WorldWideScience

Sample records for denver service center

  1. The changing face of academic health centers: a path forward for the University of Colorado Denver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M Roy; Krugman, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    This article describes a decade of major changes at an academic health center (AHC) and university. The authors describe two major changes undertaken at the University of Colorado and its AHC during the past 10 years and the effects of these changes on the organization as a whole. First, the AHC's four health professional schools and two partner hospitals were completely relocated from a space-limited urban campus to a closed Army base. The impact of that change and the management of its potential disruption of academic programs are discussed in detail. In the middle of this total relocation, the AHC campus was consolidated with a general academic campus within the University of Colorado system, compounding the challenge. The authors describe the strategies employed to implement this major consolidation, including changing the organizational structure and selecting the new name of the university--the University of Colorado Denver.

  2. Building America Case Study: New Town Builders' Power of Zero Energy Center, Denver, Colorado (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-10-01

    New Town Builders, a builder of energy efficient homes in Denver, Colorado, offers a zero energy option for all the homes it builds. To attract a wide range of potential homebuyers to its energy efficient homes, New Town Builders created a 'Power of Zero Energy Center' linked to its model home in the Stapleton community of Denver. This case study presents New Town Builders' marketing approach, which is targeted to appeal to homebuyers' emotions rather than overwhelming homebuyers with scientific details about the technology. The exhibits in the Power of Zero Energy Center focus on reduced energy expenses for the homeowner, improved occupant comfort, the reputation of the builder, and the lack of sacrificing the homebuyers' desired design features to achieve zero net energy in the home. The case study also contains customer and realtor testimonials related to the effectiveness of the Center in influencing homebuyers to purchase a zero energy home.

  3. 76 FR 9598 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone...

  4. 76 FR 9597 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone...

  5. 76 FR 9603 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone...

  6. 75 FR 23807 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human.... Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 2001 (9)-(10...

  7. 75 FR 5627 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human... of Indians, Oklahoma. Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science have determined that...

  8. 75 FR 70027 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY... of human remains in the possession of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human... remains are determined to be Native American. Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science have...

  9. 76 FR 43709 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... may contact the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. Repatriation of the human remains and associated...

  10. 77 FR 23504 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Museum of Nature & Science has... may contact the Denver Museum of Nature & Science. Repatriation of the human remains and associated...

  11. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: New Town Builders' Power of Zero Energy Center - Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-10-01

    New Town Builders, a builder of energy efficient homes in Denver, Colorado, offers a zero energy option for all the homes it builds. To attract a wide range of potential homebuyers to its energy efficient homes, New Town Builders created a "Power of Zero Energy Center" linked to its model home in the Stapleton community. This case study presents New Town Builders' marketing approach, which is targeted to appeal to homebuyers' emotions rather than overwhelming homebuyers with scientific details about the technology. The exhibits in the Power of Zero Energy Center focus on reduced energy expenses for the homeowner, improved occupant comfort, the reputation of the builder, and the lack of sacrificing the homebuyers' desired design features to achieve zero net energy in the home. This case study also contains customer and realtor testimonials related to the effectiveness of the Center in influencing homebuyers to purchase a zero energy home.

  12. 78 FR 72710 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Denver Art Museum, in consultation with the... this notice meet the definition of sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony. Lineal...

  13. 75 FR 55823 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO... Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed... Museum of Nature & Science collections. In the Federal Register of July 22, 2010, paragraph number 4...

  14. 78 FR 45961 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver... of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate... Denver Museum of Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the...

  15. Flexibility the Key. Auraria Book Center Serves Three Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Jude

    1977-01-01

    The Book Center provides services to the Community College of Denver at Auraria, Metropolitan State College, and the University of Colorado at Denver, as well as the greater Denver community. Its interior design is detailed with emphasis on its flexibility. (LBH)

  16. Early diagnosis and Early Start Denver Model intervention in autism spectrum disorders delivered in an Italian Public Health System service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devescovi R

    2016-06-01

    . Particularly in toddlers, it seems that an intervention model based on the ESDM principles, involving the active engagement of parents and nursery school teachers, may be effective even when the individual treatment is delivered at low intensity. Furthermore, our study supports the adaptation and the positive impact of the ESDM entirely sustained by the Italian Public Health System. Keywords: early diagnosis, early intervention, autism spectrum disorder, Early Start Denver Model, Public Health System service

  17. The DLESE Community Services Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, E.; Aivazian, B.; Manduca, C.; Mogk, D.

    2003-12-01

    The DLESE Community Services Center (DCSC) is one of several centers recently funded by the National Science Foundation to promote greater and more effective use of Digital Library resources. The primary goals of the DCSC are to: (1) increase the current resource user and contributor base to include greater numbers of K-12, informal, and college educators and students, (2) diversify the DLESE user and contributor base to include rich and robust representation of ethnic, cultural, and differently-abled groups, (3) improve the ability of users and contributors to easily find, adapt, and use high quality digital resources in their classrooms, laboratories, and communities and (4) demonstrate how DLESE can support community activity addressing issues in geoscience education. During the course of the next three years we will: (a) solicit, create, and disseminate "exemplars" that highlight effective digital resource use in a variety of diverse educational settings, (b) continue to support and promote on-line DLESE community services, and (c) work to develop a DLESE ambassadors outreach program involving educators, scientists, and students working across the Earth, space, and environmental sciences. Collaborations with the DLESE Evaluation and Data Centers, collection builders, the DLESE Program Center staff, as well as diverse audience groups will be a key focus of our efforts. We invite you to join us as we work to build and support the next generation of digital services and resources for educators and students at all levels.

  18. 77 FR 23502 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, has completed...

  19. 78 FR 45962 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, Denver... of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in... of Anthropology. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer of control of the human...

  20. Counseling Services in Adult Day Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Gamal; Zaki, Sylvia

    Federal support for adult day care centers began in the United States approximately 10 years ago. To examine the counseling practices in the adult day care centers across the country and to explore how the services are affected by the staffing patterns at these centers, 135 centers completed a questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed…

  1. Denver TMA assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Kelly; Sanford, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the assessment of the Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) conducted at the Denver Center and TRACON, January 11-February 5, 1993. The assessment addressed the effectiveness of TMA for supporting various traffic management activities. At the Center, traffic management coordinators (TMC's) shadowed traffic operations, using TMA to make metering time and internal release decisions. At the TRACON, TMC's accessed TMA in an advisory mode for different planning activities such as staffing, distributing the traffic load, and changing the airport acceptance rate. These different opportunities for assessing TMA provide insight into TMA as a potential communication aid and planning tool. Findings from this assessment indicate that TMA can be used to support traffic management planning and decisions. TMC's at the center were able to use information provided by TMA to determine metering times as well as internal release times. At the TRACON, TMA supported decisions on airport configuration, airport acceptance rate, load distribution, proactive coordination with the center, and staffing. While findings of TMA use are generally positive, it must be kept in mind that this assessment is a snapshot in time. Not all TMA capabilities were assessed, nor were TMC's fully trained and knowledgeable on all features. Feature use will continue to evolve and strategies emerge as the TMC's gain experience with TMA over a variety of traffic situations and their understanding of TMA capabilities broadens with continued training.

  2. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  3. Information Systems, Services, and Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Herman M.

    Following an introduction providing background on the role of information, modern methods of information transfer and the theoretical bases of information systems are described. A second section deals with practical aspects of information services practices and operational management problems. A final section examines the specialized character of…

  4. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Portuguese Translation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    This is a Portuguese translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center Services fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  5. 78 FR 64007 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology has corrected an inventory of...

  6. Modern Data Center Services Supporting Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, J. D.; Cartwright, J.; McLean, S. J.; Boucher, J.; Neufeld, D.; LaRocque, J.; Fischman, D.; McQuinn, E.; Fugett, C.

    2011-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) World Data Center for Geophysics and Marine Geology provides scientific stewardship, products and services for geophysical data, including bathymetry, gravity, magnetics, seismic reflection, data derived from sediment and rock samples, as well as historical natural hazards data (tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanoes). Although NGDC has long made many of its datasets available through map and other web services, it has now developed a second generation of services to improve the discovery and access to data. These new services use off-the-shelf commercial and open source software, and take advantage of modern JavaScript and web application frameworks. Services are accessible using both RESTful and SOAP queries as well as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standard protocols such as WMS, WFS, WCS, and KML. These new map services (implemented using ESRI ArcGIS Server) are finer-grained than their predecessors, feature improved cartography, and offer dramatic speed improvements through the use of map caches. Using standards-based interfaces allows customers to incorporate the services without having to coordinate with the provider. Providing fine-grained services increases flexibility for customers building custom applications. The Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping program and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning program are two examples of national initiatives that require common data inventories from multiple sources and benefit from these modern data services. NGDC is also consuming its own services, providing a set of new browser-based mapping applications which allow the user to quickly visualize and search for data. One example is a new interactive mapping application to search and display information about historical natural hazards. NGDC continues to increase the amount of its data holdings that are accessible and is augmenting the capabilities with modern web

  7. Women's health centers and specialized services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, E K; Taylor, S L

    1996-01-01

    More than 75% of the female respondents in this study would choose a women's health center (WHC) over a standard health facility. Women who worked outside the home perceived a greater WHC need. And almost all respondents were interested in communications from the center via a quarterly newsletter. Significant test results related to age, income, education, and work status as segmentation variables, offering WHC's an opportunity to target their patients with specialized services such as cosmetic surgery, infertility treatment, breast imaging, etc. If enough resources are allocated, a WHC can design itself to attract highly lucrative patients. Little difference was found in the opinions of women regarding the need for a WHC or the core services desired, but the specific service mix decision must be carefully considered when designing a WHC.

  8. 77 FR 5837 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... the cultural items may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum...

  9. 78 FR 19308 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Museum of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that... University of Denver Museum of Anthropology. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it...

  10. Modeling Road Traffic Using Service Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARAGOS, I.-M.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Transport systems have an essential role in modern society because they facilitate access to natural resources and they stimulate trade. Current studies aimed at improving transport networks by developing new methods for optimization. Because of the increase in the global number of cars, one of the most common problems facing the transport network is congestion. By creating traffic models and simulate them, we can avoid this problem and find appropriate solutions. In this paper we propose a new method for modeling traffic. This method considers road intersections as being service centers. A service center represents a set consisting of a queue followed by one or multiple servers. This model was used to simulate real situations in an urban traffic area. Based on this simulation, we have successfully determined the optimal functioning and we have computed the performance measures.

  11. Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services (CSELS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services (CSELS) is to provide scientific service, expertise, skills, and tools in support of...

  12. Supercomputing Centers and Electricity Service Providers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patki, Tapasya; Bates, Natalie; Ghatikar, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Supercomputing Centers (SCs) have high and variable power demands, which increase the challenges of the Electricity Service Providers (ESPs) with regards to efficient electricity distribution and reliable grid operation. High penetration of renewable energy generation further exacerbates this pro......Supercomputing Centers (SCs) have high and variable power demands, which increase the challenges of the Electricity Service Providers (ESPs) with regards to efficient electricity distribution and reliable grid operation. High penetration of renewable energy generation further exacerbates...... from a detailed, quantitative survey-based analysis and compare the perspectives of the European grid and SCs to the ones of the United States (US). We then show that contrary to the expectation, SCs in the US are more open toward cooperating and developing demand-management strategies with their ESPs...... (LRZ). We conclude that perspectives on demand management are dependent on the electricity market and pricing in the geographical region and on the degree of control that a particular SC has in terms of power-purchase negotiation....

  13. 77 FR 5839 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... item may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology....

  14. 77 FR 23501 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Item: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation... with the cultural item may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum...

  15. [Development and application of hospital customer service center platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minya; Zheng, Konglin; Xia, Yong

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the construction and application of the platform of client service center in the general hospital and discusses how to provide patients with an entire service including service before clinic, on clinic and after clinic. It can also provide references for a new service mode for clinic service.

  16. 47 CFR 25.284 - Emergency Call Center Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency Call Center Service. 25.284 Section... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Operations § 25.284 Emergency Call Center Service. (a) Providers of mobile satellite service to end-user customers (part 25, subparts A-D) must provide Emergency Call...

  17. Cloud services on an astronomy data center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, Mauricio; Araya, Mauricio; Farias, Humberto; Mardones, Diego; Wang, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    The research on computational methods for astronomy performed by the first phase of the Chilean Virtual Observatory (ChiVO) led to the development of functional prototypes, implementing state-of-the-art computational methods and proposing new algorithms and techniques. The ChiVO software architecture is based on the use of the IVOA protocols and standards. These protocols and standards are grouped in layers, with emphasis on the application and data layers, because their basic standards define the minimum operation that a VO should conduct. As momentary verification, the current implementation works with a set of data, with 1 TB capacity, which comes from the reduction of the cycle 0 of ALMA. This research was mainly focused on spectroscopic data cubes coming from the cycle 0 ALMA's public data. As the dataset size increases when the cycle 1 ALMA's public data is also increasing every month, data processing is becoming a major bottleneck for scientific research in astronomy. When designing the ChiVO, we focused on improving both computation and I/ O costs, and this led us to configure a data center with 424 high speed cores of 2,6 GHz, 1 PB of storage (distributed in hard disk drives-HDD and solid state drive-SSD) and high speed communication Infiniband. We are developing a cloud based e-infrastructure for ChiVO services, in order to have a coherent framework for developing novel web services for on-line data processing in the ChiVO. We are currently parallelizing these new algorithms and techniques using HPC tools to speed up big data processing, and we will report our results in terms of data size, data distribution, number of cores and response time, in order to compare different processing and storage configurations.

  18. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Arabic Translation) (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-06-01

    This is the Arabic translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center Services fact sheet. The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  19. Tri-Service Center for Oral Health Studies (TSCOHS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tri-Service Center for Oral Health Studies (TSCOHS), a service of the Postgraduate Dental College, is chartered by the Department of Defense TRICARE Management...

  20. Transitioning from Curriculum Materials Center to School Library Media Center in Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Gail; Cogdell, Edna A.; Gavigan, Karin

    2004-01-01

    Pre-service teachers use Curriculum Materials Centers (CMCs) to find resources to use in assignments for college-level pre-service coursework and to use in practice teaching with PK-12 students. CMCs that visually and environmentally resemble school library media centers can transition pre-service CMC users into classroom teachers who use school…

  1. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-04-01

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  2. Consumer drop-in centers: operations, services, and consumer involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Carol T; Robinson, Elizabeth A R; Holter, Mark C

    2002-11-01

    Interest in involvement of consumers in mental health and psychiatric rehabilitation services delivery has expanded in recent years, encompassing self-help approaches, consumers employed as providers in formal agencies, and consumers operating their own services. This study reports results from in-depth phone surveys conducted with 32 consumer drop-in centers in Michigan. Results indicate that centers operate in many ways like other human services businesses, albeit with much smaller budgets. Funding levels, salaries, and services showed great heterogeneity among the centers and in comparison with reports in the literature. Centers autonomously run by consumers and centers with consumer involvement (operated by a non-consumer agency) were found to differ significantly on several variables, including consumer control, funding and service levels, and challenges. Implications for the growth and increased use of consumer drop-in centers are discussed.

  3. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (French Translation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    This is a French translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  4. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Arabic Translation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    This is an Arabic translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  5. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Vietnamese Translation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    This is a Vietnamese translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  6. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Chinese Translation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    This is a Mandarin translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center fact sheet. The Solutions Center offers no-cost expert policy assistance, webinars and training forums, clean energy policy reports, data, and tools provided in partnership with more than 35 leading international and regional clean energy organizations.

  7. Preschool Developmental Screening with Denver II Test in Semi-Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eratay, Emine; Bayoglu, Birgül; Anlar, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and reliability of screening semi-urban preschool children with Denver II, developmental and neurological status was examined in relation with one-year outcome. Methodology: Denver II developmental screening test was applied to 583 children who visited family physicians or other health centers in a province of…

  8. Student Centered Financial Services: Innovations That Succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsabaugh, Nancy, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This collection of best practices shares how 18 higher education institutions across the country have successfully evaluated and redesigned their student financial services programs to improve services to students and their parents and find cost savings for the institution. This volume illustrates how other institutions have successfully tackled…

  9. Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are the hospital's statistics for cesarean sections, episiotomies, and mortality? (Keep in mind, though, that these ... What are the center's statistics for hospital transfers, episiotomies, and mortality? What procedures are followed after your ...

  10. 76 FR 17444 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... (History Colorado), Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from Howiri Ruin (LA 71), Taos County, NM...), Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in accordance... Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque,...

  11. 76 FR 28071 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ...), Denver, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in accordance... (History Colorado), Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from Canyon de Chelly, AZ. This notice is... Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New...

  12. Assessing uncertainty in outsourcing clinical services at tertiary health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, John E; Pai, Chih-Wen; Spahlinger, David A

    2007-01-01

    When tertiary health centers face capacity constraint, one feasible strategy to meet service demand is outsourcing clinical services to qualified community providers. Clinical outsourcing enables tertiary health centers to meet the expectations of service timeliness and provides good opportunities to collaborate with other health care providers. However, outsourcing may result in dependence and loss of control for the tertiary health centers. Other parties involved in clinical outsourcing such as local partners, patients, and payers may also encounter potential risks as well as enjoy benefits in an outsourcing arrangement. Recommendations on selecting potential outsourcing partners are given to minimize the risks associated with an outsourcing contract.

  13. Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessary to treat sick babies and moms. A birth center can provide natural pain control and pain control with mild narcotic medications, ... be an option. Women who want a natural birth with minimal medical intervention or pain control may feel more comfortable in a birth ...

  14. Maintenance Centered Service Parts Inventory Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.L. van Jaarsveld (Willem)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHigh-tech capital goods enable the production of many services and articles that have become a part of our daily lives. Examples include the refineries that produce the gasoline we put in our cars, the photolithography systems that enable the production of the chips in our cell phones a

  15. China Petroleum Information Technology Service Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) is one of the world's leading integrated energy companies. Its business covers a broad spectrum of upstream and downstream activities, oil and gas engineering technical services, and equipment manufacturing and supply.CNPC ranks 9th among the world's top 50 petroleum companies and rates 39th in Global 500.

  16. Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) is the home (archive) of Precipitation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics, and...

  17. Health Services Cost Analyzing in Tabriz Health Centers 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massumeh gholizadeh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : Health Services cost analyzing is an important management tool for evidence-based decision making in health system. This study was conducted with the purpose of cost analyzing and identifying the proportion of different factors on total cost of health services that are provided in urban health centers in Tabriz. Material and Methods : This study was a descriptive and analytic study. Activity Based Costing method (ABC was used for cost analyzing. This cross–sectional survey analyzed and identified the proportion of different factors on total cost of health services that are provided in Tabriz urban health centers. The statistical population of this study was comprised of urban community health centers in Tabriz. In this study, a multi-stage sampling method was used to collect data. Excel software was used for data analyzing. The results were described with tables and graphs. Results : The study results showed the portion of different factors in various health services. Human factors by 58%, physical space 8%, medical equipment 1.3% were allocated with high portion of expenditures and costs of health services in Tabriz urban health centers. Conclusion : Based on study results, since the human factors included the highest portion of health services costs and expenditures in Tabriz urban health centers, balancing workload with staff number, institutionalizing performance-based management and using multidisciplinary staffs may lead to reduced costs of services. ​

  18. 76 FR 58032 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    .... History and Description of the Cultural Item The cultural item is a wooden hat (AC.11506) in the shape of... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Denver Museum of Nature and Science... & Science, in consultation with the appropriate Indian Tribe, has determined that a cultural item meets...

  19. Family-Centered Services by Choice Not Chance: Getting beyond Piecemeal Services for Families in Need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freado, Mark D.

    1996-01-01

    Provides suggestions for transitioning to family-centered services. Discusses how to establish commitments from schools and agencies, how to bring staff into the process of change, how to develop family-centered initiatives, how to provide appropriate training for staff, ways to overcome resistance, and strategies for matching services to need.…

  20. City and County of Denver Off Post Water Quality Monitoring Station : 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This memorandum encloses a letter and drawings from the City and County of Denver showing the design and location of the Off Post Water Quality Monitoring Station on...

  1. The potential effects of Rocky Mountain Arsenal cleanup and Denver metropolitan transportation development on bald eagles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Army's Rocky Mountain Arsenal and Colorado's Barr Lake State Park provide habitats which support wintering and nesting bald eagles near metropolitan Denver,...

  2. Sexual Abuse: Therapeutic & Systems Considerations for the Child and Family. [Report of] Colorado State Department of Social Services Conference (Denver, Colorado, July 7-8, 1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Claudia A., Ed.; Gottlieb, Bruce, Ed.

    This publication presents papers from a 1982 child sexual abuse conference sponsored by the Colorado State Department of Social Services, designed to identify major issues and trends and to stimulate the exchange of perspectives and practices among persons concerned about preventing and treating child sexual abuse. The first section of the…

  3. Hospital image and the positioning of service centers: an application in market analysis and strategy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S M; Clark, M

    1990-09-01

    The research confirms the coexistence of different images for hospitals, service centers within the same hospitals, and service programs offered by each of the service centers. The images of individual service centers are found not to be tied to the image of the host facility. Further, service centers and host facilities have differential rankings on the same service decision attributes. Managerial recommendations are offered for "image differentiation" between a hospital and its care centers.

  4. Experience with Server Self Service Center (S3C)

    CERN Document Server

    Sucik, J; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2010-01-01

    CERN has a successful experience with running Server Self Service Center (S3C) for virtual server provisioning which is based on Microsoft® Virtual Server 2005. With the introduction of Windows Server 2008 and its built-in hypervisor based virtualization (Hyper-V) there are new possibilities for the expansion of the current service. This paper describes the architecture of the redesigned virtual Server Self Service based on Hyper-V which provides dynamically scalable virtualized resources on demand as needed and outlines the possible implications on the future use of virtual machines at CERN.

  5. Experience with Server Self Service Center (S3C)

    CERN Multimedia

    Sucik, J

    2009-01-01

    CERN has a successful experience with running Server Self Service Center (S3C) for virtual server provisioning which is based on Microsoft® Virtual Server 2005. With the introduction of Windows Server 2008 and its built-in hypervisor based virtualization (Hyper-V) there are new possibilities for the expansion of the current service. This paper describes the architecture of the redesigned virtual Server Self Service based on Hyper-V which provides dynamically scalable virtualized resources on demand as needed and outlines the possible implications on the future use of virtual machines at CERN.

  6. The history of aggregate development in the denver, Co area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    At the start of the 20th century Denver's population was 203,795. Most streets were unpaved. Buildings were constructed of wood frame or masonry. Transport was by horse-drawn-wagon or rail. Statewide, aggregate consumption was less than 0.25 metric tons per person per year. One hundred years later Denver had a population of 2,365,345. Today Denver is a major metropolitan area at the crossroads of two interstates, home to a new international airport, and in the process of expanding its light rail transit system. The skyline is punctuated with skyscrapers. The urban center is surrounded with edge cities. These changes required huge amounts of aggregate. Statewide, aggregate consumption increased 50 fold to over 13 metric tons per person per year. Denver has a large potential supply of aggregate, but sand and gravel quality decreases downstream from the mountain front and potential sources of crushed stone occur in areas prized for their scenic beauty. These issues, along with urban encroachment and citizen opposition, have complicated aggregate development and have paved a new path for future aggregate development including sustainable resource management and reclamation techniques.

  7. NOAA Coastal Services Center Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: National Weather Service Forecast Office - Wilmington (ILM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center's efforts to create an online mapping viewer called...

  8. Denver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branscombe, Art

    1977-01-01

    Notes that Denverites are proud that they have accomplished school desegregation with little or no violence. School enrollment statistics, however, indicate that one effect of desegregation has been a movement to the suburbs or to private schools. (Author/AM)

  9. Atmospheric Composition Data and Information Services Center (ACDISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, S.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's GSFC Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information and Data Services Center (DISC) manages the archive, distribution and data access for atmospheric composition data from AURA'S OMI, MLS, and hopefully one day, HIRDLS instruments, as well as heritage datasets from TOMS, UARS, MODIS, and AIRS. This data is currently archived in the GES Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The GES DISC has begun the development of a community driven data management system that's sole purpose is to manage and provide value added services to NASA's Atmospheric Composition (AC) Data. This system, called the Atmospheric Composition Data and Information Services Center (ACDISC) will provide access all AC datasets from the above mentioned instruments, as well as AC datasets residing at remote archive sites (e.g, LaRC DAAC) The goals of the ACDISC are to: 1) Provide a data center for Atmospheric Scientists, guided by Atmospheric Scientists; 2) Be absolutely responsive to the data and data service needs of the Atmospheric Composition (AC) community; 3) Provide services (i.e., expertise) that will facilitate the effortless access to and usage of AC data; 4) Collaborate with AC scientists to facilitate the use of data from multiple sensors for long term atmospheric research. The ACDISC is an AC specific, user driven, multi-sensor, on-line, easy access archive and distribution system employing data analysis and visualization, data mining, and other user requested techniques that facilitate science data usage. The purpose of this presentation is to provide the evolution path that the GES DISC in order to better serve AC data, and also to receive continued community feedback and further foster collaboration with AC data users and providers.

  10. Situation of Drug Information Centers and Services in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall V

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available PAHO establishes guidelines that must be met by drug information centers (DIC and the drug information services (DIS. Objective: To describe the operations, activities, and resources of the DICs and the DISs affiliated with public institutions of Costa Rica, and their adjustment to the provisions set forth by the PAHO. Methods: Descriptive study conducted in May 2003. The officers in charge of each of the seven public DICs or DISs in Costa Rica were interviewed, and inquiries were made regarding aspects of the structure and process of their centers. Results: In Costa Rica there are seven public drug information units, that is, four DICs and three DISs. One of the DICs is located in this university, and the remaining six centers and services are in located in hospitals. Five of the centers do not have the primary sources required by the PAHO. Fifteen out of the 36 tertiary sources recommended are not available in any of the centers. 100% of the information units carry out four main activities: answering inquiries from the hospital community, answering inquiries from users outside the hospital, implementing education programs for patients and risk groups, and rotation programs for student training. Conclusions: The activities developed by the DISs and the DICs in Costa Rica are similar to each other; they respond not only to the PAHO’s guidelines, but they also have similarities with the activities and operations of other DICs worldwide. Primary, secondary, and tertiary bibliographical support must be strengthened.

  11. National Center for Standards and Certification Information: Service and programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Joanne

    1994-01-01

    The National Center for Standards and Certification Information (NCSCI) provides information on U.S., foreign and international voluntary standards, government regulations, and conformity assessment procedures for non-agricultural products. The Center serves as a referral service and focal point in the United States for information on standards and standards-related information. NCSCI staff respond to inquiries, maintain a reference collection of standards and standards-related documents, and serve as the U.S. inquiry point for information to and from foreign countries.

  12. Northern California Earthquake Data Center: Data Sets and Data Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, D. S.; Allen, R. M.; Zuzlewski, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) provides a permanent archive and real-time data distribution services for a unique and comprehensive data set of seismological and geophysical data sets encompassing northern and central California. We provide access to over 85 terabytes of continuous and event-based time series data from broadband, short-period, strong motion, and strain sensors as well as continuous and campaign GPS data at both standard and high sample rates. The Northen California Seismic System (NCSS), operated by UC Berkeley and USGS Menlo Park, has recorded over 900,000 events from 1984 to the present, and the NCEDC serves catalog, parametric information, moment tensors and first motion mechanisms, and time series data for these events. We also serve event catalogs, parametric information, and event waveforms for DOE enhanced geothermal system monitoring in northern California and Nevada. The NCEDC provides a several ways for users to access these data. The most recent development are web services, which provide interactive, command-line, or program-based workflow access to data. Web services use well-established server and client protocols and RESTful software architecture that allow users to easily submit queries and receive the requested data in real-time rather than through batch or email-based requests. Data are returned to the user in the appropriate format such as XML, RESP, simple text, or MiniSEED depending on the service and selected output format. The NCEDC supports all FDSN-defined web services as well as a number of IRIS-defined and NCEDC-defined services. We also continue to support older email-based and browser-based access to data. NCEDC data and web services can be found at http://www.ncedc.org and http://service.ncedc.org.

  13. The greater Denver Latino Cancer Prevention/Control Network. Prevention and research through a community-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Estevan; Espinoza, Paula; Jacobellis, Jillian; Bakemeier, Richard; Press, Norma

    2006-10-15

    The Latino/a Research & Policy Center (LRPC), at the University of Colorado (UC) at Denver and Health Sciences Center built the Greater Denver Latino Cancer Prevention Network, a successful cancer prevention network, in 6 Denver metro area counties. The Network consisted of 23 Latino community-based organizations, health clinics, social service agencies, faith-based groups, and employee-based organizations; 2 migrant health clinics; and 14 scientific partners including the UC Comprehensive Cancer Center, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and the American Cancer Society. The Network focused on 5 significant cancers: breast, cervical, lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. The Steering Committee initiated a review process for junior researchers that resulted in 5 NCI-funded pilot projects. Pilot projects were conducted with various Latino populations. The Network developed community education and health promotion projects including the bilingual outreach play The Cancer Monologues. The Network's partnership also started and held 2 annual health fairs, Dia de la Mujer Latina/Day of the Latina Woman, and annual health prevention summits. The Special Population Network (SPN) adapted and revised a clinical trials education outreach module that reached Network community partners. SPN partners recruited Latino/a students to cancer research through a6-week NCI training program held yearly at the UCHSC campus. The Network methodology of bringing together the Latino community with the scientific community increased the level of awareness of cancer in the Latino community and increased cancer research and the level of engagement of the scientific partners with the Latino community. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society.

  14. Predictors of consumer satisfaction in community mental health center services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Minji; Barrett, Hope; Talbert, Jeffery

    2014-11-01

    Kentucky Department for Behavioral Health Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities conducted a survey to evaluate consumers' satisfaction with services delivered at the Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) in Kentucky. The survey was administered at outpatient clinics operated by fourteen CMHCs in 2010. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that predict whether clients will respond that they were "generally satisfied" with services received from CMHCs. A logistic regression model was developed using respondents' characteristics and their responses to survey questions. Survey questions were grouped into seven core domains: general satisfaction, access, quality, participation in treatment planning, outcomes, functioning, and social connectedness. In result, responses to domains of access, quality and participation in treatment planning significantly affected clients' perception of general satisfaction. Respondents who positively assessed those domains of services were more likely to answer that they were generally satisfied with services. Based on the analysis in this report, improvement in certain domains of services, especially access, quality and participation in treatment planning could increase the level of positive responses in general satisfaction.

  15. Study of Construction of Personalized Service Oriented Government Virtual Information Service Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed the idea of personalized information service for enterprises and customers through government visual information service center (GVISC). It discusses an extensible, reusable, reconstructive and integrated framework of GVISC with new techniques, such as XML, agent, data mining and information portal. They include the design and analysis of the logical structure, the design of the data layer, and the description of the function application. We show an example of personalized informa...

  16. NASA Space Weather Center Services: Potential for Space Weather Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Masha; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Chulaki, A.; Lee, H.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Space Weather Center's primary objective is to provide the latest space weather information and forecasting for NASA's robotic missions and its partners and to bring space weather knowledge to the public. At the same time, the tools and services it possesses can be invaluable for research purposes. Here we show how our archive and real-time modeling of space weather events can aid research in a variety of ways, with different classification criteria. We will list and discuss major CME events, major geomagnetic storms, and major SEP events that occurred during the years 2010 - 2012. Highlights of major tools/resources will be provided.

  17. Analysis of the Denver Developmental Screening Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, James N.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to validate the Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST), the scores were compared with selected demographic, health history, and physical examination variables of migrant and seasonal farmworkers' preschool children in Colorado. (NQ)

  18. Optimization for Service Routes of Pallet Service Center Based on the Pallet Pool Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shiwei; Song, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Service routes optimization (SRO) of pallet service center should meet customers' demand firstly and then, through the reasonable method of lines organization, realize the shortest path of vehicle driving. The routes optimization of pallet service center is similar to the distribution problems of vehicle routing problem (VRP) and Chinese postman problem (CPP), but it has its own characteristics. Based on the relevant research results, the conditions of determining the number of vehicles, the one way of the route, the constraints of loading, and time windows are fully considered, and a chance constrained programming model with stochastic constraints is constructed taking the shortest path of all vehicles for a delivering (recycling) operation as an objective. For the characteristics of the model, a hybrid intelligent algorithm including stochastic simulation, neural network, and immune clonal algorithm is designed to solve the model. Finally, the validity and rationality of the optimization model and algorithm are verified by the case. PMID:27528865

  19. Optimization for Service Routes of Pallet Service Center Based on the Pallet Pool Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Service routes optimization (SRO of pallet service center should meet customers’ demand firstly and then, through the reasonable method of lines organization, realize the shortest path of vehicle driving. The routes optimization of pallet service center is similar to the distribution problems of vehicle routing problem (VRP and Chinese postman problem (CPP, but it has its own characteristics. Based on the relevant research results, the conditions of determining the number of vehicles, the one way of the route, the constraints of loading, and time windows are fully considered, and a chance constrained programming model with stochastic constraints is constructed taking the shortest path of all vehicles for a delivering (recycling operation as an objective. For the characteristics of the model, a hybrid intelligent algorithm including stochastic simulation, neural network, and immune clonal algorithm is designed to solve the model. Finally, the validity and rationality of the optimization model and algorithm are verified by the case.

  20. Optimization for Service Routes of Pallet Service Center Based on the Pallet Pool Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kang; He, Shiwei; Song, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Service routes optimization (SRO) of pallet service center should meet customers' demand firstly and then, through the reasonable method of lines organization, realize the shortest path of vehicle driving. The routes optimization of pallet service center is similar to the distribution problems of vehicle routing problem (VRP) and Chinese postman problem (CPP), but it has its own characteristics. Based on the relevant research results, the conditions of determining the number of vehicles, the one way of the route, the constraints of loading, and time windows are fully considered, and a chance constrained programming model with stochastic constraints is constructed taking the shortest path of all vehicles for a delivering (recycling) operation as an objective. For the characteristics of the model, a hybrid intelligent algorithm including stochastic simulation, neural network, and immune clonal algorithm is designed to solve the model. Finally, the validity and rationality of the optimization model and algorithm are verified by the case.

  1. Shared services centers and work sustainability: which contributions from ergonomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoud, Justine; Falzon, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the way in which Shared Services Centers (SSCs) were implemented in a French multinational company. It aims to characterize the change according to the capabilities model developed by Amartya Sen: what are the effects of SSCs in terms of capabilities development and developmental quality of work, i.e. in the enabling potential of work? A 3-step methodology has been used: first, an investigation was conducted in a pay service of a local entity moving into SSC in 2013; second, two investigations were conducted in another pay service of a SSC: first, a few months after the change, and then, one year after the change (the same operators were interviewed). Results show a tendency to the decrease of the enabling potential. Additionally, it was noted that administrators are kept away from the design process and have to struggle with inappropriate rules. The efficiency and sustainability of the SSC are questioned; in this context, the human factor specialist has an important role to play.

  2. Optimization of Service Operations Sequence in a Four-Wheeler Service Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch Venkatadri Naidu,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In India, automobile service sector occupies a strategic position in the economic development. Although, sales rate of auto vehicles have been continually and rapidly increasing, a similar growth has not been in the growth of auto service sector leads to customer dissatisfaction. A pilot study has been carried out in a four wheeler service centers and recognizes the need for improve existing process sequence of the service activities those have been fallowed forserviceing the vehicles. This paper proposes improved sequence leading to an optimial sequence which to minimize the total time. The optimal solution was generated as formulating the given problem as a travelling salesman problem (TSP and solving by employing a novel lexicographic approach.

  3. [Medical controlling as medical economical service center. Successful concept for orthopedics and trauma surgery centers?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auhuber, T C; Hoffmann, R

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients from administrative admission through the orthopedic-surgical treatment to completion of the billing is complex. Additional challenges originate from the necessity to treat patients in both outpatient and inpatient departments and in more than one medical sector. A superior coordination is essential for a successful cooperation of the various procedures of controlling. The model of a medical controlling department as a service center with effective competence in the management of service and cost, functions as a successful solution to the problem. Central elements of a successful medical economical case management are a well-defined assignment of tasks and definitions of intersections, the integration of health professionals and administrative employees, the utilization of software for process control and the implementation of inlier controlling.

  4. National Service Center, St. Louis County, Missouri - USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth, -

    1979-11-01

    Full Text Available The new building housing the National Service Center stands in a 40 Ha property in the outskirts of the city and it resembles more a university campus than an administrative centre. The building has only two levels above grade in an attempt to blend into the eminently rural surroundings, avoiding any architectural aggression to the natural environment. With a similar intention, earth hues were used in the precast concrete façade panels finish, completed by the horizontal emphasis of the dark bronze fenestration. Interiorly, the building is outstanding by its flexible arrangement, creating open and integrated office spaces. The modular structure allows for future expansion that will eventually double its present size without affecting its architectural unity.

    La nueva sede del National Service Center, situada en una parcela de más de 40 Há en el extrarradio de la ciudad, parece un campus universitario más que un centro administrativo. El edificio, que consta de sólo dos plantas sobre rasante, procura su integración en un paisaje marcadamente rural evitando la posible imposición agresiva de la arquitectura en el entorno natural. Con este fin se emplearon colores terrosos, en el acat>ado de los paneles prefabricados de cemento, complementados por una carpintería de marcado trazado horizontal en tonos bronce oscuro. Interiormente el edificio destaca por su flexibilidad, constituyendo espacios de oficinas abiertos e integrados. Su estructura modular permite la ampliación futura de la construcción, hasta duplicar su dimensión actual, sin alterar la unidad arquitectónica.

  5. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-07-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication.

  6. Evaluation of Ski Center Services in Greece based on the Multiattribute Measurement Model of Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theophilos Masmanidis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this study was to evaluate ski center services in Greece. Our research sample consists of n=1,614 visitors in 11 of the largest ski centers in Greece. The 22-item SERVQUAL standard questionnaire has been used, with each item classified based on five quality-assessment dimensions. In order to assess ski center offered services, the Multiattribute Attitude Measurement Model has been used. The values gathered by applying this model were used as reference values for ski center evaluation. Ski centers have then been ranked based on their total attitude score. The paper provides administrative suggestions on improving center offered services.

  7. 42 CFR 415.174 - Exception: Evaluation and management services furnished in certain centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exception: Evaluation and management services furnished in certain centers. 415.174 Section 415.174 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... in Teaching Settings § 415.174 Exception: Evaluation and management services furnished in certain...

  8. Establishing a National Center for Research To Systematize the Study of Service Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Explores the rationale for establishing a national center for research on service learning, outlining various current issues and challenges in conducting service learning research and describing how the establishment of a national center can raise the standards and visibility of service learning research. Offers several suggestions about how the…

  9. Quality of Prenatal Care Services in Karabuk Community Health Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binali Catak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality and quantity of prenatal care services according to gestastional week in Karabuk Community Health Center (CHC. Methods: In this descriptive study 365 pregnant women was selected as sample among 753 pregnant women registered at Karabuk CHC in 18/01/2011. 93.0% of women in the selected sample has been visited in their homes and the face to face interviews were done. The questionnaire was prepared according to Prenatal Care Management Guidelines (PCMG of Ministry of Health. Findings The number of follow-ups was not complete in 23.7% of 15-24 month, 34.4% of 25-32 month, 52,1% of 33-42 month pregnant women. At least four follow-up visits were completed only in 66,7% of postpartum women. Timing of first visit was after 15th week in 15,6% of women. In follow up visits 62.5% of of women’s height were never measured, in 13,0% the women hearth sound of infants didn’t monitored at least once. Laboratory test numbers were under the level required by PCMG. The delivery conditions weren’t planned in 41,8% of last trimester and postpartum women and training about breastfeeding wasn’t given to 15,5 of the same group. Result In family medicine model in Karabuk CHC developments in number of prenatal follow-up visits were observed, but no substantial improvements were found in quality of prenatal visits. Regular in service trainings shoud be given to family doctors and midwives. The use of prenatal care guideline published by MoH should be increased. Keywords: Prenatal care, pregnancy, timing of first visit, qality of prenatal care [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(2.000: 153-162

  10. Quality of Health Services Provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent Health Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghrid S. Suifan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Quality of services measurement has been the concern of many scholars who have tried to develop scales for it. The most popular scale used was SERVQUAL. Hence the aim of this study is to discover the quality of health services provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent Health Centers in Amman. Approach: A sample study was derived from (1652 male and female patients from five health centers: Ashrafieh Health Center; Al-Hashemi Health Center; Marka Health Center; Al-Taj Health Center and AL-Hussein Health Center. Means, Standard Deviation, Independent Sample T-Test, simple regression and the Scheffe Test were used to answer the study's main questions. Results: It was found that the quality of health services provided to the Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent health centers was high in all dimensions, the highest quality dimensions displayed among the health service available at Jordan Red Crescent health centers were tangibles and assurance, whereas the lowest quality dimensions were empathy and responsiveness, there was a significant difference in the quality of health services provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent Health Centers (Ashrafieh Health Center, Al-Hashemi Health Center, Marka Health Center, Al-Taj Health Center and AL-Hussein Health Center from one center to another and there was a significant difference in the quality of health services provided to Iraqis at Jordan Red Crescent health centers based on the number of visits the Iraqis made to the center. Conclusion: The main recommendation presented in this study is that there is a need to expand the health services in cooperation with international humanitarian organizations in order to accommodate the rising number of Iraqis frequenting the centers.

  11. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Vietnamese Translation) (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-11-01

    This is the Vietnamese language translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) fact sheet. The Solutions Center helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  12. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Chinese Translation) (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-04-01

    This is the Chinese language translation of the Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) fact sheet. The Solutions Center helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  13. The Use of the Denver Developmental Screening Test in Infant Welfare Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, M.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Results of a single Denver Developmental Screening Test performance on 823 infants attending maternal and child health centers were compared with developmental information recorded by public health nurses during routine well baby care of these same infants. Journal Avaliability: J.B. Lippincott Co; E. Washington Sq., Philadelphia, PA 19105.…

  14. Assessing the ecosystem services provided by urban green spaces along urban center-edge gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jie; Qu, Zelong; Xu, Ronghua; Pan, Kaixuan; Xu, Bin; Min, Yong; Ren, Yuan; Yang, Guofu; Ge, Ying

    2017-09-11

    Urban green spaces provide various ecosystem services, especially cultural services. Previous assessment methods depend either on hypothetic payments for ecosystems or real payments not directly related to ecosystems. In this paper, we established a method for assessing the cultural ecosystem services in any location in urban area using only two variables, green space (ecosystem) and land rent (real payment). We integrated the cultural and the regulating services into the total ecosystem services because urban green spaces provide almost no provisioning services. Results showed that the same area of green spaces near the center provided much higher cultural services than that near the urban edge; the regulating services accounted for 5% to 40% of the total ecosystem services from the center to the edge of urban area; along the center-edge gradient, there was a threshold out which the ecosystem services were lower than the maintenance cost of green spaces.

  15. Terrestrial Hydrological Data from NASA's Hydrology Data and Information Services Center (HDISC): Products, Services, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongliang; Beaudoing, Hiroko K.; Mocko, David M.; Rodell, Matthew; Teng, Bill; Vollmer, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial hydrological variables are important in global hydrology, climate, and carbon cycle studies. The North American and Global Land Data Assimilation Systems (NLDAS and GLDAS, respectively) have been generating a series of land surface states (soil moisture, snow, and temperature) and fluxes (evapotranspiration, radiation, and heat flux) variables. These data, hosted at and available from NASA s Hydrology Data and Information Services Center (HDISC), include the NLDAS hourly 1/8 degree products and the GLDAS 3-hourly 0.25 and 1.0 degree products. HDISC provides easy access and visualization and analysis capabilities for these products, thus reducing the time and resources spent by scientists on data management and facilitating hydrological research. Users can perform spatial and parameter subsetting, data format transformation, and data analysis operations without needing to first download the data. HDISC is continually being developed as a data and services portal that supports weather and climate forecasts, and water and energy cycle research.

  16. About Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services at EPA's Environmental Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mission & contact information for EPA Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services located at EPA's Environmental Science Center: the Office of Analytical Services and Quality Assurance & Field Inspection Program

  17. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, 911 Call Center Service Area, Published in 2007, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Town of Cary NC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of...

  18. 76 FR 9599 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... representing a minimum of one individual from Kohlberg's Antiques and Indian Arts, in Denver, CO. In 1972, the... Kohlberg's Antiques and Indian Arts. The remains were reportedly a part of the George A. Cuneo...

  19. 76 FR 14061 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... accessioned into the collections (AC.8315A (CUI 68) and AC.8315B (CUI 69)). The remains include partial... of Nature & Science (then the Denver Museum of Natural History) (AC.9248A (CUI 70)). No...

  20. Teachers Lead the Way in Denver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazareno, Lori

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a teacher-led school "Mathematics and Science Leadership Academy" (MSLA) that is part of the Denver Public Schools. At MSLA, teachers collaborate to make authentic and substantive decisions about how the school operates and seek to meet each student's needs. At teacher-led schools, teachers hire their own…

  1. Early Start DENVER Model: A Meta - analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane P. Canoy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Each child with Autism Spectrum Disorder has different symptoms, skills and types of impairment or disorder with other children. This is why the word “spectrum” is included in this disorder. Eapen, Crncec, and Walter, 2013 claimed that there was an emerging evidence that early interventions gives the greatest capacity of child’s development during their first years of life as “brain plasticity” are high during this period. With this, the only intervention program model for children as young as 18 months that has been validated in a randomized clinical trial is “Early Start Denver Model” (ESDM. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of the outcome of “Early Start Denver Model” (ESDM towards young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. This study made use of meta-analysis method. In this study, the researcher utilized studies related to “Early Start Denver Model (ESDM” which is published in a refereed journal which are all available online. There were five studies included which totals 149 children exposed to ESDM. To examine the “pooled effects” of ESDM in a variety of outcomes, a meta-analytic procedure was performed after the extraction of data of the concrete outcomes. Comprehensive Meta Analysis Version 3.3.070 was used to analyze the data.  The effectiveness of the outcome of “Early Start Denver Model” towards young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD highly depends on the intensity of intervention and the younger child age. This study would provide the basis in effectively implementing an early intervention to children with autism such as the “Early Start Denver Model” (ESDM that would show great outcome effects to those children that has “Autism Spectrum Disorder”.

  2. Comparison of patient satisfaction with services of vision centers in rural areas of Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovai Vilas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the satisfaction of patients with the services of Vision Center services (primary eye care in large village (s and small village (s in rural settings in Andhra Pradesh state, India. Materials and Methods: We have administered standard questionnaires to randomly selected patients to assess patient satisfaction when assessing Vision Center Services. We used the Chi-square ( P <0.05 to explore differences in satisfaction of patients with Vision Center services located in the large village (s and small village (s rural settings. Results: Vision Center patients at the large village (s expressed higher levels of satisfaction (median 78% than patients treated at the Vision Center at small village (s (median 69%. The difference was statistically significant (Chi square P value ranging from <0.001 to 0.03 for all the items except two - ′easy to identify vision center location′ and ′spectacles dispensing time′ as compared to other (privately run optometry facilities (Chi square P value=0.498 and 0.993 respectively. The location of the Vision Center, convenience of journey, ophthalmic technician′s behavior with patients, are some of the most important factors that determined the patient perception about Vision Center services. Conclusion: The overall satisfaction levels of the Vision Center experience at 78% and 69% were good. However, continual improvement is to be made in service time, staff performance, cost and quality of vision care, especially at more remote primary eye Care Centers.

  3. Semantic Data Access Services at NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffer, E.; Hertz, J.; Kusterer, J.

    2012-12-01

    The corpus of Earth Science data products at the Atmospheric Science Data Center at NASA's Langley Research Center comprises a widely heterogeneous set of products, even among those whose subject matter is very similar. Two distinct data products may both contain data on the same parameter, for instance, solar irradiance; but the instruments used, and the circumstances under which the data were collected and processed, may differ significantly. Understanding the differences is critical to using the data effectively. Data distribution services must be able to provide prospective users with enough information to allow them to meaningfully compare and evaluate the data products offered. Semantic technologies - ontologies, triple stores, reasoners, linked data - offer functionality for addressing this issue. Ontologies can provide robust, high-fidelity domain models that serve as common schema for discovering, evaluating, comparing and integrating data from disparate products. Reasoning engines and triple stores can leverage ontologies to support intelligent search applications that allow users to discover, query, retrieve, and easily reformat data from a broad spectrum of sources. We argue that because of the extremely complex nature of scientific data, data distribution systems should wholeheartedly embrace semantic technologies in order to make their data accessible to a broad array of prospective end users, and to ensure that the data they provide will be clearly understood and used appropriately by consumers. Toward this end, we propose a distribution system in which formal ontological models that accurately and comprehensively represent the ASDC's data domain, and fully leverage the expressivity and inferential capabilities of first order logic, are used to generate graph-based representations of the relevant relationships among data sets, observational systems, metadata files, and geospatial, temporal and scientific parameters to help prospective data consumers

  4. The Administrative Assessment Center: An Opportunity for Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M. D.

    In 1988, the Department of Educational Leadership at Western Kentucky University (WKU) established the Western Kentucky Assessment Center, sponsored by the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP). This document provides an overview of the history and methods of NASSP assessment centers, followed by a discussion of costs to…

  5. Pediatric Oncology Branch - Support Services | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Support Services As part of the comprehensive care provided at the NCI Pediatric Oncology Branch, we provide a wide range of services to address the social, psychological, emotional, and practical facets of pediatric cancer and to support patients and families while they are enrolled in clinical research protocols.

  6. Promoting Library Services with User-Centered Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Allison R.

    2017-01-01

    As libraries respond to new teaching and research practices in the twenty-first century, it is important to consider how to advertise library services. Users are often surprised to learn about the varied expertise of library staff and the many services the staff provides. To investigate this issue, the author designed a study to identify a more…

  7. 38 CFR 61.80 - General operation requirements for supportive housing and service centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recipient if VA determines that such services are of unacceptable quality. Further, VA will not pay per diem...) Space in a service center shall be made available as mutually agreeable for use by VA staff and other..., job training and job placement services (including job readiness, job counseling, and literacy and...

  8. 75 FR 25845 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS); Overview Information; Centers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS); Overview Information; Centers for... Administration (RSA) staff from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. The pre-application.... Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. BILLING CODE 4000-01...

  9. The National Resource Center on LGBT Aging provides critical training to aging service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hilary; Johnston, Tim R

    2014-01-01

    The National Resource Center on LGBT Aging was created in 2010 by Services & Advocacy for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Elders (SAGE) with seed funding from the US Department of Health and Human Services. Three years into the project, thousands of aging and LGBT service providers have been reached with training and technical assistance; however, a great need, especially for cultural competency training, remains.

  10. User-Centered Design of CHIL Services: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianesi, Fabio; Terken, Jacques

    Services, that is, organized sets of functionalities targeting users, are at the core of the CHIL enterprise. It is at this level, in fact, that the general vision - putting the computer in the loop of human interaction - is made concrete and enjoyable to the user; it is services that users see, interact with, and exploit to better achieve their objectives. In the conception of this book, services are neither simple collections of technologies, nor showcases aimed to concept-proof technological advances, nor integration add-ons.

  11. Community control of health services. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's community management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, N M; Taylor, J I

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the case of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of control, namely, management, without experiencing destructive conflicts and the deterioration of health services.

  12. Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) , Medicare Claims data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2003 forward. CMS compiles claims data for Medicare and Medicaid patients across a variety of categories and years. This includes Inpatient and Outpatient claims,...

  13. A Result Data Offloading Service for HPC Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, Henri [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Modern High-Performance Computing applications are consuming and producing an exponentially increasing amount of data. This increase has lead to a significant number of resources being dedicated to data staging in and out of Supercomputing Centers. The typical approach to staging is a direct transfer of application data between the center and the application submission site. Such a direct data transfer approach becomes problematic, especially for staging-out, as (i) the data transfer time increases with the size of data, and may exceed the time allowed by the center's purge policies; and (ii) the submission site may not be online to receive the data, thus further increasing the chances for output data to be purged. In this paper, we argue for a systematic data staging-out approach that utilizes intermediary data-holding nodes to quickly offload data from the center to the intermediaries, thus avoiding the peril of a purge and addressing the two issues mentioned above. The intermediary nodes provide temporary data storage for the staged-out data and maximize the offload bandwidth by providing multiple data-flow paths from the center to the submission site. Our initial investigation shows such a technique to be effective in addressing the above two issues and providing better QOS guarantees for data retrieval.

  14. NUCLEAR INFORMATION SERVICES AT THE NATIONAL NUCLEAR DATA CENTER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURROWS,T.W.; DUNFORD,C.L.

    2004-09-26

    The National Nuclear Data Center has provided remote access to its databases and other resources since 1986. This year we have completed the modernization of our databases and Web site. Resources available from our Web site will be summarized and some of the major improvements described in more detail.

  15. Decision Support Services provided by the NWS Alaska Regional Operations Center in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breukelen, C. M.; Osiensky, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The NWS Alaska Region's Regional Operations Center (AR ROC) provides a variety of decision support services to partners and customers across the state. The AR ROC is virtual most times but can flex to stand up support for partners as needed. Support can vary from briefings over the phone or in person to dedicated virtual support to providing on-site meteorologist at an Emergency Operations Center or Incident Command Post to provide tailored support services. During 2015 there have been a number of situations where the AR ROC provided unique support services. This presentation will outline a few examples of how these unique support services benefitted partner agency decisions.

  16. Human‐Centered Design: Integrating Services & Systems Around People By Providing A Common Ground for Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    argue that human-centered design challenges the systems view of service engineers and service designers and requires them to reach out to each other. For this reason, I conclude that for these two disciplines, human-centered design provides a common ground for purposeful action: to arrive at the best......Service engineering and service design, though distinct in their origins, theories, concepts, methods and practices, share that they are both consequential productive arts for people who depend on their outcomes. The ideas, methods and practices of human‐centred design are therefore relevant...

  17. Structured Communication-Centered Programming for Web Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carbone, Marco; Honda, Kohei; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2012-01-01

    This article relates two different paradigms of descriptions of communication behavior, one focusing on global message flows and another on end-point behaviors, using formal calculi based on session types. The global calculus, which originates from a Web service description language (W3C WS...

  18. 76 FR 80401 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Inventory Completion: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO... University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO. The human remains and... transferred to Fallis F. Rees, who donated them to the University of Denver Department of Anthropology...

  19. 75 FR 77665 - Frank Russell Company, Administrative Service Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Volt...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Frank Russell Company, Administrative Service Center, Including On... for Worker Adjustment Assistance on July 30, 2010, applicable to workers of Frank Russell Company..., Washington location of Frank Russell Company, Administrative Service Center. The Department has determined...

  20. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Radiation Therapy Services at Tripler Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diehl, Diane S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the costs and benefits associated with continuance of "in-house" radiation therapy services to eligible beneficiaries at Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC...

  1. 75 FR 45600 - Information Collection; Customer Data Worksheet Request for Service Center Information Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... Information Management System (SCIMS) Record Changes AGENCY: Farm Service Agency, USDA. ] ACTION: Notice and... Center Information Management System (SCIMS) that contains the producer's personal information... Officer for Agriculture, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and...

  2. NOAA Coastal Services Center Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Philadelphia WFO - Pennsylvania

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center's Sea Level...

  3. Evaluation of poison information services provided by a new poison information center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Churi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The poison information center provided requested services in a skillful, efficient and evidence-based manner to meet the needs of the requestor. The enquiries and information provided is documented in a clear and systematic manner.

  4. Telecommunications Services Required by Distributed and Interconnected Office Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-20

    by the Defense Communications Engineering Center (DCEC R720). Released by Under authority of H. Wong, Head H.D. Smith, Head Shore Systems Division ...the end of 1979 twelve divisions were ucing WP systems, six more divisions were awaiting equipment delivery and twenty other divisions were under...The development of a " celular system" is an advanced form of multi-channel trunking which will permit expanded and more efficient use of mobile radio

  5. Succession planning in an academic medical center nursing service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barginere, Cynthia; Franco, Samantha; Wallace, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Succession planning is of strategic importance in any industry. It ensures the smooth transition from leader to leader and the ability of the organization to maintain the forward momentum as well as meet its operational and financial goals. Health care and nursing are no exception. In the complex and challenging world of health care today, leadership is critical to an organization's success and leadership succession is a key strategy used to ensure continuity of leadership and development of talent from within the organization. At Rush University Medical Center, a 667-bed academic medical center providing tertiary care to adults and children, the need for a focus on succession planning for the nursing leadership team is apparent as key leaders come to the end of their careers and consider retirement. It has become apparent that to secure the legacy and continue the extraordinary history of nursing excellence, care must be taken to grow talent from within and take the opportunity to leverage the mentoring opportunities before the retirement of many key leaders. To ensure a smooth leadership transition, nursing leadership and human resources partner at Rush University Medical Center to implement a systematic approach to leadership succession planning.

  6. World Key Information Service System Designed For EPCOT Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, J. A.

    1984-03-01

    An advanced Bell Laboratories and Western Electric designed electronic information retrieval system utilizing the latest Information Age technologies, and a fiber optic transmission system is featured at the Walt Disney World Resort's newest theme park - The Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow (EPCOT Center). The project is an interactive audio, video and text information system that is deployed at key locations within the park. The touch sensitive terminals utilizing the ARIEL (Automatic Retrieval of Information Electronically) System is interconnected by a Western Electric designed and manufactured lightwave transmission system.

  7. Effect of Outsourced Pharmacies of Rural Healthcare Centers on Service Quality in Abharand Soltanieh Counties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Maher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a part of healthcare services has been assigned to the private sector to increase the quality of medical services, increase patient satisfaction and reduce costs. In this regard, the outsourcing approach has been significantly considered for pharmaceutical services provided by healthcare centers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of outsourced pharmacies of rural healthcare centers on service quality using structural equations modelling. The methodology used was descriptive using correlation by structural equations modelling. The studied population included those patients who provided their medicines from pharmacies of rural healthcare centers in Abhar and Soltanieh counties. The samples included 384 of these patients. Data was collected by outsourcing and service quality questionnaires. A structural equation modelling was used to analyze data by LISREAL software. Results indicated a positive significant effect of outsourced pharmacies of rural healthcare centers on quality of tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance and empathy. findings emphasize the role of outsourcing on quality of services. Outsourced pharmacies of rural healthcare centers of Abhar and Soltanieh counties lead to improved service quality.

  8. Storytelling event in Floyd to benefit Service-Learning Center's Hometown Corps

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2006-01-01

    A benefit storytelling and music evening will be held at the Jacksonville Center for the Arts on Route 8 (South Locust Street), Floyd, Va. from 7 to 9:30 p.m. on Thurs., March 23. Admission is free and all ages are invited. Voluntary donations will be accepted to support joint projects between the Virginia Tech Service-Learning Center's Hometown Corps and the Women's Resource Center of the New River Valley.

  9. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services…

  10. Enhancing HR shared service centers through resource orchestration : uncovering the dynamic capabilities of the administrative expert

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maatman, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Many organizations have introduced transactional HR Shared Service Centers (HR SSCs) that are responsible for supporting the business by providing administrative HR services. Many of these HR SSCs are faced with headcount and cost reduction objectives and therefore unable to respond to the

  11. Truancy Assessment and Service Centers (TASC): Engaging Elementary School Children and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Judith L. F.; Thomas, Johanna M.; Lemieux, Catherine M.; Cain, Daphne S.; Guin, Cecile C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews literature describing truancy and its correlates, and it analyzes the current research on truancy prevention programs. Few truancy prevention programs exist in elementary school settings. This article describes Truancy Assessment and Service Centers, a theory-driven program providing case management services to children in 85…

  12. Enhancing HR shared service centers through resource orchestration : uncovering the dynamic capabilities of the administrative expert

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maatman, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Many organizations have introduced transactional HR Shared Service Centers (HR SSCs) that are responsible for supporting the business by providing administrative HR services. Many of these HR SSCs are faced with headcount and cost reduction objectives and therefore unable to respond to the increasin

  13. Virtualized Multi-Mission Operations Center (vMMOC) and its Cloud Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Haisam Kassim

    2017-01-01

    His presentation will cover, the current and future, technical and organizational opportunities and challenges with virtualizing a multi-mission operations center. The full deployment of Goddard Space Flight Centers (GSFC) Virtualized Multi-Mission Operations Center (vMMOC) is nearly complete. The Space Science Mission Operations (SSMO) organizations spacecraft ACE, Fermi, LRO, MMS(4), OSIRIS-REx, SDO, SOHO, Swift, and Wind are in the process of being fully migrated to the vMMOC. The benefits of the vMMOC will be the normalization and the standardization of IT services, mission operations, maintenance, and development as well as ancillary services and policies such as collaboration tools, change management systems, and IT Security. The vMMOC will also provide operational efficiencies regarding hardware, IT domain expertise, training, maintenance and support.The presentation will also cover SSMO's secure Situational Awareness Dashboard in an integrated, fleet centric, cloud based web services fashion. Additionally the SSMO Telemetry as a Service (TaaS) will be covered, which allows authorized users and processes to access telemetry for the entire SSMO fleet, and for the entirety of each spacecrafts history. Both services leverage cloud services in a secure FISMA High and FedRamp environment, and also leverage distributed object stores in order to house and provide the telemetry. The services are also in the process of leveraging the cloud computing services elasticity and horizontal scalability. In the design phase is the Navigation as a Service (NaaS) which will provide a standardized, efficient, and normalized service for the fleet's space flight dynamics operations. Additional future services that may be considered are Ground Segment as a Service (GSaaS), Telemetry and Command as a Service (TCaaS), Flight Software Simulation as a Service, etc.

  14. Quality of Primary Health Services in the Clinics of Shomal Health Center of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hossein Safi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Quality is a major concern in the services offered by the health sector.  The first basic step, in formulating any quality-improvement program, is recognizing consumers’ perceptions and expectations of the services' quality. The aim of this study is to determine the gaps in the health services and provide solutions to increase clients' satisfaction in the clinics of Shomal Health Center of Tehran.Material and Methods: This cross-sectional and descriptive study was done in 2013. The sample size was 325, proportionately selected from the recipients of primary health care in each clinic. Data was collected by a questionnaire, based on the five dimensions of service quality gap SERVQUAL instrument; which includes 22 questions. The collected data was statistically analyzed using SPSS software.  Results: There was a significant difference between the client's perception and expectation in each of the five dimensions of service quality. The smallest gap was in the communion (0.68 and the largest gap in the concrete (0/88 service. The client's education was significantly associated with the quality gap.Conclusion: None of the service dimensions were beyond the expectations of the respondents. Therefore, there is an ample room for improving the service processes.Keywords: Health center, Quality of service, SERVQUAL, Shomal Health Center, Primary Health

  15. What do clinicians want? Interest in integrative health services at a North Carolina academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eadie Dee

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of complementary medicine is common, consumer driven and usually outpatient focused. We wished to determine interest among the medical staff at a North Carolina academic medical center in integrating diverse therapies and services into comprehensive care. Methods We conducted a cross sectional on-line survey of physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at a tertiary care medical center in 2006. The survey contained questions on referrals and recommendations in the past year and interest in therapies or services if they were to be provided at the medical center in the future. Results Responses were received from 173 clinicians in 26 different departments, programs and centers. There was strong interest in offering several specific therapies: therapeutic exercise (77%, expert consultation about herbs and dietary supplements (69%, and massage (66%; there was even stronger interest in offering comprehensive treatment programs such as multidisciplinary pain management (84%, comprehensive nutritional assessment and advice (84%, obesity/healthy lifestyle promotion (80%, fit for life (exercise and lifestyle program, 76%, diabetes healthy lifestyle promotion (73%; and comprehensive psychological services for stress management, including hypnosis and biofeedback (73%. Conclusion There is strong interest among medical staff at an academic health center in comprehensive, integrated services for pain, obesity, and diabetes and in specific services in fitness, nutrition and stress management. Future studies will need to assess the cost-effectiveness of such services, as well as their financial sustainability and impact on patient satisfaction, health and quality of life.

  16. Teacher Performance Management in Denver Public Schools. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Teacher Project, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the 2008-2009 school year, The New Teacher Project (TNTP) partnered with Denver Public Schools (DPS) and the Denver Classroom Teachers Association (DCTA) to assess the effectiveness of current teacher performance management policies and practices. DPS and the DCTA have been national leaders in their willingness to examine the difficult issues…

  17. Harvard Catalyst | The Clinical Translational Science Center IND/IDE Consult Service: providing an IND/IDE consult service in a decentralized network of academic healthcare centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min J; Winkler, Sabune J; Bierer, Barbara E; Wolf, Delia

    2014-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations require sponsors of clinical investigations involving an investigational drug or device to submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) or Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application. Strict adherence to applicable regulations is vital to the success of clinical research. Unlike most major pharmaceutical sponsors, investigator sponsors often do not fully appreciate their regulatory obligations nor have resources to ensure compliance. As a result they can place themselves and their institutions at risk. Nevertheless, investigator-initiated clinical trials are vital to the further development of innovative drugs, biologics, and medical devices. The IND/IDE Subcommittee under the Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program at Harvard Catalyst, The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center worked in collaboration with Harvard and Harvard affiliated institutions to create and launch an IND/IDE Consult Service in a decentralized network of collaborating Academic Healthcare Centers (AHC). The IND/IDE Consult Service offers expertise, resources, and shared experiences to assist sponsor-investigators and IRBs in meeting regulatory requirements for conducting and reviewing investigator-initiated IND/IDE studies. The scope of the services provided by the Harvard Catalyst IND/IDE Consult Service are described, including the specifics of the service, lessons learned, and challenges faced, in a scalable model that builds inter-institutional capacity.

  18. Product and service design for patient centered diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumitri Varadarajan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Design plays a marginal part in the discourse of diabetes care, mainly in visualizing the form and packaging of medical technologies. The authors however have a practice that advocates that design orientated solutions can add much needed dimensions to problems that havetraditionally been the exclusive preserve of expert discourses. This position has for long been a validated and largely accepted approach in design’s engagement withissues in sustainability and development studies. A similar approach in the area of medicine has been constructed bythe authors and marks out a position of advocacy where the designer takes on agency to intervene on behalf of the user community. This position contains a healthy critique of thetraditional approach of product design for manufacture while simultaneously amplifying a desire to intervene and make a substantial improvement in the quality of life ofpeople with diabetes. This article first opens out contemporary diabetes care as a contested domain and then goes on to sketch out the key aspects of a design practice focussed upon delivering positive health outcomes in diabetes care. The specific context of discussion for this article is the practice of teaching in design studios wherestudents of design listen to the voices of people with diabetes and visualize ways for design to provide products and service solutions that transform the lived experiences of people with diabetes.

  19. Innovation in user-centered skills and performance improvement for sustainable complex service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    In order to leverage individual and organizational learning and to remain competitive in current turbulent markets it is important for employees, managers, planners and leaders to perform at high levels over time. Employee competence and skills are extremely important matters in view of the general shortage of talent and the mobility of employees with talent. Two factors emerged to have the greatest impact on the competitiveness of complex service systems: improving managerial and employee's knowledge attainment for skills, and improving the training and development of the workforce. This paper introduces the knowledge-based user-centered service design approach for sustainable skill and performance improvement in education, design and modeling of the next generation of complex service systems. The rest of the paper cover topics in human factors and sustainable business process modeling for the service industry, and illustrates the user-centered service system development cycle with the integration of systems engineering concepts in service systems. A roadmap for designing service systems of the future is discussed. The framework introduced in this paper is based on key user-centered design principles and systems engineering applications to support service competitiveness.

  20. Vocational Rehabilitation and End Stage Renal Disease. Proceedings of the Workshop (Denver, Colorado, December 11-13, 1979).

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC. Rehabilitation Research and Training Center.

    This document contains 12 papers presented to medical and vocational rehabilitation professionals on the topic of vocational rehabilitation and End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) at a Denver conference in 1979. The following papers are contained in this report: "Rehabilitation and ESRD: Services with a New Thrust" by Kathleen E. Lloyd;…

  1. Estimating the Costs of Services Provided by Health House and Health Centers in Shahroud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad amiri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calculating cost is an important management tool for programming, control, supervision and evaluation of health services in order that informed decisions can be done. This study was done to determine the cost of services provided by health centers, and health house in Shahroud in 2009.Methods: In this study, all health centers in urban and rural regions were studied. 70 forms for provided services, public and specific materials used for each service, medicine and equipment, time required for each service and activities, buildings and equipment depreciation costs were used to collect the data. Then the costs of each unit including direct and indirect costs (overhead, as well as the costs of one center and one health care home were calculated through cost analysis software. Results: Findings from data analysis showed that 44.4% of health care providers were male and 55.6% were female. 22.8% of the personnel were working in health house, 26.1% in rural health centers, 9.1% in urban health centers, health centers 24.5% in urban boarding health centers, 2.6% in health care posts and 14.9% were working in Healthcare Department. The highest cost were personnel costs (66.1% followed by central department costs (12.8%. Next were the costs for drug consumption with 11.0% and specific use with 3.8%. The highest cost was also for training healthcare providers (1325209 RLS and lowest cost was for sampling of influenza (3872 RLS. Conclusion: Due to high personnel costs, increasing of productivity will play an important role in reducing labor costs .Also, moderating workforce and the using private sector participation in services and outsourcing costly units can play an important role in optimum utilization of resources.

  2. Spatial Data Services for Interdisciplinary Applications from the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. S.; MacManus, K.; Vinay, S.; Yetman, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC), one of 12 Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) in the NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), has developed a variety of operational spatial data services aimed at providing online access, visualization, and analytic functions for geospatial socioeconomic and environmental data. These services include: open web services that implement Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) specifications such as Web Map Service (WMS), Web Feature Service (WFS), and Web Coverage Service (WCS); spatial query services that support Web Processing Service (WPS) and Representation State Transfer (REST); and web map clients and a mobile app that utilize SEDAC and other open web services. These services may be accessed from a variety of external map clients and visualization tools such as NASA's WorldView, NOAA's Climate Explorer, and ArcGIS Online. More than 200 data layers related to population, settlements, infrastructure, agriculture, environmental pollution, land use, health, hazards, climate change and other aspects of sustainable development are available through WMS, WFS, and/or WCS. Version 2 of the SEDAC Population Estimation Service (PES) supports spatial queries through WPS and REST in the form of a user-defined polygon or circle. The PES returns an estimate of the population residing in the defined area for a specific year (2000, 2005, 2010, 2015, or 2020) based on SEDAC's Gridded Population of the World version 4 (GPWv4) dataset, together with measures of accuracy. The SEDAC Hazards Mapper and the recently released HazPop iOS mobile app enable users to easily submit spatial queries to the PES and see the results. SEDAC has developed an operational virtualized backend infrastructure to manage these services and support their continual improvement as standards change, new data and services become available, and user needs evolve. An ongoing challenge is to improve the reliability and performance

  3. Langley Mobile Ozone Lidar (LMOL) results from the Denver, CO DISCOVER-AQ campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Young, Russell; Carrion, William; Pliutau, Denis; Ganoe, Rene

    2015-10-01

    The Langley Mobile Ozone Lidar (LMOL) is a compact mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system that was developed at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA to provide ozone, aerosol and cloud atmospheric measurements in a mobile trailer for ground-based atmospheric air quality campaigns. This lidar is part of the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) currently made up of six other ozone lidars across the U.S and Canada. This lidar has been deployed to Denver, CO July 15-August 15, 2014 for the DISCOVER-AQ air quality campaign. Ozone and aerosol profiles were taken showing the influence of emissions from the Denver region. Results of ozone concentration, aerosol scattering ratio, boundary layer height and clouds will be presented with emphasis on regional air quality.

  4. Mental Health and the Elderly: Issues in Service Delivery to the American Indian and the Hispanic Communities. Part II. Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session (Denver, Colorado).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This field hearing by the House Select Committee on Aging produced testimony on the mental health problems and service delivery needs of American Indian and Hispanic American elderly. A director of research and two American Indian advocates: (1) pointed out the high rate of depression among Indian elderly due to physical impairments and deprived…

  5. The Italian multiregional thalassemia registry: Centers characteristics, services, and patients' population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Rosa; Ruggieri, Lucia; Gambino, Arianna; Bartoloni, Franco; Baiardi, Paola; Bonifazi, Donato; Bonifazi, Fedele; Felisi, Mariagrazia; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Padula, Rosa; Pepe, Alessia; Putti, Maria Caterina; Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; Maggio, Aurelio; Filosa, Aldo; Iacono, Angela; Mangiarini, Laura; Ceci, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    The prognosis of beta-Thalassemia major and other congenital hemoglobinopathies has profoundly changed over the last decades. Moreover, only few countries in Europe provide dedicated services and the description of the measures for patients monitoring and treatment is overall very scarce. The HTA-Thal project is aimed to identify the services available in Italy and to collect epidemiological and clinical data on the thalassemic population (HTA-Thal Registry). A map of the existing centers was created and two electronic questionnaires were completed with information on the services and patients. On 182 centers identified, 60 completed the two questionnaires. Centers resulted to be extremely heterogeneous in terms of size, age of patients in care, and services availability. The transition of pediatric patients to adult centers was not guaranteed. Thousand eight hundred and seventy-three beta-Thalassemia major patients (of which 259 pediatrics), regularly transfused, were registered. Deferasirox is the most used chelator as monotherapy (616 patients) and its use prevails in younger patients. A higher number of patients (847 patients) use Deferoxamine, either alone (448 patients) or in combination with DFP (399 patients), while 782 patients use Deferiprone alone (383 patients) or in combination (399 patients). 31.6 and 66.6% of centers were not equipped for specialized visits or local MRI, respectively. Centers with 30-80 patients show the high percentage of patients appropriately monitored when compared to smaller or bigger centers. This analysis confirms the importance of patients' registries for the collection of large datasets and the need for dedicated 'specialized centers' equipped to provide the best standard treatment to patients.

  6. Rapidkl Bus Service in City Center, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: An Epitome of Good Service?

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Aziz Abdullah; Rohaya Mat Talip

    2013-01-01

    Public transportation in Kuala Lumpur (the capital city of Malaysia) serves the daily commuting needs of all strata of society. To meet the ever increasing needs of reliable public transport in and around the capital city, the Rangkaian Pengangkutan Integrasi Deras Sdn Bhd (RapidKL) has been established. Notwithstanding the effort by the company to provide the best public service, it seems there are more brickbats than bouquet of flowers given at the level of service rendered. Gamut of compla...

  7. Oral health services in primary care nursing centers: opportunities for dental hygiene and nursing collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellona, M O; DeVore, L R

    1999-01-01

    The basic oral health needs of more than 100 million Americans are not being met, which places them at an increased risk for serious oral and systemic health consequences. Primary care nursing centers, a comparatively new method of health care delivery, provide health care screening, education, and referral services to person typically underserved in the traditional health care delivery system. Primary care nursing centers were surveyed to determine to what extent they provide oral health screening, education, and referral services for clients, and to identify factors that discourage and encourage the integration of these services. Nurses from 158 primary care nursing centers in the United States made up the study population. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Data from 59 primary care nursing centers were analyzed using frequency distributions and measures of central tendency. Almost half of the responding nurses at primary care nursing centers "almost always" screen their clients for gum infections (49%) and oral lesions (48%). Fewer teach their clients how to perform oral cancer self-examinations (20%); or educate them regarding use of athletic mouth protectors (15%), the effects of xerostomia (19%), and the benefits of fluoride (38%). The majority do not always refer clients needing treatment for dental decay (55%), gum infections (61%), missing teeth (80%), oral lesions (67%), oral pain (64%), or oral trauma (65%). Lack of referral sources (64%) and unavailability of oral health professionals to provide on site basic oral health services (63%) were the leading factors that discourage the integration of oral health services in the centers. An appreciation for the benefits of oral health (73%) and a knowledgeable clinician to perform oral health services (68%) were the leading factors that encourage the integration of oral health services into primary care nursing centers. These data could be useful in planning, implementing, and

  8. Rapidkl Bus Service in City Center, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: An Epitome of Good Service?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Aziz Abdullah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Public transportation in Kuala Lumpur (the capital city of Malaysia serves the daily commuting needs of all strata of society. To meet the ever increasing needs of reliable public transport in and around the capital city, the Rangkaian Pengangkutan Integrasi Deras Sdn Bhd (RapidKL has been established. Notwithstanding the effort by the company to provide the best public service, it seems there are more brickbats than bouquet of flowers given at the level of service rendered. Gamut of complaints range from late arrival, overcrowding, poor customer service, and bad general upkeep of the bus to frequent mechanical letdown. Hence, this research attempts to ascertain factors which influence the latitude of customer satisfaction towards RapidKL bus service in the Klang Valley. The picked independent variables of service quality; consumer satisfaction and dissatisfaction are assessed. The findings indentify factors that influence customers’ satisfaction to choose bus as a public transportation. The results will be used to suggest plan of improvement so that the public can experience better service in the Klang Valley.

  9. Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Need Additional Management Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    H 4 , 2 0 1 5 Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Need Additional Management Oversight Report No. DODIG-2015...04 MAR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Naval...of Defense that supports the warfighter; promotes accountability , integrity, and efficiency; advises the Secretary of Defense and Congress; and

  10. Competitive service centers location in the cities with aim to reduce traffic (Case study: Health centers location in the city if Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Moradi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract   Distribution of goods and services in cities is of utmost importance. Selecting appropriate venues for different service centers in a city not only enables the citizens to access these services much more easily, but also reduces the traffic load caused by trips made to reach them. Unfortunately, the lack of a correct urban planning has led to inappropriate formation of many cities around the world in terms of the locations assumed for different service centers. Since the private sector has been given the responsibility to construct most of these centers, changing their current locations may be restricted due to legal obligations. Therefore, it seems necessary for the government to construct new service centers with high competitive facilities to attract customers and to compete with those built by the private sector. In this paper, the selection of appropriate locations to construct new service centers has been studied. Such locations have been selected in a way to fulfill goals such as rapid and easy accessibility for the customers and reduction of traffic drawbacks caused by the related trips. In this regard, a model for service centers with restricted capacity has been designed and a parallel simulated annealing algorithm has been proposed to solve it. Finally, the proposed algorithm has been utilized to locate the health centers around the city of Isfahan and its efficiency has been investigated. The findings highlight the accuracy and speed of the proposed algorithm in location of the health centers of Isfahan.

  11. Using the "customer service framework" to successfully implement patient- and family-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani; Bhat, Anita; Seol, Yoon-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing momentum toward patient- and family-centered care at the federal policy level, the organizational literature remains divided on its effectiveness, especially in regard to its key dimension of involving patients and families in treatment decisions and safety practices. Although some have argued for the universal adoption of patient involvement, others have questioned both the effectiveness and feasibility of patient involvement. In this article, we apply a well-established theoretical perspective, that is, the Service Quality Model (SQM) (also known as the "customer service framework") to the health care context, to reconcile the debate related to patient involvement. The application helps support the case for universal adoption of patient involvement and also question the arguments against it. A key contribution of the SQM lies in highlighting a set of fundamental service quality determinants emanating from basic consumer service needs. It also provides a simple framework for understanding how gaps between consumer expectations and management perceptions of those expectations can affect the gap between "expected" and "perceived" service quality from a consumer's perspective. Simultaneously, the SQM also outlines "management requirements" for the successful implementation of a customer service strategy. Applying the SQM to the health care context therefore, in addition to reconciling the debate on patient involvement, helps identify specific steps health care managers could take to successfully implement patient- and family-centered care. Correspondingly, the application also provides insights into strategies for the successful implementation of policy recommendations related to patient- and family-centered care in health care organizations.

  12. Web Services at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S.; Baldwin, R.; Del Greco, S.; Lott, N.; Rutledge, G.

    2007-12-01

    NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) currently archives over 1.5 petabytes of climatological data from various networks and sources including in-situ, numerical models, radar and satellite. Access to these datasets is evolving from interactive web interfaces utilizing database technology to standardized web services in a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). NCDC is currently offering several web services using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), XML over Representational State Transfer (REST/XML), Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) / Web Feature Service (WFS) / Web Coverage Service (WCS) and OPeNDAP web service protocols. These services offer users a direct connection between their client applications and NCDC data servers. In addition, users may embed access to the services in custom applications to efficiently navigate and subset data in an automated fashion. NCDC currently provides gridded numerical model data through a THREDDS Data Server and GrADS Data Server which offers OPeNDAP and WCS access. In-situ network metadata are available through WMS and WFS while the corresponding time-series data are accessible through SOAP and REST web services. These in-situ services are a part of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science (CUAHSI) WaterOneFlow services, a consolidated access system for hydrologic data, and comply with the WaterOneFlow specifications. NCDC's Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI), which provides user access to archives of several datasets critical to the detection and evaluation of severe weather, is also accessible through REST/XML services. Providing cataloging, access and search capabilities for many of NCDC's datasets using community driven standards is a top priority for the ever increasing data volumes being archived at NCDC. Providing interoperable access is critical to supporting data stewardship across multiple scientific disciplines and user types. This demonstration will

  13. Community-Centered Service Learning: A Transformative Lens for Teaching-Learning in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Nan Russell

    2016-04-01

    Although service learning has been proposed as a teaching-learning modality in response to an ongoing challenge to transform nursing education, there is a risk to community and student when service learning is poorly conceived. A community-centered service learning approach founded on a nursing theoretical perspective and community model is explored as a way to honor the wisdom and perspective of the community in changing while illuminating a new way of being a nurse in community for the nursing student. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. 20 CFR 670.955 - Are center operators and service providers subject to Federal audits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Administrative... arranges for the survey, audit, or evaluation of each Job Corps center and service provider at least once every three years, by Federal auditors or independent public accountants. The Secretary may arrange...

  15. The state of client-centered public service delivery in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; de Vries, Sjoerd A.; van der Geest, Thea; van Dijk, Johannes A.G.M.; Arendsen, R.; Wimmer, Maria A.; Scholl, Hans J.; Janssen, Marijn; Traunmüller, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Businesses and citizens demand a better and more client-centered way of service delivery from public organizations. As society becomes more complex, dynamic and diverse, public organizations need to adapt to this demand. Conversely, our perception is that public organizations might still treat their

  16. The state of client-centered public service delivery in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Jurjen; Vries, de Sjoerd; Geest, van der Thea; Dijk, van Jan; Wimmer, Maria A.; Scholl, Hans J.; Janssen, Marijn; Traunmüller, Roland

    2009-01-01

    Businesses and citizens demand a better and more client-centered way of service delivery from public organizations. As society becomes more complex, dynamic and diverse, public organizations need to adapt to this demand. Conversely, our perception is that public organizations might still treat their

  17. Establishment of a Separate Psychology Service at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    Sheila Forsythe, Barbara J. Morgan); the Department of Psychology at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (CAPT Frank Mullins and...Services w2 1l have to be configured to specific staffs, available resources, and missions. To enhance leadership opportunities and carper rr𔄁-0ssion fe

  18. Timely Result-Data Offloading for Improved HPC Center Scratch Provisioning and Serviceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, Henri [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Modern High-Performance Computing (HPC) centers are facing a data deluge from emerging scientific applications. Supporting large data entails a significant commitment of the highthroughput center storage system, scratch space. However, the scratch space is typically managed using simple purge policies, without sophisticated end-user data services to balance resource consumption and user serviceability. End-user data services such as offloading are performed using point-to-point transfers that are unable to reconcile center s purge and users delivery deadlines, unable to adapt to changing dynamics in the end-toend data path and are not fault-tolerant. Such inefficiencies can be prohibitive to sustaining high performance. In this paper, we address the above issues by designing a framework for the timely, decentralized offload of application result data. Our framework uses an overlay of user-specified intermediate and landmark sites to orchestrate a decentralized fault-tolerant delivery. We have implemented our techniques within a production job scheduler (PBS) and data transfer tool (BitTorrent). Our evaluation using both a real implementation and supercomputer job log-driven simulations show that: the offloading times can be significantly reduced (90.4% for a 5 GB data transfer); the exposure window can be minimized while also meeting center-user Service Level Agreements.

  19. 41 CFR 101-30.504 - Cataloging data from Defense Logistics Services Center (DLSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Cataloging data from Defense Logistics Services Center (DLSC). 101-30.504 Section 101-30.504 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY...

  20. The Center of Excellence Model for Information Services. CLIR Publication No. 163

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Joy; Diaz, José; Henry, Geneva; Fliss, Susan; Culshaw, John; Gendron, Heather; Cawthorne, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded a group of seven librarians from the Research Library Leadership Fellows program of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) a planning grant to examine the center of excellence (CoE) model for information services. Used in a variety of industries, CoEs are designed to attract the most talented…

  1. A laundry's reincarnation. Hospital Cooperative Laundry, Denver, CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-15

    It started out as an off-site hospital laundry, then was leased to a commercial operator, now it is a cooperative plant that serves several accounts in the Denver area. See what makes Hospital Cooperative Laundry tick.

  2. Denver Coal Basin boundary from 1999 National Coal Resource Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This ArcView shapefile contains a polygon representing the extent of the Denver coal basin boundary. This theme was created specifically for the National Coal...

  3. Strengthening Climate Services Capabilities and Regional Engagement at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, E.

    2008-12-01

    The demand for sector-based climate information is rapidly expanding. In order to support this demand, it is crucial that climate information is managed in an effective, efficient, and user-conscious manner. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center is working closely with numerous partners to develop a comprehensive interface that is authoritative, accessible, and responsive to a variety of sectors, stakeholders, and other users. This talk will explore these dynamics and activities, with additional perspectives on climate services derived from the regional and global experiences of the NOAA Integrated Data and Environmental Applications (IDEA) Center in the Pacific. The author will explore the importance of engaging partners and customers in the development, implementation and emergence of a national climate service program. The presentation will draw on the author's experience in climate science and risk management programs in the Pacific, development of regional and national climate services programs and insights emerging from climate services development efforts in NCDC. In this context, the author will briefly discuss some of guiding principles for effective climate services and applications including: - Early and continuous dialogue, partnership and collaboration with users/customers; - Establishing and sustaining trust and credibility through a program of shared learning and joint problem- solving; - Understanding the societal context for climate risk management and using a problem-focused approach to the development of products and services; - Addressing information needs along a continuum of timescales from extreme events to long-term change; and - Embedding education, outreach and communications activities as critical program elements in effective climate services. By way of examples, the author will reference lessons learned from: early Pacific Island climate forecast applications and climate assessment activities; the implementation of the Pacific Climate

  4. The Cost analysis of cervical cancer screening services provided by Damavand health center in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Chouhdari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, the health sector in many countries is facing with severe resource constraints; hence it is absolutely necessary that cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness assessment have a major role in design of health services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-benefit and effectiveness of cervical cancer screening service (Pap smear test done by the health centers in Damavand County in 2013.  Methods: This is a descriptive study with cross-sectional method. All data was extracted from existing documents in Damavand health network.Cost of service screening for doing Pap smear test (manpower costs of performing the service, the cost of transferring samples, water, electricity, telephone and gas was estimated in all health centers then results, were compared with the incomes of this service.  Results: Screening program coverage was 22.3%, 6.9% and 6.05% in 2011, 2012 and 2013 respectively. All costs and incomes of units performing Pap smear screening test were calculated. Entire costs and incomes of this service during 2013 were respectively 303,009,000 and 11,640,000 RLS equal $12,227 and $496.73. Therefore, the cost-benefit ratio of this screening test was approximately 0.040.  Conclusion: The costs of units performing cervical cancer screening test in Damavand Health Center were much more than this benefit and because of a none-positive Pap smear test in spite of high cost, performing this test in Damavand health centers was not cost effective.

  5. AN ANALYSIS ON THE DETERMINANTS OF SERVICE QUALITY PERCEIVED BY MEMBERS OF THE FITNESS CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir YILDIZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, it is aimed to determine the determinants of service quality perceived by fitness center members. Scanning model from quantitative research methods was used in the research. The study group consisted of 301 women and 390 men in total 691 members who participated the research voluntarily and were selected through an easily accessible sample. The "Sport-Fitness Centers Perceived Service Quality Scale (SFC-PSQS" developed by Uçan (2007 was used in the study. In the analysis of the data, independent t-test, correlation analysis and logistic regression tests were applied. According to obtained findings, significant and moderate relationships were determined between service quality sub-dimensions in positive direction whereas Independent T test results showed that service quality perceptions of participants who evaluated the program as expensive were found to be significantly lower in all sub-dimensions. Considering the logistic regression results, it was determined that variable of "physical environment quality" from perceived service quality sub-dimensions had an effect on the level of program fees of the members. It seems that 1 unit increase in physical environment quality variable caused 6.1% decrease in "program fee prediction" related to odds value. It can be stated that 11% of the total variance of program fee levels predicts perceived service quality. As a result, it is considered that only one factor cannot be effective in ensuring the continuity of sport-fitness center customers and the sustainability of the business. This is because factors such as customer expectations, equipment, experience of fitness center, customer loyalty, physical appearance that may affect individual consumer satisfaction are important factors.

  6. The Cost analysis of cervical cancer screening services provided by Damavand health center in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Chouhdari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, the health sector in many countries is facing with severe resource constraints; hence it is absolutely necessary that cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness assessment have a major role in design of health services. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-benefit and effectiveness of cervical cancer screening service (Pap smear test done by the health centers in Damavand County in 2013.  Methods: This is a descriptive study with cross-sectional method. All data was extracted from existing documents in Damavand health network.Cost of service screening for doing Pap smear test (manpower costs of performing the service, the cost of transferring samples, water, electricity, telephone and gas was estimated in all health centers then results, were compared with the incomes of this service.  Results: Screening program coverage was 22.3%, 6.9% and 6.05% in 2011, 2012 and 2013 respectively. All costs and incomes of units performing Pap smear screening test were calculated. Entire costs and incomes of this service during 2013 were respectively 303,009,000 and 11,640,000 RLS equal $12,227 and $496.73. Therefore, the cost-benefit ratio of this screening test was approximately 0.040.  Conclusion: The costs of units performing cervical cancer screening test in Damavand Health Center were much more than this benefit and because of a none-positive Pap smear test in spite of high cost, performing this test in Damavand health centers was not cost effective.

  7. EarthScope Data Access Services at the IRIS Data Management Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamb, L.; Weertman, B.; Trabant, C.

    2008-12-01

    To meet the data management and access challenges of EarthScope, the IRIS Data Management Center is building a broad range of new and leveraged data discovery and access services. This collection of SOAP- based and REST-style web services support both the EarthScope Data Portal and IRIS DMC's operational needs. The services provide access to station metadata, waveform inventory and data, and data products from the SPADE product archive. The EarthScope Data Portal provides a single point of access to all data and products from three EarthScope component data centers: IRIS (USArray), UNAVCO (PBO), and ICDP (SAFOD). The Portal allows users to search for EarthScope stations and data matching specific search constraints. Selected data and data products can be added to a data cart for final packaging and download to the user's machine. Defining a single common service interface for all of the EarthScope components was one of the primary challenges of the Portal's development. This poster presents the design and implementation of the IRIS data access web services as it applies to the EarthScope Portal as well as a standalone service framework for the IRIS DMC.

  8. Analysis of the Service Quality of Medical Centers Using Servqual Model (Case:Shaheed Rahnemoon Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zare Ahmadabadi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many organizations, especially service oriented ones, relative to their goals and mission, have a special view towards quality phenomena and its management. Methods: This paper analyzes medical service quality in one case; The internal section of Shaheed Rahnemoon Hospital Based on the basis of gap analysis model and Servqual technique. A questionnaire was designed and applied to measure expectations and perceptions of patients and personnel of the hospital. Results: On application of non-parametric statistical tests, we propose certain recommendations. These tests drive on five conceptual dimensions of service quality including intangibility, responsiveness, reliability, assurance and empathy. Results show that patients in this section were satisfied from the service provider’s responsiveness, but there are significant differences between expectations and perceptions in other dimensions. Conclusion: The service quality analysis models are useful for managers of medical centers to distinguish gaps between the two sides of service representation; patients and medical centers personnel. Ultimately, they can reinforce strengths and control weaknesses.

  9. Interim report on the scientific investigations in the Animas River watershed, Colorado to facilitate remediation decisions by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service, March 29, 2000 meeting, Denver, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The joint U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Department of Agriculture Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative (AMLI) was developed as a collaborative effort between the Federal land management agencies (FLMA, that is the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1996. The stated goal of the AML Initiative was to develop a strategy for gathering and communicating the scientific information needed to develop effective and cost-efficient remediation of abandoned mines within the framework of a watershed. Four primary objectives of the AMLI are to: 1. Provide the scientific information needed (in the short-term) by the FLMAs to make decisions related to the design and implementation of cleanup actions, 2. Develop a multi-disciplined, multi-division approach that integrates geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and ecological information into a knowledge base for sound decision making, 3. Transfer technologies developed within the scientific programs of the USGS to the field and demonstrate their suitability to solve real, practical problems, and 4. Establish working relationships among involved members of land management and regulatory agencies within the framework of a watershed approach to the cleanup of abandoned mines. Long-term process-based research, including development of analytical tools, is recognized as being critical to the long-term success in remediating watersheds impacted by historical mining activities (AML 5-year plan, http://amli.usgs.gov/amli). In a meeting of Federal agencies (U.S. Bureau of Land Management [BLM], U.S. Bureau of Reclamation [BOR], U.S. National Park Service [NPS], U.S. Forest Service [USFS], the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [F&WS]), and State agencies (Colorado Division of Public Health and Environment, Colorado Division of Mines and Geology), several watersheds were examined within the state whose water quality was

  10. Management is performance: strategies for client-centered practice in social service organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowdy, E A; Rapp, C A; Poertner, J

    1993-01-01

    The political nature of human services is a given. The multiple constituency dilemma coupled with the retrenchment of the 1970s and 1980s has led to a great gulf separating managers from clients, and managers from front-line personnel. These political factors have been reinforced by management theory and the blind adoption of "state-of-the-art" management technologies developed in business and the military, and the separation has gained legitimacy. The result is less than optimal service, a dissatisfied workforce, and continued attacks for being inefficient, self-serving, and ineffective. The purpose of this article is to portray an alternative form of human service management. Its vision places clients center stage in our organizations and places the manager as the director and producer. It accepts the premises that "management is the principle engine of progress" (Levitt, 1976) and that management is performance. It then lays a foundation for client-centered management by presenting four principles for social service administrators who desire to adopt this perspective in their daily practice. An elaboration of the skills and methods of client-centered management can be found in a recently published text (Rapp & Poertner, 1991).

  11. Commentary: the role of mental health services in preadjudicated juvenile detention centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migdole, Scott; Robbins, Judith P

    2007-01-01

    The role of preadjudicated juvenile detention centers (JDCs) in treating children and adolescents with mental health needs has continued to receive national attention. Legal actions mandating improved health care services over the past decade, coupled with a national focus on detainees' mental health needs, have led to the increased presence of mental health professionals in JDCs. In this context, we must build on the current "call to action" and develop innovative blueprints for the provision of mental health services for detained youth. Although operationalizing this movement is complicated, we must be prepared to sustain its effects by developing effective communication and planning among correctional health care organizations, universities, municipalities, and other stakeholders.

  12. A step towards realizing a pan-European Climate Service - Activities of the Climate Service Center in the ECLISE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B.

    2012-04-01

    The overall objective of the EU funded project ECLISE (Enabling Climate Information Service for Europe) is to take the first step towards the realisation of a European Climate Service. The approach of this pan-European effort is to conduct 26 case studies in which researchers closely cooperate with users of climate information to develop and demonstrate local climate services to support climate adaption policies. ECLISE focuses on climate-vulnerable regions in Europe, and analyzes four sectoral levels: cities, water resources, coastal defence and energy production. The ECLISE approach covers all elements of flow of information including climate modelling, impact modelling and implementation of simulations into the decision making process on adaptation measures development. The Climate Service Center Germany (CSC) is one of 12 project partners and leads the work package integration and synthesis of project results. CSC contributes to the maintenance of dialogue between researchers and users and conducts climate simulation. One main task of CSC in ECLISE is to provide an outline and proof of concept for a pan-European Climate Service as a key outcome of the project. To reach this objective the first step is to provide an inventory of existing Climate Service initiatives around the globe. The ECLISE case study results will be analysed to investigate the functionality of local Climate Services within these demonstrations. In cooperation with other modelling groups CSC conducts climate simulations for whole Europe with a spatial resolution of 10 Km and for climate-vulnerable regions in particular with high spatial resolution (2-4 Km). These results will be implemented for further local impact and adaptation studies which will be done in close cooperation with local decision makers. The users of climate information in ECLISE are representatives from local and regional authorities, municipalities and decision makers from enterprises. In 2012 a broader set of European

  13. The Servicescape in the Fitness Center: Measuring Fitness Center’s Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Tae Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since fitness centers rely heavily on the physical environment of their service, an understanding of the impact of the physical environment on the participants is vitally important. Despite the importance of the servicescape within the fitness center, no conceptual or empirical research has been attempted that might conceptualize and measure the servicescape in a fitness center. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of what elements affect consumers’ perceptions of the servicescape within the participants in fitness centers. After conducting an item analysis and an exploratory factor analysis. An eight-factor solution emerged and was found to be statistically and conceptually sound. The eight factors are as follows: (a accessibility, (b facility layout, (c facility design, (d equipment condition, (e ambience, (f facility system, (g signage, and (h social factor. The results were positive in that the new scales that were designed to measure important factors that comprising servicescape for fitness center appeared to possess sufficient reliability and validity to encourage their further testing in other fitness centers.

  14. Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center Need Additional Management Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-28

    HEALTH AFFAIRS) AUDITOR GENERAL , DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY SUBJECT: Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center Need...accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards. We considered management comments on a draft of this report when preparing the final...Inspector General . RHCE UBO will adhere to ABACUS grouping code reports and the message logs under the legacy process to ensure tracking of delinquent

  15. An Electronic Commerce Program for the Defence Finance and Accounting Service-Columbus Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    AD-A237 636 JU0 0 u5 11111 IN III III1 m11i AN ELECTRONIC COMMERCE PROGRAM FOR THE DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE - COLUMBUS CENTER Report...MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE 6400 Goldsboro Road Bethesda, Maryland 20817-5886 91-04373 LMI Executive Summary AN ELECTRONIC COMMERCE PROGRAM FOR THE DEFENSE...some Electronic Commerce techniques, such as electronic data interchange and electronic funds transfer. We believe additional applications of those

  16. Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) Products, Services and Application from NASA Hydrology Data and Information Services Center (HDISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongliang; Beaudoing, Hiroko K.; Rodell, matthew; Teng, William L.; Vollmer, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is generating a series of land surface state (e.g., soil moisture and surface temperature) and flux (e.g., evaporation and sensible heat flux) products simulated by four land surface models (CLM, Mosaic, Noah and VIC). These products are now accessible at the Hydrology Data and Information Services Center (HDISC), a component of the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). Current data holdings include a set of 1.0 degree resolution data products from the four models, covering 1979 to the present; and a 0.25 degree data product from the Noah model, covering 2000 to the present. The products are in Gridded Binary (GRIB) format and can be accessed through a number of interfaces. Users can search the products through keywords and perform on-the-fly spatial and parameter subsetting and format conversion of selected data. More advanced visualization, access and analysis capabilities will be available in the future. The long term GLDAS data are used to develop climatology of water cycle components and to explore the teleconnections of droughts and pluvial.

  17. Use-Inspired Data Information Services for NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Leveraging environmental data and information to make specific, informed decisions is critical to the Nation's economy, environment, and public safety. The ability to successfully transform past and recent data into environmental intelligence is predicated on the articulation of use-inspired, actionable requirements for product and service development. With the formation of the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), there is a unique opportunity to revolutionize the delivery of information services in support of customer requirements. Such delivery cuts across the disciplines of meteorology, geophysics, and oceanography, as well as regions and sectors for the United States. At NCEI, information services are based on a two-way dialogue that (i) raises awareness of environmental data products and services and (ii) captures user needs for product and services sustainment and development. To this end, NCEI information services has developed a formal process for collecting user needs and translating them into requirements. This process reflects economically-prevalent and regionally-focused sectors based on Census Bureau classifications.

  18. SOCaaS: Security Operations Center as a Service for Cloud Computing Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad F. Alruwaili

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The management of information security operations is a complex task, especially in a cloud environment.  The cloud service layers and multi-tenancy architecture creates a complex environment in which to develop and manage an information security incident management and compliance program. This paper presents a novel security operations center (SOC framework as a service for cloud service providers and customers. The goal is to protect cloud services against new and existing attacks as well as comply with security policies and regulatory requirements. The SOCaaS design is based on multi-governance and defense in depth models and fits within the multi-tenancy cloud services. A SOCaaS provider is a trusted entity that collects event and system logs from cloud systems to ensure proactive incident management and compliance with regulations. The proposed approach provides better managed services for customers wanting to outsource their information security operations to attain reliable, transparent, and efficient security and privacy.

  19. Leveraging Terminology Services for Extract-Transform-Load Processes: A User-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kevin J; Jiang, Guoqian; Brue, Scott M; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Terminology services serve an important role supporting clinical and research applications, and underpin a diverse set of processes and use cases. Through standardization efforts, terminology service-to-system interactions can leverage well-defined interfaces and predictable integration patterns. Often, however, users interact more directly with terminologies, and no such blueprints are available for describing terminology service-to-user interactions. In this work, we explore the main architecture principles necessary to build a user-centered terminology system, using an Extract-Transform-Load process as our primary usage scenario. To analyze our architecture, we present a prototype implementation based on the Common Terminology Services 2 (CTS2) standard using the Patient-Centered Network of Learning Health Systems (LHSNet) project as a concrete use case. We perform a preliminary evaluation of our prototype architecture using three architectural quality attributes: interoperability, adaptability and usability. We find that a design-time focus on user needs, cognitive models, and existing patterns is essential to maximize system utility.

  20. The volume and mix of inpatient services provided by academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, E; Valente, E; Levin, R J; Bhak, K J; Griner, P F

    1996-10-01

    This is the first in a series of AAMC Papers that analyze the clinical spectrum of patients treated in the nation's teaching hospitals. As stated in the separate Introduction, "The Transformation of Data into Knowledge," subsequent papers will examine trends in the provision of care to the indigent and make comparisons of quality of care among teaching and non-teaching hospitals. These analyses, carried out by the AAMC's Center for the Assessment and Management of Change in Academic Medicine (CAMCAM), are made possible by a reorganization of the AAMC's information infrastructure, in which many formerly separate databases have been linked. The Introduction concludes with a description of specific AAMC-CAMCAM initiatives that are being planned. This initial analysis examines the volume and mix of clinical services provided by AMCs, examines trends in these services over time, and compares services provided at different AMCs, in different markets, and between AMCs and non-teaching hospitals. Data from a variety of sources were used in these secondary analyses. The American Hospital Association's Annual Survey of Hospitals database was used to analyze volumes of inpatient services provided in AMCs and other hospitals. The AAMC's Clinical-Administrative Data Service database was used to analyze the volume and mix of clinical services provided in individual AMCs. The Agency for Health Care Policy and Research's Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to compare the mix of clinical services provided in AMCs and other hospitals. Volumes of inpatient services in AMCs changed little between 1991 and 1994 and totaled six million hospitalizations, 41 million inpatient days, and two million inpatient surgeries in 1994. The mix of inpatient services in AMCs also showed little variation over time among individual AMCs, in markets with both high and low managed care penetrations, between public and private AMCs, or between AMCs and non-teaching hospitals, with the ten most frequent

  1. Secure Cloud-Based Solutions for Different eHealth Services in Spanish Rural Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Lopez-Coronado, Miguel; Garcia-Zapirain Soto, Begonya; Mendez-Zorrilla, Amaia

    2015-07-27

    The combination of eHealth applications and/or services with cloud technology provides health care staff—with sufficient mobility and accessibility for them—to be able to transparently check any data they may need without having to worry about its physical location. The main aim of this paper is to put forward secure cloud-based solutions for a range of eHealth services such as electronic health records (EHRs), telecardiology, teleconsultation, and telediagnosis. The scenario chosen for introducing the services is a set of four rural health centers located within the same Spanish region. iCanCloud software was used to perform simulations in the proposed scenario. We chose online traffic and the cost per unit in terms of time as the parameters for choosing the secure solution on the most optimum cloud for each service. We suggest that load balancers always be fitted for all solutions in communication together with several Internet service providers and that smartcards be used to maintain identity to an appropriate extent. The solutions offered via private cloud for EHRs, teleconsultation, and telediagnosis services require a volume of online traffic calculated at being able to reach 2 Gbps per consultation. This may entail an average cost of €500/month. The security solutions put forward for each eHealth service constitute an attempt to centralize all information on the cloud, thus offering greater accessibility to medical information in the case of EHRs alongside more reliable diagnoses and treatment for telecardiology, telediagnosis, and teleconsultation services. Therefore, better health care for the rural patient can be obtained at a reasonable cost.

  2. Defining multiple organ failure after major trauma: A comparison of the Denver, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment and Marshall scoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Lynn; Watkinson, Peter; Young, J Duncan; Willett, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Background Postinjury multiple organ failure (MOF) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. A large number of scoring systems have been proposed to define MOF, with no gold-standard. The purpose of this study was to compare three commonly used scores – the Denver PostInjury Multiple Organ Failure Score, the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and the Marshall Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score – by descriptive analysis of the populations described by each score, and their predictive ability for mortality. Methods An observational cohort study was performed at a UK trauma center on major trauma patients requiring ICU admission from 2003-2011. A novel trauma database was created, merging national audit data with local electronic monitoring systems. Data were collected on demographics, laboratory results, pharmacy, interventions, and hourly physiological monitoring. The primary outcome measure was mortality within 100 days from injury. Sensitivity analyses and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to assess the predictive ability of MOF scores for mortality. Results In total, 491 patients were included in the trauma database. MOF incidence ranged from 22.8% (Denver) to 40.5% (Marshall) to 58.5% (SOFA). MOF definition did not affect timing of onset, but did alter duration and organ failure patterns. Overall mortality was 10.6%, with Denver MOF associated with the greatest increased risk of death (Hazard Ratio 3.87, 95% CI 2.24-6.66). No significant difference was observed in area under the ROC curve values between scores. Marked differences were seen in relative predictors, with Denver showing highest specificity (81%) and SOFA highest sensitivity (73%) for mortality. Conclusions The choice of MOF scoring system affects incidence, duration, organ dysfunction patterns and mortality prediction. We would recommend use of the Denver score since it is simplest to calculate, identifies a high-risk group of patients and has the

  3. Highlights of Space Weather Services/Capabilities at NASA/GSFC Space Weather Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Zheng, Yihua; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Maria; Pulkkinen, Antti; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Mays, Leila; Chulaki, Anna; Lee, Hyesook

    2012-01-01

    The importance of space weather has been recognized world-wide. Our society depends increasingly on technological infrastructure, including the power grid as well as satellites used for communication and navigation. Such technologies, however, are vulnerable to space weather effects caused by the Sun's variability. NASA GSFC's Space Weather Center (SWC) (http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov//674/swx services/swx services.html) has developed space weather products/capabilities/services that not only respond to NASA's needs but also address broader interests by leveraging the latest scientific research results and state-of-the-art models hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC: http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov). By combining forefront space weather science and models, employing an innovative and configurable dissemination system (iSWA.gsfc.nasa.gov), taking advantage of scientific expertise both in-house and from the broader community as well as fostering and actively participating in multilateral collaborations both nationally and internationally, NASA/GSFC space weather Center, as a sibling organization to CCMC, is poised to address NASA's space weather needs (and needs of various partners) and to help enhancing space weather forecasting capabilities collaboratively. With a large number of state-of-the-art physics-based models running in real-time covering the whole space weather domain, it offers predictive capabilities and a comprehensive view of space weather events throughout the solar system. In this paper, we will provide some highlights of our service products/capabilities. In particular, we will take the 23 January and the 27 January space weather events as examples to illustrate how we can use the iSWA system to track them in the interplanetary space and forecast their impacts.

  4. INVESTIGATION OF INTENDED SERVICE QUALITY LEVELS IN HEALTH-FITNESS CENTERS IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydoğan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality of services in health-fitness centers a medium-sized city that located in Central Anatolia Region in Turkey. In this study, assessments of the levels of service perceived and expected by the customers under four different dimensions (staff, programme, locker rooms and facility were carried out in order to identify the levels of fitness centers in terms of service quality. The replies provided by 219 members of fitness center who filled out the scale form voluntarily and without skipping any parts were evaluated. In order to measure the service quality of fitness in the study, Service Quality Assessment Scale (SQAS, which was developed by Lam et al. (2005 and whose Turkish adaptation was done by Gürbüz et al. (2005, was used. The SQAS was composed of 4 dimensions (staff, programme, locker rooms and facility and 34 items. In assessing the service quality, Gap Model (Parasuraman, Zeithaml and Berry, 1988 was used; though this method, the gaps were identified by subtracting perception scores from expectation scores. In order to find the differences between the groups, “Paired-Samples "t" test”, “Independent Samples "t" test” and “One way ANOVA” were utilized. When the results obtained and the differences between perception and expectation scores were assessed in terms of dimensions, it was observed that all dimensions had a negative difference. In terms of statistics, it was discovered that there was a meaningful difference in all of staff, programme, locker rooms and facility at the level of p<0,05. Among those, the lowest level of quality was observed to belong to “programme” dimension with the unit of -0,564. Later, with the -0,509-unit difference “locker rooms” dimension, with the -0,487-unit difference “staff” dimension and with the -0,481-unit difference “facility” dimension follow respectively. When it was evaluated according to demographic aspect in the study, it

  5. Report on the feasibility study for improving electric motor service centers in Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, J.S.; Jallouk, P.A.; Staunton, R.H.

    1999-12-10

    On March 3 and 4, 1998, a visit was made to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by two officials from Ghana: Mr. I.K. Mintah, Acting Executive Director, Technical Wing, Ministry of Mines and Energy (MOME) and Dr. A.K. Ofosu-Ahenkorah, Coordinator, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program, MOME. As a result of this visit, Dr. John S. Hsu of ORNL was invited by MOME to visit the Republic of Ghana in order to study the feasibility of improving electric motor service centers in Ghana.

  6. The Progress of LCA Center Denmark After Almost Two Years of Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendal, Jeppe; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2004-01-01

    As the first country in Europe Denmark almost 2 years ago established an official center for Life Cycle Assessments and life cycle approaches as an element of the national IPP (Integrated Product Policy). The Danish EPA lends financial support to this important initiative, the aim of which is to: 1....... promote the use of Life Cycle Assessment and other product-oriented environmental tools in companies, 2. support companies and other in using environmental assessment of products and services, 3. ensure that the effort in the LCA area is based on a solid and scientific basis, and 4. maintain the well...

  7. Goddard Atmospheric Composition Data Center: Aura Data and Services in One Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptoukh, G.; Kempler, S.; Gerasimov, I.; Ahmad, S.; Johnson, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Goddard Atmospheric Composition Data and Information Services Center (AC-DISC) is a portal to the Atmospheric Composition specific, user driven, multi-sensor, on-line, easy access archive and distribution system employing data analysis and visualization, data mining, and other user requested techniques for the better science data usage. It provides convenient access to Atmospheric Composition data and information from various remote-sensing missions, from TOMS, UARS, MODIS, and AIRS, to the most recent data from Aura OMI, MLS, HIRDLS (once these datasets are released to the public), as well as Atmospheric Composition datasets residing at other remote archive site.

  8. Delivering health information services and technologies to urban community health centers: the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E R; McDaniels, C; Crespo, J; Lanier, D

    1997-10-01

    Health professionals cannot address public health issues effectively unless they have immediate access to current biomedical information. This paper reports on one mode of access, the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project, which was supported by the National Library of Medicine through outreach awards in 1995 and 1996. The three-year project is an effort to link the programs and services of the University of Illinois at Chicago Library of the Health Sciences and the Midwest AIDS Training and Education Center with the clinic services of community-based organizations in Chicago. The project was designed to provide electronic access to AIDS-related information for AIDS patients, the affected community, and their care givers. The project also provided Internet access and training and continued access to library resources. The successful initiative suggests a working model for outreach to health professionals in an urban setting.

  9. Balanced scorecards as a tool for developing patient-centered pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwere, Emmanuel N; Keating, Ellen A; Weber, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Having accurate data is essential for the pharmacy director to manage the department and develop patient-centered pharmacy services. A balanced scorecard (BSC) of essential department data, which is a broad view of a department's function beyond its financial performance, is an important part of any department's strategic plan. This column describes how the pharmacy director builds and promotes a department's BSC. Specifically, this article reviews how the BSC supports the department's mission and vision, describes the metrics of the BSC and how they are collected, and recommends how the pharmacy director can effectively use the scorecard results in promoting the pharmacy. If designed properly and updated consistently, a BSC can present a broad view of the pharmacy's performance, serve as a guide for strategic decision making, and improve on the quality of its services.

  10. Climate information products for users: Examples from the German Climate Service Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsler, Andreas; Jacob, Daniela; Brasseur, Guy; Pfeifer, Susanne; Rechid, Diana; Hennemuth, Barbara; Keup-Thiel, Elke

    2014-05-01

    In 2009, the German Federal Government (BMBF) established the German Climate Service Center (CSC) as part of the Hightech-Strategy for protection against climate change and the German Adaptation Strategy. The fundamental objective of the CSC is to support society (business, administration) to cope with climate risks and opportunities. In the first five years, the CSC developed a set of tools and products in order to provide climate information to users. These products were mostly developed in close cooperation with the customers and are therefore sector-specific and tailored to the actual users needs. In the presentation a selection of those user-tailored climate service products such as Climate-Fact-Sheets or Climate Signal Maps will be introduced and their application will be highlighted.

  11. Balanced Scorecards As a Tool for Developing Patient-Centered Pharmacy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwere, Emmanuel N.; Keating, Ellen A.; Weber, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Having accurate data is essential for the pharmacy director to manage the department and develop patient-centered pharmacy services. A balanced scorecard (BSC) of essential department data, which is a broad view of a department’s function beyond its financial performance, is an important part of any department’s strategic plan. This column describes how the pharmacy director builds and promotes a department’s BSC. Specifically, this article reviews how the BSC supports the department’s mission and vision, describes the metrics of the BSC and how they are collected, and recommends how the pharmacy director can effectively use the scorecard results in promoting the pharmacy. If designed properly and updated consistently, a BSC can present a broad view of the pharmacy’s performance, serve as a guide for strategic decision making, and improve on the quality of its services. PMID:24958976

  12. Web Services Implementations at Land Process and Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, M.; Bambacus, M.; Lynnes, C.; Sauer, B.; Falke, S.; Yang, W.

    2007-12-01

    NASA's vast array of scientific data within its Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) is especially valuable to both traditional research scientists as well as the emerging market of Earth Science Information Partners. For example, the air quality science and management communities are increasingly using satellite derived observations in their analyses and decision making. The Air Quality Cluster in the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) uses web infrastructures of interoperability, or Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), to extend data exploration, use, and analysis and provides a user environment for DAAC products. In an effort to continually offer these NASA data to the broadest research community audience, and reusing emerging technologies, both NASA's Goddard Earth Science (GES) and Land Process (LP) DAACs have engaged in a web services pilot project. Through these projects both GES and LP have exposed data through the Open Geospatial Consortiums (OGC) Web Services standards. Reusing several different existing applications and implementation techniques, GES and LP successfully exposed a variety data, through distributed systems to be ingested into multiple end-user systems. The results of this project will enable researchers world wide to access some of NASA's GES & LP DAAC data through OGC protocols. This functionality encourages inter-disciplinary research while increasing data use through advanced technologies. This paper will concentrate on the implementation and use of OGC Web Services, specifically Web Map and Web Coverage Services (WMS, WCS) at GES and LP DAACs, and the value of these services within scientific applications, including integration with the DataFed air quality web infrastructure and in the development of data analysis web applications.

  13. Waterfowl mortality : Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Each year since 1951, during the fall, winter, and spring months, an outbreak of a waterfowl disease of unknown etiology has occurred on the lakes of the Rocky...

  14. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Published in 2006, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Polk County, Wisconsin.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2006....

  15. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Published in 2003, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Greenwood County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2003....

  16. Denver Developmental Screening Test: Cultural Variations in Southeast Asian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Virginia; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The Denver Developmental Screening Tests (DDST) was administered to 25 Southeast Asian children (one to five years old) and scores of 150 other DDSTs performed on Southeast Asian children were reviewed. Findings suggested that scores may reflect differences in social and cultural experiences between these children and the standardization sample.…

  17. Experience in Collaboration: McDenver at McDonald's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Clarice Sue

    2002-01-01

    The McDenver at McDonald's project provided a nontraditional, community-based teaching and learning environment for faculty and students in a health, physical education, and recreation (HPER) department and a school of nursing. Children and parents come to McDonald's, children received developmental screenings, and parents completed conferences…

  18. Electronic Book Usage: A Survey at the University of Denver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine-Clark, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2005, the University of Denver's Penrose Library conducted a survey of its users to determine their degree of awareness of electronic books, how and why they use them, and their level of satisfaction with the format. It is clear from vendor-supplied usage statistics that electronic books are used, but it is not clear how or why…

  19. Electronic Book Usage: A Survey at the University of Denver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine-Clark, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2005, the University of Denver's Penrose Library conducted a survey of its users to determine their degree of awareness of electronic books, how and why they use them, and their level of satisfaction with the format. It is clear from vendor-supplied usage statistics that electronic books are used, but it is not clear how or why…

  20. Examination Of The Influence Of Service Quality On Membership Renewal In Fitness Centers In San Francisco Bay Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Chih Wei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporations have to learn how to satisfy their customers’ various demands as the era of interactivity with customers has emerged (Pepper & Rogers, 1999. For fitness center, customers’ demands are increasing and diversified. Therefore, service quality is an index of quality assessment from customers for service-producing industries. Furthermore, the concept of corporate expansion and customer relationship has become the foundation of service-providers for higher profitability through customers’ renewal of membership. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of service quality on the renewal willingness of fitness center membership. Customers from four fitness centers in the San Francisco Bay Area, USA, were randomly selected for this survey. A total of 50 subjects participated in this survey. The data was analyzed by multiple regression and stepwise regression. The result indicated that the service quality has positive influence on the renewal willingness of membership.

  1. Providing Western Regional Climate Services - Perspectives from the Western Regional Climate Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T. J.; Redmond, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The western United States faces distinct challenges such as persistent drought, dwindling water resources amidst an expanding population, and climate-sensitive alpine environments. The complex terrain of the region compounds these challenges. The Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC), one of six National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) university-based regional climate centers, has been providing climate services since 1986 that support the unique needs of stakeholders in the mountainous region of the western U.S. This includes meteorological data, tools, and products for thousands of stations across the West, and gridded data products, such as based on PRISM for example, that are used for drought assessment among other needs. WRCC and partners have developed numerous web-based tools and products to support decision-making and research pertinent to the West. Changing climate and variability along with the diverse physical and human geographies of the western U.S. require continuous advancements in climate knowledge and applications development. Examples include the need for tools and model downscaling that support and inform adaptation, mitigation and resiliency planning; web-based analytics that would allow users to interact and explore temporal and spatial data and relationships, and products from new satellite sensors that can provide higher resolution information on soil moisture and vegetation health given the sparseness of in-situ observations for the vastness of the West. This presentation provides an overview of some insights, opportunities and challenges of providing current and future climate services in the West.

  2. Student Services/One Stop Centers: A Qualitative Examination of Implementation at Three Post-Secondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Janine M.

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates Student Services/One Stop Centers at three post-secondary institutions, looking at the origination of the centers and success through the lens of behavioral theories. Comparing the 3-stage Group Dynamics Theory of Lewin (1947), Social Learning Theory of Bandura (1977), and the 8-stage Change Management Model of Kotter…

  3. Student Services/One Stop Centers: A Qualitative Examination of Implementation at Three Post-Secondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Janine M.

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates Student Services/One Stop Centers at three post-secondary institutions, looking at the origination of the centers and success through the lens of behavioral theories. Comparing the 3-stage Group Dynamics Theory of Lewin (1947), Social Learning Theory of Bandura (1977), and the 8-stage Change Management Model of Kotter…

  4. Outcomes from Wraparound and Multisystemic Therapy in a Center for Mental Health Services System-of-Care Demonstration Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Leyla Faw; Mustillo, Sarah A.; Burns, Barbara J.; Stephens, Robert L.; Baxter, Beth; Edwards, Dan; DeKraai, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This study examined outcomes for 320 youth in a Center for Mental Health Services system-of-care demonstration site. Youth received wraparound-only (n = 213), MST-only (n = 54), or wraparound + MST (n = 53). Participants were 12 years old on average and mostly White (90%), and 75% were Medicaid-eligible. Service use and functional and clinical…

  5. NASA Ames Research Center R and D Services Directorate Biomedical Systems Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitt, J.; Flynn, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate teams with NASA, other government agencies and/or industry investigators for the development, design, fabrication, manufacturing and qualification testing of space-flight and ground-based experiment hardware for biomedical and general aerospace applications. In recent years, biomedical research hardware and software has been developed to support space-flight and ground-based experiment needs including the E 132 Biotelemetry system for the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF), E 100 Neurolab neuro-vestibular investigation systems, the Autogenic Feedback Systems, and the Standard Interface Glove Box (SIGB) experiment workstation module. Centrifuges, motion simulators, habitat design, environmental control systems, and other unique experiment modules and fixtures have also been developed. A discussion of engineered systems and capabilities will be provided to promote understanding of possibilities for future system designs in biomedical applications. In addition, an overview of existing engineered products will be shown. Examples of hardware and literature that demonstrate the organization's capabilities will be displayed. The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate is available to support the development of new hardware and software systems or adaptation of existing systems to meet the needs of academic, commercial/industrial, and government research requirements. The Ames R&D Services Directorate can provide specialized support for: System concept definition and feasibility Mathematical modeling and simulation of system performance Prototype hardware development Hardware and software design Data acquisition systems Graphical user interface development Motion control design Hardware fabrication and high-fidelity machining Composite materials development and application design Electronic/electrical system design and fabrication System performance verification testing and qualification.

  6. Extension of Small-Scale Postharvest Horticulture Technologies—A Model Training and Services Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Kitinoja

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A pilot Postharvest Training and Services Center (PTSC was launched in October 2012 in Arusha, Tanzania as part of a United States Agency for International Development (USAID funded project. The five key components of the PTSC are (1 training of postharvest trainers, (2 postharvest training and demonstrations for local small-scale clientele, (3 adaptive research, (4 postharvest services, and (5 retail sales of postharvest tools and supplies. During the years of 2011–2012, a one year e-learning program was provided to 36 young horticultural professionals from seven Sub-Saharan African countries. These postharvest specialists went on to train more than 13,000 local farmers, extension workers, food processors, and marketers in their home countries in the year following completion of their course. Evaluators found that these specialists had trained an additional 9300 people by November 2014. When asked about adoption by their local trainees, 79% reported examples of their trainees using improved postharvest practices. From 2012–2013, the project supported 30 multi-day training programs, and the evaluation found that many of the improved practices being promoted were adopted by the trainees and led to increased earnings. Three PTSC components still require attention. Research activities initiated during the project are incomplete, and successful sales of postharvest goods and services will require commitment and improved partnering.

  7. Utilization of Dental Services in Public Health Center: Dental Attendance, Awareness and Felt Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pewa, Preksha; Garla, Bharath K; Dagli, Rushabh; Bhateja, Geetika Arora; Solanki, Jitendra

    2015-10-01

    In rural India, dental diseases occur due to many factors, which includes inadequate or improper use of fluoride and a lack of knowledge regarding oral health and oral hygiene, which prevent proper screening and dental care of oral diseases. The objective of the study was to evaluate the dental attendance, awareness and utilization of dental services in public health center. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 251 study subjects who were visiting dental outpatient department (OPD) of public health centre (PHC), Guda Bishnoi, and Jodhpur using a pretested proforma from month of July 2014 to October 2014. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect the data regarding socioeconomic status and demographic factors affecting the utilization of dental services. Pearson's Chi-square test and step-wise logistic regression were applied for the analysis. Statistically significant results were found in relation to age, educational status, socioeconomic status and gender with dental attendance, dental awareness and felt needs. p-value dental services, thereby increasing the oral health status of the population.

  8. New service interface for River Forecasting Center derived quantitative precipitation estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, David L.

    2013-01-01

    For more than a decade, the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Centers (RFCs) have been estimating spatially distributed rainfall by applying quality-control procedures to radar-indicated rainfall estimates in the eastern United States and other best practices in the western United States to producea national Quantitative Precipitation Estimate (QPE) (National Weather Service, 2013). The availability of archives of QPE information for analytical purposes has been limited to manual requests for access to raw binary file formats that are difficult for scientists who are not in the climatic sciences to work with. The NWS provided the QPE archives to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the contents of the real-time feed from the RFCs are being saved by the USGS for incorporation into the archives. The USGS has applied time-series aggregation and added latitude-longitude coordinate variables to publish the RFC QPE data. Web services provide users with direct (index-based) data access, rendered visualizations of the data, and resampled raster representations of the source data in common geographic information formats.

  9. A Pilot Demonstration of Electrochromic and Thermochromic Windows in the Denver Federal Center, Building 41, Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eleanor S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fernandes, Luis L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Goudey, Chad Howdy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jonsson, Carl Jacob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Curcija, D. Charlie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pang, Xiufeng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DiBartolomeo, Dennis [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hoffmann, Sabine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Chromogenic glazing materials are emerging technologies that tint reversibly from a clear to dark tinted state either passively in response to environmental conditions or actively in response to a command from a switch or building automation system. Switchable coatings on glass manage solar radiation and visible light while enabling unobstructed views to the outdoors. Building energy simulations estimate that actively controlled, near-term chromogenic glazings can reduce perimeter zone heating, ventilation, and airconditioning (HVAC) and lighting energy use by 10-20% and reduce peak electricity demand by 20-30%, achieving energy use levels that are lower than an opaque, insulated wall. This project demonstrates the use of two types of chromogenic windows: thermochromic and electrochromic windows. By 2013, these windows will begin production in the U.S. by multiple vendors at high-volume manufacturing plants, enabling lower cost and larger area window products to be specified. Both technologies are in the late R&D stage of development, where cost reductions and performance improvements are underway. Electrochromic windows have been installed in numerous buildings over the past four years, but monitored energy-efficiency performance has been independently evaluated in very limited applications. Thermochromic windows have been installed in one other building with an independent evaluation, but results have not yet been made public.

  10. NREL PV AR D 11th review meeting, May 13--15, 1992, Denver Marriott City Center, Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This is a collection of abstracts from papers presented at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) research and development review meeting held May 1992. Subject areas covered include solar cell and solar module manufacturing and development, materials, polycrystalline thin films, applications, amorphous silicon, solar cell performance and testing, crystalline silicon and other photovoltaic and safety perspectives. (GHH)

  11. Determining rules for closing customer service centers: A public utility company's fuzzy decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekorvin, Andre; Shipley, Margaret F.; Lea, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    In the present work, we consider the general problem of knowledge acquisition under uncertainty. Simply stated, the problem reduces to the following: how can we capture the knowledge of an expert when the expert is unable to clearly formulate how he or she arrives at a decision? A commonly used method is to learn by examples. We observe how the expert solves specific cases and from this infer some rules by which the decision may have been made. Unique to our work is the fuzzy set representation of the conditions or attributes upon which the expert may possibly base his fuzzy decision. From our examples, we infer certain and possible fuzzy rules for closing a customer service center and illustrate the importance of having the decision closely relate to the conditions under consideration.

  12. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' readmission reports inaccurately describe an institution's decompensated heart failure admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Zachary L; Lai, Pikki; Lewis, Connie M; Lenihan, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    Hospitals typically use Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services' (CMS) Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) administrative reports as the standard of heart failure (HF) admission quantification. We aimed to evaluate the HF admission population identified by CMS HRRP definition of HF hospital admissions compared with a clinically based HF definition. We evaluated all hospital admissions at an academic medical center over 16 months in patients with Medicare fee-for service benefits and age ≥65 years. We compared the CMS HRRP HF definition against an electronic HF identification algorithm. Admissions identified solely by the CMS HF definition were manually reviewed by HF providers. Admissions confirmed with having decompensated HF as the primary problem by manual review or by the HF ID algorithm were deemed "HF positive," whereas those refuted were "HF negative." Of the 1672 all-cause admissions evaluated, 708 (42%) were HF positive. The CMS HF definition identified 440 admissions: sensitivity (54%), specificity (94%), positive predictive value (87%), negative predictive value (74%). The CMS HF definition missed 324 HF admissions because of inclusion/exclusion criteria (15%) and decompensated HF being a secondary diagnosis (85%). The CMS HF definition falsely identified 56 admissions as HF. The most common admission reasons in this cohort included elective pacemaker or defibrillator implantations (n = 13), noncardiac dyspnea (n = 9), left ventricular assist device complications (n = 8), and acute coronary syndrome (n = 6). The CMS HRRP HF report is a poor representation of an institution's HF admissions because of limitations in administrative coding and the HRRP HF report inclusion/exclusion criteria. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Urgent Need to Antibiotic Pharmacokinetic Services for Iranian Health Care Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Hayatshahi

    2013-02-01

    amikacin for both empiric and culture based therapy. In some cases, it is necessary for patient to be on these antibacterial agents for weeks (endocarditis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia, etc..  Fever, white blood cells (WBC besides other clinical measurements are often used to assess the clinical response to antimicrobial agents. On the other hand microbiological tests including cultures and sensitivity results are routinely utilized to guide the therapy. At our medical centers as the clinicians do not see any of the expected responses based on the above measurements, they change the agent or add another antibacterial to the regimen with no consideration of performing appropriate TDM. Based on the most updated guidelines, a vancomycin trough level at the steady state and peak and trough levels for aminoglycosides make it possible for clinicians to optimize the antibacterial doses without necessarily changing the whole regimen and significantly reduce the rate of treatment failures. If an aminoglycoside is dosed as extended interval, then a random level can help to adjust the frequency of the doses. This valuable pharmacokinetic service by clinical pharmacists would be a great asset to healthcare and medical team which significantly reduces the morbidity and mortality due to both underdosing or high dose induced toxicities in both hospitalized and outpatients. Pharmacokinetic services must be a 24 hour seven day task of the pharmaceutical care division of each medical center. It will be necessary for each hospital to have a permanent team of clinical pharmacists to maintain this TDM service. This is not possible unless there would be a close cooperation between pharmacy and medical laboratory of each hospital or an outsource laboratory with drug serum level measuring services. As a result, it seems to be an absolute need to perform pharmacokinetic services with the cooperation of medical, clinical pharmacy and laboratory teams under the support of insurance companies since

  14. Impelementation of Information Technology Service Management at Data And Information System Center of XYZ University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelius Irfandhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Information Technology (IT is increasingly progressing. Nowadays, the success of a business of the organization/company is highly dependent on the IT infrastructure used. Therefore, organizations/companies have to manage their IT service to be optimal to their customers. Looking at this matter and the increasing dynamics of XYZ University, then Data and Information System Center (Pusdatin - an IT provider of XYZ University began implementing IT Service Management (ITSM from 2013 using the latest version of Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL, namely ITIL v3 as a framework for implementing ITSM in its business processes. However, along the way, there are still some problems happen in Pusdatin in order that ITSM can actually support and align with the objectives of XYZ University. Through this paper, the authors want to explain how the implementation of ITSM at Pusdatin, identify the problems related to the implementation of ITSM, and provide the solutions for each problem. The methods used are direct observation to Pusdatin, conductan interview with the Head of Pusdatin and Staff of Pusdatin, and also perform a literature review of books and papers that discuss about ITIL. The result of this research is that ITSM process of Pusdatin generally works quite well but there are still some shortcomings because ITSM is not 100% implemented in all areas.

  15. Emergency care and the national quality strategy: highlights from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Arjun K; Goodrich, Kate

    2015-04-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) of the US Department of Health and Human Services seeks to optimize health outcomes by leading clinical quality improvement and health system transformation through a variety of activities, including quality measure alignment, prioritization, and implementation. CMS manages more than 20 federal quality measurement and public reporting programs that cover the gamut of health care providers and facilities, including both hospital-based emergency departments (EDs) and individual emergency physicians. With more than 130 million annual visits, and as the primary portal of hospital admission, US hospital-based EDs deliver a substantial portion of acute care to Medicare beneficiaries. Given the position of emergency care across clinical conditions and between multiple settings of care, the ED plays a critical role in fulfilling all 6 priorities of the National Quality Strategy. We outline current CMS initiatives and future opportunities for emergency physicians and EDs to effect each of these priorities and help CMS achieve the triple aim of better health, better health care, and lower costs.

  16. An analysis of paramilitary referrals to psychiatric services at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a dearth of specialized mental health services for Indian paramilitary service personnel. Those requiring psychiatric evaluation are referred to government psychiatric services often with minimal information. Hence, major diagnostic and decision making relies on the psychiatrist′s clinical evaluation and judgment. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate the paramilitary referrals to psychiatric services at a tertiary care referral center. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart analysis of all consecutive referrals by various Indian paramilitary services to a tertiary care hospital (2008-2010 was carried out. Results: Among the sample of 18 referrals, all were males (mean age: 37 years ± standard deviation (SD =7.79. Various reasons for referral included: Evaluation of fitness for duty (83.3%, fitness to handle firearms (16.7%, and for disability certification (5.6%. There were no informants at all in 22.2%, and family members were available in only 11.1%. Hence, most referrals were admitted to the psychiatry ward for observation for various lengths of time. The mean duration of assessment (outpatient and inpatient was 17.89 days (SD = 20.74 and final reported diagnoses were schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder in 16.7, 11.1, and 11.1%, respectively. There was concurrent history of alcohol and nicotine dependence (40%. A large group (40% was diagnosed not to suffer from a major mental illness, while a firm and final diagnosis could not be arrived at in 16.7% subjects. Only one subject was given the fitness to handle firearms, fitness for duty was refused in three (16.7% subjects, and one subject was referred to neurology after being diagnosed as a case of seizure disorder. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for intensive training both to paramilitary physicians as well as to general hospital psychiatrists regarding proper assessment of paramilitary personnel, as there are frequent

  17. Satisfaction of oncologic patients hospitalized in centers with and without service of palliative cares: multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Campaña Castillo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the satisfaction regarding care of patients suffering advanced stage cancer admitted in Hospital Sant Jaume de Calella, Sant Rafael de Barcelona and San Lorenzo de Viladecans, subject to the presence or absence of Palliative Care Unit during 2012. An observational, descriptive and transversal study will be conducted.The assessed population are patients admitted to these centers that meet the requirements for inclusion and exclusion.In the Hospital Sant Jaume de Calella, which provides Palliative Care service, patients will be check into the Internal Medicine unit and the Medium-Stay unit. In the other two hospitals, there isn’t any Palliative Care Service and patients will be admitted in the Internal Medicine units of both hospitals. Data will be collected during one year with a sample of 200 patients and non-probably sampling case row.The main variables to consider are the presence or absence of palliative service, satisfaction of care and quality of life of patients to be studied. The secondaries are sex, age, pap score, reason for admission, cancer diagnosis and origin. For the collection of the data we used the questionnaire EORTC IN-PASAT32 modified by the research team and the EORTC QLQ C-15 PAL.The analysis of the quantitative variables will be done through centralization and dispersal parameters. Categorical variables satisfaction of care and quality of life will be analysed using frequencies and joined together by the Chi square. The statistical program SPSS v 16.0 will be used.

  18. Computerized Coordinated Service Center: A Comparison of Service Methodologies and Costs in the Urban and Rural Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Risa J.; And Others

    Ten parallel human service agencies (five urban and five rural) were compared to identify variations in the service delivery system and to compare the costs of service provision. The agencies responded to approximately 36 questions covering eight major areas and were compared and contrasted, urban versus rural, according to the type of agency. All…

  19. Microfiche/Telex Oriented Document Services Center Established in Sylvania Library Through Cooperative Test Program with Defense Documentation Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Dean K.

    In a cooperative program with Defense Documentation Center Headquarters, Sylvania arranged for procurement of 70,000 unclassified-unlimited documents without DDC Form I cards and 30,000 unclassified-limited and classified documents with Form I's. This was done in order to overcome effects of an in-house documents inventory/selective destruction…

  20. Combining ESGF Data node with its complementary data services at the NASA Center for Climate Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Carriere, L.; Nadeau, D.; Potter, G. L.; Peters, J.; Winter, E.; Cinquini, L.; Blodgett, D. L.; McInerney, M.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Climate Model Data Service (CDS) and the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) are collaborating to manage an Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) node that distributes over 150 TB of climate model data in support of multiple ESGF projects; Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), NASA observational data for model-data comparisons (obs4MIPs), reanalysis data (ana4MIPs) and downscaled NASA Earth Exchange Downscaled Climate Projections (NEX-DCP30) climate data. The purpose of ESGF is to improve collaboration among climate modelers and to extend access to these climate data to other scientific communities. A complementary THREDDS server was set up to provide services that are not available through the ESGF data node but are of great interest to a broad user community. For example, the high spatial resolution of the downscaled NEX-DCP30 climate data attracts many GIS users who are interested in a slice/point time series subset. This cannot be done through ESGF but can be done through the complementary THREDDS server that is seamlessly linked to ESGF. Another example is the customized aggregation prepared for the complementary THREDDS service that provides access from the USGS Geo Data Portal (GDP). This access requires the aggregation of 23 models each containing 3 variables. BioClim data (Biodiversity) in geotiff format have been published, becoming the first geotiff image files to be successfully published in ESGF. In order to make ESGF's Live Access Server (LAS) work with BioClim geotiff, we recompiled THREDDS with the USGS-CIDA geotiff-iosp plugin. The plugin adds the ability to access geotiff format with OPeNDAP through THREDDS. This enables LAS, which uses FERRET, to provide visualizations of the data. This technique was extended to provide LAS access to the NEX-DCP30 data. Recently we have expanded the complementary server to cover NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) forecast and assimilation operational products in near real

  1. Wound center facility billing: A retrospective analysis of time, wound size, and acuity scoring for determining facility level of service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Caroline E; Walker, David; Farrow, Wade; Otto, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Outpatient wound center facility reimbursement for Medicare beneficiaries can be a challenge to determine and obtain. To compare methods of calculating facility service levels for outpatient wound centers and to demonstrate the advantages of an acuity-based billing system (one that incorporates components of facility work that is non-reimbursable by procedure codes and that represents an activity-based costing approach to medical billing), a retrospective study of 5,098 patient encounters contained in a wound care-specific electronic medical record database was conducted. Approximately 500 patient visits to the outpatient wound center of a Texas regional hospital between April 2003 and November 2004 were categorized by service level in documentation and facility management software. Visits previously billed using a time-based system were compared to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' proposed three-tiered wound size-based system. The time-based system also was compared to an acuity-based scoring system. The Pearson correlation coefficient between billed level of service by time and estimated level of service by acuity was 0.442 and the majority of follow-up visits were billed as Level 3 and above (on a time level of 1 to 5) , confirming that time is not a surrogate for actual work performed. Wound size also was found to be unrelated to service level (Pearson correlation = 0.017) and 97% of wound areas were based scoring system produced a near-normal distribution of results, producing more mid-range billings than extremes; no other method produced this distribution. Hospital-based outpatient wound centers should develop, review, and refine acuity score-based models on which to determine billed level of service.

  2. 75 FR 79388 - Service Regulations Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ...: The Service Regulations Committee will meet at the Embassy Suites Hotel, Denver--International Airport... Fish and Wildlife Service Service Regulations Committee Meeting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Fish and Wildlife Service (hereinafter Service) will...

  3. Usual Primary Care Provider Characteristics of a Patient-Centered Medical Home and Mental Health Service Use

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, AL; Cochran, SD; Leibowitz, A.; Wells, KB; Kominski, G; Mays, VM

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society of General Internal Medicine BACKGROUND: The benefits of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) over and above that of a usual source of medical care have yet to be determined, particularly for adults with mental health disorders. OBJECTIVE: To examine qualities of a usual provider that align with PCMH goals of access, comprehensiveness, and patient-centered care, and to determine whether PCMH qualities in a usual provider are associated with the use of mental health services...

  4. Design, Implementation and Analysis of Learner-Centered Guided In-Service Programme for Technical Teacher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Tiia Rüütmann; Hants Kipper

    2014-01-01

    The design of learner-centered guided in-service program for technical teacher education has been launched at Estonian Centre for Engineering Pedagogy at Tallinn University of Technology. The aim of the program has been facilitating the initial in-service teaching experience, involving mentoring, peer support and cognitive apprenticeship. The emphasis has been on teaching for knowledge application, including the choice of content and processes, motivation, reflection, problem-solving, choice ...

  5. Journalism and Academic Surgery: The Denver Post and The American Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Don K

    2015-07-01

    Publication in professional journals is where advancements in surgery are reported and verified. Thus academic surgery holds common ground with journalism, where the principles of service, communication, and integrity are the basis of their public trust and standing in society. Writing for the Denver Post the author learned lessons that are relevant to academic surgery. Facts have to be solid. There are important issues to be discussed. Articles have to be interesting and not tiresome to read. And if it's something new--the essence of news--get it out there first. The American Surgeon embodies the same principles. The journal is a place where members of the Southeastern Surgical Congress discuss important matters, like surgical education, and share stories of interest, like a Japanese surgeon trying to treat victims of nuclear war. It is accessible yet disciplined, dedicated to advancing our field and fostering fellowship and communication among its members.

  6. Burden of alcohol-related injuries on radiology services at a level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudsari, Bahman; Psoter, Kevin J; Mack, Christopher; Vavilala, Monica S; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the burden of alcohol-related injuries on a radiology department at a level 1 trauma center. We linked the trauma registry (2005-2009) of Harborview Medical Center to billing department data and extracted patient demographic and injury-related characteristics and the radiology services provided. Multivariate negative binomial analysis was used to evaluate the association between blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and CT and MRI utilization rates. A total of 125,776 CT and 4681 MRI examinations were performed on 27,274 patients during the study period. Higher BAC was generally associated with higher utilization rates for all types of CT even after adjusting for potential confounding variables. Compared with patients with a BAC of 0, the greatest increases in utilization were observed in individuals with a BAC of 240 mg/dL or more for head CT (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.43; 95% CI, 1.32-1.54), cervical spine (IRR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.32-1.58), and maxillofacial (IRR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.42-1.95), with no increase observed for MRI. This association was more prominent in less severely injured patients with utilization rates for head CT (IRR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.56-2.13), abdomen (IRR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.32-1.63), and thorax (IRR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.30-1.89) in individuals with a BAC of 240 mg/dL or more compared with those with a BAC of 0. Higher BAC was associated with increased CT utilization for most body region-specific CT scans and was more strongly associated in patients with less severe injuries. Any guideline that could potentially decrease unnecessary imaging for patients with alcohol-involved injuries would represent a cost-saving strategy.

  7. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-02-20

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  8. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon Leigh

    2002-02-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  9. Information, education, and communication services in MCH care provided at an urban health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Bratati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular IEC programs during antenatal and intranatal period, through individual or group approach, brings desirable changes in health practices of people, resulting in a healthy mother and a healthy baby. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted to assess the level of IEC services regarding pregnancy and child care, received by the women at an MCH clinic of an urban health center, where the study subjects comprised 400 antenatal (AN and postnatal (PN women and mothers of children under five years. Results: Warning signs of danger was explained to only 10% of the AN and PN women. Advice regarding family planning appeared to be the most frequently covered, though that too was explained to less than half of the subjects. About one third of the women were advised on breast feeding. Only 8% of the mothers had been told about all issues regarding pregnancy and child care. Breast feeding and weaning was properly explained to 85.7 and 81.1% of the total mothers of U5 children. Advice regarding subsequent nutrition was given to 60.9% of mothers. About only a quarter of the total mothers were advised on home management of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. Very few mothers were counseled about the growth pattern of the children and none were shown the growth chart. Only 12.9% of the mothers were informed about all issues. Conclusion: IEC regarding maternal and child care other than feeding practices is a neglected service in the health facility where the study was conducted.

  10. An Analysis of Cloud Computing with Amazon Web Services for the Atmospheric Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, J. L.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA science and engineering efforts rely heavily on compute and data handling systems. The nature of NASA science data is such that it is not restricted to NASA users, instead it is widely shared across a globally distributed user community including scientists, educators, policy decision makers, and the public. Therefore NASA science computing is a candidate use case for cloud computing where compute resources are outsourced to an external vendor. Amazon Web Services (AWS) is a commercial cloud computing service developed to use excess computing capacity at Amazon, and potentially provides an alternative to costly and potentially underutilized dedicated acquisitions whenever NASA scientists or engineers require additional data processing. AWS desires to provide a simplified avenue for NASA scientists and researchers to share large, complex data sets with external partners and the public. AWS has been extensively used by JPL for a wide range of computing needs and was previously tested on a NASA Agency basis during the Nebula testing program. Its ability to support the Langley Science Directorate needs to be evaluated by integrating it with real world operational needs across NASA and the associated maturity that would come with that. The strengths and weaknesses of this architecture and its ability to support general science and engineering applications has been demonstrated during the previous testing. The Langley Office of the Chief Information Officer in partnership with the Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) has established a pilot business interface to utilize AWS cloud computing resources on a organization and project level pay per use model. This poster discusses an effort to evaluate the feasibility of the pilot business interface from a project level perspective by specifically using a processing scenario involving the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project.

  11. Immigrant Workers Centers in Eastern Massachusetts, USA: Fostering Services, Support, Advocacy, and Community Organizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Reynoso-Vallejo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immigrant Workers Centers (IWCs are community-based organizations that have been developed in the United States to promote and protect workers’ rights through support, services, advocacy, and organizing initiatives. The purpose of this research study was to examine how IWCs in the Eastern part of the state of Massachusetts are structured along twelve dimensions of organizational development and community organizing. Qualitative research methods were used to identify shared themes within the six IWCs and three immigrant support organizations, as well as their organizational responses to the current anti-immigrant environment. IWCs constituted a convenience sample which enabled the researchers to gather data utilizing a case study methodology. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted between the months of July and September of 2009 to answer the following research questions: 1What are the shared themes for the development of Immigrant Workers Centers?, and 2 How do Immigrant Workers Centers respond to current anti-immigrant sentiment, intolerant immigration policies, and increased exploitation in this troubled economy? Shared themes among the IWCs include prioritizing community organizing for workers’ rights and collective empowerment. Sub-modalities such as education, training and leadership development area common feature. While some individual support is provided, and in some cases, programming, it always is offered within a context that emphasizes the need for collective action to overcome injustice. Issues addressed include health/safety, sexual harassment, discrimination, and various problems associated with wages (underpayment, missed payments, collecting back wages, and lack of overtime pay. IWCs respond to antiimmigrant policies and practices by supporting larger efforts for immigration reformat the municipal, state, and federal levels. Coalitions of IWCS and their allies attempt to make state wide and federal policy changes

  12. CO2 Data Distribution and Support from the Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearty, Thomas; Savtchenko, Andrey; Vollmer, Bruce; Albayrak, Arif; Theobald, Mike; Esfandiari, Ed; Wei, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This talk will describe the support and distribution of CO2 data products from OCO-2, AIRS, and ACOS, that are archived and distributed from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center. We will provide a brief summary of the current online archive and distribution metrics for the OCO-2 Level 1 products and plans for the Level 2 products. We will also describe collaborative data sets and services (e.g., matchups with other sensors) and solicit feedback for potential future services.

  13. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction in women seeking services at family planning centers in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, P; Mirmohamadi, M; Mehrabi, F; Babaei, G

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, a modified standardized sexual function questionnaire, along with a test of knowledge about and attitude toward sexuality, was administered to 300 healthy women, ages 16 through 53, who sought services at family planing centers in Tehran, Iran. All participants were married. The greatest percentages had two children (35%) and were housewives (69%). Some 72% were well educated, and 1% were illiterate; 74% of the women had moderate knowledge about sexuality, and 53% had a conservative attitude toward sexuality. The study revealed the prevalence of inhibited desire (15%), inhibited orgasm (26%), lack of lubrication (15%), vaginismus (8%), and dyspareunia (10%); 38% of the women had at least one sexual dysfunction. The most common sexual difficulties reported were "too little foreplay before intercourse" and "partner chooses inconvenient time" (8% each). Despite these difficulties, 51% of the sample reported that their overall sexual relationship was satisfactory. Knowledge about sexuality was significantly correlated with orgasm experience, higher knowledge being associated with more orgasm experience. There were significant correlations between attitude toward sexuality and sexual function (orgasm, desire, lubrication); a conservative attitude was associated with more sexual dysfunction. Spousal sexual dysfunction had a significant negative correlation with sexual function in the woman.

  14. [Outreach services to clients with severe mental illness in the Okayama Prefectural Mental Health and Welfare Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masayuki; Moriya, Akira; Fujita, Kenzo

    2012-01-01

    The community mental health system in Japan is being adversely affected by diminishing public mental health services, including those provided by public healthcare centers and the mental health divisions of municipal governments. It seems reasonable to expect that this will lead to the inadequate detection, assessment, and treatment of the population with mental health problems, and thus to the flooding of psychiatric hospitals with excessive numbers of severely mentally ill patients. In this article, the author suggests the utility of a 'network-based outreach team' as a possible remedy for the current situation. The Okayama Prefectural Mental Health & Welfare Center is running a network-based outreach team on a trial basis to work with individuals with serious mental illness who are disengaged from mental health services. The team is composed of members from the Mental Health & Welfare Center, public mental health services, and human service agencies. The main aims of this team are two-fold: to enhance support for clients with severe mental illness who are overwhelmed with multiple complex problems, through collaborative intervention within the framework of a network-based outreach team; and to develop the qualities and skills of public mental health service and human agency personnel in order that they better assist people with severe mental illness, by providing joint training with mental health specialists of the Mental Health & Welfare Center in community settings. The author suggests that the team structure of the network-based outreach team will benefit public mental health services by reintegrating currently fragmented services into coordinated ones.

  15. PRINCIPLES OF DESIGNING THE CENTER FOR ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES IN DNIPROPETROVS’K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PODOLYNNY S. I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem. Nowadays providing administrative services of good quality is considered to be one of the most important conditions for establishing firm and democratic relations between local authorities and population The work for creating municipal institutions using the principle of a "single window" is being fulfilled in Dnipropetrovs’k. Two pilot projects have been done at the Department of Architectural Engineering and Design (Prydniprovs’ka State Academy of Construction and Architecture. Objective. To demonstrate peculiarities of two project proposals for CAS comparing them with the recommendations of State Administration and basic principles formed while designing similar objects in foreign practice. Main part. Basic principles for creating the Center for Administrative Services (CAS were formulated regarding foreign experience and recommendations of State Administration. These principles are organized as three conceptual blocks: city-planning relevancy, functional arrangement, form making and artistic image peculiarities. CAS on the left bank of the river is situated on the territory that is being reconstructed at the moment. It is a functional and compositional landmark of social and administrative subcentre of the left bank. The Centre is designed in a 16-storey building with a build-in and build-on 2-floor block of the front-office. The front-office is designed for 121 working places and the back-office – for 440 ones. The general area of the front-office is 605 sq. m., the area of the back-office is 2130 sq. m. Artistic characteristics are designed according to traditional office planning schemes. CAS of the right bank is planned on a vacant site on Zaporiz’ke highway. Spacious parking lots are also provided on the territory. The building is positioned sideways on to the highway with its long axis. It can serve as a peculiar sign at the entrance to the city. The front-office is situated in a two-floor stylobate of the Center

  16. 34 CFR 645.13 - What additional services do Upward Bound Math and Science Centers provide and how are they...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional services do Upward Bound Math and Science Centers provide and how are they organized? 645.13 Section 645.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  17. An Analysis of Bilingual Education Programs and Directors in Texas Education Service Center Region Two School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Michelle Arevalo

    2013-01-01

    In this mixed methods research study, the researcher investigated the difference between additive and subtractive bilingual education programs and student achievement. The researcher examined types of bilingual education and special language programs currently utilized in school districts located within the Education Service Center Region Two…

  18. Developing an Operational Mental Health Center with Service Provisions for the Public School System. Maxi II Practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatoul, Warren P.

    The purpose of the practicum was to develop an effective relationship between a community mental health center and the public schools. To highlight the potential effectiveness of such a relationship, the practicum involved specific provisions for services to classes of socially maladjusted and/or emotionally disturbed children. The results of the…

  19. Exploring spatial change and gravity center movement for ecosystem services value using a spatially explicit ecosystem services value index and gravity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yingbin; Chen, Youqi; Tang, Huajun; Yao, Yanmin; Yang, Peng; Chen, Zhongxin

    2011-04-01

    Spatially explicit ecosystem services valuation and change is a newly developing area of research in the field of ecology. Using the Beijing region as a study area, the authors have developed a spatially explicit ecosystem services value index and implemented this to quantify and spatially differentiate ecosystem services value at 1-km grid resolution. A gravity model was developed to trace spatial change in the total ecosystem services value of the Beijing study area from a holistic point of view. Study results show that the total value of ecosystem services for the study area decreased by 19.75% during the period 1996-2006 (3,226.2739 US$×10(6) in 1996, 2,589.0321 US$×10(6) in 2006). However, 27.63% of the total area of the Beijing study area increased in ecosystem services value. Spatial differences in ecosystem services values for both 1996 and 2006 are very clear. The center of gravity of total ecosystem services value for the study area moved 32.28 km northwestward over the 10 years due to intensive human intervention taking place in southeast Beijing. The authors suggest that policy-makers should pay greater attention to ecological protection under conditions of rapid socio-economic development and increase the area of green belt in the southeastern part of Beijing.

  20. UNAVCO Data Center Initiatives in CyberInfrastructure for Discovery, Services, and Distribution of Data and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, F.; Meertens, C.

    2012-04-01

    The UNAVCO Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, archives for preservation and distributes geodesy data and products in the GNSS, InSAR, and LiDAR domains to the scientific and education community. The GNSS data, which in addition to geodesy are useful for tectonic, volcanologic, ice mass, glacial isostatic adjustment, meteorological and other studies, come from 2,500 continuously operating stations and 8000 survey-mode observation points around the globe that are operated by over 100 U.S. and international members of the UNAVCO consortium. SAR data, which are in many ways complementary to the GNSS data collection have been acquired in concert with the WInSAR Consortium activities and with EarthScope, with a focus on the western United States. UNAVCO also holds a growing collection of terrestrial laser scanning data. Several partner US geodesy data centers, along with UNAVCO, have developed and are in the process of implementing the Geodesy Seamless Archive Centers, a web services based technology to facilitate the exchange of metadata and delivery of data and products to users. These services utilize a repository layer implemented at each data center, and a service layer to identify and present any data center-specific services and capabilities, allowing simplified vertical federation of metadata from independent data centers. UNAVCO also has built web services for SAR data discovery and delivery, and will partner with other SAR data centers and institutions to provide access for the InSAR scientist to SAR data and ancillary data sets, web services to produce interferograms, and mechanisms to archive and distribute resulting higher level products. Improved access to LiDAR data from space-based, airborne, and terrestrial platforms through utilization of web services is similarly currently under development. These efforts in cyberinfrastructure, while initially aimed at intra-domain data sharing and providing products for research and education, are envisioned as

  1. Mental health needs of visible minority immigrants in a small urban center: recommendations for policy makers and service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitmanova, Sylvia; Gustafson, Diana L

    2009-02-01

    This qualitative pilot study explored the mental health needs of visible minority immigrants in St. John's--a small urban center in Atlantic Canada with limited ethnoracial diversity and ethnospecific infrastructure. The study examined the facilitators and barriers to maintaining immigrants' mental health and their perspectives on availability and access to support services and programs that support mental health. Our findings revealed several determinants of the mental health of visible minority immigrants: social support, income, employment, culture, physical environment, coping skills, gender, and availability, accessibility and cultural appropriateness of mental health services. We offer 18 recommendations framed by Health Canada determinants of health that may be of interest to decision-makers in government, health agencies and social services in similar small urban centers.

  2. Zeolites replacing plant fossils in the Denver formation, Lakewood, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.; Verbeek, E.R.; Grout, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Well-developed crystals of heulandite and stilbite, within fossil wood, occur in sedimentary rocks in Lakewood, Jefferson County. The rocks belong to the Denver formation, a locally fossiliferous deposit of fluvial claystone, siltstone, sandstone and conglomerate, containing some volcanic mudflows (andesitic) of late Cretaceous to Palaeocene age. Altered volcanic glass released Na and Ca into the ground-water and subsequently zeolites were crystallized in the open spaces between grains and within fossil plant structures. Minor pyrite, quartz (jasper), calcite and apatite also occur as replacements of fossil wood. Similar zeolite occurrences in other areas are reviewed.-R.S.M.

  3. [Physical and pharmacological restraints in geriatric and gerontology services and centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Cordero, Primitivo; López Trigo, José Antonio; Maíllo Pedraz, Herminio; Paz Rubio, José María

    2015-01-01

    Physical and pharmacological restraints are a controversial issue in the context of geriatric care due to their moral, ethical, social and legal repercussions and, despite this fact, no specific legislation exists at a national level. The use of restraints is being questioned with growing frequency, as there are studies that demonstrate that restraints do not reduce the number of falls or their consequences, but rather can increase them, cause complications, injuries and potentially fatal accidents. Restraints are not always used rationally, despite compromising a fundamental human right, that is, freedom, protected in the Constitution, as well as values and principles, such as dignity and personal self-esteem. There are centers where restraints are applied to more than 50% of patients, and in some cases without the consent of their legal representatives. On some occasions, restraints are used for attaining organizational or environmental objectives, such as complying with tight schedules, and for reducing or avoiding the supervision of patients who walk erratically and, at times, are used indefinitely. Even greater confusion exists with respect to the emerging concept of chemical or pharmacological restraints, since no conceptual framework exists based on scientific evidence, and with sufficient consensus for guiding healthcare workers. In this context, the Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología (SEGG--Spanish Geriatrics and Gerontology Society), aware of the significance and transcendence of the issue, and in an attempt to preserve and guarantee maximum freedom, dignity and self-esteem, on the one hand, and to ensure the maximum integrity and legal certainty of the persons cared for in geriatric and gerontology services and centers, on the other, decided to create an "Interdisciplinary Committee on Restraints" made up by members from different disciplines and members of SEGG Working Groups or Committees, external health care workers, groups

  4. Orion Crew Module / Service Module Structural Weight and Center of Gravity Simulator and Vehicle Motion Simulator Hoist Structure for Orion Service Module Umbilical Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Peter A.; Haddock, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    An Orion Crew Module Service Module Structural Weight and Center of Gravity Simulator and a Vehicle Motion Simulator Hoist Structure for Orion Service Module Umbilical Testing were designed during a summer 2014 internship in Kennedy Space Centers Structures and Mechanisms Design Branch. The simulator is a structure that supports ballast, which will be integrated into an existing Orion mock-up to simulate the mass properties of the Exploration Mission-1 flight vehicle in both fueled and unfueled states. The simulator mimics these configurations through the use of approximately 40,000 lbf of steel and water ballast, and a steel support structure. Draining four water tanks, which house the water ballast, transitions the simulator from the fueled to unfueled mass properties. The Ground Systems Development and Operations organization will utilize the simulator to verify and validate equipment used to maneuver and transport the Orion spacecraft in its fueled and unfueled configurations. The second design comprises a cantilevered tripod hoist structure that provides the capability to position a large Orion Service Module Umbilical in proximity to the Vehicle Motion Simulator. The Ground Systems Development and Operations organization will utilize the Vehicle Motion Simulator, with the hoist structure attached, to test the Orion Service Module Umbilical for proper operation prior to installation on the Mobile Launcher. Overall, these two designs provide NASA engineers viable concepts worthy of fabricating and placing into service to prepare for the launch of Orion in 2017.

  5. Optimal scheduling of logistical support for medical resources order and shipment in community health service centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper aims to propose an optimal scheduling for medical resources order and shipment in community health service centers (CHSCs.Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents two logistical support models for scheduling medical resources in CHSCs. The first model is a deterministic planning model (DM, which systematically considers the demands for various kinds of medical resources, the lead time of supplier, the storage capacity and other constraints, as well as the integrated shipment planning in the dimensions of time and space. The problem is a multi-commodities flow problem and is formulated as a mixed 0-1 integer programming model. Considering the demand for medical resources is always stochastic in practice, the second model is constructed as a stochastic programming model (SM. A solution procedure is developed to solve the proposed two models and a simulation-based evaluation method is proposed to compare the performances of the proposed models. Findings andFindings: The main contributions of this paper includes the following two aspects: (1 While most research on medical resources optimization studies a static problem taking no consideration of the time evolution and especially the dynamic demand for such resources, the proposed models in our paper integrate time-space network technique, which can find the optimal scheduling of logistical support for medical resources order and shipment in CHSCs effectively. (2 The logistics plans in response to the deterministic demand and the time-varying demand are constructed as 0-1 mixed integer programming model and stochastic integer programming model, respectively. The optimal solutions not only minimize the operation cost of the logistics system, but also can improve the order and shipment operation in practice.Originality/value: Currently, medical resources in CHSCs are purchased by telephone or e-mail. The important parameters in decision making, i.e. order/shipment frequency

  6. Inter-linkage between Hinterlands and Service Centers of Bima and Darbang VDCs in Myagdi District: A Rural Development Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beg Prasad Garbuja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on exploring the status and contribution of inter- linkage relationship between service center and rural hinterland. The study was conducted in Bima and Darbang Village Development Committees (VDCs of Myagdi district. This paper has used rural development perspective. The respondents were from 63 sample households including producers, consumers and service providers selected by using probability and non probability sampling methods. The primary data were collected through survey questionnaire, key informant interview, participant observation and focus group discussion whereas secondary data were generated from published and unpublished books, articles, journals, profile of VDCs and DDC. The study has revealed with various types of linkage between service center and rural hinterland i.e. service delivery, spatial or physical, administrative, economic, technological, financial and socio-cultural, educational and health service linkage. The study also highlighted productive role of remittance, international experience and adaptation of modern agriculture technology that has been positively affecting socio-economic life of the rural people. Further, joint efforts of public and private sectors’ and local stakeholders’ can be applied for developing and promoting service delivery opportunities and marketing facilities to the local people. The finding of the study has very strong implications to the local stakeholders for formulation of short run and long run local development plan in a similar situation.

  7. Analysis of Gap in Service Quality in Drug Addiction Treatment Centers of Kerman, Iran, Using SERVQUAL Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqavi, Mohammad Reza; Refaiee, Raheleh; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of drug addicts is one of the main strategies of drug control in Iran. Client satisfaction strongly influences the success of any treatment program. This study aimed to explore the difference between customer expectations and perceptions in drug addiction treatment centers of Kerman, Iran, using SERVQUAL model. Using a cross-sectional design 260 clients referring to drug addiction treatment centers of Kerman, were enrolled in 2012. From among 84 clinics, 20 centers were selected randomly. Based on the number of clients registered in each center, a random sample proportional to the size was selected and 290 subjects were invited for interviews. A well validated 22-item questionnaire, which measured the 5 dimensions of service quality (reliability, assurance, tangibility, empathy, and responsiveness), was completed by participants. Each item measured 2 aspects of service quality; expectations and perceptions. Mean ± SD (Standard deviation) age of the subjects was 37.7 ± 9.4. Most of them were male (87.7%). Less than half of them had an educational level lower than diploma. The total score of clients` expectations was higher than their perceptions (P service quality in addiction treatment clinics.

  8. [Models for intervention in autism spectrum disorders: Denver and SCERTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forment-Dasca, C

    2017-02-24

    Introduccion. Dado el aumento de prevalencia respecto a los diagnosticos de autismo en los ultimos años, la creciente investigacion sobre modelos para trabajar con las personas con trastornos del espectro autista (TEA) hace que se encuentren diversas tecnicas y metodos para obtener mayores resultados y poder asi ayudar a mejorar muchos de los sintomas que impiden llevar una vida plena a personas con dicho diagnostico y a sus familias. Objetivo. Revisar dos modelos de intervencion diseñados especificamente para trabajar con personas con TEA. Desarrollo. Se revisa el modelo de intervencion temprana Early Start Denver Model, que presenta un checklist para niños con TEA de 12 a 48 meses, a partir de la evolucion de estos. Se revisa tambien el modelo SCERTS. A diferencia del Denver, este modelo presenta objetivos a trabajar a lo largo de toda la vida de las personas con TEA. Conclusiones. A falta de mayores resultados de la practica basada en la evidencia cientifica respecto a los dos modelos revisados, se concluye que no existe un modelo unico estandarizado y que se necesita una derivacion precoz en niños con dificultades en atencion conjunta e imitacion y el trabajo junto con las familias. Asi pues, para realizar una correcta intervencion debe tenerse en cuenta tanto la practica basada en la evidencia como un conocimiento, respeto y comprension profunda de los niños con TEA y de sus familias por parte del terapeuta.

  9. Denver Papillae Protocol for Objective Analysis of Fungiform Papillae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuessle, Tiffany M; Garneau, Nicole L; Sloan, Meghan M; Santorico, Stephanie A

    2015-06-08

    The goal of the Denver Papillae Protocol is to use a dichotomous key to define and prioritize the characteristics of fungiform papillae (FP) to ensure consistent scoring between scorers. This protocol builds off of a need that has arisen from the last two decades of taste research using FP as a proxy for taste pore density. FP density has historically been analyzed using Miller & Reedy's 1990 characterizations of their morphology: round, stained lighter, large, and elevated. In this work, the authors forewarned that stricter definitions of FP morphology needed to be outlined. Despite this call to action, follow up literature has been scarce, with most studies continuing to cite Miller & Reedy's original work. Consequently, FP density reports have been highly variable and, combined with small sample sizes, may contribute to the discrepant conclusions on the role of FP in taste sensitivity. The Genetics of Taste Lab explored this apparent inconsistency in counting and found that scorers were individually prioritizing the importance of these characteristics differently and had no guidance for when a papilla had some, but not all, of the reported qualities of FP. The result of this subjectivity is highly variable FP counts of the same tongue image. The Denver Papillae Protocol has been developed to remedy this consequence through use of a dichotomous key that further defines and prioritizes the importance of the characteristics put forth by Miller & Reedy. The proposed method could help create a standard way to quantify FP for researchers in the field of taste and nutritional studies.

  10. A Look into the National Drought Mitigation Center: Providing 15 Years of Drought Services (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, M. D.; Hayes, M. J.; Knutson, C. L.; Wardlow, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    The National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) was formed in 1995 at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Over the past 15 years, the NDMC has made it a priority to work with various local, state, tribal and federal entities to provide a suite of drought/climate services, with a goal of bringing research to fruition through applications and operations. Through our research and outreach projects, the NDMC has worked to reduce risk to drought by developing several mitigation strategies, monitoring and decision making tools and other services aimed at enhancing our nation’s capacity to cope with drought. Two of the earliest NDMC activities were the creation of a website and assessing drought conditions around the United States. An electronic drought clearinghouse was built in 1995 at drought.unl.edu. The site was designed, and still concentrates, on the concepts of drought monitoring, planning, and mitigation and also serves as a repository of information from around the world. The NDMC’s electronic quarterly newsletter, DroughtScape, disseminates information about all things drought to people across the country. In addition, the NDMC has developed and is home to websites for the U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM), Drought Impact Reporter (DIR), and the Vegetation Drought Response Index (VegDRI). In an effort to inform decision makers, the NDMC continually pursues ways to raise the awareness and visibility of drought as one of the most costly hazards we face. This began in the mid-1990s with the creation of a state-based drought impact assessment map that would help lead to the formation of the USDM in 1999 and the DIR in 2005. The NDMC plays a key role in producing the weekly USDM and the monthly North American Drought Monitor (NADM). The USDM was created out of collaborations between the NDMC, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and has quickly become one of the most widely used products in assessing

  11. Parents' Definition of Effective Child Disability Support Services: Implications for Implementing Family-Centered Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Trute, Barry; Wright, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined parents' perspectives of services within a community-based childhood disability program in the process of enhancing the family centeredness of its services. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 mothers and 22 fathers approximately 18 months after entering the service delivery system. Parents reported that…

  12. Parents' Definition of Effective Child Disability Support Services: Implications for Implementing Family-Centered Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Trute, Barry; Wright, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined parents' perspectives of services within a community-based childhood disability program in the process of enhancing the family centeredness of its services. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 39 mothers and 22 fathers approximately 18 months after entering the service delivery system. Parents reported that…

  13. Energy service contracts in regional engineering center for small and medium businesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil'manshin, I. R.; Kashapov, N. F.

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of the energy service contracts development in Russia is given in the article. The role of the Complex learning centres in the field of energy efficiency in the promotion of energy service contracts is described. The reasons of constraining the development of energy service contracts are described.

  14. Neighborhood Communications Centers: Planning Information and Referral Services in The Urban Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Robert K.; And Others

    The potential development of information and referral (I&R) services in branch libraries was explored by examining five cases where such services have been initiated. The extent to which the public library system is appropriate for information and referral services was carefully examined in the light of its ability to carry on seven functions: (1)…

  15. Examining the reach of a brief alcohol intervention service in routine practice at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brianna J; McCann, Barbara S; Dunn, Christopher W; Darnell, Doyanne A; Beam, Christopher R; Kleiber, Blair; Nelson, Kimberly M; Fukunaga, Rena

    2017-08-01

    The American College of Surgeons requires Level I and II trauma centers to provide brief intervention services to traumatically injured patients who screen positive for alcohol. Despite evidence supporting substantial cost savings and reduced re-injury associated with these services, brief interventions may not be uniformly delivered owing to a variety of demographic, clinical and operational characteristics. To inform service adjustments that may improve the reach of such services, we compared trauma patients who did and did not receive brief alcohol intervention services during their hospitalizations. Electronic medical records of injured patients admitted to a Level I trauma center between September 27, 2013 and March 11, 2014 with a positive blood alcohol concentration (N=189) were coded for demographic and clinical variables. Records of those who did not receive a brief intervention during their admission were reviewed for possible reasons why interventions were not delivered. Of the total sample, 115 patients (60.8%) received brief interventions. Patients who did and did not receive brief interventions did not differ on age, sex, race, blood alcohol concentration at admission, or mechanism of injury, indicating that patient characteristics were unlikely to bias service delivery. Instead, common features of patients who were referred but did not receive SBIRT interventions included admissions lasting fewer than two working days (12.7%) and persistent cognitive impairment following injury (9.0%). These findings align with previous studies suggesting that service reach could be improved by promoting dedicated and flexible staffing and adapting services to allow for SBIRT delivery in follow-up care settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 40 CFR 81.16 - Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.16 Section 81.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.16 Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Denver Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Colorado) consists of the territorial...

  17. Great Expectations, Mixed Results: Standards and Performance in Denver's New Public Schools, 2007-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In conjunction with the Denver Plan instituted in 2005, Denver Public Schools (DPS) has embarked upon a consistent strategy of opening new schools in an effort to improve overall academic performance. DPS has pursued this strategy under several different paths: an annual request for proposals from charter school applicants; allowing current…

  18. Model for a merger: New York-Presbyterian's use of service lines to bring two academic medical centers together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Steven J; Cooper, Mary Reich; Leiman, Joan M; Stein, Dina E; Pardes, Herbert; Berman, Michael A

    2003-11-01

    NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is the result of the 1998 merger of two large New York City academic medical centers, the former New York and Presbyterian Hospitals, and is affiliated with two independent medical schools, the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Joan and Sanford J. Weill Medical College of Cornell University. At the time of the merger, the hospital faced a number of significant challenges, chief among them the clinical integration of the two medical centers. Size, separate medical schools, geography, and different histories and cultures all presented barriers to collaboration. To bring about the needed clinical alignment, the hospital turned to service lines as a way to realize the benefits of clinical integration without forcing the consolidation of departments. In this article, members of the hospital's senior management review the thinking behind the hospital's use of the service lines, their development and operation, and the significant, positive effects they have had on volume, clinical quality, clinical efficiency, best practices, and revenue management. They discuss how the service lines were used to bring together the two clinical cultures, the impact they have had on the way the hospital is operated and managed, and why service lines have worked at NewYork-Presbyterian in contrast to other hospitals that tried and abandoned them. Service lines play an increasingly central role in the hospital's clinical and business strategies, and are being extended into the NewYork-Presbyterian health care system.

  19. Analysis of Inpatient Bed Allocation Equity and Utilization in the City Community Health Service Center of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许静; 吴妮娜; 金生国; 王芳; 王云霞; 刘利群; 卢祖洵

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the inpatient bed(IB) allocation equity and utilization in Chinese city community health service centers(CHSCs).The data were derived from the Baseline Survey of National City Community Health Service System Building Project,which was conducted in 1917 CHSCs in 28 cities in 2007.The IB allocation was analyzed in terms of IB allocation quantity and distribution equity,and the IB utilization was analyzed by the IB utilization rate and average length of stay of the CH...

  20. Survey of health beliefs of women about performing mammography in thehealth servic centers of Sari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Abedian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Breast cancer is one of the most important non contagious disease with high incidence and mortality in females. It is the most commonly reported cancer and consists 18.9% of all reported cancer cases. Screening is a very important method for early diagnosis of breast cancer. Considering the important role of beliefs in performing as the most effective available method in diagnosis, this study was designed and done about the health beliefs of women towards mammography.Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was performed on 400 randomly selected women above 40 years of age referring to the health service centers in Sari. Their health beliefs about mammography was assessed by a questionnaire using Champion method. The obtained data were analyzed by inferential and descriptive statistical methods.Results: Majority of the women (69.5% did not practice mammography until the time of this study but 13.9% of their first family members did it. About 55.8% of them accepted that mammography insures individuals of their breast health. About 41.6% of them believed that early diagnosis of breast cancer prevents mastectomy. The most common obstacle of mammography was the concept that lack of any mass observation in breast self examination rejects requirement for mammography. About 34.5% of the patients, agreed that breast cancer affects their job activity and 34.7% agreed that breast cancer may lead to masteatomy. Statistical analysis did not reveal any relation between the occupation of the women and their beliefs about benefit of mammography and their vulnerability to breast cancer and its severity. Statistically significant relationship was observed between the education and the concepts of the women about the benefit and barrier of mammography (p<0.05.Conclusion: Despite positive concept, about mammography, it is not routinely performed in the society. Hence, it is recommended to encourage women to take advantage of this

  1. State of spirituality-infused mental health services in Los Angeles County wellness and client-run centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ann-Marie; Subica, Andrew M; Kim, Min Ah; Van Nguyen, Kevin; Lim, Caroline S; Mancuso, Laura L

    2014-11-01

    Spiritual coping is associated with positive mental health outcomes for individuals with serious mental illness, yet spirituality-infused services are seldom offered in public sector mental health agencies. The Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health introduced a policy addressing spirituality in 2012. This study explored the breadth and degree to which spirituality-infused activities were being offered in 53 Los Angeles wellness and recovery centers after the policy was widely disseminated. More than 98 % of the centers offered options for spirituality-infused activities; one-third offered spirituality-focused groups. Los Angeles's progress may guide implementation of spirituality-infused services in other state or local public mental health systems.

  2. Social accountability and education revives health sub-centers in India and increases access to family planning services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Otchere

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uttar Pradesh (UP is the most populous state in India. The maternal mortality ratio, infant mortality rate, and fertility rates are all higher than the national average. Sixty percent of UP inhabitants live in rural communities. The reasons behind the poor state of health and services in many areas of UP are inadequate knowledge and availability in communities of healthy behaviors, and information on available government health services. Methods: World Vision, Inc. implemented a three-and-half year mobilizing plan for maternal and neonatal health through a birth spacing and advocacy project (MOMENT, partnering with local organizations in rural Hardoi and urban slums of Lucknow districts in UP. World Vision used print, audio, visual media, and house-to-house contacts to educate communities on timing and spacing of pregnancies; and the benefits of seeking and using maternal and child health services (MCH including immunization and family planning (FP.This paper focuses on World Vision’s social accountability strategy – Citizen Voice and Action (CVA and interface meetings – used in Hardoi that helped educate and empower Village Health Sanitation and Nutrition Committees (VHSNCs and village leaders to access government untied funds to improve community social and health services. Results: Forty VHSNCs were revived in 24 months. Nine local leaders accessed government untied funds. In addition, increased knowledge of the benefits of timing and spacing of pregnancies, maternal child health, family planning services, and access to community entitlements led the community to embrace and contribute their time to rebuild and re-open 17 non-functional Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANM sub-centers. Seventeen ANMs received refresher training to provide quality care. Sub-center data showed that 1,121 and 3,156 women opted for intra-uterine contraceptive device and oral pills, respectively, and 29,316 condoms were distributed. Conclusion: In Hardoi

  3. Design Challenges of an Episode-Based Payment Model in Oncology: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Oncology Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Ronald M; Muldoon, L Daniel; Schumacher, Heidi K; Strawbridge, Larisa M; York, Andrew W; Mortimer, Laura K; Falb, Alison F; Cox, Katherine J; Bazell, Carol; Lukens, Ellen W; Kapp, Mary C; Rajkumar, Rahul; Bassano, Amy; Conway, Patrick H

    2017-07-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services developed the Oncology Care Model as an episode-based payment model to encourage participating practitioners to provide higher-quality, better-coordinated care at a lower cost to the nearly three-quarter million fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries with cancer who receive chemotherapy each year. Episode payment models can be complex. They combine into a single benchmark price all payments for services during an episode of illness, many of which may be delivered at different times by different providers in different locations. Policy and technical decisions include the definition of the episode, including its initiation, duration, and included services; the identification of beneficiaries included in the model; and beneficiary attribution to practitioners with overall responsibility for managing their care. In addition, the calculation and risk adjustment of benchmark episode prices for the bundle of services must reflect geographic cost variations and diverse patient populations, including varying disease subtypes, medical comorbidities, changes in standards of care over time, the adoption of expensive new drugs (especially in oncology), as well as diverse practice patterns. Other steps include timely monitoring and intervention as needed to avoid shifting the attribution of beneficiaries on the basis of their expected episode expenditures as well as to ensure the provision of necessary medical services and the development of a meaningful link to quality measurement and improvement through the episode-based payment methodology. The complex and diverse nature of oncology business relationships and the specific rules and requirements of Medicare payment systems for different types of providers intensify these issues. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services believes that by sharing its approach to addressing these decisions and challenges, it may facilitate greater understanding of the model within the oncology

  4. The Role of Outpatient Reception Service Center%论门诊前台服务中心的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣婉茹; 骆包明

    2013-01-01

    设立门诊前台服务中心,优化门诊服务流程,提供高效、便捷、人性化的就医环境和畅通的医患沟通平台,提供患者所需要的各种人性化服务,构建和谐的医患关系,患者满意率从90.75%上升至96.50%;同期门诊投诉率从0.069‰下降至0.010‰.门诊前台服务中心的设立优化了门诊医疗服务流程,提高了门诊患者的满意度,降低了门诊投诉率,改善了医患关系.%The practice of setting up the outpatient reception service center,optimizing the outpatient service process,providing efficient,convenient and humanistic medical environment and doctor-patient communication platform,providing all kinds of humanized service for patients,improving the doctor-patient relationship,made the patients'satisfaction rate increase from 90.75% to 96.50% and the outpatient service complaint rate decrease from 0.069‰ to 0.069‰.The experience showed that the outpatient reception service center could optimize outpatient service process,improve the patients'satisfaction,reduce the outpatient service complaint rate and improve the doctor-patient relationship.

  5. EFFECTS OF PERSONALITY TRAITS OF SPORTS-HEALTH CENTER EMPLOYEES ON SERVICE ORIENTATION IN PROVINCE OF ANKARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was made for the purpose of researching the effects of personality traits of sports-health center personnel on service orientation in province of Ankara. As data collection tool, “Five Factor Personality Inventory” developed by Goldberg in 1990 and a version of “Customer Centricity Scale” developed by Brown et al. (2000, which was localized and tested for validity-reliability by Serçeoğlu (2013, were used. In the mentioned scale, the factor load values representing the structure validity of items constituting the service orientation change between 0,85 and 0,97. Cronbach Alpha reliability coefficient calculated for the reliability of the scale was calculated as 0,98 (Serçeoğlu, 2013. Data collected from 201 participants working at 19 businesses were analyzed by processing in SPSS-21 package software. The conclusion of personality traits of personnel working at sports-health centers having a significant effect on the service orientation, also personality traits sub-factors having a significant effect on service orientation was reached. When the effect of personality traits of sports-health business employees’ belonging to sub-factors of five factor personality inventory on service orientation is looked at; the sub-factors of agreeableness, responsibility and being open to new ideas are seen to have significant effect, the sub-factors of extroversion and emotional balance are seen not to have significant effect. The conclusion of significant difference between the personality traits and service orientation of the participants according to their status in the department they are employed was reached. It was identified that there were no significant difference between personality traits and service orientation according to gender, marital status and duration of working in the industry of the employees.

  6. Technical Information Centers: Specialized Services to Science and Technology. An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douville, Judith A.

    1972-01-01

    This study attempts to describe the purposes, establishment, practices, and problems of a technical information center, and to focus attention on the unique relationships that do or could exist between the traditional special or company library and the modern information center. (74 references) (Author/SJ)

  7. Human‐Centered Design: Integrating Services & Systems Around People By Providing A Common Ground for Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Service engineering and service design, though distinct in their origins, theories, concepts, methods and practices, share that they are both consequential productive arts for people who depend on their outcomes. The ideas, methods and practices of human‐centred design are therefore relevant to b...... solutions that work for people inside and outside of organizations and to conceive of, plan and deliver services that embrace the full human being, not merely a person’s purchasing power or cognitive abilities....

  8. Service Users Facing Household Challenges : Their Experiences with Task-Centered Coping Approach

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on a study of an educational and developmental programme, in which the task-centred coping approach (TCCA) was a central part. Twenty social worker practitioners from Norwegian municipal social services (MSS) participated in the programme, and practiced TCCA with 74 of their service users. The aim of the study was to develop knowledge about how service users evolve their housing competence by utilizing TCCA.The study was based on a way of participatory action research, i...

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF SERVICE QUALITY; CUSTOMER SATISFACTION AND ATTITUDINAL LOYALTY ON BEHAVIORAL FUTURE INTENTION OF PARTICIPATIONS IN FITNESS CENTERS

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Elahi; Eisa Eskandari; Sayed Mahdi Rasouli; Vahid Saatchian; Ahmad Mahmoudi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was influence of service quality; customer satisfaction and attitudinalloyalty on behavioral future intention of participations in fitness centers. This study wasdescriptive-co relational. The population of study includes all costumers of aerobic and fitnesscenters in Rasht and 104 people elected randomly. To gather data standard questionnaire ofservice quality (QSS) Alexandris (1999); customer loyalty (AIS) Alen (1990); customersatisfaction (OCS) Victor (2002) and b...

  10. ANALYSING THE USABILITY OF ICT AND E-SERVICES FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES AT THE SCHOOL OF KEMI RECEPTION CENTER

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Education is the most important means that can be used to change and develop the world. Information and Communication Technology is one of the most innovative and progressive arena in today’s world. The objective of this study is to analyse teachers’ and students’ ability to use Information and Communication Technology and e-services to perform the required activities for teaching and learning purposes at the School of Kemi Reception Center. Exploratory research on literature and e-so...

  11. Designing pro-poor rewards for ecosystem services: Land Tenure Center spring forum 7-8 April 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Land Tenure Center

    2008-01-01

    Metadata only record The web page for the Land Tenure Center Spring Forum: "Designing Pro-poor Rewards for Ecosystem Services" (7-8 April 2008) has links to many of the presentations, papers and audio files from the two-day event. The forum featured scholars and field practitioners evaluating strategies for rewarding local ecosystem stewards in places of poverty and high biodiversity and included cases from the US, Tanzania, Liberia, Mexico, Borneo, Sumatra, Madagascar, Cambodia, Kenya, Ec...

  12. A decade of building massage therapy services at an academic medical center as part of a healing enhancement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Nancy J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Hauschulz, Jennifer L; Ristau, Crystal R; Thomley, Barb S; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-02-01

    The use of complementary and integrative medicine therapies is steadily becoming an integral part of health care. Massage therapy is increasingly offered to hospitalized patients for various conditions to assist with the management of common symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and tension. This article summarizes a decade of building the massage therapy service at a large tertiary care medical center, from the early pilot studies and research to the current program offerings, and the hopes and dreams for the future.

  13. New trends in medical and service robots human centered analysis, control and design

    CERN Document Server

    Chevallereau, Christine; Pisla, Doina; Bleuler, Hannes; Rodić, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Medical and service robotics integrates several disciplines and technologies such as mechanisms, mechatronics, biomechanics, humanoid robotics, exoskeletons, and anthropomorphic hands. This book presents the most recent advances in medical and service robotics, with a stress on human aspects. It collects the selected peer-reviewed papers of the Fourth International Workshop on Medical and Service Robots, held in Nantes, France in 2015, covering topics on: exoskeletons, anthropomorphic hands, therapeutic robots and rehabilitation, cognitive robots, humanoid and service robots, assistive robots and elderly assistance, surgical robots, human-robot interfaces, BMI and BCI, haptic devices and design for medical and assistive robotics. This book offers a valuable addition to existing literature.

  14. Implementing the Customer Contact Center: An Opportunity to Create a Valid Measurement System for Assessing and Improving a Library's Telephone Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sarah Anne; Cerqua, Judith

    2012-01-01

    A customer contact center offers academic libraries the ability to consistently improve their telephone, e-mail, and IM services. This paper discusses the establishment of a contact center and the benefits of implementing the contact center model at this institution. It then introduces a practical methodology for developing a valid measurement…

  15. Implementing the Customer Contact Center: An Opportunity to Create a Valid Measurement System for Assessing and Improving a Library's Telephone Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sarah Anne; Cerqua, Judith

    2012-01-01

    A customer contact center offers academic libraries the ability to consistently improve their telephone, e-mail, and IM services. This paper discusses the establishment of a contact center and the benefits of implementing the contact center model at this institution. It then introduces a practical methodology for developing a valid measurement…

  16. A framework for improving access and customer service times in health care: application and analysis at the UCLA Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Catherine; Rajaram, Kumar; Barz, Christiane; Rosenthal, J Thomas

    2013-01-01

    There has been an increasing emphasis on health care efficiency and costs and on improving quality in health care settings such as hospitals or clinics. However, there has not been sufficient work on methods of improving access and customer service times in health care settings. The study develops a framework for improving access and customer service time for health care settings. In the framework, the operational concept of the bottleneck is synthesized with queuing theory to improve access and reduce customer service times without reduction in clinical quality. The framework is applied at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center to determine the drivers for access and customer service times and then provides guidelines on how to improve these drivers. Validation using simulation techniques shows significant potential for reducing customer service times and increasing access at this institution. Finally, the study provides several practice implications that could be used to improve access and customer service times without reduction in clinical quality across a range of health care settings from large hospitals to small community clinics.

  17. Service Users Facing Household Challenges : Their Experiences with Task-Centered Coping Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Elisabeth Eriksen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a study of an educational and developmental programme, in which the task-centred coping approach (TCCA was a central part. Twenty social worker practitioners from Norwegian municipal social services (MSS participated in the programme, and practiced TCCA with 74 of their service users. The aim of the study was to develop knowledge about how service users evolve their housing competence by utilizing TCCA.The study was based on a way of participatory action research, in which the researcher was positioned as a partly participating researcher. The researcher tried to attain knowledge from the individualized activities of the service users and the practitioners, and use this knowledge as a contribution to developing their practice and the programme. User participation was one of the cornerstones of the study, and individualization meant matching the approaches of the practitioners to the experienced needs of the individual service user.

  18. Task shifting of HIV/AIDS case management to Community Health Service Centers in urban China: a qualitative policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuchang; Lv, Fan; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Dapeng; Meng, Sining; Ju, Lahong; Jiang, Huihui; Ma, Liping; Sun, Jiangping; Wu, Zunyou

    2015-07-02

    The growing number of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in China points to an increased need for case management services of HIV/AIDS. This study sought to explore the challenges and enablers in shifting the HIV/AIDS case management services from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCs) to Community Health Service Centers (CHSCs) in urban China. A qualitative method based on the Health Policy Triangle (HPT) framework was employed to gain in-depth insights into four elements of the task shifting strategy. This included a review on published literature and health policy documents, 15 focus group discussions (FGDs) and 30 in-depth interviews (IDIs) with four types of key actors from three cities in China. A total of 78 studies and 17 policy files at the national, municipal and local levels were obtained and reviewed comprehensively. Three semi-structured interview guides were used to explore key actors' views on shifting the HIV/AIDS case management services to CHSCs. It is necessary and feasible for CHSCs to engage in case management services for PLWHA in local communities. The increasing number of PLWHA and shortage of qualified health professionals in CDCs made shifting case management services downwards to CHSCs an urgent agenda. CHSCs' wide distribution, technical capacity, accessibility and current practice enabled them to carry out case management services for PLWHA. However our findings indicated several challenges in this task shifting process. Those challenges included lack of specific policy and stable financial support for CHSCs, inadequate manpower, relatively low capacity for health service delivery, lack of coordination among sectors, PLWHA's fear for discrimination and privacy disclosure in local communities, which may compromise the effectiveness and sustainability of those services. Shifting the HIV/AIDS case management services from CDCs to CHSCs is a new approach to cope with the rising number of PLWHA in China, but it should be

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Products and Services at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Ostrenga, D.; Vollmer, B.; Kempler, S.; Deshong, B.; Greene, M.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) hosts and distributes GPM data within the NASA Earth Observation System Data Information System (EOSDIS). The GES DISC is also home to the data archive for the GPM predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Over the past 17 years, the GES DISC has served the scientific as well as other communities with TRMM data and user-friendly services. During the GPM era, the GES DISC will continue to provide user-friendly data services and customer support to users around the world. GPM products currently and to-be available: -Level-1 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and partner radiometer products, DPR products -Level-2 Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) GMI and partner products, DPR products -Level-3 daily and monthly products, DPR products -Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products (early, late, and final) A dedicated Web portal (including user guides, etc.) has been developed for GPM data (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gpm). Data services that are currently and to-be available include Google-like Mirador (http://mirador.gsfc.nasa.gov/) for data search and access; data access through various Web services (e.g., OPeNDAP, GDS, WMS, WCS); conversion into various formats (e.g., netCDF, HDF, KML (for Google Earth), ASCII); exploration, visualization, and statistical online analysis through Giovanni (http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov); generation of value-added products; parameter and spatial subsetting; time aggregation; regridding; data version control and provenance; documentation; science support for proper data usage, FAQ, help desk; monitoring services (e.g. Current Conditions) for applications. The United User Interface (UUI) is the next step in the evolution of the GES DISC web site. It attempts to provide seamless access to data, information and services through a single interface without sending the user to different applications or URLs (e.g., search, access

  20. Promoting Freight Carrier EDI Participation with the Defense Finance and Accounting Service - Indianapolis Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    of the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and three Army regional data centers known as Multifunctional Information Processing Activities (MIPAs) that...environment (now 49 mainframe computers at 22 different locations) into four regional data centers known as Multifunctional Information Processing...15.4 5 0.1 Yes (LGAQ) Freightways Yellow Freight 676 14.1 0 0 Yes System G. I. Trucking 512 10.7 0 0 Yes Danzas - Northern 485 10.1 0 0 No Air Condor

  1. The service encounter in radiology: acing the "moments of truth" to achieve patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Pysarenko, Kristine

    2015-02-01

    Radiologists are increasingly recognizing their role as direct service providers to patients and seeking to offer an exceptional patient experience as part of high-quality service delivery. Patients' perceptions of service delivery are derived from the chain of numerous individual real-time encounters that occur throughout their visit. These so-called "moments of truth" define the overall experience and form the lasting impression of the given practice in their mind. Providing excellent service can be difficult to achieve in practice given its intangible nature as well as the heterogeneity and unpredictability of the large number of patients, frontline staff, and environmental circumstances that define the patient experience. Thus, broad commitment and team effort among all members of a radiology practice are required. This article explores important areas to be considered by a radiology practice to ensure positive and meaningful patient experiences. Specific ways in which every member within the practice, including schedulers, receptionists, technologists, nurses, and radiologists, can contribute to achieving high-quality patient service are discussed. Examples of patient-oriented language that may be useful in particular scenarios in radiology practice are given. The role of the practice's physical facility, including all aspects of its aesthetics and amenities, as well as of Internet services, in shaping the patient experience is also described. Throughout this work, a proactive approach to promoting a service-oriented organizational culture is provided. By improving the patient experience, these strategies may serve to enhance patients' perceptions of radiology and radiologists.

  2. How to operate an Energy Advisory Service. Volume II. New York Institute of Technology Energy Information Center and Referral Service resource material. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spak, G.T.

    1978-06-01

    The NYIT Energy Information Center is a comprehensive information service covering every aspect of energy conservation and related technology, including conservation programs and practices, alternative energy systems, energy legislation, and public policy development in the United States and abroad. Materials in the Center can be located through a Card Catalog System and a Vertical File System. The Card Catalog System has entries which organize books and other printed materials according to authors/titles and according to the subject headings developed by the Library of Congress. The Vertical System contains pamphlets, newsclips, reprints, studies, announcements, product specifications and other ephemeral literature, and is organized according to subject headings based on the emerging vocabulary of the energy literature. The key to vertical file resources is the Thesaurus of Descriptors which is given. The Thesaurus includes all subject headings found in the Vertical File as well as other cross referenced terms likely to come to mind when seeking information on a specific energy area.

  3. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas - 911 Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) Area Boundary (polygon)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — 911 Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) service area boundaries in Arkansas According to the National Emergency Number Association (NENA), a Public Safety Answering...

  4. Southeast Kansas Demonstration Child Development Center. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, Joan I.

    The development of 10 preschool children who attended the Southeast Kansas Demonstration Child Development Center was compared with the development of 10 preschool children who did not attend a child care center to ascertain the value of the center's program. Both groups were tested with the Denver Developmental Screening Test at the beginning and…

  5. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, 911 Call Center Area Boundary for Thomas County, GA, Published in 2010, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Thomas County BOC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2010. It...

  6. Adapted User-Centered Design: A Strategy for the Higher User Acceptance of Innovative e-Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Dinevski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Being familiar with all the benefits of e-Health and the strategic plan for the Slovenian health sector’s informatization, Telekom Slovenia and the Faculty of Medicine from the University of Maribor, along with other partners, have initiated an e-Health project. The project group is developing various e-Health services that are based on modern ICT (information and communications technology solutions and will be available on several screens. In order to meet the users’ needs and expectations and, consequently, achieve the high acceptance of e-Health services, the user-centered design (UCD approach was employed in the e-Health project. However, during the research it was found that conventional UCD methods are not completely appropriate for older adults: the target population of the e-Health services. That is why the selected UCD methods were modified and adapted for older adults. The modified UCD methods used in the research study are presented in this paper. Using the results of the adapted UCD methods, a prototype for a service named MedReminder was developed. The prototype was evaluated by a group of 12 study participants. The study participants evaluated the MedReminder service as acceptable with a good potential for a high adoption rate among its target population, i.e., older adults.

  7. Demonstrating a Conceptual Framework to Provide Efficient Wound Management Service for a Wound Care Center in a Tertiary Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Chang-Cheng; Shen, Jen-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Nung; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the benefits of wound care services and multidisciplinary team care have been well elaborated on in the literature, there is a gap in the actual practice of wound care and the establishment of an efficient referral system. The conceptual framework for establishing efficient wound management services requires elucidation. A wound care center was established in a tertiary hospital in 2010, staffed by an integrated multidisciplinary team including plastic surgeons, a full-time coordinator, a physical therapist, occupational therapists, and other physician specialists. Referral patients were efficiently managed following a conceptual framework for wound care. This efficient wound management service consists of 3 steps: patient entry and onsite immediate wound debridement, wound re-evaluation, and individual wound bed preparation plan. Wound conditions were documented annually over 4 consecutive years. From January 2011 to December 2014, 1103 patients were recruited from outpatient clinics or inpatient consultations for the 3-step wound management service. Of these, 62% of patients achieved healing or improvement in wounds, 13% of patients experienced no change, and 25% of patients failed to follow-up. The outcome of wound treatment varied by wound type. Sixty-nine percent of diabetic foot ulcer patients were significantly healed or improved. In contrast, pressure ulcers were the most poorly healed wound type, with only 55% of patients achieving significantly healed or improved wounds. The 3-step wound management service in the wound care center efficiently provided onsite screening, timely debridement, and multidisciplinary team care. Patients could schedule appointments instead of waiting indefinitely for care. Further wound condition follow-up, education, and prevention were also continually provided. PMID:26554805

  8. Demonstrating a Conceptual Framework to Provide Efficient Wound Management Service for a Wound Care Center in a Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Chang-Cheng; Shen, Jen-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Nung; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2015-11-01

    Although the benefits of wound care services and multidisciplinary team care have been well elaborated on in the literature, there is a gap in the actual practice of wound care and the establishment of an efficient referral system. The conceptual framework for establishing efficient wound management services requires elucidation.A wound care center was established in a tertiary hospital in 2010, staffed by an integrated multidisciplinary team including plastic surgeons, a full-time coordinator, a physical therapist, occupational therapists, and other physician specialists. Referral patients were efficiently managed following a conceptual framework for wound care. This efficient wound management service consists of 3 steps: patient entry and onsite immediate wound debridement, wound re-evaluation, and individual wound bed preparation plan. Wound conditions were documented annually over 4 consecutive years.From January 2011 to December 2014, 1103 patients were recruited from outpatient clinics or inpatient consultations for the 3-step wound management service. Of these, 62% of patients achieved healing or improvement in wounds, 13% of patients experienced no change, and 25% of patients failed to follow-up. The outcome of wound treatment varied by wound type. Sixty-nine percent of diabetic foot ulcer patients were significantly healed or improved. In contrast, pressure ulcers were the most poorly healed wound type, with only 55% of patients achieving significantly healed or improved wounds.The 3-step wound management service in the wound care center efficiently provided onsite screening, timely debridement, and multidisciplinary team care. Patients could schedule appointments instead of waiting indefinitely for care. Further wound condition follow-up, education, and prevention were also continually provided.

  9. Enhanced Performance of Community Health Service Centers during Medical Reforms in Pudong New District of Shanghai, China: A Longitudinal Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Sun

    Full Text Available The performance of community health service centers (CHSCs has not been well monitored and analysed since China's latest community health reforms in 2009. The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the performing trends of the CHSCs and to analyze the main factors that could affect the performance in Pudong new district of Shanghai, China.A regional performance assessment indicator system was applied to the evaluation of Pudong CHSCs' performance from 2011 to 2013. All of the data were sorted out by a panel, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and a generalized estimating equation model.We found that the overall performance increased annually, with a growing number of CHSCs achieving high scores. Significant differences were observed in institutional management, public health services, basic medical services and comprehensive satisfaction during the period of three years. However, we found no differences in the service scores of Chinese traditional medicine (CTM. The investigation also demonstrated that the key factors affecting performance were the location, information system level, family GP program and medical association program rather than the size of the center. However, the medical association participation appeared to have a significant negative effect on performance.It can be concluded from the three-year investigation that the overall performance was improved, but that it could have been further enhanced, especially in institutional management and basic medical service; therefore, it is imperative that CHSCs undertake approaches such as optimizing the resource allocation and utilization, reinforcing the establishment of the information system level, extending the family GP program to more local communities, and promoting the medical association initiative.

  10. The evaluation of time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Nasiripour, Amir Ashkan; Fakhri, Mahmood; Bakhtiari, Ahad; Azari, Samad; Akbarzadeh, Arash; Goli, Ali; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2014-09-28

    This study evaluated the time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah. This study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study 500 cases of patients from Shahrivar (September) 2012 to the end of Shahrivar (September) 2013 were selected and studied by the non-probability quota method. The measuring tool included a preset cases record sheet and sampling method was completing the cases record sheet by referring to the patients' cases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test, benchmark Eta (Eta), Games-Howell post hoc test). The results showed that the interval mean between receiving the mission to reaching the scene, between reaching the scene to moving from the scene, and between moving from the scene to a health center was 7.28, 16.73 and 7.28 minutes. The overall mean of time performance from the scene to the health center was 11.34 minutes. Any intervention in order to speed up service delivery, reduce response times, ambulance equipment and facilities required for accuracy, validity and reliability of the data recorded in the emergency dispatch department, Continuing Education of ambulance staffs, the use of manpower with higher specialize levels such as nurses, supply the job satisfaction, and increase the coordination with other departments that are somehow involved in this process can provide the ground for reducing the loss and disability resulting from traffic accidents.

  11. Overview of Space Weather Impacts and NASA Space Weather Center Services and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The presentation is divided into two major components. First, I will give an overview of space weather phenomenon and their associated impacts. Then I will describe the comprehensive list of products and tools that NASA Space Weather Center has developed by leveraging more than a decade long modeling experience enabled by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) and latest scientific research results from the broad science community. In addition, a summary of the space weather activities we have been engaged in and our operational experience will be provided.

  12. Products and Services Available from the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) and the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, E.; Bhaskaran, A.; Chen, S. L.; Andrews, J. R.; Thomas, V. I.; Hauksson, E.; Clayton, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) archives continuous and triggered data from nearly 9429 data channels from 513 Southern California Seismic Network recorded stations. The SCEDC provides public access to these earthquake parametric and waveform data through web services, its website http://scedc.caltech.edu and through client application such as STP. This poster will describe the most recent significant developments at the SCEDC. The SCEDC now provides web services to access its holdings. Event Parametric Data (FDSN Compliant): http://service.scedc.caltech.edu/fdsnws/event/1/ Station Metadata (FDSN Compliant): http://service.scedc.caltech.edu/fdsnws/station/1/ Waveforms (FDSN Compliant): http://service.scedc.caltech.edu/fdsnws/dataselect/1/ Event Windowed Waveforms, phases: http://service.scedc.caltech.edu/webstp/ In an effort to assist researchers accessing catalogs from multiple seismic networks, the SCEDC has entered its earthquake parametric catalog into the ANSS Common Catalog (ComCat). Origin, phase, and magnitude information have been loaded. The SCEDC data holdings now include a double difference catalog (Hauksson et. al 2011) spanning 1981 through 2015 available via STP, and a focal mechanism catalog (Yang et al. 2011). As part of a NASA/AIST project in collaboration with JPL and SIO, the SCEDC now archives and distributes real time 1 Hz streams of GPS displacement solutions from the California Real Time Network. The SCEDC has implemented the Continuous Wave Buffer (CWB) to manage its waveform archive and allow users to access continuous data available within seconds of real time. This software was developed and currently in use at NEIC. SCEDC has moved its website (http://scedc.caltech.edu) to the Cloud. The Recent Earthquake Map and static web pages are now hosted by Amazon Web Services. This enables the web site to serve large number of users without competing for resources needed by SCSN/SCEDC mission critical operations.

  13. Operations research techniques applied to service center logistics in power distribution users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresinha Arns Steiner

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the optimization for the logistics regarding services demanded byusers of power distribution lines, served by the Portão office, located in Curitiba, PR, Brazil,and operated by COPEL (Paranaense Power Company. Through the use of OperationsResearch techniques, an Integer Programming Mathematical model and Floyd Algorithm, amethod was defined to determine in an optimized way, the number of teams needed by theselected office, as well as, the optimized assignment for the teams to the sites in need, inorder to offer efficient services to the users and, besides that, the immediate execution onemergencies and, as to the other services, accordingly to parameters set by the NationalPower Agency together with COPEL. The methodology hereby presented is generic, so thatit could be applied to any power network (or any of its lines, and it has presented verysatisfactory results to the case in analysis.

  14. Parents' Experiences with Childhood Deafness: Implications for Family-Centered Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Carla Wood; Traub, Randi J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the need for family-centered follow-up, this study examined parents' experiences with deafness after early identification. Qualitative inquiry methods were used to explore and describe the perceptions and experiences of nine parents of children identified with severe to profound deafness. Parents participated in face-to-face…

  15. Beyond Lip-Service: An Operational Definition of "Learning-Centered College"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, William C.; Hester, Jessica L.; MacEntee, Virginia M.; MacKenzie, James A.; Morey, T. Mark; Nichols, James T.; Pacitti, Patricia A.; Shaffer, Barbara A.; Tomascak, Paul B.; Weber, Suzanne P.; Young, Rosalie R.

    2008-01-01

    Faculty, staff, and student perceptions of high-quality learning experiences were explored using focus groups attempting to define a "learning-centered" college. Common themes emerged suggesting that a successful learning community requires faculty-student collaboration, effective communication, critical thinking skills, reciprocal respect,…

  16. A Novel Cloud-Based Service Robotics Application to Data Center Environmental Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ludovico Orlando; Rosa, Stefano; Maggiora, Marcello; Bona, Basilio

    2016-08-08

    This work presents a robotic application aimed at performing environmental monitoring in data centers. Due to the high energy density managed in data centers, environmental monitoring is crucial for controlling air temperature and humidity throughout the whole environment, in order to improve power efficiency, avoid hardware failures and maximize the life cycle of IT devices. State of the art solutions for data center monitoring are nowadays based on environmental sensor networks, which continuously collect temperature and humidity data. These solutions are still expensive and do not scale well in large environments. This paper presents an alternative to environmental sensor networks that relies on autonomous mobile robots equipped with environmental sensors. The robots are controlled by a centralized cloud robotics platform that enables autonomous navigation and provides a remote client user interface for system management. From the user point of view, our solution simulates an environmental sensor network. The system can easily be reconfigured in order to adapt to management requirements and changes in the layout of the data center. For this reason, it is called the virtual sensor network. This paper discusses the implementation choices with regards to the particular requirements of the application and presents and discusses data collected during a long-term experiment in a real scenario.

  17. A Novel Cloud-Based Service Robotics Application to Data Center Environmental Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico Orlando Russo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a robotic application aimed at performing environmental monitoring in data centers. Due to the high energy density managed in data centers, environmental monitoring is crucial for controlling air temperature and humidity throughout the whole environment, in order to improve power efficiency, avoid hardware failures and maximize the life cycle of IT devices. State of the art solutions for data center monitoring are nowadays based on environmental sensor networks, which continuously collect temperature and humidity data. These solutions are still expensive and do not scale well in large environments. This paper presents an alternative to environmental sensor networks that relies on autonomous mobile robots equipped with environmental sensors. The robots are controlled by a centralized cloud robotics platform that enables autonomous navigation and provides a remote client user interface for system management. From the user point of view, our solution simulates an environmental sensor network. The system can easily be reconfigured in order to adapt to management requirements and changes in the layout of the data center. For this reason, it is called the virtual sensor network. This paper discusses the implementation choices with regards to the particular requirements of the application and presents and discusses data collected during a long-term experiment in a real scenario.

  18. A Novel Cloud-Based Service Robotics Application to Data Center Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ludovico Orlando; Rosa, Stefano; Maggiora, Marcello; Bona, Basilio

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a robotic application aimed at performing environmental monitoring in data centers. Due to the high energy density managed in data centers, environmental monitoring is crucial for controlling air temperature and humidity throughout the whole environment, in order to improve power efficiency, avoid hardware failures and maximize the life cycle of IT devices. State of the art solutions for data center monitoring are nowadays based on environmental sensor networks, which continuously collect temperature and humidity data. These solutions are still expensive and do not scale well in large environments. This paper presents an alternative to environmental sensor networks that relies on autonomous mobile robots equipped with environmental sensors. The robots are controlled by a centralized cloud robotics platform that enables autonomous navigation and provides a remote client user interface for system management. From the user point of view, our solution simulates an environmental sensor network. The system can easily be reconfigured in order to adapt to management requirements and changes in the layout of the data center. For this reason, it is called the virtual sensor network. This paper discusses the implementation choices with regards to the particular requirements of the application and presents and discusses data collected during a long-term experiment in a real scenario. PMID:27509505

  19. Call centers as lean service environments: job-related strain and the mediating role of work design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigg, Christine A; Jackson, Paul R

    2006-04-01

    Call centers can be considered as lean service systems, with leanness being described in terms of both dialog scripting and performance monitoring. Using data from a sample of 823 call handlers from 36 call centers, these lean characteristics are examined in relation to the prediction of call handler job-related strain. Moreover, the extent to which this relationship can be accounted for by work design characteristics are examined. Findings confirm that employees who experience greater dialog scripting and more intensive performance monitoring show higher levels of strain. These relationships are fully mediated by work design. These findings demonstrate the importance of considering the impact of lean working practices on employee health. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Centers for independent living and secondary transition collaboration: characteristics for enhanced service delivery for adolescents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotner, Anthony J; Shogren, Karrie A; Shaw, Leslie A; VanHorn Stinnett, Chelsea; Seo, Hyojeong

    2017-06-01

    Research involving secondary transition practices indicates a growing implementation of interagency collaboration to maximize service delivery to support students transitioning from school to adult life. Centers for Independent Living (CILs) are often excluded from collaborative partnerships and denied the opportunity to contribute as a valued stakeholder in the transition process. A total of 189 CIL professionals representing represented 38 states completed the online survey to (a) identify to what degree does the factor structure of Thompson's Collaboration Survey holds for CIL professionals and (b) explore what specific CIL professional and agency characteristics predict greater collaboration between CILs and local education agencies (LEAs). Additionally (c) researchers sought to determine the degrees to which greater self-reported collaboration predicts more frequent transition services provided to transition-age youth by CIL professionals. Results indicated that the factor structure proposed by Thompson was confirmed in a sample of CIL professionals. None of the agency or individual characteristics (i.e., number of high schools partnered with, number of students served, amount of training in transition services, and importance of collaboration between high schools and agencies for transition) predicted greater collaboration with LEAS. When analyzing the effects of degree of collaboration on the services provided, high ratings on three of the five collaborative dimensions predicted a higher likelihood of providing services to transition-age youth. This study suggests that more training and experience of CIL professionals does not necessarily lead to greater collaboration. Additionally, the findings suggest that collaborative team structure is more important than social capital collaborative dimensions in leading to frequent services from CILs to transition-age youth. Implications for rehabilitation Extant literature suggests that secondary transition

  1. An Investigation of the Implementation of Support Services in a Graduate Advising Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Susan W.

    2014-01-01

    This capstone examined the differences in support services provided for undergraduate versus graduate students. From the research, a centralized advising system was designed and implemented for graduate students at a public state supported university in Kentucky to help students be more satisfied with their graduate school experience and increase…

  2. Chronic Childhood Trauma, Mental Health, Academic Achievement, and School-Based Health Center Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Satu; Chapman, Susan; Spetz, Joanne; Brindis, Claire D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Children and adolescents exposed to chronic trauma have a greater risk for mental health disorders and school failure. Children and adolescents of minority racial/ethnic groups and those living in poverty are at greater risk of exposure to trauma and less likely to have access to mental health services. School-based health centers…

  3. Family-Centered Early Intervention Visual Impairment Services through Matrix Session Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Mindy S.; Gullifor, Kateri; Hollinshead, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Early intervention visual impairment services are built on a model that values family. Matrix session planning pulls together parent priorities, family routines, and identified strategies in a way that helps families and early intervention professionals outline a plan that can both highlight long-term goals and focus on what can be done today.…

  4. The effect of clinical service center in the clinical service%临床服务中心在临床服务中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石芳; 王艳雪

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of clinical service center in the clinical service. Methods 1240 patients in our hospital from October 2012 to October 2013 were selected as research group,the center clinical service was used in research group.At the same time,1240 patients in our hospital from October 2012 to October 2013 were selected as control group,there was no center clinical service in control group.Inspection time,appointment to check the time,8-h beyond the time of taking the medicine,8-h beyond the time of taking the blood and satisfaction rate of patient in two groups was compared respectively. Results Inspection time,appointment to check the time in research group was signif-icantly shorter than that in control group respectively,with statistical difference (P<0.01).8-h beyond the time of taking the medicine in research group was(0.6±0.3) h,8-h beyond the time of taking the blood in research group was(0.7±0.5) h,significantly shorter than that in control group respectively,with statistical difference (P<0.01).Satisfaction rate of pa-tient in research group was significantly higher than that in control group,with statistical difference (P<0.01). Conclu-sion Implementation of clinical service center management in clinical service,which can effectively improve work effi-ciency.improve satisfaction of patient,has high clinical value.%目的:探讨临床服务中心在临床服务中的作用。方法选择2012年10月~2013年10月来本院住院的患者1240例作为研究组,由临床服务中心提供服务,同时选择2012年10月~2013年10月来本院住院的患者1240例作为对照组,临床服务中心未提供服务,比较两组的送检时间、预约检查时间、8 h以外取药及取血时间、患者满意度。结果研究组的送检时间、预约检查时间明显短于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);研究组8 h以外取药时间为(0.6±0.3)h、8 h以外取血时间为(0.7±0.5)h,明显短于对照组,

  5. Design, Implementation and Analysis of Learner-Centered Guided In-Service Programme for Technical Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiia Rüütmann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of learner-centered guided in-service program for technical teacher education has been launched at Estonian Centre for Engineering Pedagogy at Tallinn University of Technology. The aim of the program has been facilitating the initial in-service teaching experience, involving mentoring, peer support and cognitive apprenticeship. The emphasis has been on teaching for knowledge application, including the choice of content and processes, motivation, reflection, problem-solving, choice of educational technology, effective teaching methods, teaching models and strategies ཿ concepts, tools and procedures of the field of engineering, organized in ways enabling teachers to formulate real world problems, apply and solve them. The program has been implemented since 2012 and covers IGIP curriculum requirements. In the present article the designed program is described and analyzed.

  6. Semantic Web Data Discovery of Earth Science Data at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Mahabaleshwara; Strub, Richard F.; Lynnes, Christopher S.; Fang, Hongliang; Teng, William

    2008-01-01

    Mirador is a web interface for searching Earth Science data archived at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). Mirador provides keyword-based search and guided navigation for providing efficient search and access to Earth Science data. Mirador employs the power of Google's universal search technology for fast metadata keyword searches, augmented by additional capabilities such as event searches (e.g., hurricanes), searches based on location gazetteer, and data services like format converters and data sub-setters. The objective of guided data navigation is to present users with multiple guided navigation in Mirador is an ontology based on the Global Change Master directory (GCMD) Directory Interchange Format (DIF). Current implementation includes the project ontology covering various instruments and model data. Additional capabilities in the pipeline include Earth Science parameter and applications ontologies.

  7. A Comment on the Efficiency of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, James H.

    1976-01-01

    The efficiency of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test an easily administered measure of four areas of infant and preschool development, was evaluated using an estimate of the base rate of mental retardation in the screening population. (Author/CL)

  8. Location Planning Problem of Service Centers for Sustainable Home Healthcare: Evidence from the Empirical Analysis of Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Du

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is of theoretical and practical significance to understand what factors influence the sustainable development of home healthcare services in China. Based on a face-to-face survey, we find that the location planning, which is decisive for the improvement of patient satisfaction, can effectively reduce the risks, as well as the costs of redundant construction and re-construction of service centers for home healthcare and, thus, helps ensure the sustainability of health and the environment. The purposes of this paper are to investigate the existing problem of home healthcare in Shanghai and to find the optimum location planning scheme under several realistic constraints. By considering differentiated services provided by the medical staff at different levels and the degrees of patient satisfaction, a mixed integer programming model is built to minimize the total medical cost. The IBM ILOGCPLEX is used to solve the above model. Finally, a case study of Putuo district in Shanghai is conducted to validate the proposed model and methodology. Results indicate that the model used in this paper can effectively reduce the total medical cost and enhance the medical sustainability, and therefore, the results of the model can be used as a reference for decision makers on the location planning problem of home healthcare services in China.

  9. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, 911 servive areas, Published in 2008, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, CITY OF LAURINBURG.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2008. It...

  10. NOAA Coastal Services Center Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Weather Forecast Office (PHI WFO) and Wakefield, Virginia Weather Forecast Office (AKQ WFO) - Eastern Shore of Maryland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center's efforts to create an online mapping viewer called...

  11. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Published in unknown, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Racine County Planning & Development.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of unknown....

  12. Incarceration of umbilical hernia after radiological insertion of a Denver peritoneovenous shunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kengo; Shimohira, Masashi; Hashizume, Takuya; Kawai, Tatsuya; Kurosaka, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Kazushi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2013-03-01

    We report a rare complication of incarceration of an umbilical hernia after Denver peritoneovenous shunt placement. A 50-year-old man presented with refractory ascites from liver cirrhosis. He also had an umbilical hernia. Because the ascites became uncontrollable, Denver peritoneovenous shunting was performed. The operation was successful and the ascites decreased. Ten days later, however, incarceration of the umbilical hernia occurred. A surgical repair was performed, but he died 2 days later. The cause of death was considered to be sepsis.

  13. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Products and Services at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrenga, D.; Liu, Z.; Vollmer, B.; Teng, W. L.; Kempler, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    On February 27, 2014, the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched to provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow (http://pmm.nasa.gov/GPM). The GPM mission consists of an international network of satellites in which a GPM "Core Observatory" satellite carries both active and passive microwave instruments to measure precipitation and serve as a reference standard, to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of other research and operational satellites. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) hosts and distributes GPM data within the NASA Earth Observation System Data Information System (EOSDIS). The GES DISC is home to the data archive for the GPM predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Over the past 16 years, the GES DISC has served the scientific as well as other communities with TRMM data and user-friendly services. During the GPM era, the GES DISC will continue to provide user-friendly data services and customer support to users around the world. GPM products currently and to-be available include the following: Level-1 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and partner radiometer products Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) GMI and partner products Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products (early, late, and final) A dedicated Web portal (including user guides, etc.) has been developed for GPM data (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gpm). Data services that are currently and to-be available include Google-like Mirador (http://mirador.gsfc.nasa.gov/) for data search and access; data access through various Web services (e.g., OPeNDAP, GDS, WMS, WCS); conversion into various formats (e.g., netCDF, HDF, KML (for Google Earth), ASCII); exploration, visualization, and statistical online analysis through Giovanni (http://giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov); generation of value-added products; parameter and spatial subsetting; time aggregation; regridding

  14. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Products and Services at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, D.; Vollmer, B.; Deshong, B.; Greene, M.; Teng, W.; Kempler, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    On February 27, 2014, the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was launched to provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow (http:pmm.nasa.govGPM). The GPM mission consists of an international network of satellites in which a GPM Core Observatory satellite carries both active and passive microwave instruments to measure precipitation and serve as a reference standard, to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of other research and operational satellites. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) hosts and distributes GPM data within the NASA Earth Observation System Data Information System (EOSDIS). The GES DISC is home to the data archive for the GPM predecessor, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Over the past 16 years, the GES DISC has served the scientific as well as other communities with TRMM data and user-friendly services. During the GPM era, the GES DISC will continue to provide user-friendly data services and customer support to users around the world. GPM products currently and to-be available include the following: 1. Level-1 GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and partner radiometer products. 2. Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF) GMI and partner products. 3. Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) products. (early, late, and final)A dedicated Web portal (including user guides, etc.) has been developed for GPM data (http:disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.govgpm). Data services that are currently and to-be available include Google-like Mirador (http:mirador.gsfc.nasa.gov) for data search and access; data access through various Web services (e.g., OPeNDAP, GDS, WMS, WCS); conversion into various formats (e.g., netCDF, HDF, KML (for Google Earth), ASCII); exploration, visualization, and statistical online analysis through Giovanni (http:giovanni.gsfc.nasa.gov); generation of value-added products; parameter and spatial subsetting; time aggregation; regridding; data

  15. Multimedia Health Records: user-centered design approach for a multimedia uploading service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazzotta, Fernando; Mayan, John C; Storani, Fernando D; Ortiz, Juan M; Lopez, Gastón E; Gimenez, Gastón M; Luna, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia elements add value to text documents by transmitting information difficult to express in words. In healthcare, many professional and services keep this elements in their own repositories. This brings the problem of information fragmentation in different silos which hinder its access to other healthcare professionals. On the other hand patients have clinical data of their own in different formats generated in different healthcare organizations which is not accessible to professionals within our healthcare network. This paper describes the design, development and implementation processes of a service which allows media elements to be loaded in a patient clinical data repository (CDR) either through an electronic health record by professionals (EHR) or through a personal health record (PHR) by patients, in order to avoid fragmentation of the information.

  16. Index System of Health Services Quality Evaluation on Township Health Centers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐明生; 王静

    2004-01-01

    THERE IS ABOUT 80% of total population in ruralChina. Rural health care is an important content ofbuilding socialism new villages, and is a big thing tosafeguard peasants’ health and protect agricultureproductivity, invigorate rural economy and maintainsocial stability. So, rural health acre is a pivot ofChina’s health development. In 1997, the policy “tostrengthen rural health organization constructionand to perfect three-level health services systemincluding the county, the town and the village” wasdefini...

  17. Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at David Grant Air Force Medical Center Need Additional Management Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-24

    17 counties. DGMC Uniform Business Office (UBO) uses MSAs to record billing and fee collection for medical and dental services from Uniformed...personnel processed new accounts, the process used by DGMC did not manage or prioritize the aging MSAs or alert clerks of delinquent accounts...have been applied to other valid requirements such as administrative, operating, and equipment costs; readiness training; or trauma consortium

  18. Neuro-Oncology Branch patient emotional support services | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emotional Support Services The diagnosis of a brain tumor elicits many different and sometimes difficult emotions, not only for the patient, but also for their family members. Patients may encounter changes in cognitive functioning and language, a diminished ability to focus or make decisions, or short-term memory loss, all of which can greatly affect their personal and professional lives. We are dedicated to helping patients and their families deal with the physical and emotional facets of this disease.

  19. User Feedback Mechanisms for Defense Technical Information Center Services and Products. Phase II,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-10

    these visitors are users or potential users of DTIC products L and services. A DTIC spokesperson summarizes the history of the agency and provides an...questionnaire and the user responses to it were studied and offered a number of useful insights for development of this qulestionnaire. Paul Klinefelter , Judy...questionnaire). * 5P. Klinefelter , J. Pickeral, and T. Lahr, 5, 7, 8, 21, and 25 April, 6 and 9 May 1983. 6 "DTIC-TOS Annual Historical Summary--FY82

  20. A Service-Oriented Healthcare Message Alerting Architecture in an Asia Medical Center: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Shin Lai

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates how our development team has used some information technologies to let physicians obtain an instant abnormal laboratory result report for critical patient care services. We have implementeda healthcare message alerting system (HMAS on a healthcare short message service (HSMS engine and the distributed healthcare-oriented service environment (DiHOSE in the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH. The HSMS engine has a general interface for all applications which could easily send any kind of alerting messages. Fundamentally, the DiHOSE uses HL7 standard formats to process the information exchange behaviors and can be flexibly extended for reasonable user requirements. The disease surveillance subsystem is an integral part of NTUH new hospital information system which is based on DiHOSE and the disease surveillance subsystem would send alerting messages through the HSMS engine. The latest cell phone message alerting subsystem, a case study, in NTUH proved that the DiHOSE could integrate the user required functions without much work. We concluded that both HSMS and DiHOSE can generalize and extend application demands efficiently.

  1. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurements at Denver International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Wang, Frank Y.; Booth, Earl R.; Watts, Michael E.; Fenichel, Neil; D'Errico, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Airport capacity is constrained, in part, by spacing requirements associated with the wake vortex hazard. NASA's Wake Vortex Avoidance Project has a goal to establish the feasibility of reducing this spacing while maintaining safety. Passive acoustic phased array sensors, if shown to have operational potential, may aid in this effort by detecting and tracking the vortices. During August/September 2003, NASA and the USDOT sponsored a wake acoustics test at the Denver International Airport. The central instrument of the test was a large microphone phased array. This paper describes the test in general terms and gives an overview of the array hardware. It outlines one of the analysis techniques that is being applied to the data and gives sample results. The technique is able to clearly resolve the wake vortices of landing aircraft and measure their separation, height, and sinking rate. These observations permit an indirect estimate of the vortex circulation. The array also provides visualization of the vortex evolution, including the Crow instability.

  2. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Eighth Biennial Geographic Information Science Workshop and first The National Map Users Conference, Denver, Colorado, May 10-13, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieverling, Jennifer B.; Dietterle, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is sponsoring the first The National Map Users Conference in conjunction with the eighth biennial Geographic Information Science (GIS) Workshop on May 10-13, 2011, in Lakewood, Colorado. The GIS Workshop will be held at the USGS National Training Center, located on the Denver Federal Center, Lakewood, Colorado, May 10-11. The National Map Users Conference will be held directly after the GIS Workshop at the Denver Marriott West, a convention hotel in the Lakewood, Colorado area, May 12-13. The National Map is designed to serve the Nation by providing geographic data and knowledge for government, industry, and public uses. The goal of The National Map Users Conference is to enhance communications and collaboration among the communities of users of and contributors to The National Map, including USGS, Department of the Interior, and other government GIS specialists and scientists, as well as the broader geospatial community. The USGS National Geospatial Program intends the conference to serve as a forum to engage users and more fully discover and meet their needs for the products and services of The National Map. The goal of the GIS Workshop is to promote advancement of GIS and related technologies and concepts as well as the sharing of GIS knowledge within the USGS GIS community. This collaborative opportunity for multi-disciplinary GIS and associated professionals will allow attendees to present and discuss a wide variety of geospatial-related topics. The Users Conference and Workshop collaboration will bring together scientists, managers, and data users who, through presentations, posters, seminars, workshops, and informal gatherings, will share accomplishments and progress on a variety of geospatial topics. During this joint event, attendees will have the opportunity to present or demonstrate their work; to develop their knowledge by attending hands-on workshops, seminars, and presentations given by professionals from USGS and

  3. Finding the service you need: human centered design of a Digital Interactive Social Chart in DEMentia care (DEM-DISC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Roest, H G; Meiland, F J M; Haaker, T; Reitsma, E; Wils, H; Jonker, C; Dröes, R M

    2008-01-01

    Community dwelling people with dementia and their informal carers experience a lot of problems. In the course of the disease process people with dementia become more dependent on others and professional help is often necessary. Many informal carers and people with dementia experience unmet needs with regard to information on the disease and on the available care and welfare offer, therefore they tend not to utilize the broad spectrum of available care and welfare services. This can have very negative consequences like unsafe situations, social isolation of the person with dementia and overburden of informal carers with consequent increased risk of illness for them. The development of a DEMentia specific Digital Interactive Social Chart (DEM-DISC) may counteract these problems. DEM-DISC is a demand oriented website for people with dementia and their carers, which is easy, accessible and provides users with customized information on healthcare and welfare services. DEM-DISC is developed according to the human centered design principles, this means that people with dementia, informal carers and healthcare professionals were involved throughout the development process. This paper describes the development of DEM-DISC from four perspectives, a domain specific content perspective, an ICT perspective, a user perspective and an organizational perspective. The aims and most important results from each perspective will be discussed. It is concluded that the human centered design was a valuable method for the development of the DEM-DISC.

  4. Epidemic assistance by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: role of the Epidemic Intelligence Service, 1946-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Stephen B; Stroup, Donna F; Sencer, David J

    2011-12-01

    Since 1946, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has responded to urgent requests from US states, federal agencies, and international organizations through epidemic-assistance investigations (Epi-Aids). The authors describe the first 60 years of Epi-Aids, breadth of problems addressed, evolution of methodologies, scope of activities, and impact of investigations on population health. They reviewed Epi-Aid reports and EIS Bulletins, contacted current and former Epidemic Intelligence Service staff, and systematically searched the PubMed and Web of Science databases. They abstracted information on dates, location, staff involved, health problems, methods, and impacts of investigations according to a preplanned protocol. They assessed the methods presented as well as the quality of reports. During 1946-2005, a total of 4,484 investigations of health events were initiated by 2,815 Epidemic Intelligence Service officers. In the early years, the majority were in response to infectious agents, although environmental problems emerged. Investigations in subsequent years focused on occupational conditions, birth defects, reproductive health, tobacco use, cancer, violence, legal debate, and terrorism. These Epi-Aids heralded expansion of the agency's mission and presented new methods in statistics and epidemiology. Recommendations from Epi-Aids led to policy implementation, evaluation, or modification. Epi-Aids provide the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with the agility to respond rapidly to public health crises.

  5. Chinese Telephone Number-Input Technology and Its Applications in a Customer Service Call Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗仁; 许晓革; 兰德品; 郭盛芳

    2002-01-01

    The Chinese intelligence input technology, its applications, and a customer serv ice call center system are developed. This technology can be used both in stan dard English telephone number-input keyboard and in Chinese telephone number- input keyboard .And authors develop sophisticated technologies including "Pinyi n" (the Chinese p honetic alphabet ) encoding technology of phonetic symbol code and formal symbo l code of Chinese character structure, phrase encoding technology, input technol ogy of whole sentence intelligence encoding and input technology of Chinese tele phone number encoding.

  6. The Black Sea Monitoring and Forecasting Center (BS-MFC) in the framework of the Copernicus Marine Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazov, Atanas; Coppini, Giovanni; Ciliberti, Stefania Angela; Gregoire, Marilaure; Staneva, Joanna; Peneva, Elisaveta; Özsoy, Emin; Vandenbulcke, Luc; Storto, Andrea; Lemieux-Dudon, Benedicte; Lovato, Tomas; Masina, Simona; Pinardi, Nadia; Palermo, Francesco; Creti, Sergio; Macchia, Francesca; Lecci, Rita; Behrens, Arno; Marinova, Veselka; Slabakova, Violeta

    2017-04-01

    The BS-MFC entered the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS, http://marine.copernicus.eu/) in October 2016, providing regular and systematic information about the ocean state in the Black Sea in operational mode. An expert team constitutes the BS-MFC Consortium: the Institute of Oceanology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (IO-BAS, Bulgaria) coordinates the service and the management in collaboration with Fondazione Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC, Italy), Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht - Institute of Coastal Research (HZG, Germany), the University of Liege (ULG, Belgium), the Sofia University "St. Kliment Ohridski (USOF, Bulgaria) and the Eurasia Earth Sciences Institute - Istanbul Technical University (ITU, Turkey). The system provides a complete data catalogue for the Black Sea ocean variables such as temperature, salinity, sea level, currents, biogeochemistry and waves through a technologically advanced and resilient service, which is fully interconnected with the other Centers in the Copernicus network. The high level BS-MFC architecture is based on 3 Production Units, for Physics, Biogeochemistry and Waves products respectively, a Dissemination/Archiving Unit for the delivery of the products and their archiving/accessibility, a Local Service Desk connected to the CMEMS Service Desk devoted to support all the operational activities, and backup units for all the main service components. Products consist of analysis/hindcast, 10-days forecast and reanalysis, describing the physical (currents, temperature, salinity, sea level, mixed layer depth and bottom temperature), the biogeochemical state and waves. To implement and improve the service, the BS-MFC has detailed an evolution plan, actually under implementation, devoted to establish, assess and improve the systems and their operational functionalities, providing some improvements from the scientific point of view concerning the modeling components (e.g., the fully aligned

  7. Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems and Career Counseling Services. Eleventh Annual Report [of the] Oakland University Adult Career Counseling Center: September 1993-June 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splete, Howard

    This report profiles the Adult Career Counseling Center (ACCC) at Oakland University, Michigan. Conceived in 1982, the Center provides services for adults seeking career guidance. The ACCC supplies career information, counseling, advice in preparation and interviewing skills, and referral information, all at no charge. The ACCC employed computers…

  8. Development of a user-centered health information service system for depressive symptom management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jeongyee; Wolpin, Seth; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Sowoo; Yoon, Sookhee; An, Kyungeh

    2009-06-01

    A user-centered, Web-based depressive symptoms management system might be particularly useful in Korea, where those who seek mental health care face stigmatizing and where personal computers and the Internet have reached saturation levels. The purpose of this article is to describe the development process of a Web-based system for depressive symptom management through user-centered design principles. Our design process included four distinct phases: a needs assessment, analysis, design/development/testing, and the application release. The final revised website was released with the URL address, "http://www.baejy.com/smiles/". In the 3 years since the site was made available publicly, it is notable that 161,604 Koreans have accessed this website, either for educational purposes or for managing their depressive symptoms. A Web-based depressive symptom management system with a high degree of usability was developed. This website can be used to assess depressive symptoms and to serve as an intervention strategy to improve mental health.

  9. Person-Centered, Physical Activity for Patients with Low Back Pain: Piloting Service Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Bloxham

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is one of the most common and costly conditions in industrialized countries. Exercise therapy has been used to treat LBP, although typically using only one mode of exercise. This paper describes the method and initial findings of a person-centered, group physical activity programme which featured as part of a multidisciplinary approach to treating LBP. Six participants (aged 50.7 ± 17 years completed a six-week physical activity programme lasting two hours per week. A multicomponent approach to physical activity was adopted which included aerobic fitness, core activation, muscular strength and endurance, Nordic Walking, flexibility and exercise gaming. In addition, participants were required to use diary sheets to record physical activity completed at home. Results revealed significant (p < 0.05 improvements in back strength (23%, aerobic fitness (23%, negative wellbeing (32% and disability (16%. Person’s Correlation Coefficient analysis revealed significant (p < 0.05 relationships between improvement in perceived pain and aerobic fitness (r = 0.93. It was concluded that a person-centered, multicomponent approach to physical activity may be optimal for supporting patients who self-manage LBP.

  10. Interdisciplinary counseling service for renal malignancies: a patient-centered approach to raise guideline adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Johannes; Ihrig, Andreas; Winkler, Eva; Brechtel, Anette; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Herzog, Wolfgang; Frank, Martin; Grüllich, Carsten; Hallscheidt, Peter; Zeier, Martin; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Tumor boards have become an integral part of high-quality cancer care, but in general, patients are not directly involved. To overcome this weakness, we established an interdisciplinary counseling service for renal malignancies where 4 specialists talked to the patient at once. We evaluated this approach from the patients' and physicians' perspective. For 3 months, we assessed organizational and clinical data. Within a standardized telephone interview lasting for 14 ± 8 minutes, we explored the patients' view 1 week after counseling. A focus group contributed the physicians' perspective. Costs and revenues were calculated from the hospital's perspective. We included 52 consecutive patients aged 62 ± 10 years. Patients' initiative for a "second opinion" triggered 37% of all appointments. Patients had localized (52%) and systemic (48%) disease presenting with primary diagnosis (48%), relapse (27%), or under continuous therapy (25%). The treatment strategy was changed significantly in 16 of 30 (53%) patients reporting a specific external opinion. The most frequent changes in recommendation were nephron-sparing surgery instead of radical nephrectomy in 8 cases and divergent judgments on restaging causing changes in systemic treatment in 6 cases. We successfully interviewed 43 of 52 patients. Overall, patients rated the consultation as very positive and only 1 patient (2%) was dissatisfied. Patients rated the quality of interpersonal interaction as very positive and said they would recommend the consultation service to others. Disease state was not associated with ratings. Physicians expressed a very positive opinion, highlighting the patients' benefit and very constructive case discussions. Nevertheless, they report remarkable efforts concerning time investment and effective coordination of medical experts. We estimated a deficit of 39 Euro per patient given the German health care system. There might be relevant secondary positive economic effects for the hospital

  11. A Patient-Centered Framework for Evaluating Digital Maturity of Health Services: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flott, Kelsey; Callahan, Ryan; Darzi, Ara; Mayer, Erik

    2016-04-14

    Digital maturity is the extent to which digital technologies are used as enablers to deliver a high-quality health service. Extensive literature exists about how to assess the components of digital maturity, but it has not been used to design a comprehensive framework for evaluation. Consequently, the measurement systems that do exist are limited to evaluating digital programs within one service or care setting, meaning that digital maturity evaluation is not accounting for the needs of patients across their care pathways. The objective of our study was to identify the best methods and metrics for evaluating digital maturity and to create a novel, evidence-based tool for evaluating digital maturity across patient care pathways. We systematically reviewed the literature to find the best methods and metrics for evaluating digital maturity. We searched the PubMed database for all papers relevant to digital maturity evaluation. Papers were selected if they provided insight into how to appraise digital systems within the health service and if they indicated the factors that constitute or facilitate digital maturity. Papers were analyzed to identify methodology for evaluating digital maturity and indicators of digitally mature systems. We then used the resulting information about methodology to design an evaluation framework. Following that, the indicators of digital maturity were extracted and grouped into increasing levels of maturity and operationalized as metrics within the evaluation framework. We identified 28 papers as relevant to evaluating digital maturity, from which we derived 5 themes. The first theme concerned general evaluation methodology for constructing the framework (7 papers). The following 4 themes were the increasing levels of digital maturity: resources and ability (6 papers), usage (7 papers), interoperability (3 papers), and impact (5 papers). The framework includes metrics for each of these levels at each stage of the typical patient care pathway

  12. Approach to Managing MeaSURES Data at the GSFC Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Bruce; Kempler, Steven J.; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2009-01-01

    A major need stated by the NASA Earth science research strategy is to develop long-term, consistent, and calibrated data and products that are valid across multiple missions and satellite sensors. (NASA Solicitation for Making Earth System data records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) 2006-2010) Selected projects create long term records of a given parameter, called Earth Science Data Records (ESDRs), based on mature algorithms that bring together continuous multi-sensor data. ESDRs, associated algorithms, vetted by the appropriate community, are archived at a NASA affiliated data center for archive, stewardship, and distribution. See http://measures-projects.gsfc.nasa.gov/ for more details. This presentation describes the NASA GSFC Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) approach to managing the MEaSUREs ESDR datasets assigned to GES DISC. (Energy/water cycle related and atmospheric composition ESDRs) GES DISC will utilize its experience to integrate existing and proven reusable data management components to accommodate the new ESDRs. Components include a data archive system (S4PA), a data discovery and access system (Mirador), and various web services for data access. In addition, if determined to be useful to the user community, the Giovanni data exploration tool will be made available to ESDRs. The GES DISC data integration methodology to be used for the MEaSUREs datasets is presented. The goals of this presentation are to share an approach to ESDR integration, and initiate discussions amongst the data centers, data managers and data providers for the purpose of gaining efficiencies in data management for MEaSUREs projects.

  13. Variability in Criteria for Emergency Medical Services Routing of Acute Stroke Patients to Designated Stroke Center Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Koenig, William; Bosson, Nichole; Song, Sarah; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Mack, William J.; Sanossian, Nerses

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensive stroke systems of care include routing to the nearest designated stroke center hospital, bypassing non-designated hospitals. Routing protocols are implemented at the state or county level and vary in qualification criteria and determination of destination hospital. We surveyed all counties in the state of California for presence and characteristics of their prehospital stroke routing protocols. Methods Each county’s local emergency medical services agency (LEMSA) was queried for the presence of a stroke routing protocol. We reviewed these protocols for method of stroke identification and criteria for patient transport to a stroke center. Results Thirty-three LEMSAs serve 58 counties in California with populations ranging from 1,175 to nearly 10 million. Fifteen LEMSAs (45%) had stroke routing protocols, covering 23 counties (40%) and 68% of the state population. Counties with protocols had higher population density (1,500 vs. 140 persons per square mile). In the six counties without designated stroke centers, patients meeting criteria were transported out of county. Stroke identification in the field was achieved using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Screen in 72%, Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen in 7% and a county-specific protocol in 22%. Conclusion California EMS prehospital acute stroke routing protocols cover 68% of the state population and vary in characteristics including activation by symptom onset time and destination facility features, reflecting matching of system design to local geographic resources. PMID:26587100

  14. Variability in Criteria for Emergency Medical Services Routing of Acute Stroke Patients to Designated Stroke Center Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Dimitrov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Comprehensive stroke systems of care include routing to the nearest designated stroke center hospital, bypassing non-designated hospitals. Routing protocols are implemented at the state or county level and vary in qualification criteria and determination of destination hospital. We surveyed all counties in the state of California for presence and characteristics of their prehospital stroke routing protocols. Methods: Each county’s local emergency medical services agency (LEMSA was queried for the presence of a stroke routing protocol. We reviewed these protocols for method of stroke identification and criteria for patient transport to a stroke center. Results: Thirty-three LEMSAs serve 58 counties in California with populations ranging from 1,175 to nearly 10 million. Fifteen LEMSAs (45% had stroke routing protocols, covering 23 counties (40% and 68% of the state population. Counties with protocols had higher population density (1,500 vs. 140 persons per square mile. In the six counties without designated stroke centers, patients meeting criteria were transported out of county. Stroke identification in the field was achieved using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Screen in 72%, Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen in 7% and a county-specific protocol in 22%. Conclusion: California EMS prehospital acute stroke routing protocols cover 68% of the state population and vary in characteristics including activation by symptom onset time and destination facility features, reflecting matching of system design to local geographic resources.

  15. Marketing information goods and services in medical libraries and information centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Kazempour, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Marketing is one of the essential parts of any business corporation in the modern management. One can see the difference between corporations in gaining their goals, considering their marketing methods. Gaining more advantage or acquiring more funds can be of reasons for marketing, but these are not all the reasons. Perhaps the most important reason for marketing is increasing the customer satisfaction. This, in turn, leads to more willingness in payment and using services. Nowadays, due to rapid growth in ICT, changes in budgets, rapid growth in development and use of knowledge, variety of users and their needs, marketing has become an important factor in any library activities. Libraries are now more responsible in this regard, because marketing is now an important tool in improving users' satisfaction in using library services. Hence, marketing is now very important for libraries to survive in the increasing pressures of competitive conditions of the information market. This article is tapping on issues such as information marketing, principles of marketing, marketing techniques, developing markets, and marketing skills. Some recommendations are also presented for marketing in libraries.

  16. Marketing information goods and services in medical libraries and information centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi-rizi, Hasan; Kazempour, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Marketing is one of the essential parts of any business corporation in the modern management. One can see the difference between corporations in gaining their goals, considering their marketing methods. Gaining more advantage or acquiring more funds can be of reasons for marketing, but these are not all the reasons. Perhaps the most important reason for marketing is increasing the customer satisfaction. This, in turn, leads to more willingness in payment and using services. Nowadays, due to rapid growth in ICT, changes in budgets, rapid growth in development and use of knowledge, variety of users and their needs, marketing has become an important factor in any library activities. Libraries are now more responsible in this regard, because marketing is now an important tool in improving users’ satisfaction in using library services. Hence, marketing is now very important for libraries to survive in the increasing pressures of competitive conditions of the information market. This article is tapping on issues such as information marketing, principles of marketing, marketing techniques, developing markets, and marketing skills. Some recommendations are also presented for marketing in libraries. PMID:23555112

  17. In search of service innovations by public libraries in Chinese urban centers:A case study of Dongguan Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Donglai

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces several of the more significant service delivery innovations and their resulting accomplishments instigated by Dongguan Library(thereafter abbreviated as DGL)in recent years.The textual exposition of this paper is based on a case study of DGL by this author about its user-centered vision,mission,immediate objectives and the exhibited service performance within a contextual environment of collegial support from its professional peers.After a five-year period of intensive efforts on such focused professional development and practice,DGL has completed its information service mapping and information delivery for the entire municipality of Dongguan on a 7-day and twentyfour-hour(7/24)basis.This singular feast of accomplishment seems to suggest the moral that any significant development of scale of a municipal library has to be in keeping pace closely with the progress of the society at large in general and with the changing information demands of its local clientele in particular.

  18. Comparison of the socioeconomic impacts of international fuel service centers versus dispersed nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braid, Jr., R. B.

    1979-01-01

    The paper investigates a variety of community impacts including: public services, fiscal issues, economic matters, land and water use, political and social cohesion, and legal considerations. Comparisons of socioeconomic impacts of colocated versus dispersed sites are made on the basis of the size of the impacted communities, the size and type of nuclear facility, and the facility's construction time frame. The paper concludes that, under similar circumstances, most of the socioeconomic impacts of colocated nuclear facilities would be somewhat less than the sum of the impacts associated with equivalent dispersed sites. While empirical data is non-existent, the paper contends, however, that because the socioeconomic impacts of colocated facilities are so great and readily identifiable to a public unskilled in making comparisons with the dispersed alternative, the facilities will likely generate so much public opposition that IFSCs will probably prove infeasible.

  19. Predicting client improvement from and satisfaction with community mental health center services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, T C; Balch, P; Lewis, S B; Katz, B

    1981-06-01

    The present study assesses client improvement from and satisfaction with CMHC services, and attempts to examine the presence of positive bias from responders. Results based on questionnaires mailed to 1,000 former clients indicated both high consumer satisfaction and reported improvement attributable to treatment. Responders and nonresponders did not differ on demographic or treatment variables related to post-treatment improvement. A multiple regression analysis was computed and yielded an estimated index of improvement for responders. No differences obtained on this measure between responders and nonresponders, thereby not supporting the presence of a positive bias in this sample. confidence in therapist, satisfaction with the therapeutic relationship, and number of individual sessions were the most positive improvement correlates, with lack of contact and increasing age most negatively related to improvement. Discussion focuses on the implications for generalization of results based on responders' data.

  20. Radiation protection in medical centers : teletherapy service; Proteccion radiologica en centros hospitalarios : servicio de teleterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resendiz G, G.; Perez P, M.; Figueroa M, E. [Clinica Medica Sur, Servicio de Radioterapia, Puente de Piedra No. 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, Mexico 14050 D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-12-15

    The General Regulation of Radiation Safety, it clearly provides the classification, requirements and obligations of the various figures relating to a radiation protection system, i.e., the occupationally exposed personnel, the radiation safety responsible, the legal representative, the type of installation, etc. For new installations, the shieldings calculation should be contained in the analytical report with due consideration of factors, such as those surrounding the areas classification based on the occupation type, the work load of the equipment and others. The operation license involves requirements such as the Report and the Radiation Safety Handbook, the Emergencies Plan, the establishment of register levels, investigation and intervention, the way it is carried out medical surveillance of the occupationally exposed personnel, and the description of the protection mechanisms and detection instrumentation and radiation measurement. Deserves mention the case when high readings are recorded in the personal dosimeters, which must submit to an interrogation to the employee, you must determine if it is an incorrect reading to the service provider, you must perform a medical exam blood cell count with relevant to the dose determination, may eventually can lead to a cytogenetic study and the determination to do if confirmed an unexpectedly high dose. Moreover, the technology evolution also implies the development of adaptation measures. For example, the Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, which is an advanced high-precision radiotherapy that uses X-ray accelerators for computer-controlled radiation doses precisely to a malignant tumor or specific areas within the tumor, taking into account requires regard to equipment, and space and shielding, time and staff hours for treatment, personnel training, materials for making images (such as two-dimensional arrangements of integrated circuits or diodes, films or portal images), the attention given by the engineers of

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Denver and Greeley NTMS Quadrangles, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolivar, S.L.; Broxton, D.E.; Olsen, C.E.

    1978-03-01

    Although this report covers two National Topographic Map Series 2/sup 0/ quadrangles, the data for each quadrangle are presented separately. Evaluation of the data by quadrangle resulted in the delineation of areas in which water and/or sediment uranium concentrations are notably higher than surrounding background concentrations. The major clusters of anomalous water samples were found in areas of the Denver Basin underlain by the Pierre, Laramie, Fox Hills, Denver, and Arapahoe formations. Most of the anomalous sediment samples were collected in areas of the Front Range underlain by Precambrian crystalline rocks, particularly granites of the Silver Plume-Sherman group. Many of the anomalous sediment samples are from sites located near fault zones. The data in this report are also presented by geologic/physiographic province because background uranium concentrations in Front Range samples differ significantly from those in the Denver Basin. Denver Basin waters have higher mean uranium concentrations (mean 14.4 ppB) than Front Range waters (mean 3.3 ppB). Conversely, Front Range sediments are more uraniferous (mean 14.7 ppM) than those in the Denver Basin (mean 6.1 ppM). These differences in background uranium concentrations between Front Range and Denver Basin samples can be attributed to differences in regional geology, physiography, and (in the case of water) the ratio of surface water to ground water sites sampled. There is a significant northward increase in uranium concentrations in water samples from the Denver Basin. The higher uranium concentrations in water samples from the northern part of the basin are probably due to leaching of uraniferous strata in the Pierre and Laramie formations which crop out in that area.

  2. Transition Marshall Space Flight Center Wind Profiler Splicing Algorithm to Launch Services Program Upper Winds Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    NASAs LSP customers and the future SLS program rely on observations of upper-level winds for steering, loads, and trajectory calculations for the launch vehicles flight. On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds and provide forecasts to the launch team via the AMU-developed LSP Upper Winds tool for launches at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This tool displays wind speed and direction profiles from rawinsondes released during launch operations, the 45th Space Wing 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP, and output from numerical weather prediction models.The goal of this task was to splice the wind speed and direction profiles from the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) 915-MHz Doppler radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP at altitudes where the wind profiles overlap to create a smooth profile. In the first version of the LSP Upper Winds tool, the top of the 915-MHz DRWP wind profile and the bottom of the 50-MHz DRWP were not spliced, sometimes creating a discontinuity in the profile. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (NE) created algorithms to splice the wind profiles from the two sensors to generate an archive of vertically complete wind profiles for the SLS program. The AMU worked with MSFC NE personnel to implement these algorithms in the LSP Upper Winds tool to provide a continuous spliced wind profile.The AMU transitioned the MSFC NE algorithms to interpolate and fill data gaps in the data, implement a Gaussian weighting function to produce 50-m altitude intervals in each sensor, and splice the data together from both DRWPs. They did so by porting the MSFC NE code written with MATLAB software into Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). After testing the new algorithms in stand-alone VBA modules, the AMU replaced the existing VBA code in the LSP Upper Winds tool with the new

  3. Impact of a Clinical Pharmacy Service on the Management of Patients in a Sickle Cell Disease Outpatient Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jin; Bhat, Shubha; Gowhari, Michel; Gordeuk, Victor R; Saraf, Santosh L

    2016-11-01

    Ambulatory care clinical pharmacy services have expanded beyond primary care settings, but literature supporting the benefits of clinical pharmacy involvement with patients who have rare diseases such as sickle cell disease (SCD) is lacking. Hydroxyurea is the only agent approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of SCD; full benefit in controlling pain episodes and other complications is achieved through monitored escalation to a maximum tolerated dose. The primary objective of this analysis was to evaluate the impact of a newly implemented clinical pharmacy service on the management of patients with SCD. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of 385 adults with SCD who received care between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2014, at a single Sickle Cell Outpatient Center that implemented a clinical pharmacy service in August 2013. Data were collected on hydroxyurea dose escalation, immunization completion rates, and health maintenance metrics (screening for nephropathy with microalbuminuria testing, retinopathy with annual retinal examinations, and pulmonary hypertension with echocardiography). The impact of the clinical pharmacy service on quality measurements was evaluated by using univariate and multivariate analyses. The number of pharmacist encounters, defined as a clinic visit when a clinical pharmacist interacted with a patient as documented in the medical records, was associated with an improved hydroxyurea dose escalation rate (odds ratio [OR] 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-2.05, p=0.02). Immunization rates for the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, and influenza vaccine were 66%, 47%, and 62%, respectively. The number of pharmacist encounters was associated with improved immunization completion rates (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.17-1.62, pmanaging a rare disease, SCD, was associated with an improved hydroxyurea dose escalation rate, immunization completion

  4. MOL-D: A Collisional Database and Web Service within the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. Vujčić; D. Jevremović; A. A. Mihajlov; Lj. M. Ignjatović; V. A. Srećković; M. S. Dimitrijević; M. Malović

    2015-12-01

    MOL-D database is a collection of cross-sections and rate coefficients for specific collisional processes and a web service within the Serbian Virtual Observatory (SerVO) and the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center (VAMDC). This database contains photo-dissociation cross-sections for the individual ro-vibrational states of the diatomic molecular ions and rate coefficients for the atom-Rydberg atom chemiionization and inverse electron–ion–atom chemi-recombination processes. At the moment it contains data for photodissociation crosssections of hydrogen H+2 and helium H+2 molecular ions and the corresponding averaged thermal photodissociation cross-sections. The ro-vibrational energy states and the corresponding dipole matrix elements are provided as well. Hydrogen and helium molecular ion data are important for calculation of solar and stellar atmosphere models and for radiative transport, as well as for kinetics of other astrophysical and laboratory plasma (i.e. early Universe).

  5. Contraception in adolescents over the last 15 years: perspective of a youth service center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Teixeira da Silva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contraceptive counselling is essential in the prevention of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections in adolescents. Objectives: Evaluate the behaviour of adolescents who recurred to our Youth Assistence Center (YAC in the past 15 years, regarding their sexual and reproductive health and contraceptive choice. Material and Methods: Retrospective study of female adolescents under 18 years, who recurred for the first time to YAC in 1997, 2002, 2007 and 2012 (group 1,2,3 and 4, respectively. Data were analysed using SPSS 21.0 and Microsoft Excel 2007. Results: Most adolescents were sexually active (61.5% in 1997 vs 76.5% in 2012, p = 0.01 and there was an increase, over the years, of adolescents who had already started regular hormonal contraception (8.4% in 1997 vs 21.4% in 2012, p <0.001. In adolescents who did not use Hormonal Contraception (HC and recurred to YAC for its beginning, we found the following results: 1997 - 98.6% started a Combined Oral Contraceptive (COC, 2002 - 100% initiated HC [99, 1% - COC, 0.9% subcutaneous implant], 2007 - 90.9% initiated HC [83% - COC, 16.4% - subcutaneous implant, 0.6% - patch] and 2012 - 97% initiated HC [85.9% - COC, 14.1% - subcutaneous implant]. Conclusion: Over the studied period, there was an increased number of adolescents who were using a hormonal contraceptive at first appointment. The COC remains the contraceptive method of choice in adolescents, although there is a growing adherence to the subcutaneous implant.

  6. The Needs Assessment in order to develop the Service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance, the Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiporn Pongpisanrat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the needs assessment in order to develop the service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance, the Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University. This study aimed to compare the realistic service and the desirable service, as well as, to explore the directions to improve the service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center among the service recipients based on their gender, age range, and field of studies. A total sample of 150 participants were service recipients; college students, lecturers, staff during the first semester academic year 2014 until the first semester academic year 2015. The instruments used included: the Questionnaire on needs assessment of the development of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, and a focus group discussion. Frequency distribution, percentage, means, standard deviation, and variance were used to analyze the data. The needs assessment results showed as follows: 1 Overall the realistic basis of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center service was in an “above level of needs” while “the highest level of needs” was found in the desirable qualification. After having divided into categories, the result yielded an “above level” on the realistic basis of the counselor characteristics, task planning, and facility arrangement. For the desired qualification, the results showed that the needs on the counselors’ characteristics, task planning, and facility arrangement were identified as at a highest level of needs. 2 No differences were found on the realistic basis needs of the clients, the services provided, gender, and age range of the clients although they responded differently to the questionnaire. The clients who responded to the questionnaire from different field of studies showed the different needs of services provided in the realistic basis significantly at the level of .05 in which the General Sciences

  7. Evolution of Information Management at the GSFC Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC): 2006-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Vollmer, Bruce; Alcott, Gary; Berrick, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly sophisticated National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth science missions have driven their associated data and data management systems from providing simple point-to-point archiving and retrieval to performing user-responsive distributed multisensor information extraction. To fully maximize the use of remote-sensor-generated Earth science data, NASA recognized the need for data systems that provide data access and manipulation capabilities responsive to research brought forth by advancing scientific analysis and the need to maximize the use and usability of the data. The decision by NASA to purposely evolve the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) and other information management facilities was timely and appropriate. The GES DISC evolution was focused on replacing the EOSDIS Core System (ECS) by reusing the In-house developed disk-based Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Product Archive (S4PA) data management system and migrating data to the disk archives. Transition was completed in December 2007

  8. Competitive priorities for service operations strategy: an analysis of the perceived-value criteria of a fitness center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Costa Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The setting of priorities among the various performance objectives is one of the main activities in the formulation of manufacturing strategy. Recognizing the importance of this activity and using the nomenclature of “perceived-value criteria”, this paper reports an analysis of competitive priorities of a fitness center, which was an essential part of a broader process aimed at the formulation of operations strategy for the company. After a brief literature review, the article proposes a model for the analysis of perceived-value criteria in service operations that, among other tools, makes use of importance-performance matrix and trade-off analysis. To validate its applicability, the proposed model was field-tested in an action research approach, in which one of the authors of this paper played the role of external facilitator of the process of organizational intervention. The application of the model allowed identifying the processes and the perceived-value criteria (PVC's that should be prioritized by the company, using for this, two bases of comparison: the direct competitors of its influence area and the benchmark fitness centers (best practices. As a result, the firm's managers were able to better decide about the different strategic alternatives to improve its operations.

  9. Data Access Tools And Services At The Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (GDAAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, L. B.; Eng, E.; Sweatman, P.

    2003-12-01

    As one of the largest providers of Earth Science data from the Earth Observing System, GDAAC provides the latest data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) data products via GDAAC's data pool (50TB of disk cache). In order to make this huge volume of data more accessible to the public and science communities, the GDAAC offers multiple data access tools and services: Open Source Project for Network Data Access Protocol (OPeNDAP), Grid Analysis and Display System (GrADS/DODS) (GDS), Live Access Server (LAS), OpenGIS Web Map Server (WMS) and Near Archive Data Mining (NADM). The objective is to assist users in retrieving electronically a smaller, usable portion of data for further analysis. The OPeNDAP server, formerly known as the Distributed Oceanographic Data System (DODS), allows the user to retrieve data without worrying about the data format. OPeNDAP is capable of server-side subsetting of HDF, HDF-EOS, netCDF, JGOFS, ASCII, DSP, FITS and binary data formats. The GrADS/DODS server is capable of serving the same data formats as OPeNDAP. GDS has an additional feature of server-side analysis. Users can analyze the data on the server there by decreasing the computational load on their client's system. The LAS is a flexible server that allows user to graphically visualize data on the fly, to request different file formats and to compare variables from distributed locations. Users of LAS have options to use other available graphics viewers such as IDL, Matlab or GrADS. WMS is based on the OPeNDAP for serving geospatial information. WMS supports OpenGIS protocol to provide data in GIS-friendly formats for analysis and visualization. NADM is another access to the GDAAC's data pool. NADM gives users the capability to use a browser to upload their C, FORTRAN or IDL algorithms, test the algorithms, and mine data in the data pool. With NADM, the GDAAC provides an

  10. Street Level Hydrology: An Urban Application of the WRF-Hydro Framework in Denver, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, L.; Hogue, T. S.; Salas, F. R.; Gochis, D.

    2015-12-01

    Urban flood modeling at the watershed scale carries unique challenges in routing complexity, data resolution, social and political issues, and land surface - infrastructure interactions. The ability to accurately trace and predict the flow of water through the urban landscape enables better emergency response management, floodplain mapping, and data for future urban infrastructure planning and development. These services are of growing importance as urban population is expected to continue increasing by 1.84% per year for the next 25 years, increasing the vulnerability of urban regions to damages and loss of life from floods. Although a range of watershed-scale models have been applied in specific urban areas to examine these issues, there is a trend towards national scale hydrologic modeling enabled by supercomputing resources to understand larger system-wide hydrologic impacts and feedbacks. As such it is important to address how urban landscapes can be represented in large scale modeling processes. The current project investigates how coupling terrain and infrastructure routing can improve flow prediction and flooding events over the urban landscape. We utilize the WRF-Hydro modeling framework and a high-resolution terrain routing grid with the goal of compiling standard data needs necessary for fine scale urban modeling and dynamic flood forecasting in the urban setting. The city of Denver is selected as a case study, as it has experienced several large flooding events in the last five years and has an urban annual population growth rate of 1.5%, one of the highest in the U.S. Our work highlights the hydro-informatic challenges associated with linking channel networks and drainage infrastructure in an urban area using the WRF-Hydro modeling framework and high resolution urban models for short-term flood prediction.

  11. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, We have two 911 call centers. Police dispatch services inside the city limits of Emporia. Sheriff dispatch serves the rest of Lyon County., Published in 2010, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, City of Emporia/Lyon County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of...

  12. Quality of groundwater in the Denver Basin aquifer system, Colorado, 2003-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, MaryLynn; Beck, Jennifer A.; Paschke, Suzanne; Bauch, Nancy J.; Mashburn, Shana L.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater resources from alluvial and bedrock aquifers of the Denver Basin are critical for municipal, domestic, and agricultural uses in Colorado along the eastern front of the Rocky Mountains. Rapid and widespread urban development, primarily along the western boundary of the Denver Basin, has approximately doubled the population since about 1970, and much of the population depends on groundwater for water supply. As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted groundwater-quality studies during 2003–5 in the Denver Basin aquifer system to characterize water quality of shallow groundwater at the water table and of the bedrock aquifers, which are important drinking-water resources. For the Denver Basin, water-quality constituents of concern for human health or because they might otherwise limit use of water include total dissolved solids, fluoride, sulfate, nitrate, iron, manganese, selenium, radon, uranium, arsenic, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. For the water-table studies, two monitoring-well networks were installed and sampled beneath agricultural (31 wells) and urban (29 wells) land uses at or just below the water table in either alluvial material or near-surface bedrock. For the bedrock-aquifer studies, domestic- and municipal-supply wells completed in the bedrock aquifers were sampled. The bedrock aquifers, stratigraphically from youngest (shallowest) to oldest (deepest), are the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifers. The extensive dataset collected from wells completed in the bedrock aquifers (79 samples) provides the opportunity to evaluate factors and processes affecting water quality and to establish a baseline that can be used to characterize future changes in groundwater quality. Groundwater samples were analyzed for inorganic, organic, isotopic, and age-dating constituents and tracers. This report discusses spatial and statistical distributions of chemical constituents

  13. Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC): Using innovative tools and services to support worldwide space weather scientific communities and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A. M.; Bakshi, S.; Berrios, D.; Chulaki, A.; Evans, R. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Lee, H.; MacNeice, P. J.; Maddox, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Mullinix, R. E.; Ngwira, C. M.; Patel, K.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Shim, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Zheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    the general public about the importance and impacts of space weather effects. Although CCMC is organizationally comprised of United States federal agencies, CCMC services are open to members of the international science community and encourages interagency and international collaboration. In this poster, we provide an overview of using Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) tools and services to support worldwide space weather scientific communities and networks.;

  14. LINKING CLASSROOM AND COMMUNITY: A THEORETICAL ALIGNMENT OF SERVICE LEARNING AND A HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN METHODOLOGY IN CONTEMPORARY COMMUNICATION DESIGN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Bowie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The current emphasis on social responsibility and community collaboration within higher education has led to an increased drive to include service learning in the curriculum. With its emphasis on mutually beneficial collaborations, service learning can be meaningful for both students and the community, but is challenging to manage successfully. From a design education perspective, it is interesting to note that contemporary design practice emphasises a similar approach known as a human-centered design, where users are considered and included throughout the design process. In considering both service learning and human-centred design as foundations for design pedagogy, various philosophical and methodological similarities are evident. The paper explores the relationship between a service learning community engagement approach and a human-centered design approach in contemporary communication design education. To this end, each approach is considered individually after which a joint frame of reference is presented. Butin’s service learning typology, namely the four Rs – respect, reciprocity, relevance and reflection – serves as a point of departure for the joint frame of reference. Lastly, the potential value and relevance of a combined understanding of service learning and human-centered design is considered.

  15. Program for establishing long-time flight service performance of composite materials in the center wing structure of C-130 aircraft. Phase 5: flight service and inspection. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kizer, J.A.

    1981-10-01

    Inspections of the C-130 composite-reinforced center wings were conducted over the flight service monitoring period of more than six years. Twelve inspections were conducted on each of the two C-130H airplanes having composite reinforced center wing boxes. Each inspection consisted of visual and ultrasonic inspection of the selective boron-epoxy reinforced center wings which included the inspection of the boron-epoxy laminates and the boron-epoxy reinforcement/aluminum structure adhesive bondlines. During the flight service monitoring period, the two C-130H aircraft accumulated more than 10,000 flight hours and no defects were detected in the inspections over this period. The successful performance of the C-130H aircraft with composite-reinforced center wings allowed the transfer of the responsibilities of inspecting and maintaining these two aircraft to the U. S. Air Force.

  16. Identity development in pre-service teachers who are explainers in a science center: Dialectically developing theory and praxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Preeti

    This dissertation investigates how teaching in a hands-on science center contributes to re/shaping one's teaching identity. Situated at the New York Hall of Science (NYHS) in Queens, New York, my research approach is to conduct a critical ethnography where the focus is on improving the teaching and learning of science for all involved. In particular, Explainers, floor staff at NYHS, who are studying to be science teachers, are invited to become co-researchers with me. Written as a manuscript style, this dissertation consists of six chapters. Each chapter foregrounds certain events and phenomena, and theory and method are woven in to theorize identity construction. Grounded in cultural sociology, the frameworks of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), and the sociology of emotions, illuminate key understandings about the construction of teaching identity. Multiple data sources including field notes, transcribed audio and videotapes, and cogenerative dialogues are used. I employ a hermeneutic phenomenological approach to data analysis. This research has salient implications for museum-university partnerships, and training for museum floor staff and has the potential to inform policy-making for pre-service teaching clinical fieldwork experiences.

  17. Integrating Traditional Chinese Medicine Services in Community Health Centers: Insights into Utilization Patterns in the Pearl River Region of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent C. H. Chung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In China's healthcare reform, community health centers (CHCs are designed to take a pivotal role in providing primary care. Whilst about 20% of all outpatient care in China is delivered by the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM sector, hospitals, instead of CHCs, are major providers. Using current patterns of patient utilization this study aims to inform CHCs on how they may strengthen access to TCM services. Three thousand three hundred and sixty CHC patients from six cities within the urban Pearl Delta Region were enumerated using multistage cluster sampling. Fifty-two percent had visited herbalists within three months with a mean visit frequency of 1.50 times. Herbal treatments, which are cheaper than western medicines, were more popular amongst those who needed to pay out of pocket including the uninsured. Herbal medicines appeared to be an alternative for those who are underinsured. Acupuncturists and massage therapists were visited by smaller proportions, 6.58% and 5.98%, respectively, with a mean three-month visit of 0.27 and 0.26 times. Access was restricted by lack of social insurance coverage. Whilst increasing provision of TCM in CHCs might respond to patient demand, increasing insurance coverage for TCM needs to be evaluated using current evidence on safety and effectiveness.

  18. MOL-D: A Collisional Database and Web Service within the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujčič, V.; Jevremović, D.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Ignjatović, Lj. M.; Srećković, V. A.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Malović, M.

    2015-12-01

    MOL-D database is a collection of cross-sections and rate coefficients for specific collisional processes and a web service within the Serbian Virtual Observatory (SerVO) and the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center (VAMDC). This database contains photo-dissociation cross-sections for the individual ro-vibrational states of the diatomic molecular ions and rate coefficients for the atom-Rydberg atom chemi-ionization and inverse electron-ion-atom chemi-recombination processes. At the moment it contains data for photodissociation cross-sections of hydrogen H2+ and helium He2+ molecular ions and the corresponding averaged thermal photodissociation cross-sections. The ro-vibrational energy states and the corresponding dipole matrix elements are provided as well. Hydrogen and helium molecular ion data are important for calculation of solar and stellar atmosphere models and for radiative transport, as well as for kinetics of other astrophysical and laboratory plasma (i.e. early Universe).

  19. MOL-D: A Collisional Database and Web Service within the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center

    CERN Document Server

    Vujčić, V; Mihajlov, A A; Ignjatović, Lj M; Srećković, V A; Dimitrijević, M S; Malović, M

    2016-01-01

    MOL-D database is a collection of cross-sections and rate coefficients for specific collisional processes and a web service within the Serbian Virtual Observatory (SerVO) and the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center (VAMDC). This database contains photo-dissociation cross-sections for the individual ro-vibrational states of the diatomic molecular ions and rate coefficients for the atom-Rydberg atom chemi-ionization and inverse electron-ion-atom chemi-recombination processes. At the moment it contains data for photodissociation cross-sections of hydrogen H2+ and helium He2+ molecular ions and the corresponding averaged thermal photodissociation cross-sections. The ro-vibrational energy states and the corresponding dipole matrix elements are provided as well. Hydrogen and helium molecular ion data are important for calculation of solar and stellar atmosphere models and for radiative transport, as well as for kinetics of other astrophysical and laboratory plasma (i.e. early Universe).

  20. Designing a Staff Development Program and Subsequent Handbook for Use at Woburn Nursing Center: A Long-Term Care Facility of Salter Healthcare Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Cole; Capone, Martha

    Woburn Nursing Center (WNC), a private nursing home owned and operated by Salter Healthcare Services (SHS), developed an integrated, comprehensive staff development program and handbook. A literature review focused on staff needs, responsible agent, and handbook development. The following activities were undertaken: a review of ERIC documents,…

  1. Teacher Mobility and Financial Incentives: A Descriptive Analysis of Denver's ProComp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulbeck, Eleanor S.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive teacher mobility can undermine policy efforts to develop a high-quality workforce. In response, policymakers have increasingly championed financial incentives to retain teachers. In 2006, the Denver Public Schools adopted an alternative teacher compensation reform, the Professional Compensation System for Teachers ("ProComp").…

  2. 77 FR 13627 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... Colorado by the Denver Medical Examiner's Office. They are identified as OAHP Case Number 128. There is no information available as to where or how the remains were recovered. The medical examiner determined that the... Anthropology, the remains were transferred to History Colorado. They are identified as OAHP Case Number 175....

  3. The Efficiency of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test as a Language Screening Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Jennifer; Bernthal, John

    1996-01-01

    The validity of using the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test (RDDST) was investigated by testing 199 preschool children (ages 3-4) and reviewing the results 6 months later. Results indicated that the RDDST was an efficient prognostic tool in predicting formal assessment results for children at risk for language impairments. (CR)

  4. Effectiveness of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test in Identifying Children at Risk for Learning Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Karen E.

    1990-01-01

    Findings from a 5-year follow-up study of 78 kindergartners suggest that while the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test (RDDST) accurately predicts academic achievement and standardized test performance, it consistently misclassifies as normal the performance of a significant number of children who require special help in their early…

  5. Improving the Sensitivity of the Language Sector of the Denver Developmental Screening Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glascoe, Frances P.; Borowitz, Kathleen C.

    1988-01-01

    The Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST) and an expressive language measure were administered to 114 children (aged 24 to 74 months) suspected of developmental difficulties. The DDST did not identify the majority of children who failed the expressive language screening, even after cutoff scores were made more rigorous. (Author/JDD)

  6. Standardization of the Denver Developmental Screening Test on Infants from Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Hope C.

    1982-01-01

    Standardization of the Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST) on 288 babies raning in age from two to 54 weeks in Yucatan, Mexico, yielded such findings as that subtest scores increased with age, and that the DDST failed to identify a "questionable" 16 or 17 babies with borderline scores on the Bayley Motor Scale. (Author/MC)

  7. Denver's airport of doom; the story behind the world's possibly most controversial airport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk, J.

    2014-01-01

    Big airport projects have often been prone to controversy. Schiphol’s Polderbaan project, Heathrow’s expansion, and the construction of Berlin’s new airport all suffered from political, financial or technical issues. However, Denver International Airport (often referred to as DIA) caused uproar in

  8. 78 FR 19296 - Notice of Inventory Completion: History Colorado, formerly Colorado Historical Society, Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains...: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should... of History Colorado, Denver, CO. The human remains were removed from Suncor Energy USA Pipeline...

  9. A Social Marketing Campaign in Denver: Reducing the Risk of Elder Fraud

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Judy; Miller, Jacque; Curtis, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Acknowledging the pain and loss senior citizens experience due to fraud, the Denver District Attorney's Office launched a campaign--"Clergy Against Senior Exploitation (CASE)"--to reduce fraud perpetrated on older persons. The thrust of this project was preventing fraud by educating older adults through their religious affiliations in…

  10. Denver's airport of doom; the story behind the world's possibly most controversial airport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolwijk, J.

    2014-01-01

    Big airport projects have often been prone to controversy. Schiphol’s Polderbaan project, Heathrow’s expansion, and the construction of Berlin’s new airport all suffered from political, financial or technical issues. However, Denver International Airport (often referred to as DIA) caused uproar in s

  11. A Downtown Denver Law Firm Leverages Tenant Improvement Funds to Cut Operating Expenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-03-01

    Bryan Cave HRO (formerly Holme Roberts & Owen LLP, headquartered in Denver, Colorado), an international law firm, partnered with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce annual energy consumption by at least 30% versus pre-retrofit energy use as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  12. Available Thermal Energy in the Denver Basin Dakota Group: Colorado and Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, A. M.; Gosnold, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    The University of North Dakota, in conjunction with the United States Geological Survey, has begun a geothermal assessment of energy in place for the Denver Basin. We focused on the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstones which are a series of petroleum producing formations in the Denver Basin. The "D" and "J" sands, in particular, are primary sources of petroleum and therefore of interest to the co-produced geothermal energy community. Analysis of bottom-hole temperature data from over 33,000 wells within the Lower Cretaceous Dakota group in the Denver Basin show that the potential available thermal energy in place is 5.23 x 1021 Joules (J). We estimated the following variables: the average thickness of 485 meters (m), the predominant rock is sandstone with a density of 2.3 x 1012 kg/km3 and a heat capacity of 920.48 J/kg °C, an average temperature of 109.4 °C. The interpolation of the bottom-hole temperatures for this group yielded an area of 73,449.20 km2, and a volume of 35,622,862 km3. Sorey et al. (1983) determined a recovery rate of 0.1% to be appropriate for a basin the size of the Denver Basin. Bottom-hole temperature interpolation of the Lower Cretaceous formations.

  13. 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting Summary Report: Denver, Colorado - August 9-11, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's Summer 2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting. This meeting was held on August 9-11, 2011, in Denver, Colorado, and brought together more than 290 professionals representing organizations with a vested interest in energy efficiency improvements in residential buildings.

  14. NREL PV AR&D 11th review meeting, May 13--15, 1992, Denver Marriott City Center, Denver, Colorado. Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This is a collection of abstracts from papers presented at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) research and development review meeting held May 1992. Subject areas covered include solar cell and solar module manufacturing and development, materials, polycrystalline thin films, applications, amorphous silicon, solar cell performance and testing, crystalline silicon and other photovoltaic and safety perspectives. (GHH)

  15. Environmental Assessment of the Proposed Denver Security Operations Center (DSOC) Center of Excellence at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    effects on vegetation. Wildlife . The midgrass prairie habitat in the vicinity of the RTF provides suitable habitat for birds , small and large mammals ...Guard Bureau APE Area of Potential Effect AQCR Air Quality Control Region BMPs best management practices CAA Clean Air Act CDPHE Colorado...on Buckley AFB provides a diversity of habitat that supports many wildlife species typical of the high plains of Colorado. Mammals . Mammalian

  16. An assessment of technology-based service encounters & network security on the e-health care systems of medical centers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ching

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhancing service efficiency and quality has always been one of the most important factors to heighten competitiveness in the health care service industry. Thus, how to utilize information technology to reduce work load for staff and expeditiously improve work efficiency and healthcare service quality is presently the top priority for every healthcare institution. In this fast changing modern society, e-health care systems are currently the best possible way to achieve enhanced service efficiency and quality under the restraint of healthcare cost control. The electronic medical record system and the online appointment system are the core features in employing e-health care systems in the technology-based service encounters. Methods This study implemented the Service Encounters Evaluation Model, the European Customer Satisfaction Index, the Attribute Model and the Overall Affect Model for model inference. A total of 700 copies of questionnaires from two authoritative southern Taiwan medical centers providing the electronic medical record system and the online appointment system service were distributed, among which 590 valid copies were retrieved with a response rate of 84.3%. We then used SPSS 11.0 and the Linear Structural Relationship Model (LISREL 8.54 to analyze and evaluate the data. Results The findings are as follows: (1 Technology-based service encounters have a positive impact on service quality, but not patient satisfaction; (2 After experiencing technology-based service encounters, the cognition of the service quality has a positive effect on patient satisfaction; and (3 Network security contributes a positive moderating effect on service quality and patient satisfaction. Conclusion It revealed that the impact of electronic workflow (online appointment system service on service quality was greater than electronic facilities (electronic medical record systems in technology-based service encounters. Convenience and

  17. An assessment of technology-based service encounters & network security on the e-health care systems of medical centers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin Hsin; Chang, Ching Sheng

    2008-04-17

    Enhancing service efficiency and quality has always been one of the most important factors to heighten competitiveness in the health care service industry. Thus, how to utilize information technology to reduce work load for staff and expeditiously improve work efficiency and healthcare service quality is presently the top priority for every healthcare institution. In this fast changing modern society, e-health care systems are currently the best possible way to achieve enhanced service efficiency and quality under the restraint of healthcare cost control. The electronic medical record system and the online appointment system are the core features in employing e-health care systems in the technology-based service encounters. This study implemented the Service Encounters Evaluation Model, the European Customer Satisfaction Index, the Attribute Model and the Overall Affect Model for model inference. A total of 700 copies of questionnaires from two authoritative southern Taiwan medical centers providing the electronic medical record system and the online appointment system service were distributed, among which 590 valid copies were retrieved with a response rate of 84.3%. We then used SPSS 11.0 and the Linear Structural Relationship Model (LISREL 8.54) to analyze and evaluate the data. The findings are as follows: (1) Technology-based service encounters have a positive impact on service quality, but not patient satisfaction; (2) After experiencing technology-based service encounters, the cognition of the service quality has a positive effect on patient satisfaction; and (3) Network security contributes a positive moderating effect on service quality and patient satisfaction. It revealed that the impact of electronic workflow (online appointment system service) on service quality was greater than electronic facilities (electronic medical record systems) in technology-based service encounters. Convenience and credibility are the most important factors of service quality

  18. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  19. 76 FR 35010 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Colorado Historical Society (History Colorado), Denver, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... Service's administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the... County, CO. In 2009, the individual was anonymously left at Anasazi Heritage Center with a note stating...

  20. SAVEnergy Action Plan: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, S.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Richman, E.E.; Sandusky, W.F. III; Dittmer, A.L.

    1995-05-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a SAVEnergy Audit of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s (NOAA) National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Washington. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the performance of all energy-consuming equipment in the facility, to estimate energy consumption and demand by end-use and to recommend energy conservation measures (ECMs) and water conservation measures (WCMs) to reduce costs . This section describes the facility and the systems encountered during the visit by the audit team. It also presents a summary of energy conservation measures. Section 2 shows energy consumption and costs for electricity, natural gas and water. A breakdown of energy consumed by end-use is also presented. Recommended energy conservation measures are presented in Section 3. Section 4 contains a discussion of operations and maintenance issues and other energy measures that can be implemented on a replace-on-failure basis rather than replacing immediately. Appendix A contains a three-year history of consumption, demand and cost for electric, natural gas and water utilities. Appendix B contains information on local weather data correlated to utility billing periods. A brief summary on Federal life-cycle costing is located in Appendix C along with the life-cycle cost analyses summaries for the energy and water conservation measures detailed in this report. Information on the rebate program sponsored by Seattle City Light, the electric utility, is located in Appendix D. Sample information for water-efficient equipment is located in Appendix E. Appendix F contains submittal forms to the Federal Energy Efficiency Fund for the energy conservation measures recommended in Section 3 of this report. A glossary of terms and abbreviations used in this report is located in Appendix G.

  1. Telephone Service Areas, TelephoneServiceAreas-This data set represents the service areas of companies providing (dial tone) telephone service in Utah., Published in 2001, Smaller than 1:100000 scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Telephone Service Areas dataset, published at Smaller than 1:100000 scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2001. It is described as...

  2. Bridging science to service: using Rehabilitation Research and Training Center program to ensure that research-based knowledge makes a difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Marianne; Anthony, William A

    2007-01-01

    The challenge of bridging science to service is increasingly visible in the healthcare field, with emphasis on the influence of evidence-based knowledge on both policy and practice. Since its inception more than 40 years ago, the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) program has provided grants for both research and training activities designed to ensure that research knowledge is translated into practice. The RRTC program is unique in that its mission and funding have always required that both time and money be invested in the translation and dissemination of research-generated knowledge to users in the field, i.e., decision makers and practitioners. Boston University's Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation has been an RRTC for more than 25 years and provides an example of the effect of the RRTC program in bridging science to service. The Center's mission as an RRTC has been to develop and transfer research knowledge to decision makers and practitioners who can then inform change and promote progress in mental health disability policy and practice. This article reviews five basic dissemination and utilization principles for overcoming the most common barriers to effective dissemination of evidence-based knowledge and provides examples of the Center's activities related to each principle. In addition, a knowledge-transfer framework developed by the Center to organize dissemination and utilization efforts is described.

  3. BioPortal: enhanced functionality via new Web services from the National Center for Biomedical Ontology to access and use ontologies in software applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetzel, Patricia L; Noy, Natalya F; Shah, Nigam H; Alexander, Paul R; Nyulas, Csongor; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) is one of the National Centers for Biomedical Computing funded under the NIH Roadmap Initiative. Contributing to the national computing infrastructure, NCBO has developed BioPortal, a web portal that provides access to a library of biomedical ontologies and terminologies (http://bioportal.bioontology.org) via the NCBO Web services. BioPortal enables community participation in the evaluation and evolution of ontology content by providing features to add mappings between terms, to add comments linked to specific ontology terms and to provide ontology reviews. The NCBO Web services (http://www.bioontology.org/wiki/index.php/NCBO_REST_services) enable this functionality and provide a uniform mechanism to access ontologies from a variety of knowledge representation formats, such as Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) format. The Web services provide multi-layered access to the ontology content, from getting all terms in an ontology to retrieving metadata about a term. Users can easily incorporate the NCBO Web services into software applications to generate semantically aware applications and to facilitate structured data collection.

  4. Building and evaluating an informatics tool to facilitate analysis of a biomedical literature search service in an academic medical center library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Elizabeth G; Oelschlegel, Sandra; Vaughn, Cynthia J; Lindsay, J Michael; Hurst, Sachiko M; Earl, Martha

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes an informatics tool to analyze a robust literature search service in an academic medical center library. Structured interviews with librarians were conducted focusing on the benefits of such a tool, expectations for performance, and visual layout preferences. The resulting application utilizes Microsoft SQL Server and .Net Framework 3.5 technologies, allowing for the use of a web interface. Customer tables and MeSH terms are included. The National Library of Medicine MeSH database and entry terms for each heading are incorporated, resulting in functionality similar to searching the MeSH database through PubMed. Data reports will facilitate analysis of the search service.

  5. [An analysis of mental disorders of international students visiting the Mental Health Service at Tsukuba University Health Center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takafumi; Tachikawa, Hirokazu; Ishii, Terumi; Shimada, Naoko; Takemori, Tadashi; Lebowitz, Adam; Asadas, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    With the expected increase in the number of international students coming to Japan as part of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology's "300,000 Foreign Student (Global 30) Plan", the demands on university mental health facilities will also increase. However, the rate of mental disorders of recent international students has not been fully evaluated. As part of an initiative to establish effective treatment measures for the mental health of international students, we investigated the present status and recent trends of these students who visited the Mental Health Service (MHS) in the Tsukuba University Health Center. The demographic characteristics, pathway, stress, and diagnosis of international students who visited the MHS from 2005 to 2010 were investigated retrospectively based on medical records. The subjects were 59 international students (15 male, 44 female; mean age: 28.4). The consultation rate of international students was significantly lower than that of Japanese students each year. Although the rate is almost stable in Japanese students (2.1-2.5%), it has increased significantly in international students, from 0.5% in 2005 to 1.4% in 2010. A larger percentage of the subjects were from Asia (66%), compared to the former Soviet Union (10%) and Europe (7%). A greater proportion of the subjects were graduate students (67%). The diagnoses were as follows: depression (34%), adjustment disorder (32%), insomnia (15%), and schizophrenia (9%). The percentage requiring emergency consultation was 24%, including the most severe cases that had to return to their home country. Sixty-nine percent of the subjects stayed in Japan for more than 1 year. Half of the subjects decided to visit the MHS themselves. The results of the present study show that the consultation rate of international students was lower than that of Japanese students in spite of the "culture shock" experienced by international students. This result is in agreement with

  6. An Investigation, Analysis, and Evaluation of Activities Connected with the Operation of Educational Information Service Centers. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, C. Neil; and Others

    This one-year project produced several publications and an evaluative investigation, all having to do with the rapidly growing community of educational information centers. Over 1500 such centers were surveyed by questionnaire to determine their locations, sizes, activities, and holdings. A directory which lists and describes some four hundred…

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans Seniors & Aging ... Employment Center Returning Service Members Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Homeless Veterans Women Veterans Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving ...

  8. Successful Integration of Hepatitis C Virus Point-of-Care Tests into the Denver Metro Health Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jewett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC recommends testing and linkage to care for persons most likely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV, including persons with human immunodeficiency virus. We explored facilitators and barriers to integrating HCV point-of-care (POC testing into standard operations at an urban STD clinic. Methods. The OraQuick HCV rapid antibody test was integrated at the Denver Metro Health Clinic (DMHC. All clients with at least one risk factor were offered the POC test. Research staff conducted interviews with clients (three HCV positive and nine HCV negative. Focus groups were conducted with triage staff, providers, and linkage-to-care counselors. Results. Clients were pleased with the ease of use and rapid return of results from the HCV POC test. Integrating the test into this setting required more time but was not overly burdensome. While counseling messages were clear to staff, clients retained little knowledge of hepatitis C infection or factors related to risk. Barriers to integrating the HCV POC test into clinic operations were loss to follow-up and access to care. Conclusion. DMHC successfully integrated HCV POC testing and piloted a HCV linkage-to-care program. Providing testing opportunities at STD clinics could increase identification of persons with HCV infection.

  9. Successful Integration of Hepatitis C Virus Point-of-Care Tests into the Denver Metro Health Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, A; Al-Tayyib, A A; Ginnett, L; Smith, B D

    2013-01-01

    Background. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends testing and linkage to care for persons most likely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), including persons with human immunodeficiency virus. We explored facilitators and barriers to integrating HCV point-of-care (POC) testing into standard operations at an urban STD clinic. Methods. The OraQuick HCV rapid antibody test was integrated at the Denver Metro Health Clinic (DMHC). All clients with at least one risk factor were offered the POC test. Research staff conducted interviews with clients (three HCV positive and nine HCV negative). Focus groups were conducted with triage staff, providers, and linkage-to-care counselors. Results. Clients were pleased with the ease of use and rapid return of results from the HCV POC test. Integrating the test into this setting required more time but was not overly burdensome. While counseling messages were clear to staff, clients retained little knowledge of hepatitis C infection or factors related to risk. Barriers to integrating the HCV POC test into clinic operations were loss to follow-up and access to care. Conclusion. DMHC successfully integrated HCV POC testing and piloted a HCV linkage-to-care program. Providing testing opportunities at STD clinics could increase identification of persons with HCV infection.

  10. Evaluation of service quality by using fuzzy MCDM: A case study in Iranian health-care centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Afkham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Service quality plays an important role in health care systems since hospitals are responsible for people's lives. This study presents an effective approach for evaluating and comparing service qualities of four hospitals. Service quality consists of different attributes and many of them are intangible and difficult to measure. Therefore, we propose a fuzzy method to resolve the ambiguity of the concepts, which are associated with human judgments. SERVQUAL model is used to evaluate the respondents' judgments of service quality and multi attribute decision making approach is implemented for the comparison among hospitals. The paper use analytical hierarchy process (AHP for obtaining criteria weight and TOPSIS for ranking the cases.

  11. Clinical Informatics Fellowship Programs: In Search of a Viable Financial Model: An open letter to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C U; Longhurst, C A; Hersh, W; Mohan, V; Levy, B P; Embi, P J; Finnell, J T; Turner, A M; Martin, R; Williamson, J; Munger, B

    2015-01-01

    In the US, the new subspecialty of Clinical Informatics focuses on systems-level improvements in care delivery through the use of health information technology (HIT), data analytics, clinical decision support, data visualization and related tools. Clinical informatics is one of the first subspecialties in medicine open to physicians trained in any primary specialty. Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers such as Medicare and Medicaid through its potential to reduce errors, increase safety, reduce costs, and improve care coordination and efficiency. Even though Clinical Informatics benefits patients and payers, because GME funding from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has not grown at the same rate as training programs, the majority of the cost of training new Clinical Informaticians is currently paid by academic health science centers, which is unsustainable. To maintain the value of HIT investments by the government and health care organizations, we must train sufficient leaders in Clinical Informatics. In the best interest of patients, payers, and the US society, it is therefore critical to find viable financial models for Clinical Informatics fellowship programs. To support the development of adequate training programs in Clinical Informatics, we request that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issue clarifying guidance that would allow accredited ACGME institutions to bill for clinical services delivered by fellows at the fellowship program site within their primary specialty.

  12. Extending the mission to the work site. A Denver provider joins a local television station in sponsoring health fairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacStravic, R S; Ginsburg, D; Godbey, V

    1994-10-01

    In 1991 KUSA Channel 9Health Fair Foundation asked Provenant Health Partners--a Catholic multi-institutional healthcare system in the Denver area--to become a sponsor of its annual fairs. Provenant viewed this invitation as an excellent opportunity to extend its mission and increase its focus on health and community service. Since January 1992, Provenant and 9Health Fair have conducted more than 45 fairs at 28 different work sites. At many sites, more than one employer participates, so approximately 90 companies have actually been served. Health fair volunteers and healthcare professionals check attendees' weight, blood pressure, lung function, body fat composition, foot conditions, vision, and hearing. Attendees may be screened for peripheral vascular disease, glaucoma, and a variety of cancers. In addition, a comprehensive blood chemistry test and a prostate-specific antigen blood test are offered for a small fee. For conditions requiring further evaluation, attendees are referred for medical follow-up. The fairs have been successful in identifying pathological conditions, enabling many people to seek early treatment. The early detection has resulted in significant healthcare cost savings. Health fairs have also promoted higher familiarity and favorability ratings of Provenant Health Partners and constituent institutions. Perhaps more important, the health fairs have enabled hundreds of Provenant employees and staff physicians to devote thousands of hours volunteering to promote better health in the community.

  13. Validation of the Training Benefit Forecasting Method: Recreational Vehicle Service Training. Training and Development Research Center: Project Number Six.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Richard A.; Geroy, Gary D.

    The validity of the Training Benefit Forecasting Method (TBFM) in a recreational vehicle service training setting was studied. Cost-benefit issues were associated with the Onan Service School change from a field-based Recreational Vehicle Generator Set training program to a customer-delivered self-instructional training program. Actual costs and…

  14. Creating Problems and Their Solutions: Service-Learning through Trinity Mathematics Triathlons, Math Nights, and Math Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanderman, David B.; Moore, Mary Webster; Maxwell, Mandi S.; Robbert, Sharon K.

    2013-01-01

    We describe several service-learning initiatives implemented by the mathematics and education departments. College students with majors and minors in math and math education have helped to design and implement math events for elementary and middle school students. Formal and informal reflections on these service-related experiences have…

  15. Results from an experimental trial at a Head Start center to evaluate two meal service approaches to increase fruit and vegetable intake of preschool aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnack, Lisa J; Oakes, J Michael; French, Simone A; Rydell, Sarah A; Farah, Farhiyah M; Taylor, Gretchen L

    2012-04-30

    Strategies to increase fruit and vegetable consumption of preschool aged children are needed. Evaluate the independent effects of the following meal service strategies on intake of fruits and vegetables of preschool children: 1.) Serving fruits and vegetables in advance of other menu items as part of traditional family style meal service; and 2.) Serving meals portioned and plated by providers. Fifty-three preschool aged children completed a randomized crossover experiment conducted at a Head Start center in Minneapolis, MN. Over a six week trial period each of the experimental meal service strategies (serving fruits and vegetable first and serving meals portioned by providers) was implemented during lunch service for two one-week periods. Two one-week control periods (traditional family style meal service with all menu items served at once) were also included over the six week trial period. Childrens lunch intake was observed as a measure of food and nutrient intake during each experimental condition. Fruit intake was significantly higher (pprovider portioned compared with control condition. Serving fruits in advance of other meal items may be a low cost easy to implement strategy for increasing fruit intake in young children. However, serving vegetables first does not appear to increase vegetable intake. Results provide support for current recommendations for traditional family style meal service in preschool settings.

  16. Results from an experimental trial at a Head Start center to evaluate two meal service approaches to increase fruit and vegetable intake of preschool aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnack Lisa J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strategies to increase fruit and vegetable consumption of preschool aged children are needed. Objectives Evaluate the independent effects of the following meal service strategies on intake of fruits and vegetables of preschool children: 1. Serving fruits and vegetables in advance of other menu items as part of traditional family style meal service; and 2. Serving meals portioned and plated by providers. Methods Fifty-three preschool aged children completed a randomized crossover experiment conducted at a Head Start center in Minneapolis, MN. Over a six week trial period each of the experimental meal service strategies (serving fruits and vegetable first and serving meals portioned by providers was implemented during lunch service for two one-week periods. Two one-week control periods (traditional family style meal service with all menu items served at once were also included over the six week trial period. Childrens lunch intake was observed as a measure of food and nutrient intake during each experimental condition. Results Fruit intake was significantly higher (p Conclusions Serving fruits in advance of other meal items may be a low cost easy to implement strategy for increasing fruit intake in young children. However, serving vegetables first does not appear to increase vegetable intake. Results provide support for current recommendations for traditional family style meal service in preschool settings.

  17. More Water, Madam? An ESL Curriculum for Service Helpers in Full-Service and Fast-Food Restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwach, Marlin Day; Gravely, Mary Liles

    This document, which was developed as a cooperative effort between the business and education communities in Denver, presents an English-as-a-second-language curriculum for service helpers in full-service and fast food restaurants. The curriculum consists of five lessons targeted toward high intermediate to advanced nonnative speakers who work in…

  18. Rural development NGOS and service delivery to the very poor: An empirical analysis of a training center in rural Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balgah Roland Azibo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of development nongovernmental organizations (DNGOs in driving change, servicing the very poor and reducing poverty especially in rural areas in developing countries has been generally affirmed in the rural economics literature. This romantic image accounts to a large extent for the exponential numeric growth observed in the sector, and for burgeoning research on the subject by rural development economists. However, not enough empirical evidence exists on the extent to which such organizations actually service the very poor. This paper uses the example of a rural development NGO in the administrative unit of North West Cameroon to assess the extent to which the very poor actually benefit from DNGO services. A relative poverty approach is applied, allowing for the use of individual indicators and computed poverty indices to compare beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of the DNGO service delivery based on cross sectional data. The results indicate that the DNGO serviced mainly poor communities. However, a disproportionately higher share of the benefits (60% went to groups that were already well off before service delivery, than to the very poor. The paper then emphasizes the need for DNGOs to carry out poverty analysis prior to service delivery, as a prerequisite to effectively reach out to the very poor, particularly in rural areas in Cameroon.

  19. Performance Evaluation of Employees of Community Health Service Center%社区卫生服务中心员工绩效考核方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程敏; 田军

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过对成都高新区芳草社区卫生服务中心员工绩效考核的实践过程进行分析,探讨社区卫生服务中心员工的绩效考核管理方法,以有效融合基础医疗和公共卫生工作,调动医务人员参与社区公共卫生服务的积极性,并不断促进其工作的规范性.方法 成立员工绩效考核管理小组,采取导向性方法,从工作数量、工作质量、综合满意度三方面对员工的工作进行考核,并根据考核结果发放绩效工资.结果 芳草社区卫生服务中心在投入运行后不到两年的时间内,基本医疗和公共卫生服务的数量、质量及社区居民的满意度都快速稳健提升.中心工作规范高效,以优异成绩通过国家级示范社区卫生服务中心的评审验收.结论 社区卫生服务中心员工绩效考核是社区卫生管理的重要组成部分,科学合理地设置绩效考核办法,将有效调动员工工作的积极性,引导员工的工作重心始终与中心发展的方向保持一致,促进了中心工作优质高效的开展.%Objective By analysis of the implementation of performance evaluation for the employees of Fangcao Community Health Service Center, to explore the managing method of performance evaluation so as to effectively merge basic health care and public health service, to motivate the employees to actively take a part in community public health service and to continuously improve their working standardization. Methods A management team for employee performance evaluation was set up. The employees' performance was evaluated by using guidance method from the three aspects of quantity, quality and overall satisfaction. Each employee's merit pay was given based on the outcome of evaluation. Results Within the two years' operation, in Fangcao Community Health Center there appeared a stable and rapid increase of quantity, quality and community resident's satisfaction in basic health care and public health service. Our

  20. Proceedings of the U.S. Geological Survey Eighth Biennial Geographic Information Science Workshop and first The National Map Users Conference, Denver, Colorado, May 10-13, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieverling, Jennifer B.; Dietterle, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is sponsoring the first The National Map Users Conference in conjunction with the eighth biennial Geographic Information Science (GIS) Workshop on May 10-13, 2011, in Lakewood, Colorado. The GIS Workshop will be held at the USGS National Training Center, located on the Denver Federal Center, Lakewood, Colorado, May 10-11. The National Map Users Conference will be held directly after the GIS Workshop at the Denver Marriott West, a convention hotel in the Lakewood, Colorado area, May 12-13. The National Map is designed to serve the Nation by providing geographic data and knowledge for government, industry, and public uses. The goal of The National Map Users Conference is to enhance communications and collaboration among the communities of users of and contributors to The National Map, including USGS, Department of the Interior, and other government GIS specialists and scientists, as well as the broader geospatial community. The USGS National Geospatial Program intends the conference to serve as a forum to engage users and more fully discover and meet their needs for the products and services of The National Map. The goal of the GIS Workshop is to promote advancement of GIS and related technologies and concepts as well as the sharing of GIS knowledge within the USGS GIS community. This collaborative opportunity for multi-disciplinary GIS and associated professionals will allow attendees to present and discuss a wide variety of geospatial-related topics. The Users Conference and Workshop collaboration will bring together scientists, managers, and data users who, through presentations, posters, seminars, workshops, and informal gatherings, will share accomplishments and progress on a variety of geospatial topics. During this joint event, attendees will have the opportunity to present or demonstrate their work; to develop their knowledge by attending hands-on workshops, seminars, and presentations given by professionals from USGS and

  1. Study of the Rate and Causes of Islamshahr Urban Residents’ Voiding to Refer to the Health Centers for Receiving Health Services (2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ghazy Sharei

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: It was believed that Inhabitant of Islamshahr avoid referring to their health centers and health posts to receive bargain medical services. In search for the rate and causes of such neglect, this study was formed. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study from all urban centers and health posts under the supervision of Islamshahr health network, 712 files were selected randomly. Results: Investigating the selected files it revealed that 25% were complete, 51% were defective and 24% were blank. In other words, only 25% of the files were complete and 75% of the files showed lack of full participation in primary care services. In the process of evaluation of each separate service unit, more defective files were found in family planning and oral health programs. But in the prenatal care and growth observation units, the number of complete files was a little higher than the number of defective ones. This is probably justifiable de to free vaccination of children and pregnant women, which causes the customer to refer to the mentioned units. In search for the causes of this lack of participation, 533 defective files were selected and those families were interviewed through some questionnaires. Conclusion: In family planning and growth observation and prenatal care, the interviewees believed that there was no need for them to seek such services. This in turn shows their lack of knowledge about the necessity of these cares. In case of oral health, lack of such unite in the health center was mentioned as the reason. More details are discussed in the article.

  2. The Virtual Climate Data Server (vCDS): An iRODS-Based Data Management Software Appliance Supporting Climate Data Services and Virtualization-as-a-Service in the NASA Center for Climate Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnase, John L.; Tamkin, Glenn S.; Ripley, W. David III; Stong, Savannah; Gill, Roger; Duffy, Daniel Q.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific data services are becoming an important part of the NASA Center for Climate Simulation's mission. Our technological response to this expanding role is built around the concept of a Virtual Climate Data Server (vCDS), repetitive provisioning, image-based deployment and distribution, and virtualization-as-a-service. The vCDS is an iRODS-based data server specialized to the needs of a particular data-centric application. We use RPM scripts to build vCDS images in our local computing environment, our local Virtual Machine Environment, NASA s Nebula Cloud Services, and Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud. Once provisioned into one or more of these virtualized resource classes, vCDSs can use iRODS s federation capabilities to create an integrated ecosystem of managed collections that is scalable and adaptable to changing resource requirements. This approach enables platform- or software-asa- service deployment of vCDS and allows the NCCS to offer virtualization-as-a-service: a capacity to respond in an agile way to new customer requests for data services.

  3. Water Service Areas, Published in 2000, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, North Georgia Regional Development Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Water Service Areas dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Not Provided information as of 2000. Data by this publisher...

  4. A Manual on the Evaluation of Information Centers and Services (Manuel pour l’Evaluation des Centres et Services d’Information)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    compute costs of resources or services. conductA ~ per user). More complex models include statistical correlation, multiple regression and conjoint In...Publishing, 1982. "Information and Work." In Progress in Communication Slater, Margaret. Sciences:, Volume 2, eds. Brenda Dervin and Melvin Voigt, " Social

  5. Needs assessment of science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana: A basis for in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyamfi, Alexander

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, it identified the priority needs common to all science teachers in secondary schools in Kumasi, Ghana. Second, it investigated the relationship existing between the identified priority needs and the teacher demographic variables (type of school, teacher qualification, teaching experience, subject discipline, and sex of teacher) to be used as a basis for implementing in-service education training programs at the Science Resource Centers in Kumasi Ghana. An adapted version of the Moore Assessment Profile (MAP) survey instrument and a set of open-ended questions were used to collect data from the science teachers. The researcher handed out one hundred and fifty questionnaire packets, and all one hundred and fifty (100%) were collected within a period of six weeks. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and inferential statistics. The descriptive statistics reported the frequency of responses, and it was used to calculate the Need Index (N) of the identified needs of teachers. Sixteen top-priority needs were identified, and the needs were arranged in a hierarchical order according to the magnitude of the Need Index (0.000 ≤ N ≤ 1.000). Content analysis was used to analyze the responses to the open-ended questions. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the null hypotheses of the study on each of the sixteen identified top-priority needs and the teacher demographic variables. The findings of this study were as follows: (1) The science teachers identified needs related to "more effective use of instructional materials" as a crucial area for in-service training. (2) Host and Satellite schools exhibited significant difference on procuring supplementary science books for students. Subject discipline of teachers exhibited significant differences on utilizing the library and its facilities by students, obtaining information on where to get help on effective science teaching

  6. Gender in relation to work motivation, satisfaction and use of day center services among people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Mona; Eklund, Lisa

    2017-05-01

    Day centres can prepare for open-market employment, and attendees' work motivation is key in this. Adopting a gender perspective, this study investigated (1) motivation for day centre attendance, satisfaction with the day centre services, number of hours spent there, and number and type of occupations performed; and (2) whether those factors were related with motivation for open-market employment. Women (n = 164) and men (n = 160) with psychiatric disabilities completed self-report questionnaires. There were no gender differences regarding satisfaction with the day centre services or number of hours spent there, but women engaged in more occupations. More women than men performed externally-oriented services and textile work, while men were in the majority in workshops. Externally oriented services, working in workshops, and low satisfaction with the day centre services were associated with higher motivation for employment. Women and men were equally motivated for employment. Women scored higher on motivation for attending the day centre, something that may deter transition into open-market employment. For men, less motivation for attending day centres may reduce their possibilities of gaining skills that can facilitate transitioning to open-market employment. Thus, the possibility for transitioning from day centre activities to open-market employment may be gendered.

  7. Hospital organization and importance of an interventional radiology inpatient admitting service: Italian single-center 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel; Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-03-01

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of 1,009,095.35 euros. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  8. [Calls to the SAMU Centre 15 (Emergency Medical Service Center 15): an indicator of peak pollen concentrations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardinet, M; Viallard, M S; Ballotte, B; Storme, D; Ferracci, C; Chalmet, C P

    2001-02-01

    A retrospective analysis of the calls received by the emergency services in Montluçon and the outpatient dossiers in the Adult and Pediatric Emergency Departments for June 3 to 5, 2000 evidenced an increase in the number of requests made for assistance regarding pollinosis symptoms. These symptoms and the associated requests for assistance seem to have been caused by Poaceae pollen peaks, ozone peaks and specific weather conditions. Hence, the number of calls received by the emergency services can be viewed as an unfavorable indicator for pollen-related diseases.

  9. Information Centers at NAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Robyn C.

    1989-01-01

    Descriptions of the 12 specialized information centers of the National Agricultural Library (NAL) include subject coverage, information services provided, information technologies used, and staffing. The development of the Rural Information Center, a joint venture between the Extension Service and NAL to provide information services to local…

  10. Inpatient satisfaction and usage patterns of personalized smart bedside station system for patient-centered service at a tertiary university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Borim; Kim, Seok; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2016-11-01

    for patient-centered services. Further research should be directed at developing sophisticated patient-centered services as a communication tool between the hospital and the patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of Banking Services in Emerging Markets -Household-Level Evidence (Replaces CentER DP 2010-092)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; Brown, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses survey data for 60,000 households from 29 transition economies in 2006 and 2010 to explore how the use of banking services is related to household characteristics, as well as to bank ownership, deposit insurance and creditor protection. At the household level we find that the holding

  12. Application of Pole Walking to Day Service Centers for Use by Community-dwelling Frail Elderly People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Ota

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The effects of 3 months of pole walking on community-dwelling elderly day service users showed improved Physical Component Summary scores of higher QoL. However, there was no significant effect of physical functions due to the intervention.

  13. UNUSUAL FINDINGS IN ZEBRAFISH, DANIO RERIO, FROM TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES AND THE ZEBRAFISH INTERNATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER DIAGNOSTIC SERVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of interesting and unusual lesions have been diagnosed in zebrafish that have been evaluated from toxicological studies or submitted as cases to the Diagnostic Service at Oregon State University. Lesions were observed in various wild-type and mutant lines of zebrafish an...

  14. Pricing the Services of the Computer Center at the Catholic University of Louvain. Program on Institutional Management in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecquet, Ignace; And Others

    Principles are outlined that are used as a basis for the system of pricing the services of the Computer Centre. The system illustrates the use of a management method to secure better utilization of university resources. Departments decide how to use the appropriations granted to them and establish a system of internal prices that reflect the cost…

  15. Dial-Up Service Manual. User's Guide and Technical Reference. University of Houston Libraries Electronic Publications Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabus, Karl, Ed.

    In addition to outlining the 100 online services available to students, this guide provides basic information about electronic databases and instructions for conducting searches. After an introduction to the various types of searches possible and the costs of searches, the guide describes how to choose an appropriate database. The basics of…

  16. Technological Innovation Relay Center Architecture Based on Grid Service%基于网格服务的科技创新驿站架构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付国亮; 潘郁

    2011-01-01

    In the development of innovation relay center, some problems such as "information island" , "barriers between the departments and regions" have been emerged, which blocked the function of technology information sharing and information transmitting of the network platform, not to mention the collaborative innovation of technology between production, teaching and research. The method of grid service has been adopted in this paper to set up the innovation relay center architecture in order to realize the sharing of technology information and the seamless combination of each regional innovation relay center. In this virtual grid environment, the technology solutions were provided to the user of the innovation relay in the form of service, the collaborative technology innovation by the government, enterprise, university, research center, intermediary agent and financial organ was completed either.%在创新驿站发展的过程中,暴露出“信息孤岛”,“条块分割”等问题,影响网络平台实现技术信息传播和共享的功能的发挥,更不利于产学研协同创新的实现.拟采用网格服务方式,搭建科技创新驿站技术信息资源共享的架构模型,实现网络内部信息的共享,实现各创新驿站资源的无缝衔接,在虚拟的网格环境下,以服务的方式向创新驿站用户提供技术解决方案,完成官产学研中金协同创新的全过程.

  17. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  18. The predicted impact of VOCs from Marijuana cultivation operations on ozone concentrations in great Denver, CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. T.; Vizuete, W.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Ashworth, K.

    2016-12-01

    Colorado is the first the marijuana legal states in the United States since 2014. As a result, thousands of legal Marijuana cultivation operations are at great Denver area now. Those Marijuana cultivation operations could be the potential to release a lot of biogenic VOCs, such as monoterpene(C10H16), alpha-pinene, and D-limonene. Those alkene species could rapidly increase the peroxy radicals and chemical reactions in the atmosphere, especially in the urban area which belong to VOC-limited ozone regime. These emissions will increase the ozone in Denver city, where is ozone non-attainment area. Some previous research explained the marijuana smoke and indoor air quality (Martyny, Serrano, Schaeffer, & Van Dyke, 2013) and the smell of marijuana chemical compounds(Rice & Koziel, 2015). However, there have been no studies discuss on identifying and assessing emission rate from marijuana and how those species impact on atmospheric chemistry and ozone concentration, and the marijuana emissions have been not considered in the national emission inventory, either. This research will use air quality model to identify the possibility of ozone impact by marijuana cultivation emission. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions, CAMx, are applied for this research to identify the impact of ozone concentration. This model is government regulatory model based on the Three-State Air Quality Modeling Study (3SAQS), which developed by UNC-Chapel Hill and ENVIRON in 2012. This model is used for evaluation and regulate the ozone impact in ozone non-attainment area, Denver city. The details of the 3SAQS model setup and protocol can be found in the 3SAQS report(UNC-IE, 2013). For the marijuana emission study scenarios, we assumed the monoterpene (C10H16) is the only emission species in air quality model and identify the ozone change in the model by the different quantity of emission rate from marijuana cultivation operations.

  19. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) boundaries for the entire county, Published in 1998, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Cochise County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 1998. It...

  20. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Important layer used in County Dispatch for routing first responders. Created using the County USPLS and documented reports on correct boundaries, Published in 2012, Not Applicable scale, Chippewa County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at Not Applicable scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2012. It is...

  1. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Homeland Security Infrastructure Program- public safety answer point boundaries, Published in 2008, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Georgia Department of Community Affairs.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2008. It is...

  2. 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas, Important layer used in County Dispatch for routing first responders. Created using the County USPLS and documented reports on correct boundaries, Published in 2012, Not Applicable scale, Chippewa County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — 911 Call Center (PSAP) Service Areas dataset current as of 2012. Important layer used in County Dispatch for routing first responders. Created using the County USPLS...

  3. The value of a safety-net hospital case example: Denver Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Mori J; Brown, Carrie A; Mehler, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    Mergers in the health care are common. The safety nets are being left out, because the operating margins of these hospitals are too thin. The Accountable Care Act (ACA) may increase the financial challenges of safety nets. This is because uncompensated care disbursements such as funding of the disproportionate share hospitals are scheduled to phase down as ACA implementation proceeds. If the safety nets became financially unstable, this would destabilize the local hospital market. Denver Health has gained national recognition for its innovations and excellent quality of care. This article will promote an awareness that safety-net hospitals should be considered for collaborations.

  4. Geohydrology of the shallow aquifers in the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Stanley G.

    1996-01-01

    The Denver metropolitan area is underlain by shallow layers of water-bearing sediments (aquifers) consisting of unconsolidated gravel, sand, silt, and clay. The depth to water in these aquifers is less than 20 feet in much of the area, and the aquifers provide a ready source of water to numerous shallow, small-capacity wells. The shallow depth to water also makes the aquifers susceptible to contamination from the land surface. Water percolating downward from residential, commercial, and industrial property, spills of hazardous materials, and leaks from underground storage tanks and pipelines can cause contaminants to enter the shallow aquifers. Wet basements, unstable foundation materials, and waterlogged soils also are common in areas of very shallow ground water.Knowledge of the extent, thickness, and water-table altitude of the shallow aquifers is incomplete. This, coupled with the complexity of development in this large metropolitan area, makes effective use, management, and protection of these aquifers extremely difficult. Mapping of the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of these aquifers would provide the general public and technical users with information needed to better use, manage, and protect this water resource. A study to map the geohydrology of shallow aquifers in the Denver metropolitan area was begun in 1994. The work was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army-Rocky Mountain Arsenal, U.S. Department of Energy-Rocky Flats Field Office, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Colorado Department of Natural Resources-State Engineers Office, Denver Water Department, Littleton-Englewood Wastewater Treatment Plant, East Cherry Creek Valley Water and Sanitation District, Metro Wastewater Reclamation District, Willows Water District, and the cities of Aurora, Lakewood, and Thornton.This report presents the results of a systematic mapping of the extent, thickness, and water-table altitude of the shallow

  5. The Excitement and Wonder of Teaching Science: What Pre-service Teachers Learn from Facilitating Family Science Night Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Danielle B.

    2012-02-01

    In this study, pre-service teachers facilitated stations at a family science night as a context to learn to identify, assess, and use children's science ideas. Assessment is already difficult in K-12 classrooms. Assessing learning in informal learning environments adds the complication that participation is largely voluntary. As such, controlling the learners' participation to systematically assess learning is counter to the intents of informal environments. The pre-service teachers in this study experienced success at teaching science and developed understandings about children's science ideas. Data included reflective postings, class discussions, observations, artifacts, and photographs. The findings contribute to understanding the value of multiple learning contexts in teacher preparation and lead to implications about leveraging informal science contexts for educating teachers.

  6. Implementing a fax referral program for quitline smoking cessation services in urban health centers: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Fax referral services that connect smokers to state quitlines have been implemented in 49 U.S. states and territories and promoted as a simple solution to improving smoker assistance in medical practice. This study is an in-depth examination of the systems-level changes needed to implement and sustain a fax referral program in primary care. Methods The study involved implementation of a fax referral system paired with a chart stamp prompting providers to identify smoking p...

  7. The Practice of Whole Course First-rate Service from the Physical Examination Center%体检中心全程优质服务实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨媛; 赵长伟

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the practice and effect of whole course first-rate service from the physical examina-tion.Methods:To conduct the whole course first-rate service in 2013,it means pre-hospital service、the process service of physical examination and post physical examination service , pre-hospital service conducts the pre-hospital coaching and communication to medical customers ,as well as the formulating the medical examination process、the open and programmed physical process ,the post physical examination service means informationized and healthy management ,physical examination extending services,to divide into two groups according to different physical examination time quantum ,the control group is from January,2011 to December,2012,the observation group is from January ,2013 to January,2014,compare the situation of medical volume growth in two groups ,as well as the satisfaction of health management、featuring services、service efficien-cy、service process .Results:The medical volume growth of observation group is obviously higher than that of control group (P<0.05);The satisfaction of physical examination healthy management、featuring service、service efficiency、service process of observation group is obviously higher than that of control group (P<0.05).Conclusion:The physical examina-tion center conducts whole course first-rate service,promotes physical examination service quality ,as a result,it can improve the client satisfaction ,lift the health level of the whole nation .%目的:探析体检中心全程优质服务的做法与效果。方法:2013年进行全程优质服务,全程体检优质服务即进行院前服务、体检过程服务及体检后服务。院前服务进行体检客户的院前指导沟通、制定体检流程、开放程序化的体检过程,体检后服务即进行信息化、健康管理、体检延伸服务。按体检时间段的不同分入两组,对照组为2011年1月至2012年12月,观察组为2013

  8. Evaluation of a marketing program designed to increase consumer consideration of energy-efficient products in Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    A demonstration marketing program to sensitize Denver homeowners to incorporate the energy cost of ownership orientation in their decision process regarding purchase of energy-efficient products is described. Personal interviews with Denver homeowners were conducted. A first survey established a baseline for consumer awareness and acceptance of energy conservation and conservation-related products and provided information which could be utilized in developing marketing strategies related to energy conservation and the concept of energy cost of ownership. A second survey measured shifts in awareness and attitudes which might have occurred as a result of the marketing demonstration program. The methodology and results of the evaluation are discussed in detail. The Denver Test Market Media Campaign conducted through multi-media advertising and public relations campaigns to sensitize the residents to the positive consideraton of energy-efficient products is described. (MCW)

  9. Evaluation of a marketing program designed to increase consumer consideration of energy-efficient products in Denver, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    A demonstration marketing program to sensitize Denver homeowners to incorporate the energy cost of ownership orientation in their decision process regarding purchase of energy-efficient products is described. Personal interviews with Denver homeowners were conducted. A first survey established a baseline for consumer awareness and acceptance of energy conservation and conservation-related products and provided information which could be utilized in developing marketing strategies related to energy conservation and the concept of energy cost of ownership. A second survey measured shifts in awareness and attitudes which might have occurred as a result of the marketing demonstration program. The methodology and results of the evaluation are discussed in detail. The Denver Test Market Media Campaign conducted through multi-media advertising and public relations campaigns to sensitize the residents to the positive consideraton of energy-efficient products is described. (MCW)

  10. Transformational leadership, transnational culture and political competence in globalizing health care services: a case study of Jordan's King Hussein Cancer Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pappas Gregory

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following the demise of Jordan's King Hussein bin Talal to cancer in 1999, the country's Al-Amal Center was transformed from a poorly perceived and ineffectual cancer care institution into a Western-style comprehensive cancer center. Renamed King Hussein Cancer Center (KHCC, it achieved improved levels of quality, expanded cancer care services and achieved Joint Commission International accreditation under new leadership over a three-year period (2002–2005. Methods An exploratory case research method was used to explain the rapid change to international standards. Sources including personal interviews, document review and on-site observations were combined to conduct a robust examination of KHCC's rapid changes. Results The changes which occurred at the KHCC during its formation and leading up to its Joint Commission International (JCI accreditation can be understood within the conceptual frame of the transformational leadership model. Interviewees and other sources for the case study suggest the use of inspirational motivation, idealized influence, individualized consideration and intellectual stimulation, four factors in the transformational leadership model, had significant impact upon the attitudes and motivation of staff within KHCC. Changes in the institution were achieved through increased motivation and positive attitudes toward the use of JCI continuous improvement processes as well as increased professional training. The case study suggests the role of culture and political sensitivity needs re-definition and expansion within the transformational leadership model to adequately explain leadership in the context of globalizing health care services, specifically when governments are involved in the change initiative. Conclusion The KHCC case underscores the utility of the transformational leadership model in an international health care context. To understand leadership in globalizing health care services, KHCC

  11. Comparação do desempenho de pré-escolares, mediante teste de desenvolvimento de Denver, antes e após intervenção nutricional Comparison of preschool children´s performance through Denver developmental test, before and after nutritional supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fisberg

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A análise de performance psicomotora de crianças institucionalizadas é de fundamental importância no planejamento de atividades educativas. Estudos anteriores têm mostrado prejuízos desta função em crianças de creches. OBJETIVO. Comparar o desempenho no teste de triagem de Denver em crianças de 2 a 6 anos de idade, de creches conveniadas com a Prefeitura de São Paulo, antes e após seis meses de intervenção nutricional com suplemento alimentar enriquecido com ferro. MÉTODO. Foram analisadas 130 crianças de 2 a 6 anos de idade, em três creches municipais de São Paulo, aplicando-se o teste de Denver, por psicólogas treinadas, comparando-se os resultados de acordo com o sexo, faixa etária e estado nutricional, antes e após período de suplementação alimentar. RESULTADOS. A maior parte das crianças teve desempenho normal, tanto na primeira aplicação (70,80%, como na segunda (80,80%, sem modificação do estado nutricional. Na comparação dos resultados, 76,92% não modificaram o desempenho e 18,46% melhoraram significativamente. Em relação ao sexo, não foram encontradas diferenças significantes, enquanto que, para a faixa etária, houve melhora significante entre as crianças de 4 a 6 anos. CONCLUSÕES. Além do aspecto nutricional, fatores como prontidão para aprendizagem, organização familiar e orientação psicopedagógica das creches devem estar favorecendo o desenvolvimento, mesmo considerando-se o baixo nível socioeconômico da população estudada.Psychomotor and development analysis must be emphasized when studying institutionalized children. Many previous investigations have been showing deleterious effects of day care centers over developmental performance in children. OBJECTIVE. This study is aimed at comparing the performance in the Development Screening Test (Denver in children attending day care centers, before and after nutritional intervention with an energetic supplement enriched with iron. METHOD

  12. Hydrologic Modeling at the National Water Center: Operational Implementation of the WRF-Hydro Model to support National Weather Service Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, B.; Gochis, D.; Clark, E. P.; Cui, Z.; Dugger, A. L.; Fall, G. M.; Feng, X.; Fresch, M. A.; Gourley, J. J.; Khan, S.; Kitzmiller, D.; Lee, H. S.; Liu, Y.; McCreight, J. L.; Newman, A. J.; Oubeidillah, A.; Pan, L.; Pham, C.; Salas, F.; Sampson, K. M.; Smith, M.; Sood, G.; Wood, A.; Yates, D. N.; Yu, W.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) National Water Center(NWC) is collaborating with the NWS National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to implement a first-of-its-kind operational instance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Hydro model over the Continental United States (CONUS) and contributing drainage areas on the NWS Weather and Climate Operational Supercomputing System (WCOSS) supercomputer. The system will provide seamless, high-resolution, continuously cycling forecasts of streamflow and other hydrologic outputs of value from both deterministic- and ensemble-type runs. WRF-Hydro will form the core of the NWC national water modeling strategy, supporting NWS hydrologic forecast operations along with emergency response and water management efforts of partner agencies. Input and output from the system will be comprehensively verified via the NWC Water Resource Evaluation Service. Hydrologic events occur on a wide range of temporal scales, from fast acting flash floods, to long-term flow events impacting water supply. In order to capture this range of events, the initial operational WRF-Hydro configuration will feature 1) hourly analysis runs, 2) short-and medium-range deterministic forecasts out to two day and ten day horizons and 3) long-range ensemble forecasts out to 30 days. All three of these configurations are underpinned by a 1km execution of the NoahMP land surface model, with channel routing taking place on 2.67 million NHDPlusV2 catchments covering the CONUS and contributing areas. Additionally, the short- and medium-range forecasts runs will feature surface and sub-surface routing on a 250m grid, while the hourly analyses will feature this same 250m routing in addition to nudging-based assimilation of US Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow observations. A limited number of major reservoirs will be configured within the model to begin to represent the first-order impacts of

  13. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Denver Developmental Screening Test II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Andrés-Beltrán, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Fernández, Ángel L; Güeita-Rodríguez, Javier; Lambeck, Johan

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Denver Developmental Screening Test II in a population of Spanish children. Two hundred children ranging from 9 month to 6 years were grouped into two samples (healthy/with psychomotor delay) and screened in order to check whether they suffered from psychomotor delay. Children from three Early Intervention Centres and three schools participated in this study. Criterion validity was calculated by the method of extreme groups, comparing healthy children to those with development delay. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were calculated using Cohen Kappa coefficient, and internal consistency was calculated via the Kuder-Richardson coefficient. The scale demonstrated 89% sensitivity, 92% specificity, a positive predicted value of 91% and a negative predicted value of 89%, whereas the positive and negative likelihood ratio was 11.12 and 0.12, respectively. Intraobserver reliability ranged from 0.662 to 1, and interobserver reliability ranged from 0.886 to 1. The Kuder-Richardson coefficient values ranged from 87.5 to 97.6%. The Spanish version of the Denver Developmental Screening Test II was found to have a good criterion validity, reliability and internal consistency and is a suitable screening test for use in a population of Spanish children.

  14. Performance of children with phenylketonuria in the Developmental Screening Test--Denver II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Greyce Kelly da; Lamônica, Dionísia Aparecida Cusin

    2010-01-01

    phenylketonuria is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from the mutation of a gene located in chromosome 12q22-24.1. to describe the performance of children with classic phenylketonuria, who were diagnosed and treated early, in the Development Screening Test Denver - II. participants were 20 children with phenylketonuria, ranging in age from 3 and 6 years, and 10 children with typical language development, paired by gender, age and socioeconomic level to the research group. The plasmatic phenylalanine measure and the neurological, psychological and social information were gathered in the data base of the Neonatal Screening Programs for Metabolic disorder. Assessment consisted on the application of the Development Screening Test Denver II. A descriptive statistical analysis and the Mann Whitney test were used in order to characterize the tested skills. For the measurements of the plasmatic phenylalanine blood levels the values considered for analysis were: below 2 mg/dL, above 4 mg/dL, reference values between 2 and 4 mg/dL, of all exams performed during the participants'lives; maximum and minimum values and values obtained on the day of the screening application. comparison between the groups indicated statistically significant differences for the personal-social and language areas. children who were diagnosed and treated early for phenylketonuria present deficits in the personal-social and language areas. Also, even when receiving follow-up and undergoing treatment, these children presented difficulties in maintaining normal plasmatic phenylalanine levels.

  15. Effects of the May 5-6, 1973, storm in the Greater Denver area, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Wallace R.

    1973-01-01

    Rain began falling on the Greater Denver area the evening of Saturday, May 5, 1973, and continued through most of Sunday, May 6. Below about 7,000 feet altitude, the precipitation was mostly rain; above that altitude, it was mostly snow. Although the rate of fall was moderate, at least 4 inches of rain or as much as 4 feet of snow accumulated in some places. Sustained precipitation falling at a moderate rate thoroughly saturated the ground and by midday Sunday sent most of the smaller streams into flood stage. The South Platte River and its major tributaries began to flood by late Sunday evening and early Monday morning. Geologic and hydrologic processes activated by the May 5-6 storm caused extensive damage to lands and to manmade structures in the Greater Denver area. Damage was generally most intense in areas where man had modified the landscape--by channel constrictions, paving, stripping of vegetation and topsoil, and oversteepening of hillslopes. Roads, bridges, culverts, dams, canals, and the like were damaged or destroyed by erosion and sedimentation. Streambanks and structures along them were scoured. Thousands of acres of croplands, pasture, and developed urban lands were coated with mud and sand. Flooding was intensified by inadequate storm sewers, blocked drains, and obstructed drainage courses. Saturation of hillslopes along the Front Range caused rockfalls, landslides, and mudflows as far west as Berthoud Pass. Greater attention to geologic conditions in land-use planning, design, and construction would minimize storm damage in the future.

  16. Customer care policy for utilities - demonstrated with the example of a call center; Customer Care fuer EVU - Wirkungszusammenhaenge am Beispiel des Telefon-Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisse, D. [Consulting und Services, pdv Unternehmensberatung GmbH, Roesrath (Germany)

    2000-01-10

    Customer care policy, for preventing change to another provider and consolidating customer loyalty, is becoming a strategic (powerful) instrument for a utility in the competitive market. But what does this really imply for the day-to-day process of dealing with client-specific operations and workflows? The article describes the interactions between strategic marketing for ensuring client satisfaction and the resulting requirements to be met by a utility's call center, and also describes the key 'parameters' and requirements for successful day-to-day management of call centers. (orig./CB) [German] Customer Care zur Reduzierung der Wechselbereitschaft bzw. zur Erhoehung der Kundenbindung wird fuer EVU zu einem strategischen Instrument im Kampf um die Kunden. Aber was bedeutet dies fuer die operative Abwicklung der kundenbezogenen Geschaeftsprozesse? Der Verfasser erlaeutert die Zusammenhaenge zwischen dem strategischen Ziel der Kundenzufriedenheit und der operativen Umsetzung des Telefon-Service und beschreibt die 'Stellschrauben', die fuer diesen Zweck bei der Planung aber auch im taeglichen Management eines Call Centers zur Verfuegung stehen. (orig.)

  17. Spinal Cord Injury Project: A Project to Improve and Expand Spinal Cord Injury Services at the West Virginia Rehabilitation Center. Final Report. July 1, 1979 to June 30, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Virginia State Dept. of Education, Charleston. Div. of Vocational Rehabilitation.

    The primary purpose of this project was to establish a structured multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary program of services for the traumatically spinal cord injured (SCI) clients at the West Virginia Rehabilitation Center. The program, conducted from July 1, 1979 to June 30, 1982, included services ranging from physical and mental restoration…

  18. Audio Visual Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Audiovisual Services Center provides still photographic documentation with laboratory support, video documentation, video editing, video duplication, photo/video...

  19. Analysis on the contracting service model in community health centers%社区卫生服务机构签约服务模式分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁莎莎; 王芳; 李陈晨; 刘利群; 周巍; 马海燕; 傅济; 刘伟

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the progress of the contracting service model in community health centers in the typical areas in China, and provide empirical evidence for the hierarchical system targeted to make first contact and orderly dual transfer. Methods: Purposive sampling was adopted. Twelve community health centers in Beijing, Shanghai , Zhengzhou and Chengdu areas where the general practitioner model was conducted earlier and set to be the representative one, were selected as the field survey sites. A thematic framework analysis was used to describe the key factors around the contacting service model. Results:This model was developed around the following key factors:using the general practice team as the main service provider, taking the patients with chronic diseases as the main contracting groups and extending to their family members with the number of contracted ranging around 1500~2000 , freely providing both essential public health and medical services, fully using the family physician room as the con-tracting service platform and highlighting the actively serving concept, building the financial and non-financial incen-tives, health insurance benefits and green transfer mechanisms in order to efficiently guarantee the contracting service development. Conclusions: Based on the information platform, the contracting service model in the sample sites played a great role in the appointment and referral services development as well as the self-health management among residents, improving the relationship between physicians and patients, and promoting the formation of orderly health service pursuing pattern.%目的::分析典型地区社区卫生服务机构签约服务模式进展,为社区首诊、有序转诊等分级诊疗体系的建立提供实践依据。方法:采取目的抽样,选取全科医生制度探索较早且具有代表性的北京市、上海市、郑州市、成都市共12家社区卫生服务中心进行现场调查。采用主题框

  20. 金融与上海国际航运中心联动研究%The Study About the Finance Service and the Center of International Shiping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨绍波; 傅尔基

    2012-01-01

    Financial and shipping between relation is Mutual fusion 、Interaction and Mutual promotion relation. Financial policy、 investment、 innovation and service promote the development of shipping. Shanghai international shipping center financial services by the link to the whole industry chain to widen ceaselessly, by means of the traditional way to the new way of innovation, area from Shanghai to the Yangtze River Delta region extends continuously, policy by limiting to encourage continued to deepen, market from single to comprehensive integrated expands ceaselessly, mechanism is composed of "point" to "group" continuous agglomeration. To seize the central to Shanghai's first test policy and international shipping and financial service industry to the Shanghai transfer opportunities, the innovation of financial system and financial services, promoting the development of shipping finance, logistics finance, focus on services throughout the shipping industry chain, efforts in the offshore financial, insurance and reinsurance in areas such as breakthrough, in promotion comprehensive financial service level to promote Shanghai international shipping transit and high-end shipping service industry development.%金融与航运之间关系是互融、互动和互推关系。金融政策、投资、创新、服务等推动航运发展。上海国际航运中心的金融服务领域由环节向整个产业链不断拓宽,手段由传统方式向新方式不断创新,区域由上海向长三角地区不断延伸,政策由限制性向鼓励性不断深化,市场由单一向全面综合不断扩大,机构由"点"向"团"不断集聚。要抓住中央给予上海的先行先试政策和国际航运金融等服务业向上海转移的机遇,创新金融体制机制和金融服务手段,大力发展航运金融、物流金融,着眼于服务整个航运产业链,努力在离岸金融、保险与再保险等领域中有所突破,在提升金融综合服务水平中推动

  1. Pima Community College Facilities Specification for a Library/Student Center Prototype. Final [Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulien, Daniel K.; Thibodeau, Yvonne

    This document is a description of a prototype Library/Student Center designed to serve approximately 10,000 students at a comprehensive campus. Prepared by the firm Paulien & Associates, Inc., of Denver, Colorado, this prototype will serve a design basis for facilities at all Pima Community College (PCC) campuses. The prototype will not be…

  2. Implementing a fax referral program for quitline smoking cessation services in urban health centers: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantrell Jennifer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fax referral services that connect smokers to state quitlines have been implemented in 49 U.S. states and territories and promoted as a simple solution to improving smoker assistance in medical practice. This study is an in-depth examination of the systems-level changes needed to implement and sustain a fax referral program in primary care. Methods The study involved implementation of a fax referral system paired with a chart stamp prompting providers to identify smoking patients, provide advice to quit and refer interested smokers to a state-based fax quitline. Three focus groups (n = 26 and eight key informant interviews were conducted with staff and physicians at two clinics after the intervention. We used the Chronic Care Model as a framework to analyze the data, examining how well the systems changes were implemented and the impact of these changes on care processes, and to develop recommendations for improvement. Results Physicians and staff described numerous benefits of the fax referral program for providers and patients but pointed out significant barriers to full implementation, including the time-consuming process of referring patients to the Quitline, substantial patient resistance, and limitations in information and care delivery systems for referring and tracking smokers. Respondents identified several strategies for improving integration, including simplification of the referral form, enhanced teamwork, formal assignment of responsibility for referrals, ongoing staff training and patient education. Improvements in Quitline feedback were needed to compensate for clinics' limited internal information systems for tracking smokers. Conclusions Establishing sustainable linkages to quitline services in clinical sites requires knowledge of existing patterns of care and tailored organizational changes to ensure new systems are prioritized, easily integrated into current office routines, formally assigned to specific

  3. Locating distribution/service centers based on multi objective decision making using set covering and proximity to stock market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Dabibi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present competitive world, facility location is an important aspect of the supply chain (sc optimization. It involves selecting specific locations for facility construction and allocation of the distribution channel among different SC levels. In fact, it is a strategic issue which directly affects many operational/tactical decisions. Besides the accessibility, which results in customer satisfaction, the present paper optimizes the establishment costs of a number of distribution channels by considering their proximity to the stock market of the goods they distribute, and proposes mathematical models for two objective functions using the set covering problem. Then, two objective functions are proposed into one through the ε-constraint method and solved by the metaheuristic Genetic Algorithm (GA. To test the resulted model, a smaller scale problem is solved. Results from running the algorithm with different ε-values show that, on average, a 10% increase in ε, which increases the value of the second objective function - distance covered by customers will cause a 2% decrease in the value of the first objective function including the costs of establishing distribution centers. The repeatability and solution convergence of the two-objective model presented by the GA are other results obtained in this study.

  4. Triagem de desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor em instituições de educação infantil segundo o Teste de Denver II Selección de desarrollo neuropsicomotriz en instituciones de educación infantil según el Test de Denver II Neuropsychological development screening in child's educational institutions according to Denver II Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Andrade Rezende

    2005-12-01

    lenguaje y personal-social fueron perjudicados por las condiciones de los jardines infantiles (escolaridad de las educadoras y el tamaño de los grupos infantiles, y tal vez por la situación familiar. En cuanto al área motriz, se ve a los niños, mismo siendo pequeños, jugando en las calles. Estas hipótesis precisan ser comprobadas por nuevas pesquisas.To develop is an important right that any child has and occurs according the relationship between genetic background and environment. Following this statement, a screening of development was done in 66 children (37 boys and 29 girls between 2 and 3 years' old who attended 4 public day-care centers in the city of Sao Paulo. The Denver II Development Selection Test was used. The better part of the sample (62.74% earns up to 0.5 MS (minimum salary per capita per month. The adequacies for each development area were: personal-social(N=54; 81.8%, fine engine (N=53; 80.3%, rough engine (N=53; 8.3% and language (N=49; 72.4%. In the language and personal-social areas the children attained the worst results, and in the rough engine the best. It is hypothesized: the language and personal-social language were prejudiced by the day-care centers' conditions (educators' schooling and the children's groups' sizes and maybe by the familiar situation. As to the motor area, one can see children, even though small, playing in streets. The hypotheses must be proven with new researches.

  5. Culture-centered engagement with delivery of health services: co-constructing meanings of health in the Tzu Chi Foundation through Buddhist philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, Sydney J; Dutta, Mohan; Sun, Wei-San

    2014-01-01

    The shift in health communication scholarship from the narrow focus on curing to the complexly intertwined spaces of health, illness, healing, and curing attends to the dynamic cultural contexts within which meanings and practices are negotiated, directing scholarship toward alternative spaces of health care delivery. This study utilized the culture-centered approach as a theoretical lens for providing a discursive space for understanding meanings of health constituted in the practices of the Tzu Chi Foundation, an organization that offers biomedical services within the larger philosophical understandings of Buddhism with 10 million members in over 50 different countries. The emerging perspective promotes non-biomedical meanings of health through selfless giving and assistance founded in Buddhist principles, simultaneously seeking purity of the mind, body, and soul holistically. Through the negotiation of the principles driving Buddhist philosophy and the principles that shape biomedical health care delivery, this study seeks to understand the interpretive frames that circulate among foundation staff and care recipients.

  6. Heat-pump-centered Integrated Community Energy Systems: systems development, Consolidated Natural Gas Service Company. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, N.R.; Donakowski, T.D.; Foster, R.B.; Sala, D.L.; Tison, R.R.; Whaley, T.P.; Yudow, B.D.; Swenson, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Heat-Actuated Heat Pump Centered Integrated Community Energy System (HAHP-ICES) utilizes a gas-fired, engine-driven, heat pump and commercial buildings, and offers several advantages over the more conventional equipment it is intended to supplant. The general non-site-specific application assumes a hypothetical community of one 59,000 ft/sup 2/ office building and five 24-unit, low-rise apartment buildings located in a region with a climate similar to Chicago. This community serves as a starting point - the base case - upon which various sensitivity analyses are performed and through which the performance characteristics of the HAHP are explored. The results of these analyses provided the selection criteria for the site-specific application of the HAHP-ICES concept to a real-world community. The site-specific community consists of 42 townhouses; five 120-unit, low-rise apartment buildings; five 104-unit high-rise apartment buildings; one 124,000 ft/sup 2/ office building; and a single 135,000 ft/sup 2/ retail building located in Monroeville, Pa. The base-case analyses confirmed that the HAHP-ICES has significant potentials for reducing the primary energy consumption and pollutant emissions associated with space conditioning when compared with a conventional system. Primary energy consumption was reduced by 30%, while emission reductions ranged from 39 to 77%. The results of the site-specific analysis indicate that reductions in energy consumption of between 15 and 22% are possible when a HAHP-ICES is selected as opposed to conventional HVAC equipment.

  7. Study on Guiding Signage Design of the Administrative Service Center%行政服务中心导向标识设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡伟

    2014-01-01

    Guiding signage is an important part of public space and its role of architectural space is the spatial cognitive guidance. The administrative ser-vice center was brought into being at the beginning of this century and prospered in recent years as a new type of public building space. Base on a number of actual investigations on guiding signage design in the administrative service center, the main existing problems are summed up and the design princi-ples of the guiding signage design are presented based on the functional orientation. Some guiding signage design suggestions are offered from the aspect of humanistic concern under the background of the times.%导向标识是公共空间的重要组成部分,其作用表现在建筑空间上即为对空间认知的引导。行政服务中心诞生于本世纪初,近年来得到蓬勃发展,是新型的公共建筑空间。在对若干行政服务中心导向标识现状实地调研的基础上,总结出目前存在的主要问题;基于行政服务中心的功能定位,提出导向标识的设计原则;在建设服务型政府的时代背景下,从重视人文关怀角度对导向标识设计提出建议。

  8. Utilization of dental health-care services and its barriers among the patients visiting community health centers in Nellore District, Andhra Pradesh: A cross-sectional, questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Nagarjuna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The primary health centers and community health centers (CHCs offer an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, dental health education, and institution of preventive measures in the remote areas. Aim: To assess the level of utilization of dental health care services and to determine barriers that prevent utilization of dental health-care services among the patients visiting CHCs in Nellore District, Andhra Pradesh. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 600 patients aged 20 years and above visiting the randomly selected 10 CHCs during May 2015 in Nellore District. A multistage sampling method was followed. The source of data was primary in nature and it was obtained through self-administered questionnaire. Data was entered and analyzed using a software program IBM SPSS Statistics version 22 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp (P < 0.05. Results: Only 36% of patients had visited the dentist in the last 12 months. Males (54% visited dentist more frequently than females (46%. The most common reported reasons for the last dental visit were pain or a dental emergency (71%, followed by restorative treatment (17% and other reasons (12%. The most commonly reported reasons for not seeking dental care were “Not needed unless having pain” by 360 (60%, “I do not think dental diseases are very serious” by 304 (51%, “I have fear of dental procedures” by 290 (48.6%,“Lack of time” by 235 (45.6%, “Dental treatment is expensive” by 200 (33.3%, and “The dentist is at a long distance” by 158 (26.8%. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that only a small portion of population visited a dentist in previous year. Most of them believe that visiting dentist is necessary only for pain relief.

  9. The Usefulness of the Denver Developmental Screening Test to Predict Kindergarten Problems in a General Community Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadman, David; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST) was administered to 2569 children prior to starting kindergarten. At the end of the school year, teachers rated each child. Results suggest that because of its low sensitivity and modest predictive value, the DDST is relatively inefficient for a school entry screening program in a general population.…

  10. Developmental Screenings in Rural Settings: A Comparison of the Child Development Review and the Denver II Developmental Screening Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachlow, Allison; Jordan, Augustus E.; Tervo, Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Two developmental screening tests were applied to 73 children, aged 1 month-6.7 years, in Sioux Falls and the Cheyenne River Reservation (South Dakota). There were no racial differences; compared to urban children, rural reservation children of any race were more likely to pass the Child Development Review and to fail the Denver II Developmental…

  11. Parents Evaluation of Developmental Status and Denver Developmental Screening Test II in high risk infant and toddler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effie Koesnandar

    2010-03-01

    Conclusions. The prevalence of developmental disorder is higher in high risk infant and toddler, who >12 months old, undernourished, premature, and LBW. PEDS instrument are equivalent to Denver II test, shows good agreement, particularly for gross motor and language domain. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:26-30].

  12. Early Start Denver Model - intervention for de helt små børn med autisme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) er en autismespecifik interventionsmetode, som er udviklet til helt små børn med autisme (0-4 år). Metoden fokuserer på at styrke den tidlige kontakt og barnets motivation, og den arbejder målrettet med de socio-kommunikative forløbere for sprog og med den tidlige...

  13. 78 FR 12104 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; INB Hauser Pharmaceutical Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. By Notice dated November 1, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on November 9, 2012, 77 FR 67398, InB Hauser Pharmaceutical Services, Inc., 6880 N. Broadway, Suite H, Denver... considered the factors in 21 U.S.C. 823(a), and determined that the registration of InB Hauser...

  14. Experiences in Bridging the Gap between Science and Decision Making at NASA's GSFC Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Steven; Teng, Bill; Friedl, Lawrence; Lynnes, Chris; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Recognizing the significance of NASA remote sensing Earth science data in monitoring and better understanding our planet s natural environment, NASA has implemented the Decision Support Through Earth Science Research Results program (NASA ROSES solicitations). a) This successful program has yielded several monitoring, surveillance, and decision support systems through collaborations with benefiting organizations. b) The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) has participated in this program on two projects (one complete, one ongoing), and has had opportune ad hoc collaborations gaining much experience in the formulation, management, development, and implementation of decision support systems utilizing NASA Earth science data. c) In addition, GES DISC s understanding of Earth science missions and resulting data and information, including data structures, data usability and interpretation, data interoperability, and information management systems, enables the GES DISC to identify challenges that come with bringing science data to decision makers. d) The purpose of this presentation is to share GES DISC decision support system project experiences in regards to system sustainability, required data quality (versus timeliness), data provider understanding of how decisions are made, and the data receivers willingness to use new types of information to make decisions, as well as other topics. In addition, defining metrics that really evaluate success will be exemplified.

  15. Collective efficacy in Denver, Colorado: Strengthening neighborhoods and health through community gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teig, Ellen; Amulya, Joy; Bardwell, Lisa; Buchenau, Michael; Marshall, Julie A; Litt, Jill S

    2009-12-01

    Community gardens are viewed as a potentially useful environmental change strategy to promote active and healthy lifestyles but the scientific evidence base for gardens is limited. As a step towards understanding whether gardens are a viable health promotion strategy for local communities, we set out to examine the social processes that might explain the connection between gardens, garden participation and health. We analyzed data from semi-structured interviews with community gardeners in Denver. The analysis examined social processes described by community gardeners and how those social processes were cultivated by or supportive of activities in community gardens. After presenting results describing these social processes and the activities supporting them, we discuss the potential for the place-based social processes found in community gardens to support collective efficacy, a powerful mechanism for enhancing the role of gardens in promoting health.

  16. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Models Using Denver 2006 Field Experiment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash’at N.; Pruis, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a series of wake vortex field experiments at Denver in 2003, 2005, and 2006. This paper describes the lidar wake vortex measurements and associated meteorological data collected during the 2006 deployment, and includes results of recent reprocessing of the lidar data using a new wake vortex algorithm and estimates of the atmospheric turbulence using a new algorithm to estimate eddy dissipation rate from the lidar data. The configuration and set-up of the 2006 field experiment allowed out-of-ground effect vortices to be tracked in lateral transport further than any previous campaign and thereby provides an opportunity to study long-lived wake vortices in moderate to low crosswinds. An evaluation of NASA's fast-time wake vortex transport and decay models using the dataset shows similar performance as previous studies using other field data.

  17. High-Penetration Photovoltaics Standards and Codes Workshop, Denver, Colorado, May 20, 2010: Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coddington, M.; Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; Lynn, K.; Herig, C.; Bower, W.

    2010-09-01

    Effectively interconnecting high-level penetration of photovoltaic (PV) systems requires careful technical attention to ensuring compatibility with electric power systems. Standards, codes, and implementation have been cited as major impediments to widespread use of PV within electric power systems. On May 20, 2010, in Denver, Colorado, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), held a workshop to examine the key technical issues and barriers associated with high PV penetration levels with an emphasis on codes and standards. This workshop included building upon results of the High Penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) Systems into the Distribution Grid workshop held in Ontario California on February 24-25, 2009, and upon the stimulating presentations of the diverse stakeholder presentations.

  18. 3D Adaptive Virtual Exhibit for the University of Denver Digital Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shea-Tinn Yeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While the gaming industry has taken the world by storm with its three-dimensional (3D user interfaces, current digital collection exhibits presented by museums, historical societies, and libraries are still limited to a two-dimensional (2D interface display. Why can’t digital collections take advantage of this 3D interface advancement? The prototype discussed in this paper presents to the visitor a 3D virtual exhibit containing a set of digital objects from the University of Denver Libraries’ digital image collections, giving visitors an immersive experience when viewing the collections. In particular, the interface is adaptive to the visitor’s browsing behaviors and alters the selection and display of the objects throughout the exhibit to encourage serendipitous discovery. Social media features were also integrated to allow visitors to share items of interest and to create a sense of virtual community.

  19. SeaWiFS ocean color products and services at the NASA Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Kartan, Ravi; Li, Angela W.; Simmon, Robert B.

    1997-02-01

    SeaWiFS ocean color data will be archived at the Goddard DAAC in early 1997. The Goddard DAAC has been designated the primary archive for all SeaWiFS data. Almost all authorized SeaWiFS users will access SeaWiFS data via the Goddard DAAC Ocean Color Data and Resources web page. New interfaces and services are being developed by the Goddard DAAC Ocean Color Data Support Team on the Ocean Color website to support the SeaWiFS community following launch: A new SeaWiFS WWW Browser will allow users to browse and order SeaWiFS data via the Web. This Browser will incorporate all necessary elements for SeaWiFS data ordering, including password controls, subsetting, coincident search and visual browse. Users will also find SeaWiFS ancillary data, software routines, SeaWiFS data products specification, an order form for the SeaWIFS Technical Memoranda, as well as direct links to the 'Dear Colleague' letter and other documents and software on the SeaWiFS Project homepage. Other ocean color products available at he Goddard DAAC Ocean Color website include the following: New HDF versions of CZCS data files, including browse images and collection of regridded global composites designed for interdisciplinary study. New CZCS read and visualization software are available. A bibliography of ocean color research papers, several previously rare hardcopy documents, and a periodic ocean color newsletter are also available via the Web. The website also contains a collection of several new educational resources for ocean color educators and students. Being the main source of SeaWiFS data and consolidating ocean color data, documents, software, and points of contact form several other sources all at one convenient location, the Goddard DAAC hopes to become an important nexus for the entire global ocean color community. The Ocean Color Data and Resources webpage can be found at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov under 'ocean color'. Contact the Goddard DAAC Ocean Color Data Support Team about

  20. The GEISA 2009 Spectroscopic Database System and its CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Center Interactive Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquinet-Husson, Nicole; Crépeau, Laurent; Capelle, Virginie; Scott, Noëlle; Armante, Raymond; Chédin, Alain; Boonne, Cathy; Poulet-Crovisier, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    The GEISA (1) (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) computer-accessible database, initiated in 1976, is developed and maintained at LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France) a system comprising three independent sub-databases devoted respectively to : line transition parameters, infrared and ultraviolet/visible absorption cross-sections, microphysical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosols. The updated 2009 edition (GEISA-09) archives, in its line transition parameters sub-section, 50 molecules, corresponding to 111 isotopes, for a total of 3,807,997 entries, in the spectral range from 10-6 to 35,877.031 cm-1. Detailed description of the whole database contents will be documented. GEISA and GEISA/IASI are implemented on the CNES/CNRS Ether Products and Services Centre WEB site (http://ether.ipsl.jussieu.fr), where all archived spectroscopic data can be handled through general and user friendly associated management software facilities. These facilities will be described and widely illustrated, as well. Interactive demonstrations will be given if technical possibilities are feasible at the time of the Poster Display Session. More than 350 researchers are registered for on line use of GEISA on Ether. Currently, GEISA is involved in activities (2) related to the remote sensing of the terrestrial atmosphere thanks to the sounding performances of new generation of hyperspectral Earth' atmospheric sounders, like AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder -http://www-airs.jpl.nasa.gov/), in the USA, and IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer -http://earth-sciences.cnes.fr/IASI/) in Europe, using the 4A radiative transfer model (3) (4A/LMD http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr; 4A/OP co-developed by LMD and NOVELTIS -http://www.noveltis.fr/) with the support of CNES (2006). Refs: (1) Jacquinet-Husson N., N.A. Scott, A. Chédin,L. Crépeau, R. Armante, V. Capelle

  1. Prevalence of mental disorders in a population requesting health services at a primary health care center and its association with suicidal ideation and perceived disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mérida R. Rodríguez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study’s goal was to determine the most prevalent mental disorders and the impact on the perception of disability and suicidal ideation among the population from a primary health care center in the city of Cali. Methodology: a cross sectional study was conducted on 254 patients who were screened with the prime-md instrument. Descriptive statistics was used in the analysis to determine the most frequent disorders. Similarly, a multiple analysis with logistic and Poisson regressions using robust variance was conducted to determine the influence of mental disorders on disability and suicidal ideation. Results: most patients were female, young, and mature adults. Depression was present in 66.8% of all cases, followed by somatization disorder and anxiety. Half of the patients had had suicidal ideations at some point in their lives, and three out of four patients claimed to suffer from some kind of disability. Upon adjusting for the covariables, depression and anxiety disorders had a strong association with suicidal ideation and perceived disability that was overestimated by the logistic regression. Conclusion: depression and anxiety were the most common disorders and showed a strong association with suicidal ideation and disability. This is why it is necessary to screen for those disorders among adults using primary health care services. Likewise, we suggest considering Poisson regression with robust variance in cross-sectional studies in health services.

  2. Application of Digital Object Identifiers to data sets at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, B.; Ostrenga, D.; Johnson, J. E.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Shen, S.; Teng, W. L.; Wei, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are applied to selected data sets at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). The DOI system provides an Internet resolution service for unique and persistent identifiers of digital objects. Products assigned DOIs include data from the NASA MEaSUREs Program, the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and EOS Aura High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). DOIs are acquired and registered through EZID, California Digital Library and DataCite. GES DISC hosts a data set landing page associated with each DOI containing information on and access to the data including a recommended data citation when using the product in research or applications. This work includes participation with the earth science community (e.g., Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Federation) and the NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project to identify, establish and implement best practices for assigning DOIs and managing supporting information, including metadata, for earth science data sets. Future work includes (1) coordination with NASA mission Science Teams and other data providers on the assignment of DOIs for other GES DISC data holdings, particularly for future missions such as Orbiting Carbon Observatory -2 and -3 (OCO-2, OCO-3) and projects (MEaSUREs 2012), (2) construction of landing pages that are both human and machine readable, and (3) pursuing the linking of data and publications with tools such as the Thomson Reuters Data Citation Index.

  3. Guidebook of the Western United States: Part E - The Denver & Rio Grande Western Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Marius R.

    1922-01-01

    The United States of America comprise an area so vast in extent and so diverse in natural features as well as in characters due to human agency that the American citizen who knows thoroughly his own country must have traveled widely and observed wisely. To 'know America first' is a patriotic obligation, but to meet this obligation the railroad traveler needs to have his eyes directed toward the more important or essential things within his field of vision and then to have much that he sees explained by what is unseen in the swift passage of the train. Indeed, many things that attract his attention are inexplicable except as the story of the past is available to enable him to interpret the present. Herein lie the value and the charm of history, whether human or geologic. The present stimulus given to travel in the home country will encourage many thousands of Americans to study geography at first hand. To make this study most profitable the traveler needs a handbook that will answer the questions that come to his mind so readily along the way. Furthermore, the aim of such a guide should be to stimulate the eye in the selection of the essentials in the scene that so rapidly unfolds itself in the crossing of the continent. In recognition of the opportunity to render service of this kind to an unusually large number of American citizens, as well as to visitors from other countries, the United States Geological Survey has published a series of guidebooks covering four of the older railroad routes west of the Mississippi. The present volume is an addition to this series and covers one of the finest scenic routes of the continent. These books are educational in purpose, but the method adopted is to entertain the traveler by making more interesting what he sees from the car window. The plan of the series is to present authoritative information that may enable the reader to realize adequately the scenic and material resources of the region he is traversing, to comprehend

  4. WASCAL - West African Science Service Center on Climate Change and Adapted Land Use Regional Climate Simulations and Land-Atmosphere Simulations for West Africa at DKRZ and elsewhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Ilse; Arnault, Joel; Bliefernicht, Jan; Klein, Cornelia; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Kunstmann, Harald

    2014-05-01

    Changing climate and hydro-meteorological boundary conditions are among the most severe challenges to Africa in the 21st century. In particular West Africa faces an urgent need to develop effective adaptation and mitigation strategies to cope with negative impacts on humans and environment due to climate change, increased hydro-meteorological variability and land use changes. To help meet these challenges, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) started an initiative with institutions in Germany and West African countries to establish together a West African Science Service Center on Climate Change and Adapted Land Use (WASCAL). This activity is accompanied by an establishment of trans-boundary observation networks, an interdisciplinary core research program and graduate research programs on climate change and related issues for strengthening the analytical capabilities of the Science Service Center. A key research activity of the WASCAL Competence Center is the provision of regional climate simulations in a fine spatio-temporal resolution for the core research sites of WASCAL for the present and the near future. The climate information is needed for subsequent local climate impact studies in agriculture, water resources and further socio-economic sectors. The simulation experiments are performed using regional climate models such as COSMO-CLM, RegCM and WRF and statistical techniques for a further refinement of the projections. The core research sites of WASCAL are located in the Sudanian Savannah belt in Northern Ghana, Southern Burkina Faso and Northern Benin. The climate in this region is semi-arid with six rainy months. Due to the strong population growth in West Africa, many areas of the Sudanian Savannah have been already converted to farmland since the majority of the people are living directly or indirectly from the income produced in agriculture. The simulation experiments of the Competence Center and the Core Research Program are

  5. Central Laboratories Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TVA Central Laboratories Services is a comprehensive technical support center, offering you a complete range of scientific, engineering, and technical services....

  6. Agreement between the Denver II and Parents’ Evaluation of Developmental Status tests, with and without the assistance of a table of categorical responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Priambodo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Among standardized developmental screening tools, the Denver II is commonly used by Indonesian pediatricians, but the Parent’s Evaluation of Developmental Status (PEDS test has gained in popularity. The Denver II test is filled by physicians, while the PEDS test is meant to be filled by parents. From a practical standpoint, however, parents often require assistance from doctors when filling out the PEDS forms. Hence, the advantage of the PEDS test over the Denver II test is not fully realized. Objective To compare the agreement between Denver II and PEDS tests, with and without parental use of a table of categorical responses taken from the PEDS manual. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in children aged 6 months to 5 years in Bandung from November 2015 to March 2016. Subjects were divided into two groups using block randomization. One group of subjects’ parents filled the PEDS questionnaires with the assistance of a table of categorical responses taken from the PEDS manual, while the other group of subjects’ parents filled PEDS forms without this table. All subjects underwent Denver II screening by pediatricans. The agreement between the PEDS and Denver II results were assessed by Kappa score. Results Of 254 children, 239 were analyzed. Kappa scores between the Denver II and PEDS tests were 0.05 (95%CI: -0.10 to 0.20 without the table of categorical responses, and -0.06 (-0.23 to 0.10 with the table of categorical responses. Conclusion Agreement between the Denver II and PEDS tests is poor. The table of categorical responses does not increase the agreement between Denver II and PEDS.

  7. Patient and trauma center characteristics associated with helicopter emergency medical services transport for patients with minor injuries in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Brian H; Delgado, M Kit; Staudenmayer, Kristan L

    2014-11-01

    Helicopter emergency medical services (EMS) transport is expensive, and previous work has shown that cost-effective use of this resource is dependent on the proportion of minor injuries flown. To understand how overtriage to helicopter EMS versus ground EMS can be reduced, it is important to understand factors associated with helicopter transport of patients with minor injuries. The aim was to characterize patient and hospital characteristics associated with helicopter transport of patients with minor injuries. This was a retrospective analysis of adults ≥18 years who were transported by helicopter to Level I/II trauma centers from 2009 through 2010 as identified in the National Trauma Data Bank. Minor injuries were defined as all injuries scored at an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of trauma (OR = 2.52, 95% CI = 2.12 to 3.00). Being flown with minor injuries was more likely if the patient was transported to a trauma center that also received a high proportion of patients with minor injuries by ground EMS (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.58 to 2.26) or a high proportion of EMS traffic by helicopter (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.78). No significant association with urban-rural scene location or EMS transport time was found. Better recognizing which patients with falls and penetrating trauma have serious injuries that could benefit from being flown may lead to the more cost-effective use of helicopter EMS. More research is needed to determine why patients without insurance, who are most at risk for high out-of-pocket expenses from helicopter EMS, are at higher risk for being flown when only having minor injuries. This suggests that interventions to optimize cost-effectiveness of helicopter transport will likely require an evaluation of helicopter triage guidelines in the context of regional and patient needs. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  8. Health Services OutPatient Experience questionnaire: factorial validity and reliability of a patient-centered outcome measure for outpatient settings in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coluccia A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Anna Coluccia, Fabio Ferretti, Andrea PozzaDepartment of Medical Sciences, Surgery and Neurosciences, Santa Maria alle Scotte University Hospital, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyPurpose: The patient-centered approach to health care does not seem to be sufficiently developed in the Italian context, and is still characterized by the biomedical model. In addition, there is a lack of validated outcome measures to assess outpatient experience as an aspect common to a variety of settings. The current study aimed to evaluate the factorial validity, reliability, and invariance across sex of the Health Services OutPatient Experience (HSOPE questionnaire, a short ten-item measure of patient-centeredness for Italian adult outpatients. The rationale for unidimensionality of the measure was that it could cover global patient experience as a process common to patients with a variety of diseases and irrespective of the phase of treatment course.Patients and methods: The HSOPE was compiled by 1,532 adult outpatients (51% females, mean age 59.22 years, standard deviation 16.26 receiving care in ten facilities at the Santa Maria alle Scotte University Hospital of Siena, Italy. The sample represented all the age cohorts. Twelve percent were young adults, 57% were adults, and 32% were older adults. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to evaluate factor structure. Reliability was evaluated as internal consistency using Cronbach’s α. Factor invariance was assessed through multigroup analyses.Results: Both exploratory and confirmatory analyses suggested a clearly defined unidimensional structure of the measure, with all the ten items having salient loadings on a single factor. Internal consistency was excellent (α=0.95. Indices of model fit supported a single-factor structure for both male and female outpatient groups. Young adult outpatients had significantly lower scores on perceived patient-centeredness relative to older adults. No

  9. Avaliação de habilidades de linguagem e pessoal-sociais pelo Teste de Denver II em instituições de educação infantil Evaluacion de habilidades de lenguaje y personal-sociales por el Test de Denver II em instituiciones de educacion infantil Evaluation of language and personal social abilities by the Denver Test II in institutions of infantile education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magda Andrade Rezende; Vivian César Beteli; Jair Lício Ferreira dos Santos

    2005-01-01

    ... avaliação do desenvolvimento foi usado o Teste de Triagem de Desenvolvimento de Denver II, empregado em dois momentos distintos no primeiro ano de acompanhamento da coorte, e uma vez no segundo ano. RESULTADOS: Na...

  10. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... site currently does not fully support browsers with “JavaScript” disabled. Please enable “JavaScript” and revisit this page or proceed with browsing CMS.gov with “JavaScript” disabled. Instructions for enabling “JavaScript” can be found ...

  11. One-stop Remote Service Center of Renewable Power%可再生能源发电的一站式远程服务中心

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    北京ABB贝利工程有限公司

    2015-01-01

    监控和管理可再生能源发电,提高产能并降低运维成本,对于投资者和业主而言愈来愈重要,尤其是地理分散的太阳能、风电、生物质等可再生能源。ABB推出的可再生能源发电一站式远程服务中心解决方案,不仅仅是先进技术的结晶,而且将对运行、维护商业模式产生重大推动作用。%It is increasingly important for investors and owners to monitor, control and manage the renewable power, especially the solar, wind, biomass energy and etc. which are geographically widely spread. The solution of one-stop remote service center of renewable power proposed by ABB is not only the result of advancedtechnology, but also an impulse to the business model of operation and maintenance.

  12. Examples of applied public health through the work of the Epidemic Intelligence Service officers at CDC's National Center for Environmental Health: 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Yulia I; Rashid, Fauzia A; Falk, Henry; Howley, Meredith M

    2017-01-01

    The Epidemic Intelligence Service officers (EISOs) at the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH)/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) respond to public health outbreaks, assist public health surveillance, and recommend public health actions. We summarize the breadth of work done by EISOs assigned to NCEH/ATSDR during 2006-2015. We used the Web of Science, Scopus, and PubMed databases to identify articles authored by the EISOs, number and types of epidemiologic assistance field investigations (Epi-Aids), and interviewed NCEH/ATSDR programs with EISO assignees. The largest number of NCEH/ATSDR EISO publications (n = 61) and Epi-Aids (n = 110) related to toxic chemicals (23 and 37, respectively), followed by natural disasters and those caused by humans (19 and 25, respectively), extreme temperature-related illness (9), and chronic diseases (8). The investigations raised awareness, identified risk factors and public health needs, and introduced better prevention and protection measures for human health. Through field investigations and other technical assistance, NCEH/ATSDR provided leadership and staff scientists to assist in the field, as well as knowledge transfer to local, state, territorial, and international health departments.

  13. Records of wells, test borings, and some measured geologic sections near the Western New York Nuclear Service Center, Cattaraugus County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC) is a 3 ,336-acre tract of land in northern Cattaraugus County, NY, about 30 mi south of Buffalo. In 1963, 247 acres within the WNYNSC was developed for a nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant and ancillary facilities, including (1) a receiving and storage facility to store fuel prior to reprocessing, (2) underground storage tanks for liquid high-level radioactive wastes from fuel reprocessing, (3) a low-level wastewater treatment plant, and (4) two burial grounds for shallow burial of solid radioactive waste. A series of geologic and hydrologic investigations was done as part of the initial development and construction of the facilities by numerous agencies during 1960-62; these produced a large quantity of well data, some of which are difficult to locate or obtain. This report is a compilation of well and boring data collected during this period. The data include records of 236 wells, geologic logs of 145 wells and 167 test borings, and descriptions of 20 measured geologic sections. Two oversized maps show locations of the reported data. (USGS)

  14. Data from core analyses, aquifer testing, and geophysical logging of Denver Basin bedrock aquifers at Castle Pines, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, S.G.; Banta, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains data pertaining to the geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the bedrock aquifers of the Denver basin at a site near Castle Pines, Colorado. Data consist of a lithologic- description of about 2,400 ft of drill core and laboratory determinations of mineralogy, grain size, bulk and grain density, porosity, specific yield, and specific retention for selected core samples. Water-level data, atmospheric-pressure measurements, aquifer-compression measurements, and borehole geophysical logs also are included.

  15. Reducing Maladaptive Behaviors in Preschool-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Using the Early Start Denver Model

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, Elizabeth,; Eapen, Valsamma; Črnčec, Rudi; Walter, Amelia; Rogers, Sally

    2014-01-01

    The presence of maladaptive behaviors in young people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can significantly limit engagement in treatment programs, as well as compromise future educational and vocational opportunities. This study aimed to explore whether the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) treatment approach reduced maladaptive behaviors in preschool-aged children with ASD in a community-based long day care setting. The level of maladaptive behavior of 38 children with ASD was rated using an ...

  16. Reducing maladaptive behaviors in preschool-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder using the Early Start Denver Model

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth eFulton; Valsamma eEapen; Rudi eČrnčec; Amelia eWalter; Sally eRogers

    2014-01-01

    The presence of maladaptive behaviors in young people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) can significantly limit engagement in treatment programs, as well as compromise future educational and vocational opportunities. This study aimed to explore whether the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) treatment approach reduced maladaptive behaviors in preschool-aged children with ASD in a community-based long day care setting. The level of maladaptive behavior of 38 children with ASD was rated using an ...

  17. Which score should be used for posttraumatic multiple organ failure? - Comparison of the MODS, Denver- and SOFA- Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Matthias; Wafaisade, Arasch; Mansuri, Anastasios; Koenen, Paola; Probst, Christian; Maegele, Marc; Bouillon, Bertil; Sakka, Samir G

    2016-11-03

    Multiple organ dysfunction and multiple organ failure (MOF) is still a major complication and challenge in the treatment of severely injured patients. The incidence varies decisively in current studies, which complicates the comparability regarding risk factors, treatment recommendations and patients' outcome. Therefore, we analysed how the currently used scoring systems, the MODS, Denver- and SOFA Score, influence the definition and compared the scores' predictive ability. Out of datasets of severely injured patients (ISS ≥ 16, Age ≥ 16) staying more tha 48 h on the ICU, the scores were calculated, respectively. The scores' predictive ability on day three after trauma for resource requiring measurements and patient specific outcomes were compared using receiver-operating characteristics. One hundred seventy-six patients with a mean ISS 28 ± 13 could be included. MODS and SOFA score defined the incidence of MOF consistently (46.5 % vs. 52.3 %), while the Denver score defined MOF in 22.2 %. The MODS outperformed Denver- and SOFA score in predicting mortality (area under the curve/AUC: 0.83 vs. 0.67 vs. 0.72), but was inferior predicting the length of stay (AUC 0.71 vs.0.80 vs.0.82) and a prolonged time on mechanical ventilation (AUC 0.75 vs. 0.81 vs. 0.84). MODS and SOFA score were comparably sensitive and the Denver score more specific in all analyses. All three scores have a comparable ability to predict the outcome in trauma patients including patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Either score could be favored depending weather a higher sensitivity or specificity is targeted. The SOFA score showed the most balanced relation of sensitivity and specificity. The incidence of posttraumatic MOF relies decisively on the score applied. Therefore harmonizing the competing scores and definitions is desirable.

  18. [Assessment of risk to neuro-psychomotor development: screening using the Test Denver II and identification of maternal risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Hilton Luiz; de Melo, Aurea Nogueira

    2005-01-01

    To identify a positive screening test for developmental delay in children by the Denver Test II and their risk factors. A sample of 398 children was studied at 0 the 12 months of age regarding their neurodevelopment. The Denver II Test was used. The children who failed in two or more items of the test were suspected of having neurodevelopment delay. A set of independent variables was: socioeconomic, reproductive and environmental, birth conditions children's care. Analyses were performed using chi-square test and multivariate techinique logistic regression. At of 0 - 12 months of age, 45,73% (182) of the total of 398 children failed in the screening test. After adjusting for possible confounding variables, failure was associated with family lower income children, gestacional age less than 38 weeks, socioeconomic status family, schooling of the mother, mother's age, use of drug. This study demonstrates: 1--The Denver Test permited screening the delays development; 2--Maternal risk factors may interfere in the child's neurodevelopmental.

  19. On-road measurements of vehicle NO2/NOx emission ratios in Denver, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Robert J.; Dubé, William P.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Eilerman, Scott J.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Brown, Steven S.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) emitted by on-road combustion engines are important contributors to tropospheric ozone production. The NOx fraction emitted as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is usually presumed to be small but can affect ozone production and distribution, and this fraction is generally not reported in emissions inventories. We have developed an accurate method for determination of this primary NO2 emission and demonstrated it during measurement of on-road vehicle emission plumes from a mobile laboratory during July and August 2014 in the region between Denver and Greeley in Colorado. During a total of approximately 90 h of sampling from an instrumented mobile laboratory, we identified 1867 vehicle emission plumes, which were extracted using an algorithm that looks for rapid and large increases in measured NOx. We find a distribution of NO2/NOx emissions similar to a log-normal profile, with an average emission ratio of 0.053 ± 0.002 per sampled NOx plume. The average is not weighted by the total NOx emissions from sampled vehicles, which is not measured here, and so may not represent the NO2/NOx ratio of the total NOx emission if this ratio is a function of NOx itself. Although our current data set does not distinguish between different engine types (e.g., gasoline, light duty diesel and heavy duty diesel), the ratio is on the low end of recent reports of vehicle fleet NO2 to NOx emission ratios in Europe.

  20. A comparison of the korean-ages and stages questionnaires and denver developmental delay screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ga, Hyo-Yun; Kwon, Jeong Yi

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate concurrent validity between the Korean-Ages and Stages Questionnaires (K-ASQ) and the Denver Developmental Screening Test II (DDST II), and to evaluate the validity of the K-ASQ as a screening tool for detecting developmental delay of Korean children. A retrospective chart review was done to examine concurrent validity of the screening potentials for developmental delay between the K-ASQ and the DDST II (n=226). We examined validity of the K-ASQ compared with Capute scale (n=141) and Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) (n=69) as a gold standard of developmental delay. Correlation analysis was used to determine the strength of the associations between tests. A fair to good strength relationship (k=0.442, ptest characteristics of the K-ASQ were sensitivity 76.3-90.2%, specificity 62.5-76.5%, positive likelihood ratio (PLR) 2.41-3.40, and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) 0.16-0.32. Evidence of concurrent validity of the K-ASQ with DDST II was found. K-ASQ can be used for screening of developmental delay.

  1. Barriers and facilitators to providing primary care-based weight management services in a patient centered medical home for Veterans: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Melanie; Chintapalli, Sumana; Squires, Allison; Mateo, Katrina F; Sherman, Scott E; Kalet, Adina L

    2015-11-14

    Obesity is highly prevalent among Veterans. In the United States, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) offers a comprehensive weight management program called MOVE!. Yet, fewer than 10 % of eligible patients ever attend one MOVE! visit. The VHA has a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model of primary care (PC) called Patient-Aligned Care Teams (PACT) at all Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers. PACT teamlets conduct obesity screening, weight management counseling, and refer to MOVE!. As part of a needs assessment to improve delivery of weight management services, the purpose of this study was to assess PACT teamlet and MOVE! staff: 1) current attitudes and perceptions regarding obesity care; 2) obesity-related counseling practices 3) experiences with the MOVE! program; and 4) targets for interventions to improve implementation of obesity care in the PC setting. We recruited 25 PACT teamlet members from a single VA study site-11 PC physicians, 5 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 1 clerical assistant, and 3 MOVE! staff (2 dietitians, 1 psychologist)-for individual interviews using a combination of convenience and snowball sampling. Audio recorded interviews were professionally transcribed and iteratively coded by two independent reviewers. The analytic process was guided by discourse analysis in order to discover how the participants perceived and provided weight management care and what specific attitudes affected their practices, all as bounded within the organization. Emerging themes included: 1) role perceptions, 2) anticipated outcomes of weight management counseling and programs, and 3) communication and information dissemination. Perceived role among PCPs was influenced by training, whereas personal experience with their own weight management impacted role perception among LPNs/RNs. Attitudes about whether or not they could impact patients' weight outcomes via counseling or referral to MOVE! varied. System-level communication about VHA

  2. Evaluation of Routine HIV Opt-Out Screening and Continuum of Care Services Following Entry into Eight Prison Reception Centers--California, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Kimberley D; Eckert, Valorie; Behrends, Czarina N; Wheeler, Charlotte; MacGowan, Robin J; Mohle-Boetani, Janet C

    2016-02-26

    Early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) improves health outcomes and prevents HIV transmission. Before 2010, HIV testing was available to inmates in the California state prison system upon request. In 2010, the California Correctional Health Care Services (CCHCS) integrated HIV opt-out screening into the health assessment for inmates entering California state prisons. Under this system, a medical care provider informs the inmate that an HIV test is routinely done, along with screening for sexually transmitted, communicable, and vaccine-preventable diseases, unless the inmate specifically declines the test. During 2012-2013, CCHCS, the California Department of Public Health, and CDC evaluated HIV screening, rates of new diagnoses, linkage to and retention in care, ART response, and post-release linkage to care among California prison inmates. All prison inmates are processed through one of eight specialized reception center facilities, where they undergo a comprehensive evaluation of their medical needs, mental health, and custody requirements for placement in one of 35 state prisons. Among 17,436 inmates who entered a reception center during April-September 2012, 77% were screened for HIV infection; 135 (1%) tested positive, including 10 (0.1%) with newly diagnosed infections. Among the 135 HIV-positive patient-inmates, 134 (99%) were linked to care within 90 days of diagnosis, including 122 (91%) who initiated ART. Among 83 who initiated ART and remained incarcerated through July 2013, 81 (98%) continued ART; 71 (88%) achieved viral suppression (HIV RNA copies/mL). Thirty-nine patient-inmates were released on ART; 12 of 14 who were linked to care within 30 days of release were virally suppressed at that time. Only one of nine persons with a viral load test conducted between 91 days and 1 year post-release had viral suppression. Although high rates of viral suppression were achieved in prison

  3. Constraints to connecting children with nature--Survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees sponsored by the National Conservation Training Center, Division of Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Schuster, Rudy M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) names "connecting people with nature" as one of its top six priorities in the online Service Employee Pocket Guide. The National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) took the initiative to identify issues that impede greater progress in addressing constraints to connecting children with nature. The Division of Education Outreach at NCTC formed a working relation with the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance branch of the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a study on these issues. To meet the objectives of the study, a survey of a sample of FWS employees was conducted. This report includes the description of how the survey was developed and administered, how the data were analyzed, and a discussion of the survey results. The survey was developed based on published literature and incorporated input from two working groups of professionals focused on the issue of connecting children with nature. Although the objective as stated by the FWS is to connect people with nature, the survey primarily focused on connecting children, rather than all people, with nature. The four primary concepts included on the survey were interpretation of how the FWS defined "connection" as part of its mission, perceived success with outreach, constraints to connecting children with nature, and importance of connecting children with nature. The survey was conducted online using KeySurvey© software. The survey was sent to 604 FWS employees. Responses were received from 320 employees. The respondents represented diversity in regions, tenure, wage/grade level, job series, supervisory status, and involvement with education and outreach activities. The key findings of the survey are as follows: * FWS employees believe they as individuals and the agency are successful now and will be more successful in the future in connecting children with nature. * FWS employees believe that there are many outcomes that are relevant to the FWS objective to connect people

  4. Assessment of nutritional activities under integrated child development services at anganwadi centers of different districts of Gujarat from April 2012 to March 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh K Chudasama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Integrated Child Development Service (ICDS program aims at enhancing survival and development of children from the vulnerable sections of the society. Aim: The present study was conducted to assess various nutritional activities at anganwadi centers (AWCs in different districts of Gujarat state. Settings and Design: AWCs, cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: A total of 130 AWCs were selected including 95 from rural and 35 from urban area from April 2012 to March 2015 including 12 districts of Gujarat and union territory, Diu. Five AWCs were selected from one district randomly. Detailed information about various nutritional activities including growth monitoring, preschool education (PSE and nutrition and health education (NHED, coverage for supplementary nutrition (SN, type of food provided under SN, and its issues at AWCs was collected. Statistical Analysis: Percentages, proportions, Chi-square/Fischer's exact test. Results: Growth chart was available in 96.9% AWCs. The malnutrition was reported among 14.9% children. PSE received by all children was only in 14.6% AWCs. NHED meeting was conducted in 73.8% AWCs. High coverage of receiving SN among enrolled was reported in pregnant and lactating mothers (84.6% and adolescents (79.2%. SN was fully acceptable in 91.5% AWCs. Interruption in SN supply during last 6 months was reported in 55.4% AWCs. Conclusion: Regular workshops should be conducted for ICDS staff to sensitize them about the importance of and practices on PSE. Interruption in supply of SN should be corrected by regular and adequate provision of SN foods to the beneficiaries.

  5. The Application of Cloud Accounting in Financial Shared Service Centers%云会计在财务共享服务中心的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘东; 朱昕昀

    2015-01-01

    建立财务共享服务中心,需要以网络为基础进行数据信息的传递与共享.云会计作为云计算与会计的混搭组合,为财务共享服务中心信息化建设提供了整合的平台.FSSC的管理模式在经历了三十多年的发展后已经成为当前国内外大型企业提高效率和降低成本的有效手段.FSSC更专注于标准化业务流程,充分发挥集团总部控制管理职能,云会计提供了应用实施FSSC的平台,相信在未来云会计在FSSC在我国企业中将得到更加广泛、深入的运用.%To build a financial shared service center (FSSC), it requires digital information transmission and share based on internet. As a combination between cloud computing and accounting, cloud accounting provides a platform for building digital FSSC. Through the devel-opment over thirty years, the management pattern of FSSC has become an effective measure for increasing efficiency and decreasing costs for large enterprises at home and abroad. It focuses on standard procedure, give full play to the control function of group headquarters. Since cloud accounting offers an application platform for FSSC, it will fuel the extensive and intensive implementation of FSSC in Chinese enterprises.

  6. Communicating Science: The Role of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Field-Based Epidemic Intelligence Service Officers, 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Fátima; Chen, Guan M; Smith, C Kay; Glynn, M Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    A highly skilled public health workforce is needed for responding to health threats, and that workforce must be able to communicate its scientific findings effectively. We evaluated the scientific communication effectiveness of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) field-based Epidemic Intelligence Service officers (EISOs). A descriptive analysis of all scientific information products produced and submitted for institutional clearance by CDC's field-based EISOs during 2009-2014. The number of abstracts, journal manuscripts, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWRs), and other information products approved by CDC during 2009-2014; the number of those products published; and of those published, the number cited in the scientific literature. During 2009-2014, a total of 152 field-based EISOs produced 835 scientific information products, including 437 abstracts, 261 manuscripts, and 103 MMWRs. The majority of scientific information products submitted for clearance were abstracts (52.3%), and infectious diseases (75.3%) constituted the majority of topics. Among the 103 MMWRs and 261 manuscripts cleared, 88 (85%) and 199 (76%) were published, respectively, with the majority also infectious disease-related. The 199 published manuscripts were cited in the scientific literature 2415 times, and the 88 published MMWRs were cited 1249 times. Field-based EISOs published their work in 74 different peer-reviewed medical and public health journals, with 54% published in journals with impact factors of 1 to 5. Field-based EISOs' publications are a measurable marker that reflects proficiency in epidemiology, written communication, and professionalism, and those publications are a direct reflection of EISOs' contribution to local and state health departments. Our study establishes a baseline for future evaluations of publication outcome of scientific information products by EISOs. Information released by EISOs provides health professionals with the scientific

  7. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  8. Global Hydrology Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GHRC is the data management and user services arm of the Global Hydrology and Climate Center. It encompasses the data and information management, supporting...

  9. Hazardous Waste Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A full-service research and evaluation center equipped with safety equipment, a high-bay pilot studies area, and a large-scale pilot studies facility The U.S. Army...

  10. Health Center Controlled Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health Center Controlled Network (HCCN) tool is a locator tool designed to make data and information concerning HCCN resources more easily available to our...

  11. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014-2020 VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Claims Representation RESOURCES Careers at VA Employment Center Returning Service Members Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment Homeless Veterans Women Veterans Minority Veterans Plain Language Surviving Spouses & Dependents ...

  12. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9743 Accredited since January 2016 98 Bright Eyes Midwifery and Wild Rivers Women's Health Accredited 29135 Ellensburg ... Accredited since November 2015 96 Footprints in Time Midwifery Services and Birth Center Accredited 351 N. Water ...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans Seniors & Aging ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans ...

  15. A call center primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies.

  16. 综合性体育中心服务质量差距模型构建及其运用方法研究——以湖北省奥林匹克体育中心为例%Comprehensive Sports Center Service Quality Gap Model and Corresponding Application Methods——A Case Study of Hubei Olympic Sports Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江岚; 郭旭泓

    2012-01-01

    综合性体育中心指以体育训练比赛场馆为主,同时提供餐饮、住宿、休闲娱乐等服务为辅的大型体育场所,以经营规模大、服务项目多元、经营模型单一、内部结构复杂等特征。本文通过研究综合性体育中心的服务质量衡量标准,构建综合性体育中心五差距服务质量模型,确定其SERVQUAL量表,以期建立服务质量测量的量化模型,为提高综合性体育中心的服务质量提供参考与借鉴。%A comprehensive sports center bases on sports training and competition venues,provides the catering,accommodation,entertainment and other services,and large-scale operation,multi-services business model comprise its single and complex internal structure characteristics.It measures quality service standards of a comprehensive sports center,builds a quality service model according to five gaps of the comprehensive sports center,and determines the SERVQUAL scale to establish a quantitative model of service quality measurement and provide a reference to improve the quality of service of a comprehensive sports center.

  17. High-Resolution Magnetostratigraphic Analysis of the Denver Basin Kiowa Core; Testing Paleocene Astrochronologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. M.; Clyde, W. C.; Bowring, S. A.; Ramezani, J.; Johnson, K. R.

    2009-05-01

    Marine records of orbitally driven climate cycles have been used to create an astronomically calibrated timescale for the Neogene Period (0-23 Ma). Recent studies have attempted to extend this approach to the Paleogene Period (23-65 Ma), despite various uncertainties related to astronomical solutions this far back, climate sensitivity in a greenhouse world, and stratigraphic completeness. We seek to test published Paleocene astrochronologies by comparing the durations of magnetic polarity chrons as determined by cyclostratigraphy to their durations as determined by U/Pb geochronology. To complete this test, the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene Kiowa Core of the Denver Basin was analyzed. This core was chosen as it is from a terrestrial basin with high sediment accumulation rates, contains abundant layers of volcanic ash, and records a reliable magnetostratigraphy. Twenty-three paleomagnetic samples were collected from the core to improve the stratigraphic resolution of magnetic reversals that were coarsely constrained by earlier research. Once the depths of the geomagnetic reversals were precisely determined, ash layers that best constrained these reversals were selected for U/Pb geochronology. Durations of periods of normal and reverse magnetization were estimated based on these radiometrically dated ashes. Initial results indicate that the interval between the Chron C28n/C28r reversal and the K/T Boundary is ca 1.27 million years in duration. This is within error of previously published astrochronologically determined durations for the same time interval. Although additional independent comparisons are needed for a more complete test, our initial results indicate a remarkable consistency between these different geochronometers.

  18. City and County of Denver: Technical comparison between hythane, CNG and gasoline fueled vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The City and County of Denver, in cooperation with the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force of Public Technology, Inc. has completed a unique two-year research and development project designed to test and compare the technical merits of three transportation fuels. Comparisons of the tailpipe emissions from Hythane - a new, blended, alternative motor fuel comprised of 85% compressed natural gas (CNG) and 15% hydrogen measured by volume - to the emissions from gasoline and 100% CNG were conducted. This project has been one of the first pioneering studies of a hydrogen blended fuel and, through its success, has prompted eight additional Hythane research projects to date. Phase I of the project provided results from the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) testing of a light duty pick-up truck operating on Hythane. The purpose of this testing was to quantify any decrease in tailpipe emissions and to determine whether Hythane could meet the California Ultra Low Emission Vehicle standard (ULEV) for light duty trucks. During Phase I, FTP analyses were conducted in both Colorado (high altitude testing) and California (sea level testing) on a converted Chevrolet S-10, pick-up truck by Hydrogen Consultants (HCl), the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) and the California Air Resource Board (CARB). Currently, the only other non-electric vehicle which is capable of meeting the ULEV standard is Chrysler`s natural gas vehicle. There was additional interest in the role Hythane could play as a transitional fuel in the introduction of hydrogen. Hydrogen, a renewable energy carrier, may soon be categorized as a ZEV fuel by the South Coast Air Quality Management District. This factor may encourage the use of Hythane as a transportation fuel that not only meets the ULEV standard, but may provide the bridge necessary to the eventual widespread use of hydrogen.

  19. The Denver universal microspectroradiometer (DUM). II. Computer configuration and modular programming for radiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, W; Geyer, S B; David, G B

    1975-12-01

    This paper describes and discusses for microscopists and spectroscopists the choice of computer equipment and the design of programs used in the Denver Universal Microspectroradiometer (DUM). This instrument is an accurate computerized photon-counting microspectrophotometer, microspectrofluorimeter and microrefractometer. The computer is used to control the operation of the system, to acquire radiometric data of various kinds, and to reduce, analyse and output the data in a readily usable form. Since the radiometer was designed to carry out many kinds of measurements in a variety of micro- and macroscopic specimens, and since different methods of microscopy or spectroscopy have to be combined in various ways fro the study of any one specimen, no single master-program could fulfill efficiently all foreseeable requirements. Therefore, the programming developed is interactive, modular, hierarchical and hybrid. Modular interactive programming makes it possible for almost any kind of main program, applicable to almost any kind of measurement, to be assembled quickly from a collection of hierarchical subroutines. Main programs are short and composed mainly of Fortran statements calling subroutines; subroutines, in turn, automatically call other subroutines over many levels. The subroutines are independently written and optimized for maximum operational efficiency in the computer system used, or for maximum ease of transfer to other systems. This approach to programming enables someone unfamiliar with computer languages to operate the radiometric system from the console of the CRT terminal. The writing of new main programs, by linking groups of existing subroutines, requires only a minimum acquaintance with Fortran; only the writing and revision of subroutines requires programming experience. Differences and similarities in the method of computer operation between the present system and other computerized radiometers are briefly discussed.

  20. Classification of Security Operation Centers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, P

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Security Operation Centers (SOCs) are a necessary service for organisations that want to address compliance and threat management. While there are frameworks in existence that addresses the technology aspects of these services, a holistic framework...