microfluidic device is demonstrated in which multi-step (bio)chemical procedures can be performed in continuous flow. The system operates by generating several co-laminar flow streams, which contain reagents for specific (bio)reactions across a rectangular reaction chamber. Functionalized magnetic microparticles are employed as mobile solid-supports and are pulled from one side of the reaction chamber to the other by use of an external magnetic field. As the particles traverse the co-laminar reagent streams, binding and washing steps are performed on their surface in one operation in continuous flow. The applicability of the platform was first demonstrated by performing a proof-of-principle binding assay between streptavidin coated magnetic particles and biotin in free solution with a limit of detection of 20 ng mL(-1) of free biotin. The system was then applied to a mouse IgG sandwich immunoassay as a first example of a process involving two binding steps and two washing steps, all performed within 60 s, a fraction of the time required for conventional testing.

  5. Local mobility in lipid domains of supported bilayers characterized by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, Daniel J.; Buranda, T. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Burns, Alan Richard

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is used to examine mobility of labeled probes at specific sites in supported bilayers consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid domains in 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). Those sites are mapped beforehand with simultaneous atomic force microscopy and submicron confocal fluorescence imaging, allowing characterization of probe partitioning between gel DPPC and disordered liquid DOPC domains with corresponding topography of domain structure. We thus examine the relative partitioning and mobility in gel and disordered liquid phases for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled GM1 ganglioside probes and for headgroup- and tailgroup-labeled phospholipid probes. For the GM1 probes, large differences in mobility between fluid and gel domains are observed; whereas unexpected mobility is observed in submicron gel domains for the phospholipid probes. We attribute the latter to domain heterogeneities that could be induced by the probe. Furthermore, fits to the FCS data for the phospholipid probes in the DOPC fluid phase require two components (fast and slow). Although proximity to the glass substrate may be a factor, local distortion of the probe by the fluorophore could also be important. Overall, we observe nonideal aspects of phospholipid probe mobility and partitioning that may not be restricted to supported bilayers.

  6. Mobile technology supporting trainee doctors' workplace learning and patient care: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardyman, Wendy; Bullock, Alison; Brown, Alice; Carter-Ingram, Sophie; Stacey, Mark

    2013-01-21

    The amount of information needed by doctors has exploded. The nature of knowledge (explicit and tacit) and processes of knowledge acquisition and participation are complex. Aiming to assist workplace learning, Wales Deanery funded "iDoc", a project offering trainee doctors a Smartphone library of medical textbooks. Data on trainee doctors' (Foundation Year 2) workplace information seeking practice was collected by questionnaire in 2011 (n = 260). iDoc baseline questionnaires (n = 193) collected data on Smartphone usage alongside other workplace information sources. Case reports (n = 117) detail specific instances of Smartphone use. Most frequently (daily) used information sources in the workplace: senior medical staff (80% F2 survey; 79% iDoc baseline); peers (70%; 58%); and other medical/nursing team staff (53% both datasets). Smartphones were used more frequently by males (p mobile technology used for simple (information-based), complex (problem-based) clinical questions and clinical procedures (skills-based scenarios). From thematic analysis, the Smartphone library assisted: teaching and learning from observation; transition from medical student to new doctor; trainee doctors' discussions with seniors; independent practice; patient care; and this 'just-in-time' access to reliable information supported confident and efficient decision-making. A variety of information sources are used regularly in the workplace. Colleagues are used daily but seniors are not always available. During transitions, constant access to the electronic library was valued. It helped prepare trainee doctors for discussions with their seniors, assisting the interchange between explicit and tacit knowledge.By supporting accurate prescribing and treatment planning, the electronic library contributed to enhanced patient care. Trainees were more rapidly able to medicate patients to reduce pain and more quickly call for specific assessments. However, clinical decision-making often requires

  7. Optimizing small cell deployment by the use of C-RANs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checko, Aleksandra; Holm, Henrik Laumand; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2014-01-01

    A Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) is a novel mobile network architecture that has the potential to support extremely dense mobile network deployments enhancing the network capacity while offering cost savings on baseband resources. In this work we analyze cell traffic profiles and evaluate...... the conditions that impact the statistical multiplexing gain in the Baseband Unit (BBU) Pool. We conclude on the set of parameters that maximize the statistical multiplexing gain, leading to the highest potential cost savings. We then propose a packet based architecture that can adapt to changing traffic...... conditions. Furthermore, based on theoretical calculations and Network simulations we present considerations on deployment scenarios to optimize green field deployments in terms of Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). This involves optimizing the mix of cells with different traffic profiles and the BBU Pool...

  8. On Using a Mobile Application to Support Teledermatology: A Case Study in an Underprivileged Area in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Sáenz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of mobile applications in dermatology to support remote diagnosis is gaining acceptance, particularly in rural areas, where dermatology services are commonly managed by healthcare personnel with no specialty training. Moreover, ontologies—sets of concepts that represent knowledge in a given domain—are increasingly being used to support medical diagnosis. A specific case is ONTODerm: an ontology to aid dermatological diagnosis. However, there is little information on the combined use of mobile applications and ontologies as support solutions in dermatology. Objective. Assessing the reliability of ONTODerm as a tool to support remote dermatological diagnosis when used together with a mobile dermatological application in underprivileged areas. Methods. A mobile application that allows characterization of skin lesions was developed, and the information about the lesions was sent to ONTODerm. An exploratory study was conducted in a remote area without access to a dermatologist. A total of 64 dermatological queries were recorded in the application and consulted with ONTODerm. Later, an experienced dermatologist evaluated the characterization and diagnosis of each query to determine the accuracy of the system. Results. The results showed that the probability of obtaining a correct diagnosis was between 64.4% and 85.6% with a confidence interval of 95%. A higher accuracy rate was obtained when the skin lesion occurred on the face or when its border was categorized as poorly demarcated. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the implementation of a teledermatology strategy based on mobile applications and domain ontology-driven knowledge base to provide timely assistance to healthcare professionals. This approach was found to be pertinent in the Colombian rural context, particularly in forest regions, where dermatology specialists are not available. The results of this article do not represent a final validation of the proposed

  9. Quality function deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This book indicates quality function deployment with quality and deployment of quality function, process and prospect of quality function deployment and development, product process and conception of quality table, deployment of quality demand, design of quality table and application of concurrent multi design, progress design and quality development, main safe part and management of important function part, quality development and deployment of method of construction, quality deployment and economics, total system of quality function deployment and task of quality function deployment in the present and future.

  10. The Affordances of Mobile-App Supported Teacher Observations for Peer Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Sercan; Baran, Evrim; Sert, Olcay

    2018-01-01

    Mobile technologies offer new affordances for teacher observation in teacher education programs, albeit under-examined in contrast to video technologies. The purpose of this article is to investigate the integration of mobile technologies into teacher observation. Using a case study method, the authors compare the traditional narrative paper-pen,…

  11. Biometric gait recognition for mobile devices using wavelet transform and support vector machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbek, Martin Reese; Nickel, C.; Busch, C.

    2012-01-01

    The ever growing number of mobile devices has turned the attention to security and usability. If a mobile device is lost or stolen this can lead to loss of personal information and the possibility of identity theft. People often tend not to use passwords which leads to lack of personal security...

  12. Could a Mobile-Assisted Learning System Support Flipped Classrooms for Classical Chinese Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the researcher aimed to develop a mobile-assisted learning system and to investigate whether it could promote teenage learners' classical Chinese learning through the flipped classroom approach. The researcher first proposed the structure of the Cross-device Mobile-Assisted Classical Chinese (CMACC) system according to the pilot…

  13. User experience of mobile business support services for rural micro and small enterprises

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the power of user experience of mobile phones and technologies and explores how micro and small enterprises use mobile services. The authors also identify the missing gaps and propose a mobi-incubation solution for rural micro...

  14. Making the CARE Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment as the Core of a Total Mobile Long Term Care Support System in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanyan; Gong, Dongwei; Yang, Bo; Chen, Hua; Tu, Ming-Hsiang; Zhang, Chaonan; Li, Huan; Liang, Naiwen; Jiang, Liping; Chang, Polun

    2018-01-01

    Comprehensive Geriatric Assessments (CGAs) have been recommended to be used for better monitoring the health status of elder residents and providing quality care. This study reported how our nurses perceived the usability of CGA component of a mobile integrated-care long term care support system developed in China. We used the Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation (CARE), developed in the US, as the core CGA component of our Android-based support system, in which apps were designed for all key stakeholders for delivering quality long term care. A convenience sample of 18 subjects from local long term care facilities in Shanghai, China were invited to assess the CGA assessment component in terms of Technology Acceptance Model for Mobile based on real field trial assessment. All (100%) were satisfied with the mobile CGA component. 88.9% perceived the system was easy to learn and use. 99.4% showed their willingness to use for their work. We concluded it is technically feasible to implement a CGA-based mobile integrated care support system in China.

  15. Application of mobile agent technology with portable information device to the maintenance support of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Ito, Yo; Sato, Hisashi; Kitamura, Masaharu

    2004-01-01

    A support system for trouble shooting activities has been developed based on the distributed DB and mobile agent technology. The main purpose of the proposed system is to provide field workers with effective functions for realizing trouble-shooting with the aid of the mobile agents, which performs data retrieval from DB and fault diagnosis. In the proposed scheme of trouble shooting support, a portable information device is utilized by the maintenance personnel, which is connected to the local data base (LDB) via wireless network. The important point is that these functions can be accessed by the field workers through wearable information device with the lower cognitive burden. The prototype system has been developed using the JAVA-based Aglets Framework SDK and applied to the actual objective system. It has been confirmed through the experiments that the developed prototype system is capable of performing the tasks to support diagnostic activities. (author)

  16. Mobile Anwendungssysteme zur Unterstützung ambulanter Pflegedienstleistungen: Anforderungsanalyse und Einsatzpotenziale / Mobile application systems for home nursing services support: requirements analysis and usage potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory nursing services increasingly gain significance due to immediate implications of demographic developments. However, portable application systems have only been established sporadically in home nursing environments unlike in the comparable domain of technical field service. This paper identifies a new mobile usage scenario by matching healthcare requirements with state-of-the-art concepts. Potentials concerning the support of the actual nursing care processes can be concluded on that basis. The results are of relevance not only to patients and nurses but also to various providers of healthcare and IT solutions.

  17. Comparison of approaches for mobile document image analysis using server supported smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozarslan, Suleyman; Eren, P. Erhan

    2014-03-01

    With the recent advances in mobile technologies, new capabilities are emerging, such as mobile document image analysis. However, mobile phones are still less powerful than servers, and they have some resource limitations. One approach to overcome these limitations is performing resource-intensive processes of the application on remote servers. In mobile document image analysis, the most resource consuming process is the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) process, which is used to extract text in mobile phone captured images. In this study, our goal is to compare the in-phone and the remote server processing approaches for mobile document image analysis in order to explore their trade-offs. For the inphone approach, all processes required for mobile document image analysis run on the mobile phone. On the other hand, in the remote-server approach, core OCR process runs on the remote server and other processes run on the mobile phone. Results of the experiments show that the remote server approach is considerably faster than the in-phone approach in terms of OCR time, but adds extra delays such as network delay. Since compression and downscaling of images significantly reduce file sizes and extra delays, the remote server approach overall outperforms the in-phone approach in terms of selected speed and correct recognition metrics, if the gain in OCR time compensates for the extra delays. According to the results of the experiments, using the most preferable settings, the remote server approach performs better than the in-phone approach in terms of speed and acceptable correct recognition metrics.

  18. Interactive, mobile, AGIle and novel education (IMAGINE): a conceptual framework to support students with mobility challenges in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Mary; Karimi, Hassan; Pearlman, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Interactive, mobile, AGIle and novel education (IMAGINE) is a conceptual framework to help students with disabilities (SwD) participate more in the physical space and become more engaged in school. IMAGINE recommends and reminds students, and allows them to make requests of key learning resources (LRs). The goal of IMAGINE is to provide SwD with the location and time for attending a LR that is most optimal with respect to their learning style and preference, learning performance and other activities. IMAGINE will be a means through which SWD will be provided with tailored recommendations with respect to their daily activities to improve learning outcomes. A pilot was conducted with SwD who used IMAGINE's navigation and wayfinding functionality, and the subjects reported that it aligns well with their needs. Preliminary results suggest that after completing a training and using the tool, SwD reported that they are more likely to use the tool and their participation may increase as a result. In contrast to before the trial, the SwD were also able to better describe the tool's benefits and how to improve its functionality after using the tool for four weeks. Implications for Rehabilitation The IMAGINE tool may be a means through which SwD can be provided with tailored recommendations with respect to their daily activities to improve learning outcomes. PWD should be involved (as research study participants and research study team members) in the design and development of tools like IMAGINE to improve participation. IMAGINE and similar tools may not only encourage better learning outcomes, but also more physical participation in the community, and could be used across education and employment settings.

  19. Relasphone—Mobile and Participative In Situ Forest Biomass Measurements Supporting Satellite Image Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Molinier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the high cost of traditional forest plot measurements, the availability of up-to-date in situ forest inventory data has been a bottleneck for remote sensing image analysis in support of the important global forest biomass mapping. Capitalizing on the proliferation of smartphones, citizen science is a promising approach to increase spatial and temporal coverages of in situ forest observations in a cost-effective way. Digital cameras can be used as a relascope device to measure basal area, a forest density variable that is closely related to biomass. In this paper, we present the Relasphone mobile application with extensive accuracy assessment in two mixed forest sites from different biomes. Basal area measurements in Finland (boreal zone were in good agreement with reference forest inventory plot data on pine ( R 2 = 0 . 75 , R M S E = 5 . 33 m 2 /ha, spruce ( R 2 = 0 . 75 , R M S E = 6 . 73 m 2 /ha and birch ( R 2 = 0 . 71 , R M S E = 4 . 98 m 2 /ha, with total relative R M S E ( % = 29 . 66 % . In Durango, Mexico (temperate zone, Relasphone stem volume measurements were best for pine ( R 2 = 0 . 88 , R M S E = 32 . 46 m 3 /ha and total stem volume ( R 2 = 0 . 87 , R M S E = 35 . 21 m 3 /ha. Relasphone data were then successfully utilized as the only reference data in combination with optical satellite images to produce biomass maps. The Relasphone concept has been validated for future use by citizens in other locations.

  20. An Action Design Research on development and deployment of a computer-based group discussion support tool for achieving consensus and culture change at an educational institution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee Mui Suan, Jaclyn; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Kumar, Kuldeep

    2015-01-01

    Organisational culture change is a long and complex process that typically takes years to complete and has a very low success rate. This project addresses the problem by the proposed use of an Action Design Research Methodology to build and deploy an IT artifact named Organisational Culture

  1. Mobile technology supporting trainee doctors’ workplace learning and patient care: an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardyman Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of information needed by doctors has exploded. The nature of knowledge (explicit and tacit and processes of knowledge acquisition and participation are complex. Aiming to assist workplace learning, Wales Deanery funded “iDoc”, a project offering trainee doctors a Smartphone library of medical textbooks. Methods Data on trainee doctors’ (Foundation Year 2 workplace information seeking practice was collected by questionnaire in 2011 (n = 260. iDoc baseline questionnaires (n = 193 collected data on Smartphone usage alongside other workplace information sources. Case reports (n = 117 detail specific instances of Smartphone use. Results Most frequently (daily used information sources in the workplace: senior medical staff (80% F2 survey; 79% iDoc baseline; peers (70%; 58%; and other medical/nursing team staff (53% both datasets. Smartphones were used more frequently by males (p  Preferred information source varied by question type: hard copy texts for information-based questions; varied resources for skills queries; and seniors for more complex problems. Case reports showed mobile technology used for simple (information-based, complex (problem-based clinical questions and clinical procedures (skills-based scenarios. From thematic analysis, the Smartphone library assisted: teaching and learning from observation; transition from medical student to new doctor; trainee doctors’ discussions with seniors; independent practice; patient care; and this ‘just-in-time’ access to reliable information supported confident and efficient decision-making. Conclusion A variety of information sources are used regularly in the workplace. Colleagues are used daily but seniors are not always available. During transitions, constant access to the electronic library was valued. It helped prepare trainee doctors for discussions with their seniors, assisting the interchange between explicit and tacit knowledge. By

  2. Supporting nursing students' critical thinking with a mobile web learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chin-Yuan; Wu, Cheng-Chih

    2012-01-01

    The use of mobile technology has the potential of revolutionizing and transforming the way clinical practicums are conducted in nursing training. Our Web-based implementation suggested that incorporating technology, specifically with Internet and mobile devices, to promote nursing students’ critical thinking is feasible and showed dramatic results. As our environment was tailored for the psychiatric nursing practicum, future studies should delineate the context in which they are to be delivered.

  3. Mobile Variable Depth Sampling System Design Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    A design study is presented for a mobile, variable depth sampling system (MVDSS) that will support the treatment and immobilization of Hanford LAW and HLW. The sampler can be deployed in a 4-inch tank riser and has a design that is based on requirements identified in the Level 2 Specification (latest revision). The waste feed sequence for the MVDSS is based on Phase 1, Case 3S6 waste feed sequence. Technical information is also presented that supports the design study

  4. Mobile Variable Depth Sampling System Design Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-08-25

    A design study is presented for a mobile, variable depth sampling system (MVDSS) that will support the treatment and immobilization of Hanford LAW and HLW. The sampler can be deployed in a 4-inch tank riser and has a design that is based on requirements identified in the Level 2 Specification (latest revision). The waste feed sequence for the MVDSS is based on Phase 1, Case 3S6 waste feed sequence. Technical information is also presented that supports the design study.

  5. Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) Testbed Development and Evaluation to Support Dynamic Mobility Applications (DMA) and Active Transportation and Demand Management (ATDM) Programs - calibration Report for Phoenix Testbed : Final Report. [supporting datasets - Phoenix Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-26

    The datasets in this zip file are in support of FHWA-JPO-16-379, Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (AMS) Testbed Development and Evaluation to Support Dynamic Mobility Applications (DMA) and Active Transportation and Demand Management (ATDM) Program...

  6. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Till Beiwinkel; Stefan Hey; Olaf Bock; Wulf Rössler; Wulf Rössler; Wulf Rössler

    2017-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons...

  7. mCare: using secure mobile technology to support soldier reintegration and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poropatich, Ronald K; Pavliscsak, Holly H; Tong, James C; Little, Jeanette R; McVeigh, Francis L

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Army Medical Department conducted a pilot mobile health project to determine the requirements for coordination of care for "Wounded Warriors" using mobile messaging. The primary objective was to determine if a secure mobile health (mhealth) intervention provided to geographically dispersed patients would improve contact rates and positively impact the military healthcare system. Over 21 months, volunteers enrolled in a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, secure mobile messaging initiative called mCare. The study included males and females, 18-61 years old, with a minimum of 60 days of outpatient recovery. Volunteers were required to have a compatible phone. The mhealth intervention included appointment reminders, health and wellness tips, announcements, and other relevant information to this population exchanged between care teams and patients. Provider respondents reported that 85% would refer patients to mCare, and 56% noted improvement in appointment attendance (n=90). Patient responses also revealed high acceptability of mCare and refined the frequency and delivery times (n=114). The pilot project resulted in over 84,000 outbound messages and improved contact rates by 176%. The mCare pilot project demonstrated the feasibility and administrative effectiveness of a scalable mhealth application using secure mobile messaging and information exchanges, including personalized patient education.

  8. Mobile phones to support adherence to antiretroviral therapy: what would it cost the Indian National AIDS Control Programme?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rashmi; Bogg, Lennart; Shet, Anita; Kumar, Dodderi Sunil; De Costa, Ayesha

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) is critical to maintaining health and good clinical outcomes in people living with HIV/AIDS. To address poor treatment adherence, low-cost interventions using mobile communication technology are being studied. While there are some studies that show an effect of mobile phone reminders on adherence to ART, none has reported on the costs of such reminders for national AIDS programmes. This paper aims to study the costs of mobile phone reminder strategies (mHealth interventions) to support adherence in the context of India's National AIDS Control Program (NACP). The study was undertaken at two tertiary level teaching hospitals that implement the NACP in Karnataka state, South India. Costs for a mobile phone reminder application to support adherence, implemented at these sites (i.e. weekly calls, messages or both) were studied. Costs were collected based on the concept of avoidable costs specific to the application. The costs that were assessed were one-time costs and recurrent costs that included fixed and variable costs. A sequential procedure for costing was used. Costs were calculated at national-programme level, individual ART-centre level and individual patient level from the NACP's perspective. The assessed costs were pooled to obtain an annual cost per patient. The type of application, number of ART centres and number of patients on ART were varied in a sensitivity analysis of costs. The Indian NACP would incur a cost of between 79 and 110 INR (USD 1.27-1.77) per patient per year, based on the type of reminder, the number of patients on ART and the number of functioning ART centres. The total programme costs for a scale-up of the mHealth intervention to reach the one million patients expected to be on treatment by 2017 is estimated to be 0.36% of the total five-year national-programme budget. The cost of the mHealth intervention for ART-adherence support in the context of the Indian NACP is low and is facilitated by

  9. A mobile application to support collection and analytics of real-time critical care data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankipuram, Akshay; Vankipuram, Mithra; Ghaemmaghami, Vafa; Patel, Vimla L

    2017-11-01

    Data collection, in high intensity environments, poses several challenges including the ability to observe multiple streams of information. These problems are especially evident in critical care, where monitoring of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocol provides an excellent opportunity to study the efficacy of applications that allow for the rapid capture of event information, providing theoretically-driven feedback using the data. Our goal was, (a) to design and implement a way to capture data on deviation from the standard practice based on the theoretical foundation of error classification from our past research, (b) to provide a means to meaningfully visualize the collected data, and (c) to provide a proof-of-concept for this implementation, using some understanding of user experience in clinical practice. We present the design and development of a web application designed to be used primarily on mobile devices and a summary data viewer to allow clinicians to, (a) track their activities, (b) provide real-time feedback of deviations from guidelines and protocols, and (c) provide summary feedback highlighting decisions made. We used a framework previously developed to classify activities in trauma as the theoretical foundation of the rules designed to do the same algorithmically, in our application. Attending physicians at a Level 1 trauma center used the application in the clinical setting and provided feedback for iterative development. Informal interviews and surveys were used to gain some deeper understanding of the user experience using this application in-situ. Activity visualizations were created highlighting decisions made during a trauma code as well as classification of tasks per the theoretical framework. The attendings reviewed the efficacy of the data visualizations as part of their interviews. We also conducted a proof-of-concept evaluation by way of usability questionnaire. Two attendings rated 4 out of the usability 6 categories highly

  10. A counselor in your pocket: feasibility of mobile health tailored messages to support HIV medication adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook PF

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul F Cook,1 Jane M Carrington,2 Sarah J Schmiege,1 Whitney Starr,3 Blaine Reeder11University of Colorado College of Nursing, Aurora, CO, USA; 2University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, AZ, USA; 3University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USAPurpose: Medication adherence is a major challenge in HIV treatment. New mobile technologies such as smartphones facilitate the delivery of brief tailored messages to promote adherence. However, the best approach for tailoring messages is unknown. Persons living with HIV (PLWH might be more receptive to some messages than others based on their current psychological state.Methods: We recruited 37 PLWH from a parent study of motivational states and adherence. Participants completed smartphone-based surveys at a random time every day for 2 weeks, then immediately received intervention or control tailored messages, depending on random assignment. After 2 weeks in the initial condition, participants received the other condition in a crossover design. Intervention messages were tailored to match PLWH’s current psychological state based on five variables – control beliefs, mood, stress, coping, and social support. Control messages were tailored to create a mismatch between message framing and participants’ current psychological state. We evaluated intervention feasibility based on acceptance, ease of use, and usefulness measures. We also used pilot randomized controlled trial methods to test the intervention’s effect on adherence, which was measured using electronic caps that recorded pill-bottle openings.Results: Acceptance was high based on 76% enrollment and 85% satisfaction. Participants found the hardware and software easy to use. However, attrition was high at 59%, and usefulness ratings were slightly lower. The most common complaint was boredom. Unexpectedly, there was no difference between mismatched and matched messages’ effects, but each group showed a 10%–15% improvement

  11. PNNI routing support for ad hoc mobile networking: The multilevel case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1998-01-01

    This contribution extends the Outside Nodal Hierarchy List (ONHL) procedures described in ATM Forum Contributions 97-0766 and 97-0933. These extensions allow multiple mobile networks to form either an ad hoc network or an extension of a fixed PNNI infrastructure. A previous contribution (97-1073) covered the simplest case where the top-most Logical Group Nodes (LGNs), in those mobile networks, all resided at the same level in a PNNI hierarchy. This contribution covers the more general case wherein those top-most LGNs may reside at different PNNI hierarchy levels. Both of the SNL contributions consider flat ad hoc network architectures in the sense that each mobile network always participates in the PNNI hierarchy at the pre-configured level of its top-most LGN.

  12. Can existing mobile apps support healthier food purchasing behaviour? Content analysis of nutrition content, behaviour change theory and user quality integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Sarah-Jane; McCarthy, Mary; Collins, Alan; McAuliffe, Fionnuala

    2018-02-01

    To assess the quality of nutrition content and the integration of user quality components and behaviour change theory relevant to food purchasing behaviour in a sample of existing mobile apps. Descriptive comparative analysis of eleven mobile apps comprising an assessment of their alignment with existing evidence on nutrition, behaviour change and user quality, and their potential ability to support healthier food purchasing behaviour. Mobile apps freely available for public use in GoogePlay were assessed and scored according to agreed criteria to assess nutrition content quality and integration of behaviour change theory and user quality components. A sample of eleven mobile apps that met predefined inclusion criteria to ensure relevance and good quality. The quality of the nutrition content varied. Improvements to the accuracy and appropriateness of nutrition content are needed to ensure mobile apps support a healthy behaviour change process and are accessible to a wider population. There appears to be a narrow focus towards behaviour change with an overemphasis on behavioural outcomes and a small number of behaviour change techniques, which may limit effectiveness. A significant effort from the user was required to use the mobile apps appropriately which may negatively influence user acceptability and subsequent utilisation. Existing mobile apps may offer a potentially effective approach to supporting healthier food purchasing behaviour but improvements in mobile app design are required to maximise their potential effectiveness. Engagement of mobile app users and nutrition professionals is recommended to support effective design.

  13. Data Supporting Mobile Application Development for Use within the Marine Air-Ground Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Unhelkar & Murugesan, 2010) ............................................................. 36   Figure 7.   Starbucks iPhone payment application (from... Starbucks , 2015) .......... 38   Figure 8.   The Mobile Applications Development Framework (from Unhelkar & Murugesan, 2010...application (Unhelkar & Murugesan, 2010). Retailer-developed electronic 38 payment applications such as the Starbucks iPhone application (see Figure 7

  14. Mathematics on the Move: Using Mobile Technologies to Support Student Learning (Part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Catherine; Northcote, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Continuing the series of articles on teaching mathematics with technology, this article furthers the authors' exploration of the use of a range of mobile technologies to enhance teachers' practices in the primary mathematics classroom. In Part 1 of this article, the authors explored the use of the iPod Touch and iPad. In Part 2, they explore…

  15. Enhancing Motivation in Online Courses with Mobile Communication Tool Support: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiprasurt, Chantorn; Esichaikul, Vatcharaporn

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies have helped establish new channels of communication among learners and instructors, potentially providing greater access to course information, and promoting easier access to course activities and learner motivation in online learning environments. The paper compares motivation between groups of learners being taught through an…

  16. Mobile monitoring application to support sustainable behavioural change towards healthy lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; de Wijk, Rene A.; Duit, Jantine; Widya, I.A.; Bults, Richard G.A.; Mendes Batista, R.J.; Mendes Batista, Ricardo; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Noldus, Lucas P.J.J.; Ilyas, M.; Alwakeel, S.S.; Alwakeel, M.M.; Aggoune el Hadi, M.

    We describe the development of body area networks (BANs) incorporating sensors and other devices to provide intelligent mobile services in healthcare and well-being. The first BAN applications were designed to simply transmit biosignals and display them remotely. Further developments include

  17. Exploring the Role of Accreditation in Supporting Transfer and Student Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Pamela Petrease; Arleth, Megan T.

    2016-01-01

    Student mobility and transfer between two-year and four-year institutions are critical issues when considering student success and degree completion. College and university administrators continually work to identify opportunities that align policy and practice with accreditation standards in an effort to facilitate self-study initiatives and meet…

  18. Transforming Clinical Imaging and 3D Data for Virtual Reality Learning Objects: HTML5 and Mobile Devices Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelease, Robert B.; Nieder, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Web deployable anatomical simulations or "virtual reality learning objects" can easily be produced with QuickTime VR software, but their use for online and mobile learning is being limited by the declining support for web browser plug-ins for personal computers and unavailability on popular mobile devices like Apple iPad and Android…

  19. Tactics for Homing in Mobile LifeTactics for Homing in Mobile Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja; Winther, Ida Wentzel

    we argue that several of the tactics identified are currently not well supported. We discuss how technology design can learn from this study through pointing to the potential in designing mobile technologies to better support these unsupported tactics. We consider the tactics as a tool for deeper...... studies of extremely mobile people we identify general tactics for homing. We present the identified tactics and show how people deploy not only one but several tactics in their intention of making a homely feeling despite not being in their primary home. Reviewing the mobile technologies currently in use...... understanding of mobile practices and thus informing the design of more relevant future technologies for people engaged in a mobile lifestyle....

  20. Enhancing integrated indoor/outdoor mobility in a smart campus

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Sospedra, Joaquín; Avariento, Joan; Rambla Risueño, David; Montoliu Colás, Raúl; Casteleyn, Sven; Benedito Bordonau, Mauri; Gould Carlson, Michael; Huerta Guijarro, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    A Smart City relies on six key factors: Smart Governance, Smart People, Smart Economy, Smart Environment, Smart Living and Smart Mobility. This paper focuses on Smart Mobility by improving one of its key components: positioning. We developed and deployed a novel indoor positioning system (IPS) that is combined with an outdoor positioning system to support seamless indoor and outdoor navigation and wayfinding. The positioning system is implemented as a service in our broader cartography-based ...

  1. Review and Analysis of Existing Mobile Phone Apps to Support Heart Failure Symptom Monitoring and Self-Care Management Using the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson Creber, Ruth M; Maurer, Mathew S; Reading, Meghan; Hiraldo, Grenny; Hickey, Kathleen T; Iribarren, Sarah

    2016-06-14

    Heart failure is the most common cause of hospital readmissions among Medicare beneficiaries and these hospitalizations are often driven by exacerbations in common heart failure symptoms. Patient collaboration with health care providers and decision making is a core component of increasing symptom monitoring and decreasing hospital use. Mobile phone apps offer a potentially cost-effective solution for symptom monitoring and self-care management at the point of need. The purpose of this review of commercially available apps was to identify and assess the functionalities of patient-facing mobile health apps targeted toward supporting heart failure symptom monitoring and self-care management. We searched 3 Web-based mobile app stores using multiple terms and combinations (eg, "heart failure," "cardiology," "heart failure and self-management"). Apps meeting inclusion criteria were evaluated using the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS), IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics functionality scores, and Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) guidelines for nonpharmacologic management. Apps were downloaded and assessed independently by 2-4 reviewers, interclass correlations between reviewers were calculated, and consensus was met by discussion. Of 3636 potentially relevant apps searched, 34 met inclusion criteria. Most apps were excluded because they were unrelated to heart failure, not in English or Spanish, or were games. Interrater reliability between reviewers was high. AskMD app had the highest average MARS total (4.9/5). More than half of the apps (23/34, 68%) had acceptable MARS scores (>3.0). Heart Failure Health Storylines (4.6) and AskMD (4.5) had the highest scores for behavior change. Factoring MARS, functionality, and HFSA guideline scores, the highest performing apps included Heart Failure Health Storylines, Symple, ContinuousCare Health App, WebMD, and AskMD. Peer-reviewed publications were identified for only 3 of the 34 apps. This review suggests

  2. Next-Generation NATO Reference Mobility Model (NG-NRMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    moments of inertia) - Control arms - Spindles - Half shafts - Springs - Shocks - Subframe - Tie rod - Anti-roll bar - Bushings Bushings...facilitate comparisons between vehicle design candidates and to assess the mobility of existing vehicles under specific scenarios. Although NRMM has...of different deployed platforms in different areas of operation and routes  Improved flexibility as a design and procurement support tool through

  3. Wavelet-based compression with ROI coding support for mobile access to DICOM images over heterogeneous radio networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglogiannis, Ilias; Doukas, Charalampos; Kormentzas, George; Pliakas, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Most of the commercial medical image viewers do not provide scalability in image compression and/or region of interest (ROI) encoding/decoding. Furthermore, these viewers do not take into consideration the special requirements and needs of a heterogeneous radio setting that is constituted by different access technologies [e.g., general packet radio services (GPRS)/ universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS), wireless local area network (WLAN), and digital video broadcasting (DVB-H)]. This paper discusses a medical application that contains a viewer for digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images as a core module. The proposed application enables scalable wavelet-based compression, retrieval, and decompression of DICOM medical images and also supports ROI coding/decoding. Furthermore, the presented application is appropriate for use by mobile devices activating in heterogeneous radio settings. In this context, performance issues regarding the usage of the proposed application in the case of a prototype heterogeneous system setup are also discussed.

  4. Solar sail deployment experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Shimose, Shigeru; 下瀬 滋

    2006-01-01

    Solar Sail move by receiving momentum of photons in sunlight. This paper presents results of some Spin-Stabilized Solar Sail deployment experiment. ISAS has successfully deployed, for the first time in the world, the polyimide Solar Sail taking advantage of centrifugal force in space. Based on this result, the new deployment mechanism is being developed which retracts the 50 m diameter sail.

  5. How we developed eForms: an electronic form and data capture tool to support assessment in mobile medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Jane S; Cappelli, Tim; Byrne-Davis, Lucie; Lumsden, Colin J

    2014-12-01

    Mobile learning technologies are being introduced and adopted by an increasing number of medical schools. Following the implementation of these devices, institutions are tasked with the challenge of their integration into curriculum delivery and presented with the opportunity to facilitate data collection from large student cohorts. Since 2011, Manchester Medical School (MMS) has undertaken the largest deployment of iPads within UK Higher Education. Working towards the more efficient collation of students' compulsory workplace-based assessment data led us to evaluate how existing information management software could replace previously paper-based systems. Following an evaluation of six, and a trial of one, commercially available packages, the existing software solutions were found to be inflexible and unfit for purpose. This resulted in the development of a new digital solution that addressed the limitations of the previous system. "University of Manchester (UoM) eForms" consists of an app and a web-based administration system that respectively permit high volume data collection and management. UoM eForms has now replaced the preceding paper-based and electronic systems within MMS for workplace-based assessment administration, due to the improved usability and dynamicity built into its interface and infrastructure. This new system has found many further useful applications, including research data collection, feedback, placement evaluations, quality assurance and interview marking.

  6. Effects of mobile and digital support for a structured, competency-based curriculum in neurosurgery residency education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Nestor R; Dusick, Joshua R; Martin, Neil A

    2012-07-01

    Changes in neurosurgical practice and graduate medical education impose new challenges for training programs. We present our experience providing neurosurgical residents with digital and mobile educational resources in support of the departmental academic activities. A weekly mandatory conference program for all clinical residents based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies, held in protected time, was introduced. Topics were taught through didactic sessions and case discussions. Faculty and residents prepare high-quality presentations, equivalent to peer-review leading papers or case reports. Presentations are videorecorded, stored in a digital library, and broadcasted through our Website and iTunes U. Residents received mobile tablet devices with remote access to the digital library, applications for document/video management, and interactive teaching tools. Residents responded to an anonymous survey, and performances on the Self-Assessment in Neurological Surgery examination before and after the intervention were compared. Ninety-two percent reported increased time used to study outside the hospital and attributed the habit change to the introduction of mobile devices; 67% used the electronic tablets as the primary tool to access the digital library, followed by 17% hospital computers, 8% home computers, and 8% personal laptops. Forty-two percent have submitted operative videos, cases, and documents to the library. One year after introducing the program, results of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons-Self-Assessment in Neurological Surgery examination showed a statistically significant improvement in global scoring and improvement in 16 of the 18 individual areas evaluated, 6 of which reached statistical significance. A structured, competency-based neurosurgical education program supported with digital and mobile resources improved reading habits among residents and performance on the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  7. IPv6 deployment and management

    CERN Document Server

    Dooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A guide for understanding, deploying, and managing Internet Protocol version 6 The growth of the Internet has created a need for more addresses than are available with Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4)-the protocol currently used to direct almost all Internet traffic. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6)-the new IP version intended to ultimately succeed IPv4-will expand the addressing capacity of the Internet to support the explosive growth of users and devices on the Internet as well as add flexibility to allocating addresses and efficiency for routing traffic. IPv6 Deploy

  8. Supporting Self-Assembly : the IKEA Effect on Mobile Health Persuasive Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yunlong; Pfeil, Ulrike; Reiterer, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the idea of examining the effect of self-assembly on the success of mobile health persuasive technology. The IKEA effect shows that individuals evaluate products assembled by themselves more positively than pre-assembled products. The IKEA effect has been proven in several domains, e.g., in human robot interaction, where participants who assembled the robot evaluated the robot and the interaction with the robot more favorably than participants who did not assemble th...

  9. Mobile patient feedback through continued monitoring and guideline-based decision support

    OpenAIRE

    Hernando Pérez, María Elena; Martínez Sarriegui, Iñaki; García Sáez, Gema; Quaglini, Silvana; Rigla Cros, Mercedes; Napolitano, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the MobiGuide mobile application that provides patients with guideline-based feedback personalized to their health state, preferences, social context and technological context. Patients? state and compliance are observed through the continued monitorization of physiological and lifestyle parameters: blood glucose, physical activity, ECG, heart rate and blood pressure. The Smartphone application is generic and has a modular structure to allow reusing system components i...

  10. Integrating Big Data into a Sustainable Mobility Policy 2.0 Planning Support System

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Semanjski; Rik Bellens; Sidharta Gautama; Frank Witlox

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that each of us, on a daily basis, produces a bit more than 1 GB of digital content through our mobile phone and social networks activities, bank card payments, location-based positioning information, online activities, etc. However, the implementation of these large data amounts in city assets planning systems still remains a rather abstract idea for several reasons, including the fact that practical examples are still very strongly services-oriented, and are a largely unexpl...

  11. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Transformation, Fixation, and Mobilization of Arsenic and Antimony in Contaminated Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    and Edwards (1977) reported that whole cells of :ethaogenic bacteria in variod anaerobic environments ( rumen fluid, sewage sludge) nproduced...sediments were studied with emphasis placed on short- and long-term 14 leaching and sediment conditions that affect mobilization. -; Under anaerobic ...conditions, arsenate [As(V)] was reduced to arsenite [As(III)] in a wide range of sediments. In anaerobic Texas City sediment slur- ries, 70% of added As(V

  12. The potential of crowdsourcing and mobile technology to support flood disaster risk reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Linda; McCallum, Ian; Liu, Wei; Mechler, Reinhard; Keating, Adriana; Hochrainer-Stigler, Stefan; Mochizuki, Junko; Fritz, Steffen; Dugar, Sumit; Arestegui, Michael; Szoenyi, Michael; Laso-Bayas, Juan-Carlos; Burek, Peter; French, Adam; Moorthy, Inian

    2016-04-01

    The last decade has seen a rise in citizen science and crowdsourcing for carrying out a variety of tasks across a number of different fields, most notably the collection of data such as the identification of species (e.g. eBird and iNaturalist) and the classification of images (e.g. Galaxy Zoo and Geo-Wiki). Combining human computing with the proliferation of mobile technology has resulted in vast amounts of geo-located data that have considerable value across multiple domains including flood disaster risk reduction. Crowdsourcing technologies, in the form of online mapping, are now being utilized to great effect in post-disaster mapping and relief efforts, e.g. the activities of Humanitarian OpenStreetMap, complementing official channels of relief (e.g. Haiti, Nepal and New York). Disaster event monitoring efforts have been further complemented with the use of social media (e.g. twitter for earthquakes, flood monitoring, and fire detection). Much of the activity in this area has focused on ex-post emergency management while there is considerable potential for utilizing crowdsourcing and mobile technology for vulnerability assessment, early warning and to bolster resilience to flood events. This paper examines the use of crowdsourcing and mobile technology for measuring and monitoring flood hazards, exposure to floods, and vulnerability, drawing upon examples from the literature and ongoing projects on flooding and food security at IIASA.

  13. Mobile augmented reality in support of building damage and safety assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W.; Kerle, N.; Gerke, M.

    2016-02-01

    Rapid and accurate assessment of the state of buildings in the aftermath of a disaster event is critical for an effective and timely response. For rapid damage assessment of buildings, the utility of remote sensing (RS) technology has been widely researched, with focus on a range of platforms and sensors. However, RS-based approaches still have limitations to assess structural integrity and the specific damage status of individual buildings. Structural integrity refers to the ability of a building to hold the entire structure. Consequently, ground-based assessment conducted by structural engineers and first responders is still required. This paper demonstrates the concept of mobile augmented reality (mAR) to improve performance of building damage and safety assessment in situ. Mobile AR provides a means to superimpose various types of reference or pre-disaster information (virtual data) on actual post-disaster building data (real buildings). To adopt mobile AR, this study defines a conceptual framework based on the level of complexity (LOC). The framework consists of four LOCs, and for each of these, the data types, required processing steps, AR implementation and use for damage assessment are described. Based on this conceptualization we demonstrate prototypes of mAR for both indoor and outdoor purposes. Finally, we conduct a user evaluation of the prototypes to validate the mAR approach for building damage and safety assessment.

  14. Short-Term Changes in Physical and Chemical Properties of Soil Charcoal Support Enhanced Landscape Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Lacey A.; Magee, Kate L.; Gallagher, Morgan E.; Hockaday, William C.; Masiello, Caroline A.

    2017-11-01

    Charcoal is a major component of the stable soil organic carbon reservoir, and the physical and chemical properties of charcoal can sometimes significantly alter bulk soil properties (e.g., by increasing soil water holding capacity). However, our understanding of the residence time of soil charcoal remains uncertain, with old measured soil charcoal ages in apparent conflict with relatively short modeled and measured residence times. These discrepancies may exist because the fate of charcoal on the landscape is a function not just of its resistance to biological decomposition but also its physical mobility. Mobility may be important in controlling charcoal landscape residence time and may artificially inflate estimates of its degradability, but few studies have examined charcoal vulnerability to physical redistribution. Charcoal landscape redistribution is likely higher than other organic carbon fractions owing to charcoal's low bulk density, typically less than 1.0 g/cm3. Here we examine both the physical and chemical properties of soil and charcoal over a period of two years following a 2011 wildfire in Texas. We find little change in properties with time; however, we find evidence of enhanced mobility of charcoal relative to other forms of soil organic matter. These data add to a growing body of evidence that charcoal is preferentially eroded, offering another explanation for variations observed in its environmental residence times.

  15. Mastering Windows 7 Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Finn, Aidan; van Surksum, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Get professional-level instruction on Windows 7 deployment tools Enterprise-level operating system deployment is challenging and requires knowledge of specific tools. It is expected that Windows 7 will be extensively deployed in businesses worldwide. This comprehensive Sybex guide provides thorough coverage of the Microsoft deployment tools that were specifically created for Windows 7, preparing system administrators, MIS professionals, and corporate programmers to tackle the task effectively.Companies worldwide are expected to deploy Windows 7 as their enterprise operating system; system admi

  16. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon; Jensen, Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    Mobilities comprise a large part of our world and everyday lives, and the mobilities spaces in which we travel are ubiquitous. Yet, ordinary mobilities spaces – such as parking lots, pedestrian tunnels, and road lay-bys – tend to be criticized as typologies that lack consideration for the people...... who use them and for their wider social, aesthetic, cultural, and ecological agency in the city. This is clearly not an unambiguous characterization. But from it follows an urgency to re-examine unheeded mobilities spaces and extend demands of their agency beyond standards of technical efficiency....... This article draws on the recent “mobilities turn” in social science to support such re-examination of mobilities spaces. In social-scientific mobilities research, mobilities are considered the departure point for understanding the socio-material world in which we live. Mobilities are regarded as far more than...

  17. The use of a mobile laboratory unit in support of patient management and epidemiological surveillance during the 2005 Marburg Outbreak in Angola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Grolla

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marburg virus (MARV, a zoonotic pathogen causing severe hemorrhagic fever in man, has emerged in Angola resulting in the largest outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF with the highest case fatality rate to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A mobile laboratory unit (MLU was deployed as part of the World Health Organization outbreak response. Utilizing quantitative real-time PCR assays, this laboratory provided specific MARV diagnostics in Uige, the epicentre of the outbreak. The MLU operated over a period of 88 days and tested 620 specimens from 388 individuals. Specimens included mainly oral swabs and EDTA blood. Following establishing on site, the MLU operation allowed a diagnostic response in <4 hours from sample receiving. Most cases were found among females in the child-bearing age and in children less than five years of age. The outbreak had a high number of paediatric cases and breastfeeding may have been a factor in MARV transmission as indicated by the epidemiology and MARV positive breast milk specimens. Oral swabs were a useful alternative specimen source to whole blood/serum allowing testing of patients in circumstances of resistance to invasive procedures but limited diagnostic testing to molecular approaches. There was a high concordance in test results between the MLU and the reference laboratory in Luanda operated by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MLU was an important outbreak response asset providing support in patient management and epidemiological surveillance. Field laboratory capacity should be expanded and made an essential part of any future outbreak investigation.

  18. Diabetes self-management education and support delivered by mobile health (m-health) interventions for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, Anne Meike; Vos, Rimke C.; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Rutten, Guy E.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of diabetes self-management education and support delivered by mobile health interventions in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  19. The cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation support delivered by mobile phone text messaging: Txt2stop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Carla; Cairns, John; Roberts, Ian; Rodgers, Anthony; Whittaker, Robyn; Free, Caroline

    2013-10-01

    The txt2stop trial has shown that mobile-phone-based smoking cessation support doubles biochemically validated quitting at 6 months. This study examines the cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation support delivered by mobile phone text messaging. The lifetime incremental costs and benefits of adding text-based support to current practice are estimated from a UK NHS perspective using a Markov model. The cost-effectiveness was measured in terms of cost per quitter, cost per life year gained and cost per QALY gained. As in previous studies, smokers are assumed to face a higher risk of experiencing the following five diseases: lung cancer, stroke, myocardial infarction, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and coronary heart disease (i.e. the main fatal or disabling, but by no means the only, adverse effects of prolonged smoking). The treatment costs and health state values associated with these diseases were identified from the literature. The analysis was based on the age and gender distribution observed in the txt2stop trial. Effectiveness and cost parameters were varied in deterministic sensitivity analyses, and a probabilistic sensitivity analysis was also performed. The cost of text-based support per 1,000 enrolled smokers is £16,120, which, given an estimated 58 additional quitters at 6 months, equates to £278 per quitter. However, when the future NHS costs saved (as a result of reduced smoking) are included, text-based support would be cost saving. It is estimated that 18 LYs are gained per 1,000 smokers (0.3 LYs per quitter) receiving text-based support, and 29 QALYs are gained (0.5 QALYs per quitter). The deterministic sensitivity analysis indicated that changes in individual model parameters did not alter the conclusion that this is a cost-effective intervention. Similarly, the probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicated a >90 % chance that the intervention will be cost saving. This study shows that under a wide variety of conditions, personalised

  20. Biologically Complex Planar Cell Plasma Membranes Supported on Polyelectrolyte Cushions Enhance Transmembrane Protein Mobility and Retain Native Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Liang; Ober, Christopher K; Daniel, Susan

    2018-01-23

    Reconstituted supported lipid bilayers (SLB) are widely used as in vitro cell-surface models because they are compatible with a variety of surface-based analytical techniques. However, one of the challenges of using SLBs as a model of the cell surface is the limited complexity in membrane composition, including the incorporation of transmembrane proteins and lipid diversity that may impact the activity of those proteins. Additionally, it is challenging to preserve the transmembrane protein native orientation, function, and mobility in SLBs. Here, we leverage the interaction between cell plasma membrane vesicles and polyelectrolyte brushes to create planar bilayers from cell plasma membrane vesicles that have budded from the cell surface. This approach promotes the direct incorporation of membrane proteins and other species into the planar bilayer without using detergent or reconstitution and preserves membrane constituents. Furthermore, the structure of the polyelectrolyte brush serves as a cushion between the planar bilayer and rigid supporting surface, limiting the interaction of the cytosolic domains of membrane proteins with this surface. Single particle tracking was used to analyze the motion of GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins (GPI-YFP) and neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors (P2X2-neon) and shows that this platform retains over 75% mobility of multipass transmembrane proteins in its native membrane environment. An enzyme accessibility assay confirmed that the protein orientation is preserved and results in the extracellular domain facing toward the bulk phase and the cytosolic side facing the support. Because the platform presented here retains the complexity of the cell plasma membrane and preserves protein orientation and mobility, it is a better representative mimic of native cell surfaces, which may find many applications in biological assays aimed at understanding cell membrane phenomena.

  1. Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, Anton R; Gridnev, Vladimir I; Shvartz, Vladimir A; Posnenkova, Olga M; Dovgalevsky, Pavel Ya

    2012-01-01

    The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P mobile phone improves the quality of ambulatory care of hypertensive patients. Copyright © 2012 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Technology-Aided Program to Support Basic Occupational Engagement and Mobility in Persons with Multiple Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio E. Lancioni

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPersons with severe/profound intellectual and multiple disabilities tend to be passive and sedentary. Promoting their occupational engagement and mobility (i.e., indoor walking can help to modify their condition and improve their environmental input, health, and social image.AimThis study assessed whether a technology-aided program was suitable to (a support independent occupation and mobility in eight participants with intellectual and sensory disabilities and (b eventually increase the participants’ heart rates to levels considered beneficial for them.MethodThe program, which involved a computer system regulating the presentation of auditory or visual cues and the delivery of preferred stimulation, was introduced according to a non-concurrent multiple baseline design across participants. The auditory or visual cues guided the participants to collect objects from different desks and to transport them to a final destination (i.e., depositing them into a carton. Preferred stimulation was available to the participants for collecting and for depositing the objects.ResultsDuring the program, all participants had an increase in their independent responses of collecting objects and transporting them to the final destination. Their heart rates also increased to levels reflecting moderate-intensity physical exercise, potentially beneficial for their health.ConclusionA program, such as that used in this study, can promote occupational engagement and mobility in persons with multiple disabilities.

  3. Miniature field deployable terahertz source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Mark G.

    2006-05-01

    Developments in terahertz sources include compacted electron beam systems, optical mixing techniques, and multiplication of microwave frequencies. Although significant advances in THz science have been achieved, efforts continue to obtain source technologies that are more mobile and suitable for field deployment. Strategies in source development have approached generation from either end of the THz spectrum, from up-conversion of high-frequency microwave to down-conversion of optical frequencies. In this paper, we present the design of a THz source which employs an up-conversion method in an assembly that integrates power supply, electronics, and radiative component into a man-portable unit for situations in which a lab system is not feasible. This unit will ultimately evolve into a ruggedized package suitable for use in extreme conditions, e.g. temporary security check points or emergency response teams, in conditions where THz diagnostics are needed with minimal planning or logistical support. In order to meet design goals of reduced size and complexity, the inner workings of the unit ideally would be condensed into a monolithic active element, with ancillary systems, e.g. user interface and power, coupled to the element. To attain these goals, the fundamental component of our design is a THz source and lens array that may be fabricated with either printed circuit board or wafer substrate. To reduce the volume occupied by the source array, the design employs a metamaterial composed of a periodic lattice of resonant elements. Each resonant element is an LC oscillator, or tank circuit, with inductance, capacitance, and center frequency determined by dimensioning and material parameters. The source array and supporting electronics are designed so that the radiative elements are driven in-phase to yield THz radiation with a high degree of partial coherence. Simulation indicates that the spectral width of operation may be controlled by detuning of critical dimensions

  4. In search of altruistic community: patterns of social support mobilization following Hurricane Hugo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniasty, K; Norris, F H

    1995-08-01

    Twelve months after Hurricane Hugo, 1,000 disaster victims and nonvictims were asked about social support they exchanged following the hurricane. Victims of disaster received and provided very high levels of tangible, informational, and emotional support. Disaster exposure (loss and harm) was a strong predictor of help received and a modest predictor of help provided. However, postdisaster help was not distributed equally and disaster exposure was more strongly related to social support in some groups than in others. Race, education, and age most consistently moderated the impact of disaster exposure on receipt of postdisaster support. Blacks and less educated victims received less help than similarly affected victims who were white or more educated. Relative disadvantage of being old in receiving support was not the case for those elderly disaster victims who experienced threats to their lives or health. Some subgroups of victims were relied upon disproportionately for providing assistance. Implications for social support research are addressed.

  5. Integrating Big Data into a Sustainable Mobility Policy 2.0 Planning Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Semanjski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that each of us, on a daily basis, produces a bit more than 1 GB of digital content through our mobile phone and social networks activities, bank card payments, location-based positioning information, online activities, etc. However, the implementation of these large data amounts in city assets planning systems still remains a rather abstract idea for several reasons, including the fact that practical examples are still very strongly services-oriented, and are a largely unexplored and interdisciplinary field; hence, missing the cross-cutting dimension. In this paper, we describe the Policy 2.0 concept and integrate user generated content into Policy 2.0 platform for sustainable mobility planning. By means of a real-life example, we demonstrate the applicability of such a big data integration approach to smart cities planning process. Observed benefits range from improved timeliness of the data and reduced duration of the planning cycle to more informed and agile decision making, on both the citizens and the city planners end. The integration of big data into the planning process, at this stage, does not have uniform impact across all levels of decision making and planning process, therefore it should be performed gradually and with full awareness of existing limitations.

  6. Emerging models for mobilizing family support for chronic disease management: a structured review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Piette, John D

    2010-03-01

    We identify recent models for programmes aiming to increase effective family support for chronic illness management and self-care among adult patients without significant physical or cognitive disabilities. We then summarize evidence regarding the efficacy for each model identified. Structured review of studies published in medical and psychology databases from 1990 to the present, reference review, general Web searches and conversations with family intervention experts. Review was limited to studies on conditions that require ongoing self-management, such as diabetes, chronic heart disease and rheumatologic disease. Programmes with three separate foci were identified: (1) Programmes that guide family members in setting goals for supporting patient self-care behaviours have led to improved implementation of family support roles, but have mixed success improving patient outcomes. (2) Programmes that train family in supportive communication techniques, such as prompting patient coping techniques or use of autonomy supportive statements, have successfully improved patient symptom management and health behaviours. (3) Programmes that give families tools and infrastructure to assist in monitoring clinical symptoms and medications are being conducted, with no evidence to date on their impact on patient outcomes. The next generation of programmes to improve family support for chronic disease management incorporate a variety of strategies. Future research can define optimal clinical situations for family support programmes, the most effective combinations of support strategies, and how best to integrate family support programmes into comprehensive models of chronic disease care.

  7. Incorporating a Static Versus Supportive Mobile Phone App Into a Partial Meal Replacement Program With Face-to-Face Support: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindal, Emily; Hendrie, Gilly A; Freyne, Jill; Noakes, Manny

    2018-04-18

    Mobile phone apps may be acceptable to users and could improve retention and adherence over more traditional methods, but there is mixed literature supporting their efficacy. In the weight management space, very little is known about how a mobile phone app integrating features beyond text messaging (short message service) can affect behavior, particularly when combined with face-to-face support. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a mobile phone app when combined with a partial meal replacement program including face-to-face support. This paper compares a static versus supportive app over a 6-month randomized trial for effects on weight loss, weight-related biomarkers, and psychological outcomes. Overweight and obese adults (71.2% female, 104/146; mean 48.11, SD 11.75 years) were recruited to participate in the weight loss study, and they were randomized on a 1:1 basis using a computer algorithm. The supportive app (n=75) provided information, food intake recording, rewards, prompts for regular interaction through reminders, and the opportunity to review personal compliance with the dietary program. The static app (n=71) included only recipes and weight loss information. Both groups recieved equal amounts of face-to-face support in addition to app. The overall reduction in app usage over 24 weeks was lower for the supportive app in comparison with the static app; approximately 39.0% (57/146) of the users were still using the app at week 24. Despite the promising results for app usage, there were no differences in weight loss between groups (F1,128.12=0.83, P=.36). However, it should be noted that almost 60% (49/84) of all participants lost 5% or more of body weight during the trial. No weight-related biomarkers were significantly different between groups. Both groups experienced an increase in positive mood, but this was significantly higher for those who received the static app (F1,118.12=4.93, P=.03). Although the supportive app was

  8. Small cell networks deployment, management, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Claussen, Holger; Ho, Lester; Razavi, Rouzbeh; Kucera, Stepan

    2018-01-01

    Small Cell Networks: Deployment, Management, and Optimization addresses key problems of the cellular network evolution towards HetNets. It focuses on the latest developments in heterogeneous and small cell networks, as well as their deployment, operation, and maintenance. It also covers the full spectrum of the topic, from academic, research, and business to the practice of HetNets in a coherent manner. Additionally, it provides complete and practical guidelines to vendors and operators interested in deploying small cells. The first comprehensive book written by well-known researchers and engineers from Nokia Bell Labs, Small Cell Networks begins with an introduction to the subject--offering chapters on capacity scaling and key requirements of future networks. It then moves on to sections on coverage and capacity optimization, and interference management. From there, the book covers mobility management, energy efficiency, and small cell deployment, ending with a section devoted to future trends and applicat...

  9. CCT deployment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, B.

    1993-01-01

    The deployment of Clean Coal Technologies (CCT) is discussed by asserting that in the case of commercializing CCT, the government's involvement should not stop at the demonstration gate. Two areas in this regard are described. First, the need for the domestic DOE CCT Program to focus on the domestic deployment of demonstrated technologies, and second, the need to recognize that to participate in the phenomenal growth of international power markets through use of clean coal or advanced coal technologies an aggressive partnering between the government and industry to demonstrate technologies abroad will be required. The Clean Coal Technology Coalition's (CCT) primary mission has been to promote the development and use of CCTs. The CCT is a strong advocate for the DOE CCT Program and applauds the Department's and industry's success at developing many coal-based technologies. By current design, the DOE program is said to go no further than the initial demonstration of a technology. Since the inception of CCT in 1986, the Coalition has advocated the need to pursue a partnership with government in which more than one demonstration of the same or similar technology is supported by the clean coal program. Only in this way can one be assured of widespread acceptance of any given technology. There exists a gap (call it a open-quotes risk gapclose quotes) between CCTs that have been successfully demonstrated (and presumably available for commercial use) and their widespread commercial use. A technology matrix has been developed in which the developmental status of a variety of clean coal technologies is demonstrated. While still too early to pass judgment, it appears that while success is being achieved in demonstrating advanced coal technologies, the market place - for several reasons - is not, indeed may have no plans, to adopt these technologies

  10. Using narrative-based design scaffolds within a mobile learning environment to support learning outdoors with young children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, Brian J.

    This study aims to advance learning outdoors with mobile devices. As part of the ongoing Tree Investigators design-based research study, this research investigated a mobile application to support observation, identification, and explanation of the tree life cycle within an authentic, outdoor setting. Recognizing the scientific and conceptual complexity of this topic for young children, the design incorporated technological and design scaffolds within a narrative-based learning environment. In an effort to support learning, 14 participants (aged 5-9) were guided through the mobile app on tree life cycles by a comic-strip pedagogical agent, "Nutty the Squirrel", as they looked to explore and understand through guided observational practices and artifact creation tasks. In comparison to previous iterations of this DBR study, the overall patterns of talk found in this study were similar, with perceptual and conceptual talk being the first and second most frequently coded categories, respectively. However, this study coded considerably more instances of affective talk. This finding of the higher frequency of affective talk could possibly be explained by the relatively younger age of this iteration's participants, in conjunction with the introduced pedagogical agent, who elicited playfulness and delight from the children. The results also indicated a significant improvement when comparing the pretest results (mean score of .86) with the posttest results (mean score of 4.07, out of 5). Learners were not only able to recall the phases of a tree life cycle, but list them in the correct order. The comparison reports a significant increase, showing evidence of increased knowledge and appropriation of scientific vocabulary. The finding suggests the narrative was effective in structuring the complex material into a story for sense making. Future research with narratives should consider a design to promote learner agency through more interactions with the pedagogical agent and a

  11. Mobilities Mobilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Pompeyo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Urry, John (2007 Mobilities.Oxford: Polity Press.Urry, John (2007 Mobilities.Oxford: Polity Press.John Urry (1946-, profesor en la Universidad de Lancaster, es un sociólogo de sobra conocido y altamente reputado en el panorama internacional de las ciencias sociales. Su dilatada carrera, aparentemente dispersa y diversificada, ha seguido senderos bastante bien definidos dejando tras de sí un catálogo extenso de obras sociológicas de primer nivel. Sus primeros trabajos se centraban en el campo de la teoría social y la filosofía de las ciencias sociales o de la sociología del poder [...

  12. FUNCTIONS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR RUSSIAN PULSATING MONITOR DEPLOYMENT IN THE GUNITE AND ASSOCIATED TANKS AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas Albert

    1999-01-01

    This document provides functions and requirements to support deployment of pulsating mixer pump technology in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite and Associated Tanks to mobilize and mix the settled sludge and solids in these tanks. In FY 1998 pulsating mixer pump technology, a jet mixer powered by a reciprocating air supply, was selected for FY 1999 deployment in one of the GAAT tanks to mobilize settled solids. Pulsating mixer pump technology was identified in FY 1996 during technical exchanges between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Tanks Focus Area Retrieval and Closure program, the DOE Environmental Management International Programs, and delegates from Russia as a promising technology that could be implemented in the US. The pulsating mixer pump technology, provided by the Russian Integrated Mining Chemical Company, was tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to observe its ability to mobilize settled solids. Based on the results of this demonstration, ORNL and DOE staff determined that a modified pulsating mixer pump would meet project needs for bulk mobilization of Gunite tank sludge prior to deployment of other retrieval systems. The deployment of this device is expected to significantly reduce the costs of operation and maintenance of more expensive retrieval systems. The functions and requirements presented here were developed by evaluating the results and recommendations that resulted from the pulsating mixer pump demonstration at PNNL, and by coupling this with the remediation needs identified by staff at ORNL involved with the remediation of the Gunite and Associated Tanks

  13. Mobile Ocean Test Berth Support: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-413

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LiVecchi, Albert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC), headquartered at the Oregon State University, is establishing the capabilities to test prototype wave energy conversion devices in the ocean. This CRADA will leverage the technical expertise and resources at NREL in the wind industry and in ocean engineering to support and enhance the development of the NNMREC Mobile Ocean Test Berth (MOTB). This CRADA will provide direct support to NNMREC by providing design evaluation and review of the MOTB, developing effective protocols for testing of the MOTB and wave energy conversion devices in the ocean, assisting in the specification of appropriate instrumentation and data acquisition packages, and providing guidance on obtaining and maintaining A2LA (American Association for Laboratory Accreditation) accreditation.

  14. Sea Surface Temperature data collected from buoys deployed world-wide in support of the U.S. Coast Guard Office of Search and Rescue (CG-SAR) program from 2004-03-24 to 2016-09-30 (NCEI Accession (0098145) (NCEI Accession 0098145)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NCEI accessions contains Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data collected from buoys deployed in support of the U.S. Coast Guard Office of Search and Rescue...

  15. Tether Deployer And Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joseph A.; Alexander, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    Design concept promises speed, control, and reliability. Scheme for deploying tether provides for fast, free, and snagless payout and fast, dependable braking. Developed for small, expendable tethers in outer space, scheme also useful in laying transoceanic cables, deploying guidance wires to torpedoes and missiles, paying out rescue lines from ship to ship via rockets, deploying antenna wires, releasing communication and power cables to sonobuoys and expendable bathythermographs, and in reeling out lines from fishing rods.

  16. Instrumental Supporting System for Developing and Analysis of Software-Defined Networks of Mobile Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sokolov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the organization principles for wireless mesh-networks (software-defined net-works of mobile objects. The emphasis is on the questions of getting effective routing algorithms for such networks. The mathematical model of the system is the standard transportation network. The key parameter of the routing system is the node reachability coefficient — the function depending on several basic and additional parameters (“mesh-factors”, which characterize the route between two network nodes. Each pair (arc, node is juxtaposed to a composite parameter which characterizes the “reacha-bility” of the node by the route which begins with this arc. The best (“shortest” route between two nodes is the route with the maximum reachability coefficient. The rules of building and refreshing the routing tables by the network nodes are described. With the announcement from the neighbor the node gets the information about the connection energy and reliability, the announcement time of receipt, the absence of transitional nodes and also about the connection capability. On the basis of this informationthe node applies the penalization (decreasing the reachability coefficient or the reward (increasing the reachability coefficient to all routes through this neighbor node. The penalization / reward scheme has some separate aspects: 1. Penalization for the actuality of information. 2. Penalization / reward for the reliability of a node. 3. Penalization for the connection energy. 4. Penalization for the present connection capability. The simulator of the wireless mesh-network of mobile objects is written. It is based on the suggested heuristic algorithms. The description and characteristics of the simulator are stated in the article. The peculiarities of its program realization are also examined.

  17. RSOI: Force Deployment Bottleneck

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amato, Mark

    1998-01-01

    This study uses The Theory Of Constraints (TOC) management methodology and recent military missions to show that RSOI operations are generally the limiting constraint to force deployment operations...

  18. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  19. Deployment Health Surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeNicola, Anthony D

    2004-01-01

    .... Gulf War health questions have resulted in controversy over potentially hazardous exposures during the deployment, the possibility of adverse affects from preventive health measures, and the role...

  20. Texas Urban Triangle : pilot study to implement a spatial decision support system (SDSS) for sustainable mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    This project addressed sustainable transportation in the Texas Urban Triangle (TUT) by conducting a pilot : project at the county scale. The project tested and developed the multi-attribute Spatial Decision Support : System (SDSS) developed in 2009 u...

  1. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, T. [State of Illinois Washington Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  2. A Radiation Learning Support System by Tri-sensory Augmented Reality using a Mobile Phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, Hiroshi; Zhao, Yue; Yan, Weida; Ishii, Hirotake

    2011-01-01

    A radiation learning support system has been developed to support learning basic knowledge of radiation and its influence on the human body by using tri-sensory Augmented Reality (AR) technology with presenting information to visual, auditory and tactile sensation. The system consists of a knowledge learning mode in which learners can learn basic knowledge of radiation and an experience learning mode in which they can virtually experience its influence on the human body under various conditions. As the result of a simple evaluation, it was suggested that the system improves the learners' intuitive understanding, and information presentation to auditory and tactile sensation is more effective than that to visual sensation

  3. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This report compiles information and conclusions gathered as part of the “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs” project. The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge in which future research is needed.

  4. Mobile Augmented Reality Support for Architects Based on Feature Tracking Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang Nielsen, Michael; Kramp, Gunnar; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2004-01-01

    on the horizon view from an office building, while working on a courtyard garden proposal. The SitePack applies a novel combination of GPS tracking and vision based feature tracking in its support for architects. The SitePack requires no preparation of the site and combines and extends the strengths of previous...

  5. What Makes a Mobile App Successful in Supporting Health Behaviour Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Martin; McClelland, Tracy

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Health promotion apps designed to support and reinforce health behaviours or to reduce risk behaviours are the most commonly downloaded apps. Such technologies have the potential to reach and deliver health care to new populations. But the extent to which they are successful in enabling the adoption of new and desired behaviours can…

  6. Walk-Rally Support System Using Two-Dimensional Codes and Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Tetsuya; Yamagishi, Yoshio; Mizuno, Shun

    2013-01-01

    "Walk Rally" (WR), an orienteering-like recreation game, is common, especially in Japan. Numerous trials to combine WR with educational activities are being carried out by some educators. However, participants are always at the risk of straying and subjected to various accidents during the WR. We developed a WR support system based on…

  7. Enhancing guideline-based decision support with distributed computation through local mobile application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shalom, Erez; Shahar, Yuval; Goldstein, Ayelet; Ariel, Elior; Quaglini, Silvana; Sacchi, Lucia; Fung, L.S.N.; Jones, Valerie M.; Broens, T.H.F.; García-Sáez, Gema; Hernando, Elena

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the need for a distributed guideline-based decision support (DSS) process, describe its characteristics, and explain how we implemented this process within the European Union’s MobiGuide project. In particular, we have developed a mechanism of sequential, piecemeal projection, i.e.,

  8. Effects of a Technology Supported Project Based Learning (TS-PBL Approach on the Success of a Mobile Application Development Course and the Students’ Opinions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fezile Ozdamli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Similar to traditional desktop software development processes, teamwork is a necessity in the mobile application development process. Thus, the aim of this study is to examine the effects of the technology supported project-based learning approach in mobile application development courses on the academic achievement of students and to clarify the engineering students’ opinions. A total of 130 engineering students from the Department taking mobile application development courses were the participants of this study. The lessons progressed in one group in the form of technology supported project-based learning steps, while in the other group, they were conducted using traditional methods. Based on the results, the practical implementation of a mobile application with a TS-PBL approach in engineering students’ education will be discussed.

  9. Community health workers' experiences of mobile device-enabled clinical decision support systems for maternal, newborn and child health in developing countries: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzabeng, Francis; Enuameh, Yeetey; Adjei, George; Manu, Grace; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this review is to synthesize evidence on the experiences of community health workers (CHWs) of mobile device-enabled clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) interventions designed to support maternal newborn and child health (MNCH) in low-and middle-income countries.Specific objectives.

  10. Can mobile phone technology support a rapid sharing of information on novel psychoactive substances among health and other professionals internationally?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonato, Pierluigi; Bersani, Francesco S; Santacroce, Rita; Cinosi, Eduardo; Schifano, Fabrizio; Bersani, Giuseppe; Martinotti, Giovanni; Corazza, Ornella

    2017-05-01

    The diffusion of novel psychoactive substances (NPSs), combined with the ability of the Internet to act as an online marketplace, has led to unprecedented challenges for governments, health agencies, and substance misuse services. Despite increasing research, there is a paucity of reliable information available to professionals working in the field. The paper will present the pilot results of the first mobile application (SMAIL) for rapid information sharing on NPSs among health professionals. The development of SMAIL was divided into 2 parts: (a) the creation of the application for registered users, enabling them to send an SMS or email with the name or "street name" of an NPS and receive within seconds emails or SMS with the information, when available and (b) the development of a database to support the incoming requests. One hundred twenty-two professionals based in 22 countries used the service over the pilot period of 16 months (from May 2012 to September 2013). Five hundred fifty-seven enquires were made. Users received rapid information on NPSs, and 61% of them rated the service as excellent. This is the right time to use mobile phone technologies for rapid information sharing and prevention activities on NPSs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. UMineAR: Mobile-Tablet-Based Abandoned Mine Hazard Site Investigation Support System Using Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jangwon Suh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional mine site investigation has difficulties in fostering location awareness and understanding the subsurface environment; moreover, it produces a large amount of hardcopy data. To overcome these limitations, the UMineAR mobile tablet application was developed. It enables users to rapidly identify underground mine objects (drifts, entrances, boreholes, hazards and intuitively visualize them in 3D using a mobile augmented reality (AR technique. To design UMineAR, South Korean georeferenced standard-mine geographic information system (GIS databases were employed. A web database system was designed to access via a tablet groundwater-level data measured every hour by sensors installed in boreholes. UMineAR consists of search, AR, map, and database modules. The search module provides data retrieval and visualization options/functions. The AR module provides 3D interactive visualization of mine GIS data and camera imagery on the tablet screen. The map module shows the locations of corresponding borehole data on a 2D map. The database module provides mine GIS database management functions. A case study showed that the proposed application is suitable for onsite visualization of high-volume mine GIS data based on geolocations; no specialized equipment or skills are required to understand the underground mine environment. UMineAR can be used to support abandoned-mine hazard site investigations.

  12. Development and testing of a mobile application to support diabetes self-management for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mira; Hempler, Nana F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous mobile applications have been developed to support diabetes-self-management. However, the majority of these applications lack a theoretical foundation and the involvement of people with diabetes during development. The aim of this study was to develop and test a mobile applic...... and implementation of the mobile health app were crucial to creating value for users. More attention should be paid to the training of professionals who introduce health apps. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Danish Data Protection Agency: 2012-58-0004. Registered 6 February 2016....

  13. Utility of Mobile phones to support In-situ data collection for Land Cover Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduor, P.; Omondi, S.; Wahome, A.; Mugo, R. M.; Flores, A.

    2017-12-01

    With the compelling need to create better monitoring tools for our landscapes to enhance better decision making processes, it becomes imperative to do so in much more sophisticated yet simple ways. Making it possible to leverage untapped potential of our "lay men" at the same time enabling us to respond to the complexity of the information we have to get out. SERVIR Eastern and Southern Africa has developed a mobile app that can be utilized with very little prior knowledge or no knowledge at all to collect spatial information on land cover. This set of in-situ data can be collected by masses because the tools is very simple to use, and have this information fed in classification algorithms than can then be used to map out our ever changing landscape. The LULC Mapper is a subset of JiMap system and is able to pull the google earth imagery and open street maps to enable user familiarize with their location. It uses phone GPS, phone network information to map location coordinates and at the same time gives the user sample picture of what to categorize their landscape. The system is able to work offline and when user gets access to internet they can push the information into an amazon database as bulk data. The location details including geotagged photos allows the data to be used in development of a lot of spatial information including land cover data. The app is currently available in Google Play Store and will soon be uploaded on Appstore for utilization by a wider community. We foresee a lot of potential in this tool in terms of making data collection cheaper and affordable. Taking advantage of the advances made in phone technology. We envisage to do a data collection campaign where we can have the tool used for crowdsourcing.

  14. A mobile computer system to support first responders to a radiological emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Antonio J.D. da, E-mail: antoniojoseds@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Informatica; Santos, Joao R. dos; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R., E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Decision-making in emergency situations is characterized by its speed, pressure, and especially the uncertainty of information. Uninformed decisions or decisions based on unreliable data may lead to inappropriate actions. Although several studies that aim to combine different databases and provide full information to emergency response operation commanders can be found, only few of them are dedicated to radiological emergencies situations and even less are those that aim to provide support for the emergency first responder. We developed a system to support first responders to deal with radiological emergencies using cognitive task analysis techniques to elicit the tacitly knowledge of practitioners to grasp what information is really needed during radiological emergency response. (author)

  15. A radiation learning support system by tri-sensory augmented reality using a mobile phone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, Hiroshi; Zhao, Yue; Yan, Weida; Ishii, Hirotake

    2011-01-01

    A radiation learning support system has been developed to support learning basic knowledge of radiation and its strength of human body impact by using tri-sensory Augmented Reality (AR) technology with presenting information to visual, auditory and haptic sensation. The system consists of a knowledge learning mode in which learners can learn basic knowledge of radiation and an experience learning mode in which they can virtually experience its strength of human body impact under various conditions. As the result of a simple evaluation, it was suggested that the system improves the learners' intuitive understanding, and information presentation of the radiation strength to auditory and haptic sensation is more comprehensive than that to visual sensation. (author)

  16. Supporting Stroke Motor Recovery Through a Mobile Application: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Sonia; Tang, Ziying; Feng, Jinjuan

    Neuroplasticity and motor learning are promoted with repetitive movement, appropriate challenge, and performance feedback. ARMStrokes, a smartphone application, incorporates these qualities to support motor recovery. Engaging exercises are easily accessible for improved compliance. In a multiple-case, mixed-methods pilot study, the potential of this technology for stroke motor recovery was examined. Exercises calibrated to the participant's skill level targeted forearm, elbow, and shoulder motions for a 6-wk protocol. Visual, auditory, and vibration feedback promoted self-assessment. Pre- and posttest data from 6 chronic stroke survivors who used the app in different ways (i.e., to measure active or passive motion, to track endurance) demonstrated improvements in accuracy of movements, fatigue, range of motion, and performance of daily activities. Statistically significant changes were not obtained with this pilot study. Further study on the efficacy of this technology is supported. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  17. A mobile computer system to support first responders to a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Antonio J.D. da

    2013-01-01

    Decision-making in emergency situations is characterized by its speed, pressure, and especially the uncertainty of information. Uninformed decisions or decisions based on unreliable data may lead to inappropriate actions. Although several studies that aim to combine different databases and provide full information to emergency response operation commanders can be found, only few of them are dedicated to radiological emergencies situations and even less are those that aim to provide support for the emergency first responder. We developed a system to support first responders to deal with radiological emergencies using cognitive task analysis techniques to elicit the tacitly knowledge of practitioners to grasp what information is really needed during radiological emergency response. (author)

  18. Mobile Autonomous Sensing Unit (MASU: A Framework That Supports Distributed Pervasive Data Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esunly Medina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pervasive data sensing is a major issue that transverses various research areas and application domains. It allows identifying people’s behaviour and patterns without overwhelming the monitored persons. Although there are many pervasive data sensing applications, they are typically focused on addressing specific problems in a single application domain, making them difficult to generalize or reuse. On the other hand, the platforms for supporting pervasive data sensing impose restrictions to the devices and operational environments that make them unsuitable for monitoring loosely-coupled or fully distributed work. In order to help address this challenge this paper present a framework that supports distributed pervasive data sensing in a generic way. Developers can use this framework to facilitate the implementations of their applications, thus reducing complexity and effort in such an activity. The framework was evaluated using simulations and also through an empirical test, and the obtained results indicate that it is useful to support such a sensing activity in loosely-coupled or fully distributed work scenarios.

  19. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Users are already mobile, but the question is to which extent knowledge-based dictionary apps are designed for the mobile user situation. The objective of this article is to analyse the characteristics of the mobile user situation and to look further into the stationary user situation and the mob......Users are already mobile, but the question is to which extent knowledge-based dictionary apps are designed for the mobile user situation. The objective of this article is to analyse the characteristics of the mobile user situation and to look further into the stationary user situation...... and the mobile user situation. The analysis is based on an empirical survey involving ten medical doctors and a monolingual app designed to support cognitive lexicographic functions, cf. (Tarp 2006:61-64). In test A the doctors looked up five medical terms while sitting down at a desk and in test B the doctors...

  20. Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions (JITAIs) in Mobile Health: Key Components and Design Principles for Ongoing Health Behavior Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Smith, Shawna N; Spring, Bonnie J; Collins, Linda M; Witkiewitz, Katie; Tewari, Ambuj; Murphy, Susan A

    2018-05-18

    The just-in-time adaptive intervention (JITAI) is an intervention design aiming to provide the right type/amount of support, at the right time, by adapting to an individual's changing internal and contextual state. The availability of increasingly powerful mobile and sensing technologies underpins the use of JITAIs to support health behavior, as in such a setting an individual's state can change rapidly, unexpectedly, and in his/her natural environment. Despite the increasing use and appeal of JITAIs, a major gap exists between the growing technological capabilities for delivering JITAIs and research on the development and evaluation of these interventions. Many JITAIs have been developed with minimal use of empirical evidence, theory, or accepted treatment guidelines. Here, we take an essential first step towards bridging this gap. Building on health behavior theories and the extant literature on JITAIs, we clarify the scientific motivation for JITAIs, define their fundamental components, and highlight design principles related to these components. Examples of JITAIs from various domains of health behavior research are used for illustration. As we enter a new era of technological capacity for delivering JITAIs, it is critical that researchers develop sophisticated and nuanced health behavior theories capable of guiding the construction of such interventions. Particular attention has to be given to better understanding the implications of providing timely and ecologically sound support for intervention adherence and retention.

  1. A Mobile Sensor Network System for Monitoring of Unfriendly Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guangming; Zhou, Yaoxin; Ding, Fei; Song, Aiguo

    2008-11-14

    Observing microclimate changes is one of the most popular applications of wireless sensor networks. However, some target environments are often too dangerous or inaccessible to humans or large robots and there are many challenges for deploying and maintaining wireless sensor networks in those unfriendly environments. This paper presents a mobile sensor network system for solving this problem. The system architecture, the mobile node design, the basic behaviors and advanced network capabilities have been investigated respectively. A wheel-based robotic node architecture is proposed here that can add controlled mobility to wireless sensor networks. A testbed including some prototype nodes has also been created for validating the basic functions of the proposed mobile sensor network system. Motion performance tests have been done to get the positioning errors and power consumption model of the mobile nodes. Results of the autonomous deployment experiment show that the mobile nodes can be distributed evenly into the previously unknown environments. It provides powerful support for network deployment and maintenance and can ensure that the sensor network will work properly in unfriendly environments.

  2. Evaluating the Acceptability and Usability of EASEL: A Mobile Application that Supports Guided Reflection for Experiential Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry C Schnepp

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: To examine the early perceptions (acceptability and usability of EASEL (Education through Application-Supported Experiential Learning, a mobile platform that delivers reflection prompts and content before, during, and after an experiential learning activity. Background: Experiential learning is an active learning approach in which students learn by doing and by reflecting on the experience. This approach to teaching is often used in disciplines such as humanities, business, and medicine. Reflection before, during, and after an experience allows the student to analyze what they learn and why it is important, which is vital in helping them to understand the relevance of the experience. A just-in-time tool (EASEL was needed to facilitate this. Methodology: To inform the development of a mobile application that facilitates real-time guided reflection and to determine the relevant feature set, we conducted a needs analysis with both students and faculty members. Data collected during this stage of the evaluation helped guide the creation of a prototype. The user experience of the prototype and interface interactions were evaluated during the usability phase of the evaluation study. Contribution: Both the needs analysis and usability assessment provided justification for continued development of EASEL as well as insight that guides current development. Findings: The interaction design of EASEL is understandable and usable. Both students and teachers value an application that facilitates real-time guided reflection. Recommendations for Practitioners: The use of a system such as EASEL can leverage time and location-based services to support students in field experiences. This technology aligns with evidence that guided reflection provides opportunities for metacognition. Recommendation for Researchers: Iterative prototyping, testing, and refinement can lead to a deliberate and effective app development process. Impact on Society: The EASEL

  3. Wapice News Mobile Application

    OpenAIRE

    Söylemez, Ilke

    2017-01-01

    Since the mobile phones started to have an increasingly significant role in daily life, the mobile application development also started to be an important area in the software industry. The problem for mobile application developers is to develop a mobile application which supports all the devices and platforms on the market. This issue created a need for cross platform mobile applications. The cross platform mobile development refers to the development of mobile applications that could be use...

  4. Part 8. Deployment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, K.D.; Chang, Y.I.; Daly, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report addresses considerations of fast breeder reactor development and deployment from a national perspective. Nations vary greatly in their expertise and interest relative to nuclear power, and hence a single set of steps to be taken by a nation in decision-making on breeder development and deployment cannot be presented. The approach taken in this report is to present discussions on key factors influencing the breeder development and deployment decisions, especially in non-breeder nations, by drawing upon historical perspectives of the Light Water Reactor for comparison

  5. How Do Students Use Their Mobile Devices to Support Learning? A Case Study from an Australian Regional University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Helen; Murphy, Angela; Johnson, Chris; Carter, Brad; Lane, Michael; Midgley, Warren; Hafeez-Baig, Abdul; Dekeyser, Stijn; Koronios, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Though universities are eager to leverage the potential of mobile learning to provide learning flexibly, most balk at the cost of providing students with mobile hardware. The practice of "bring your own device" (BYOD) is often mooted as a cost-effective alternative. This paper provides a snapshot of student ownership of mobile devices at…

  6. Examining perceptions of the usefulness and usability of a mobile-based system for pharmacogenomics clinical decision support: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Blagec

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pharmacogenomic testing has the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of pharmacotherapy, but clinical application of pharmacogenetic knowledge has remained uncommon. Clinical Decision Support (CDS systems could help overcome some of the barriers to clinical implementation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception and usability of a web- and mobile-enabled CDS system for pharmacogenetics-guided drug therapy–the Medication Safety Code (MSC system–among potential users (i.e., physicians and pharmacists. Furthermore, this study sought to collect data on the practicability and comprehensibility of potential layouts of a proposed personalized pocket card that is intended to not only contain the machine-readable data for use with the MSC system but also human-readable data on the patient’s pharmacogenomic profile. Methods. We deployed an emergent mixed methods design encompassing (1 qualitative interviews with pharmacists and pharmacy students, (2 a survey among pharmacogenomics experts that included both qualitative and quantitative elements and (3 a quantitative survey among physicians and pharmacists. The interviews followed a semi-structured guide including a hypothetical patient scenario that had to be solved by using the MSC system. The survey among pharmacogenomics experts focused on what information should be printed on the card and how this information should be arranged. Furthermore, the MSC system was evaluated based on two hypothetical patient scenarios and four follow-up questions on the perceived usability. The second survey assessed physicians’ and pharmacists’ attitude towards the MSC system. Results. In total, 101 physicians, pharmacists and PGx experts coming from various relevant fields evaluated the MSC system. Overall, the reaction to the MSC system was positive across all investigated parameters and among all user groups. The majority of participants were able to solve the patient

  7. Testing a mobile digital cognitive support system for high functioning adolescents with ASD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyori, Miklos; Aagaard, Morten; Kanizsai-Nagy, Ildiko

    HANDS Project is aimed at developing a cognitive support system for high functioning (HF) adolescents with ASD, running on smartphones and PDAs, complemented by a webbased management system. It is designed to teach/facilitate adaptive social behaviours and daily living skills, and is based...... on a detailed understanding of the cognitiveprofile of ASD, and on evidence‐based intervention techniques. Development of the system was based on recurrent interactions of expert groups from persuasive design, child psychiatry,cognitive psychology, (special) education, software development, and intended users...... clinical trial, with a total sample of 54 HF adolescents with ASD (27 test & 27 matched control subjects) in 4 test‐sites, internationally. Results In preliminary analysis, SRS measurements did not yield overall conclusive results on the efficiency of the system. E‐T testing was done and analysed on a semi...

  8. I've got a mobile phone too! Hard and soft assistive technology customization and supportive call centres for people with disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Simon; Green, Jenny; Maxwell, Hazel

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the use of a mobile technology platform, software customization and technical support services by people with disability. The disability experience is framed through the participants' use of the technology, their social participation. A qualitative and interpretive research design was employed using a three-stage process of observation and semi-structured interviews of people with disability, a significant other and their service provider. Transcripts were analyzed to examine the research questions through the theoretical framework of PHAATE - Policy, Human, Activity, Assistance and Technology and Environment. The analysis revealed three emergent themes: 1. Engagement and activity; 2. Training, support and customization; and 3. Enablers, barriers and attitudes. The findings indicate that for the majority of users, the mobile technology increased the participants' communication and social participation. However, this was not true for all members of the pilot with variations due to disability type, support needs and availability of support services. Most participants, significant others and service providers identified improvements in confidence, security, safety and independence of those involved. Yet, the actions and attitudes of some of the significant others and service providers acted as a constraint to the adoption of the technology. Implications for Rehabilitation Customized mobile technology can operate as assistive technology providing a distinct benefit in terms of promoting disability citizenship. Mobile technology used in conjunction with a supportive call centre can lead to improvements in confidence, safety and independence for people experiencing disability. Training and support are critical in increasing independent use of mobile technology for people with disability. The enjoyment, development of skills and empowerment gained through the use of mobile technology facilitate the social inclusion of people with

  9. Deployment Health Surveillance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeNicola, Anthony D

    2004-01-01

    ... of stress in causing chronic illness. The lack of comprehensive deployment health surveillance has made it difficult to determine possible causes of adverse health effects reported by Gulf War veterans...

  10. Modeling EERE deployment programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, K. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, D. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Belzer, D. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Livingston, O. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address possible improvements to the modeling process, and note gaps in knowledge for future research.

  11. RSOI: Force Deployment Bottleneck

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amato, Mark

    1998-01-01

    .... This runs counter to the popular belief that strategic lift is the limiting constraint. The study begins by highlighting the genesis of the military's current force projection strategy and the resulting importance of rapid force deployments...

  12. Deployable Brake for Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, J. R.; Maloney, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Aerodynamic shield that could be opened and closed proposed. Report presents concepts for deployable aerodynamic brake. Brake used by spacecraft returning from high orbit to low orbit around Earth. Spacecraft makes grazing passes through atmosphere to slow down by drag of brake. Brake flexible shield made of woven metal or ceramic withstanding high temperatures created by air friction. Stored until needed, then deployed by set of struts.

  13. Wireless just-in-time training of mobile skilled support personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, Cesar; Marsico, Michael; Rosen, Mitchel; Schlegel, Barry

    2006-05-01

    Skilled Support Personnel (SSP) serve emergency response organizations during an emergency incident, and include laborers, operating engineers, carpenters, ironworkers, sanitation workers and utility workers. SSP called to an emergency incident rarely have recent detailed training on the chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and/or explosives (CBRNE) agents or the personal protection equipment (PPE) relevant to the incident. This increases personal risk to the SSP and mission risk at the incident site. Training for SSP has been identified as a critical need by the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Worker Education and Training Program. We present a system being developed to address this SSP training shortfall by exploiting a new training paradigm called just-in-time training (JITT) made possible by advances in distance learning and cellular telephony. In addition to the current conventional training at regularly scheduled instructional events, SSP called to an emergency incident will have secure access to short (technologies and wireless service providers, integration with the incident management system, and SCORM compliance.

  14. Mobile DNA and the TE-Thrust hypothesis: supporting evidence from the primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Keith R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transposable elements (TEs are increasingly being recognized as powerful facilitators of evolution. We propose the TE-Thrust hypothesis to encompass TE-facilitated processes by which genomes self-engineer coding, regulatory, karyotypic or other genetic changes. Although TEs are occasionally harmful to some individuals, genomic dynamism caused by TEs can be very beneficial to lineages. This can result in differential survival and differential fecundity of lineages. Lineages with an abundant and suitable repertoire of TEs have enhanced evolutionary potential and, if all else is equal, tend to be fecund, resulting in species-rich adaptive radiations, and/or they tend to undergo major evolutionary transitions. Many other mechanisms of genomic change are also important in evolution, and whether the evolutionary potential of TE-Thrust is realized is heavily dependent on environmental and ecological factors. The large contribution of TEs to evolutionary innovation is particularly well documented in the primate lineage. In this paper, we review numerous cases of beneficial TE-caused modifications to the genomes of higher primates, which strongly support our TE-Thrust hypothesis.

  15. An ontology-based, mobile-optimized system for pharmacogenomic decision support at the point-of-care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Miñarro-Giménez

    Full Text Available The development of genotyping and genetic sequencing techniques and their evolution towards low costs and quick turnaround have encouraged a wide range of applications. One of the most promising applications is pharmacogenomics, where genetic profiles are used to predict the most suitable drugs and drug dosages for the individual patient. This approach aims to ensure appropriate medical treatment and avoid, or properly manage, undesired side effects.We developed the Medicine Safety Code (MSC service, a novel pharmacogenomics decision support system, to provide physicians and patients with the ability to represent pharmacogenomic data in computable form and to provide pharmacogenomic guidance at the point-of-care. Pharmacogenomic data of individual patients are encoded as Quick Response (QR codes and can be decoded and interpreted with common mobile devices without requiring a centralized repository for storing genetic patient data. In this paper, we present the first fully functional release of this system and describe its architecture, which utilizes Web Ontology Language 2 (OWL 2 ontologies to formalize pharmacogenomic knowledge and to provide clinical decision support functionalities.The MSC system provides a novel approach for enabling the implementation of personalized medicine in clinical routine.

  16. Feasibility of a Mobile Phone App to Support Recovery From Addiction in China: Secondary Analysis of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hui; Zhang, Jing Ying; Hser, Yih-Ing; Liang, Di; Li, Xu; Wang, Shan Shan; Du, Jiang; Zhao, Min

    2018-02-27

    Mobile health technologies have been found to improve the self-management of chronic diseases. However, there is limited research regarding their feasibility in supporting recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs) in China. The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of a mobile phone-based ecological momentary assessment (EMA) app by testing the concordance of drug use assessed by the EMA, urine testing, and a life experience timeline (LET) assessment. A total of 75 participants dependent on heroin or amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) in Shanghai were recruited to participate in a 4-week pilot study. Of the participants, 50 (67% [50/75]) were randomly assigned to the experimental group and 25 (33% [25/75]) were assigned to the control group. The experimental group used mobile health (mHealth) based EMA technology to assess their daily drug use in natural environments and received 2 short health messages each day, whereas the control group only received 2 short health messages each day from the app. Urine tests and LET assessments were conducted each week and a post-intervention survey was administered to both groups. The correlations among the EMA, the LET assessment, and the urine test were investigated. The mean age of the participants was 41.6 (SD 8.0) years, and 71% (53/75) were male. During the 4 weeks of observation, 690 daily EMA survey data were recorded, with a response rate of 49.29% (690/1400). With respect to drug use, the percent of agreement between the EMA and the LET was 66.7%, 79.2%, 72.4%, and 85.8%, respectively, for each of the 4 weeks, whereas the percent of agreement between the EMA and the urine test was 51.2%, 65.1%, 61.9%, and 71.5%, respectively. The post-intervention survey indicated that 46% (32/70) of the participants preferred face-to-face interviews rather than the mHealth app. This study demonstrated poor agreement between the EMA data and the LET and found that the acceptance of mHealth among individuals with SUDs

  17. Feasibility of a mobile and web-based intervention to support self-management in outpatients with cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstenbach, Laura M J; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Courtens, Annemie M; van Kleef, Maarten; de Witte, Luc P

    2016-08-01

    Cancer pain is a prevalent and distressing symptom. To enhance self-management in outpatients, a multi-component intervention was developed, integrating patient self-management and professional care through healthcare technology. This article describes feasibility of the intervention in everyday practice. Patients with moderate to severe cancer pain (n = 11) and registered nurses specialized in pain and palliative care (n = 3) participated in a four-week study. The intervention involved daily monitoring, graphical feedback, education, and advice by means of a mobile application for patients and a web application for nurses. Learnability, usability and desirability were measured in patients with a 20-item questionnaire (1-5 scale), higher scores indicating better feasibility. Patients' adherence was based on completion rates from server logs. Single semi-structured interviews with patients and a focus group interview with nurses provided insight into experiences. Questionnaire findings confirmed learnability (4.8), usability (4.8) and desirability (4.6) of the application for patients. Average completion rates were 76.8% for pain monitoring, 50.4% for medication monitoring and 100% for education sessions. Interviews revealed that patients were pleased with the simplicity of the mobile application and appreciated different components. Nurses agreed upon the added value and were mostly positive about the possibilities of the web application. Patients and nurses provided ideas for improvements relating to the content and technical performance of the intervention. Study results demonstrate feasibility of the intervention in everyday practice. Provided that content-related and technical adjustments are made, the intervention enables patients with cancer pain to practice self-management and nurses to remotely support these patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Decision support system for the response to infectious disease emergencies based on WebGIS and mobile services in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-pin; Fang, Li-qun; Gao, Su-qing; Wang, Zhen; Gao, Hong-wei; Liu, Peng; Wang, Ze-Rui; Li, Yan-Li; Zhu, Xu-Guang; Li, Xin-Lou; Xu, Bo; Li, Yin-Jun; Yang, Hong; de Vlas, Sake J; Shi, Tao-Xing; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    For years, emerging infectious diseases have appeared worldwide and threatened the health of people. The emergence and spread of an infectious-disease outbreak are usually unforeseen, and have the features of suddenness and uncertainty. Timely understanding of basic information in the field, and the collection and analysis of epidemiological information, is helpful in making rapid decisions and responding to an infectious-disease emergency. Therefore, it is necessary to have an unobstructed channel and convenient tool for the collection and analysis of epidemiologic information in the field. Baseline information for each county in mainland China was collected and a database was established by geo-coding information on a digital map of county boundaries throughout the country. Google Maps was used to display geographic information and to conduct calculations related to maps, and the 3G wireless network was used to transmit information collected in the field to the server. This study established a decision support system for the response to infectious-disease emergencies based on WebGIS and mobile services (DSSRIDE). The DSSRIDE provides functions including data collection, communication and analyses in real time, epidemiological detection, the provision of customized epidemiological questionnaires and guides for handling infectious disease emergencies, and the querying of professional knowledge in the field. These functions of the DSSRIDE could be helpful for epidemiological investigations in the field and the handling of infectious-disease emergencies. The DSSRIDE provides a geographic information platform based on the Google Maps application programming interface to display information of infectious disease emergencies, and transfers information between workers in the field and decision makers through wireless transmission based on personal computers, mobile phones and personal digital assistants. After a 2-year practice and application in infectious disease

  19. Decision support system for the response to infectious disease emergencies based on WebGIS and mobile services in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-pin Li

    Full Text Available For years, emerging infectious diseases have appeared worldwide and threatened the health of people. The emergence and spread of an infectious-disease outbreak are usually unforeseen, and have the features of suddenness and uncertainty. Timely understanding of basic information in the field, and the collection and analysis of epidemiological information, is helpful in making rapid decisions and responding to an infectious-disease emergency. Therefore, it is necessary to have an unobstructed channel and convenient tool for the collection and analysis of epidemiologic information in the field.Baseline information for each county in mainland China was collected and a database was established by geo-coding information on a digital map of county boundaries throughout the country. Google Maps was used to display geographic information and to conduct calculations related to maps, and the 3G wireless network was used to transmit information collected in the field to the server. This study established a decision support system for the response to infectious-disease emergencies based on WebGIS and mobile services (DSSRIDE. The DSSRIDE provides functions including data collection, communication and analyses in real time, epidemiological detection, the provision of customized epidemiological questionnaires and guides for handling infectious disease emergencies, and the querying of professional knowledge in the field. These functions of the DSSRIDE could be helpful for epidemiological investigations in the field and the handling of infectious-disease emergencies.The DSSRIDE provides a geographic information platform based on the Google Maps application programming interface to display information of infectious disease emergencies, and transfers information between workers in the field and decision makers through wireless transmission based on personal computers, mobile phones and personal digital assistants. After a 2-year practice and application in

  20. THE USE OF MOBILE TECHNOLOGIES IN MULTIMEDIA-SUPPORTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan DUYGU ERIŞTI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to reveal the students’ opinions about the use of PDAs (Personal Digital Assistant in learning environment within the context of multimedia based applications. Through purposeful sampling, 17 undergraduate students attending the elective course of BTÖ 323 Character Design in Computer Environment in the Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology at Anadolu University were involved in the study. Additionally, the present study was conducted in two phases; in the first phase, within the scope of the course, an interactive Learning content including the subject of “Interactive Multimedia Design” was prepared and installed on PDAs. Then, the PDAs installed with these prepared contents were distributed to the students, and two-hour training on how to use the PDAs was given to the students. In the second phase of the study, a three-week application regarding students’ following the course content via PDAs was conducted. Throughout the application, the students communicated with the instructor for extracurricular feedback by means of PDAs. After the application, semi-structured interviews were held with the students regarding the course application performed via PDAs and its effectiveness. The interview data collected were examined with descriptive analysis. The results demonstrated that most of the students explained the hardware inadequacies in the use of multimedia environment facilities via PDAs such as visual images, videos, animation particularly in learning content. Besides this, for the interactive dimension and communication, the students mentioned negativities particularly regarding file sharing. Consequently, it was concluded that the students had negative opinions about the presentation of multimedia-supported Learning content via PDAs.

  1. Mobile Phone Text Messages to Support Treatment Adherence in Adults With High Blood Pressure (SMS-Text Adherence Support [StAR]): A Single-Blind, Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrow, Kirsten; Farmer, Andrew J; Springer, David; Shanyinde, Milensu; Yu, Ly-Mee; Brennan, Thomas; Rayner, Brian; Namane, Mosedi; Steyn, Krisela; Tarassenko, Lionel; Levitt, Naomi

    2016-02-09

    We assessed the effect of automated treatment adherence support delivered via mobile phone short message system (SMS) text messages on blood pressure. In this pragmatic, single-blind, 3-arm, randomized trial (SMS-Text Adherence Support [StAR]) undertaken in South Africa, patients treated for high blood pressure were randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to information only, interactive SMS text messaging, or usual care. The primary outcome was change in systolic blood pressure at 12 months from baseline measured with a validated oscillometric device. All trial staff were masked to treatment allocation. Analyses were intention to treat. Between June 26, 2012, and November 23, 2012, 1372 participants were randomized to receive information-only SMS text messages (n=457), interactive SMS text messages (n=458), or usual care (n=457). Primary outcome data were available for 1256 participants (92%). At 12 months, the mean adjusted change in systolic blood pressure compared with usual care was -2.2 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -4.4 to -0.04) with information-only SMS and -1.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -3.7 to 0.6) with interactive SMS. Odds ratios for the proportion of participants with a blood pressure high blood pressure, we found a small reduction in systolic blood pressure control compared with usual care at 12 months. There was no evidence that an interactive intervention increased this effect. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02019823. South African National Clinical Trials Register, number SANCTR DOH-27-1212-386; Pan Africa Trial Register, number PACTR201411000724141. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. The financial impact of deployments on reserve health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petinaux, Bruno

    2008-08-01

    This study retrospectively surveyed the financial impact of deployments on 17 U.S. Army Reserve health care providers. Due to multiple mobilizations, 29 separate deployments were reported. The deployments, mostly between 2001 and 2005, typically lasted 3 months during which 86% reported no civilian income and 76% reported no civilian benefits. Solo practice providers reported the greatest financial losses due to continuing financial responsibility related to their civilian practice despite being deployed. Overall, 2 deployments did not change, 9 increased, and 16 decreased the medical officer's income. Two were not reported. In this small retrospective convenience sample study, solo practice U.S. Army Reserve health care providers were found to be at highest risk of financial losses during military deployments. This being said, no price can be put on the privilege of serving our men and women in uniform.

  3. Women’s Perceptions of Using Mobile Phones for Maternal and Child Health Support in Afghanistan: Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Fazal; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Singhasivanon, Pratap

    2018-01-01

    Background Growing rates of global mobile subscriptions pave the way for implementation of mobile health (mHealth) initiatives, especially among hard-to-reach populations. Objective This study aimed to determine the perceptions of Afghan women regarding the use of mobile phones for maternal and child health services. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in both rural and urban districts of Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan. The interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to assess participants’ demographic profile, mobile phone usage, and perception of respondents toward different aspects of health care delivery via mobile phones. Results Of the 240 participants, 142 (59.2%) owned mobile phones and 220 (91.7%) routinely used mobile phones. Approximately 209 (87.1%) of participants were willing to receive health messages via a mobile phone. Automated voice call was the most preferred method for sending health messages. More than 90% of the women reported that they would like to receive reminders for their children’s vaccinations and antenatal care visits. Conclusions Users’ perception was associated with mobile phone ownership, literacy level, and experience using mobile phones. In the study area, where the literacy rate is low, mHealth was well perceived. PMID:29636317

  4. Women's Perceptions of Using Mobile Phones for Maternal and Child Health Support in Afghanistan: Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Fazal; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Lawpoolsri, Saranath

    2018-04-10

    Growing rates of global mobile subscriptions pave the way for implementation of mobile health (mHealth) initiatives, especially among hard-to-reach populations. This study aimed to determine the perceptions of Afghan women regarding the use of mobile phones for maternal and child health services. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in both rural and urban districts of Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan. The interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to assess participants' demographic profile, mobile phone usage, and perception of respondents toward different aspects of health care delivery via mobile phones. Of the 240 participants, 142 (59.2%) owned mobile phones and 220 (91.7%) routinely used mobile phones. Approximately 209 (87.1%) of participants were willing to receive health messages via a mobile phone. Automated voice call was the most preferred method for sending health messages. More than 90% of the women reported that they would like to receive reminders for their children's vaccinations and antenatal care visits. Users' perception was associated with mobile phone ownership, literacy level, and experience using mobile phones. In the study area, where the literacy rate is low, mHealth was well perceived. ©Fazal Yamin, Jaranit Kaewkungwal, Pratap Singhasivanon, Saranath Lawpoolsri. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 10.04.2018.

  5. Applying Mobile and Pervasive Computer Technology to Enhance Coordination of Work in a Surgical Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    locations, tracking systems, and mobile devices to support social awareness and different types of communication modalities relevant to the current context. In this paper we report qualitative data from a one-year deployment of the system in a local hospital. Overall, this study shows that 75...

  6. The Impact of Using Mobile-Supported Learning Management Systems in Teaching Web Design on the Academic Success of Students and Their Opinions on the Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezer, Murat; Çimsir, Burcu Turan

    2018-01-01

    This research aimed to examine the impact of using mobile-supported learning management systems (LMS) in teaching web design on the academic success of students and their opinion on the course; and it was conducted on 70 volunteer students (35 experimental, 35 control) enrolled at Giresun University, Technical Sciences Vocational School, Computer…

  7. Mobile Phone Support for Diabetes Self-Care Among Diverse Adults: Protocol for a Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lyndsay A; Wallston, Kenneth A; Kripalani, Sunil; Greevy Jr, Robert A; Elasy, Tom A; Bergner, Erin M; Gentry, Chad K

    2018-01-01

    Background Nonadherence to self-care is common among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and often leads to severe complications. Moreover, patients with T2D who have low socioeconomic status and are racial/ethnic minorities disproportionately experience barriers to adherence and poor outcomes. Basic phone technology (text messages and phone calls) provides a practical medium for delivering content to address patients’ barriers to adherence; however, trials are needed to explore long-term and sustainable effects of mobile phone interventions among diverse patients. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of mobile phone–based diabetes support interventions on self-care and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) among adults with T2D using a 3-arm, 15-month randomized controlled trial with a Type 1 hybrid effectiveness-implementation approach. The intervention arms are (1) Rapid Encouragement/Education And Communications for Health (REACH) and (2) REACH + Family-focused Add-on for Motivating Self-care (FAMS). Methods We recruited primary care patients with T2D (N=512) from Federally Qualified Health Centers and an academic medical center, prioritizing recruitment of publicly insured and minority patients from the latter. Eligible patients were prescribed daily diabetes medication and owned a cell phone with text messaging capability. We excluded patients whose most recent HbA1c result within 12 months was <6.8% to support detection of intervention effects on HbA1c. Participants were randomly assigned to REACH only, REACH + FAMS, or the control condition. REACH provides text messages tailored to address patient-specific barriers to medication adherence based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral skills model, whereas FAMS provides monthly phone coaching with related text message content focused on family and friend barriers to diet and exercise adherence. We collect HbA1c and self-reported survey data at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months, and again at 15

  8. PTT Advisor: A CDC-supported initiative to develop a mobile clinical laboratory decision support application for the iOS platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel, Thomas G; Lee, Brian A; Ledbetter, Greg; Brown, Sara; Lavalley, Dale; Taylor, Julie; Thompson, Pam

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript describes the development of PTT (Partial Thromboplastin Time) Advisor, one of the first of a handful of iOS-based mobile applications to be released by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). PTT Advisor has been a collaboration between two groups at CDC (Informatics R&D and Laboratory Science), and one partner team (Clinical Laboratory Integration into Healthcare Collaborative - CLIHC). The application offers clinicians a resource to quickly select the appropriate follow-up tests to evaluate patients with a prolonged PTT and a normal Prothrombin Time (PT) laboratory result. The application was designed leveraging an agile methodology, and best practices in user experience (UX) design and mobile application development. As it is an open-source project, the code to PTT Advisor was made available to the public under the Apache Software License. On July 6, 2012, the free app was approved by Apple, and was published to their App Store. Regardless of the complexity of the mobile application, the level of effort required in the development process should not be underestimated. There are several issues that make designing the UI for a mobile phone challenging (not just small screen size): the touchscreen, users' mobile mindset (tasks need to be quick and focused), and the fact that mobile UI conventions/expectations are still being defined and refined (due to the maturity level of the field of mobile application development).

  9. Supporting the self-management of hypertension: Patients' experiences of using a mobile phone-based system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, I; Ranerup, A; Kjellgren, K

    2016-02-01

    Globally, hypertension is poorly controlled and its treatment consists mainly of preventive behavior, adherence to treatment and risk-factor management. The aim of this study was to explore patients' experiences of an interactive mobile phone-based system designed to support the self-management of hypertension. Forty-nine patients were interviewed about their experiences of using the self-management system for 8 weeks regarding: (i) daily answers on self-report questions concerning lifestyle, well-being, symptoms, medication intake and side effects; (ii) results of home blood-pressure measurements; (iii) reminders and motivational messages; and (iv) access to a web-based platform for visualization of the self-reports. The audio-recorded interviews were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. The patients considered the self-management system relevant for the follow-up of hypertension and found it easy to use, but some provided insight into issues for improvement. They felt that using the system offered benefits, for example, increasing their participation during follow-up consultations; they further perceived that it helped them gain understanding of the interplay between blood pressure and daily life, which resulted in increased motivation to follow treatment. Increased awareness of the importance of adhering to prescribed treatment may be a way to minimize the cardiovascular risks of hypertension.

  10. Advanced OS deployment system

    OpenAIRE

    Galiano Molina, Sebastián

    2007-01-01

    The main project’s objective is to design and build an OS deployment system taking advantage of the Linux OS and the Open Source community developments. This means to use existing technologies that modularize the system. With this philosophy in mind, the number of developed code lines within the project is keeping as small as possible. As REMBO, the OS deployment system to develop has to be transparent to the user. This means a system with a friendly user interface and no te...

  11. Modeling EERE Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.

    2007-11-08

    The purpose of this report is to compile information and conclusions gathered as part of three separate tasks undertaken as part of the overall project, “Modeling EERE Deployment Programs,” sponsored by the Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation office within the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The purpose of the project was to identify and characterize the modeling of deployment programs within the EERE Technology Development (TD) programs, address improvements to modeling in the near term, and note gaps in knowledge where future research is needed.

  12. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  13. Feasibility and acceptability of mobile phone short message service as a support for patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiho; Zhang, Wendy; Nyonyitono, Maureen; Lourenco, Lillian; Nanfuka, Mastula; Okoboi, Stephen; Birungi, Josephine; Lester, Richard T; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Munderi, Paula; Moore, David M

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone technologies have been promoted to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We studied the receptiveness of patients in a rural Ugandan setting to the use of short messaging service (SMS) communication for such purposes. We performed a cross-sectional analysis measuring mobile phone ownership and literacy amongst patients of The AIDS Support Organisation (TASO) in Jinja, Uganda. We performed bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to examine associations between explanatory variables and a composite outcome of being literate and having a mobile phone. From June 2012 to August 2013, we enrolled 895 participants, of whom 684 (76%) were female. The median age was 44 years. A total of 576 (63%) were both literate and mobile phone users. Of these, 91% (527/ 576) responded favourably to the potential use of SMS for health communication, while only 38.9% (124/319) of others were favourable to the idea (pmobile phone users reported optimal adherence to ART (86.4% vs. 90.6%; p=0.007). Male participants (AOR=2.81; 95% CI 1.83-4.30), sub-optimal adherence (AOR=1.76; 95% CI 1.12-2.77), those with waged or salaried employment (AOR=2.35; 95% CI 1.23-4.49), crafts/trade work (AOR=2.38; 95% CI 1.11-5.12), or involved in petty trade (AOR=1.85; 95% CI 1.09-3.13) (in comparison to those with no income) were more likely to report mobile phone ownership and literacy. In a rural Ugandan setting, we found that over 60% of patients could potentially benefit from a mobile phone-based ART adherence support. However, support for such an intervention was lower for other patients.

  14. Android Based Mobile Environment for Moodle Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Clunie, Gisela T.; Clunie, Clifton; Castillo, Aris; Rangel, Norman

    2013-01-01

    This paper is about the development of a platform that eases, throughout Android based mobile devices, mobility of users of virtual courses at Technological University of Panama. The platform deploys computational techniques such as "web services," design patterns, ontologies and mobile technologies to allow mobile devices communicate…

  15. Tool support for detection and analysis of following and leadership behavior of pedestrians from mobile sensing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M.B.; Blunck, H.

    2014-01-01

    The vast availability of mobile phones with built-in movement and location sensors enables the collection of detailed information about human movement even indoors. As mobility is a key element of many processes and activities, an interesting class of information to extract is movement patterns t...

  16. The use of mobile devices as means of data collection in supporting elementary school students' conceptual understanding about plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Lazaridou, Charalambia; Avraamidou, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of mobile learning among young learners. Specifically, we investigated whether the use of mobile devices for data collection during field trips outside the classroom could enhance fourth graders' learning about the parts of the flower and their

  17. Learning Potentials of the Ubiquitous Internet: Using Mobile Devices to Support the Individual, Social and Physical Context of the Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Pedersen, Nicholai Friis; Aaen, Janus Holst

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the key learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet. Rather than focusing on mobile technology or the mobility of the learner, the paper emphasises the ubiquity of internet access as a paramount catalyst for new learning in the digital age. From a sociocultural perspective the paper discusses different ways…

  18. The Use of Mobile Devices as Means of Data Collection in Supporting Elementary School Students' Conceptual Understanding about Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Lazaridou, Charalambia; Avraamidou, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of mobile learning among young learners. Specifically, we investigated whether the use of mobile devices for data collection during field trips outside the classroom could enhance fourth graders' learning about the parts of the flower and their functions, flower pollinators and the process of…

  19. SMARTHealth India: Development and Field Evaluation of a Mobile Clinical Decision Support System for Cardiovascular Diseases in Rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Devarsetty; Patel, Anushka; Raghu, Arvind; Clifford, Gari D; Maulik, Pallab K; Mohammad Abdul, Ameer; Mogulluru, Kishor; Tarassenko, Lionel; MacMahon, Stephen; Peiris, David

    2014-12-08

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of premature death and disability in India and yet few people at risk of CVD are able to access best practice health care. Mobile health (mHealth) is a promising solution, but very few mHealth interventions have been subjected to robust evaluation in India. The objectives were to develop a multifaceted, mobile clinical decision support system (CDSS) for CVD management and evaluate it for use by public nonphysician health care workers (NPHWs) and physicians in a rural Indian setting. Plain language clinical rules were developed based on standard guidelines and programmed into a computer tablet app. The algorithm was validated and field-tested in 11 villages in Andhra Pradesh, involving 11 NPHWs and 3 primary health center (PHC) physicians. A mixed method evaluation was conducted comprising clinical and survey data and in-depth patient and staff interviews to understand barriers and enablers to the use of the system. Then this was thematically analyzed using NVivo 10. During validation of the algorithm, there was an initial agreement for 70% of the 42 calculated variables between the CDSS and SPSS software outputs. Discrepancies were identified and amendments were made until perfect agreement was achieved. During field testing, NPHWs and PHC physicians used the CDSS to screen 227 and 65 adults, respectively. The NPHWs identified 39% (88/227) of patients for referral with 78% (69/88) of these having a definite indication for blood pressure (BP)-lowering medication. However, only 35% (24/69) attended a clinic within 1 month of referral, with 42% (10/24) of these reporting continuing medications at 3-month follow-up. Physicians identified and recommended 17% (11/65) of patients for BP-lowering medications. Qualitative interviews identified 3 interrelated interview themes: (1) the CDSS had potential to change prevailing health care models, (2) task-shifting to NPHWs was the central driver of change, and (3) despite high

  20. Deploying Renewables - Best and Future Policy Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-23

    The global energy system faces urgent challenges. Concerns about energy security are growing, as highlighted by the recent political turmoil in Northern Africa and the nuclear incident in Fukushima. At the same time, the need to respond to climate change is more critical than ever. Against this background, many governments have increased efforts to promote deployment of renewable energy -- low-carbon sources that can strengthen energy security. This has stimulated unprecedented rise in deployment, and renewables are now the fastest growing sector of the energy mix. This 'coming of age' of renewable energy also brings challenges. Growth is focused on a few of the available technologies, and rapid deployment is confined to a relatively small number of countries. In more advanced markets, managing support costs and system integration of large shares of renewable energy in a time of economic weakness and budget austerity has sparked vigorous political debate. The IEA's new report, Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice: - Provides a comprehensive review and analysis of renewable energy policy and market trends; - Analyses in detail the dynamics of deployment and provides best-practice policy principles for different stages of market maturity; - Assesses the impact and cost-effectiveness of support policies using new methodological tools and indicators; - Investigates the strategic reasons underpinning the pursuit of RE deployment by different countries and the prospects for globalisation of RE. This new book builds on and extends a 2008 IEA publication, drawing on recent policy and deployment experience world-wide. It provides guidance for policy makers and other stakeholders to avoid past mistakes, overcome new challenges and reap the benefits of deploying renewables -- today and tomorrow.

  1. Mobile Phone Support for Diabetes Self-Care Among Diverse Adults: Protocol for a Three-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lyndsay A; Wallston, Kenneth A; Kripalani, Sunil; Greevy, Robert A; Elasy, Tom A; Bergner, Erin M; Gentry, Chad K; Mayberry, Lindsay S

    2018-04-10

    Nonadherence to self-care is common among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and often leads to severe complications. Moreover, patients with T2D who have low socioeconomic status and are racial/ethnic minorities disproportionately experience barriers to adherence and poor outcomes. Basic phone technology (text messages and phone calls) provides a practical medium for delivering content to address patients' barriers to adherence; however, trials are needed to explore long-term and sustainable effects of mobile phone interventions among diverse patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of mobile phone-based diabetes support interventions on self-care and hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) among adults with T2D using a 3-arm, 15-month randomized controlled trial with a Type 1 hybrid effectiveness-implementation approach. The intervention arms are (1) Rapid Encouragement/Education And Communications for Health (REACH) and (2) REACH + Family-focused Add-on for Motivating Self-care (FAMS). We recruited primary care patients with T2D (N=512) from Federally Qualified Health Centers and an academic medical center, prioritizing recruitment of publicly insured and minority patients from the latter. Eligible patients were prescribed daily diabetes medication and owned a cell phone with text messaging capability. We excluded patients whose most recent HbA 1c result within 12 months was phone coaching with related text message content focused on family and friend barriers to diet and exercise adherence. We collect HbA 1c and self-reported survey data at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months, and again at 15 months to assess sustained changes. We will use generalized estimating equation models to test the effects of REACH (either intervention arm) on HbA 1c relative to the control group, the potential additive effects of FAMS, and effects of either intervention on adherence to self-care behaviors and diabetes self-efficacy. The trial is ongoing; recruitment closed

  2. Deploying Node.js

    CERN Document Server

    Pasquali, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    If you are an intermediate or advanced developer deploying your Node.js applications, then this book is for you. If you have already built a Node application or module and want to take your knowledge to the next level, this book will help you find your way.

  3. Cooperative Technolgy Deployed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.; Velt, R. in 't

    2011-01-01

    After the successful demonstrations of cooperative technology by the CVIS and Safespot projects the question remains how this technology can be successfully deployed. This question is explored by the Field Operational Test project FREILOT, which aims to provide fuel economy applications that must be

  4. Fusion Power Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Ogden, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Fusion power plants could be part of a future portfolio of non-carbon dioxide producing energy supplies such as wind, solar, biomass, advanced fission power, and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. In this paper, we discuss key issues that could impact fusion energy deployment during the last half of this century. These include geographic issues such as resource availability, scale issues, energy storage requirements, and waste issues. The resource needs and waste production associated with fusion deployment in the U.S. should not pose serious problems. One important feature of fusion power is the fact that a fusion power plant should be locatable within most local or regional electrical distribution systems. For this reason, fusion power plants should not increase the burden of long distance power transmission to our distribution system. In contrast to fusion power, regional factors could play an important role in the deployment of renewable resources such as wind, solar and biomass or fossil energy with CO2 sequestration. We examine the role of these regional factors and their implications for fusion power deployment

  5. Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing team: An examination of LA-ICP-AES in a mobile configuration. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the need for field-deployable elemental analysis devices that are safer, faster, and less expensive than the fixed laboratory procedures now used to screen hazardous waste sites. As a response to this need, the Technology Integration Program (TIP) created a mobile, field-deployable laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) sampling and analysis prototype. Although the elemental. screening prototype has been successfully field-tested, continued marketing and technical development efforts are required to transfer LA-ICP-AES technology to the commercial sector. TIP established and supported a student research and design group called the Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing (IDMM) team to advance the technology transfer of mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES. The IDMM team developed a conceptual design (which is detailed in this report) for a mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES sampling and analysis system, and reports the following findings: Mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES is commercially viable. Eventual regulatory acceptance of field-deployable LA-ICP-AES, while not a simple process, is likely. Further refinement of certain processes and components of LA-ICP-AES will enhance the device's sensitivity and accuracy

  6. The Long Tail Issue in Large Scale Deployment of Personal Informatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuttone, Andrea; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    2014-01-01

    We describe the challenges and the open questions arising during the design and deployment of SensibleJournal, a mobile personal informatics system with interactive visualizations of mobility and social interactions based on data acquired from embedded smartphone sensors. The SensibleJournal system...... was evaluated in a large scale (N=136) mobile sensing field study. We report issues in deployment, limitations in user engagement and uptake, and the challenges in measuring the effect of the system....

  7. ICT Solutions to Support EV Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Bro; Andersen, Peter Bach; Skov Johansen, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies and projects have proven that the electric vehicle can offer value and services that go beyond its function as a means of transportation. The value and services can, for instance, be the reduction of charging costs, adherence to grid constraints, or adjustment of charging behavior...... utilization concepts for EVs and be harmonized to obtain interoperability among numerous electric vehicle (EV) and electric vehicle supply equipment from original equipment manufacturers. This chapter describes contemporary Smart Grid communication methods in terms of requirements and specific solutions...

  8. Trustworthy execution on mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Vasudevan, Amit; Newsome, James

    2013-01-01

    This brief considers the various stakeholders in today's mobile device ecosystem, and analyzes why widely-deployed hardware security primitives on mobile device platforms are inaccessible to application developers and end-users. Existing proposals are also evaluated for leveraging such primitives, and proves that they can indeed strengthen the security properties available to applications and users, without reducing the properties currently enjoyed by OEMs and network carriers. Finally, this brief makes recommendations for future research that may yield practical and deployable results.

  9. Introduction of mobile phones for use by volunteer community health workers in support of integrated community case management in Bushenyi District, Uganda: development and implementation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumusiime, David Katuruba; Agaba, Gad; Kyomuhangi, Teddy; Finch, Jan; Kabakyenga, Jerome; MacLeod, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    A substantial literature suggests that mobile phones have great potential to improve management and survival of acutely ill children in rural Africa. The national strategy of the Ugandan Ministry of Health calls for employment of volunteer community health workers (CHWs) in implementation of Integrated Community Case Management (iCCM) of common illnesses (diarrhea, acute respiratory infection, pneumonia, fever/malaria) affecting children under five years of age. A mobile phone enabled system was developed within iCCM aiming to improve access by CHWs to medical advice and to strengthen reporting of data on danger signs and symptoms for acutely ill children under five years of age. Herein critical steps in development, implementation, and integration of mobile phone technology within iCCM are described. Mechanisms to improve diagnosis, treatment and referral of sick children under five were defined. Treatment algorithms were developed by the project technical team and mounted and piloted on the mobile phones, using an iterative process involving technical support personnel, health care providers, and academic support. Using a purposefully developed mobile phone training manual, CHWs were trained over an intensive five-day course to make timely diagnoses, recognize clinical danger signs, communicate about referrals and initiate treatment with appropriate essential drugs. Performance by CHWs and the accuracy and completeness of their submitted data was closely monitored post training test period and during the subsequent nine month community trial. In the full trial, the number of referrals and correctly treated children, based on the agreed treatment algorithms, was recorded. Births, deaths, and medication stocks were also tracked. Seven distinct phases were required to develop a robust mobile phone enabled system in support of the iCCM program. Over a nine month period, 96 CHWs were trained to use mobile phones and their competence to initiate a community trial was

  10. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Beiwinkel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile health (mHealth could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons with moderate to high distress. Over a 4-week period, the intervention will be compared to a self-monitoring without intervention group and a passive control group. Telephone interviews will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks, and 12-week follow-up to assess study outcomes. The primary outcome will be improvement of mental health. Secondary outcomes will include well-being, intentions toward help-seeking and help-seeking behavior, user activation, attitudes toward mental-health services, perceived stigmatization, smartphone app quality, user satisfaction, engagement, and adherence with the intervention. Additionally, data from the user’s daily life as collected during self-monitoring will be used to investigate risk and protective factors of mental health in real-world settings. Therefore, this study will allow us to demonstrate the effectiveness of a smartphone application as a widely accessible and low-cost intervention to improve mental health on a population level. It also allows to identify new assessment approaches in the field of psychiatric epidemiology.

  11. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiwinkel, Till; Hey, Stefan; Bock, Olaf; Rössler, Wulf

    2017-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons with moderate to high distress. Over a 4-week period, the intervention will be compared to a self-monitoring without intervention group and a passive control group. Telephone interviews will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks), and 12-week follow-up to assess study outcomes. The primary outcome will be improvement of mental health. Secondary outcomes will include well-being, intentions toward help-seeking and help-seeking behavior, user activation, attitudes toward mental-health services, perceived stigmatization, smartphone app quality, user satisfaction, engagement, and adherence with the intervention. Additionally, data from the user’s daily life as collected during self-monitoring will be used to investigate risk and protective factors of mental health in real-world settings. Therefore, this study will allow us to demonstrate the effectiveness of a smartphone application as a widely accessible and low-cost intervention to improve mental health on a population level. It also allows to identify new assessment approaches in the field of psychiatric epidemiology. PMID:28983477

  12. Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator; An Enhanced Evaporative Cooling System for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Portable Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Makinen, Janice V.; Miller, Sean; Campbell, Colin; Lynch, Bill; Vogel, Matt; Craft, Jesse; Wilkes, Robert; Kuehnel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) portable life support subsystem (PLSS) is currently under way at NASA Johnson Space Center. The AEMU PLSS features a new evaporative cooling system, the Generation 4 Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (Gen4 SWME). The SWME offers several advantages when compared with prior crewmember cooling technologies, including the ability to reject heat at increased atmospheric pressures, reduced loop infrastructure, and higher tolerance to fouling. Like its predecessors, Gen4 SWME provides nominal crew member and electronics cooling by flowing water through porous hollow fibers. Water vapor escapes through the hollow fiber pores, thereby cooling the liquid water that remains inside of the fibers. This cooled water is then recirculated to remove heat from the crew member and PLSS electronics. Test results from the backup cooling system which is based on a similar design and the subject of a companion paper, suggested that further volume reductions could be achieved through fiber density optimization. Testing was performed with four fiber bundle configurations ranging from 35,850 fibers to 41,180 fibers. The optimal configuration reduced the Gen4 SWME envelope volume by 15% from that of Gen3 while dramatically increasing the performance margin of the system. A rectangular block design was chosen over the Gen3 cylindrical design, for packaging configurations within the AEMU PLSS envelope. Several important innovations were made in the redesign of the backpressure valve which is used to control evaporation. A twin-port pivot concept was selected from among three low profile valve designs for superior robustness, control and packaging. The backpressure valve motor, the thermal control valve, delta pressure sensors and temperature sensors were incorporated into the manifold endcaps, also for packaging considerations. Flight-like materials including a titanium housing were used for all components. Performance testing

  13. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiwinkel, Till; Hey, Stefan; Bock, Olaf; Rössler, Wulf

    2017-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N  = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons with moderate to high distress. Over a 4-week period, the intervention will be compared to a self-monitoring without intervention group and a passive control group. Telephone interviews will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks), and 12-week follow-up to assess study outcomes. The primary outcome will be improvement of mental health. Secondary outcomes will include well-being, intentions toward help-seeking and help-seeking behavior, user activation, attitudes toward mental-health services, perceived stigmatization, smartphone app quality, user satisfaction, engagement, and adherence with the intervention. Additionally, data from the user's daily life as collected during self-monitoring will be used to investigate risk and protective factors of mental health in real-world settings. Therefore, this study will allow us to demonstrate the effectiveness of a smartphone application as a widely accessible and low-cost intervention to improve mental health on a population level. It also allows to identify new assessment approaches in the field of psychiatric epidemiology.

  14. Evaluation of Data Transfer Performance Between Moving Sender and Receiver in Mobile Communication Networks for Heterogeneous Service Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalė Dzemydienė

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular communication networks are acquiring more and more commercial relevance because of recent advances in inter-vehicular communications via the DSRC/WAVE standard, which stimulates a brand new family of visionary services for vehicles, from road safety to entertainment and multimedia applications. After deep analysis of the literature it was decided to investigate evaluation of data transfer performance between moving sender and receiver in mobile communication network for heterogeneous service support. After careful analysis of the simulation tools the NCTUns 6.0 software package was chosen for planned investigations. The results illustrate that the longest communication can be maintained at the maximum number of vehicles participating on the network, but the quality of communication is inversely proportional to the number of vehicles. On this changing topology network when growing number of nodes (vehicles increases flooding of network with the data packages and it determines many collisions. The number of rejected packages increases directly in proportion to the number of vehicles. When the number of nodes (vehicle increases—it is increasing the number of the received same packages which are received from different nodes in the recipient node. On the sender node, the packages are rejected because the collisions occur due to improperly functioning access channel allocation mechanisms. It can be concluded that the routing protocols created for a normal MANET networks is useless in a fast-changing topology large-scale vehicle communication network. To provide heterogeneous services new routing protocols and channel access methods are needed, specifically for vehicle communication networks.

  15. Evaluation of Data Transfer Performance Between Moving Sender and Receiver in Mobile Communication Networks for Heterogeneous Service Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalė Dzemydienė

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vehicular communication networks are acquiring more and more commercial relevance because of recent advances in inter-vehicular communications via the DSRC/WAVE standard, which stimulates a brand new family of visionary services for vehicles, from road safety to entertainment and multimedia applications. After deep analysis of the literature it was decided to investigate evaluation of data transfer performance between moving sender and receiver in mobile communication network for heterogeneous service support. After careful analysis of the simulation tools the NCTUns 6.0 software package was chosen for planned investigations. The results illustrate that the longest communication can be maintained at the maximum number of vehicles participating on the network, but the quality of communication is inversely proportional to the number of vehicles. On this changing topology network when growing number of nodes (vehicles increases flooding of network with the data packages and it determines many collisions. The number of rejected packages increases directly in proportion to the number of vehicles. When the number of nodes (vehicle increases—it is increasing the number of the received same packages which are received from different nodes in the recipient node. On the sender node, the packages are rejected because the collisions occur due to improperly functioning access channel allocation mechanisms. It can be concluded that the routing protocols created for a normal MANET networks is useless in a fast-changing topology large-scale vehicle communication network. To provide heterogeneous services new routing protocols and channel access methods are needed, specifically for vehicle communication networks.

  16. HIV Care Providers' Attitudes regarding Mobile Phone Applications and Web-Based Dashboards to support Patient Self-Management and Care Coordination: Results from a Qualitative Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendeman, Dallas; Farmer, Shu; Mindry, Deborah; Lee, Sung-Jae; Medich, Melissa

    2016-10-01

    In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with healthcare providers (HCPs) from five HIV medical care coordination teams in a large Los Angeles County HIV clinic, including physicians, nurses, and psychosocial services providers. HCPs reported on the potential utility, acceptability, and barriers for patient self-monitoring and notifications via mobile phones, and web-based dashboards for HCPs. Potential benefits included: 1) enhancing patient engagement, motivation, adherence, and self-management; and 2) improving provider-patient relationships and HCP care coordination. Newly diagnosed and patients with co-morbidities were highest priorities for mobile application support. Facilitators included universal mobile phone ownership and use of smartphones or text messaging. Patient-level barriers included concerns about low motivation and financial instability for consistent use by some patients. Organizational barriers, cited primarily by physicians, included concerns about privacy protections, easy dashboard access, non-integrated electronic records, and competing burdens in limited appointment times. Psychosocial services providers were most supportive of the proposed mobile tools.

  17. HIV Care Providers’ Attitudes regarding Mobile Phone Applications and Web-Based Dashboards to support Patient Self-Management and Care Coordination: Results from a Qualitative Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendeman, Dallas; Farmer, Shu; Mindry, Deborah; Lee, Sung-Jae; Medich, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with healthcare providers (HCPs) from five HIV medical care coordination teams in a large Los Angeles County HIV clinic, including physicians, nurses, and psychosocial services providers. HCPs reported on the potential utility, acceptability, and barriers for patient self-monitoring and notifications via mobile phones, and web-based dashboards for HCPs. Potential benefits included: 1) enhancing patient engagement, motivation, adherence, and self-management; and 2) improving provider-patient relationships and HCP care coordination. Newly diagnosed and patients with co-morbidities were highest priorities for mobile application support. Facilitators included universal mobile phone ownership and use of smartphones or text messaging. Patient-level barriers included concerns about low motivation and financial instability for consistent use by some patients. Organizational barriers, cited primarily by physicians, included concerns about privacy protections, easy dashboard access, non-integrated electronic records, and competing burdens in limited appointment times. Psychosocial services providers were most supportive of the proposed mobile tools. PMID:28066820

  18. Deployment and use of mobile phone technology for real-time reporting of fever cases and malaria treatment failure in areas of declining malaria transmission in Muheza district north-eastern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Filbert; Ishengoma, Deus S; Mmbando, Bruno P; Rutta, Acleus S M; Malecela, Mwelecele N; Mayala, Benjamin; Lemnge, Martha M; Michael, Edwin

    2017-08-01

    Early detection of febrile illnesses at community level is essential for improved malaria case management and control. Currently, mobile phone-based technology has been commonly used to collect and transfer health information and services in different settings. This study assessed the applicability of mobile phone-based technology in real-time reporting of fever cases and management of malaria by village health workers (VHWs) in north-eastern Tanzania. The community mobile phone-based disease surveillance and treatment for malaria (ComDSTM) platform, combined with mobile phones and web applications, was developed and implemented in three villages and one dispensary in Muheza district from November 2013 to October 2014. A baseline census was conducted in May 2013. The data were uploaded on a web-based database and updated during follow-up home visits by VHWs. Active and passive case detection (ACD, PCD) of febrile cases were done by VHWs and cases found positive by malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) were given the first dose of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) at the dispensary. Each patient was visited at home by VHWs daily for the first 3 days to supervise intake of anti-malarial and on day 7 to monitor the recovery process. The data were captured and transmitted to the database using mobile phones. The baseline population in the three villages was 2934 in 678 households. A total of 1907 febrile cases were recorded by VHWs and 1828 (95.9%) were captured using mobile phones. At the dispensary, 1778 (93.2%) febrile cases were registered and of these, 84.2% were captured through PCD. Positivity rates were 48.2 and 45.8% by RDT and microscopy, respectively. Nine cases had treatment failure reported on day 7 post-treatment and adherence to treatment was 98%. One patient with severe febrile illness was referred to Muheza district hospital. The study showed that mobile phone-based technology can be successfully used by VHWs in surveillance and timely reporting of fever

  19. Understanding consumer health information-seeking behavior from the perspective of the risk perception attitude framework and social support in mobile social media websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhaohua; Liu, Shan

    2017-09-01

    This study integrates the risk perception attitude framework and social support to examine factors influencing consumers' intentions to seek health information in mobile social media websites. We develop a research model consisting of four social support dimensions, perceived health risk, health self-efficacy, and health information-seeking intention. A survey is conducted among patients with non-serious conditions. A two-step approach of structural equation modeling is used to test the research model. Among the four dimensions of social support, tangible support and appraisal support significantly influence perceived risk, whereas emotional support and esteem support significantly influence health self-efficacy. Perceived health risk and health self-efficacy significantly influence the health information-seeking behavior intention of consumers. Specifically, health self-efficacy significantly moderates the relationship between perceived risk and behavior intention. This study highlights the integrated effects of social capital and risk perception attitude framework on health information-seeking intention. It examines relationships among perceived health risk, health self-efficacy, and behavior intention in the mobile social media context. The findings help understand effects of social capital factors on perceived health risk and health self-efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.