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Sample records for denture plaque biofilms

  1. Influence of denture plaque biofilm on oral mucosal membrane in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowska, D; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Rolski, D; Swoboda-Kopeć, E

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have the lower airways colonized with pathogenic bacteria in a stable period of the disease and during exacerbations. The etiology of bacterial exacerbations of COPD depends on the underlying disease, the frequency of exacerbations and antibiotic therapy. Microorganisms can be aspirated off the denture plaque biofilm into the lower respiratory tract and could reduce the patient's immunity and cause pneumonia. COPD patients, who are using acrylic dentures in oral cavity, are exposed to denture stomatitis and oral candidiasis. The aim of this study was to establish the composition of denture plaque biofilm and its impact on the oral mucosa in COPD patients. The study included patients in a stable phase of COPD using removable denture and the control group included healthy wearer's appliances. Examinations concerned the oral mucosal membrane and the hygienic condition of prosthetic restorations. Microbiological examinations were performed by taking a direct swab from the surface of acrylic dentures. Seventeen bacterial and fungal strains were isolated from denture plaque of COPD patients, which could be a reservoir of pathogens in the upper and lower airways. The results showed a greater frequency of prosthetic stomatitis complicated by mucosal infections among COPD patients compared to healthy subjects.

  2. Inhibition of denture plaque deposition on complete dentures by 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer coating: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Kenji; Iwasa, Fuminori; Inoue, Yuuki; Fukunishi, Miya; Takahashi, Nana; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2017-05-12

    Denture plaque-associated infections are regarded as a source of serious dental and medical complications in the elderly population. Methods of managing this problem are needed. The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer, PMBPAz, on plaque deposition in complete dentures. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Showa University (#2013-013). Eleven individuals with maxillary complete dentures participated in this study. Their dentures were treated with PMBPAz, and the amount of denture plaque accumulation was evaluated by staining the denture surfaces with methylene blue after 2 weeks of denture usage. The same procedures were repeated to evaluate the original denture surfaces as a control. The image of the stained denture surface was captured using a digital camera, and the percentage of stained area, quantified as a pixel-based density, of the whole denture area (percentage of plaque index) was calculated for the mucosal and polished surfaces. To quantify the biofilm on the dentures, denture plaque biofilm was detached by ultrasonic vibration, resuspended in diluent, and measured with a microplate reader at an optical density of 620 nm. The effects of PMBPAz treatment on these variables were statistically analyzed with ANOVA (α=.05). The mean ±SD percentage of plaque index was 40.7% ±19.9% on the mucosal surfaces and 28.0% ±16.8% on the polished surfaces of the control denture. The mean percentage of plaque index of PMBPAz-treated dentures significantly decreased to 17.4%% ±12.0% on the mucosal surfaces (Pcomplete dentures. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral biofilm models for mechanical plaque removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, Martinus J.; Busscher, Henk J.; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Slomp, Anje M.; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro plaque removal studies require biofilm models that resemble in vivo dental plaque. Here, we compare contact and non-contact removal of single and dual-species biofilms as well as of biofilms grown from human whole saliva in vitro using different biofilm models. Bacteria were adhered to a sa

  4. 2-Methacryloyloxyethyl Phosphorylcholine Polymer Treatment of Complete Dentures to Inhibit Denture Plaque Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Kenji; Fukunishi, Miya; Iwasa, Fuminori; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2016-12-26

    Removable dentures made of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are prone to bacterial adherence and dental plaque formation, which is called denture plaque. Denture plaque-associated infection is a source of serious dental and medical complications in the elderly. 2-Methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) is a well-known biomedical material that exhibits marked antithrombogenicity and tissue compatibility because of its high resistance to protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Therefore, MPC polymer coatings are suggested to have the potential to inhibit plaque deposition on the surface of PMMA dentures. However, coating MPC polymer on the surface of a PMMA denture is a complex procedure that requires specialized equipment, which is regarded as a major barrier to its clinical application. Here, we introduce a new MPC polymer treatment procedure that uses poly (MPC-co-BMA-co-MPAz) (PMBPAz) to prevent denture plaque deposition on removable dentures. This procedure enables the MPC coating of PMMA denture surfaces in a simple and stable manner that is resistant to various chemical and mechanical stresses due to the MPC layer of PMBPAz that is covalently bound to the PMMA surface by ultraviolet light irradiation. In addition, the procedure does not require any specialized equipment and can be completed by clinicians within 2 min. We applied this procedure in a clinical setting and demonstrated its clinical utility and efficacy in inhibiting plaque deposition on removable dentures.

  5. Efficacy of three denture brushes on biofilm removal from complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseana Aparecida Gomes Fermandes

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three denture brushes (Bitufo-B; Medic Denture-MD; Colgate-C on biofilm removal from upper and lower dentures using a specific dentifrice (Corega Brite. The correlation between biofilm levels on the internal and external surfaces of the upper and lower dentures was also evaluated. A microbiological assay was performed to assess the growth of colony-formed units (cfu of Candida yeasts on denture surface. Thirty-three patients were enrolled in a 10-week trial divided in two stages: 1 (control - three daily water rinses within 1 week; 2 - three daily brushings within 3 weeks per tested brush. Internal (tissue and external (right buccal flange surfaces of the complete dentures were disclosed (neutral red 1% and photographed. Total denture areas and disclosed biofilm areas were measured using Image Tool 3.00 software for biofilm quantification. Dentures were boxed with #7 wax and culture medium (CHROMagarTM Candida was poured to reproduce the internal surface. Statistical analysis by Friedman's test showed significant difference (p0.01. Analysis by the Correlation test showed higher r values (B=0.78; MD=0.8341, C=0.7362 for the lower dentures comparing the surfaces (internal and external and higher r values (B=0.7861, MD=0.7955, C=0.8298 for the external surface comparing the dentures (upper and lower. The results of the microbiological showed no significant difference (p>0.01 between the brushes with respect to the frequency of the species of yeasts (chi-square test. In conclusion, all denture brushes evaluated in this study were effective in the removal of biofilm. There was better correlation of biofilm levels between the surfaces for the lower dentures, and between the dentures for the external surface. There was no significant difference among the brushes regarding the frequency of yeasts.

  6. A Simplified Technique to Measure Plaque on the Intaglio Surfaces of Complete Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almas, Khalid; Salameh, Ziad; Kutkut, Ahmad; Al Doubali, Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a simplified quantitative denture plaque index that could help dentists to motivate denture patients to maintain optimal oral hygiene. The secondary aim was to assess specific areas of dentures more prone to accumulate plaque and subjects' oral hygiene habits related to their dentures. One hundred subjects who wore maxillary and/or mandibular complete dentures for at least one year were included in the study as a powered sample. Fifteen females and 85 males, age range 45-75 years, were recruited. The study was carried out at King Saud University (KSU), College of Dentistry. A plaque disclosing solution was used to assess the plaque covered areas of denture. A quantitative percentage (10 x 10%) score index was developed by assessing plaque scores from digital images of intaglio surfaces of the dentures. The weighted kappa method was used to assess inter-examiner agreement in the main study. The new denture plaque index was identified as ASKD-DPI (Almas, Salameh, Kutkut, and Doubali-Denture Plaque Index). It ranged from 0 - 100%, and reflected the percentage of the intaglio surfaces of maxillary and mandibular complete dentures that contained plaque. It also classified quantitative percentages: 30 subjects ranged from 0 - 30% (low DPI), 50 subjects ranged from 31 - 70% (moderate DPI), and 20 subjects ranged from 71 - 100% (high DPI) denture plaque score. A simplified denture plaque index (ASKD-DPI) technique was developed and tested in this study. ASKD-DPI may be used for evaluating denture plaque scores, monitoring denture hygiene, and measuring compliance of patients regarding plaque control for complete dentures.

  7. The effectiveness of chemical denture cleansers and ultrasonic device in biofilm removal from complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Patrícia Costa; Andrade, Ingrid Machado de; Peracini, Amanda; Souza-Gugelmin, Maria Cristina Monteiro de; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Adequate denture hygiene can prevent and treat infection in edentulous patients. They are usually elderly and have difficulty for brushing their teeth. This study evaluated the efficacy of complete denture biofilm removal using chemical (alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets), mechanical (ultrasonic) and combined (association of the effervescent and ultrasonic) methods. Eighty complete denture wearers participated in the experiment for 21 days. They were distributed into 4 groups (n=20): (1) Brushing with water (Control); (2) Effervescent tablets (Corega Tabs); (3) Ultrasonic device (Ultrasonic Cleaner, model 2840 D); (4) Association of effervescent tablets and ultrasonic device. All groups brushed their dentures with a specific brush (Bitufo) and water, 3 times a day, before applying their treatments. Denture biofilm was collected at baseline and after 21 days. To quantify the biofilm, the internal surfaces of the maxillary complete dentures were stained and photographed at 45º. The photographs were processed and the areas (total internal surface stained with biofilm) quantified (Image Tool 2.02). The percentage of the biofilm was calculated by the ratio between the biofilm area multiplied by 100 and the total area of the internal surface of the maxillary complete denture. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison among groups followed by the Dunn multiple-comparison test. All tests were performed respecting a significance level of 0.05. Significant difference was found among the treatments (KW=21.18; Pcomplete dentures.

  8. Impact of Denture Cleaning Method and Overnight Storage Condition on Denture Biofilm Mass and Composition: A Cross-Over Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Duyck

    Full Text Available Appropriate oral hygiene is required to maintain oral health in denture wearers. This study aims to compare the role of denture cleaning methods in combination with overnight storage conditions on biofilm mass and composition on acrylic removable dentures.In a cross-over randomized controlled trial in 13 older people, 4 conditions with 2 different mechanical cleaning methods and 2 overnight storage conditions were considered: (i brushing and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, (ii brushing and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet, (iii ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, and (iv ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet. Each test condition was performed for 5 consecutive days, preceded by a 2-days wash-out period. Biofilm samples were taken at baseline (control and at the end of each test period from a standardized region. Total and individual levels of selected oral bacteria (n = 20, and of Candida albicans were identified using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR technique. Denture biofilm coverage was scored using an analogue denture plaque score. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used to compare the test conditions. The level of significance was set at α< 5%.Overnight denture storage in water with a cleansing tablet significantly reduced the total bacterial count (p<0.01. The difference in total bacterial level between the two mechanical cleaning methods was not statistically significant. No significant effect was observed on the amount of Candida albicans nor on the analogue plaque scores.The use of cleansing tablets during overnight denture storage in addition to mechanical denture cleaning did not affect Candida albicans count, but reduced the total bacterial count on acrylic removable dentures compared to overnight storage in water. This effect was more pronounced when combined with ultrasonic cleaning compared to brushing

  9. Controlling fungal biofilms with functional drug delivery denture biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianchuan; Jiang, Fuguang; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Sun, Yuyu

    2016-04-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS), caused by colonization and biofilm-formation of Candida species on denture surfaces, is a significant clinical concern. We show here that modification of conventional denture materials with functional groups can significantly increase drug binding capacity and control drug release rate of the resulting denture materials for potentially managing CADS. In our approach, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based denture resins were surface grafted with three kinds of polymers, poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PNVP), poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), through plasma-initiated grafting polymerization. With a grafting yield as low as 2 wt%, the three classes of new functionalized denture materials showed significantly higher drug binding capacities toward miconazole, a widely used antifungal drug, than the original PMMA denture resin control, leading to sustained drug release and potent biofilm-controlling effects against Candida. Among the three classes of functionalized denture materials, PNVP-grafted resin provided the highest miconazole binding capability and the most powerful antifungal and biofilm-controlling activities. Drug binding mechanisms were studied. These results demonstrated the importance of specific interactions between drug molecules and functional groups on biomaterials, shedding lights on future design of CADS-managing denture materials and other related devices for controlled drug delivery.

  10. The effectiveness of chemical denture cleansers and ultrasonic device in biofilm removal from complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Costa Cruz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate denture hygiene can prevent and treat infection in edentulous patients. They are usually elderly and have difficulty for brushing their teeth. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the efficacy of complete denture biofilm removal using chemical (alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets, mechanical (ultrasonic and combined (association of the effervescent and ultrasonic methods. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty complete denture wearers participated in the experiment for 21 days. They were distributed into 4 groups (n=20: (1 Brushing with water (Control; (2 Effervescent tablets (Corega Tabs; (3 Ultrasonic device (Ultrasonic Cleaner, model 2840 D; (4 Association of effervescent tablets and ultrasonic device. All groups brushed their dentures with a specific brush (Bitufo and water, 3 times a day, before applying their treatments. Denture biofilm was collected at baseline and after 21 days. To quantify the biofilm, the internal surfaces of the maxillary complete dentures were stained and photographed at 45º. The photographs were processed and the areas (total internal surface stained with biofilm quantified (Image Tool 2.02. The percentage of the biofilm was calculated by the ratio between the biofilm area multiplied by 100 and the total area of the internal surface of the maxillary complete denture. RESULTS: The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison among groups followed by the Dunn multiple-comparison test. All tests were performed respecting a significance level of 0.05. Significant difference was found among the treatments (KW=21.18; P<0.001, the mean ranks for the treatments and results for Dunn multiple comparison test were: Control (60.9; Chemical (37.2; Mechanical (35.2 and Combined (29.1. CONCLUSION: The experimental methods were equally effective regarding the ability to remove biofilm and were superior to the control method (brushing with water. Immersion in alkaline peroxide and ultrasonic vibration can be used as auxiliary agents

  11. Plaque biofilms: the effect of chemical environment on natural human plaque biofilm architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C; Strafford, S; Rees, G; Brookes, S J; Kirkham, J; Shore, R C; Watson, P S; Wood, S

    2006-11-01

    The architecture of microbial biofilms especially the outer regions have an important influence on the interaction between biofilm and local environment particularly on the flux of materials into and out of biofilm compartments and as a consequence, biofilm metabolic behaviour. In the case of dental plaque biofilms, architecture will determine access of nutrients including acidogenic substrates and therapeutic materials to the microbial biomass and to the underlying tooth surface. Manipulation of this architecture may offer a means of altering mass transfer into the whole biofilm and biomass and raises the possibility of improving access of therapeutics. Plaque biofilms formed in vivo on human enamel were subjected to a number of different chemical conditions while under observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy in reflection mode. In this way the outer 50-100 microm or so of the biofilms was examined. Density and distribution of biomass were recorded as degree of reflectance. The amount and density of biofilm biomass increased from the plaque saliva interface towards the interior. Plaque biofilms were robust and little affected by mechanical manipulation, high ionic strength or low pH (2.5). Detergent (SLS), however, often appeared to either remove biomass and/or dramatically reduce its density.

  12. Comparison of two cleansing pastes for the removal of biofilm from dentures and palatal lesions in patients with atrophic chronic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrucioli, Marcela Cristina Damião; de Macedo, Leandro Dorigan; Panzeri, Heitor; Lara, Elza Helena Guimarães; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of 2 oral hygiene products, an experimental toothpaste specific for complete denture cleansing and a regular standard toothpaste, was compared in terms of denture biofilm removal and cure of palatal lesions in patients with atrophic chronic candidiasis. The degree of correlation between presence of biofilm and mucosa erythema was also evaluated. Twenty-four complete denture wearers (45-80 years old) were divided into 2 groups: experimental paste and standard toothpaste (Sorriso-Kolynos, Brazil). Both groups received soft toothbrushes. The internal surfaces of upper dentures were stained using 1% sodium fluorescein and photographed at a 45 masculine angle at 0, 15, 30 and 60 days. The slides were scanned and the areas of interest (denture total area and biofilm area) were measured (Image Tool software). The degree of erythema was evaluated on slides according to the Prosthesis Tissue Index. There was a significant reduction (1%) in the degree of biofilm (ANOVA/Tukey) between the two initial visits (0 and 15 days) and the two final visits (30 and 60 days), and in the average erythema scores (Kruskal-Wallis) between 0 and 60 days, in both groups. The Mann-Whitney test showed a significant difference (1%) between pastes in terms of biofilm degree, but no difference was found for the erythema score. Correlation values between biofilm and erythema degree were 0.3801 (experimental paste) and (0.3678 (standard toothpaste). We may therefore conclude that the experimental product was efficient for the removal of denture plaque biofilm.

  13. Inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei on Candida biofilm of denture surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Gyun; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2017-04-01

    Candida albicans biofilm is associated with denture-related stomatitis and oral candidiasis of elderly. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria and have antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal activity of various probiotics against C. albicans and the inhibitory effects of probiotics on Candida biofilm on the denture surface. The spent culture media of various probiotics were investigated the antifungal efficacy against C. albicans. Candida biofilm was formed on a denture base resin and was then treated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei. Also, the biofilms of L. rhamnosus and L. casei were formed and were sequentially treated with C. albicans. Colony-forming units of C. albicans on the denture surface were counted after spreading on agar plate. The denture base resin was treated with the spent culture media for 30days, after which the denture surface roughness was analyzed with an atomic force microscope. L. rhamnosus and L. casei exhibited stronger antifungal activity than other probiotics. The spent culture medium of L. rhamnosus and L. casei exhibited the antifungal activity against blastoconidia and biofilm of C. albicans. L. rhamnosus and L. casei showed the antifungal activity against Candida biofilm, and the biofilm of L. rhamnosus and L. casei inhibited formation of Candida biofilm on denture surface. Neither of the probiotics affected the surface roughness of the denture base resin. L. rhamnosus and L. casei may be the ideal probiotics for the prevention and treatment of denture-related stomatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dental plaque biofilm in oral health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath; Zhang, Cheng Fei; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2011-01-01

    Dental plaque is an archetypical biofilm composed of a complex microbial community. It is the aetiological agent for major dental diseases such as dental caries and periodontal disease. The clinical picture of these dental diseases is a net result of the cross-talk between the pathogenic dental plaque biofilm and the host tissue response. In the healthy state, both plaque biofilm and adjacent tissues maintain a delicate balance, establishing a harmonious relationship between the two. However, changes occur during the disease process that transform this 'healthy' dental plaque into a 'pathogenic' biofilm. Recent advances in molecular microbiology have improved the understanding of dental plaque biofilm and produced numerous clinical benefits. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians keep abreast with these new developments in the field of dentistry. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind dental diseases will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to establish a 'healthy dental plaque biofilm' by modulating both host and microbial factors. In this review, the present authors aim to summarise the current knowledge on dental plaque as a microbial biofilm and its properties in oral health and disease.

  15. Biofilm formation and Candida albicans morphology on the surface of denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susewind, Sabine; Lang, Reinhold; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Fungal biofilms may contribute to the occurrence of denture stomatitis. The objective of the study was to investigate the biofilm formation and morphology of Candida albicans in biofilms on the surface of denture base materials. Specimens were prepared from different denture base materials. After determination of surface properties and salivary pellicle formation, mono- and multispecies biofilm formation including Candida albicans ATCC 10231 was initiated. Relative amounts of adherent cells were determined after 20, 44, 68 and 188 h; C. albicans morphology was analysed employing selective fluorescence microscopic analysis. Significant differences were identified in the relative amount of cells adherent to the denture base materials. Highest blastospore/hyphae index suggesting an increased percentage of hyphae was observed in mono- and multispecies biofilms on the soft denture liner, which did not necessarily respond to the highest relative amount of adherent cells. For both biofilm models, lowest relative amount of adherent cells was identified on the methacrylate-based denture base material, which did not necessarily relate to a significantly lower blastospore/hyphae index. The results indicate that there are significant differences in both biofilm formation as well as the morphology of C. albicans cells in biofilms on the surface of different denture base materials.

  16. Antibacterial effect of taurolidine (2%) on established dental plaque biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweiler, Nicole Birgit; Auschill, Thorsten Mathias; Sculean, Anton

    2012-04-01

    Preliminary data have suggested that taurolidine may bear promising disinfectant properties for the therapy of bacterial infections. However, at present, the potential antibacterial effect of taurolidine on the supragingival plaque biofilm is unknown. To evaluate the antibacterial effect of taurolidine on the supragingival plaque biofilm using the vital fluorescence technique and to compare it with the effect of NaCl and chlorhexidine (CHX), 18 subjects had to refrain from all mechanical and chemical hygiene measures for 24 h. A voluminous supragingival plaque sample was taken from the buccal surfaces of the lower molars and wiped on an objective slide. The sample was then divided into three equal parts and mounted with one of the three test or control preparations (a) NaCl, (b) taurolidine 2% and (c) CHX 0.2%. After a reaction time of 2 min, the test solutions were sucked of. Subsequently, the plaque biofilm was stained with fluorescence dye and vitality of the plaque flora was evaluated under the fluorescence microscope (VF%). Plaque samples treated with NaCl showed a mean VF of 82.42 ± 6.04%. Taurolidine affected mean VF with 47.57 ± 16.60% significantly (p taurolidine). Taurolidine possesses a significant antibacterial effect on the supragingival plaque biofilm which was, however, not as pronounced as that of CHX.

  17. Efficacy of citric acid denture cleanser on the Candida albicans biofilm formed on poly(methyl methacrylate): effects on residual biofilm and recolonization process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faot, Fernanda; Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Mendonça e Bertolini, Martinna de; Pinto, Luciana de Rezende; da Silva, Wander José; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel

    2014-01-01

    ...; however, the efficacy of citric acid denture cleansers is uncertain. In addition, the long-term efficacy of this denture cleanser is not well established, and their effect on residual biofilms is unknown...

  18. Comparative study of methods for the quantification of biofilm on complete dentures

    OpenAIRE

    PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Silva,Cláudia Helena Lovato da

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the application and reliability of 4 methods for biofilm quantification (computerized, paper-weighing, point-counting, and planimetric) in complete dentures, verifying the correlation between them. The internal surfaces of 62 complete dentures were stained (5% erythrosine) and photographed. The slides were projected on paper, and the areas (total and biofilm-covered) were outlined with a pencil. These areas were measured with an equidistant point grid (point-counting metho...

  19. Biofilms, a new approach to the microbiology of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, Jacob M

    2006-09-01

    Dental plaque has the properties of a biofilm, similar to other biofilms found in the body and the environment. Modern molecular biological techniques have identified about 1000 different bacterial species in the dental biofilm, twice as many as can be cultured. Oral biofilms are very heterogeneous in structure. Dense mushroom-like structures originate from the enamel surface, interspersed with bacteria-free channels used as diffusion pathways. The channels are probably filled with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) matrix produced by the bacteria. Bacteria in biofilms communicate through signaling molecules, and use this "quorum-sensing" system to optimize their virulence factors and survival. Bacteria in a biofilm have a physiology different from that of planktonic cells. They generally live under nutrient limitation and often in a dormant state. Such "sleepy" bacteria respond differently to antibiotics and antimicrobials, because these agents were generally selected in experiments with metabolically active bacteria. This is one of the explanations as to why antibiotics and antimicrobials are not as successful in the clinic as could be expected from laboratory studies. In addition, it has been found that many therapeutic agents bind to the biofilm EPS matrix before they even reach the bacteria, and are thereby inactivated. Taken together, these fundings highlight why the study of bacteria in the oral cavity is now taken on by studying the biofilms rather than individual species.

  20. Effect of Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin on Multi-Species Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keke; Ren, Biao; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Hockin H K; Chen, Yu; Han, Qi; Li, Bolei; Weir, Michael D; Li, Mingyun; Feng, Mingye; Cheng, Lei

    2016-06-29

    Our aims of the research were to study the antimicrobial effect of dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) modified denture base resin on multi-species biofilms and the biocompatibility of this modified dental material. Candida albicans (C. albicans), Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis), as well as Actinomyces naeslundii (A. naeslundii) were used for biofilm formation on denture base resin. Colony forming unit (CFU) counts, microbial viability staining, and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) array were used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of DMADDM. C. albicans staining and Real-time PCR were used to analyze the morphology and expression of virulence genes of C. albicans in biofilm. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) array and Real-time PCR were conducted to examine the results after biofilm co-cultured with epithelial cell. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining followed by histological evaluation were used to study the biocompatibility of this modified material. We found that DMADDM containing groups reduced both biomass and metabolic activity of the biofilm significantly. DMADDM can also inhibit the virulence of C. albicans by means of inhibiting the hyphal development and downregulation of two virulence related genes. DMADDM significantly reduced the cell damage caused by multi-species biofilm according to the LDH activity and reduced the expression of IL-18 gene of the cells simultaneously. The in vivo histological evaluation proved that the addition of DMADDM less than 6.6% in denture material did not increase the inflammatory response (p > 0.05). Therefore, we proposed that the novel denture base resin containing DMADDM may be considered as a new promising therapeutic system against problems caused by microbes on denture base such as denture stomatitis.

  1. Effect of Antimicrobial Denture Base Resin on Multi-Species Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keke Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Our aims of the research were to study the antimicrobial effect of dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM modified denture base resin on multi-species biofilms and the biocompatibility of this modified dental material. Candida albicans (C. albicans, Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis, as well as Actinomyces naeslundii (A. naeslundii were used for biofilm formation on denture base resin. Colony forming unit (CFU counts, microbial viability staining, and 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT array were used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of DMADDM. C. albicans staining and Real-time PCR were used to analyze the morphology and expression of virulence genes of C. albicans in biofilm. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH array and Real-time PCR were conducted to examine the results after biofilm co-cultured with epithelial cell. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining followed by histological evaluation were used to study the biocompatibility of this modified material. We found that DMADDM containing groups reduced both biomass and metabolic activity of the biofilm significantly. DMADDM can also inhibit the virulence of C. albicans by means of inhibiting the hyphal development and downregulation of two virulence related genes. DMADDM significantly reduced the cell damage caused by multi-species biofilm according to the LDH activity and reduced the expression of IL-18 gene of the cells simultaneously. The in vivo histological evaluation proved that the addition of DMADDM less than 6.6% in denture material did not increase the inflammatory response (p > 0.05. Therefore, we proposed that the novel denture base resin containing DMADDM may be considered as a new promising therapeutic system against problems caused by microbes on denture base such as denture stomatitis.

  2. Oral hygiene habits, denture plaque, presence of yeasts and stomatitis in institutionalised elderly in Lothian, Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Wight, C; Cumming, C

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relation between oral hygiene habits, denture plaque, presence of yeasts and stomatitis in institutionalised elderly. A sample of 201 residents, 48-99 yr of age (mean age 82 yr), was selected from four different institutions in Lothian, Scotland....... Clinical recordings were carried out under standardised circumstances using well recognised indices. Information about oral hygiene habits was obtained through structured interviews conducted immediately before the clinical examination. A multivariate analysis, principal component, was carried out...

  3. Epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Linda; Loewy, Zvi G

    2011-06-01

    Denture stomatitis, a common disorder affecting denture wearers, is characterized as inflammation and erythema of the oral mucosal areas covered by the denture. Despite its commonality, the etiology of denture stomatitis is not completely understood. A search of the literature was conducted in the PubMed electronic database (through November 2009) to identify relevant articles for inclusion in a review updating information on the epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis and the potential role of denture materials in this disorder. Epidemiological studies report prevalence of denture stomatitis among denture wearers to range from 15% to over 70%. Studies have been conducted among various population samples, and this appears to influence prevalence rates. In general, where reported, incidence of denture stomatitis is higher among elderly denture users and among women. Etiological factors include poor denture hygiene, continual and nighttime wearing of removable dentures, accumulation of denture plaque, and bacterial and yeast contamination of denture surface. In addition, poor-fitting dentures can increase mucosal trauma. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces, where it acts as an opportunistic pathogen. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms, but unless dentures are decontaminated and their cleanliness maintained, stomatitis will recur when antifungal therapy is discontinued. New developments related to denture materials are focusing on means to reduce development of adherent biofilms. These may have value in reducing bacterial and yeast colonization, and could lead to reductions in denture stomatitis with appropriate denture hygiene.

  4. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Junko; Yu, Alika; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is caused by Candida albicans, which readily colonizes and form biofilms on denture materials. While evidence for biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces initiating Candida infections is accumulating, a role for biofilms in DS remains unclear. Using an established model of DS in immunocompetent animals, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of biofilm formation in mucosal damage during pathogenesis using C. albicans or mutants defective in morphogenesis (efg1-/-) or biofilm formation (bcr1-/-). For in vivo analyses, rats fitted with custom dentures, consisting of fixed and removable parts, were inoculated with wild-type C. albicans, mutants or reconstituted strains and monitored weekly for fungal burden (denture and palate), body weight and tissue damage (LDH) for up to 8 weeks. C. albicans wild-type and reconstituted mutants formed biofilms on dentures and palatal tissues under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions as indicated by microscopy demonstrating robust biofilm architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM). In contrast, both efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants exhibited poor biofilm growth with little to no ECM. In addition, quantification of fungal burden showed reduced colonization throughout the infection period on dentures and palates of rats inoculated with efg1-/-, but not bcr1-/-, compared to controls. Finally, rats inoculated with efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants had minimal palatal tissue damage/weight loss while those inoculated with wild-type or reconstituted mutants showed evidence of tissue damage and exhibited stunted weight gain. These data suggest that biofilm formation is associated with tissue damage during DS and that Efg1 and Bcr1, both central regulators of virulence in C. albicans, have pivotal roles in pathogenesis of DS.

  5. Transcription Factors Efg1 and Bcr1 Regulate Biofilm Formation and Virulence during Candida albicans-Associated Denture Stomatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Yano

    Full Text Available Denture stomatitis (DS is characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with dentures and affects a significant number of otherwise healthy denture wearers. The disease is caused by Candida albicans, which readily colonizes and form biofilms on denture materials. While evidence for biofilms on abiotic and biotic surfaces initiating Candida infections is accumulating, a role for biofilms in DS remains unclear. Using an established model of DS in immunocompetent animals, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of biofilm formation in mucosal damage during pathogenesis using C. albicans or mutants defective in morphogenesis (efg1-/- or biofilm formation (bcr1-/-. For in vivo analyses, rats fitted with custom dentures, consisting of fixed and removable parts, were inoculated with wild-type C. albicans, mutants or reconstituted strains and monitored weekly for fungal burden (denture and palate, body weight and tissue damage (LDH for up to 8 weeks. C. albicans wild-type and reconstituted mutants formed biofilms on dentures and palatal tissues under in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo conditions as indicated by microscopy demonstrating robust biofilm architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM. In contrast, both efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants exhibited poor biofilm growth with little to no ECM. In addition, quantification of fungal burden showed reduced colonization throughout the infection period on dentures and palates of rats inoculated with efg1-/-, but not bcr1-/-, compared to controls. Finally, rats inoculated with efg1-/- and bcr1-/- mutants had minimal palatal tissue damage/weight loss while those inoculated with wild-type or reconstituted mutants showed evidence of tissue damage and exhibited stunted weight gain. These data suggest that biofilm formation is associated with tissue damage during DS and that Efg1 and Bcr1, both central regulators of virulence in C. albicans, have pivotal roles in pathogenesis of DS.

  6. Effect of denture-coating composite on Candida albicans biofilm and surface degradation after disinfection protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Matheus Jacobina; de Oliveira, Denise G; Marcillo, Oscar O; Neppelenbroek, Karin H; Lara, Vanessa S; Porto, Vinícius C

    2016-04-01

    Denture stomatitis is the most common pathology affecting denture wearers and its main cause is colonisation of dentures with Candida albicans. This study investigated the effectiveness of two commercial composite surface sealants (Biscover(®) LV and Surface Coat(®)) to reduce C. albicans biofilm colonisation on denture resin, as well as their surface integrity after disinfection cycles with 1% sodium hypochlorite solution. Heat-cured acrylic resin specimens were manufactured (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm). The specimen surfaces were mechanically polished to simulate rough or smooth denture surfaces. Four surface-treatment groups were tested: smooth surfaces [0.3 μm of mean roughness (Ra)]; rough surfaces (3 μm of Ra); rough surfaces treated with Biscover(®) LV; and rough surfaces treated with Surface Coat(®). Specimens of each group were randomly divided to undergo immersion in distilled water or 1% sodium hypochlorite for 30 or 90 cycles each. Specimens of all groups in each immersion solution were tested using a crystal violet (CV) staining assay for biofilm quantification and by scanning electron microscopy for visual analyses of surface integrity and biofilm structure. CV assay data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test (P < 0.05). The effectiveness and surface integrity of Biscover(®) LV-treated surfaces were similar to those of smooth surfaces, whereas Surface Coat(®) -treated surfaces presented a similar performance to rough surfaces in all solutions and cycles. These results suggest the possibility of clinical use of Biscover(®) LV for denture coating on surfaces in which mechanical polish is not indicated, such as the fitting surface. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  7. Microbiology of dental plaque biofilms and their role in oral health and caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Dental plaque is the biofilm found naturally on teeth. Dental plaque is also implicated in dental caries, which is associated with shifts in the microbial balance of the biofilm resulting in increased proportions of acid producing and acid tolerating bacteria, especially (but not exclusively) mutans streptococci and lactobacilli. The regular intake of fermentable dietary sugars, or impaired saliva flow, produces persistent conditions of low pH within the biofilm, which selects for these cariogenic bacteria. Clinicians should prevent this disruption to the natural microbial balance of the biofilm (relevant approaches are described) rather than merely treating its consequences by restoring cavities.

  8. In vitro Candida albicans biofilm induced proteinase activity and SAP8 expression correlates with in vivo denture stomatitis severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, Gordon; Coco, Brent; Sherry, Leighann; Bagg, Jeremy; Lappin, David F

    2012-07-01

    Denture stomatitis is a common inflammatory disorder of the palatal mucosa amongst denture wearers. The pathological changes are induced by Candida albicans biofilm on the fitting surface of the upper denture, and different individuals experience different levels of disease. C. albicans is known to produce secreted aspartyl proteinases (SAPs) to aid adhesion, invasion and tissue destruction. We hypothesised that differential expression and activity of SAPs from denture stomatitis isolates results in different levels of disease amongst denture wearers. We selected C. albicans isolates from asymptomatic controls and three different severities of disease [Newton’s type (NT) 0, I, II and III]. We assessed biofilm formation and proteinase activity for each biofilm and investigated the transcriptional profile of SAPs 1, 2, 5, 6 and 8 from early (12 h) and mature (24 h) biofilms. There were no significant differences between isolates with respect to biofilm formation, whereas proteinase activity normalised to biofilm growth was significantly increased in the diseased groups (p < 0.0001). Proteinase activity correlated strongly with SAP expression (p < 0.0001). SAP8 expression was the greatest, followed by SAP5, 6, 2 and 1. The diseased groups showed the greatest levels of SAP expression, with significant differences also observed between the groups (p < 0.005). All SAPs except SAP5 were expressed in greater amounts in the mature biofilms compared to early biofilms. Overall, this study suggests that SAP activity in biofilms determined in vitro may help to explain differences in disease severity. SAP8 has been shown for the first time to play a prominent role in biofilms.

  9. Level of Denture Cleanliness Influences the Presence of Denture Stomatitis on Maxillary Denture Bearing-Mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Winatty Krisma; Martha Mozartha; Rani Purba

    2014-01-01

    Plaque accumulation on internal surface of denture is a common problem among removable denture wearers. Poor denture cleanliness can increase colonization of Candida albicans and cause inflammatory reaction of denture-bearing mucosa, i.e. denture stomatitis. Objective: To find out the effect of denture cleanliness level on denture stomatitis on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa in a group of removable denture wearers who received prosthodontic treatment at Poliklinik Gigi RSMH Palembang and to...

  10. Early canine plaque biofilms: characterization of key bacterial interactions involved in initial colonization of enamel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy J Holcombe

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (PD is a significant problem in dogs affecting between 44% and 63.6% of the population. The main etiological agent for PD is plaque, a microbial biofilm that colonizes teeth and causes inflammation of the gingiva. Understanding how this biofilm initiates on the tooth surface is of central importance in developing interventions against PD. Although the stages of plaque development on human teeth have been well characterized little is known about how canine plaque develops. Recent studies of the canine oral microbiome have revealed distinct differences between the canine and human oral environments and the bacterial communities they support, particularly with respect to healthy plaque. These differences mean knowledge about the nature of plaque formation in humans may not be directly translatable to dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial species important in the early stages of canine plaque formation in vivo and then use isolates of these species in a laboratory biofilm model to develop an understanding of the sequential processes which take place during the initial colonization of enamel. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 12 dogs at 24 and 48 hour time points following a full mouth descale and polish. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA identified 134 operational taxonomic units after statistical analysis. The species with the highest relative abundance were Bergeyella zoohelcum, Neisseria shayeganii and a Moraxella species. Streptococcal species, which tend to dominate early human plaque biofilms, had very low relative abundance. In vitro testing of biofilm formation identified five primary colonizer species, three of which belonged to the genus Neisseria. Using these pioneer bacteria as a starting point, viable two and three species communities were developed. Combining in vivo and in vitro data has led us to construct novel models of how the early canine plaque biofilm develops.

  11. The Beneficial Effect of Equisetum giganteum L. against Candida Biofilm Formation: New Approaches to Denture Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavarce, Rafaela A S; Saldanha, Luiz L; Almeida, Nara Ligia M; Porto, Vinicius C; Dokkedal, Anne L; Lara, Vanessa S

    2015-01-01

    Equisetum giganteum L. (E. giganteum), Equisetaceae, commonly called "giant horsetail," is an endemic plant of Central and South America and is used in traditional medicine as diuretic and hemostatic in urinary disorders and in inflammatory conditions among other applications. The chemical composition of the extract EtOH 70% of E. giganteum has shown a clear presence of phenolic compounds derived from caffeic and ferulic acids and flavonoid heterosides derived from quercitin and kaempferol, in addition to styrylpyrones. E. giganteum, mainly at the highest concentrations, showed antimicrobial activity against the relevant microorganisms tested: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. It also demonstrated antiadherent activity on C. albicans biofilms in an experimental model that is similar to dentures. Moreover, all concentrations tested showed anti-inflammatory activity. The extract did not show cytotoxicity in contact with human cells. These properties might qualify E. giganteum extract to be a promising alternative for the topic treatment and prevention of oral candidiasis and denture stomatitis.

  12. Candida albicans biofilms and MMA surface treatment influence the adhesion of soft denture liners to PMMA resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça e Bertolini, Martinna de; Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Bordin, Dimorvan; Silva, Wander José da; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Candida albicans biofilms and methyl methacrylate (MMA) pretreatment on the bond strength between soft denture liners and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin was analyzed. Specimens were prepared and randomly divided with respect to PMMA pretreatment, soft liner type (silicone-based or PMMA-based), and presence or absence of a C. albicans biofilm. Samples were composed of a soft denture liner bonded between two PMMA bars. Specimens (n = 10) were incubated to produce a C. albicans biofilm or stored in sterile PBS for 12 days. The tensile bond strength test was performed and failure type was determined using a stereomicroscope. Surface roughness (SR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis were performed on denture liners (n = 8). Highest bond strength was observed in samples containing a silicone-based soft liner and stored in PBS, regardless of pretreatment (p PMMA-based liners predominantly underwent cohesive failures. The silicone-based specimens SR decreased after 12 days of biofilm accumulation or PBS storage, while the SR of PMMA-based soft liners increased (p PMMA-based soft liners surfaces presented sharp valleys and depressions, while silicone-based specimens surfaces exhibited more gentle features. In vitro exposure to C. albicans biofilms reduced the adhesion of denture liners to PMMA resin, and MMA pretreatment is recommended during relining procedures.

  13. Candida albicans biofilms and MMA surface treatment influence the adhesion of soft denture liners to PMMA resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinna de Mendonça e Bertolini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Candida albicans biofilms and methyl methacrylate (MMA pretreatment on the bond strength between soft denture liners and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA resin was analyzed. Specimens were prepared and randomly divided with respect to PMMA pretreatment, soft liner type (silicone-based or PMMA-based, and presence or absence of a C. albicans biofilm. Samples were composed of a soft denture liner bonded between two PMMA bars. Specimens (n = 10 were incubated to produce a C. albicans biofilm or stored in sterile PBS for 12 days. The tensile bond strength test was performed and failure type was determined using a stereomicroscope. Surface roughness (SR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis were performed on denture liners (n = 8. Highest bond strength was observed in samples containing a silicone-based soft liner and stored in PBS, regardless of pretreatment (p < 0.01. Silicone-based specimens mostly underwent adhesive failures, while samples containing PMMA-based liners predominantly underwent cohesive failures. The silicone-based specimens SR decreased after 12 days of biofilm accumulation or PBS storage, while the SR of PMMA-based soft liners increased (p < 0.01. The PMMA-based soft liners surfaces presented sharp valleys and depressions, while silicone-based specimens surfaces exhibited more gentle features. In vitro exposure to C. albicans biofilms reduced the adhesion of denture liners to PMMA resin, and MMA pretreatment is recommended during relining procedures.

  14. Silver colloidal nanoparticle stability: influence on Candida biofilms formed on denture acrylic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Takamiya, Aline Satie; Feresin, Leonardo Perina; Gorup, Luiz Fernando; de Camargo, Emerson Rodrigues; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Henriques, Mariana; Barbosa, Debora Barros

    2014-08-01

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate how the chemical stability of silver nanoparticles (SNs) influences their efficacy against Candida albicans and C. glabrata biofilms. Several parameters of SN stability were tested, namely, temperature (50ºC, 70ºC, and 100ºC), pH (5.0 and 9.0), and time of contact (5 h and 24 h) with biofilms. The control was defined as SNs without temperature treatment, pH 7, and 24 h of contact. These colloidal suspensions at 54 mg/L were used to treat mature Candida biofilms (48 h) formed on acrylic. Their efficacy was determined by total biomass and colony-forming unit quantification. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and the Bonferroni post hoc test (α = 0.05). The temperature and pH variations of SNs did not affect their efficacy against the viable cells of Candida biofilms (P > 0.05). Moreover, the treatment periods were not decisive in terms of the susceptibility of Candida biofilms to SNs. These findings provide an important advantage of SNs that may be useful in the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  15. A comparative study for plaque removing efficacy between commonly used denture cleansers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: There was no significant difference among action of four denture cleansers used in this study. Thus we can infer that patients can use liquid handwashing soap or commercial products to overcome disadvantages of toothpastes. Recommendation from the results of this study is the use of liquid handwashing soap for cleansing after every meal and soaking of the denture in commercial denture cleanser during the night.

  16. Level of Denture Cleanliness Influences the Presence of Denture Stomatitis on Maxillary Denture Bearing-Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winatty Krisma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plaque accumulation on internal surface of denture is a common problem among removable denture wearers. Poor denture cleanliness can increase colonization of Candida albicans and cause inflammatory reaction of denture-bearing mucosa, i.e. denture stomatitis. Objective: To find out the effect of denture cleanliness level on denture stomatitis on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa in a group of removable denture wearers who received prosthodontic treatment at Poliklinik Gigi RSMH Palembang and to investigate the denture hygiene habits of removable denture wearers. Methods: Thirty subjects participated in this study. Denture cleanliness level was assessed with disclosing solution to disclose denture plaque on internal surface of maxillary denture. Cleanliness level was graded according to Budtz-Jorgensen. Intraoral examination was done to determine any visible signs of denture stomatitis. Data referring to denture hygiene habits of removable denture wearers was collected from interview using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using the Komolgorov-Smirnov test. Results: Result of the study showed that 40% subjects had poor upper denture cleanliness. Denture stomatitis was observed on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa in 43.3% subjects. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showed that there was a significant effect of denture cleanliness level on denture stomatitis on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa (p<0.05. Conclusion: Denture cleanliness level influence the occurence of denture stomatitis on maxillary denture bearing-mucosa in a group of removable denture wearers who received prosthodontic treatment.

  17. Clinical Implications of Power Toothbrushing on Fluoride Delivery: Effects on Biofilm Plaque Metabolism and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aspiras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental biofilms are implicated in the formation of caries and periodontal disease. A major constituent of the supragingival biofilm is Streptococcus mutans, which produces lactic acid from sucrose fermentation, enhancing enamel demineralization and eventual caries development. Caries prevention through F inhibits enamel demineralization and promotes remineralization. Fluoride also exerts effects on metabolic activities in the supragingival biofilm such as aerobic respiration, acid fermentation and dentrification. In experimental S. mutans biofilms, adding 1000 ppm F to an acidogenic biofilm resulting from 10% sucrose addition increased pH to pre-sucrose levels, suggesting inhibition of acid fermentation. F effects on metabolic activity and sucrose utilization in interproximal plaque biofilms were also recorded. Addition of 10% sucrose reduced pH from neutral to 4.2, but subsequent addition of 1000 ppm F increased pH by 1 unit, inhibiting acid fermentation. 10% Sucrose addition also stimulated denitrification, increasing production of nitrous oxide (N2O. Addition of 1000 ppm F suppressed denitrification, indicating an additional mechanism by which F exerts effects in the active interproximal biofilm. Finally, fluid dynamic activity by power tooth brushing enhanced F delivery and retention in an experimental S. mutans biofilm, suggesting a potential novel benefit for this intervention beyond mechanical plaque removal.

  18. Bacterial Amyloid and DNA are Important Constituents of Senile Plaques: Further Evidence of the Spirochetal and Biofilm Nature of Senile Plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklossy, Judith

    2016-01-01

    It has long been known that spirochetes form clumps or micro colonies in vitro and in vivo. Cortical spirochetal colonies in syphilitic dementia were considered as reproductive centers for spirochetes. Historic and recent data demonstrate that senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are made up by spirochetes. Spirochetes, are able to form biofilm in vitro. Senile plaques are also reported to contain elements of biofilm constituents. We expected that AβPP and Aβ (the main components of senile plaques) also occur in pure spirochetal biofilms, and bacterial DNA (an important component of biofilm) is also present in senile plaques. Histochemical, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization techniques and the TUNEL assay were used to answer these questions. The results obtained demonstrate that Aβ and DNA, including spirochete-specific DNA, are key components of both pure spirochetal biofilms and senile plaques in AD and confirm the biofilm nature of senile plaques. These results validate validate previous observations that AβPP and/or an AβPP-like amyloidogenic protein are an integral part of spirochetes, and indicate that bacterial and host derived Aβ are both constituents of senile plaques. DNA fragmentation in senile plaques further confirms their bacterial nature and provides biochemical evidence for spirochetal cell death. Spirochetes evade host defenses, locate intracellularly, form more resistant atypical forms and notably biofilms, which contribute to sustain chronic infection and inflammation and explain the slowly progressive course of dementia in AD. To consider co-infecting microorganisms is equally important, as multi-species biofilms result in a higher resistance to treatments and a more severe dementia. PMID:27314530

  19. Do Dental Resin Composites Accumulate More Oral Biofilms and Plaque than Amalgam and Glass Ionomer Materials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A long-time drawback of dental composites is that they accumulate more biofilms and plaques than amalgam and glass ionomer restorative materials. It would be highly desirable to develop a new composite with reduced biofilm growth, while avoiding the non-esthetics of amalgam and low strength of glass ionomer. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a protein-repellent composite with reduced biofilms matching amalgam and glass ionomer for the first time; and (2 investigate their protein adsorption, biofilms, and mechanical properties. Five materials were tested: A new composite containing 3% of protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; the composite with 0% MPC as control; commercial composite control; dental amalgam; resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU, and lactic acid production. Composite with 3% MPC had flexural strength similar to those with 0% MPC and commercial composite control (p > 0.1, and much greater than RMGI (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had protein adsorption that was only 1/10 that of control composites (p < 0.05. Composite with 3% MPC had biofilm CFU and lactic acid much lower than control composites (p < 0.05. Biofilm growth, metabolic activity and lactic acid on the new composite with 3% MPC were reduced to the low level of amalgam and RMGI (p > 0.1. In conclusion, a new protein-repellent dental resin composite reduced oral biofilm growth and acid production to the low levels of non-esthetic amalgam and RMGI for the first time. The long-held conclusion that dental composites accumulate more biofilms than amalgam and glass ionomer is no longer true. The novel composite is promising to finally overcome the major biofilm-accumulation drawback of dental composites in order to reduce biofilm acids and secondary caries.

  20. The Beneficial Effect of Equisetum giganteum L. against Candida Biofilm Formation: New Approaches to Denture Stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela A. S. Alavarce

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Equisetum giganteum L. (E. giganteum, Equisetaceae, commonly called “giant horsetail,” is an endemic plant of Central and South America and is used in traditional medicine as diuretic and hemostatic in urinary disorders and in inflammatory conditions among other applications. The chemical composition of the extract EtOH 70% of E. giganteum has shown a clear presence of phenolic compounds derived from caffeic and ferulic acids and flavonoid heterosides derived from quercitin and kaempferol, in addition to styrylpyrones. E. giganteum, mainly at the highest concentrations, showed antimicrobial activity against the relevant microorganisms tested: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. It also demonstrated antiadherent activity on C. albicans biofilms in an experimental model that is similar to dentures. Moreover, all concentrations tested showed anti-inflammatory activity. The extract did not show cytotoxicity in contact with human cells. These properties might qualify E. giganteum extract to be a promising alternative for the topic treatment and prevention of oral candidiasis and denture stomatitis.

  1. Effect of fluoride and chlorhexidine digluconate mouthrinses on plaque biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabe, Per; Twetman, Svante; Kinnby, Bertil;

    2015-01-01

    in the pre-molar region were worn by three subjects for 7 days. Control discs were removed before subjects rinsed with 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) or 0.2% sodium fluoride (NaF) for 1 minute. Biofilms were stained with Baclight Live/Dead and z-stacks of images created using confocal scanning laser...

  2. Bifunctional bioceramics stimulating osteogenic differentiation of a gingival fibroblast and inhibiting plaque biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ya; Wang, Zhejun; Wang, Jiao; Zhou, Yinghong; Chen, Hui; Wu, Chengtie; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Gingival recession is a common clinical problem that results in esthetic deficiencies and poor plaque control and predominantly occurs in aged patients. In order to restore the cervical region, ideal biomaterials should possess the ability to stimulate proliferation and osteogenesis/cementogenesis of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and have a strong antibiofilm effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactions of HGF and oral multispecies biofilms with Ca, Mg and Si-containing bredigite (BRT, Ca7MgSi4O16) bioceramics. BRT extract induced osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation of HGF and its inhibition of plaque biofilm formation were systematically studied. BRT extract in concentrations lower than <200 mg mL(-1) presented high biocompatibility to HGF cells in 3 days. Ion extracts from BRT also stimulated a series of bone-related gene and protein expressions in HGF cells. Furthermore, BRT extract significantly inhibited oral multispecies plaque biofilm growth on its surface and contributed to over 30% bacterial cell death without additional antibacterial agents in two weeks. A planktonic killing test showed that BRT suppressed 98% plaque bacterial growth compared to blank control in 3 days. The results also revealed that BRT extract has an osteostimulation effect on HGF. The suppression effect on plaque biofilms suggested that BRT might be used as a bioactive material for cervical restoration and that the synergistic effect of bioactive ions, such as Ca, Mg and Si ions, played an important role in the design and construction of bifunctional biomaterials in combination with tissue regeneration and antibiofilm activity.

  3. [Dental plaque as a biofilm - a risk in oral cavity and methods to prevent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chałas, Renata; Wójcik-Chęcińska, Ilona; Woźniak, Michał J; Grzonka, Justyna; Święszkowski, Wojciech; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J

    2015-10-13

    Bacteria living constantly in the oral cavity are in the form of a biofilm. The biofilm formed on a solid base such as the enamel of the teeth, fillings, restorations, orthodontic appliances or obturators is dental plaque. Disturbance of homeostasis of biofilm, excessive growth or increase in the number of acid-forming bacteria leads to the development of the most common diseases of the oral cavity, i.e. dental caries and periodontal disease. The presence of bacterial biofilm on the walls of the root canal or at the top of the root on an outer wall leads to complications and failure in endodontic treatment. The aim of the study was to present the latest information on the occurrence, development and the role of biofilm in the etiopathogenesis of oral diseases and its control. Based on the literature analyzed, it can be concluded that the biofilm, due to its complex structure and numerous mechanisms of bacteria adaptation, is an effective barrier against the traditional agents with antibacterial properties. There are now great hopes for nanotechnology as an innovative method for obtaining new structures of nanometric size and different properties than source materials. The use of antibacterial properties of nano-silver used in dentistry significantly reduces the metabolic activity and the number of colony forming bacteria and lactic acid production in the biofilm.

  4. Chlorhexidine substantivity on salivary flora and plaque-like biofilm: an in situ model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía García-Caballero

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the in situ antibacterial activity of a mouthrinse with 0.2% Chlorhexidine (M-0.2% CHX on undisturbed de novo plaque-like biofilm (PL-biofilm and on salivary flora up to 7 hours after its application. METHODS: A special acrylic appliance was designed, with 3 inserted glass disks on each buccal side, allowing for PL-biofilm growth. Fifteen healthy volunteers wore the appliance for 48 hours and then performed an M-0.2% CHX; disks were removed at 30 seconds and 1, 3, 5 and 7 hours after the mouth-rinsing. Applying a washout period, saliva samples were collected from each volunteer at 30 seconds and 1, 3, 5 and 7 hours after performing an M-0.2% CHX. The PL-biofilm and saliva samples were analysed by confocal laser scanning and epifluorescence microscopes, respectively. RESULTS: At 30 seconds after M-0.2% CHX, the levels of viable bacteria detected in saliva were significantly lower than those observed in PL-biofilm. The difference in the percentage of live bacteria detected in saliva was significantly higher than that observed in PL-biofilm at 5 and 7 hours after M-0.2% CHX. CONCLUSION: After a single mouthrinse of the 0.2% CHX formulation tested in the present study, the 2-day PL-biofilm presented a significantly higher resistance to this antiseptic in situ than that observed in salivary flora. However, this 0.2% CHX formulation showed a higher substantivity on PL-biofilm than on salivary flora at 5 and 7 hours after mouth-rinsing, which could be related to the slower growth rate of PL-biofilm and the possible reservoir function for antimicrobial agents associated with the undisturbed de novo PL-biofilm.

  5. Chlorhexidine Substantivity on Salivary Flora and Plaque-Like Biofilm: An In Situ Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Caballero, Lucía; Quintas, Victor; Prada-López, Isabel; Seoane, Juan; Donos, Nikos; Tomás, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the in situ antibacterial activity of a mouthrinse with 0.2% Chlorhexidine (M-0.2% CHX) on undisturbed de novo plaque-like biofilm (PL-biofilm) and on salivary flora up to 7 hours after its application. Methods A special acrylic appliance was designed, with 3 inserted glass disks on each buccal side, allowing for PL-biofilm growth. Fifteen healthy volunteers wore the appliance for 48 hours and then performed an M-0.2% CHX; disks were removed at 30 seconds and 1, 3, 5 and 7 hours after the mouth-rinsing. Applying a washout period, saliva samples were collected from each volunteer at 30 seconds and 1, 3, 5 and 7 hours after performing an M-0.2% CHX. The PL-biofilm and saliva samples were analysed by confocal laser scanning and epifluorescence microscopes, respectively. Results At 30 seconds after M-0.2% CHX, the levels of viable bacteria detected in saliva were significantly lower than those observed in PL-biofilm. The difference in the percentage of live bacteria detected in saliva was significantly higher than that observed in PL-biofilm at 5 and 7 hours after M-0.2% CHX. Conclusion After a single mouthrinse of the 0.2% CHX formulation tested in the present study, the 2-day PL-biofilm presented a significantly higher resistance to this antiseptic in situ than that observed in salivary flora. However, this 0.2% CHX formulation showed a higher substantivity on PL-biofilm than on salivary flora at 5 and 7 hours after mouth-rinsing, which could be related to the slower growth rate of PL-biofilm and the possible reservoir function for antimicrobial agents associated with the undisturbed de novo PL-biofilm. PMID:24386220

  6. Antimicrobial agents used in the control of periodontal biofilms: effective adjuncts to mechanical plaque control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Ricardo Palmier; Teles, Flavia Rocha Fonseca

    2009-01-01

    The control of biofilm accumulation on teeth has been the cornerstone of periodontal disease prevention for decades. However, the widespread prevalence of gingivitis suggests the inefficiency of self-performed mechanical plaque control in preventing gingival inflammation. This is particularly relevant in light of recent evidence suggesting that long standing gingivitis increases the risk of loss of attachment and that prevention of gingival inflammation might reduce the prevalence of mild to moderate periodontitis. Several antimicrobials have been tested as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control in order to improve the results obtained with oral home care. Recent studies, including meta-analyses, have indicated that home care products containing chemical antimicrobials can provide gingivitis reduction beyond what can be accomplished with brushing and flossing. Particularly, formulations containing chlorhexidine, mouthrinses containing essential oils and triclosan/copolymer dentifrices have well documented clinical antiplaque and antigingivitis effects. In vivo microbiological tests have demonstrated the ability of these antimicrobial agents to penetrate the biofilm mass and to kill bacteria growing within biofilms. In addition, chemical antimicrobials can reach difficult-to-clean areas such as interproximal surfaces and can also impact the growth of biofilms on soft tissue. These agents have a positive track record of safety and their use does not seem to increase the levels of resistant species. Further, no study has been able to establish a correlation between mouthrinses containing alcohol and oral cancer. In summary, the adjunct use of chemical plaque control should be recommended to subjects with well documented difficulties in achieving proper biofilm control using only mechanical means.

  7. Antimicrobial agents used in the control of periodontal biofilms: effective adjuncts to mechanical plaque control?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Palmier Teles

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The control of biofilm accumulation on teeth has been the cornerstone of periodontal disease prevention for decades. However, the widespread prevalence of gingivitis suggests the inefficiency of self-performed mechanical plaque control in preventing gingival inflammation. This is particularly relevant in light of recent evidence suggesting that long standing gingivitis increases the risk of loss of attachment and that prevention of gingival inflammation might reduce the prevalence of mild to moderate periodontitis. Several antimicrobials have been tested as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control in order to improve the results obtained with oral home care. Recent studies, including meta-analyses, have indicated that home care products containing chemical antimicrobials can provide gingivitis reduction beyond what can be accomplished with brushing and flossing. Particularly, formulations containing chlorhexidine, mouthrinses containing essential oils and triclosan/copolymer dentifrices have well documented clinical antiplaque and antigingivitis effects. In vivo microbiological tests have demonstrated the ability of these antimicrobial agents to penetrate the biofilm mass and to kill bacteria growing within biofilms. In addition, chemical antimicrobials can reach difficult-to-clean areas such as interproximal surfaces and can also impact the growth of biofilms on soft tissue. These agents have a positive track record of safety and their use does not seem to increase the levels of resistant species. Further, no study has been able to establish a correlation between mouthrinses containing alcohol and oral cancer. In summary, the adjunct use of chemical plaque control should be recommended to subjects with well documented difficulties in achieving proper biofilm control using only mechanical means.

  8. Optimizing qPCR for the Quantification of Periodontal Pathogens in a Complex Plaque Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirakodu, S S; Govindaswami, M; Novak, M J; Ebersole, J L; Novak, K F

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) has recently been used to quantify microorganisms in complex communities, including dental plaque biofilms. However, there is variability in the qPCR protocols being used. This study was designed to evaluate the validity of two of these variables with the intent of developing a more standardized qPCR protocol. The two variables evaluated were (1) the use of DNA content versus actual cell counts to estimate bacterial numbers in mixed plaque samples and (2) the effectiveness of three different universal primers versus species specific primers in amplifying specific target pathogens in these samples. Results lead to the development of a standardized protocol that was shown to be highly reproducible as demonstrated by low coefficients of variation. The results also confirmed that this standardized qPCR protocol can be used as a sensitive method for quantifying specific bacterial species in human plaque samples.

  9. Evaluation of Denture Stomatitis in Croatian Adult Population

    OpenAIRE

    Ćelić, R.; Knezović Zlatarić, D.; Baučić, I.

    2001-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is often found under the removable partial dentures (RPDs). There are many factors influencing it, such as patient’s age and gender, smoking habits, denture age, denture material, denture wearing habits, denture hygiene habits, oral hygiene instruction, denture cleanness and denture plaque accumulation. The aim of this study was to find out the influence these factors have on the prevalence of DS under RPDs and complete dentures (CDs). A total of 200 pat...

  10. Evidence Regarding the Treatment of Denture Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarborough, Alexandra; Cooper, Lyndon; Duqum, Ibrahim; Mendonça, Gustavo; McGraw, Kathleen; Stoner, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Denture stomatitis is a common inflammatory condition affecting the mucosa underlying complete dentures. It is associated with denture microbial biofilm, poor denture hygiene, poor denture quality, and nocturnal denture use. Numerous treatment methodologies have been used to treat stomatitis; however, a gold standard treatment has not been identified. The aim of this systematic review is to report on the current knowledge available in studies representing a range of evidence on the treatment of denture stomatitis.

  11. Influence of plaque biofilm removal on reestablishment of the biocompatibility of contaminated titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Frank; Papanicolau, Pascal; Rothamel, Daniel; Beck, Brigitte; Herten, Monika; Becker, Jürgen

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of plaque biofilm removal on the mitochondrial activity of human SaOs-2 osteoblasts grown on titanium surfaces. Volunteers wore acrylic splints with structured titanium discs for 72 h to build up plaque biofilms (n = 30). Specimens were randomly instrumented using either (1) an ultrasonic system at two power settings (EMS1, EMS2) + chlorhexidine (CHX), or (2) plastic curettes + CHX. Untreated (NC, n = 10) and sterile (C, n = 10) titanium discs served as controls. Specimens were incubated with SaOs-2 cells for 6 days. Treatment time (T), residual plaque biofilm (RPB)/clean implant surface areas (%), mitochondrial cell activity (MA) (counts/second), and cell morphology (SEM) were assessed. Statistical analysis revealed the following mean scores (+/-SD): RPB areas: P (58.5 +/- 4.9) > EMS1 (38.4 +/- 4.1) > EMS2 (28.3 +/- 2.0); T: PC (292 +/- 30) = EMS1 (244 +/- 24) > EMS2 (199 +/- 25); MA: C (1.544.661 +/- 203.442) > PC (597.559 +/- 566.984) = EMS2 (389.875 +/- 409.300) = EMS1 (356.653 +/- 293.863; n.s.) > NC (138.676 +/- 86.666). In NC and PC groups, cells were predominantly rounded in shape. However, in the EMS groups, some cells had started to spread, showing complete cytoplasmatic extensions of the cell body on the titanium surface. A monolayer of flattened cells was generally observed in the C group. Within the limits of the present study, it was concluded that MA seemed to be impaired by the presence of RPB areas. However, its removal alone might not be the crucial step in the reestablishment of the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces.

  12. Inhibitory effect of coated mannan against the adhesion of Candida biofilms to denture base resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Ohshima, Tomoko; Maeda, Nobuko; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2013-01-01

    The adherence of Candida on dentures is related to diseases such as denture stomatitis and aspiration pneumonia. Mannan is a major component of the Candida cell surface, and contributes to the cell adherence. A previous report indicated that the adherence of C. albicans to culture dishes was inhibited by the coating them with mannan. The purpose of this study was to examine the adhesion inhibitory effect of mannan coating on acrylic denture surfaces against C. albicans and C. glabrata. The amount of Candida attached on the acrylic surfaces coated with mannan was calibrated by culture methods. Mannan showed significant inhibitory effects on Candida adhesion in both the yeast and hyphal form in a concentration-dependent manner, and the durability of the inhibitory effect continued for three days. These results suggest that mannan coating on the denture base acrylic can prevent Candida adhesion on the denture.

  13. The effects of surface roughness and type of denture acrylic on biofilm formation by Streptococcus oralis in a constant depth film fermentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T D; Wilson, M

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the effects of surface roughness and type of denture acrylic on the early development of a Streptococcus oralis biofilm in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF). Streptococcus oralis was incubated with acrylic of known surface roughness in the CDFF. Adherent Strep. oralis were enumerated by viable counting. Cold-cure acrylic was rougher (P effect on the number of adherent bacteria. The type of acrylic used, and its roughness, affect the early stages of biofilm formation by Strep. oralis. Choosing an appropriate type of smooth acrylic could lead to reduced biofilm formation in vivo.

  14. Effects of hydrophilicity and microtopography of titanium implant surfaces on initial supragingival plaque biofilm formation. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, F; Sculean, A; Wieland, M; Horn, N; Nuesry, E; Bube, C; Becker, J

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the present pilot study is to investigate the effects of hydrophilicity and microtopography of titanium implant surfaces on initial supragingival plaque biofilm formation. Test specimens were manufactured from commercially pure grade 2 titanium according to one of the following procedures: polished (P), acid-etched (A), chemically modified (mod) A (modA), sand-blasted large grit and A (SLA), and modSLA. Intraoral splints were used to collect an in vivo supragingival plaque biofilm in each group at 12, 24, and 48 h. Stained plaque biofilm (PB) areas (%) were morphometrically assessed. All groups exhibited significant increases of mean PB areas over time (p P > A =modA (p modSLA = P > A = modA (p A = modA (p < 0.001; respectively). Within the limits of a pilot study, it could be concluded that hydrophilicity had no apparent effect, while microtopography had a highly uneven and unpredictable influence on supragingival plaque biofilm formation.

  15. Effectiveness of a denture hygiene intervention programme among institutionalized elders

    OpenAIRE

    Au, Kar-yan; Cheung, Hiu-ching; Chung, Sze-man; Lai, Chi-fung; Leung, Ki-ki, Jessica; Leung, Yat-fung; Ng, Yuk-chun; Wah, Yat-shing, Jonathan; Wong, Chun-lung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a denture hygiene intervention programme in terms of improving denture cleanliness and denture stomatitis. Methods: Residents at seven elderly care homes were invited to participate in a denture hygiene programme. Clinical assessment of denture stomatitis was undertaken and denture cleanliness assessed: (i) qualitatively by the Denture Cleanliness Index ratings and (ii) quantitatively by planimetric assessments of plaque coverage from digital im...

  16. Denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward patient education in denture care among dental practitioners of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresan, Vinay; Mantri, Sneha; Deogade, Suryakant; Sumathi, K; Panday, Pragya; Galav, Ankit; Mishra, Kanika

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have concentrated their focus on denture wearer's attitude and practice toward denture cleansing despite the fact that they should be more focused on the attitudes of the dentists' themselves towards patient education at the time of denture delivery. It is an obligation of every dentist to motivate, instruct and provide the means and methods of plaque control for their patients. The aim was to assess the denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes and practice towards patient education in denture care among dental practitioners (DPs) of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India. A total of 168 dental practitioners completed a comprehensive questionnaire. All participants signed an informed consent before answering the questionnaire. The institutional review committee approved the study. Chi-square test for non-parametric study was employed to determine the statistical difference between the two groups. A P-value of 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Most of the subjects were qualified with a bachelor degree 142 (85%). 25 (18%) subjects did not associate oral biofilms on complete denture with conditions like denture stomatitis and other serious systemic diseases. Approximately half of the DPs 69 (48%) and specialists 8 (31%) agreed that explaining denture hygiene instructions to old patients can be very time consuming. A recall program for their patients is of importance according to 39 (27%) of DPs and 3 (12%) specialists. It may be concluded that the study subjects had limited knowledge of denture cleansing materials and denture hygiene importance. Attitudes varied among the subjects when it came to sharing information with their patients.

  17. Efficacy of biofilm disclosing agent and of three brushes in the control of complete denture cleansing Eficácia de um evidenciador de biofilme e de três escovas no controle da higiene de próteses totais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Helena Lovato da Silva

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This report evaluated the efficacy of three brushes and one biofilm disclosing agent in complete denture cleansing. METHODS: Twenty-seven wearers of maxillary dentures were distributed into three groups and received different brushes: Oral B40, conventional toothbrush (Oral B; Denture, denture-specific brush (Condor; Johnson & Johnson, denture-specific brush (Johnson & Johnson. The 60-day experimental period was divided into two techniques: I - brushing (brush associated with a paste - Dentu Creme, Dentco three times a day; II - brushing and daily application of 1% neutral red on the denture internal surface. Biofilm quantification was carried out weekly and the areas with dye biofilm were obtained by means of Image Tool 2.02 software. RESULTS: Biofilm removal was more effective during Technique II (Wilcoxon test: p=0.01 for the three groups of brushes. When the brushes were compared in Technique I, the Kruskal Wallis test indicated statistical difference between Denture X Johnson & Johnson and Denture X Oral B40, in which the Denture was more efficient. For Technique II, there was no statistical difference between brushes (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: The disclosed application promoted more efficacy on biofilm removal, regardless of the brush used. Denture (Condor was more efficient than the other brushes during Technique I.Este trabalho avaliou três escovas e um evidenciador de biofilme na higiene de próteses totais. Vinte e sete usuários de próteses totais superiores foram distribuídos em três grupos que receberam diferentes escovas: Oral B40 para dentes naturais (Oral B; Denture para dentadura (Condor e Johnson & Johnson para dentadura (Johnson & Johnson. O período experimental de 60 dias foi dividido em 2 Técnicas: I - utilização das escovas associadas a um dentifrício (Dentu-Creme, Dentco três vezes ao dia; II - escovação e aplicação diária do evidenciador Vermelho neutro a 1% na superfície interna da prótese total. A

  18. [Dental plaque microcosm biofilm behavior on a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wu; Qiang, Zhang; Ruinan, Sun; Ting, Zhu; Jianhua, Ge; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    To develop a resin composite incorporated with nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt, and to measure its effect on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing long-chain alkyl quaternary ammonium salt was synthesized according to methods introduced in previous research. Samples of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were modified by a coupling agent and then added into resin composite at 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% or 20% mass fractions; 0% composite was used as control. A flexural test was used to measure resin composite mechanical properties. Results showed that a dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was formed. Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts, lactic acid production, and live/dead assay of biofilm on the resin composite were calculated to test the effect of the resin composite on human dental plaque microcosm biofilm. The incorporation of nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers with as much as 15% concentration into the resin composite showed no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of the resin composite (P > 0.05). Resin composite containing 5% or more nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers significantly inhibited the metabolic activity of dental plaque microcosm biofilm, suggesting its strong antibacterial potency (P resin composite exhibited a strong antibacterial property upon the addition of up to 5% nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers, thereby leading to effective caries inhibition in dental application.

  19. Distribution of fluoride and calcium in plaque biofilms after the use of conventional and low-fluoride dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessan, Juliano Pelim; Pinto Alves, Karina Mirela Ribeiro; Italiani, Flávia de Moraes; Ramires, Irene; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Whitford, Gary Milton; Toumba, Kyriacos Jack; Robinson, Colin; Buzalaf, Marilia Afonso Rabelo

    2014-07-01

    The distribution of fluoride and calcium in plaque after the use of fluoride dentifrices has not yet been determined. To evaluate fluoride and calcium distribution in sections of biofilms generated in situ after the use of conventional and low-fluoride dentifrices. Children (n = 11, 8–10 years old) brushed with placebo (fluoride-free), low-fluoride (513 mgF/kg), and conventional (1072 mgF/kg) dentifrices twice daily for 1 week, following a double-blind, cross-over protocol. Biofilms were generated using Leeds in situ devices, which were collected 1 and 12 h after brushing, and sectioned through their depth. Sections were grouped (10 x 5 μm) for fluoride and calcium analysis. Sections 4 lm thick were used for image analysis and determination of biomass fraction. Results were analysed by ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and linear regression analysis (P dentifrices tested, and these ions were directly correlated throughout most of biofilm’s sections. Results for conventional dentifrice were significantly higher than for the placebo, but did not differ from those for the low-fluoride dentifrice. The use of a low-fluoride dentifrice did not promote a higher fluoride uptake in inner biofilms’ sections, as hypothesized. As plaque fluoride was significantly elevated only after the use of the conventional dentifrice, the recommendation of low-fluoride formulations should be done with caution, considering both risks and benefits.

  20. Effectiveness of denture cleanser associated with microwave disinfection and brushing of complete dentures: in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesma, Newton; Rocha, Alessandra Lima; Laganá, Dalva Cruz; Costa, Bruno; Morimoto, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Complete dentures acts as a reservoir for microbial colonization, which may lead to systemic infections. Microwave irradiation has been used as an efficient method of denture disinfection. Even though current methods eliminate denture-base microorganisms, a recurrence rate of denture stomatitis (DS) is still observed among denture-wearing patients. It was hypothesized that microwave disinfection kills microorganisms but do not remove dead bacteria from the denture surface. To test this hypothesis, the biofilm found in the dentures of 10 patients with DS was evaluated. In addition, the effects of microwave irradiation plus brushing (MW+B) on the denture biofilm and the combination of denture cleanser with microwave irradiation and brushing (MW+DC+B) for the removal of denture-accumulating microorganisms were investigated. Microbiological data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric analysis (Friedman/Wilcoxon, α=0.05). MW+B and MW+DC+B were effective in reducing the rate of microorganisms (99.2% and 99.5% respectively), but without significant difference between them (p=0.553). However, it was observed that the complete removal of microorganisms from denture surface was only possible when all regimens were combined (MW+DC+B). Microwave irradiation in combination with soaking in denture cleanser and brushing effectively disinfected the dentures and removed denture biofilm.

  1. [Denture stomatitis - definition, etiology, classification and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubera, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Denture stomatitis pertains to a number of pathological symptoms in the oral cavity caused by wearing acrylic dentures. Etiological factors include: mucosal trauma, fungal infection and accumulation of denture plaque. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms. Early diagnosis of the lesion is essential to assure rational therapy.

  2. Candida/Candida biofilms. First description of dual-species Candida albicans/C. rugosa biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Aline Oliveira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida Martins; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Abrão, Fariza; Moraes, Thais de; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-04-01

    Denture liners have physical properties that favour plaque accumulation and colonization by Candida species, irritating oral tissues and causing denture stomatitis. To isolate and determine the incidence of oral Candida species in dental prostheses, oral swabs were collected from the dental prostheses of 66 patients. All the strains were screened for their ability to form biofilms; both monospecies and dual-species combinations were tested. Candida albicans (63 %) was the most frequently isolated microorganism; Candida tropicalis (14 %), Candida glabrata (13 %), Candida rugosa (5 %), Candida parapsilosis (3 %), and Candida krusei (2 %) were also detected. The XTT assay showed that C. albicans SC5314 possessed a biofilm-forming ability significantly higher (p Candida strains, after 6 h 37 °C. The total C. albicans CFU from a dual-species biofilm was less than the total CFU of a monospecies C. albicans biofilm. In contrast to the profuse hyphae verified in monospecies C. albicans biofilms, micrographies showed that the C. albicans/non-albicans Candida biofilms consisted of sparse yeast forms and profuse budding yeast cells that generated a network. These results suggested that C. albicans and the tested Candida species could co-exist in biofilms displaying apparent antagonism. The study provide the first description of C. albicans/C. rugosa mixed biofilm. Copyright © 2016 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 具核梭杆菌在牙菌斑生物膜中的作用%The role of Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque biofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛红蕾(综述); 杨德琴(审校)

    2013-01-01

    具核梭杆菌广泛存在于牙菌斑生物膜中,在生物膜的形成、演替、代谢交流及水平基因转移方面起着重要的作用。具核梭杆菌在维护口腔微生态环境动态平衡的过程中具有重要意义。本文就具核梭杆菌在牙菌斑生物膜中发挥的作用作一综述。%Fusobacterium nucleatum(F. nucleatum)?is?a?prominent?component?in?dental?plaque?biofilms.?It?is?also?regarded?as?a?key?organism?for?dental?plaque?biofilm?formation,?shifts,?metabolic?exchanges,?and?horizontal?gene?transfer.?Meanwhile,?F. nucleatum?is?an?important?pathogen?implicated?in?periodontitis?and?dental?caries,?and?it?acts?as?a?“bridge”?of?coaggregation?between?supragingival?and?subgingival?plaque?microbiota.?In?summary,?F. nucleatum?significantly?affects?oral?health?balance.?This?review?focused?on?F. nucleatum?and?its?role?in?the?ecology?of?dental?plaque?biofilms.

  4. Comparative study of methods for the quantification of biofilm on complete dentures Estudo comparativo de métodos para quantificação de biofilme em próteses totais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena de Freitas Oliveira Paranhos

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the application and reliability of 4 methods for biofilm quantification (computerized, paper-weighing, point-counting, and planimetric in complete dentures, verifying the correlation between them. The internal surfaces of 62 complete dentures were stained (5% erythrosine and photographed. The slides were projected on paper, and the areas (total and biofilm-covered were outlined with a pencil. These areas were measured with an equidistant point grid (point-counting method, a digital planimeter (planimetric method, and for the paper weighing method they were cut and weighed with a precision scale. For the computerized method, ImageTool software was used. In order to perform a validation test of the methods, all of them were applied to slide projections of geometric figures with known dimensions. The correlation tests showed high correlation values (r = 0.82 to 0.99 among the methods. The validation test (ANOVA showed no statistically significant differences among the values obtained from the measurement of figures using all four quantitative methods and the real dimensions of these geometric figures. Quantitative methods were efficient and reliable for measuring quantity of biofilm in complete dentures, and may be useful in experimental studies on the efficacy of hygiene products. The computerized method was fast and easy to perform.Este estudo comparou a aplicação e a confiabilidade de quatro métodos de quantificação de biofilme (computadorizado, pesagem de papel, contagem de pontos e planimétrico em próteses totais, verificando a correlação entre eles. As superfícies internas de 62 próteses totais foram coradas (eritrosina a 5% e fotografadas. Os diapositivos foram projetados em papel, e as áreas (total e com biofilme corado foram contornadas com grafite. Estas áreas foram medidas com uma grade de pontos eqüidistantes (método de contagem de pontos, um planímetro digital (método planimétrico e, para o m

  5. Clinical effects of glazing denture acrylic resin bases using an ultraviolet curing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Jörgensen, E; Kaaber, S

    1986-12-01

    Control of denture plaque accumulation is essential to obtain and maintain a healthy oral mucosa in denture wearers. The present study was designed to study the effect on denture plaque accumulation and denture stomatitis of coating the fitting denture surface by a glaze. Twenty-one subjects wearing complete dentures participated in the study. Glazing of the denture surface was performed using a Perma Cure System. Plaque accumulation was studied clinically and using a semiquantitative microbiologic technique. Plaque accumulation on the glazed and the non-glazed halves of the fitting denture surface was compared after 1 wk. There was significantly less plaque on the glazed half of the denture (P less than 0.001), and the calculated number of CFU of bacteria/cm2 was significantly lower from the test area of the glazed half than from the test area of the non-glazed half of the denture (P less than 0.001). When the patients were re-examined 1 month after the entire fitting denture surface had been glazed plaque scores, yeast scores and number of CFU of bacteria/cm2 were not significantly different from those observed before glazing. There was a reduction of the erythema of the palatal mucosa in 14/19 patients with denture-induced stomatitis. The study indicates that coating of the fitting denture surface by a glaze may be a means to improve denture cleanliness; however, the present glazing system should be further developed to produce a more uniform glazing.

  6. The oral microbiome of denture wearers is influenced by levels of natural dentition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.E. O'Donnell; D. Robertson; C.J. Nile; L.J. Cross; M. Riggio; A. Sherriff; D. Bradshaw; M. Lambert; J. Malcolm; M.J. Buijs; E. Zaura; W. Crielaard; B.W. Brandt; G. Ramage

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The composition of dental plaque has been well defined, whereas currently there is limited understanding of the composition of denture plaque and how it directly influences denture related stomatitis (DS). The aims of this study were to compare the microbiomes of denture wearers, and to u

  7. Profiling of subgingival plaque biofilm microbiota in adolescents after completion of orthodontic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Li, Shuxiang; Zhang, Yujie; Liu, Jianwei; Wang, Chunling; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2017-01-01

    Background Fixed orthodontic treatment is the most common method for malocclusion but has the potential risk of periodontal complication with unclear outcomes of whether microbiologic and clinical changes could be reversible in adolescents after orthodontic therapy. Methods Twenty adolescents with orthodontic treatment were enrolled in the study as the case group at end of the therapy, while 19 periodontally healthy adolescents were involved in the control group. At baseline (T0), clinical parameters including gingival index, probing depth and sulcus bleeding index were tested, and subgingival plaque samples were collected from the lower incisors. The counts of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, T. forsythia and total bacteria were determined by real-time PCR. All parameters were reassessed after 1 month (T1) and 3 months (T2) in the case group and compared with that of the controls. Results At baseline (T0), clinical parameters (including GI, PD, SBI) of the test sites in the case group were significantly higher than that of the control group (Pprevalence and counts of periodontopathogens tend to be normal (P>0.05), while PD and the amount of P.intermedia were still significantly higher compared with that of the control group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion After removal of appliances, the periodontal changes induced by orthodontic therapy are only partially reversible at 3 months after removal. PMID:28158292

  8. Comoarison of the Effects of Five Denture Cleansers on Cleaning of Candida Albicans Biofilms.%5种义齿清洁剂对白色念珠菌生物膜清洁效果的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张燕萍; 吴凤鸣

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the capacity of five denture cleansers on reducing the candida albicans biofilms activity and biomass. Methods: C. albicans strain SC5314 was grown as biofilms on a 96- well format and immersed in Polident,Victoria- C, Protefix, 0.2 % chlorhexidine gluconate and Y- Kelin denture cleansers according to the manufacturers'- instructions and overnight. The activity and biomass of the biofilms were then quantified. Results: Following the manufacturers' instructions,only Polident,protefix reduced the activity by greater than 80 %.Except 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (58.8%), all cleansers reduced theactivity by greater than 80% following overnight immersion. Following the manufacturers' instructions, all the five denture cleansers reduced the biomass by less than 50% ,and after overnight immersion, only Polident showed a reduction greater than 50%. Conclusion:Polident exhibited the best cleaning effect among the five denture cleansers. However, residual biofilms retention with a few living cells was still observed.%目的:比较5种义齿清洁剂在减少白色念珠菌生物膜活性及生物量方面的能力.方法:在96孔微量培养板中形成的白色念珠菌SC5314生物膜按照生产商推荐时间及过夜浸泡于保丽净,澳多-C,protefix,0.2%葡萄糖酸氯己定和雅克菱义齿清洁剂中,进而定量生物膜的活性和生物量.结果:生产商推荐时间浸泡后,仅保丽净、protefix组的活性减少率达80%以上;过夜浸泡后,除0.2%葡萄糖酸氯己定(58.8%)外,其余均达80%以上.在生物量减少上,5种义齿清洁剂生产商推荐时间浸泡后,生物量减少率均位于50%以下;过夜浸泡后,仅保丽净达50%以上.结论:5种义齿清洁剂中保丽净的清洁效果最佳,但仍存在残余少量活菌的生物膜.

  9. Study of plaque biofilm structure under confocal laser scanning microscope%用激光共聚焦显微镜研究菌斑生物膜的结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周泽渊; 倪龙兴; 吴补领; 黄晓峰; 王胜朝

    2001-01-01

    目的:研究菌斑生物膜的结构。方法:从牙齿表面获得完整的菌斑生物膜标本,运用激光共聚焦显微镜对其进行断层扫描和分析。结果:菌斑生物膜是由分布不均匀的细胞、基质和空隙构成的复杂结构。结论:应用激光共聚焦显微镜技术研究菌斑生物膜结构是一种可行的方法。%AIM: To study the architecture of human plaque biofilm. METHODS: The intact dental plaque biofilm specimen was generated on the tooth surface. The specimens of the biofilms were imaged and analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscope. RESULTS: The plaque biofilm was a complex structure with heterogeneous distribution of cells, matrixs and gaps. CONCLUSION: It was feasible to study the architecture of plaque biofilm by using confocal laser scanning microscope.

  10. Denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Amy Yuntzu-Yen; Zirwas, Matthew J

    2007-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented for evaluation of an eruption localized to the area covered by her partial upper denture. Her medical history and physical examination were otherwise unremarkable. She originally had a metal upper partial denture, which she used for many years without difficulty. Four years before presentation, she developed a painful eruption affecting only the tissue covered by the upper partial denture. Contact dermatitis to metal was suspected, and a new upper partial denture constructed primarily of acrylates was fashioned. When she transitioned to the new denture, the inflammation in her oral mucosa persisted and perhaps worsened, despite an excellent fit. Examination revealed striking erythema and mild edema sharply localized to the areas where the partial upper denture contacted the gum ridge. Patch testing was performed and revealed allergies to multiple acrylates, including methyl methacrylate. A swab from the gums was sent for yeast culture. No Candida was detected. Based on suspected candidal overgrowth on the denture, the patient was advised to begin applying nystatin ointment between the gums and the denture, and to start soaking the dentures nightly in chlorhexidine 0.12% solution. In addition, because the relevance of the acrylate allergy was unclear, her dentist was contacted and it was recommended that the dentures be boiled to induce polymerization of any residual un-reacted methacrylate monomers. The patient had a 90% improvement in the clinical appearance and in symptoms at an 8-week follow-up appointment. Due to logistic issues, the dentures had not yet been boiled. The improvement, despite the dentures not having been boiled, was felt to demonstrate that the acrylate allergy was not relevant. The patient has continued to slowly show further improvement over 6 months of follow-up.

  11. Candidal Leukoplakia on Patient with Removable Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiril Paskalis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida infection is a common problem in patients using removable dentures, with the most frequent type is denture stomatitis. But other type of candidal infection could also happen in these patients, such as candidal leukoplakia. We reported a 61 years old female patient who complained a painful lesion under her lower removable denture. Oral examination revealed white plaque that could not be rubbed over an ulcer on the lingual part of alveolar processes under the lower removable denture plate, and also an erythematous area on palatum durum above the upper full denture. The patient was suspected to have candidal leukoplakia on the lingual part of the mandible and denture stomatitis on the palate area. The treatment consisted of nystatin oral suspension, chlorhexidine solution, multivitamins, along with denture replacement and oral health education. The entire lesion resolved within 2 months therapy. Candidal infection treatment on denture patient needs not only medication or denture replacement, but also patient compliance to achieve maximal result.

  12. Denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward patient education in denture care among dental practitioners of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay Suresan; Sneha Mantri; Suryakant Deogade; Sumathi, K.; Pragya Panday; Ankit Galav; Kanika Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Context: Researchers have concentrated their focus on denture wearer's attitude and practice toward denture cleansing despite the fact that they should be more focused on the attitudes of the dentists’ themselves towards patient education at the time of denture delivery. It is an obligation of every dentist to motivate, instruct and provide the means and methods of plaque control for their patients. Aims: The aim was to assess the denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes and practice towards pati...

  13. Motivação no controle do biofilme dental e sangramento gengival em escolares Motivation on plaque control and gengival bleeding in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Fernanda Ceriotti Toassi

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar a eficácia de duas estratégias motivacionais em relação ao controle do biofilme dental e sangramento gengival em 135 escolares da rede estadual e municipal de ensino do município de Santa Tereza, RS, 1999. O programa de motivação a que os escolares tinham acesso constou da utilização de diversos recursos aplicados em dois grupos de intervenção: Grupo A, motivação em sessão única, e Grupo B, motivação em quatro sessões. Para a avaliação da metodologia empregada foram realizados levantamentos do índice de placa visível (IPV de Ainamo & Bay (1975, e do índice de sangramento gengival (ISG. Em ambos os grupos houve redução tanto do ISG quanto do IPV após as sessões de intervenção (pThe objective of the study is to evaluate the impact of two pedagogical motivational approaches for plaque and gingival bleeding control among 135 students of local public schools in Santa Tereza, Brazil, in 1999 The motivational program consisted of different educational strategies offered to two distinct groups: Group A, who attended only one explanatory session about oral hygiene, and Group B, who attended a total of four pedagogical sessions. In order to evaluate the methodology applied, the visible plaque index (according to Ainamo & Bay, 1975 and gingival bleeding index (according to Löe and Silness, 1963 were calculated. A highly statistically significant reduction in the visible plaque index and gingival bleeding index was observed in both groups after the educational sessions (p<0.001. Moreover, a higher reduction in the gingival bleeding index and an even more accentuated decrease in the visible plaque index was found in group B when compared to group A (p<0.001. In conclusion, the motivational reinforcement in educational and preventive programs has a positive effect for the reduction and control of gingival bleeding and bacterial plaque.

  14. Trial of an experimental castor oil solution for cleaning dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ingrid Machado de; Andrade, Kelly Machado de; Pisani, Marina Xavier; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Denture hygiene is essential because denture biofilm is involved in oral infections and systemic diseases. Although there are chemical agents available on the market, none of them have ideal properties and research on such products is still necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a castor bean (Ricinus communis)-based solution for removing denture biofilm, compared to two traditional products (sodium hypochlorite and alkaline peroxide). Fifty maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures after meals and to immerse their dentures once a day in the following solutions: Saline (20 min; control), Polident alkaline peroxide (3 min), NaOCl (20 min) and 2% castor oil solution (20 min). Participants used each solution for a period of 7 consecutive days, according to a random sequence. After each period, the internal surfaces of maxillary complete dentures were stained with a disclosing solution (1% neutral red), photographed and the disclosed biofilm was quantified with the aid of specific software. The influence of treatments on results was verified by the Friedman test (α=0.05). Tested solutions presented significant difference (Fr=51.67; poil presented intermediate results (median: 1.0% and 1.5%, respectively). It can be concluded that the castor oil solution tested in this study was comparable to alkaline peroxide in terms of efficiency in denture biofilm removal.

  15. Development of a contemporary animal model of Candida albicans-associated denture stomatitis using a novel intraoral denture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clorinda C; Yu, Alika; Lee, Heeje; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2012-05-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is a fungal infection characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with the denture and affects up to 50% of denture wearers. Despite the prevalence, very little is known about the role of fungal or host factors that contribute to pathogenesis. Recently, we developed a novel intraoral denture system for rodent research. This denture system consists of custom-fitted fixed and removable parts to allow repeated sampling and longitudinal studies. The purpose of this study was to use this denture system to develop a clinically relevant animal model of DS. To establish DS, rats were inoculated with pelleted Candida albicans, which resulted in sustained colonization of the denture and palate for 8 weeks postinoculation. Biofilm formation on the denture was observed by week 4 and on the palate by week 6 postinoculation. Rats were monitored for clinical signs of disease by assigning a clinical score after macroscopic examination of the palate tissue according to Newton's method. By week 4 postinoculation, the majority of inoculated rats with dentures exhibited a clinical score of 1 (pinpoint erythema). By week 6 and week 8 postinoculation, increasing percentages of rats exhibited a clinical score of 2 (diffuse erythema/edema). Histological analysis of palate tissue demonstrated progressively increasing inflammatory cell recruitment throughout the time course of the infection. Palatal biofilm formation was commensurate with development of palatal erythema, which suggests a role for biofilm in the inflammatory response.

  16. 光动力疗法对牙菌斑生物膜活性及结构的影响%Effects of photodynamic therapy on the activity and structure of the dental plaque biofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹朝晖; 常秀明; 阴慧娟; 李迎新

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of photodynamic therapy(PDT) on the activity and structure of the dental plaque biofilm formed by the main cariogenic bacteria.Methods S.mutans,S.sangius,L.acidophilus and A.viscosus were chosen as the experimental bacteria to establish dental plaque biofilm model.They were separated into three groups:group of PDT、group of chlorhexidine and group of normal saline.The influence of the dental plaque biofilms was observed according to plate counting of bacteria method.The changes in the structure of biofilms after PDT were analyzed by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy.Results Compared to normal saline group,chlorhexidine cariogenic bacteria (CFU/ml) in plaque biofilms significantly reduced (P<0.05),with the bactericidal rate 57.84%.After PDT treatment against artificial caries model,the number of cariogenic bacteria (CFU/ml) in plaque biofilms reduced more significantly (P<0.05),the bactericidal rate up to 94.92%,and the structure of dental plaque biofilns changed evidently.Conclusion PDT is an effective method in eliminate cariogenic bacteria of dental plaque biofilms and to destroy the integrity of dental plaque biofilms,and it is a promising method for elimination of dental plaque and prevention of caries.%目的 探讨光动力疗法(PDT)对4种主要致龋菌形成的混合菌菌斑生物膜活性及结构的影响.方法以变形链球菌、血链球菌、嗜酸性乳杆菌和黏性放线菌为实验菌株,建立牙菌斑生物膜模型.实验分为3组:PDT组,洗必泰处理组,生理盐水处理组.平板菌落计数观察牙菌斑生物膜活性,并运用激光共聚焦显微镜(CLSM)对处理后的牙菌斑生物膜进行断层扫描、分析.结果 与生理盐水处理组相比,洗必泰能使牙菌斑生物膜内致龋菌的数量(CFU/ml)显著下降,杀菌率为57.84%,其差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);而PDT组牙菌斑生物膜内致龋菌的数量(CFU/ml)

  17. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancl, Kimberly A; Kirsner, Robert S; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque, are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible; thus, biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attention to the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction, and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields and future therapies are also discussed.

  18. Contemporary methods and mobile denture cleansers and theirs significance for older population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strajnić Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A dramatic increase in the number of people living in their seventies, eighties and nineties is associated with a loss of teeth and the use of mobile dentures. The aim of this paper was to highlight the consequences of poor denture hygiene on oral and general health in vulnerable elderly people, in long-term hospitalized elderly patients and in long-term institutionalized elderly in nursing homes. Denture deposits and consequences of poor denture hygiene. The number of bacteria living in the mouth is getting larger after putting denture on. Namely, a small ”space” develops between jaw and denture, creating perfect conditions for bacterial growth. Denture becomes a ”reservoir” of micro-organisms. Denture deposits such as bacterial plaque, fungi, tartar and remnants could be responsible for: stomatitis prothetica, cheilitis angularis, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, halitosis (bad breath, dental caries in mobile denture carriers, mucositis and periimplantitis in mobile implant over-dentures carriers, accelerated destruction of denture materials for underlying, such as denture base soft liners, respiratory airways diseases, bacterial endocarditis and gastrointestinal infections. Removal of denture deposits. It is recommendable to combine mechanical and chemical denture cleaning. Denture submersion into a commercial cleansing solution for less than one hour is an effective cleaning method. Commercial cleansers specifically intended for dentures with metal parts should be used for those dentures. Commercial cleansers with a new component of silicon polymer, whose thin layer surrounds all denture surfaces and disables oral bacteria to agglomerate, are effective and useful. Preventive hygienic treatments are very important in hospitals and homes for the aged, bearing in mind that old and ill persons reside here. Those institutions are recommended to get equipped with ultrasound denture cleaners. Importance of written brochure on

  19. Red autofluorescence of dental plaque bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M. H.; Thomas, R. Z.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; de Soet, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Red autofluorescence of plaque and its relation to fluorescence of a single species in the biofilm was studied. Fluorescence images of non-disclosed and disclosed plaque of 28 first-year students were captured. The plaque samples were assessed by culture methods and studied for red autofluorescence.

  20. The Denture-Associated Oral Microbiome in Health and Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Baochen; Wu, Tingxi; McLean, Jeffrey; Edlund, Anna; Young, Youngik; He, Xuesong; Lv, Hongyang; Zhou, Xuedong; Shi, Wenyuan; Li, Huiying; Lux, Renate

    2016-01-01

    While investigation of the microbiome on natural oral surfaces has generated a wealth of information, few studies have examined the microbial communities colonizing dentures and their relationship to oral health. To address this knowledge gap, we characterized the bacterial community associated with dentures and remaining teeth in healthy individuals and patients with denture stomatitis. The microbiome compositions of matched denture and tooth plaque samples of 10 healthy individuals and 9 stomatitis patients were determined by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The microbial communities colonizing dentures and remaining teeth in health and disease were very similar to each other. Matched denture and tooth samples from the same individuals shared a significantly higher percentage of identical phylotypes than random pairs of samples from different study participants. Despite these overall similarities, several bacterial phylotypes displayed discrete health- and stomatitis-associated denture colonization, while others were distinct in health and disease independently of the surface. Certain phylotypes exhibited differential colonization of dentures and teeth independently of denture health status. In conclusion, denture and natural tooth surfaces in health and stomatitis harbor similar bacterial communities. Individual-related rather than surface-specific factors play a significant role in the bacterial phylotype composition colonizing dentures and teeth. This individual-specific mutual influence on denture and tooth surface colonization could be an important factor in maintaining oral health in denture wearers. Discrete differences in colonization patterns for distinct genera and phylotypes warrant further studies regarding their potential involvement or utility as specific indicators of health and disease development in denture-wearing individuals. IMPORTANCE Denture stomatitis is a prevalent inflammatory condition of the mucosal tissue in denture wearers that is

  1. Photodynamic inactivation of microorganisms present on complete dentures. A clinical investigation. Photodynamic disinfection of complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Dovigo, Lívia Nordi; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Machado, Ana Lucia; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the disinfection of complete dentures. Biofilm samples were collected from dentures of 60 denture users who were randomly divided into four experimental groups (n = 15 each): subjects whose maxillary dentures were sprayed with 50 and 100 mg/l of Photogem® suspension (groups P50S and P100S) and patients whose maxillary dentures were treated with 50 and 100 mg/l of Photogem® gel (groups P50G and P100G). Dentures with photosensitizers were left in the dark for 30 min (pre-irradiation time) and then irradiated with blue LED light at 37.5 J/cm(2) (26 min). Denture samples were taken with sterile cotton swab before (left side surfaces) and after (right side surfaces) PDT. All microbial material was diluted and plated on selective media for Candida spp., Staphylococcus mutans spp., streptococci and a non-selective media. After incubation (48 h/37°C), the number of colony-forming units (cfu/ml) was counted. Microorganisms grown on selective media were identified using biochemical methods before and after PDT. The data were submitted to McNemar and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α = 0.05). No growth after PDT was observed in 60, 53, 47, and 40% of dentures from P100G, P50G, P100S, and P50S groups, respectively. When evidence of microorganisms' growth was observed, PDT regimens eliminated over 90% of microorganisms on dentures. This clinical study showed that PDT was effective for disinfecting dentures.

  2. Rotational path removable partial denture design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, T E; Krol, A J

    1982-10-01

    A detailed description of a rotational path of insertion design for removable partial dentures has been presented. By minimizing the use of conventional clasps, this technique offers some advantages. Rotational path designs may minimize adverse periodontal response to a removable partial denture by reducing plaque accumulation and may be applied in esthetically demanding situations. The design concept involves the use of rigid retentive components that gain access to undercut areas through a rotational path of insertion. These rigid components satisfy the basic requirements of conventional direct retained design.

  3. Clinical and antimicrobial efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets in complete denture wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Helena Silva-Lovato

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets for complete denture, in terms of denture biofilm removal and antimicrobial action. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty complete denture wearers (14 men and 26 women with a mean age of 62.3±9.0 years were randomly assigned to two groups and were instructed to clean their dentures according to two methods: brushing (control - 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals; brushing and immersion (Experimental - brushing the denture 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals and immersion of the denture in NitrAdineTM-based denture tablets (Medical InterporousTM. Each method was used for 21 days. Denture biofilm was disclosed by a 1% neutral red solution and quantified by means of digital photos taken from the internal surface before and after the use of the product. Microbiological assessment was conducted to quantify Candida sp. RESULTS: An independent t-test revealed a significant lower biofilm percentage for the experimental group (4.7, 95% CI 2.4 to 7.9 in comparison with the control group (mean 37.5, 95% CI 28.2 to 48.1 (t38=7.996, p<0.001. A significant reduction of yeast colony forming units could be found after treatment with Medical InterporousTM denture tablets as compared to the control group (Mann-Whitney test, Z=1.90; p<0.05. CONCLUSION: The present findings suggest that NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets are efficient in removal of denture biofilm. In addition, a clear antimicrobial action was demonstrated. Therefore, they should be recommended as a routine denture maintenance method for the prevention of the development of microbial biofilm induced denture stomatitis.

  4. Research advances of photosensitizer in dental plaque biofilm control in photodynamic therapy%光动力学疗法控制口腔菌斑生物膜中光敏剂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱维雯; 林居红

    2013-01-01

    Dental plaque biofilm are involved in the etiology of various oral conditiona,including caries,periodontal diseases,endodontic diseases and candidiasis.Current treatment techniques involve mechanical disruption of dental plaque biofilm and chemical methods,however,both of them have their limitations.Therefore,looking for a new control method of dental plaque biofilm in clinical will have a high application value.The transfer of energy from the activated photosensitizer to available oxygen results in the formation of toxic oxygen species,such as singlet oxygen and free radicals.They can damage proteins,lipids,nucleic acids,and other cellular components.Photodynamic therapy mainly involved photosensitizer,light and oxygen,which the core substance is photosensitizer.This paper reviews the photosensitizer in the control of dental plaque biofilm.%口腔菌斑生物膜与口腔多种疾病相关,包括龋病、牙周病、牙髓疾病、念珠菌病等,目前控制菌斑生物膜的方法主要是机械清除法和化学药物法,但两者皆有其局限性.因此,寻找一种新的控制菌斑生物膜的方法在临床上有很高的应用价值.光动力学疗法是利用激活的光敏剂将能量传递给可利用的氧,生成单线态氧和自由基等有毒性的氧种类,破坏细胞的蛋白质、脂质、核酸及其他成分以达到杀灭致病菌的方法.光动力学疗法主要涉及光敏剂、光源和氧,其中光敏剂是核心物质.本文就拟光动力学疗法控制口腔菌斑生物膜中光敏剂的发展及研究现状作一综述.

  5. Removable partial dentures with rotational paths of insertion: problem analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firtell, D N; Jacobson, T E

    1983-07-01

    Removable partial dentures designed to use a rotational path of insertion are technique sensitive. When indicated and when the principles discussed are followed, a denture that uses a rotational path can be highly successful. Tooth coverage can be decreased, which is an advantage in plaque control, caries reduction, and periodontal support. Esthetics can be improved without resorting to intracoronal retainers, and the number of components subject to distortion is reduced. When properly designed and constructed, use of a rotational path of insertion can result in a removable partial denture that is strong, hygienic, and esthetic.

  6. Plaque control and oral hygiene methods

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The experimental gingivitis study of Löe et al.1 demonstrated a cause and effect relationship between plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation, and helped to establish plaque\\/biofilm as the primary risk factor for gingivitis. When healthy individuals withdrew oral hygiene efforts, gingival inflammation ensued within 21 days in all subjects. Once effective plaque removal was recommenced, clinical gingival health was quickly re-established – indicating that plaque-associated inflammation is modifiable by plaque control. As current consensus confirms that gingivitis and periodontitis may be viewed as a continuum of disease,2 the rationale for achieving effective plaque control is clear.

  7. The effect of a commercial probiotic drink on oral microbiota in healthy complete denture wearers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutula, Justyna; Coulthwaite, Lisa; Thomas, Linda; Verran, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Background It is acknowledged that oral and general health status declines with age. The global population of denture wearers is increasing, so is the incidence of denture biofilm-related problems, such as denture-associated stomatitis, aspiration pneumonia and malodour. It has been suggested that consumption of probiotic bacteria may improve oral health. However, the effects of probiotics on the oral microbiota of denture wearers have received little attention. Methods The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of consumption of a commercial probiotic product (Yakult) on microbiota of saliva, tongue and denture biofilm in healthy complete denture wearers. Eight healthy complete denture-wearing National Health Service (NHS) patients undertook a 7-week trial comprising three phases: baseline; 4-week consumption of one bottle of Yakult per day, each containing a minimum 6.5×109 viable cells of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS); 4-week washout period. The microbial viability and composition of saliva, tongue dorsum coating and denture biofilm were assessed using a range of solid selective and indicator media. Questionnaires were used to explore participants’ denture cleaning habits and impact of wearing dentures on their life quality and well-being [modified oral health impact profile (OHIP-14)] prior to and after the study. Results Seven volunteers (1 male, 6 females) completed the trial. LcS temporarily colonised oral cavity and denture surface. There was no significant change in the viability of Streptococcus mutans, acidogenic microorganisms, total anaerobic species and Gram-negative obligate anaerobes between study phases. There was no obvious effect of LcS on occurrence and viability of Candida. Participants presented a good general knowledge of denture hygiene and their responses to OHIP-14 questionnaires improved after completing the study (p=0.16). Conclusion It appeared that 4-week consumption of probiotic drink had no overall effect on

  8. The effect of a commercial probiotic drink on oral microbiota in healthy complete denture wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Sutula

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background : It is acknowledged that oral and general health status declines with age. The global population of denture wearers is increasing, so is the incidence of denture biofilm-related problems, such as denture-associated stomatitis, aspiration pneumonia and malodour. It has been suggested that consumption of probiotic bacteria may improve oral health. However, the effects of probiotics on the oral microbiota of denture wearers have received little attention. Methods : The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of consumption of a commercial probiotic product (Yakult on microbiota of saliva, tongue and denture biofilm in healthy complete denture wearers. Eight healthy complete denture-wearing National Health Service (NHS patients undertook a 7-week trial comprising three phases: baseline; 4-week consumption of one bottle of Yakult per day, each containing a minimum 6.5×109 viable cells of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS; 4-week washout period. The microbial viability and composition of saliva, tongue dorsum coating and denture biofilm were assessed using a range of solid selective and indicator media. Questionnaires were used to explore participants’ denture cleaning habits and impact of wearing dentures on their life quality and well-being [modified oral health impact profile (OHIP-14] prior to and after the study. Results : Seven volunteers (1 male, 6 females completed the trial. LcS temporarily colonised oral cavity and denture surface. There was no significant change in the viability of Streptococcus mutans, acidogenic microorganisms, total anaerobic species and Gram-negative obligate anaerobes between study phases. There was no obvious effect of LcS on occurrence and viability of Candida. Participants presented a good general knowledge of denture hygiene and their responses to OHIP-14 questionnaires improved after completing the study (p=0.16. Conclusion : It appeared that 4-week consumption of probiotic drink had

  9. Characterization of complete denture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srivastava, Rajeev; Choukse, Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Characterization is a procedure in which the character or collective qualities of a person are introduced in the complete denture, either by modification of teeth or denture bases, to make it appear...

  10. Análise dos métodos de contagem de pontos e planímetro na quantificação do biofilme da dentadura: um estudo de validação metodológica Analysis of the point-counting and planimetric methods in the quantification of the biofilm of dentures: a study of methodological validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseana Aparecida Gomes FERNANDES

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Dois métodos de quantificação de biofilme da dentadura (contagem de pontos e planímetro foram testados e comparados com o método de pesagem de papel e Índice de Higiene de Prótese. Superfícies internas de 62 próteses foram coradas, fotografadas e as áreas total e do biofilme foram projetadas em papel e contornadas com grafite. O método de contagem de pontos (experimental 1 foi aplicado com uma grade de pontos. Para o método do planímetro (experimental 2, as áreas foram medidas com um planímetro digital e para o método de pesagem (controle 1 foram recortadas e pesadas em balança de precisão. No Índice de Higiene de Prótese (controle 2, utilizou-se a atribuição de escores. Os resultados mostraram uma porcentagem de concordância entre os métodos experimentais e controle 1 de 82% (contagem de pontos e 95% (planímetro, bem como alto grau de correlação (r = 0,98; r = 0,99 entre os valores obtidos. Quando comparados com o controle 2, houve concordância em 55% (contagem de pontos e 37% (planímetro dos casos. Os métodos experimentais podem ser úteis em estudos clínicos para avaliação da eficácia de agentes de higienização.Two methods of quantification of the biofilm (point-counting and planimetric were tested and compared with the paper-weighing method and with the Prosthesis Hygiene Index. The internal surfaces of 62 complete dentures were stained and photographed. The slides were projected on a paper sheet. The total area and the area covered with biofilm were contoured using a black pencil. The point-counting method (experimental 1 was carried out on a mesh of equidistant points. For the planimetric method (experimental 2, the areas of interest were measured by means of a digital planimeter. In the paper-weighing method (control 1 the areas of interest were cut and weighed on a precision scale. In the determination of the Prosthesis Hygiene Index (control 2, the accumulation of biofilm was estimated by means of a

  11. Clinical and antimicrobial efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets in complete denture wearers

    Science.gov (United States)

    SILVA-LOVATO, Cláudia Helena; DE WEVER, Bart; ADRIAENS, Els; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; WATANABE, Evandro; PISANI, Maria Xavier; de SOUZA, Rafael Freitas; ITO, Isabel Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the efficacy of NitrAdineTM-based disinfecting cleaning tablets for complete denture, in terms of denture biofilm removal and antimicrobial action. Material and methods Forty complete denture wearers (14 men and 26 women) with a mean age of 62.3±9.0 years were randomly assigned to two groups and were instructed to clean their dentures according to two methods: brushing (control) - 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals; brushing and immersion (experimental) - brushing the denture 3 times a day with denture brush and tap water following meals and immersion of the denture in NitrAdineTM-based denture tablets (Medical InterporousTM). Each method was used for 21 days. Denture biofilm was disclosed by a 1% neutral red solution and quantified by means of digital photos taken from the internal surface before and after the use of the product. Microbiological assessment was conducted to quantify Candida sp. Results An independent t-test revealed a significant lower biofilm percentage for the experimental group (4.7, 95% CI 2.4 to 7.9) in comparison with the control group (mean 37.5, 95% CI 28.2 to 48.1) (t38=7.996, pdenture tablets as compared to the control group (Mann-Whitney test, Z=1.90; pdenture biofilm. In addition, a clear antimicrobial action was demonstrated. Therefore, they should be recommended as a routine denture maintenance method for the prevention of the development of microbial biofilm-induced denture stomatitis. PMID:21308285

  12. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva-coate...

  13. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva...

  14. Swallowed dentures: Two cases and a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Gachabayov

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Fixed dentures can be accidentally ingested as well as removable dentures. Denture loosening leads to accidental denture ingestion. Patients with denture loosening should be recommended to visit dentist as soon as possible.

  15. Viable Compositional Analysis of an Eleven Species Oral Polymicrobial Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Leighann; Lappin, Gillian; O'Donnell, Lindsay E.; Millhouse, Emma; Millington, Owain R.; Bradshaw, David J.; Axe, Alyson S.; Williams, Craig; Nile, Christopher J.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Polymicrobial biofilms are abundant in clinical disease, particularly within the oral cavity. Creating complex biofilm models that recapitulate the polymicrobiality of oral disease are important in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In order to do this accurately we require the ability to undertake compositional analysis, in addition to determine individual cell viability, which is difficult using conventional microbiology. The aim of this study was to develop a defined multispecies denture biofilm model in vitro, and to assess viable compositional analysis following defined oral hygiene regimens. Methods: An in vitro multispecies denture biofilm containing various oral commensal and pathogenic bacteria and yeast was created on poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Denture hygiene regimens tested against the biofilm model included brushing only, denture cleansing only and combinational brushing and denture cleansing. Biofilm composition and viability were assessed by culture (CFU) and molecular (qPCR) methodologies. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were also employed to visualize changes in denture biofilms following treatment. Results: Combinational treatment of brushing and denture cleansing had the greatest impact on multispecies denture biofilms, reducing the number of live cells by more than 2 logs, and altering the overall composition in favor of streptococci. This was even more evident during the sequential testing, whereby daily sequential treatment reduced the total and live number of bacteria and yeast more than those treated intermittently. Bacteria and yeast remaining following treatment tended to aggregate in the pores of the PMMA, proving more difficult to fully eradicate the biofilm. Conclusions: Overall, we are the first to develop a method to enable viable compositional analysis of an 11 species denture biofilm following chemotherapeutic challenge. We were able to demonstrate viable cell

  16. Effects of gallnut tannic acid on Streptococcus mutans plaque biofilm formation: An in vitro study%五倍子单宁酸影响变异链球菌生物膜形成的体外研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娜; 赵春苗; 程小刚; 李经纬; 付建军; 王晓娟; 唐荣银; 余擎

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of gallnut tannic acid on Streptococcus mutans plaque biofilm forma- tion in Bioflux System. METHODS: Streptococcus mutans was incubated in the observation zone of Bioflux200 System for 30 min, then BHIS solution (control group) , BHIS containing 8mg/mL or 16mg/mL Gallnut tannic acid, BHIS solution containing 2 g/L chlorhexidine (positive control group) were added to the inlet respectively. The bacteria were continuously cultured under 0. 8 dyne shear force for 12 h. The biofilm formation was observed under confocal laser scanning microscope after staining with LIVE/DEAD ? BacLightTM Bacterial Viability Kit. RESULTS; Complete plaque biofilm was formed in the control group, and most bacteria was live. No biofilm formation was observed in the 2 gallnut tanic acid treatment groups, only a few of sparsely distributed live and dead bacteria could be found. In the chlorhexidine group, no plaque biofilm formation was observed and only scattered dead bacteria could be seen. CONCLUSION ; Gallnut tannic acid can inhibit the Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation under shear force.%目的:在微流体系统(Bioflux System)中观察五倍子单宁酸对变异链球菌生物膜形成的影响作用.方法:Bioflux200系统中接种复苏的变异链球菌至观察区,静置30 min后,分别在各进孔加入BHIS液(对照组)、含五倍子单宁酸终末浓度分为8 mg/mL(实验1组)、16 mg/mL(实验2组)的BHIS液及含2 g/L洗必泰的BHIS液(阳性对照组);然后在0.8 dyne剪切力作用下连续培养12h;活菌死菌荧光染色剂(LIVE/DEAD(R)BacLightTM)染色后在激光共聚焦扫描显微镜下观察各组生物膜的形成情况.结果:对照组形成了较完整的菌斑生物膜且视野内多为活菌;两种浓度五倍子单宁酸组均无菌斑生物膜形成,只可观察到少量散在的死菌和活菌;洗必泰组亦无菌斑生物膜的形成,且视野内基本为散在的死菌存在.结论:一定浓度五倍子单宁

  17. On denture marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrman, H I; DiZinno, J A; Wasén, J; René, N

    1999-06-01

    During the last decades in Sweden dentures have been permanently marked with a stainless steel metal band incorporated into the acrylic and containing the patient's birth date, a special number, and "S" for Sweden. The last recommendation issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare states that "the patients shall always be offered denture marking and be informed about the benefit thereof. Denture marking is not permitted if the patient refuses it". Requirements for denture markers have been that they should be biologically inert (when incorporated into the denture), not be expensive, be easy to inscribe, be possible to retrieve after an accident, and survive elevated temperatures for a reasonable time under normal circumstances. Although the frequency of edentulousness has decreased in recent years due to the improvement in oral health there remains a need to address the issue of marking of complete dentures, because there is a large variation in the oral status of populations in different countries. Given that only one marked denture can reveal the identity of a deceased person when all other methods fail to do so, makes it worthwhile. Furthermore, denture marking is important in long-term care facilities. We have investigated the issue of denture marking in Europe and in the United States. The results from the European survey show that denture marking is, to our knowledge regulated by law only in Sweden and Iceland. In the US denture marking is so far mandatory in 21 states while New York State requires dentures to be marked if the patient requests it and several other states impose the obligation to mark dentures on long-term care facilities. Since there is no international consensus regarding the issue of denture marking it is important to address it. A survey from the Nordic countries has shown that if denture marking was in general use, the contribution to the establishment of identity by forensic odontology in cases of fire would increase by about 10

  18. Prevalence of Candida spp. among healthy denture and nondenture wearers with respect to hygiene and age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharathi Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentures are inert and nonshading surfaces and therefore get easily colonized by Candida species. Subsequent biofilm produced by them lead to denture stomatitis and candidiasis. This study was aimed to understand the prevalence of Candida species among healthy denture and nondenture wearers with respect to their age and hygiene status. Swabs were collected from 50 complete dentures and 50 non-denture wearers and processed on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar. Identification of Candida species was done by staining and a battery of biochemical tests. Data obtained was correlated with age & oral hygiene and statistical analysis was performed. Candida was isolated from both denture and nondenture wearers. Prevalence of different Candida species was significantly higher in denture wearers and found predominated by C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. dubliensis and C. glabrata. Among nondenture wearers, C. albicans and C. tropicalis were isolated. Prevalence of Candida increased with increasing age among denture wearers. Men presented declining denture hygiene compared to women with increasing age. In comparison to nondenture wearers, multispecies of Candida colonized the dentures thus presenting higher risk of candidiasis especially with increasing age.

  19. Prevalence of Candida spp. among healthy denture and nondenture wearers with respect to hygiene and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Bharathi; Shekar, Malathi; Maiti, Biswajit; Karunasagar, Indrani; Padiyath, Sreeshma

    2015-01-01

    Dentures are inert and nonshading surfaces and therefore get easily colonized by Candida species. Subsequent biofilm produced by them lead to denture stomatitis and candidiasis. This study was aimed to understand the prevalence of Candida species among healthy denture and nondenture wearers with respect to their age and hygiene status. Swabs were collected from 50 complete dentures and 50 non-denture wearers and processed on Sabouraud's dextrose agar. Identification of Candida species was done by staining and a battery of biochemical tests. Data obtained was correlated with age & oral hygiene and statistical analysis was performed. Candida was isolated from both denture and nondenture wearers. Prevalence of different Candida species was significantly higher in denture wearers and found predominated by C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. dubliensis and C. glabrata. Among nondenture wearers, C. albicans and C. tropicalis were isolated. Prevalence of Candida increased with increasing age among denture wearers. Men presented declining denture hygiene compared to women with increasing age. In comparison to nondenture wearers, multispecies of Candida colonized the dentures thus presenting higher risk of candidiasis especially with increasing age.

  20. Prognoses of new complete dentures from the patient's denture assessment of existing dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komagamine, Yuriko; Kanazawa, Manabu; Sasaki, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Yusuke; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-06-01

    The aim was to determine prognostic factors affecting frequent post-delivery adjustments of new complete dentures using patients' assessments of existing complete dentures. A total of 125 edentulous participants (56 men, 69 women; mean age, 76.4 years) who required new complete dentures evaluated existing dentures using the patient's denture assessment (PDA), a questionnaire regarding the self-assessment of dentures composed of 22 question items and containing six subscales: "function," "lower denture," "upper denture," "expectation," "esthetics and speech," and "importance." Moreover, the numbers of post-delivery adjustments of new dentures were recorded. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify significant factors for frequent adjustments of new dentures with five subscales of the PDA (excluding "importance"), level of mandibular ridge resorption, and age as independent variables. The analysis showed that "function," "esthetics and speech," and level of mandibular ridge resorption were significant variables for a frequent number of post-delivery adjustments of new complete dentures. The results suggested that patients' assessments of existing dentures using the PDA might allow a prediction of prognosis for complete denture treatments. Additionally, low "function" scores and high "esthetics and speech" scores for existing dentures and high levels of mandibular ridge resorption were significant prognostic factors affecting frequent post-delivery adjustments of new complete dentures. It may be difficult for edentulous persons to adapt to new complete dentures, especially those who have complaints about mastication and swallowing with existing dentures and poor mandibular ridges, but are satisfied with esthetics and speech.

  1. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients.

  2. Clinical performance of a light-cured denture base material compared to polymethylmethacrylate--a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke-Wehrße, Hanna-Lena; Giese-Kraft, Katja; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical long-term performance of a visible light-cured resin (VLCR) denture base material and to compare it to a well-established polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based denture acrylic in a randomized split-mouth clinical long-term study. One hundred removable partial dentures in 90 patients, with at least two saddles each, were investigated. One saddle was made of VLCR, while the other was made of PMMA at random. Plaque adhesion, tissue reaction, and technical parameters of the dentures were assessed 6, 12, and 18 months after treatment. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Though VLCR showed higher plaque adhesion than PMMA after 6, 12, and 18 months (p denture acrylic and metal and the boundary between denture acrylic and denture tooth PMMA was rated higher than VLCR. The surface quality of the upper side of the denture saddles showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). Neither VLCR nor PMMA showed discoloration at any point in time (p > 0.05). It can be concluded that VLCR is a viable alternative for the production of removable dentures. Especially in patients with hypersensitivities to PMMA, VLCR is particularly suitable for clinical use.

  3. Evaluate the Effect of Commercially Available Denture Cleansers on Surface Hardness and Roughness of Denture Liners at Various Time Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hilal S.; Singh, Sumeet; Hari, Prasad A.; Amarnath, G. S.; Kundapur, Vinaya; Pasha, Naveed; Anand, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Chemical cleansing by denture cleansers is first choice for denture plaque control. The most common problems while using denture cleansers are hardening, porosity, odor sorption, water sorption, solubility, and colour change, bacterial and fungal growth. Chemical cleansing procedures have been found to have an effect on the physical and mechanical properties of denture liners. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available denture cleansers on surface hardness and roughness of acrylic and silicon based denture liners at various time interval. Method: Two autopolymerising denture liners Kooliner (acrylic) and GC reline soft (silicon) were tested with two commercially available denture cleansers, polident and efferdent plus. Total of 120 specimens were prepared and all the specimens were divided into six groups based on the relining materials and denture cleansers used. Surface hardness and surface roughness was tested using Shore A durometer and profilometer respectively at the end of day 1, day 7, day 30 and day 90. All the specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Cleanser solution was prepared daily by adding Polident and Efferdent plus denture cleanser tablet into 250ml of enough very warm (not hot) water. Acrylic and silicon liner groups were cleansed in a solution of denture cleanser and water for 15 minutes daily, rinsed with water and stored in artificial saliva at room temperature. The data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and independent t-test. Result: The acrylic soft lining showed gradual hardening and increase in surface roughness after immersion in denture cleanser and also with time. Acrylic liner material showed maximum hardness and roughness with Polident followed by Efferdent plus and water (control group). Silicone lining material showed a slight difference in hardness and roughness between the test group and control group. There was a slight increase in hardness in

  4. The Oral Microbiome of Denture Wearers Is Influenced by Levels of Natural Dentition

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donnell, Lindsay E.; Robertson, Douglas; Nile, Christopher J.; Cross, Laura J.; Riggio, Marcello; Sherriff, Andrea; Bradshaw, David; Lambert, Margaret; Malcolm, Jennifer; Buijs, Mark J.; Zaura, Egija; Crielaard, Wim; Brandt, Bernd W.; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The composition of dental plaque has been well defined, whereas currently there is limited understanding of the composition of denture plaque and how it directly influences denture related stomatitis (DS). The aims of this study were to compare the microbiomes of denture wearers, and to understand the implications of these towards inter-kingdom and host-pathogen interactions within the oral cavity. Methods Swab samples were obtained from 123 participants wearing either a complete or partial denture; the bacterial composition of each sample was determined using bar-coded illumina MiSeq sequencing of the bacterial hypervariable V4 region of 16S rDNA. Sequencing data processing was undertaken using QIIME, clustered in Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) and assigned to taxonomy. The dentures were sonicated to remove the microbial flora residing on the prosthesis, sonicate was then cultured using diagnostic colorex Candida media. Samples of unstimulated saliva were obtained and antimicrobial peptides (AMP) levels were measured by ELISA. Results We have shown that dental and denture plaques are significantly distinct both in composition and diversity and that the oral microbiome composition of a denture wearer is variable and is influenced by the location within the mouth. Dentures and mucosa were predominantly made up of Bacilli and Actinobacteria. Moreover, the presence of natural teeth has a significant impact on the overall microbial composition, when compared to the fully edentulous. Furthermore, increasing levels of Candida spp. positively correlate with Lactobacillus spp. AMPs were quantified, though showed no specific correlations. Conclusions This is the first study to provide a detailed understanding of the oral microbiome of denture wearers and has provided evidence that DS development is more complex than simply a candidal infection. Both fungal and bacterial kingdoms clearly play a role in defining the progression of DS, though we were unable to

  5. The Oral Microbiome of Denture Wearers Is Influenced by Levels of Natural Dentition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay E O'Donnell

    Full Text Available The composition of dental plaque has been well defined, whereas currently there is limited understanding of the composition of denture plaque and how it directly influences denture related stomatitis (DS. The aims of this study were to compare the microbiomes of denture wearers, and to understand the implications of these towards inter-kingdom and host-pathogen interactions within the oral cavity.Swab samples were obtained from 123 participants wearing either a complete or partial denture; the bacterial composition of each sample was determined using bar-coded illumina MiSeq sequencing of the bacterial hypervariable V4 region of 16S rDNA. Sequencing data processing was undertaken using QIIME, clustered in Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs and assigned to taxonomy. The dentures were sonicated to remove the microbial flora residing on the prosthesis, sonicate was then cultured using diagnostic colorex Candida media. Samples of unstimulated saliva were obtained and antimicrobial peptides (AMP levels were measured by ELISA.We have shown that dental and denture plaques are significantly distinct both in composition and diversity and that the oral microbiome composition of a denture wearer is variable and is influenced by the location within the mouth. Dentures and mucosa were predominantly made up of Bacilli and Actinobacteria. Moreover, the presence of natural teeth has a significant impact on the overall microbial composition, when compared to the fully edentulous. Furthermore, increasing levels of Candida spp. positively correlate with Lactobacillus spp. AMPs were quantified, though showed no specific correlations.This is the first study to provide a detailed understanding of the oral microbiome of denture wearers and has provided evidence that DS development is more complex than simply a candidal infection. Both fungal and bacterial kingdoms clearly play a role in defining the progression of DS, though we were unable to show a defined role for

  6. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab K

    2015-08-01

    Intravascular device-related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis-associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens-related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms.

  7. Candida Biofilms: Development, Architecture, and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHANDRA, JYOTSNA; MUKHERJEE, PRANAB K.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular device–related infections are often associated with biofilms (microbial communities encased within a polysaccharide-rich extracellular matrix) formed by pathogens on the surfaces of these devices. Candida species are the most common fungi isolated from catheter-, denture-, and voice prosthesis–associated infections and also are commonly isolated from contact lens–related infections (e.g., fungal keratitis). These biofilms exhibit decreased susceptibility to most antimicrobial agents, which contributes to the persistence of infection. Recent technological advances have facilitated the development of novel approaches to investigate the formation of biofilms and identify specific markers for biofilms. These studies have provided extensive knowledge of the effect of different variables, including growth time, nutrients, and physiological conditions, on biofilm formation, morphology, and architecture. In this article, we will focus on fungal biofilms (mainly Candida biofilms) and provide an update on the development, architecture, and resistance mechanisms of biofilms. PMID:26350306

  8. Growth inhibition factors for the bacteria consist of dental plaque biofilm%牙菌斑生物膜的细菌生长抑制因子

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴桂堂; 周黎黎

    2012-01-01

    牙菌斑生物膜中的细菌是龋病发生的先决条件,而口腔内存在多种细菌生长的抑制因子,它们对细菌的生长或菌斑的形成起一定抑制作用.细菌生长的抑制因子主要来自宿主和细菌本身产生的细菌素以及其他代谢产物,本文就致龋菌生长抑制因子的种类及作用的研究进展作一综述.%The existence of bacteria in dental plaque is the precondition for dental caries to occur. Many inhibition factors (IF) lie in oral cavity restrain bacteria to grow and form dental plaque. These inhibition factors usually come from host and bacteriocin which generated by kinds of cariogenic bacteria, and also from kinds of metabolized product. This review mainly introduced research progress on the species and function of IF in growth of caries-related bacteria.

  9. Biofilms and the food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past, interest in biofilms was limited to research related to water distribution systems, waste water treatment and dental plaques. Biofilm has become a more popular research topic in many other areas in recent years including food safety. Biofilm formation can compromise the sanitation of food surfaces and environmental surfaces by spreading detached organisms to other areas of processing plants. Unfortunately, these detached organisms are not similar to normal microorganisms suspended in an aquatic environment but are more resistant to several stresses or microbial inactivation including some food preservation methods. Microstructures of biofilms as revealed by different types of microscopic techniques showed that biofilms are highly complex and consist of many symbiotic organisms, some of which are human pathogens. This article reviewed the process of biofilm formation, the significance of biofilms on food or food contact surfaces, their ability to protect foodborne pathogens from environmental stresses and recent methods for the study of biofilms on food contact surfaces.

  10. Confocal Raman microscopy for identification of bacterial species in biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-03-01

    Implemented through a confocal microscope, Raman spectroscopy has been used to distinguish between biofilm samples of two common oral bacteria species, Streptococcus sanguinis and mutans, which are associated with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Biofilms of these species are studied as a model of dental plaque. A prediction model has been calibrated and validated using pure biofilms. This model has been used to identify the species of transferred and dehydrated samples (much like a plaque scraping) as well as hydrated biofilms in situ. Preliminary results of confocal Raman mapping of species in an intact two-species biofilm will be shown.

  11. Hollow Maxillary Complete Denture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Radke, Usha; Mundhe, Darshana

    2011-01-01

    .... The resorption occurs at a faster rate in mandibular arch as compared to the maxillary arch; but severely atrophic maxillae with large interridge distance often pose a clinical challenge during fabrication of a successful maxillary complete denture...

  12. DENTURE WEARER: ALCALIGENES SPECIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with Alcaligenes species infection in a patient using an upper single ... patient was HIV negative and VDRL screening for syphilis was also negative. ... status of denture and the underlying oral mucosal, to prevent opportunistic.

  13. In vitro study of biofilm formation and effectiveness of antimicrobial treatment on various dental material surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Finnegan, M B; Özkan, S; Kim, Y; Lillehoj, P B; Ho, C-M; Lux, R; Mito, R; Loewy, Z; Shi, W

    2010-12-01

    Elevated proportions of Candida albicans in biofilms formed on dentures are associated with stomatitis whereas Streptococcus mutans accumulation on restorative materials can cause secondary caries. Candida albicans, S. mutans, saliva-derived and C. albicans/saliva-derived mixed biofilms were grown on different materials including acrylic denture, porcelain, hydroxyapatite (HA), and polystyrene. The resulting biomass was analysed by three-dimensional image quantification and assessment of colony-forming units. The efficacy of biofilm treatment with a dissolved denture cleansing tablet (Polident(®)) was also evaluated by colony counting. Biofilms formed on HA exhibited the most striking differences in biomass accumulation: biofilms comprising salivary bacteria accrued the highest total biomass whereas C. albicans biofilm formation was greatly reduced on the HA surface compared with other materials, including the acrylic denture surface. These results substantiate clinical findings that acrylic dentures can comprise a reservoir for C. albicans, which renders patients more susceptible to C. albicans infections and stomatitis. Additionally, treatment efficacy of the same type of biofilms varied significantly depending on the surface. Although single-species biofilms formed on polystyrene surfaces exhibited the highest susceptibility to the treatment, the most surviving cells were recovered from HA surfaces for all types of biofilms tested. This study demonstrates that the nature of a surface influences biofilm characteristics including biomass accumulation and susceptibility to antimicrobial treatments. Such treatments should therefore be evaluated on the surfaces colonized by the target pathogen(s).

  14. Sectional dentures revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karir, Naveen; Hindocha, Vishali; Walmsley, A Damien

    2012-04-01

    Sectional dentures are constructed in separate parts which join together intra-orally to create a single prosthesis. They are used to exploit undercuts around teeth, hard and soft tissues which require more than one path of insertion, and are usually of split pin or locking bolts design. By using two case studies, we aim to illustrate the provision of sectional dentures and to which situations their uses are best suited. A 30-year-old male was referred to the Department of Prosthetics at the Birmingham Dental Hospital for a replacement upper partial cobalt chrome denture of a Kennedy Class IV bounded saddle. The patient had a history of failed upper cobalt chrome removable partial dentures owing to loss of retention and poor stability over the previous 12 months. A 40-year-old female patient was referred by her GDP for restoration of a bounded saddle in the lower right quadrant with a history of intolerance to previous dentures. These two cases demonstrate the successful use of sectional dentures in the aesthetic zone. Although more technically demanding, they lie well within the scope of general practice and offer patients alternative solutions from dental implants and bridgework. These cases highlight the importance of the use of alternative prosthetic techniques which can be simple and achievable for all practitioners. Sectional dentures are a treatment modality for the edentulous space where the presence of one or more undercuts prevents restoration by more conventional techniques. This paper highlights some of the situations in which sectional dentures can be employed and emphasizes their use in general practice.

  15. Oral biofilm architecture on natural teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M Barbara M; Degener, John E; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmür, Rudolf; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2010-02-24

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species.

  16. Oral biofilm architecture on natural teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Zijnge

    Full Text Available Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species.

  17. Development of Candida-associated denture stomatitis: new insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Pereira-Cenci

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite therapeutic progress, opportunistic oral fungal infectious diseases have increased in prevalence, especially in denture wearers. The combination of entrapment of yeast cells in irregularities in denture-base and denture-relining materials, poor oral hygiene and several systemic factors is the most probable cause for the onset of this infectious disease. Hence colonization and growth on prostheses by Candida species are of clinical importance. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss several key factors controlling the adhesion of Candida species which are relevant to denture-associated stomatitis. Although there is some consensus on the role of surface properties, studies on several other factors, as the use of denture liners, salivary properties and yeast-bacterial interactions, have shown contradictory findings. A comprehensive fundamental understanding is hampered by conflicting findings due to the large variations in experimental protocols, while other factors have never been thoroughly studied. Surface free energy and surface roughness control the initial adherence, but temporal changes have not been reported. Neither have in vivo studies shown if the substratum type is critical in dictating biofilm accumulation during longer periods in the oral environment. The contribution of saliva is unclear due to factors like variations in its collection and handling. Initial findings have disclosed that also bacteria are crucial for the successful establishment of Candida in biofilms, but the clinical significance of this observation is yet to be confirmed. In conclusion, there is a need to standardize experimental procedures, to bridge the gap between laboratory and in vivo methodologies and findings and - in general - to thoroughly investigate the factors that modulate the initial attachment and subsequent colonization of denture-base materials and the oral mucosa of patients subjected to Candida infections. Information on how

  18. Survival of microorganisms on complete dentures following ultrasonic cleaning combined with immersion in peroxide-based cleanser solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Yasuhiro; Seto, Katsura; Kamashita, Yuji; Kaji, Akihito; Kurono, Asutsugu; Nagaoka, Eiichi

    2014-09-01

    To compare ultrasonic cleaning combined with immersion in a commercially available peroxide-based cleanser solution (Polident(®) ) with other denture cleaning methods, we examined the quantity of micro-organisms that survived on dentures before and after various cleaning methods. One hundred complete dentures belonging to 50 nursing home residents (mean age, 84.6 years) were randomly assigned to five groups according to the cleaning method employed: (A) immersion in Polident(®) solution alone, (B) brushing with water, (C) ultrasonic cleaning with water, (D) method (A) followed by method (B) and (E) ultrasonic cleaning combined with immersion in Polident(®) solution. Before and after the dentures had been cleaned, denture biofilm was collected from the mucosal surface of each lateral half of the examined dentures. The collected micro-organisms were cultured, presumptively identified by standard methods and quantified. Comparisons between the five cleaning methods were carried out using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's multiple comparisons test. The denture cleaning methods involving the use of Polident(®) solution (methods A, D and E) were significantly more effective at denture disinfection than the other methods (p dentures and is a suitable method for elderly individuals who find brushing their dentures difficult. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Study on the Influence and Mechanism of Photodynamic Therapy on the Cariogenic Bacteria in Dental Plaque Biofilms%光动力疗法对牙菌斑生物膜内致龋菌的影响及作用机制的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常秀明; 邹朝晖; 阴慧娟

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the killing effects and mechanism of photodynamic therapy using hematoporphyrin monomethylether as photosensitizer on the cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque biofilms. Methods: S. mutans. S. sangius. L. acidophilus. A. viscosus had been chosen as the experimental bacteria to establish dental plaque biofilms model. Divide them into four groups; HMME-PDT group,HMME-PDT+ sodium azide group, cetylpyridinium chloride group, normal saline group. The influence of the cariogenic bacteria in plaque biofilms was observed according to plate counting of bacteria method. A pH reflect the acid production of cariogenic bacteria of the different treatments. Results: Compared to normal saline group, HMME-PDT and cetylpyridinium chloride made the number of cariogenic bacteria (CFU/mL) in plaque biofilms significantly reduced(Pplaque biofilms of HMME + sodium azide group was not significant different, with the bactericidal rate only 9. 47%.⊿ pH of the records showed that, HMME-PDT group could prevent the acid production of cariogenic bacteria in plaque biofilms in a certain time range (0-24h). Conclusion: PDT is an effective method in eliminating cariogenic bacteria of dental plaque biofilms and inhibiting the acid production,while singlet oxygen plays an important role in the sterile process of PDT.%目的:探讨以血卟啉单甲醚( hematoporphyrin monomethylether,HMME)为光敏剂的光动力疗法(photodynamic therapy,PDT)对牙菌斑生物膜内致龋菌的杀灭作用及机制.方法:以变形链球菌、血链球菌、嗜酸性乳杆菌和粘性放线菌为实验菌株,建立牙菌斑生物膜模型.实验分为4组:HMME- PDT组、HMME- PDT加叠氮钠组、西吡氯铵处理组、生理盐水处理组.平板菌落计数观察牙菌斑内致龋菌的活力,并测定不同处理前后pH的变化值(△pH)观察其对致龋菌产酸能力的影响.结

  20. Clinical trial for evaluation of Ricinus communis and sodium hypochlorite as denture cleanser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badaró, Maurício Malheiros; Salles, Marcela Moreira; Leite, Vanessa Maria Fagundes; Arruda, Carolina Noronha Ferraz de; Oliveira, Viviane de Cássia; Nascimento, Cássio do; Souza, Raphael Freitas de; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas de Oliveira; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated Ricinus communis and sodium hypochlorite solutions in terms of biofilm removal ability, remission of candidiasis, antimicrobial activity, and participant satisfaction. It was conducted a controlled clinical trial, randomized, double-blind, and crossover. Sixty-four denture wearers with (n=24) and without candidiasis (n=40) were instructed to brush (3 times/day) and immerse their dentures (20 min/day) in different storage solutions (S1 / S2: 0.25% / 0.5% sodium hypochlorite; S3: 10% R. communis; S4: Saline).The trial period for each solution was seven days and a washout period of seven days was used before starting the use of another solution. The variables were analyzed at baseline and after each trial period. The biofilm of inner surfaces of maxillary dentures was disclosed, photographed, and total and dyed areas were measured (Image Tool software). The percentage of biofilm was calculated. Remission of candidiasis was assessed by visual scale and score were attributed. Antimicrobial activity was assessed by the DNA-Checkerboard hybridization method. Patient satisfaction was measured using a questionnaire. S1 (4.41±7.98%) and S2 (2.93±5.23%) were more effective then S3 (6.95±10.93%) in biofilm remotion(Pcommunis and 0.25% sodium hypochlorite were effective in biofilm removal, causing remission of candidiasis and reducing the formation of microbial colonies in denture surfaces. All solutions were approved by patients.

  1. Red fluorescent dental plaque: An indicator of oral disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, C.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are worldwide the most common diseases, with dental caries and periodontal inflammatory diseases as most frequently occurring diseases. Both are strongly associated with dental plaque, which is the mass of bacteria (biofilm) that grows on surfaces in the mouth. Some dental plaque fluor

  2. Denture labeling: A new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep K Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for denture labeling is important for forensic and social reasons in case patients need to be identified individually. The importance of denture marking has long been acknowledged by the dental profession. Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature, but none till date fulfills all the prescribed ADA specifications. A simple, easy, inexpensive procedure for marking accurate identification marks on dentures with a lead foil is described here. The label caring the patient information is incorporated in the acrylic resin during the denture processing.

  3. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstraete Willy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3- concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-. Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO, nitrous oxide (N2O, and dinitrogen (N2 using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions.

  4. Exopolysaccharide Productivity and Biofilm Phenotype on Oral Commensal Bacteria as Pathogenesis of Chronic Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    2 Exopolysaccharide Productivity and Biofilm Phenotype on Oral Commensal Bacteria as Pathogenesis of Chronic Periodontitis Takeshi Yamanaka1... periodontitis is caused by dental plaque known as a complex biofilm which consists of several hundred different species of bacteria (Chen, 2001; Socransky and...species biofilm in the oral cavity can cause persistent chronic periodontitis along with the importance of dental plaque formation and maturation

  5. Denture hygiene habits among elderly patients wearing complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apratim, Abhishek; Shah, Sanket S; Sinha, Manish; Agrawal, Manisha; Chhaparia, Nidhi; Abubakkar, Abu

    2013-11-01

    To determine the denture hygiene habits in complete denture patients according to their age and time of dentures. In this study a self administered structured was developed to know the attitude of the patients regarding denture hygiene in the department of Prosthodontics. The total study sample consisted of 230 subjects including 124 (53.9%) males and 106 (46.1%) females. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 15.0 with chi-square test at p-value dentures daily once. Participants from the younger age group and who had been wearing dentures since 2 years maintain better frequency of cleaning. The majority of these subjects used water and brush for denture cleansing. After seeing the condition, half of the dentures were rated as good 50.3%, followed by fair and poor as 29.5 and 20.2% respectively. Poor condition of complete dentures seen in the population is mainly due to irregularly cleansing habits and also less usage of cleansing solutions. Dentists should give proper instructions regarding maintenance of denture hygiene.

  6. Denture Care Practices and Perceived Denture Status among Complete Denture Wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuru, Krishnam Raju V; Devi, Ganji; Grandhi, Vikram; Prasan, Kumar K; Yasangi, Manoj K; Dhanalakshmi, Mannem

    2017-01-01

    Considerable importance to oral health care was lacking in India, and oral health neglect continues to exist, which is evident in the low utilization rates and poor oral health status. Conventional dentures are the most common alternative in restoration of lost teeth. Without proper denture care practices, there is an increased risk of developing a multitude of problems. The aim of this study is to assess the denture care practices among complete denture wearers in East Godavari district, Andhra Pradesh. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Prosthodontics at the Konaseema Institute of Dental Sciences, Amalapuram, Andhra Pradesh. Patients with self-care ability and adequate overall health who were using either single or full complete dentures for more than 6 months from the time of the study were requested to participate in the study. A total of 375 study participants were given a self-administered questionnaire on denture care practices followed by clinical examination of the denture status. Statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software for windows, version 20.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). The majority of participants reported cleansing their dentures once a day, with brush and water, and had the habit of removing the dentures at night. Almost 80% of the participants reported their denture status to be good/fair. Clinical examination revealed that slightly more than half of the participants had poor denture status. This study highlights the need for improvement in patient education and counseling with respect to the maintenance of dentures and upkeep of denture hygiene. It also emphasizes the need for educating patients on how to evaluate the status of their dentures.

  7. In vivo dynamics of Streptococcus spp.and Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque biofilm analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization%荧光原位杂交观察口腔原位菌斑中链球菌和具核梭杆菌的动态变化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘靖; 王韦玮; 胡凡; 陈武

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察口腔原位菌斑形成过程中链球菌和具核梭杆菌的动态变化.方法 专业洁治后,7个志愿者佩戴可形成口内菌斑生物膜以供原位菌斑研究的上颌装置,分别佩戴12 h、1d、2d、3d、5d后,取下样本,与链球菌和具核梭杆菌的特异性寡核苷酸探针进行荧光原位杂交,于激光共聚焦显微镜下观察菌斑生物膜的形成过程及2种细菌在菌斑形成发育中的分布及比例.结果 菌斑生物膜厚度由5.26 μm逐渐发育增加为46.93 μm.12h细菌仅形成平铺片状,链球菌占绝大多数,未见具核梭杆菌;此后细菌排列趋于密集,菌斑厚度逐渐增加,最后形成团块状菌斑.链球菌在2、3d菌斑中比例下降;具核梭杆菌在5d菌斑中比例比3d上升107%.结论 链球菌在早期菌斑中为优势菌,具核梭杆菌在菌斑发育中期数量逐渐增加.2种细菌在菌斑形成中起到重要作用.%Objective To quantify formation and composition of Streptococcus spp. And Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque u-sing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Methods After professional toothcleaning, seven volunteers had to wear a special acrylic appliance, in which six specimens were inserted to allow the build-up of intra-oral biofilms. After (12 h/1 d/2 d/3 d/5 d) wearing, the specimens with the adhering biofilms were removed from the splints and stained with three oligonu-cleotide probes. Under the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm thickness (BT) was evaluated. Formation and composition of Streptococcus spp. And Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque were examined the biofilms were scanned and digital images were made. Results The thickness of formed biofilm increased from 5. 26 jjum after 12 hours after wearing to 46. 93 u,m 5 days after wearing. Streptococcus spp. Were predominant in 1 -day-old dental plaque and decreased 2 days later( P < 0.05 ). Compared to the first day

  8. Removable partial dentures without rests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinig, D A

    1994-04-01

    Ever since Bonwill recommended the use of rests on removable partial dentures in 1899, rests have been universally considered inviolate and have gone unchallenged and untested. The author claims that removable partial dentures without rests may not cause the adverse conditions usually predicted, such as gingival stripping, gingival inflammation, mutilated residual ridges, or extensive and rapid resorption of the alveolar ridges. In removable partial dentures made by the author for several patients, the residual ridge remained stable and in physiologic equilibrium when rests were not used. A history of the long-term effect on patients wearing partial dentures with and without rests is presented.

  9. The effect of a new denture adhesive on bite force until denture dislodgement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Kulak, Y.; de Baat, C.; Arikan, A.; Ucankale, M.

    2005-01-01

    : PURPOSE: Denture adhesives are used to improve the denture retention and comfort of complete denture wearers. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effect of a new denture adhesive on maximum bite force until denture dislodgement (BFDD) after adhesive application. MATERIALS AND

  10. The effect of a new denture adhesive on bite force until denture dislodgement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Özcan (Behiye); Y. Kulak (Yasemin); C. de Baat; A. Arikan (Ayla); M. Ucankale (Mert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Denture adhesives are used to improve the denture retention and comfort of complete denture wearers. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effect of a new denture adhesive on maximum bite force until denture dislodgement (BFDD) after adhesive application.

  11. The attitude of complete denture wearers towards denture adhesives in Istanbul

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Kulak, Y.; Arikan, A.; Silahtar, E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of using denture adhesives is to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved fit and comfort of their dentures and to improve their chewing ability and confidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the approach and thought of complete denture wearers to denture adhesive

  12. Do CAD/CAM dentures really release less monomer than conventional dentures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Wiedemair, Verena; Huck, Christian; Klaunzer, Florian; Steinmassl, Otto; Grunert, Ingrid; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) dentures are assumed to have more favourable material properties than conventionally fabricated dentures, among them a lower methacrylate monomer release. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures were generated from ten different master casts by using four different CAD/CAM systems. Conventional, heat-polymerised dentures served as control group. Denture weight and volume were measured; the density was calculated, and the denture surface area was assessed digitally. The monomer release after 7 days of water storage was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Whole You Nexteeth and Wieland Digital Dentures had significantly lower mean volume and weight than conventional dentures. Baltic Denture System and Whole You Nexteeth had a significantly increased density. Baltic Denture System had a significantly smaller surface area. None of the CAD/CAM dentures released significantly less monomer than the control group. All tested dentures released very low amounts of methacrylate monomer, but not significantly less than conventional dentures. A statistically significant difference might nevertheless exist in comparison to other, less recommendable denture base materials, such as the frequently used autopolymerising resins. CAD/CAM denture fabrication has numerous advantages. It enables the fabrication of dentures with lower resin volume and lower denture weight. Both could increase the patient comfort. Dentures with higher density might exhibit more favourable mechanical properties. The hypothesis that CAD/CAM dentures release less monomer than conventional dentures could, however, not be verified.

  13. The attitude of complete denture wearers towards denture adhesives in Istanbul

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Kulak, Y.; Arikan, A.; Silahtar, E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of using denture adhesives is to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved fit and comfort of their dentures and to improve their chewing ability and confidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the approach and thought of complete denture wearers to denture

  14. Bonding of acrylic denture teeth to resin denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, G A V M; Stuhlinger, M E

    2012-07-01

    Anterior teeth debonding from dentures is a common problem. This study tested the bond strength of denture teeth to two types of denture resin, with and without grooving the ridge-lap surface. Bond strength and fracture type of three different groups were compared: 1. Teeth bonded to heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA); 2. Teeth bonded to pour-type PMMA; 3. Grooved teeth bonded to pour-type PMMA. Specimens were manufactured following ISO standard 22112. Force values at failure were analysed using one-way analysis of variance, using the mixed procedure with confidence interval of 95%. Types of failure were identified as adhesive, cohesive or combination. In descending order, mean failure forces were 418.55N (Group One), 367.55N (Group Two) and 290.05N (Group Three). There was no significant difference between the means of groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.0627). Group Three differed from both other groups (p denture teeth (83% and 72% respectively); group Three showed predominantly cohesive fractures within the denture PMMA (75%). Without ridge-lap modification, the bond strengths of denture teeth to pour-type and heat-cured denture resin were similar. Failures were predominantly of cohesive nature within the teeth themselves. Grooving the ridge-lap reduced fracture resistance and led to breakages predominantly in denture PMMA.

  15. Novel denture-cleaning system based on hydroxyl radical disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Ikai, Hiroyo; Hayashi, Eisei; Shirato, Midori; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new denture-cleaning device using hydroxyl radicals generated from photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Electron spin resonance analysis demonstrated that the yield of hydroxyl radicals increased with the concentration of H2O2 and light irradiation time. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and methicillin-resistant S aureus were killed within 10 minutes with a > 5-log reduction when treated with photolysis of 500 mM H2O2; Candida albicans was killed within 30 minutes with a > 4-log reduction with photolysis of 1,000 mM H2O2. The clinical test demonstrated that the device could effectively reduce microorganisms in denture plaque by approximately 7-log order within 20 minutes.

  16. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  17. The attitude of complete denture wearers towards denture adhesives in Istanbul

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcan, M.; Kulak, Y.; ARIKAN, A.; Silahtar, E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of using denture adhesives is to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved fit and comfort of their dentures and to improve their chewing ability and confidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the approach and thought of complete denture wearers to denture adhesives and to see why they had tried denture adhesive, and their reasons for its current use or non-use through a questionnaire. One hundred and fifteen patients attending the Marmara University, Dental...

  18. Incorporation of antimicrobial macromolecules in acrylic denture base resins: a research composition and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Indumathi; Arunachalam, Kuthalingam Subbiah; Sajjan, Suresh; Ramaraju, Alluri Venkata; Rao, Bheemalingeshwara; Kamaraj, Bindu

    2014-06-01

    Contemporary research in acrylic denture base materials focuses on the development of a novel poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) resin with antimicrobial properties. Although PMMA resin has fulfilled all the requirements of an ideal denture base material, its susceptibility to microbial colonization in the oral environment is a formidable concern to clinicians. Many mechanisms including the absence of ionic charge in the methyl methacrylate resins, hydrophobic interactions, electrostatic interactions, and mechanical attachment have been found to contribute to the formation of biofilm. The present article outlines the basic categories of potential antimicrobial polymer (polymeric biocides) formulations (modified PMMA resins) and considers their applicability, biological status, and usage potential over the coming years.

  19. Treatment of Oral Multispecies Biofilms by an Anti-Biofilm Peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhejun Wang

    Full Text Available Human oral biofilms are multispecies microbial communities that exhibit high resistance to antimicrobial agents. Dental plaque gives rise to highly prevalent and costly biofilm-related oral infections, which lead to caries or other types of oral infections. We investigated the ability of the recently identified anti-biofilm peptide 1018 to induce killing of bacterial cells present within oral multispecies biofilms. At 10 μg/ml (6.5 μM, peptide 1018 was able to significantly (p50% of the biofilm being killed and >35% being dispersed in only 3 minutes. Peptide 1018 may potentially be used by itself or in combination with CHX as a non-toxic and effective anti-biofilm agent for plaque disinfection in clinical dentistry.

  20. Biofilm Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtanen, Gun Linnea; Salo, Satu

    2016-01-01

    This chapter on biofilm risks deals with biofilm formation of pathogenic microbes, sampling and detection methods, biofilm removal, and prevention of biofilm formation. Several common pathogens produce sticky and/or slimy structures in which the cells are embedded, that is, biofilms, on various s...

  1. The trial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, S H

    1977-04-01

    1. Many difficult situations can be avoided if the dentist keeps constantly aware of the physiologic, the psychologic, and the artistic factors involved in the construction of dentures, whether they be partial or complete. 2. No one would think of buying an automobile without getting adequate instruction in how to drive; neither should a patient expect to wear artifical restorations without training and practice. 3. The dentist at the try-in should check: a. The bases for fit and extension. b. Thin labial flange at frenum area. c. Posterior palatal seal and length of upper. d. Posterior tooth poisition for height of plane, relation of plane to alatragus line, tongue room, and ridge relation. e. Anterior tooth position for lip support, length, and relation to lower lip. f. Entire setup for vertical dimension of the face, test balance and simultaneous tooth contacts in all desired positions. If discrepancies exist between the articulator and the mouth, make new jaw relation records. g. Check palatal contour and incisor positions in speaking. "F" and "V" sounds to test the upper incisor, sibilant sounds for vertical dimension and lower-to-upper incisal relationships. h. Wax-up for support and proper external form. If tori exist on upper or lower, be sure there is sufficient thickness to allow relief later on. i. Be sure to repeat and continue instruction of the patient in his understanding and handling of the new dentures. Now, in addition to all these checks to dentist makes, he must constantly anticipate the thoughts and attitudes of the patient and interpret them for better rapport and ultimate patient understanding. No stage in complete dentures is anticipated with such mixed emotions as is the try-in. No stage is so significant to the future success or failure of the patient to take dentures in his stride. No stage has so much potential for making the person happy or sinking him into the depths of despair. The return of self-confidence, the pride in appearance

  2. Prosthetic stomatitis with removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozalieva Yu.Yu.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Research Objective: To study patients with prosthetic stomatitis, who use the removable laminar dentures. Materials: The consultations and treatment of 79 patients aged 47-65 years have been conducted. The patients have been divided into two clinical groups. The first clinical group (39 persons with the performance of immediate prosthet-ics; the second control clinical group (40 persons — the permanent dentures were produced without the preliminary instruction. Results: All the patients, having the laminar dentures without the preliminary use of immediate constructions of dentures, in spite of repeated correction of them, have had changes of dentures and transitory fold. Patients have been exposed to prosthetic stomatitis of different etiology (without trauma; the single-shot or multiple correction of dentures by the method of rebasing with using of cold cure plastics has been made. Conclusion: Structural and functional changes of dentition during the prosthetic stomatitis lead to disorders, associated by the mucositis. Use of the term of «prosthetic stomatitis» reflects etiological and pathogenetic component of changes in the denture-supporting tissues

  3. Assessment of dental plaque by optoelectronic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda-Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Bortun, Cristina Maria; Levai, Mihaela-Codrina; Topala, Florin Ionel; Crǎciunescu, Emanuela Lidia; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Duma, Virgil Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of dental biofilm follows specific mechanisms of initial colonization on the surface, microcolony formation, development of organized three dimensional community structures, and detachment from the surface. The structure of the plaque biofilm might restrict the penetration of antimicrobial agents, while bacteria on a surface grow slowly and display a novel phenotype; the consequence of the latter is a reduced sensitivity to inhibitors. The aim of this study was to evaluate with different optoelectronic methods the morphological characteristics of the dental biofilm. The study was performed on samples from 25 patients aged between 18 and 35 years. The methods used in this study were Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) working at 870 nm for in vivo evaluations and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for validations. For each patient a sample of dental biofilm was obtained directly from the vestibular surface of the teeth's. SD-OCT produced C- and B-scans that were used to generate three dimensional (3D) reconstructions of the sample. The results were compared with SEM evaluations. The biofilm network was dramatically destroyed after the professional dental cleaning. OCT noninvasive methods can act as a valuable tool for the 3D characterization of dental biofilms.

  4. Biofilm on dental implants: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Karthikeyan; Jung, Ronald E; Molenberg, Aart; Hammerle, Christoph H F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the current literature with regard to biofilm formation on dental implants and the influence of surface characteristics (chemistry, surface free energy, and roughness) of dental implant and abutment materials and their design features on biofilm formation and its sequelae. An electronic MEDLINE literature search was conducted of studies published between 1966 and June 2007. The following search terms were used: biofilm and dental implants, biofilm formation/plaque bacterial adhesion and implants, plaque/biofilm and surface characteristics/roughness/surface free energy of titanium dental implants, implant-abutment interface and plaque/biofilm, biofilm and supragingival/subgingival plaque microbiology, biofilm/plaque and implant infection, antibacterial/bacteriostatic titanium, titanium nanocoating/nanopatterning, antimicrobial drug/titanium implant. Both in vitro and in vivo studies were included in this review. Fifty-three articles were identified in this review process. The articles were categorized with respect to their context on biofilm formation on teeth and dental implant surfaces and with regard to the influence of surface characteristics of implant biomaterials (especially titanium) and design features of implant and abutment components on biofilm formation. The current state of literature is more descriptive, rather than providing strong data that could be analyzed through meta-analysis. Basic research articles on surface modification of titanium were also included in the review to analyze the applications of such studies on the fabrication of implant surfaces that could possibly decrease early bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Increase in surface roughness and surface free energy facilitates biofilm formation on dental implant and abutment surfaces, although this conclusion is derived from largely descriptive literature. Surface chemistry and the design features of the implant-abutment configuration also

  5. Theoretical and practical aspects regarding the development and control of microbial biofilms attached to the surface of dental materials and dental prostheses in particular

    OpenAIRE

    Zisi, Sonila; Bortollini, Sergio; Muntianu, Ligia; Papakoca, Kiro; Mihai BURLIBASA

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms play an essential role in oral pathology, in the etiology of dental caries, periodontopathy, but also in surface contamination of dental materials (and here we refer to prosthetic material such as acrylic materials usedfor dentures, occlusal rims, try-in dentures, dental alloys used in fixed dental restorations, impression materials, etc.)

  6. Combating biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Hong;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are complex microbial communities consisting of microcolonies embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymer substances. Biofilm cells show much greater resistance to environmental challenges including antimicrobial agents than their free-living counterparts. The biofilm mode of life...... is believed to significantly contribute to successful microbial survival in hostile environments. Conventional treatment, disinfection and cleaning strategies do not proficiently deal with biofilm-related problems, such as persistent infections and contamination of food production facilities. In this review......, strategies to control biofilms are discussed, including those of inhibition of microbial attachment, interference of biofilm structure development and differentiation, killing of biofilm cells and induction of biofilm dispersion....

  7. Denture adhesives: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Emmanouil, Ioannis; Papadiochos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    Denture adhesives have been the objective of scientific research for over half a century. Although they are used by denture wearers worldwide, investigations of their effectiveness and biocompatibility have led to controversial conclusions. The purpose of this study was to review the literature data with regard to the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives as well as the attitudes of both patients and dental professionals toward these materials. An electronic search of English peer-reviewed dental literature in the Medline database was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives. There was no limitation in publication year, so the search included all the available scientific evidence included in that particular database until March 2014. Specific inclusion criteria were used for the selection of the appropriate articles. A manual search of the citations of the obtained articles followed to extend the electronic search. A full text review was carried out for only 32 articles. Of the 32 articles, 21 examined the efficacy of denture adhesives in terms of retention and stability and masticatory performance, 6 evaluated the issue of the biocompatibility of denture adhesives, and 5 presented the attitudes of either professionals or patients toward these materials. The majority of clinical studies supported the fact that denture adhesives enhance the retention, stability, and masticatory performance of a removable prosthesis. In terms of biocompatibility, long-term in vivo studies to investigate potential harmful effects were lacking. Patients are satisfied with denture adhesives that meet their needs. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Biofilm removal with a dental water jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorur, Amita; Lyle, Deborah M; Schaudinn, Christoph; Costerton, John W

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a dental water jet on plaque biofilm removal using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Eight teeth with advanced aggressive periodontal disease were extracted. Ten thin slices were cut from four teeth. Two slices were used as the control. Eight were inoculated with saliva and incubated for 4 days. Four slices were treated using a standard jet tip, and four slices were treated using an orthodontic jet tip. The remaining four teeth were treated with the orthodontic jet tip but were not inoculated with saliva to grow new plaque biofilm. All experimental teeth were treated using a dental water jet for 3 seconds on medium pressure. The standard jet tip removed 99.99% of the salivary (ex vivo) biofilm, and the orthodontic jet tip removed 99.84% of the salivary biofilm. Observation of the remaining four teeth by the naked eye indicated that the orthodontic jet tip removed significant amounts of calcified (in vivo) plaque biofilm. This was confirmed by SEM evaluations. The Waterpik dental water jet (Water Pik, Inc, Fort Collins, CO) can remove both ex vivo and in vivo plaque biofilm significantly.

  9. Treatment of Oral Multispecies Biofilms by an Anti-Biofilm Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhejun; de la Fuente-Núñez, Cesar; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-01-01

    Human oral biofilms are multispecies microbial communities that exhibit high resistance to antimicrobial agents. Dental plaque gives rise to highly prevalent and costly biofilm-related oral infections, which lead to caries or other types of oral infections. We investigated the ability of the recently identified anti-biofilm peptide 1018 to induce killing of bacterial cells present within oral multispecies biofilms. At 10 μg/ml (6.5 μM), peptide 1018 was able to significantly (pbiofilm formation over 3 days. The activity of the peptide on preformed biofilms was found to be concentration-dependent since more than 60% of the total plaque biofilm cell population was killed by 10 μg/ml of peptide 1018 in 3 days, while at 5 μg/ml 50% of cells were dead and at 1 μg/ml the peptide triggered cell death in around 30% of the total bacterial population, as revealed by confocal microscopy. The presence of saliva did not affect peptide activity, since no statistically significant difference was found in the ability of peptide 1018 to kill oral biofilms using either saliva coated and non-saliva coated hydroxyapatite surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy experiments indicated that peptide 1018 induced cell lysis in plaque biofilms. Furthermore, combined treatment using peptide 1018 and chlorhexidine (CHX) increased the anti-biofilm activity of each compound compared to when these were used alone, resulting in >50% of the biofilm being killed and >35% being dispersed in only 3 minutes. Peptide 1018 may potentially be used by itself or in combination with CHX as a non-toxic and effective anti-biofilm agent for plaque disinfection in clinical dentistry.

  10. A clinical study to evaluate denture adhesive use in well-fitting dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Carlos A; Gendreau, Linda; Shanga, Gilbert; Magnuszewski, Tabetha; Fernandez, Patricia; Durocher, John

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was the assessment of retention and stability and functional benefits of denture adhesive applied to well-fitting and well-made dentures. This was a randomized, crossover study to compare two marketed denture adhesives (test cream, Super Poligrip® Free, and test strip, Super Poligrip® Comfort Seal Strips) and an unmarketed cream adhesive (GlaxoSmith Kline Consumer Healthcare) with no adhesive as the negative control. Thirty-six subjects completed the study. One hour after the application of denture adhesive, retention and stability were measured using the Kapur Index and maxillary incisal bite force. Two hours after application, functional tests were used to assess denture movement and peanut particle migration under the denture. Subjects also rated confidence, comfort, satisfaction with dentures, and denture wobble in conjunction with the functional tests. Denture adhesives significantly (p dentures. Subjects experienced significantly (p dentures. Significant (p denture wobble were associated with the use of adhesive. There was significant (p denture adhesive was well tolerated. The results of this study provide evidence that use of Super Poligrip® denture adhesives can enhance aspects of performance of complete well-fitting dentures as well as provide increased comfort, confidence, and satisfaction with dentures. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Evaluation of complete denture quality and masticatory efficiency in denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jaiane Augusta Medeiros; de Resende, Camila Maria Bastos Machado; Lopes, Ana Lilian Correia; Mestriner, Wilson; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe; Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Carreiro, Adriana da Fonte Porto

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate (1) the influence of complete denture quality and years of denture use on masticatory efficiency and (2) the relationship between complete denture quality and years of use. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 93 edentulous patients (mean age: 65.6 years) wearing both mandibular and maxillary dentures. Patients were classified into two categories according to years of denture use: ≤ 2 years and ≥ 5 years. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated via the colorimetric method with beads as the artificial test food. A reproducible method for objective evaluation of the technical quality of complete dentures was employed. The association between denture quality and years of denture use was analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact tests. The results of masticatory efficiency testing were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (with the Tukey post hoc test) in terms of years of denture use (≤ 2 years, ≥ 5 years) and denture quality (poor, average, good). A significant relationship was found between denture quality and years of denture use (P denture use (0.101 ± 0.076 absorbance) and ≥ 5 years of use (0.068 ± 0.076 absorbance). Masticatory efficiency was not influenced by denture quality. Complete denture quality and masticatory efficiency significantly decreased over time. However, complete denture quality did not influence masticatory efficiency.

  12. Effect of Lactoferrin on Oral Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments...dental implant failures, denture stomatitis and oral yeast infections such as candidiasis. It is one of the most widely studied biofilm systems, yet...Command (USAMRMC). The project research has been completed and the following represents a final report to fulfill the reporting requirements for the

  13. Rehabilitation with immediate denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayelin de la Caridad Suárez González

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the case of a 42-year-old male patient, with past history of good health, active worker, who referred refusal to the period of tooth loss both for his own personality and work responsibility. On intra-buccal examination, his central superior and inferior incisors showed plenty of tooth decay that got most of his teeth structures; besides, on X-ray examination, horizontal bone loss is observed at third apical level of the present teeth and mobility grade III and IV, for what their extraction is indicated. From the prosthetic point of view, he was diagnosed as a superior and inferior partial edentulous patient, Kennedy class I. It was decided to rehabilitate by immediate superior and inferior total denture, performing previous multiple extractions with corrective alveoloplasty and alveolectomy. With the surgical and appliances treatment, excellent results were achieved, showing the effectiveness of this treatment.

  14. Complete Denture in a Microstomia Patient

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Satpathy, Ashish; Gujjari, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    .... It's the duty of a dentist to provide every possible care to the patient with microstomia. This paper describes the treatment of a microstomia patient requiring complete dentures using sectional dentures...

  15. Study of the effective of efflux pump inhibitors in photodynamic therapy inhibition the cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque biofilms%激光共聚焦显微镜观察维拉帕米对HMME-PDT抑制混合菌菌斑生物膜作用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹朝晖; 陶亚东; 孙盼盼; 阴慧娟; 李迎新

    2013-01-01

    Objective To Study the effect of efflux pump-inhibitors(EPI)-Verapamil in photodynamic therapy (PDT) using hematoporphyrin monomethylether (HMME) as photosensitizer on the cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque biofilms.Methods According to the administrator order of the verapamil and photosensitizer in PDT,streptococcus mutans,streptococcus sanguis,eosinophilic lactobacillus and actinomyces viscosus were used to establish the dental plaque biofilm model.The experiment was divided into five groups,group A was incubated with the photosensitizer and verapamil group,group B using verapamil before incubated the photosensitize,group C suing photosensitizer before incubated verapamil,group D with PDT only,group E was control group.After laser treatment,the influence of the dental plaque biofilms was observed by confocal laser scanning microscope.Results As saline-treated group is a group of normal the dental plaque biofilms.In PDT only group,compared with the saline group,red fluorescence increased significantly,the bacteria lose accumulation capacity,and were isolated and scattered in dispersed state.In PDT plus verapamil group,compared with only PDT group,green staining increased,bacterial activity increased.In group B,cells were incubated with verapamil before incubated the photosensitizer group,green staining increased significantly,red fluorescence reduced,indicating live bacteria increased,and bacteria activity was significantly increased.Conclusion PDT is an effective method in eliminating cariogenic bacteria of dental plaque biofilms.Bacterial efflux pump inhibitors can lower HMME-PDT inhibition cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque biofilm,and pre-verapamil administration could significantly inhibit the effect of PDT treatment of dental caries.%目的 探讨细菌外排泵抑制剂(EPI)——维拉帕米对以血卟啉单甲醚(HMME)为光敏剂的光动力疗法(PDT)抵抗牙菌斑生物膜内主要致龋菌作用的影响.方法 以变形链球菌、血链球菌

  16. Clinical evaluation of isolated abutment teeth in removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarrati S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Nowadays, removable partial dentures are applied to patients who are not able to use dental implants or fixed prosthesis. Although based on the studies the users of removable partial dentures are in the risk of plaque accumulation and unacceptable changes such as gingivitis, periodontitis and mobility in abutment tooth. It is not clear whether the negative effects of removable partial dentures are more on the isolated teeth which are a kind of abutment adjacent to endentulous area in both sides. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical condition of isolated abutment teeth without splinting in comparison to control abutment from the aspects of B.O.P (bleeding on probing, mobility, pocket depth and gingivitis."nMaterials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the prepared questionnaires were filled out by 50 patients who received removable partial dentures in department of removable prosthodontics of dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients had isolated abutment tooth and did not have any systemic disease. The obtained data were analyzed. Using Wilcoxon, exact Fisher and Kruskal-Wallis test."nResults: B.O.P (P=0.004, pocket depth (P=0.035, and mobility (P<0.001 in isolated abutments were more than those in control abutments, but there were not significant differences in the degree of caries (P=0.083 and gingivitis (P=0.07."nConclusion: This study showed that clinical condition of isolated abutments is worse than that of control abutments. More attention should be paid to healthiness of isolated teeth without splinting and periodic follow ups should be done in these cases.

  17. Antibacterial effect of chlorine dioxide and hyaluronate on dental biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Al-bayaty, F.; Taiyeb-ali, T.; Abdulla, M. A.; Hashim, F.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate antimicrobial action of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gel and hyaluronate gel (Gengigel (R)) on dental biofilm. Pooled supra and subgingival dental biofilm were obtained from healthy individuals and incubated aerobically and anaerobically. Plaque bacteria investigated including Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus mitis, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, dental plaque pool samples (aerobic and anaerobic) and Staphylococcus aureus and ...

  18. Case report: a tale of two dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, H; Sequeira, P

    1998-12-01

    A case is presented where loss of an incisor tooth in a partial denture wearer created an aesthetic emergency. It was not possible to solve this simply by addition of a tooth to the existing denture. Reference to the previous dental history suggested that a further immediate solution might be unwise. The design of the existing denture lent itself to the novel solution of a second denture, retained by elements of the first.

  19. Functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Scott N; Meissner, Tobias; Su, Andrew I; Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C; Schork, Nicholas J; Bretz, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free) or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota's transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  20. Functional Expression of Dental Plaque Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Norman Peterson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota’s transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  1. 天然菌斑生物被膜中变形链球菌、远缘链球菌和血链球菌的荧光原位检测%Application of rapid identification for Streptpcoccus mutans, Streptpcoccus sobrinus and Streptpcoccus sanguis in the native dental plaque biofilm by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌均棨; 姬亚昆

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine Streptpcoccus mutans,Streptpcoccus sobrinus and Streptpcoccus sanguis in the early formation of native dental plaque biofilm. Methods An experimental dental plaque biofilm model in the oral cavity was established using enamel slabs. The spatial distribution of S. mutans, S.sobrinus and S. sanguis in the early colonization of dental plaque biofilms on the enamel surface was observed bv in situ, real-time and dynamic observations and optical sections utilizing confocal laser scanning microscopy(CLSM) and fluorescence in situ hybridization(FISH). The experiment data were analyzed with One-Way AVOVA, α=0.05 using SPSS11.5. Results Dental biofilm had a certain degree of thickness and various forms in three-dimensioned structure. The bacteria in the structure were sparse at the inner layers and the outer layers. In the middle layers the bacteria were closely compacted. There were many voids traversing from the outside of the biofilm to the enamel surface. At the initial stage of dental biofilm formation, the scanned average thickness of S. mutans,S. sobrinus and S. sanguis increased with time elapsing,the mean thicknesses of 1 h biofilms were 20.43 μm,11.50 μm and 14.76 μm,respectively,and those of 24 h were the thickest in terms of average level,the mean values were 70.25 μm,75.40 μm and 79.98 μm,respectively. Conclusion The fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with CLSM are thought to be convenient and sensitive to detect S. mutans, S. sobrinus and S. sanguis in the dental plaque biofilms.%目的 检测菌斑生物被膜初期形成过程中的变形链球菌(Streptpcoccus mutans)、远缘链球菌(Streptpcoccus sobrinus)和血链球菌(Streptpcoccus sanguis).方法 从植入釉质磨片表面获得完整的菌斑生物被膜标本,应用激光共聚焦扫描显微镜和荧光原位杂交技术相结合的方法,对天然菌斑生物被膜形成初期的变形链球菌、远缘链球菌和血链球菌进行原位的、实时的动态

  2. Fungal Biofilms: In Vivo Models for Discovery of Anti-Biofilm Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, Jeniel E; Andes, David R

    2015-06-01

    During infection, fungi frequently transition to a biofilm lifestyle, proliferating as communities of surface-adherent aggregates of cells. Phenotypically, cells in a biofilm are distinct from free-floating cells. Their high tolerance of antifungals and ability to withstand host defenses are two characteristics that foster resilience. Biofilm infections are particularly difficult to eradicate, and most available antifungals have minimal activity. Therefore, the discovery of novel compounds and innovative strategies to treat fungal biofilms is of great interest. Although many fungi have been observed to form biofilms, the most well-studied is Candida albicans. Animal models have been developed to simulate common Candida device-associated infections, including those involving vascular catheters, dentures, urinary catheters, and subcutaneous implants. Models have also reproduced the most common mucosal biofilm infections: oropharyngeal and vaginal candidiasis. These models incorporate the anatomical site, immune components, and fluid dynamics of clinical niches and have been instrumental in the study of drug resistance and investigation of novel therapies. This chapter describes the significance of fungal biofilm infections, the animal models developed for biofilm study, and how these models have contributed to the development of new strategies for the eradication of fungal biofilm infections.

  3. Controlling the oral biofilm with antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, P D

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this article is to review the properties of compounds available for the control of dental plaque biofilms, and describe their mode of action. The mouth is colonised by a diverse but characteristic collection of micro-organisms, which confer benefit to host. Numerous antiplaque (e.g. surfactants, essential oils) and antimicrobial agents (e.g. bisbiguanides, metal ions, phenols, quaternary ammonium compounds, etc.) have been successfully formulated into toothpastes and mouthrinses to control plaque biofilms. At high concentrations, these agents can remove biofilm and/or kill disease-associated bacteria, while even at sub-lethal levels they can inhibit the expression of pathogenic traits. Successful antimicrobial agents are able to meet the apparently contradictory requirements of maintaining the oral biofilm at levels compatible with oral health but without disrupting the natural and beneficial properties of the resident oral microflora.

  4. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Janus, Marleen M.; ten Cate, Jacob M.; de Soet, Johannes J.; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries. PMID:27997567

  5. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  6. Recalcitrance of Streptococcus mutans biofilms towards detergent-stimulated detachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landa, AS; van de Belt-Gritter, B; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    The biofilm mode of growth protects the plaque microorganisms against environmental attacks, such as from antimicrobials or detergents. Detergents have a demonstrated ability to detach initially adhering bacteria from enamel surfaces, but the ability of detergent components to detach plaque bacteria

  7. Significance of biofilms in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewska, Marta; Strużycka, Izabela; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades significant scientific progress has taken place in the knowledge about biofilms. They constitute multilayer conglomerates of bacteria and fungi, surrounded by carbohydrates which they produce, as well as substances derived from saliva and gingival fluid. Modern techniques showed significant diversity of the biofilm environment and a system of microbial communication (quorum sensing), enhancing their survival. At present it is believed that the majority of infections, particularly chronic with exacerbations, are a result of biofilm formation, particularly in the presence of biomaterials. It should be emphasised that penetration of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents into deeper layers of a biofilm is poor, causing therapeutic problems and necessitating sometimes removal of the implant or prosthesis. Biofilms play an increasing role in dentistry as a result of more and more broad use in dental practice of plastic and implantable materials. Biofilms are produced on the surfaces of teeth as dental plaque, in the para-nasal sinuses, on prostheses, dental implants, as well as in waterlines of a dental unit, constituting a particular risk for severely immunocompromised patients. New methods of therapy and prevention of infections linked to biofilms are under development.

  8. Biofilm formation on dental restorative and implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busscher, H J; Rinastiti, M; Siswomihardjo, W; van der Mei, H C

    2010-07-01

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on smooth surfaces. Oral biofilms mostly consist of multiple bacterial strains, but Candida species are found on acrylic dentures. Biofilms on gold and amalgam in vivo are thick and fully covering, but barely viable. Biofilms on ceramics are thin and highly viable. Biofilms on composites and glass-ionomer cements cause surface deterioration, which enhances biofilm formation again. Residual monomer release from composites influences biofilm growth in vitro, but effects in vivo are less pronounced, probably due to the large volume of saliva into which compounds are released and its continuous refreshment. Similarly, conflicting results have been reported on effects of fluoride release from glass-ionomer cements. Finally, biomaterial-associated infection of implants and devices elsewhere in the body is compared with oral biofilm formation. Biomaterial modifications to discourage biofilm formation on implants and devices are critically discussed for possible applications in dentistry. It is concluded that, for dental applications, antimicrobial coatings killing bacteria upon contact are more promising than antimicrobial-releasing coatings.

  9. Unilateral removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, W A; Greer, A C; Martin, N

    2017-01-27

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are widely used to replace missing teeth in order to restore both function and aesthetics for the partially dentate patient. Conventional RPD design is frequently bilateral and consists of a major connector that bridges both sides of the arch. Some patients cannot and will not tolerate such an extensive appliance. For these patients, bridgework may not be a predictable option and it is not always possible to provide implant-retained restorations. This article presents unilateral RPDs as a potential treatment modality for such patients and explores indications and contraindications for their use, including factors relating to patient history, clinical presentation and patient wishes. Through case examples, design, material and fabrication considerations will be discussed. While their use is not widespread, there are a number of patients who benefit from the provision of unilateral RPDs. They are a useful treatment to have in the clinician's armamentarium, but a highly-skilled dental team and a specific patient presentation is required in order for them to be a reasonable and predictable prosthetic option.

  10. EFFECT OF FREQUENT CONSUMPTION OF STARCHY FOOD ITEMS ON ENAMEL AND DENTIN DEMINERALIZATION AND ON PLAQUE PH IN-SITU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LINGSTROM, P; BIRKHED, D; RUBEN, J; ARENDS, J

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this cross-over study was to determine the cariogenic potential of starchy food items as between-meal snacks. This was done by measuring demineralization of human enamel and dentin as well as the pH of dental plaque in situ. Eight volunteers with complete dentures carried two enamel and t

  11. Dentist-Patient Communication and Denture Quality Associated with Complete Denture Satisfaction Among Taiwanese Elderly Wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jen-Hao; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Lin, Ying-Chun; Chou, Tsau-Mau; Ebinger, John; Lee, Huey-Er

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore individual (ie, sociodemographic characteristics, patient personality) and clinical factors (ie, dentist-patient communication, denture quality) associated with complete denture satisfaction among the Taiwanese elderly population. A multistage sampling and cross-sectional design was used to collect data. A total of 387 fully edentulous citizens, aged 65 years and older and who had received new sets of complete dentures, were selected. The participants completed clinical dental examinations and questionnaires by personal interview to collect information on denture satisfaction and associated variables. The relationship among three groups of these participants (satisfied, neutral, and dissatisfied) and potential factors were simultaneously examined using polytomous logistic regression analysis. Overall, 36.7% of the participants were dissatisfied with their dentures. Living status (crude odds ratio [COR] = 2.04), personality (COR = 4.86), dentist-patient communication (COR = 7.46), and denture quality (COR = 5.02) were associated with complete denture satisfaction. The multivariate regression model showed that dentist-patient communication (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 6.41) and denture quality (AOR = 4.40) were significant complete denture satisfaction factors that diluted the effect of living status and personality. Inadequate dentistpatient communication and low denture quality were associated with the dissatisfaction of patients with dentures. To increase complete denture satisfaction, the importance of training programs aimed at enhancing dentist-patient communication and denture quality cannot be overemphasized.

  12. Clinical effects of acrylic resilient denture liners applied to mandibular complete dentures on the alveolar ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, S; Kimoto, K; Gunji, A; Kawai, Y; Murakami, H; Tanaka, K; Syu, K; Aoki, H; Toyoda, M; Kobayashi, K

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether resilient denture liners has the potential to decrease problems affecting the alveolar ridge mucosa during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture. Interventions were complete denture treatment with permanent acrylic resilient denture liner dentures (RLD) in mandibles and conventional heat-activated acrylic resin dentures (ARD) in mandibles. Maxillary dentures were fabricated with conventional heat-activated ARD. Seventy-four subjects were randomly allocated to the RLD and ARD groups by random permuted blocks within the strata method after obtaining written informed consent. A randomized controlled parallel clinical trial with two hospital centres was conducted from April 2004 to July 2006. The problems were comprehensively evaluated by three outcomes with subjective and objective factors as follows: (i) numbers of sore spots, (ii) duration of wearing dentures and (iii) pain perception with 100 mm Visual Analog Scale. The numbers of sore spots in the mandibular support and border areas for the RLD group were significantly less than those for the ARD groups (P dentures an additional day longer than the ARD wearers (P denture liners to mandibular complete dentures provided edentulous patients with fewer problems affecting the alveolar during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture when compared with conventional denture treatments.

  13. Permeabilizing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Lee, Shun; Doukas,; Apostolos G.

    2008-02-19

    Methods for permeabilizing biofilms using stress waves are described. The methods involve applying one or more stress waves to a biofilm, e.g., on a surface of a device or food item, or on a tissue surface in a patient, and then inducing stress waves to create transient increases in the permeability of the biofilm. The increased permeability facilitates delivery of compounds, such as antimicrobial or therapeutic agents into and through the biofilm.

  14. A review of factors influencing the incidence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombelli, L; Farina, R

    2013-06-01

    An individual variation in the gingival inflammatory response to the dental biofilm has been demonstrated. This variability can be observed between individuals with neither quantitative nor qualitative differences in plaque accumulation. The reported significant differences in gingival inflammatory response under quantitatively and/or qualitatively almost identical bacterial challenge suggest that the gingival response to plaque accumulation may be an individual trait, possibly genetic in origin. The most recent classification of periodontal diseases acknowledges that the clinical expression of plaque-induced gingival inflammation can be substantially modified by systemic factors, either inherent to the host or related to environmental influences. The aim of the present literature review is to describe (i) the factors influencing the development of plaque-induced gingivitis as well as (ii) those metabolic, environmental and systemic factors which have a direct impact on the etiopathogenetic pathway of plaque-induced gingivitis, thus altering the nature or course of the gingival inflammatory response to dental biofilm.

  15. Effect of plaque accumulation and salivary factors on enamel demineralization and plaque composition in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenuta Livia Maria Andaló

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of some plaque and salivary factors on caries progression in situ. The salivary secretion rate, buffering capacity and mutans streptococci counts from 13 volunteers were determined. For three distinct periods of time, 4, 7 and 10 days, each of them wore a palatal appliance containing 4 bovine enamel blocks. They used a non-fluoridated dentifrice during the experiment and a 20% sucrose solution was dripped onto the blocks 10 times a day. Mutans streptococci (MS, calcium (Ca, and insoluble polysaccharide (IP were quantified in the dental plaque formed on the enamel blocks, after each period. Enamel demineralization was assessed by surface microhardness, and the percentage of surface microhardness change (%SMC in relation to the baseline values was calculated. Enamel demineralization occurred after each period of plaque accumulation (p < 0.05, and the %SMC increased with time (from 13.8 to 48.3%. The concentrations of Ca and IP in plaque were not statistically different among the experimental times, but significant correlations were found between these concentrations and %SMC. Neither the salivary factors assessed initially nor mutans streptococci in plaque presented statistically significant correlations to %SMC. The results suggest that enamel demineralization is time-dependent and is more related to the composition of the biofilm formed than to the salivary factors studied.

  16. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where plaque builds up. ...

  17. Degradation in the Dentin-Composite Interface Subjected to Multi-Species Biofilm Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yuping; Carrera, Carola; Chen, Ruoqiong; Li, Jianying; Patricia, Lenton; Rudney, Joel D.; Jones, Robert S.; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Oral biofilms can degrade the components in dental resin-based composite restorations, thus compromising marginal integrity and leading to secondary caries. In this study, we investigated the mechanical integrity of the dentin-composite interface challenged with multi-species oral biofilms. While most studies used single-species biofilms, we used a more realistic, diverse biofilm model produced directly from plaques collected from donors with a history of early childhood caries. Dentin–compos...

  18. Beneficial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara R Robertson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Surface-adherent biofilm growth is a common trait of bacteria and other microorganisms in nature. Within biofilms, organisms are present in high density and are enmeshed in an organic matrix containing polysaccharides and other molecules. The close proximity of organisms within biofilms facilitates microbial interactions and signaling, including many metabolic processes in which consortia rather than individual organisms participate. Biofilm growth also enables microorganisms to withstand chemical and biological stresses. Here, we review some current literature and document representative beneficial aspects of biofilms using examples from wastewater treatment, microbial fuel cells, biological repair (biocementation of stonework, and biofilm protection against Candida albicans infections. Finally, we address a chemical ecology strategy whereby desired microbial succession and beneficial biofilm formation can be encouraged via manipulation of culture conditions and bacterial signaling.

  19. Oral biofilms: emerging concepts in microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filoche, S; Wong, L; Sissons, C H

    2010-01-01

    Oral biofilms develop under a range of different conditions and different environments. This review will discuss emerging concepts in microbial ecology and how they relate to oral biofilm development and the treatment of oral diseases. Clues to how oral biofilms develop may lie in other complex systems, such as interactions between host and gut microbiota, and even in factors that affect biofilm development on leaf surfaces. Most of the conditions under which oral biofilms develop are tightly linked to the overall health and biology of the host. Advances in molecular techniques have led to a greater appreciation of the diversity of human microbiota, the extent of interactions with the human host, and how that relates to inter-individual variation. As a consequence, plaque development may no longer be thought of as a generic process, but rather as a highly individualized process, which has ramifications for the treatment of the diseases it causes.

  20. Identification of different bacterial species in biofilms using confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Brooke D.; Quivey, Robert G.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2010-11-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is used to discriminate between different species of bacteria grown in biofilms. Tests are performed using two bacterial species, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans, which are major components of oral plaque and of particular interest due to their association with healthy and cariogenic plaque, respectively. Dehydrated biofilms of these species are studied as a simplified model of dental plaque. A prediction model based on principal component analysis and logistic regression is calibrated using pure biofilms of each species and validated on pure biofilms grown months later, achieving 96% accuracy in prospective classification. When biofilms of the two species are partially mixed together, Raman-based identifications are achieved within ~2 μm of the boundaries between species with 97% accuracy. This combination of spatial resolution and predication accuracy should be suitable for forming images of species distributions within intact two-species biofilms.

  1. Partial denture-- an ENT surgeon's nightmare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, M; Sagesh, M

    2012-11-01

    Foreign body oesophagus is one among the common otorhinolaryngology emergencies that we come across. Artificial partial denture impaction in the oesophagus is often an ENT surgeon's nightmare. This study was done in the department of otorhinolaryngology, Government Medical College Kozhikode for a period of 2 years. All patients presented with history of accidental swallowing of partial denture followed by dysphagia. Radiological evaluation was done and subsequently oesophagoscopy and removal of the denture was done. In failed cases exploration and removal of foreign body was required. Complications were found in partial denture with metal wire clasps. It is better to avoid using malfitting dentures with small base, those with metal wire clasps and be cautious of using dentures in alcoholics and unconscious patients.

  2. Virulence and pathogenicity of Candida albicans is enhanced in biofilms containing oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Morse, Daniel James; da Silva, Wander José; Del-Bel-Cury, Altair Antoninha; Wei, Xiaoqing; Wilson, Melanie; Milward, Paul; Lewis, Michael; Bradshaw, David; Williams, David Wynne

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the influence of bacteria on the virulence and pathogenicity of candidal biofilms. Mature biofilms (Candida albicans-only, bacteria-only, C. albicans with bacteria) were generated on acrylic and either analysed directly, or used to infect a reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHOE). Analyses included Candida hyphae enumeration and assessment of Candida virulence gene expression. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and Candida tissue invasion following biofilm infection of the RHOE were also measured. Candida hyphae were more prevalent (p biofilms also containing bacteria, with genes encoding secreted aspartyl-proteinases (SAP4/SAP6) and hyphal-wall protein (HWP1) up-regulated (p biofilm infections of RHOE. Multi-species infections exhibited higher hyphal proportions (p biofilms promoted Candida virulence, consideration should be given to the bacterial component when managing denture biofilm associated candidoses.

  3. Hyperzincemia from ingestion of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature that documents the serious adverse systemic effects of prolonged, excessive zinc ingestion from the overuse of denture adhesives. This condition causes elevation of serum zinc levels that result in depression of serum copper. The low serum copper levels cause bone marrow depression and widespread sensory and motor neuropathies. Epidemiologic studies revealed the source of excessive zinc intake to be from overuse of denture adhesives. Denture patients must be advised of the risks of prolonged overuse of denture adhesives.

  4. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy in the treatment of denture stomatitis; Terapia fotodinamica antimicrobiana no tratamento da estomatite protetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senna, Andre Machado de

    2012-07-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS), also called chronic atrophic candidiasis, is the most common oral fungal infection in denture wearers. It has a multifactorial etiology, but the presence of Candida spp. biofilm on the denture is considered the most important factor for the establishment of the DS. This study aimed to evaluate the treatment of DS through the use of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAT), mediated by methylene blue. For this purpose, preclinical studies and clinical trials were performed. Simulators prototypes dentures were made of methyl methacrylate polymer to serve as a basis for biofilm growth of the following species of Candida: C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. dubliniensis, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii. Methylene blue solution at a concentration of 450 {mu}g/mL was used as a photosensitizer. The prototypes and biofilms were irradiated with a laser of wavelength of 660 nm, potency of 100 mW, for 80 seconds. For the clinical study, subjects were divided into two groups. The first group received conventional treatment based on the use of antifungal Miconazole. The second group received the treatment by PAT. The preclinical results showed that all species of the genus Candida were susceptible to PAT, with a reduction in colonies that ranged from 2.48 to 3.93 log{sub 10}. Clinical outcomes were evaluated for the reduction of colonies of Candida spp. located in the mucosa and in the prosthesis and relative to the improvement of the clinical aspect of the affected mucosa. Both the conventional therapy and PAT were effective in treating DS. There was no significant statistical difference between PAT and conventional treatment for any of the factors evaluated. Thus, it was concluded that PAT is effective in the treatment of denture stomatitis. (author)

  5. Denture Wearing during Sleep Doubles the Risk of Pneumonia in the Very Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, T.; Arai, Y.; Abe, Y.; Takayama, M.; Fukumoto, M.; Fukui, Y.; Iwase, T.; Takebayashi, T.; Hirose, N.; Gionhaku, N.; Komiyama, K.

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly. To identify modifiable oral health–related risk factors, we prospectively investigated associations between a constellation of oral health behaviors and incident pneumonia in the community-living very elderly (i.e., 85 years of age or older). At baseline, 524 randomly selected seniors (228 men and 296 women; mean age, 87.8 years) were examined for oral health status and oral hygiene behaviors as well as medical assessment, including blood chemistry analysis, and followed up annually until first hospitalization for or death from pneumonia. During a 3-year follow-up period, 48 events associated with pneumonia (20 deaths and 28 acute hospitalizations) were identified. Among 453 denture wearers, 186 (40.8%) who wore their dentures during sleep were at higher risk for pneumonia than those who removed their dentures at night (log rank P = 0.021). In a multivariate Cox model, both perceived swallowing difficulties and overnight denture wearing were independently associated with an approximately 2.3-fold higher risk of the incidence of pneumonia (for perceived swallowing difficulties, hazard ratio [HR], 2.31; and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11–4.82; and for denture wearing during sleep, HR, 2.38; and 95% CI, 1.25–4.56), which was comparable with the HR attributable to cognitive impairment (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.06–4.34), history of stroke (HR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.13–5.35), and respiratory disease (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.20–4.23). In addition, those who wore dentures during sleep were more likely to have tongue and denture plaque, gum inflammation, positive culture for Candida albicans, and higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 as compared with their counterparts. This study provided empirical evidence that denture wearing during sleep is associated not only with oral inflammatory and microbial burden but also with incident pneumonia, suggesting

  6. Denture wearing during sleep doubles the risk of pneumonia in the very elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iinuma, T; Arai, Y; Abe, Y; Takayama, M; Fukumoto, M; Fukui, Y; Iwase, T; Takebayashi, T; Hirose, N; Gionhaku, N; Komiyama, K

    2015-03-01

    Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly. To identify modifiable oral health-related risk factors, we prospectively investigated associations between a constellation of oral health behaviors and incident pneumonia in the community-living very elderly (i.e., 85 years of age or older). At baseline, 524 randomly selected seniors (228 men and 296 women; mean age, 87.8 years) were examined for oral health status and oral hygiene behaviors as well as medical assessment, including blood chemistry analysis, and followed up annually until first hospitalization for or death from pneumonia. During a 3-year follow-up period, 48 events associated with pneumonia (20 deaths and 28 acute hospitalizations) were identified. Among 453 denture wearers, 186 (40.8%) who wore their dentures during sleep were at higher risk for pneumonia than those who removed their dentures at night (log rank P = 0.021). In a multivariate Cox model, both perceived swallowing difficulties and overnight denture wearing were independently associated with an approximately 2.3-fold higher risk of the incidence of pneumonia (for perceived swallowing difficulties, hazard ratio [HR], 2.31; and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-4.82; and for denture wearing during sleep, HR, 2.38; and 95% CI, 1.25-4.56), which was comparable with the HR attributable to cognitive impairment (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.06-4.34), history of stroke (HR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.13-5.35), and respiratory disease (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.20-4.23). In addition, those who wore dentures during sleep were more likely to have tongue and denture plaque, gum inflammation, positive culture for Candida albicans, and higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 as compared with their counterparts. This study provided empirical evidence that denture wearing during sleep is associated not only with oral inflammatory and microbial burden but also with incident pneumonia, suggesting potential

  7. Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus Ernst

    A still increasing interest and emphasis on the sessile bacterial lifestyle biofilms has been seen since it was realized that the vast majority of the total microbial biomass exists as biofilms. Aggregation of bacteria was first described by Leeuwenhoek in 1677, but only recently recognized...... as being important in chronic infection. In 1993 the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) recognized that the biofilm mode of growth was relevant to microbiology. This book covers both the evidence for biofilms in many chronic bacterial infections as well as the problems facing these infections...... such as diagnostics, pathogenesis, treatment regimes and in vitro and in vivo models for studying biofilms. This is the first scientific book on biofilm infections, chapters written by the world leading scientist and clinicians. The intended audience of this book is scientists, teachers at university level as well...

  8. Denture adhesive use in complete dentures: clinical recommendations and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duqum, Ibrahim; Powers, Kendall Ann; Cooper, Lyndon; Felton, David

    2012-01-01

    This literature review sought to determine the advantages and disadvantages of denture adhesive use among complete denture patients. Manuscripts were obtained by searching the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database, Cochrane Collaboration Library, ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry website, and EMBASE database. A total of 85 abstracts were reviewed, and 38 articles that met the inclusion criteria for this review were selected. The inclusion criteria included clinical trials and case series in which 10 or more patients were treated, as well as Cochrane collaboration reviews and in vitro studies where clinical relevance could be determined. The selected manuscripts were reviewed using a standardized manuscript review matrix. Although denture adhesives improve the retention and function of complete dentures, standardized guidelines are needed for the proper use, application, and removal of denture adhesives. Additionally, long-term studies are warranted on the biologic effects of denture adhesives. There is a need to establish a regular recall program for complete denture patients.

  9. Denture Hygiene Knowledge and Practices among Complete Denture Wearers attending a Postgraduate Dental Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Thatapudi; Gowd, Snigdha; Suresan, Vinay; Mantri, Sneha; Saxena, Sudhanshu; Mishra, Prateek; Panday, Pragya

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the denture hygiene knowledge and practices among patients using complete dentures attending a postgraduate dental hospital in Jabalpur city. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between hygiene knowledge and practices to the denture wearer's gender, education, and income. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire involving the complete denture patients attending the Department of Prosthodontics. The study subjects were randomly selected by recruiting old dentures wearers visiting the Department of Prosthodontics for a recall visit or for new dentures on the odd dates of the month. All subjects signed an informed consent before filling the questionnaire. The institutional review committee approved the study. Descriptive statistics included computation of frequencies and percentages. Nonparametric test, namely, chi-square test, was used for further data analysis; p-value dentures for more than 5 years. In this study, 51 (10.2%) subjects reported never having been advised by their dentists as to how to clean their dentures. Among all the subjects interviewed, 264 (52.8%) reported to clean the oral tissues daily. This study disclosed that 66 (13.2%) of the subjects usually slept with their dentures. Maximum subjects in illiterate group had experienced bad breath sometimes when compared with subjects in postgraduate group (χ(2) = 47.452, p denture cleaning according to gender (χ(2) = 101.076, p denture wearers have limited knowledge of denture cleansing and oral hygiene practices. Hygiene habits and practices may not always present a positive correlation with the gender, educational level, and income of the subjects. Periodic recall for evaluation of denture and mucosal surfaces along with reinforcement of denture hygiene instructions will go a long way in helping the patients reap maximum benefits out of their prostheses.

  10. Corneal mucus plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraunfelder, F T; Wright, P; Tripathi, R C

    1977-02-01

    Corneal mucus plaques adhered to the anterior corneal surface in 17 of 67 advanced cases of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. The plaques were translucent to opaque and varied in size and shape, from multiple isolated islands to bizarre patterns involving more than half the corneal surface. Ultrastructurally, they consisted of mucus mixed with desquamated degenerating epithelial cells and proteinaceous and lipoidal material. The condition may be symptomatic but can be controlled and prevented in most cases by topical ocular application of 10% acetylcysteine.

  11. 中老年可摘义齿戴用者义齿性口炎检出率的研究%Prevalence of Denture Stomatitis in Elderly People Wearing Upper Denture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范彬; 邓旭亮; 冯海兰; 万喆; 李若瑜; 王新知

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of denture stomatitis in elderly patients over 50 years old wearing upper denture. To identify the most common Candida species and to analyze the affect factors. Methods 84 elderly patients wearing upper denture were examined. Their saliva and plaque from the palatal fitting surface of denture were cultured. The germ tube test and CHROMagar Candida were used to identify Candida species. Combined with clinical manifestations, denture stomatitis was diagnosed. Logistic regression was used to explain factors predisposing to Candida infection. Results Among the 84 individuals wearing upper denture,27 patients had denture stomatitis,which constituted 32. 1% of examined people. 100% patient had positive fungal cultures,of which 6 with Candida carrige and other 21 with Candida infection. No patients with denture stomatitis had negative culture. Calculated statistically, wearing dentures over night was a predisposing factor to denture stomatitis(P = 0. 007) ; women might be more predisposing to denture stomatitis than men( P =0. 055 ) . C. Albicans was significantly associated with denture stomatitis( P = 0.005 ) . Conclusion C. Albicans constituted most percentage of Candida species. It was common in the oral cavity with the most potent pathogenicity and significantly associated with denture stomatitis ( P = 0. 005 ). Wearing dentures over night was a predisposing factor to denture stomatitis( P = 0. 007 ) .%目的 调查口腔修复科门诊戴用可摘义齿50岁以上中老年患者义齿性口炎检出情况以及患者念珠菌培养情况,分析与义齿性口炎相关的因素.方法 检查戴用上颌跨过中线的可摘义齿中老年患者84人,用全唾液培养和义齿腭部组织面菌斑培养以及血清芽管实验和科玛嘉(CHROMagar)念珠菌显色培养基检查口腔念珠菌携带情况并初步鉴定菌种,结合临床表现诊断义齿性口炎.Logistic多因素回归分析可能与义齿性口

  12. Pseudomembranous candidiasis in patient wearing full denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiana Nurdiana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of Candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. Candida albicans is a harmless commensal organism inhabiting the mouths but it can change into pathogen and invade tissue and cause acute and chronic disease. Dentures predispose to infection with Candida in as many as 65% of elderly people wearing full upper dentures. Purpose: The purpose of this case report is to discuss thrush in patient wearing full denture which rapidly developed. Case: This paper report a case of 57 year-old man who came to the Oral Medicine Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University with clinical appearance of pseudomembranous candidiasis (thrush. Case Management: Diagnosis of this case is confirmed with microbiology examination. Patient was wearing full upper dentures, and from anamnesis known that patient wearing denture for 24 hours and he had poor oral hygiene. Patient was treated with topical (nystatin oral suspension and miconazole oral gel and systemic (ketoconazole antifungal. Patient also instructed not to wear his denture and cleaned white pseudomembrane on his mouth with soft toothbrush. Conclusion: Denture, habit of wearing denture for 24 hours, and poor oral hygiene are predisposing factors of thrush and it can healed completely after treated with topical and systemic antifungal.

  13. Digital immediate dentures treatment: A clinical report of two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeier, Toni Tien; Neumeier, Harold

    2016-09-01

    The use of computer-aided engineering (CAE) and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology to fabricate complete dentures was introduced in 2011. Clinical procedures for digital immediate dentures can be identical to those for conventional immediate dentures and can be simplified by leaving all remaining dentition until the time of extraction and denture placement. Through the digital process, a single digital design and a definitive digital record are created which can be used to fabricate the immediate digital denture and surgical reduction guide for alveoloplasty. Digital immediate dentures can be relined using the same process as for conventional dentures. The definitive digital dentures can be fabricated with a reline impression and new centric relation record, using the existing digital immediate denture without additional clinical procedures. Providing patients with digital immediate dentures is a viable trend.

  14. Dental diagnostics: molecular analysis of oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyari, Sarah; Bennett, Katie M

    2011-01-01

    Dental biofilms are complex, multi-species bacterial communities that colonize the mouth in the form of plaque and are known to cause dental caries and periodontal disease. Biofilms are unique from planktonic bacteria in that they are mutualistic communities with a 3-dimensional structure and complex nutritional and communication pathways. The homeostasis within the biofilm colony can be disrupted, causing a shift in the bacterial composition of the colony and resulting in proliferation of pathogenic species. Because of this dynamic lifestyle, traditional microbiological techniques are inadequate for the study of biofilms. Many of the bacteria present in the oral cavity are viable but not culturable, which severely limits laboratory analysis. However, with the advent of new molecular techniques, the microbial makeup of oral biofilms can be better identified. Some of these techniques include DNA-DNA hybridization, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and pyrosequencing. This review provides an overview of biofilm formation and examines the major molecular techniques currently used in oral biofilm analysis. Future applications of the molecular analysis of oral biofilms in the diagnosis and treatment of caries and periodontal disease are also discussed.

  15. An international multicenter study on the effectiveness of a denture adhesive in maxillary dentures using disposable gnathometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, Cees; van 't Hof, Martin; van Zeghbroeck, Lieve; Ozcan, Mutlu; Kalk, Warner

    No consensus has been achieved on whether denture adhesives are beneficial adjuncts in denture-wearers management. The purpose of this international multicenter study was to determine objectively the effect of a denture adhesive (Kukident) on the retention of complete maxillary dentures using

  16. An international multicenter study on the effectiveness of a denture adhesive in maxillary dentures using disposable gnathometers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Hof, M.A. van 't; Zeghbroeck, L. van; Ozcan, M.; Kalk, W.

    2007-01-01

    No consensus has been achieved on whether denture adhesives are beneficial adjuncts in denture-wearers management. The purpose of this international multicenter study was to determine objectively the effect of a denture adhesive (Kukident) on the retention of complete maxillary dentures using

  17. (1→3)-α-D-Glucan hydrolases in dental biofilm prevention and control: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Wiater, Adrian; Janczarek, Monika; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2015-08-01

    Dental plaque is a highly diverse biofilm, which has an important function in maintenance of oral and systemic health but in some conditions becomes a cause of oral diseases. In addition to mechanical plaque removal, current methods of dental plaque control involve the use of chemical agents against biofilm pathogens, which however, given the complexity of the oral microbiome, is not sufficiently effective. Hence, there is a need for development of new anti-biofilm approaches. Polysaccharides, especially (1→3),(1→6)-α-D-glucans, which are key structural and functional constituents of the biofilm matrix, seem to be a good target for future therapeutic strategies. In this review, we have focused on (1→3)-α-glucanases, which can limit the cariogenic properties of the dental plaque extracellular polysaccharides. These enzymes are not widely known and have not been exhaustively described in literature.

  18. Salmonella biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelijn, G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Salmonellaspp. is a problem in the food industry, since biofilms may act as a persistent source of product contamination. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain more insight in the processes involved and the factors contributing to Salmonellabiofilm formation. A collectio

  19. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244).

  20. Soft denture liners' effect on the masticatory function in patients wearing complete dentures: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Eleni Sotiria; Karaoglani, Eleni; Naka, Olga; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki

    2015-12-01

    To explore the effect of soft denture liners on the masticatory performance and muscle activity of edentulous patients wearing complete dentures, as determined by using objective measurement methods. Randomized controlled clinical trials and Cross-over studies that evaluated the masticatory capacity and muscle activity in denture wearers with and without soft denture liners were included in this systematic review. A comprehensive literature search was performed via electronic databases using the appropriate key words. The last search took place in September 2014. The potentially appropriate articles were identified and evaluated for eligibility through a predefined review process conducted by two examiners. Six out of the 176 identified records were included for quality and systematic assessment. The observed clinical and methodological diversity determined the narrative approach for the pooling of the findings. According to the studies brought together for the current systematic review, soft denture liners provided denture wearers with increased masticatory function compared to conventional denture base materials. Specifically, the use of long-term silicone liners significantly improved the mastication parameters. The observed intervention effects suggest further studies of higher quality to allow reliable conclusions to be drawn and to strengthen the clinical significance of these materials to patient's functionality. Soft denture lining materials have been suggested to address functional problems arising during complete denture function. This study was designed to systematically review the impact of soft liners' use on the masticatory efficiency in denture wearers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. O. Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244.

  2. 细菌外排泵抑制剂对光动力疗法抑制牙菌斑生物膜内主要致龋菌作用的影响%Impact of Efflux Pump-Inhibitors on Inhibition of Cariogenic Bacteria in Dental Plaque Biofilms with Photodynamic Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶亚东; 邹朝晖; 孙盼盼; 郭鹏; 阴慧娟

    2012-01-01

    To Study the impact of the efflux pump-inhibitor, verapamil, on the cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque biofilms in the photodynamic therapy using hematoporphyrin monomethylether as photosensitizer.The dental plaque biofilm models were established with streptococcus mutans, streptococcus sanguis, eosinophilic lactoba- cillus and actinomyces viscosus. By the order to add verapamil and photosensitizer in the PDT process, five groups were created; Group A, in which cells were incubated with photosensitizer and verapamil simultaneously; Group B, in which cells were incubated with verapamil before photosensitizer, Group C, in which cells were incubated with photosensitizer before verapamil; Group D, in which cells were given only PDT; and Group E, the saline-treated group. After the laser irradiation, plate count of bacteria was obtained to evaluate the vitality of the dental plaque bacteria after the PDT. Results The reduction of living cariogenic bacteria (CFU/mL) in plaque biofilms was much more distinctive (P <0.05 ) in the sole PDT group than in the saline-treatment group, showing a bactericidal rate up to 94.92% . The comparison between Group B and Group D indicated a significant upward trend in the number of living cariogenic bacteria (P < 0. 05), and the sterilizationrate of the latter was 80.92%. Conclusions HMME-PDT inhibits effectively the growth of cariogenic bacteria and bacterial efflux pump plays an extremely important role in the process.%目的 探讨细菌外排泵抑制剂(microbial efflux pump Inhibitor,EPI)——维拉帕米对以血卟啉单甲醚(hematoporphyrin monomethylether,HMME)为光敏剂的光动力疗法(photodynamic therapy,PDT)抵抗牙菌斑生物膜内主要致龋菌作用的影响.方法 以变形链球菌、血链球菌、嗜酸性乳杆菌和粘性放线菌为实验菌株,建立牙菌斑生物膜模型.以维拉帕米作为细菌外排泵抑制剂,根据在PDT过程中加入维拉帕米和光敏剂的先后顺序,实验分为5

  3. Tobacco smoking affects bacterial acquisition and colonization in oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Purnima S; Matthews, Chad R; Joshi, Vinayak; de Jager, Marko; Aspiras, Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that smoking affects the composition of the disease-associated subgingival biofilm, yet little is known about its effects during the formation of this biofilm. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the contributions of smoking to the composition and proinflammatory characteristics of the biofilm during de novo plaque formation. Marginal and subgingival plaque and gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from 15 current smokers and from 15 individuals who had never smoked (nonsmokers) following 1, 2, 4, and 7 days of undisturbed plaque formation. 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used for bacterial identification, and multiplex bead-based flow cytometry was used to quantify the levels of 27 immune mediators. Smokers demonstrated a highly diverse, relatively unstable initial colonization of both marginal and subgingival biofilms, with lower niche saturation than that seen in nonsmokers. Periodontal pathogens belonging to the genera Fusobacterium, Cardiobacterium, Synergistes, and Selenomonas, as well as respiratory pathogens belonging to the genera Haemophilus and Pseudomonas, colonized the early biofilms of smokers and continued to persist over the observation period, suggesting that smoking favors early acquisition and colonization of pathogens in oral biofilms. Smokers also demonstrated an early proinflammatory response to this colonization, which persisted over 7 days. Further, a positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokine levels and commensal bacteria was observed in smokers but not in nonsmokers. Taken together, the data suggest that smoking influences both the composition of the nascent biofilm and the host response to this colonization.

  4. In vitro method for prediction of plaque reduction by dentifrice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Bruce; Howard, Brian; Schnell, Daniel; Mills, Lisa; Xu, Jian

    2015-11-01

    An in vitro Particle Based Biofilm (PBB) model was developed to enable high throughput screening tests to predict clinical plaque reduction. Multi-species oral biofilms were cultured from pooled stimulated human saliva on continuously-colliding hydroxyapatite particles. After three days PBBs were saline washed prior to use in screening tests. Testing involved dosing PBBs for 1min followed by neutralization of test materials and rinsing. PBBs were then assayed for intact biofilm activity measured as ATP. The ranking of commercial dentifrices from most to least reduction of intact biofilm activity was Crest ProHealth Clinical Gum Protection, Crest ProHealth, Colgate Total and Crest Cavity Protection. We demonstrated five advantages of the PBB model: 1) the ATP metric had a linear response over ≥1000-fold dynamic range, 2) potential interference with the ATP assay by treatments was easily eliminated by rinsing PBBs with saline, 3) discriminating power was statistically excellent between all treatment comparisons with the negative controls, 4) screening test results were reproducible across four tests, and 5) the screening test produced the same rank order for dentifrices as clinical studies that measured plaque reduction. In addition, 454 pyrosequencing of the PBBs indicated an oral microbial consortium was present. The most prevalent genera were Neisseria, Rothia, Streptococcus, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, Veillonella and Haemophilus. We conclude these in vitro methods offer an efficient, effective and relevant screening tool for reduction of intact biofilm activity by dentifrices. Moreover, dentifrice rankings by the in vitro test method are expected to predict clinical results for plaque reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. pH gradients induced by urea metabolism in 'artificial mouth' microcosm plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissons, C H; Wong, L; Hancock, E M; Cutress, T W

    1994-06-01

    Evidence was sought for urea-induced pH gradients in dental plaque microcosm biofilms cultured from the mixed salivary bacteria in a multi plaque 'artificial mouth'. Application of 500 mmol/l urea for short periods (6 min) to 5-8 mm maximum-thickness plaques induced intraplaque pH gradients of up to 0.7 pH units with the surface alkaline relative to the inner plaque. These pH gradients persisted for more than 5 h in the absence of a flow of fluid. With 30-min urea applications and a flow of a basal medium containing mucin (BMM, pH 7.0), the pH of the inner (deeper) plaque regions also increased. Although the pH gradient initially formed was alkaline at the plaque surface, the BMM flow lowered the surface pH to neutrality whilst the inner layers were still alkaline, thereby reversing the pH gradient. In thick microcosm dental plaques, urea-induced pH gradients can therefore form and last many hours. They probably result from the significant time taken for urea to penetrate to the inner layers of plaque, its rapid metabolism by the outer plaque layers, and a rate-limiting clearance of ammonia. Even a slow BMM flow over the plaque greatly increased the rate of return to the resting pH, causing the gradients to change polarity.

  6. Biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction or terminat......During the past decade we have gained much knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that are involved in initiation and termination of biofilm formation. In many bacteria, these processes appear to occur in response to specific environmental cues and result in, respectively, induction...... or termination of biofilm matrix production via the second messenger molecule c-di-GMP. In between initiation and termination of biofilm formation we have defined specific biofilm stages, but the currently available evidence suggests that these transitions are mainly governed by adaptive responses......, and not by specific genetic programs. It appears that biofilm formation can occur through multiple pathways and that the spatial structure of the biofilms is species dependent as well as dependent on environmental conditions. Bacterial subpopulations, e.g., motile and nonmotile subpopulations, can develop...

  7. [Mechanism and risk factors of oral biofilm formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasich, Ewa; Walczewska, Maria; Pasich, Adam; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2013-08-02

    Recent microbiological investigations completely changed our understanding of the role of biofilm in the formation of the mucosal immune barrier and in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation of bacterial etiology. It is now clear that formation of bacterial biofilm on dental surfaces is characteristic for existence of oral microbial communities. It has also been proved that uncontrolled biofilms on dental tissues, as well as on different biomaterials (e.g. orthodontic appliances), are the main cause of dental diseases such as dental caries and periodontitis. The aim of this paper is to explain mechanisms and consequences of orthodontic biofilm formation. We will discuss current opinions on the influence of different biomaterials employed for orthodontic treatment in biofilm formation and new strategies employed in prevention and elimination of oral biofilm ("dental plaque").

  8. Removal of Dental Biofilms with an Ultrasonically Activated Water Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, R P; Fabbri, S; Offin, D G; Symonds, N; Kiang, K S; Knee, R J; Yoganantham, D C; Webb, J S; Birkin, P R; Leighton, T G; Stoodley, P

    2015-09-01

    Acidogenic bacteria within dental plaque biofilms are the causative agents of caries. Consequently, maintenance of a healthy oral environment with efficient biofilm removal strategies is important to limit caries, as well as halt progression to gingivitis and periodontitis. Recently, a novel cleaning device has been described using an ultrasonically activated stream (UAS) to generate a cavitation cloud of bubbles in a freely flowing water stream that has demonstrated the capacity to be effective at biofilm removal. In this study, UAS was evaluated for its ability to remove biofilms of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans UA159, as well as Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104 and Streptococcus oralis ATCC 9811, grown on machine-etched glass slides to generate a reproducible complex surface and artificial teeth from a typodont training model. Biofilm removal was assessed both visually and microscopically using high-speed videography, confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Analysis by CSLM demonstrated a statistically significant 99.9% removal of S. mutans biofilms exposed to the UAS for 10 s, relative to both untreated control biofilms and biofilms exposed to the water stream alone without ultrasonic activation (P biofilm removal. The UAS was also highly effective at S. mutans, A. naeslundii, and S. oralis biofilm removal from machine-etched glass and S. mutans from typodont surfaces with complex topography. Consequently, UAS technology represents a potentially effective method for biofilm removal and improved oral hygiene.

  9. Cast Partial Denture versus Acrylic Partial Denture for Replacement of Missing Teeth in Partially Edentulous Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramita Suwal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effects of cast partial denture with conventional all acrylic denture in respect to retention, stability, masticatory efficiency, comfort and periodontal health of abutments. Methods: 50 adult partially edentulous patient seeking for replacement of missing teeth having Kennedy class I and II arches with or without modification areas were selected for the study. Group-A was treated with cast partial denture and Group-B with acrylic partial denture. Data collected during follow-up visit of 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year by evaluating retention, stability, masticatory efficiency, comfort, periodontal health of abutment. Results: Chi-square test was applied to find out differences between the groups at 95% confidence interval where p = 0.05. One year comparison shows that cast partial denture maintained retention and stability better than acrylic partial denture (p< 0.05. The masticatory efficiency was significantly compromising from 3rd month to 1 year in all acrylic partial denture groups (p< 0.05. The comfort of patient with cast partial denture was maintained better during the observation period (p< 0.05. Periodontal health of abutment was gradually deteriorated in all acrylic denture group (p

  10. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? - A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ashish; Dhull, Kanika Singh; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-05-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (pdenture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of complete denture cleanser solutions based on sodium hypochlorite and Ricinus communis - a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Marcela Moreira; Badaró, Maurício Malheiros; Arruda, Carolina Noronha Ferraz de; Leite, Vanessa Maria Fagundes; Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato da; Watanabe, Evandro; Oliveira, Viviane de Cássia; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    To preserve oral health and to maintain the prosthetic devices, it is important not only to improve the properties of commonly known hygiene products, but also to investigate new materials with antimicrobial action. Objectives This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite (0.25% and 0.50%) and 10% Ricinus communis' solutions against specific microorganisms. Sixty four maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures three times a day and to soak them (20 min/day) in the solutions: SH1: 0.25% sodium hypochlorite; SH2: 0.5% sodium hypochlorite; RC: 10% R. communis oil; and C: 0.85% saline (control). The solutions were used for 7 days in a randomized sequence. Following each period of use, there was a 1-week washout period. Antimicrobial activity was determined by Colony Forming Units (CFU) counts of Streptococcus mutans, Candida spp., and gram-negative microorganisms. For collecting biofilm, the internal surface of maxillary dentures was brushed with saline solution, and biofilm suspension obtained. After dilutions (100 - 10-3), aliquots were seeded in Mitis salivarius, CHROMagar Candida, and MacConkey agar for detecting S. mutans, Candida spp., or gram-negative microorganisms, respectively. After incubation, colonies were counted, and CFU/mL values were calculated. Then, transformation - log10 (CFU+1) - data were analyzed using the Friedman test (α=0.05). Results showed significant differences between the solutions (p<0.001). All three solutions showed antimicrobial activity against S. mutans. Against Candida spp., RC and SH1 solutions showed similar effect while SH2 showed superior activity. SH1 and SH2 solutions showed antimicrobial action against gram-negative microorganisms. The Candida species most frequently isolated was C. albicans, followed by C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. The 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution was the most effective and might be used to control denture biofilm. C. albicans was the most

  12. A novel compound to maintain a healthy oral plaque ecology in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen M. Janus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Dental caries is caused by prolonged episodes of low pH due to acid production by oral biofilms. Bacteria within such biofilms communicate via quorum sensing (QS. QS regulates several phenotypic biofilm parameters, such as biofilm formation and the production of virulence factors. In this study, we evaluated the effect of several QS modifiers on growth and the cariogenic potential of microcosm oral biofilms. Methods: Biofilms were inoculated with pooled saliva and cultured in the presence of sucrose for 48 and 96 h. QS modifiers (or carrier controls were continuously present. Lactic acid accumulation capacities were compared to evaluate the cariogenic potential of the biofilms. Subsequently, biofilm growth was quantified by determining colony forming unit counts (CFUs and their ecology by 16S rDNA-based microbiome analyses. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC for several Streptococcus spp. was determined using microbroth dilution. Results: Of the tested QS modifiers only 3-oxo-N-(2-oxocyclohexyldodecanamide (3-Oxo-N completely abolished lactic acid accumulation by the biofilms without affecting biofilm growth. This compound was selected for further investigation. The active range of 3-Oxo-N was 10–100 µM. The homologous QS molecule, acyl homoserine lactone C12, did not counteract the reduction in lactic acid accumulation, suggesting a mechanism other than QS inhibition. Microbial ecology analyses showed a reduction in the relative abundance of Streptococcus spp. in favor of the relative abundance of Veillonella spp. in the 3-Oxo-N exposed biofilms. The MIC of 3-Oxo-N for several streptococcal species varied between 8 and 32 µM. Conclusion: 3-Oxo-N changes the ecological homeostasis of in vitro dental plaque. It reduces its cariogenic potential by minimizing lactic acid accumulation. Based on our in vitro data, 3-Oxo-N represents a promising compound in maintaining a healthy, non-cariogenic, ecology in in vivo dental plaque.

  13. Plaque Type Blue Naevus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sentamilselvi G

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of plaque type blue naevus was encountered in a Dermatology Clinic in Madras. The various clinical differential diagnoses are discussed, the hitopathological features described and the benign nature of the tumour stressed. The case is reported for its rarity and to create an awareness of this entity.

  14. Saliva as the Sole Nutritional Source in the Development of Multispecies Communities in Dental Plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S

    2015-06-01

    Dental plaque is a polymicrobial biofilm that forms on the surfaces of teeth and, if inadequately controlled, can lead to dental caries or periodontitis. Nutrient availability is the fundamental limiting factor for the formation of dental plaque, and for its ability to generate acid and erode dental enamel. Nutrient availability is also critical for bacteria to grow in subgingival biofilms and to initiate periodontitis. Over the early stages of dental plaque formation, micro-organisms acquire nutrients by breaking down complex salivary substrates such as mucins and other glycoproteins. Once dental plaque matures, dietary carbohydrates become more important for supragingival dental plaque, and gingival crevicular fluid forms the major nutrient source for subgingival microorganisms. Many species of oral bacteria do not grow in laboratory monocultures when saliva is the sole nutrient source, and it is now clear that intermicrobial interactions are critical for the development of dental plaque. This chapter aims to provide an overview of the key metabolic requirements of some well-characterized oral bacteria, and the nutrient webs that promote the growth of multispecies communities and underpin the pathogenicity of dental plaque for both dental caries and periodontitis.

  15. Effectiveness of microwave disinfection of complete dentures on the treatment of Candida-related denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppelenbroek, K H; Pavarina, A C; Palomari Spolidorio, D M; Sgavioli Massucato, E M; Spolidorio, L C; Vergani, C E

    2008-11-01

    The effectiveness of microwave disinfection of maxillary complete dentures on the treatment of Candida-related denture stomatitis was evaluated. Patients (n = 60) were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups of 15 subjects each; patients performed the routine denture care; Mw group: patients had their upper denture microwaved (650 W per 6 min) three times per week for 30 days; group MwMz: patients received the treatment of Mw group in conjunction with topical application of miconazole three times per day for 30 days; group Mz: patients received the antifungal therapy of group MwMz. Cytological smears and mycological cultures were taken from the dentures and the palates of all patients before treatment at day 15 and 30 of treatment and at follow-up (days 60 and 90). The effectiveness of the treatments was evaluated by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Microbial and clinical analysis of the control group demonstrated no significant decrease in the candidal infection over the clinical trial. Smears and cultures of palates and dentures of the groups Mw and MwMz exhibited absence of Candida at day 15 and 30 of treatment. On day 60 and 90, few mycelial forms were observed on 11 denture smears (36.6%) from groups Mw and MwMz, but not on the palatal smears. Miconazole (group Mz) neither caused significant reduction of palatal inflammation nor eradicated Candida from the dentures and palates. Microwaving dentures was effective for the treatment of denture stomatitis. The recurrence of Candida on microwaved dentures at follow-up was dramatically reduced.

  16. Treatment of Oral Biofilms by a D-Enantiomeric Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Wang, Zhejun; Hancock, Robert E. W.; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Almost all dental diseases are caused by biofilms that consist of multispecies communities. DJK-5, which is a short D-enantiomeric, protease-resistant peptide with broad-spectrum anti-biofilm activity, was tested for its effect on oral multispecies biofilms. Peptide DJK-5 at 10 μg/mL effectively prevented the growth of these microbes in culture media in a time-dependent manner. In addition to the prevention of growth, peptide DJK-5 completely killed both Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis suspended from biofilms after 30 minutes of incubation in liquid culture media. DJK-5 also led to the effective killing of microbes in plaque biofilm. The proportion of bacterial cells killed by 10 μg/mL of DJK-5 was similar after 1 and 3 days, both exceeding 85%. DJK-5 was able to significantly prevent biofilm formation over 3 days (P = 0.000). After 72 hours of exposure, DJK-5 significantly reduced and almost completely prevented plaque biofilm production by more than 90% of biovolume compared to untreated controls (P = 0.000). The proportion of dead biofilm bacteria at the 10 μg/mL DJK-5 concentration was similar for 1- and 3-day-old biofilms, whereby >86% of the bacteria were killed. DJK-5 was also able to kill >79% and >85% of bacteria, respectively, after one-time and three brief treatments of 3-day-old biofilms. The combination of DJK-5 and chlorhexidine showed the best bacterial killing among all treatments, with ~83% and >88% of bacterial cells killed after 1 and 3 minutes, respectively. No significant difference was found in the percentage of biofilm killing amongst three donor plaque samples after DJK-5 treatment. In particular, DJK-5 showed strong performance in inhibiting biofilm development and eradicating pre-formed oral biofilms compared to L-enantiomeric peptide 1018. DJK-5 was very effective against oral biofilms when used alone or combined with chlorhexidine, and may be a promising agent for use in oral anti-biofilm strategies in the future. PMID

  17. Age, gender, dentures and oral mucosal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEntee, M I; Glick, N; Stolar, E

    1998-03-01

    The numbers of participants over 75 years of age in previous studies of oral health have not been sufficient to permit a full investigation of the influence of age on the mouth. In this study a disproportionate stratified random sample of 255 independent elders was selected from a list of urban voters to provide similar numbers of men and women in three age groups. The subjects were interviewed and examined, and nearly half of them had mucosal disorders. There was a significant (P angular cheilitis in particular were associated significantly with men and with the use of defective dentures. Logistic regression revealed that neither age alone nor the quality of dentures predispose to mucosal lesions, but that the odds of finding stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular increased about three-fold in denture-users, and almost doubled in men.

  18. Cystatin C is Associated With Plaque Phenotype and Plaque Burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Wen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The relationship between carotid artery plaque burden, phenotype and serum cystatin C at normal and impaired renal function is still unclear. Methods: Demographic characteristics, carotid ultrasonography and other relevant information of 1,477 patients were collected. The association of carotid artery plaque burden, plaque phenotype with serum cystatin C was evaluated by strategy analysis based on renal function. Results: Serum cystatin C (OR=2.05, 95% CI: 1.83-2.29, POR=1.60, 95%CI: 1.43-1.78, POR=1.21, 95%CI: 1.10-1.32, P Conclusion: In normal renal function, serum cystatin C may confer stability of plaques. In mildly impaired renal function, serum cystatin C is a risk predictor of plaques. In normal renal function circumstances, serum cystatin C may benefit to the stability of plaques. In mild impaired renal function circumstances, serum cystatin C are a risk predictors of plaques.

  19. The conversion partial denture: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, Michael P; Brudvik, James S

    2004-04-01

    The treatment alternative described maximizes the benefit of remaining teeth while allowing simplified alteration of the prosthesis if abutments are lost during the life span of the removable partial denture (RPD). A conversion partial is an RPD whose tooth-frame assembly components are individually fabricated and then joined with an acrylic resin major connector. The conversion RPD optimizes retention and stabilization of a terminal dentition and can be easily converted to an immediate complete denture.

  20. Oral health: dentures and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    More than 35 million Americans have lost all of their teeth, and 178 million are missing at least one tooth. Left unmanaged, tooth loss, or edentulism, can lead to nutritional deficiencies, oral pain, and poor psychosocial functioning. The family physician may be the first clinician to discuss tooth loss as a health concern with the patient. A patient who is interested in replacing missing teeth may be a candidate for dentures, implants, or a combination of these. The patient's preferences, general health, degree of edentulism, ability to follow up regularly, smoking status, and overall oral health should be considered when the prosthodontist makes recommendations for treatment. Smoking can delay tissue healing; therefore, heavy smoking may be a contraindication to implant placement. If a patient chooses dentures, the family physician should perform regular oral examinations, because up to 70% of denture wearers are affected by denture stomatitis at some point. Poor fit, poor hygiene, nighttime wearing of removable dentures, and bacterial or candidal infections can all be identified and managed by the family physician. The physician also can reinforce proper wear and care instructions for dentures and proper care of implants.

  1. The effects of denture status on nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, A S; Palmer, C A; Rounds, M C; Russell, R M

    1998-01-01

    In Part I of this study, the Human Nutrition Research Center of the United States Department of Agriculture's Nutritional Status Study (NSS) of 691 independently living elderly people aged 60-98 found that poor dietary quality was associated with low educational attainment, low median family income, and self-report of partial or full dentures. In Part II, further analysis was conducted on a random subsample of 181 subjects who were examined and divided into four groups according to dentate status: two dentures, one denture, partial dentures, and teeth. In this subgroup, significant correlations were found between the quality of nutrient intake and the degree of edentulousness. Analysis of 53 nutrients plus calories from three-day food records showed a significantly higher nutritional quality of the diet in dentate volunteers than in the other groups. This difference was approximately 20% for 19 nutrients, bringing some nutrients (such as calcium) below the RDA for this age group. Although direct correlations cannot be made with actual nutritional status, the introduction of dentures could further compromise the precarious nutritional intake of the elderly population. With this in mind, dentists need to consider carefully the importance of their elderly patients maintaining at least some natural dentition and should provide adequate information on nutritional adaptations to dentures.

  2. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  3. Cognitive status of edentate elders wearing complete denture: Does quality of denture matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti-Kopplin, Daiane; Emami, Elham; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Padilha, Dalva Maria Pereira

    2015-09-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that an individual's level of mastication may play a role in their cognitive status. This suggests that in edentate individuals wearing complete denture, non-optimal mastication via inadequate denture could be related to cognitive status. To examine the impact of quality of denture on cognitive status of a sample of elderly edentate Brazilian individuals wearing complete denture. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of data collected from 117 edentate elders (mean age 73.7 ± 5.6 years) wearing complete denture, in southern Brazil. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Brazilian version of the mini-mental state examination (MMSE). Clinical examination was conducted to evaluate the quality of dentures by use of the FAD (functional assessment of dentures) instrument. Masticatory ability was assessed by self-reported questions. The mean MMSE score for the total sample was 23.1 (SD=4.4) and was associated with age (p=0.001), education (pdentures (pdentures in maintaining cognitive activity in elders. This association may be explained via mastication pathway. The potential beneficial effect of functional dentures on cognitive status via mastication could encourage preventive strategies to decrease substantial risk of morbidity in elders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hardness, Cohesiveness, and Adhesiveness of Oral Moisturizers and Denture Adhesives: Selection Criteria for Denture Wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Fujimoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of seven denture adhesives and eight oral moisturizers, all of which are commercially available, were evaluated using a texture profile analysis. A new assessment chart is proposed for the selection criteria of denture adhesive and oral moisturizers using a radar chart with three axes: hardness, cohesiveness, and adhesiveness.

  5. Transition of natural teeth to denture (Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Anita Kristanti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic needs of patients with complete dentures is currently greatly increasing. To encounter of the stages and the process of complete dentures settlement that takes time, the operators must develop a variety of techniques to overcome them. One of it is by considering the transitional denture method to overcome the aesthetics problem during these stages. Various selection methods during this transitional stage are the making of overdenture, immediate dentures or denture after clearance all remaining natural teeth. Each one has its advantages and disadvantages. Principally, the aesthetic needs, adaptation process, masticatory function and the tissues health are the main reason of this transitional denture. As conclusion, dentures transition method is very helpfull to encounter the patients problems to finish the process of definitive dentures settlement.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3600 Partially fabricated denture kit. (a... mold, by partially polymerizing the resin denture base materials while the materials are in...

  7. Growing oral biofilms in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratten, Jonathan

    2007-08-01

    In order to grow organisms in such a manner as to mimic their physiological growth state in vivo, it is often desirable to grow them as biofilms in the laboratory. There are numerous systems available to accomplish this; however, some are more suited to the growth of oral biofilms (dental plaque) than others. The operating parameters of one such model, the constant depth film fermentor (CDFF), are given in this unit. This model is particularly suited to studying the varied biofilms which exist in the oral cavity because environmental factors such as the substratum, nutrient source, and gas flow can be altered.

  8. Denture hyperplasia with areas simulating oral inverted ductal papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo Agustin; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz; Jorge, Jacks; Rangel, Ana Lúcia Carrinho Ayrosa; León, Jorge Esquiche; Almeida, Oslei Paes de

    2005-07-01

    Denture hyperplasia is a reactive lesion of the oral mucosa, usually associated to an ill-fitting denture. This lesion is easily diagnosed and in some cases distinct microscopic variations such as osseous, oncocytic and squamous metaplasia may be found. These metaplastic alterations probably are associated with the lymphocytic infiltrate usually present in denture hyperplasia. We present a case of denture hyperplasia containing salivary gland tissue with ductal alterations mimicking an oral inverted ductal papilloma.

  9. La pelade par plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre les schémas thérapeutiques et les résultats des traitements pour la pelade par plaques, de même que les aider à identifier les patients pour qui une demande de consultation en dermatologie pourrait s’imposer. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant le traitement de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte pileuse qui touche à la fois les enfants et les adultes. Même s’il n’y a pas de mortalité associée à la maladie, la morbidité découlant des effets psychologiques de la perte des cheveux peut être dévastatrice. Lorsque la pelade par plaques et le sous-type de la maladie sont identifiés, un schéma thérapeutique approprié peut être amorcé pour aider à arrêter la chute des cheveux et possiblement faire commencer la repousse. Les traitements de première intention sont la triamcinolone intralésionnelle avec des corticostéroïdes topiques ou du minoxidil ou les 2. Les médecins de famille peuvent prescrire ces traitements en toute sécurité et amorcer ces thérapies. Les cas plus avancés ou réfractaires pourraient avoir besoin de diphénylcyclopropénone topique ou d’anthraline topique. On peut traiter la perte de cils avec des analogues de la prostaglandine. Les personnes ayant subi une perte de cheveux abondante peuvent recourir à des options de camouflage ou à des prothèses capillaires. Il est important de surveiller les troubles psychiatriques en raison des effets psychologiques profonds de la perte de cheveux. Conclusion Les médecins de famille verront de nombreux patients qui perdent leurs cheveux. La reconnaissance de la pelade par plaques et la compréhension du processus pathologique sous-jacent permettent d’amorcer un schéma thérapeutique approprié. Les cas plus graves ou r

  10. Influence of Loading Positions of Mandibular Unilateral Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures on Movements of Abutment Tooth and Denture Base

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xilin Jin; Sato, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Ohyama, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to explore theeffects of different loading positions on the movementsof the abutment tooth and denture base ofremovable partial denture with unilaterallydesigned framework (RPD-U...

  11. Molecule Targeting Glucosyltransferase Inhibits Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhi; Cui, Tao; Zeng, Jumei; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wenling; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Yuqing

    2015-10-19

    Dental plaque biofilms are responsible for numerous chronic oral infections and cause a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be eliminated, as the bacteria in the biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotics. There is a critical need to develop new strategies to control biofilm-based infections. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans is promoted by major virulence factors known as glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), which synthesize adhesive extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). The current study was designed to identify novel molecules that target Gtfs, thereby inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation and having the potential to prevent dental caries. Structure-based virtual screening of approximately 150,000 commercially available compounds against the crystal structure of the glucosyltransferase domain of the GtfC protein from S. mutans resulted in the identification of a quinoxaline derivative, 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(3-{[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]imino}-1,4-dihydro-2-quinoxalinylidene)ethanamine, as a potential Gtf inhibitor. In vitro assays showed that the compound was capable of inhibiting EPS synthesis and biofilm formation in S. mutans by selectively antagonizing Gtfs instead of by killing the bacteria directly. Moreover, the in vivo anti-caries efficacy of the compound was evaluated in a rat model. We found that the compound significantly reduced the incidence and severity of smooth and sulcal-surface caries in vivo with a concomitant reduction in the percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque (P biofilm formation and the cariogenicity of S. mutans.

  12. Current techniques in CAD/CAM denture fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Nadim Z; AlRumaih, Hamad S; Goodacre, Brian J; Goodacre, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) to produce complete dentures has seen exponential growth in the dental market, and the number of commercially available CAD/CAM denture systems grows every year. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical and laboratory procedures of 5 CAD/CAM denture systems.

  13. RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF PSYCHOLOGIC FACTORS IN DENTURE SATISFACTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERVOORN, JM; DUINKERKE, ASH; LUTEIJN, F; VANDEPOEL, ACM

    The aim of this investigation was to explore the relative importance of psychologic variables in explaining the degree of denture satisfaction in full denture patients. A group of 125 patients who were on a waiting list to have new dentures constructed participated in this study. The patients

  14. Denture hygiene knowledge and practice amongst patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 203 patients attending a teaching hospital. ... Other information obtained were the duration of denture use, frequency of denture cleaning and type of ... About 41.9% had been using dentures for more than 10 years.

  15. Development of Candida-associated denture stomatitis: new insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Pereira-Cenci; A.A. Del Bel Cury; W. Crielaard; B. ten Cate

    2008-01-01

    Despite therapeutic progress, opportunistic oral fungal infectious diseases have increased in prevalence, especially in denture wearers. The combination of entrapment of yeast cells in irregularities in denture-base and denture-relining materials, poor oral hygiene and several systemic factors is th

  16. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false OTC denture repair kit. 872.3570 Section 872.3570...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  18. In vitro antibacterial effect of carbamide peroxide on oral biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Shu Yao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effects of carbamide peroxide (CP and chlorhexidine (CHX on oral biofilm in vitro. Collagen-coated hydroxyapatite discs were inoculated with subgingival plaque. After 3 weeks, the emergent biofilms were subjected to 1-, 3-, and 10-min exposures of a 1% CHX gel, a 5% CP gel and rinse, and a 10% CP gel and rinse. Subsequently, the biofilms were stained using a two-colour fluorescent dye kit for confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the volume ratio of dead bacteria to all bacteria was analysed. Compared to a non-treated gel control, the active agents killed bacteria on all the discs, with higher concentration and longer exposure times killing more bacteria. The rinse form disrupted the biofilm quicker than the gel form. Overall, 10% CP showed more disruption of biofilm and a greater proportion of killed bacteria than 1% CHX (p<0.05.

  19. Photodynamic inactivation of virulence factors of Candida strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Domingues, Nádia; Silva, Michelle Peneluppi; Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2015-12-01

    Candida species are major microorganisms isolated in denture stomatitis (DS), an inflammatory process of the mucosa underlying removable dental prostheses, and express a variety of virulence factors that can increase their pathogenicity. The potential of Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) in planktonic culture, biofilms and virulence factors of Candida strains was evaluated. A total of 48 clinical Candida isolates from individuals wearing removable maxillary prostheses with DS were included in the study. The effects of erythrosine (ER, 200 μM) and a green LED (λ 532 ± 10 nm, 237 mW/cm(2) and 42.63 J/cm(2)) in a planktonic culture were evaluated. The effect of the addition of ER at a concentration of 400 μM together with a green LED was evaluated in biofilms. The virulence factors of all of the Candida strains were evaluated before and after the PDI process in cells derived from biofilm and planktonic assays. All of the Candida species were susceptible to ER and green LED. However, the biofilm structures were more resistant to PDI than the planktonic cultures. PDI also promoted slight reductions in most of the virulence factors of C. albicans and some of the Candida tropicalis strains. These results suggest that the addition of PDI is effective for reducing yeasts and may also reduce the virulence of certain Candida species and decrease their pathogenicity.

  20. Antibiotic susceptibility of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans JP2 in a biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Oettinger-Barak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP is an inflammatory disease associated with specific bacteria, particularly Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, which can result in early tooth loss. The bacteria grow as a biofilm known as subgingival plaque. Treatment includes mechanical debridement of the biofilm, often associated with empirical antibiotic treatment. Objective: The aims of this study were to test in vitro the sensitivity of A. actinomycetemcomitans JP2 during planktonic and biofilm growth to doxycycline and to the combination of metronidazole and amoxicillin, which are two antibiotic protocols commonly used in clinical practice. Design: Two in vitro biofilm models were used to test the effects of the antibiotics: a static 96-well plate assay was used to investigate the effect of these antibiotics on biofilm formation whilst a flow chamber model was used to examine the effect on established biofilms. Results: Of the antibiotics tested in this model system, doxycycline was most efficacious with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC against planktonic cells of 0.21 mg/L and minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC of 2.10 mg/L. The most commonly prescribed antibiotic regimen, amoxicillin + metronidazole, was much less effective against both planktonic and biofilm cells with an MIC and MBIC of 12.0 mg/L and 20.2 mg/L, respectively. A single treatment of the clinically achievable concentration of 10 mg/L doxycycline to sparse A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms in the flow chamber model resulted in significant decreases in biofilm thickness, biovolume, and cell viability. Dense A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilms were significantly more resistant to doxycycline treatment. Low concentrations of antibiotics enhanced biofilm formation. Conclusion: A. actinomycetemcomitans JP2 homotypic biofilms were more susceptible in vitro to doxycycline than amoxicillin + metronidazole.

  1. Attitudes and usage of denture adhesives by complete denture wearers: a survey in Greece and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyzois, G.L.; Baat, C. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether there are differences in usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives among patients in two countries. BACKGROUND: There are no multi-country surveys concerning usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives from complete denture wearers. MATERIALS AND METHODS:

  2. The use of existing denture-satisfaction ratings for a diagnostic test to indicate prognosis with newly delivered complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yasuhiko; Matsumaru, Yuichi; Kanno, Kyoko; Kawase, Mitsuaki; Kawase, Mitsuo; Shu, Kazuyoshi; Izawa, Takeshi; Gunji, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Kihei

    2009-10-01

    The study investigated the relation between subjective satisfaction ratings of existing dentures and outcomes of newly delivered dentures, and the ability of the diagnostic test, using existing ratings, to indicate prognosis with newly delivered dentures. Consecutive 165 edentulous patients were recruited from November 2001 to August 2006 at a university-affiliated hospital. Dentures were fabricated with an acrylic base with full-balanced occlusion using hard resin artificial teeth by multiple prosthodontists. At the baseline and 3-month after delivery, patients rate their overall, maxillary, and mandibular satisfaction for existing and replaced dentures on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). The association between baseline ratings and newly delivered dentures was analyzed by regression analysis. The test's performance was measured by constructing a two-by-two table; patients with the following cutoff values on the VAS (overall: dentures. Relative validity of the diagnostic tests was assessed by means of sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. Mandibular dentures showed a significant association between baseline and new dentures (coefficient=0.27, p=0.01). Results of test measures for overall, maxillary, and mandibular existing dentures were 71%, 38%, and 87% (sensitivity); 62%, 66%, and 49% (specificity); and 1.1, 1.9, and 1.7 (positive likelihood), and 0.5, 1.0, and 0.2 (negative likelihood). Test performance indicates that the negative (satisfied) result for mandibular existing dentures may be useful to rule out the unsatisfied patients with new mandibular dentures.

  3. The influence of patient characteristics on acrylic-based resilient denture liners embedded in maxillary complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Akina; Kimoto, Suguru; Saeki, Hiroyuki; Ono, Masanori; Furuse, Nobuhiko; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    A major complication associated with the use of resilient denture liners (RDLs) is a change in hardness over time. In vivo studies on the deterioration of RDLs over time are needed. We aimed to investigate the influence of patient characteristics on the hardness of acrylic-based RDLs (ARDLs) embedded in complete maxillary dentures. We hypothesized that 1 month after application of the ARDLs, the hardness would be influenced by age, saliva condition, occlusal force, smoking, drinking, denture wearing during sleeping, denture cleanser usage, and denture type. Thirty complete maxillary denture wearers were recruited after obtaining informed consent. One investigator measured the Shore D hardness of the commercially available ARDLs, Soften (SFT), FD Soft (FDS), and Bio Liner (BIO) using a Vesmeter(®). The salivary flow rates and pH values and the occlusal force were measured for all patients before initiation of the study. T-tests and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used for the statistical analyses. A p-value of dentures while sleeping, use of denture cleansers, and denture type were associated with an increase in the hardness of the RDLs. The resting saliva pH only influenced the hardness of the SFT ARDLs. Smoking, denture wearing while sleeping, denture cleanser usage, denture type, and resting saliva pH are important predictors of the deterioration of ARDLs over time. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Attitudes and usage of denture adhesives by complete denture wearers: a survey in Greece and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyzois, G.L.; Baat, C. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether there are differences in usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives among patients in two countries. BACKGROUND: There are no multi-country surveys concerning usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives from complete denture wearers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Th

  5. The Relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs and Overall Denture Conditions in Complete Denture Wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rostamkhani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is any relationship between the condition of complete dentures and TMDs. Methods: The sample consisted of 61 consecutive patients (35 females and 26 males who were admitted to the Department of Prosthodontics of Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry for fabrication of new complete dentures.  The age range of the participants was between 32 and 80 years, with the mean age of 57.05±10.26 years. The patients were examined by two prosthodontists. Using a questionnaire, the first prosthodontist asked the patients about their habits and history of trauma to the temporomandibular joints (TMJs. She then examined the participants for signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs.  The second prosthodontist examined each participant's existing denture and checked its fit, stability, retention, occlusion, and centric relation, and recorded how long it had been in service. The examination was double blind. The data were recorded in examination sheets. Results: The relationship between TMDs and denture fit, stability, retention, centric relation and occlusion was analyzed using Fisher’s Exact Test. No significant relationship was found between denture characteristics and TMDs in complete denture wearers (P-value>0.05. Conclusion: Complete denture characteristics did not play a role in the development of TMDs in edentulous patients.

  6. On the clinical deformation of maxillary complete dentures. Influence of denture-base design and shape of denture-bearing tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Ghazali, S; Glantz, P O; Strandman, E; Randow, K

    1989-04-01

    This paper aimed to study the influence of denture base design and the shape of the denture-supporting area on the functional deformation of maxillary complete dentures. Six strain-gauged duplicate maxillary dentures were made for the study of two test subjects with different shapes of the palatal vault. Each subject was supplied with two polymethyl methacrylate dentures, one with a 1-mm-thick palatal base and the other 2 mm thick. A third denture was constructed with a cobalt-chromium base. The functional loading tests included maximum biting and the chewing of the food test samples. An analysis based on chewing time and total number of chewing cycles per test piece was also made. The results showed that surface straining is highly complex at the anterior part of the maxillary dentures constructed from polymethyl methacrylate and that increasing the denture thickness per se might not be accompanied by a reduction of strain. The results also suggest that high thrust to the supporting tissue is produced with high palatal vault dentures made in polymethyl methacrylate. The study proposes that cobalt-chromium bases may be used in maxillary dentures to reduce functional deformation and thrust to the supporting tissues at the anterior part of the maxilla.

  7. An alternative technique for hollowing maxillary complete denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C Deogade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme resorption of edentulous maxilla may cause difficulty during fabrication of a maxillary complete denture. Increased inter-ridge distance often creates a clinical problem due to heavy-weighted maxillary prosthesis. This article elaborates an alternative approach for hollowing a maxillary complete denture. It utilizes a clear template of the trial denture facilitating the creation of a gelatin cavity form. This hollowing ensures the even thickness of both denture base resins for structural integrity and reduces the heaviness of the denture.

  8. The cast aluminum denture base. Part I: Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, A R

    1980-06-01

    Experiments with various casting techniques have been done, and aluminum base dentures have been made for many patients. The subjective clinical response from patients wearing aluminum dentures has not been different from patients wearing acrylic resin dentures. However, Brudvik and Holt have stated that they have had marked clinical success in using aluminum bases. A literature review on using aluminum as a denture base material has been presented, and the rationale for its use has been discussed. In part II, a technique will be described that can be used for casting aluminum denture bases.

  9. Transesophageal echocardiogram causing denture dislodgement with upper airway partial obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Najeeb; Shaikh, Azim

    2009-06-01

    A 30-year-old female was evaluated with transesophageal echocardiography to exclude an atrial septal defect. The patient denied having dentures or partial dentures during her pre-procedure history and immediately prior to the procedure. Following the transesophageal echocardiography it was discovered that the patient had a partial airway obstruction caused by dislodgement of her partial dentures. The case illustrates the importance of not only asking patients if they have dentures, partial dentures, or any dental appliances, but also manually checking and directly looking into patients' mouths prior to transesophageal echocardiography for any dental appliances.

  10. Manufacturing hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Josef Kridanto Kamadjaja

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A resilient denture liner is placed in the part of the hollow obturator base that contacts to post hemimaxillectomy mucosa. Replacing the resilient denture liner can makes the hollow obturator has an intimate contact with the mucosa, so it can prevents the mouth liquid enter to the cavum nasi and sinus, also eliminates painful because of using the hollow obturator. Resilient denture liner is a soft and resilient material that applied to the fitting surface of a denture in order to allow a more distribution of load. A case was reported about using the hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy to overcome these problems.

  11. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin "Versacryl." The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P complete dentures improved denture retention.

  12. Comparative study of Candida by conventional and CHROMagar method in non-denture and denture wearers by oral rinse technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Nayak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Candidal species colonizes the oral cavities of healthy individuals without dentures and also of denture wearers. Soft liners and tissue conditioning materials have been found to support the growth of Candida albicans which may predispose to lesions. The most important and common candidal species are C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. C albicans is usually isolated from both the fitting surface of the denture and the denture-bearing mucosa of the affected patients. The aim of this study was to isolate, quantify, and speciate candidal species in non-denture wearers (controls and denture wearers (study group by the oral rinse technique. Isolation was done using Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA. Speciation was done using conventional methods like the germ tube test, carbohydrate fermentation test, urease test, as well as the CHROMagar method. Aims and Objective: 1 To assess the prevalence of Candida in non-denture wearers and in denture wearers by oral rinse technique, with isolation on SDA; 2 to speciate and quantify Candida in non-denture wearers and denture wearers by using conventional methods (germ tube test, carbohydrate fermentation test, urease test and the CHROMagar method; 3 to assess the influence of smoking and diabetes on candidal species among the denture wearers; and 4 to assess the sensitivity and specificity of SDA and CHRO Magar Materials and Methods: Salivary samples for Candida evaluation were collected from the subjects in sterile sample containers, using the oral rinse technique. Results: C glabrata was the most commonly found species among denture wearers and non-denture wearers both by conventional and CHROMagar methods. In males, C. albicans was the predominant species, whereas C. glabrata was the predominant species in females. Candidal colonization was higher in denture wearers compared to non-denture wearers, especially among females. The CHROMagar method was more rapid compared to conventional

  13. [Occlusal vertical dimension in removable complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, R; Witter, D J

    2011-12-01

    In removable complete dentures, the occlusal vertical dimension is an important factor for patients' satisfaction with aesthetics. An excessively reduced occlusal vertical dimension is especially likely to lead to complaints about aesthetics, whereas an increased occlusal vertical dimension may lead to discomfort and a decision not to wear the complete dentures. There are various methods for determining the occlusal vertical dimension in complete dentures, based on the vertical dimension in the rest position of the mandible or on phonetics. However, none of the methods have proven to be clearly superior, in terms of reliability, than the others. The assessment of the occlusal vertical dimension will become more reliable if several methods are used simultaneously. Moreover, knowledge of the characteristics of the ageing face is essential.

  14. Leaching from denture base materials in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lygre, H.; Solheim, E.; Gjerdet, N.R. [School of Medicine, Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

    1995-04-01

    Specimens made from denture base materials were leached in Ringer Solution and in ethanol. The specimens comprised a heat-cured product processed in two different ways and two cold-cured materials. The organic compounds leaching from the specimens to the solutions were separated, identified, and quantified by a combined gas-chromatography and gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry technique. Additives and degradation products, possibly made by free radical reactions, were released from the denture base materials. In Ringer solution only phthalates could be quantified. In ethanol solvent, biphenyl, dibutyl phthalate, dicyclohexyl phthalate, phenyl benzoate, and phenyl salicylate were quantified. In addition, copper was found in the ethanol solvent from one of the denture base materials. The amount of leachable organic compounds varies among different materials. Processing temperature influences the initial amount of leachable compounds. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Will wearing dentures affect edentulous patients' breathing during sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuwen; Zou, Dong; Feng, Hailan; Pan, Shaoxia

    2017-01-14

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of wearing dentures on obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea among completely edentulous patients. A self-controlled study was conducted among 30 edentulous patients. Polysomnograms were recorded in the sleep laboratory on two consecutive nights. Participants slept with their dentures in one night and without dentures in the other. The apnea and hypopnea index (AHI), lowest oxygen saturation (L-SpO2), and morning blood pressure (MBP) were collected for statistical analysis. Among the edentulous participants, 24 showed a higher AHI when sleeping with dentures. The average AHI for all 30 participants was significantly higher when they slept with dentures than without dentures (16.3 ± 14.7 vs 13.4 ± 14.0/h, P dentures) had a significant increase in AHI when sleeping with dentures, and nearly half of them (5 out of 11) reached the diagnostic standard for OSAHS (AHI >5). A higher morning diastolic blood pressure was recorded when participants slept with dentures (P dentures can lead to significant increase of AHI and diastolic MBP among edentulous people. Hence, we suggest that Chinese edentulous people should remove their dentures before sleep. ChiCTR-IOR-16008404.

  16. [Dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K; Okamoto, F; Ogata, K; Sato, T

    1989-02-01

    Recently, microwave-cured denture base resin was developed, and the resin solved the problem of internal porosity which had been generated by curing the conventional denture base resins with microwave irradiation. In this study, the dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin was compared with that of other denture base resins, such as pour-type resin, heat-cured resin and heat-shock resin. From the experiment, the following results were obtained. 1. Dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin was better than that of heat-cured resin and heat-shock resin, and was similar to that of pour-type resin. 2. Dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin by slow cooling method and rapid cooling method was almost the same. Those findings suggest that microwave-cured denture base resin is valuable in clinic.

  17. [Complete removable dentures and prognathism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postaire, M; Raux, D

    1991-06-01

    Further to some reminders concerning terminology and resorption, this article presents the full denture prosthetic treatment for two patients with total edentation and a prognathic malocclusion. The first case presents a tridimensional symptomatology, described by: a progeny; a voluminous mandibular terrain; a concave profile; a rather closed mandibular angle; a mandible ridge which circumscribes the upper jaw; The particularities of the prosthetic treatment in this case are: a lowering of the posterior occlusal plane; a mounting of the teeth in a limited external position, that is to say, the maxillary lingual cuspids and the mandibular mesio-distal groove on the inter-crest line; the mandibular incisors and cuspids placed with a lingual inclination to obtain an edge-to-edge occlusal contact. The second case is of vertical symptomatology type, described by: a macrogeny; a moderate concavity of the profile; a very marked increase of the vertical dimension; an open mandibular angle; a short ramus; a long mandibule; a very marked overjet between the anterior crests. The particularities of the prosthetic treatment for this case are: a posterior teeth placement, avoiding cross-bite position, taken into account the strong convergence of the intercrest lines; a strong lingual inclination of the mandibular incisors and cuspids, in order to obtain an edge-to-edge occlusal contact. In the light of these two specific cases, emphasis is placed on the particularities of the treatment and on the teeth placement proposed in order to avoid any cross-bite teeth mounting.

  18. Individuality, Stability, and Variability of the Plaque Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Daniel R; Mark Welch, Jessica L; Borisy, Gary G

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque is a bacterial biofilm composed of a characteristic set of organisms. Relatively little information from cultivation-independent, high-throughput analyses has been published on the temporal dynamics of the dental plaque microbiome. We used Minimum Entropy Decomposition, an information theory-based approach similar to oligotyping that provides single-nucleotide resolution, to analyze a previously published time series data set and investigate the dynamics of the plaque microbiome at various analytic and taxonomic levels. At both the genus and 97% Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) levels of resolution, the range of variation within each individual overlapped that of other individuals in the data set. When analyzed at the oligotype level, however, the overlap largely disappeared, showing that single-nucleotide resolution enables differentiation of individuals from one another without ambiguity. The overwhelming majority of the plaque community in all samples was made up of bacteria from a moderate number of plaque-typical genera, indicating that the overall community framework is shared among individuals. Each of these genera fluctuated in abundance around a stable mean that varied between individuals, with some genera having higher inter-individual variability than others. Thus, at the genus level, differences between individuals lay not in the identity of the major genera but in consistently differing proportions of these genera from mouth to mouth. However, at the oligotype level, we detected oligotype "fingerprints," a highly individual-specific set of persistently abundant oligotypes fluctuating around a stable mean over time. For example, within the genus Corynebacterium, more than a dozen oligotypes were detectable in each individual, of which a different subset reached high abundance in any given person. This pattern suggests that each mouth contains a subtly different community of organisms. We also compared the Chinese plaque community

  19. Individuality, stability, and variability of the plaque microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Utter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental plaque is a bacterial biofilm composed of a characteristic set of organisms. Relatively little information from cultivation-independent, high-throughput analyses has been published on the temporal dynamics of the dental plaque microbiome. We used Minimum Entropy Decomposition, an information theory-based approach similar to oligotyping that provides single-nucleotide resolution, to analyze a previously published time series data set and investigate the dynamics of the plaque microbiome at various analytic and taxonomic levels. At both the genus and 97% Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU levels of resolution, the range of variation within each individual overlapped that of other individuals in the dataset. When analyzed at the oligotype level, however, the overlap largely disappeared, showing that single-nucleotide resolution enables differentiation of individuals from one another without ambiguity. The overwhelming majority of the plaque community in all samples was made up of bacteria from a moderate number of plaque-typical genera, indicating that the overall community framework is shared among individuals. Each of these genera fluctuated in abundance around a stable mean that varied between individuals, with some genera having higher inter-individual variability than others. Thus, at the genus level, differences between individuals lay not in the identity of the major genera but in consistently differing proportions of these genera from mouth to mouth. However, at the oligotype level, we detected oligotype fingerprints, a highly individual-specific set of persistently abundant oligotypes fluctuating around a stable mean over time. For example, within the genus Corynebacterium, more than a dozen oligotypes were detectable in each individual, of which a different subset reached high abundance in any given person. This pattern suggests that each mouth contains a subtly different community of organisms. We also compared the Chinese plaque

  20. Veterans Administration Cooperative Dental Implant Study--comparisons between fixed partial dentures supported by blade-vent implants and removable partial dentures. Part I: Methodology and comparisons between treatment groups at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, K K

    1987-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether fixed partial dentures supported by dental implants provide an acceptable alternative to conventional removable partial dentures in patients with Kennedy class I or class II edentulous conditions. The acceptability of the new treatment will be based on success rates, impact on the health of the remaining dentition, masticatory performance, patient satisfaction, and maintenance care and cost. The study was planned also to provide comparisons between two designs commonly used by dentists for fabricating removable partial dentures. The designs differed only in terms of the type of the retainer (clasp type) and tooth support (rest location). A total of 272 patients with Kennedy class I and class II edentulous conditions were assigned on a random basis to one of the treatment groups, 134 to receive a removable partial denture and 138 a fixed partial denture supported by a blade-vent implant. All of the patients were medically screened and met prespecified criteria for oral hygiene, bone support for abutment teeth, and size of the residual ridge. Thirty-four patients were eliminated from the study before completion of their treatment. An additional six patients with early implant failures were reentered in the study and followed up as a separate group. The remaining 232 patients received comprehensive dental care, including removable partial dentures for 118 and fixed partial dentures for 114 patients. A series of examinations, radiographs, masticatory performance tests, patient satisfaction, food selection questionnaires, and dietary history were completed before initiation of the treatment, 16 weeks after the insertion of an RPD or an implant, and thereafter at 6-, 18-, 36-, and 60-month intervals. In addition, patients were seen at 6-month intervals for a recall dental examination, oral prophylaxis, plaque instructions, radiographic survey of the implant, and any needed dental treatment. The randomization stratification

  1. [Gerontoprosthesis. Concept of rebuilding old complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxkors, R; Mayer, K

    1990-04-01

    If aged patients who have been wearing their full dentures without complications so far, need further prothetic treatment, the dentist must not replace the old denture by a completely new one. It is better to rebuild it step by step. This demand is based on the following theses: --Nobody but the patient himself is able to perform functional movements. --Unless bite and occlusion are correct, patients are not able to perform accurate functional movements. --When bite and occlusion have been checked and, if necessary, improved, bases and alveolar ridges must be congruent.

  2. The Danger Signal Extracellular ATP Is an Inducer of Fusobacterium nucleatum Biofilm Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qinfeng; Tan, Kai Soo

    2016-01-01

    Plaque biofilm is the primary etiological agent of periodontal disease. Biofilm formation progresses through multiple developmental stages beginning with bacterial attachment to a surface, followed by development of microcolonies and finally detachment and dispersal from a mature biofilm as free planktonic bacteria. Tissue damage arising from inflammatory response to biofilm is one of the hallmark features of periodontal disease. A consequence of tissue damage is the release of ATP from within the cell into the extracellular space. Extracellular ATP (eATP) is an example of a danger associated molecular pattern (DAMP) employed by mammalian cells to elicit inflammatory and damage healing responses. Although, the roles of eATP as a signaling molecule in multi-cellular organisms have been relatively well studied, exogenous ATP also influences bacteria biofilm formation. Since plaque biofilms are continuously exposed to various stresses including exposure to the host damage factors such as eATP, we hypothesized that eATP, in addition to eliciting inflammation could potentially influence the biofilm lifecycle of periodontal associated bacteria. We found that eATP rather than nutritional factors or oxidative stress induced dispersal of Fusobacterium nucleatum, an organism associated with periodontal disease. eATP induced biofilm dispersal through chelating metal ions present in biofilm. Dispersed F. nucleatum biofilm, regardless of natural or induced dispersal by exogenous ATP, were more adhesive and invasive compared to planktonic or biofilm counterparts, and correspondingly activated significantly more pro-inflammatory cytokine production in infected periodontal fibroblasts. Dispersed F. nucleatum also showed higher expression of fadA, a virulence factor implicated in adhesion and invasion, compared to planktonic or biofilm bacteria. This study revealed for the first time that periodontal bacterium is capable of co-opting eATP, a host danger signaling molecule to detach

  3. Improving the esthetic replacement of missing anterior teeth: interaction between periodontics and a rotational path removable partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Leticia Machado; Bezerra-Junior, Jose Ribamar Sabino; Benatti, Bruno Braga; Santana, Ivone Lima

    2011-01-01

    The rotational path of insertion concept for removable partial dentures (RPDs) can be used in esthetically demanding situations. This clinical report describes the treatment of a patient with an anterior maxillary edentulous area using a rotational path RPD. To optimally improve gingival esthetics and to allow proximal retention on the surveyors, a crown-lengthening surgical procedure was performed prior to prosthetic treatment on all teeth involved in this rehabilitation. When correctly planned and fabricated, this prosthesis allows excellent functional and esthetic results, minimizes tooth preparation, and reduces the tendency toward plaque accumulation.

  4. Red fluorescent biofilm: the thick, the old, and the cariogenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M.C. Volgenant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some dental plaque fluoresces red. The factors involved in this fluorescence are yet unknown. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess systematically the effect of age, thickness, and cariogenicity on the extent of red fluorescence produced by in vitro microcosm biofilms. Design: The effects of biofilm age and thickness on red fluorescence were tested in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF by growing biofilms of variable thicknesses that received a constant supply of defined mucin medium (DMM and eight pulses of sucrose/day. The influence of cariogenicity on red fluorescence was tested by growing biofilm on dentin disks receiving DMM, supplemented with three or eight pulses of sucrose/day. The biofilms were analyzed at different time points after inoculation, up to 24 days. Emission spectra were measured using a fluorescence spectrophotometer (λexc405 nm and the biofilms were photographed with a fluorescence camera. The composition of the biofilms was assessed using 454-pyrosequecing of the 16S rDNA gene. Results: From day 7 onward, the biofilms emitted increasing intensities of red fluorescence as evidenced by the combined red fluorescence peaks. The red fluorescence intensity correlated with biofilm thickness but not in a linear way. Biofilm fluorescence also correlated with the imposed cariogenicity, evidenced by the induced dentin mineral loss. Increasing the biofilm age or increasing the sucrose pulsing frequency led to a shift in the microbial composition. These shifts in composition were accompanied by an increase in red fluorescence. Conclusions: The current study shows that a thicker, older, or more cariogenic biofilm results in a higher intensity of red fluorescence.

  5. Red fluorescent biofilm: the thick, the old, and the cariogenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M.C.; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Buijs, Mark J.; Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob (Bob) M.; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Some dental plaque fluoresces red. The factors involved in this fluorescence are yet unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to assess systematically the effect of age, thickness, and cariogenicity on the extent of red fluorescence produced by in vitro microcosm biofilms. Design The effects of biofilm age and thickness on red fluorescence were tested in a constant depth film fermentor (CDFF) by growing biofilms of variable thicknesses that received a constant supply of defined mucin medium (DMM) and eight pulses of sucrose/day. The influence of cariogenicity on red fluorescence was tested by growing biofilm on dentin disks receiving DMM, supplemented with three or eight pulses of sucrose/day. The biofilms were analyzed at different time points after inoculation, up to 24 days. Emission spectra were measured using a fluorescence spectrophotometer (λexc405 nm) and the biofilms were photographed with a fluorescence camera. The composition of the biofilms was assessed using 454-pyrosequecing of the 16S rDNA gene. Results From day 7 onward, the biofilms emitted increasing intensities of red fluorescence as evidenced by the combined red fluorescence peaks. The red fluorescence intensity correlated with biofilm thickness but not in a linear way. Biofilm fluorescence also correlated with the imposed cariogenicity, evidenced by the induced dentin mineral loss. Increasing the biofilm age or increasing the sucrose pulsing frequency led to a shift in the microbial composition. These shifts in composition were accompanied by an increase in red fluorescence. Conclusions The current study shows that a thicker, older, or more cariogenic biofilm results in a higher intensity of red fluorescence. PMID:27060056

  6. Preventive effects of a phospholipid polymer coating on PMMA on biofilm formation by oral streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yukie; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2016-12-01

    The regulation of biofilm formation on dental materials such as denture bases is key to oral health. Recently, a biocompatible phospholipid polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB) coating, was reported to inhibit sucrose-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic bacterium, on the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture bases. However, S. mutans is a minor component of the oral microbiome and does not play an important role in biofilm formation in the absence of sucrose. Other, more predominant oral streptococci must play an indispensable role in sucrose-independent biofilm formation. In the present study, the effect of PMB coating on PMMA was evaluated using various oral streptococci that are known to be initial colonizers during biofilm formation on tooth surfaces. PMB coating on PMMA drastically reduced sucrose-dependent tight biofilm formation by two cariogenic bacteria (S. mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus), among seven tested oral streptococci, as described previously [N. Takahashi, F. Iwasa, Y. Inoue, H. Morisaki, K. Ishihara, K. Baba, J. Prosthet. Dent. 112 (2014) 194-203]. Streptococci other than S. mutans and S. sobrinus did not exhibit tight biofilm formation even in the presence of sucrose. On the other hand, all seven species of oral streptococci exhibited distinctly reduced glucose-dependent soft biofilm retention on PMB-coated PMMA. We conclude that PMB coating on PMMA surfaces inhibits biofilm attachment by initial colonizer oral streptococci, even in the absence of sucrose, indicating that PMB coating may help maintain clean conditions on PMMA surfaces in the oral cavity.

  7. Anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, Aloe vera, and Cashew leaf on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Pooja J; Hegde, Vijaya; Gomes, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of dependent elderly, there is a need to introduce few natural products for denture cleansing, which are easily and economically available. Hence the aim of this study was to compare the anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet (sodium bicarbonate and sodium perborate monohydrate), Triphala (Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia belerica fruits powders in equal proportion), cashew leaf, Aloe vera and water (control) on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly. Study population consisted of 50 institutionalized elderly of Mangalore, Karnataka, with 10 in each group. Swabs were collected from the dentures before and after the use of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, cashew leaf, Aloe vera, and water (control). Thereafter, the swabs were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar and the total candida counts were determined. Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna showed a statistically significant reduction in Candida counts (P Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna were found to be more effective.

  8. Does wearing dentures change sensory nerve responses under the denture base?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nana; Kimoto, Suguru; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2014-03-01

    The standard textbook on complete dentures suggests the necessity of relief for the incisive and posterior palatine foramina of denture wearers to prevent the impingement of the nerves and vessels passing through these foramina. However, concrete evidence of the effect of dentures on the sensory function of the nerves underlying dentures is lacking. The study aim was to investigate the influence of denture-induced compression on sensory nerve responses to stimulations. Only partially edentulous patients of maxillary Kennedy class II who wear dentures (WD) or who never wear dentures (ND) were recruited as participants. The WD and ND groups had 15 participants with a mean age of 66.9 years and 22 participants with a mean age of 60.2 years, respectively. Current perception thresholds (CPTs) at 2000, 250 and 5 Hz, corresponding to A-beta, A-delta and C fibres, respectively, were measured by the Neurometer(®) NS3000 device and compared between groups. The data were analysed by the t-test, the paired t-test and analysis of covariance adjusted for age, sex and thickness of the mucosa. The CPTs showed large differences at 2000 Hz but no differences at the other frequencies when the WD and ND groups were compared. Only the CPT of the edentulous side at 2000 Hz was significantly different between groups. Wearing removable partial dentures contributes to changes of responses to stimulations in the large fibre of the sensory nerve underlying the maxillary alveolar ridge. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Organo-selenium-containing dental sealant inhibits bacterial biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, P; Hamood, A; Mosley, T; Gray, T; Jarvis, C; Webster, D; Amaechi, B; Enos, T; Reid, T

    2013-05-01

    Oral bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius, contribute to tooth decay and plaque formation; therefore, it is essential to develop strategies to prevent dental caries and plaque formation. We recently showed that organo-selenium compounds covalently attached to different biomaterials inhibited bacterial biofilms. Our current study investigates the efficacy of an organo-selenium dental sealant (SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant) in inhibiting S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilm formation in vitro. The organo-selenium was synthesized and covalently attached to dental sealant material via standard polymer chemistry. By colony-forming unit (CFU) assay and confocal microscopy, SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant was found to completely inhibit the development of S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilms. To assess the durability of the anti-biofilm effect, we soaked the SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant in PBS for 2 mos at 37°C and found that the biofilm-inhibitory effect was not diminished after soaking. To determine if organo-selenium inhibits bacterial growth under the sealant, we placed SeLECT-Defense sealant over a lawn of S. mutans. In contrast to a control sealant, SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant completely inhibited the growth of S. mutans. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of SeLECT-Defense(TM) sealant against S. mutans and S. salivarius biofilms is very effective and durable.

  10. IMPROVDENT: improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Janine C; Navarro-Coy, Nuria; Pavitt, Sue H; Hulme, Claire; Godfrey, Mary; Craddock, Helen L; Brunton, Paul A; Brown, Sarah; Dillon, Sean; Dukanovic, Gillian; Fernandez, Catherine; Wright, Jonathan; Collier, Howard; Swithenbank, Shirley; Lee, Carol; Hyde, T Paul

    2012-08-31

    According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009) 15% of adults aged 65-74, 30% aged 75-84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients' quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone). Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period). Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order) during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period).Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference) and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference). A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300). This trial aims to provide evidence on the costs and quality of dentures

  11. Improvdent: Improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Janine C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009 15% of adults aged 65–74, 30% aged 75–84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients’ quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone. Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period. Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period. Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference. A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. Funding: IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300. Discussion

  12. Assessment of Candida species colonization and denture-related stomatitis in complete denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Haghighi, Neda Nejabat; Rajaee, Naeem; Pakshir, Keyvan; Tarazooie, Bita; Vojdani, Mahroo; Sedaghat, Farzaneh; Vosoghi, Mehrdad

    2011-02-01

    Candida species are considered the primary causative agents of denture stomatitis, but their role in colonization and disease in denture wearers remains undefined. In this study, we investigated risk factors associated with progression to Candida-related denture stomatitis in patients using complete dentures, and we genetically identified Candida isolates associated with disease and colonization. We recruited 114 retirement home residents for this study, from whom oral mucosa samples were collected and cultured following oral cavity exams. Morphologic analysis was used to identify potential yeast-positive cultures, which were then characterized further by RFLP analysis. C. albicans was the most frequently recovered species (61; 41.5%), followed by C. glabrata (27; 18.4%), and C. tropicalis (19; 12.9%). In addition, 16 isolates (10.9%) of C. dubliniensis were recovered, which was the first identification of this species in clinical samples from Iran. This study demonstrated a significant association between the duration of denture wear and oral candidiasis. Furthermore, we noted a high prevalence of C. dubliniensis in complete denture wearers.

  13. Miconazole activity against Candida biofilms developed on acrylic discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremedhin, S; Dorocka-Bobkowska, B; Prylinski, M; Konopka, K; Duzgunes, N

    2014-08-01

    Oral candidiasis in the form of Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CaDS) is associated with Candida adhesion and biofilm formation on the fitting surface of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) dentures. Candida biofilms show considerable resistance to most conventional antifungal agents, a phenomenon that is considered a developmental-phase-specific event that may help explain the high recurrence rates associated with CaDS. The aim of this study was to examine the activity of miconazole towards in vitro-grown mature Candida biofilms formed on heat-cured PMMA discs as a standardized model. The effect of miconazole nitrate on Candida biofilms developed on acrylic discs was determined for C. albicans MYA-2732 (ATCC), C. glabrata MYA-275 (ATCC), and clinical isolates, C. albicans 6122/06, C. glabrata 7531/06, C. tropicalis 8122/06, and C. parapsilosis 11375/07. Candida biofilms were developed on heat-cured poly(methyl methacrylate) discs and treated with miconazole (0.5 - 96 μg/ml). The metabolic activity of the biofilms was measured by the XTT reduction assay. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of miconazole against Candida species were determined by the microdilution method. The MICs for miconazole for the investigated strains ranged from 0.016-32 μg/ml. Treatment with miconazole resulted in a significant reduction of biofilm metabolic activity for all strains. The highest inhibition was observed at 96 μg/ml miconazole. In the case of C. glabrata MYA-275 and C. tropicalis 8122/06 this corresponded to 83.7% and 75.4% inhibition, respectively. The lowest reduction was observed for C. parapsilosis 11375/07-46.1%. For all Candida strains there was a strong correlation between MIC values and miconazole concentrations corresponding to a reduction of metabolic activity of the biofilm by 50%. Miconazole exhibits high antifungal activity against Candida biofilms developed on the surface of PMMA discs. The study provides support for the use of miconazole as an

  14. Reinforcement of Denture Base Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nejatiant

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: PMMA has been the most popular denture base material because of its advantages including good aesthetics, accurate fit, stability in the oral environment, easy laboratory and clinical manipulation and inexpensive equipments since the 1930’s. However, its fracture resistance is not satisfactory. Aim: The aim of this study is to improve the fracture resistance of denture bases made of PMMA by assessing the effect of resin type, packing and processing variables on biaxial flexural strength (BFS. Materials & methods: 930 discs, 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thick were prepared with the following variables: a. Veined (V and Plain (P PMMA. b. 5 different powder/liquid ratios by volume (1.5:1, 2:1, 2.5:1, 3:1, 3.5:1. c. Conventional (C and Injection packing methods (I. d. Dry heat (D Water bath (W; and e. different curing times. The discs were trimmed and stored in 37°C tap water for 50 hours before carrying out BFS test, according to BS EN ISO 1567: 2001. BFS test was carried out using a tensile-testing machine (Lloyd LRX, Lloyd instruments Ltd (Figure.1 b, with a x-head speed of 1mm/min. ONE-WAY ANOVA analysis and TUKEY’S comparison were carried out (MINITAB. The temperature within the curing baths and inside of curing resin was evaluated by using a thermocouple. Results: BFS of Powder/liquid ratio of 1.5:1 is significantly lower than the other four ratios. Among the last four ratios, 2.5:1 was the strongest one although the difference was not significant. BFS of the plain type of PMMA is significantly higher than the veined type.• BFS of conventionally packed PMMA discs was greater than the injectional packed ones and the difference is significant. Water bath cured resin showed a significant higher BFS compared with dry heat curing. • Changing the curing time in the dry heat bath from 7h @ 75º C and 2hrs @ 95º C to 5hrs @ 75º C and 3hrs @ 95º C and then 2hrs @ 95º C improves BFS of PMMA. In the water bath the trend is identical

  15. 21 CFR 872.3420 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. 872.3420 Section 872.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3420 Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive is a...

  16. In vitro efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma on S. sanguinis biofilms in comparison of two test models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorynia, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Dental plaque critically affects the etiology of caries, periodontitis and periimplantitis. The mechanical removal of plaque can only be performed partially due to limited accessibility. Therefore, plaque still represents one of the major therapeutic challenges. Even though antiseptic mouth rinses reduce the extent of biofilm temporarily, plaque removal remains incomplete and continuous usage can even result in side effects. Here we tested argon plasma produced by kinpen09 as one option to inactivate microorganisms and to eliminate plaque. biofilms cultivated in either the European Biofilm Reactor (EUREBI or in 24 well plates were treated with argon plasma. In both test systems a homogeneous, good analyzable and stable biofilm was produced on the surface of titan plates within 72 h (>6,9 log CFU/ml. Despite the significantly more powerful biofilm production in EUREBI, the difference of 0.4 log CFU/ml between EUREBI and the 24 well plates was practically not relevant. For that reason both test models were equally qualified for the analysis of efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma. We demonstrate a significant reduction of the biofilm compared to the control in both test models. After plasma application of 180 s the biofilm produced in EUREBI or in 24 well plates was decreased by 0.6 log CFU/ml or 0.5 log CFU/ml, respectively. In comparison to recently published studies analyzing the efficacy of kinpen09, produces a hardly removable biofilm. Future investigations using reduced distances between plasma source and biofilm, various compositions of plasma and alternative plasma sources will contribute to further optimization of the efficacy against biofilms.

  17. Mechanical model of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Haijun; ZHANG; Mei; ZHANG; Yun

    2004-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaque is the main trigger of acute cardiovascular events, but the mechanism of plaque rupture is still unknown. We have constructed a model describing the motion of the fibrous cap of the plaque using the theory of elastic mechanics and studied the stability of the plaque theoretically. It has shown that plaque rupture is the result of a dynamic interplay between factors intrinsic to the plaque itself and extrinsic factors. We have proposed a new mechanism of plaque rupture, given a new explanation about the nonlinear dynamic progress of atherosclerosis and suggested a method to identify the vulnerable plaques to manage atherosclerosis.

  18. Effects of complete dentures on respiratory performance: spirometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskin, Bulent; Sipahi, Cumhur; Karakoc, Omer; Atay, Arzu; Ciftci, Faruk; Tasci, Canturk; Akin, Hakan; Arisan, Volkan; Sevketbeyoglu, Haldun; Turker, Turker

    2014-03-01

    There is a lack of data regarding whether edentulous subjects should remove dentures during spirometric measurements or not. The purpose of this study is to determine influences of complete dentures on spirometric parameters in edentulous subjects. A total of 46 complete denture wearers were included in this study. Respiratory functions of the subjects were evaluated by spirometric tests that were performed in four different oral conditions: without dentures (WOD), with dentures, lower denture only and upper denture only. Forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% were evaluated. The data were analyzed with Friedman, Wilcoxon and paired-samples t tests (α = 0.05). Significant differences were found between spirometric parameters in different oral conditions (p dentures (FVC), and WOD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s) and with upper dentures (forced expiratory volume in 1 s) (p complete dentures may unfavourably affect spirometric values of edentulous subjects. However, current findings need to be confirmed with advanced respiratory function tests. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Patients' perceptions of benefits and risks of complete denture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Bárbara Barbério; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Marchini, Leonardo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patients' perceptions of benefits and risks concerning complete denture therapy. A secondary objective was to assess the influence of clinical and sociodemographic variables on patients' perceptions. The sample was composed of 104 volunteers who presented themselves for complete denture treatment at a dental school. The average age of the volunteers was 69.2 years (±) 9.3. Patient opinions concerning the benefits of complete denture therapy were recorded using a previously reported questionnaire. The answers were evaluated in three domains: (1) benefits (positive perceptions); (2) risks (negative perceptions); and (3) consequences of no treatment. The average time of use of the previous dentures was 20 years (SD ±12.9). Risk factors (negative perceptions) received lower scores by the patients, while the consequences of no treatment received higher scores. No association was found among evaluations of the previous dentures and educational level, marital status, and gender; however, patients' evaluation about their previous dentures was significantly different depending on age (p = 0.001) and previous dentures' time of use (p = 0.038). Patients presented a positive perception of complete denture therapy, and the risk factors (negative perceptions) received the lowest scores. Patient perception regarding complete denture therapy was not influenced by educational level, evaluation of the previous dentures, or marital status. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Proposed technique for fabricating complete denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Ali Zwiad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reduction of the visits for fabricating complete dentures are welcomed by both dentists and patients and this might be an aspect of the new changes in prosthodontic treatment according to the suggested new methods. Clinical Innovation: Complete dentures fabricated by the technique described in this report reduce processing time, cost and efforts since the technique does not require the use of gypsum materials, metal flasks or other related materials to obtain a mold for packing the heat cured acrylic resin as might be needed with the conventional method. This method requires only an appropriate volume of silicone impression material to provide the required mold and a heat pressure machine for processing and polymerization of the heat-cured acrylic resin. Although this technique might be difficult to be applicable by all dentist but it could be consider an advisable method. Discussion: Because the record base in this technique is made of heat cured resin, it provides a reliable denture base with better retention and stability and it overcomes the shortcomings that may be faced during registration of vertical dimension. This technique meets the basic requirements for a successful complete denture which is well tolerated by the patient′s mouth.

  1. Dual Component Removable Partial Denture shows improved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-18

    Feb 18, 2009 ... Dual Component Removable Partial Denture (DuCo RPD) is composed of a double base; lower and upper. ... periodontitis, and tooth decay etc, is a disease that leads ..... SRPD did not lead to negative effects in body weight,.

  2. The lingualized occlusion of complete denture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEN Wei-hong; Eleni Roumanas

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the literatures dealing with the lingualized occlusion of complete denture including the origin,development and research. Lingualized occlusion is a valuable concept because many advantages of anatomic and nonanatomic occlusions are retained,satisfactory occlusion is easily obtained,balanced occlusion can be accomplished.

  3. Intermicrobial Interactions as a Driver for Community Composition and Stratification of Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S

    2015-11-20

    The oral cavity is accessible to microorganisms, and biofilms are present throughout on hard and soft tissues. The shedding of epithelial cell layers is usually effective for controlling biofilm development on soft tissues. Innate immune mechanisms are not so effective against biofilms on tooth surfaces, and oral hygiene measures such as brushing and flossing are required for the periodic removal of dental plaque. Even with good oral hygiene, microbial communities accumulate on teeth in areas that are protected from mechanical abrasion forces. Changes in the composition of these biofilms are associated with oral diseases such as dental caries or periodontitis. Newly formed biofilms and more mature dental plaque each have a level of spatial organization in the horizontal and vertical planes. Communities are shaped by many varied interactions between different species and genera within the biofilm, which include physical cell-cell associations known as coaggregation, interspecies signaling, secretion and turnover of antimicrobial compounds and the sharing of an extracellular matrix. Central to these interactions is the selection for metabolic synergies and it is becoming clear that the ability of communities to extract the maximum energy from the available metabolites is a potent driver for biofilm structure and stratification. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of intermicrobial interactions in oral biofilms and the roles that they play in determining the spatial organization of biofilm communities.

  4. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    in wounds. However, the impact of biofilms is often debated, because infected wounds were also treated before the concept of biofilms was coined. In this short review, we will address the significance of biofilms and their role in wounds, and discuss the future tasks of the biofilm challenge....

  5. Non-lethal control of the cariogenic potential of an agent-based model for dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, David A; Marsh, Phil D; Devine, Deirdre A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries or tooth decay is a prevalent global disease whose causative agent is the oral biofilm known as plaque. According to the ecological plaque hypothesis, this biofilm becomes pathogenic when external challenges drive it towards a state with a high proportion of acid-producing bacteria. Determining which factors control biofilm composition is therefore desirable when developing novel clinical treatments to combat caries, but is also challenging due to the system complexity and the existence of multiple bacterial species performing similar functions. Here we employ agent-based mathematical modelling to simulate a biofilm consisting of two competing, distinct types of bacterial populations, each parameterised by their nutrient uptake and aciduricity, periodically subjected to an acid challenge resulting from the metabolism of dietary carbohydrates. It was found that one population was progressively eliminated from the system to give either a benign or a pathogenic biofilm, with a tipping point between these two fates depending on a multiplicity of factors relating to microbial physiology and biofilm geometry. Parameter sensitivity was quantified by individually varying the model parameters against putative experimental measures, suggesting non-lethal interventions that can favourably modulate biofilm composition. We discuss how the same parameter sensitivity data can be used to guide the design of validation experiments, and argue for the benefits of in silico modelling in providing an additional predictive capability upstream from in vitro experiments.

  6. Non-lethal control of the cariogenic potential of an agent-based model for dental plaque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Head

    Full Text Available Dental caries or tooth decay is a prevalent global disease whose causative agent is the oral biofilm known as plaque. According to the ecological plaque hypothesis, this biofilm becomes pathogenic when external challenges drive it towards a state with a high proportion of acid-producing bacteria. Determining which factors control biofilm composition is therefore desirable when developing novel clinical treatments to combat caries, but is also challenging due to the system complexity and the existence of multiple bacterial species performing similar functions. Here we employ agent-based mathematical modelling to simulate a biofilm consisting of two competing, distinct types of bacterial populations, each parameterised by their nutrient uptake and aciduricity, periodically subjected to an acid challenge resulting from the metabolism of dietary carbohydrates. It was found that one population was progressively eliminated from the system to give either a benign or a pathogenic biofilm, with a tipping point between these two fates depending on a multiplicity of factors relating to microbial physiology and biofilm geometry. Parameter sensitivity was quantified by individually varying the model parameters against putative experimental measures, suggesting non-lethal interventions that can favourably modulate biofilm composition. We discuss how the same parameter sensitivity data can be used to guide the design of validation experiments, and argue for the benefits of in silico modelling in providing an additional predictive capability upstream from in vitro experiments.

  7. Computer-printer denture microlabeling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, B C

    1998-03-01

    This procedure is easy to use and is cost-effective because it uses equipment that exist in any office or institution. The material used, transparency film for use with plain paper copier, is less expensive than either photographic slide film or normal slide films. Moreover, the transparency sheet can be used again for photocopying until the sheet is fully used up. There is no added cost of development of film, or is it necessary to wait for the whole roll of film to be used before the label can be retrieved and used. The background of the label is clear and only the black images of the characters of the label can be clearly seen. The effect of the transparency film, photocopy ink, and adhesive glue is not known. But no adverse effects have been noted. Microlabels have advantages over conventional labels with characters in font size 8 to 12, because more information, such as the full name of the patient, sex, country of origin, and national identification number can be incorporated. With more detailed information, quick identification of a deceased person can be made. Microlabels with a clear background will have minimal esthetic impact on the patient. The disadvantages of the technique is that it may not withstand a fire. In situations where the deceased body is badly burned, the denture and its identification strip may be burned, too. However, this risk can be minimized by placing the strip in the most posterior part of the denture-palatal in the maxillary denture and distal lingual in the mandibular denture. For testing of durability, dentures with the labels were placed in water for up to 4 months. The labels showed no sign of fading or deterioration.

  8. Infrared radiant ceramic plaques; Plaques radiantes ceramiques a infrarouge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-05-01

    Infrared plaques developed by MORGAN MATROC can now produce radiant heat from both natural and bottled gas with substantially lower NOx levels, and greater fuel efficiency and cleanliness, than other mass produced gas burning systems. The properties of this ceramic system, in particular very low thermal conductivity, allied to the infrared process for heat conversion, result in efficient radiation of energy. Morgan Matroc now claims half of the world-wide market of infrared plaque. (authors)

  9. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  10. The Biofilm Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The concept of biofilms has emerged in the clinical setting during the last decade. Infections involving biofilms have been documented in all parts of the human body, and it is currently believed that the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria is equivalent to chronic infection. A quick Pubmed search...... reveals the significance of biofilms, as evidenced by a dramatic increase in scientific publications on the topic, as well as in publications concerning wounds with biofilms, which reached 600 publications in 2013. Judged from the number of publications, it appears that biofilms play a significant role...... in wounds. However, the impact of biofilms is often debated, because infected wounds were also treated before the concept of biofilms was coined. In this short review, we will address the significance of biofilms and their role in wounds, and discuss the future tasks of the biofilm challenge....

  11. Biofilm Implication in Oral Diseases of Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Zambori

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of biofilm in disease processes in humans and animals is now widely recognized. In animal species,the risk of infection is probably greater than the risk in humans. This is due to the difference in animal housing andliving environments – animals naturally live in environments with a large and much more diverse microbialcommunity. Most oral bacteria live symbiotically in biofilm. This symbiotic association gives the bacteria differentcommunal properties than individual planktonic bacteria.Bacteria that form biofilm live and develop in communities which are an important property for dental plaqueformation that leads to dental calculus formation, periodontal diseases, dental caries and systemic diseases.The objective of this study is to reveal the role of dental plaque (oral biofilm in pathogenesis of dental calculus,periodontal disease and dental caries in dogs and cats.

  12. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E. A.; Huq, N. Laila; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge. PMID:27589264

  13. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashper, Stuart G; Catmull, Deanne V; Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E A; Huq, N Laila; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge.

  14. Satisfying esthetic demands with rotational path partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, T E

    1982-09-01

    A description of the rotational path design concept for removable partial dentures has been presented. Through the combined efforts of the clinician and laboratory technician, a rotational path partial denture can be developed that meets the basic mechanical requirements and eliminates certain clasp arms. The primary advantages of this design include less display of metal, enhancing the patient's appearance, and decreased tooth and tissue coverage by partial denture framework components.

  15. Measuring early plaque formation clinically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliska, Alessandra N; Weidlich, Patricia; Gomes, Sabrina C; Oppermann, Rui V

    2006-01-01

    To test a system of measuring early plaque formation (EPF) and its subgingival extension as related to the presence or absence of a plaque free zone (PFZ). EPF was measured by three independent examiners following two consecutive 72-hour periods of undisturbed plaque build-up. One of the examiners further measured EPF following a 96-hour period in the presence of chlorhexidine or placebo. The classification system was composed of criterion 0 (plaque-free dental surface), criterion 1 (presence of plaque and PFZ) and criterion 2 (absence of PFZ, subgingival extension of plaque). Intra- and inter-examiner reliability were evaluated by means of the percentage of absolute agreement (c), Kappa (k) and Kendall (kd) coefficients. The third experiment consisted of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial. Plaque build-up in the presence of 0.12% chlorhexidine was assessed by employing the classification system described. The percentage of absolute intra- and inter-examiner agreement ranged from 85.43% to 75.63% and from 77.31% to 75.35% respectively. Chlorhexidine and placebo rinses showed similar percentages of criterion 1 surfaces, 62.6% and 51.5% respectively (p = 0.343). Of the surfaces, 44.3% showed criterion 2 after the use of placebo, while 3.4% of surfaces showed this criterion with the chlorhexidine (p = 0.007). The events associated with EPF can be appropriately scored with this classification system. Chlorhexidine rinses inhibit both the plaque colonization of the dental surfaces as well as its subgingival extension.

  16. Periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K. Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been increasing attention paid in recent years to the possibility that oral bacterial infection, particularly periodontal disease may influence the initiation and or progression of systemic diseases. These studies confirm the observation that heart disease is the most commonly found systemic condition in patients with periodontal disease. Moreover, the literature has also highlighted substantial evidence indicating the presence of Gram-negative periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques. Aim: This study intends to investigate the possible association between periodontal health and coronary artery disease by evaluating periodontal status, association between the periodontal plaque and coronary atheromatous plaques for presence of micro-organisms such as, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia. Materials and methods: A case-control study was designed with seven patients who had undergone coronary endarterectomy for cardiovascular disease and 28 controls. The periodontal examination for cases was performed 1 day before vascular surgery and the controls were clinically examined. The atheromatous plaque sample collected during endarterectomy and the intraoral plaque samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and T. forsythia. Results: The presence of periodontal bacteria DNA in coronary atheromatous plaques and sub-gingival plaque samples of the same patients was confirmed by this study. CONCLUSION A correlation was established between putative bacteria contributing to atheromatous plaques and species associated with periodontal disease. One particularly important study to be carried out is the investigation of a possible clinically meaningful reduction in coronary heart disease resulting from the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease.

  17. Effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of denture teeth to denture base resins

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    Farideh Bahrani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Debonding of denture teeth from denture bases is the most common failure in removable dentures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of denture teeth to heat-polymerized and autopolymerized denture base resins. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 maxillary central incisor acrylic teeth were divided into two groups. Group M was polymerized with heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Meliodent by compression molding technique and group F was processed by autopolymerized acrylic resin (Futura Gen by injection molding technique. Within each group, specimens were divided into three subgroups according to the teeth surface treatments (n = 10: (1 ground surface as the control group (M 1 and F 1 , (2 ground surface combined with monomer application (M 2 and F 2 , and (3 airborne particle abrasion by 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (M 3 and F 3 . The shear bond strengths of the specimens were tested by universal testing machine with crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s honestly significant difference (HSD tests (P < 0.05. Results: The mean shear bond strengths of the studied groups were 96.40 ± 14.01, 124.70 ± 15.64, and 118 ± 16.38 N for M 1 , M 2 , and M 3 and 87.90 ± 13.48, 117 ± 13.88, and 109.70 ± 13.78 N for F 1 , F 2 , and F 3 , respectively. The surface treatment of the denture teeth significantly affected their shear bond strengths to the both the denture base resins (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences between the groups treated by monomer or airborne particle abrasion (P = 0.29. The highest percentage of failure mode was mixed in Meliodent and adhesive in Futura Gen. Conclusion: Monomer application and airborne particle abrasion of the ridge lap area of the denture teeth improved their shear bond strengths to the denture base resins regardless of the type of polymerization.

  18. Elderly complete denture wearers: a social approach to tooth loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Eftychia; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki

    2012-06-01

    To correlate emotional reactions to tooth loss with denture satisfaction attributes in elderly complete denture wearers. Total tooth loss is a serious life event, and poor oral health has an impact on daily life. Edentulism treated by rehabilitation with dentures can have a positive effect on patients' self-image and social behaviour. A group of 80 edentulous subjects undergoing routine prosthetic care in a Greek Department of Prosthetic Dentistry were interviewed using two structured questionnaires. The first questionnaire explored reactions to tooth loss, whereas the second measured their subjective experience of complete dentures. The responses to both questionnaires were compared using the statistical package SPSS v.17. The results showed significant correlation between aspects of tooth loss experience and complete denture satisfaction. Despite the fact that a substantial proportion of patients were satisfied with their complete dentures, some patients experienced increased social and psychological problems related to their edentulousness and the wearing of complete dentures. The aesthetic and functional aspects of complete dentures affected both patients' social behaviour and self-confidence. Total tooth loss was not only reflected in patient's social behaviour and self-image, but it had a complex and multifaceted impact on satisfaction from complete dentures. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Liquid supported denture-management of flabby ridges

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    Pranav V Mody

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal properties of a denture are adequate rigidity on polished surface to bear masticatory forces and at the same time, flexibility and softness on the tissue surface for proper and even distribution of masticatory forces. The problem with conventional denture is rigidity of tissue surface; leads to uneven distribution of load. This drawback even worsens in the case of flabby, atrophic and unemployed ridges with excessive bone resorption.The liquid supported denture allows continued adaptation and eliminates the disadvantages of denture designs based on the application of temporary tissue conditioners or soft liners.

  20. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J.; Anuradha, R.; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R.; Senthileagappan, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure. PMID:26538876

  1. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J; Anuradha, R; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R; Senthileagappan, A R

    2015-08-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure.

  2. The social solution-denture esthetics, phonetics, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumanas, Eleni D

    2009-02-01

    Tooth loss and rehabilitation with dentures can have tremendous patient impact and social implications. In an image-conscious society, dentures restore a sense of normalcy and allow the patient the ability to interact with others. The most frequent denture complaints include chewing discomfort and objectionable esthetics and phonetics. Determining patient expectations and their influence on patient satisfaction with treatment is critical. Current evidence on functional outcomes, patient satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of treatment with conventional dentures versus implants are important factors to consider during treatment planning for the edentulous patient. The purpose of this article is to review some exemplar literature for the successful treatment of the edentulous patient.

  3. Improved denture retention in patients with retracted tongues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hua; Chen, Jen-Hao; Lee, Huey-Er; Chang, Hong-Po; Chen, Hong-Sen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Chou, Tsau-Mau

    2009-08-01

    Patients who wear mandibular dentures and hold their tongues in retracted positions alter the dimensions of the sublingual space and disrupt the peripheral seal that is needed for optimal denture retention. The authors studied whether retention could be improved if patients moved their tongues from a retracted resting position to an ideal resting position. The authors observed and classified the mandibular residual ridge morphologies of 85 participants who wore complete dentures. The authors recorded and compared the retention of the mandibular denture before and after repositioning the tongue to the ideal resting position. When the participants' tongues were in a retracted resting position, the average retention of the mandibular denture was 75.38 gram weight (+/- 81.83 standard deviation [SD]). After participants repositioned their tongues to the ideal resting position, the average retention of the mandibular denture was 118.89 gw (+/- 93.00 SD), an increase of 57.73 percent. In all morphological classes, when participants held their tongues in the ideal resting position, the average mandibular denture retention increased by 57.73 percent, a statistically significant improvement compared with when participants held their tongues in a retracted resting position. Clinicians are encouraged to evaluate carefully the tongue resting position in all patients who wear dentures, help create reasonable therapeutic expectations by informing patients about the significant effect that tongue position will have on future denture retention and provide helpful neuromuscular training for patients with retracted-tongue habits.

  4. Effects of home and office care denture reliners on maxillary complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo-Yamakawa, Aiko; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of office (OR) and home (HR) care temporary denture reliners on satisfaction and functional outcomes in maxillary complete denture wearers. Thirty-four maxillary edentulous patients received application of either OR or HR to their maxillary complete dentures. Patient's ratings on satisfaction and functional aspects were measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale at 4 days post-application. Associations between baseline ratings and improvement were also assessed. There were no significant differences between the two groups in satisfaction ratings or in the functional outcomes. The OR group showed a significant improvement in mastication and retention, whereas the HR group exhibited a significant improvement in general satisfaction and mastication. Improvement was negatively associated with baseline ratings of speech, ease of cleaning, stability and retention in the OR groups and across all variables, except ease of cleaning, in the HR group. When used correctly, home care denture therapy can be as effective as office applied temporary liner in improving satisfaction with problematic maxillary dentures.

  5. Denture quality has a minimal effect on health-related quality of life in patients with removable dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, M; John, M T; Tsukasaki, H; Furuyama, C; Baba, K

    2011-11-01

    The present study examined the association of denture quality and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with removable dentures. In a study of 171 consecutive patients with removable partial dentures or complete dentures (mean age: 68·0 ± 9·3 years) at a university-based prosthodontic clinic, dentists rated two aspects of denture quality (stability and aesthetics) using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). HRQoL was evaluated using the mental and physical component summary (MCS and PCS) scores of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36). Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) was evaluated using the Oral Health Impact Profile-Japanese version (OHIP-J). The associations among denture quality, OHRQoL, and HRQoL were examined by linear regression models. Bivariable linear regression analyses revealed that denture stability was significantly associated with the SF-36 MCS [regression coefficient = 0·52 for a 10-unit increase in denture stability on a 0-100 VAS, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0·03-1·00, P = 0·04], but not with the PCS (0·11, 95% CI: -0·49 to 0·70). Denture aesthetics was not related to the PCS or the MCS (0·22, 95% CI: -0·44 to 0·88 or 0·07, 95%CI: -0·47 to 0·62). When OHIP-J was added to the regression model, this variable was substantially and significantly associated with the MCS and PCS summary scores; in addition, the regression coefficient for denture quality decreased in magnitude and was statistically nonsignificant in all analyses. The quality of removable dentures had a minimal effect on HRQoL in patients with removable dentures, and this association was mediated by OHRQoL. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Comparative study of maxillary complete dentures constructed of metal base and metal structure framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, C; Kurtz, K S; Suzuki, Y; Hanatani, S; Abe, M; Hosoi, T

    2001-02-01

    A removable denture designed using a three-dimensional cast metal framework (hereafter referred to as the 'structurally designed' denture) could extend denture longevity because it is unbreakable and easy to adjust. The aim of the present clinical study was to compare two types of maxillary removable dentures: conventional dentures and structurally designed denture. One edentulous and five partially dentate patients were fitted with two maxillary dentures made from the same impression and same occlusal relationship. About 20 days after delivery of the denture, masticatory analysis was conducted chewing phase (open, closed, and occluded); coefficients of variation and average variation were calculated. Denture vibration during tapping was then measured using an accelerometer. The patients were also interviewed about comfort, ease of chewing, speech, stability, aesthetics and preference for regular use. For both masticatory movements and denture vibration, there were no significant differences (P>0.1) between the conventional denture and the structural design denture. In evaluating the dentures according to each criteria, the significant superiority of one denture over the other could not be determined. However, all patients subjectively preferred the structurally designed dentures for regular use. According to these findings, structurally designed dentures do not appear to have any particular physiological problems as compared with the conventional dentures.

  7. Production of virulence factors in Candida strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis and control individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Domingues, Nádia; Araújo, Maria Izabel Daniel Santos Alves; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of virulence factors in Candida isolates from the oral cavities of 50 patients with different degrees of denture stomatitis (DS, type I, II and III) and 50 individuals without signs of DS. We evaluated the enzymatic and hemolytic activities, the biofilm formation, and the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) in all isolates. Germ tube (GT) production was also evaluated in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis isolates. In C. albicans and C. dubliniensis the secretion of hemolysin and GT production was significantly different between isolates from patients with DS and individuals without DS. No significant difference was observed in the production of virulence factors by Candida glabrata isolates. Candida isolates expressed a wide range of virulence factors. However, in the majority of isolates from the type III lesions, the production of the virulence factors was higher than for the other groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of complete denture cleanser solutions based on sodium hypochlorite and Ricinus communis – a randomized clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    SALLES, Marcela Moreira; BADARÓ, Maurício Malheiros; de ARRUDA, Carolina Noronha Ferraz; LEITE, Vanessa Maria Fagundes; da SILVA, Cláudia Helena Lovato; WATANABE, Evandro; OLIVEIRA, Viviane de Cássia; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To preserve oral health and to maintain the prosthetic devices, it is important not only to improve the properties of commonly known hygiene products, but also to investigate new materials with antimicrobial action. Objectives This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite (0.25% and 0.50%) and 10% Ricinus communis’ solutions against specific microorganisms. Material and Methods Sixty four maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures three times a day and to soak them (20 min/day) in the solutions: SH1: 0.25% sodium hypochlorite; SH2: 0.5% sodium hypochlorite; RC: 10% R. communis oil; and C: 0.85% saline (control). The solutions were used for 7 days in a randomized sequence. Following each period of use, there was a 1-week washout period. Antimicrobial activity was determined by Colony Forming Units (CFU) counts of Streptococcus mutans, Candida spp., and gram-negative microorganisms. For collecting biofilm, the internal surface of maxillary dentures was brushed with saline solution, and biofilm suspension obtained. After dilutions (100 - 10-3), aliquots were seeded in Mitis salivarius, CHROMagar Candida®, and MacConkey agar for detecting S. mutans, Candida spp., or gram-negative microorganisms, respectively. After incubation, colonies were counted, and CFU/mL values were calculated. Then, transformation - log10 (CFU+1) - data were analyzed using the Friedman test (α=0.05). Results showed significant differences between the solutions (p<0.001). Results All three solutions showed antimicrobial activity against S. mutans. Against Candida spp., RC and SH1 solutions showed similar effect while SH2 showed superior activity. SH1 and SH2 solutions showed antimicrobial action against gram-negative microorganisms. The Candida species most frequently isolated was C. albicans, followed by C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. Conclusions The 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution was the most effective and might be used to

  9. Relationship among local and functional factors in the development of denture stomatitis in denture wearers in northern Brazil

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    Lurdete Maria Rocha GAUCH

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship among functional and qualitative factors in the development of denture stomatitis (DS (according to Newton's classification in acrylic-based denture wearers residents from northern Brazil.MATERIAL AND METHOD: A total of 99 patients who wore partial or total acrylic resin-based upper dentures were included in this study. The subjects completed an epidemiological data form that includes the patient's gender, age, local factors (hygiene habits, remove denture to sleep, use of mouthwash, present condition of the denture, age of the denture and functional factors (vertical dimension at rest, vertical dimension of occlusion, occlusion, retention, and static and dynamic stability. To detect yeasts, samples were collected from the inner surface of the dentures and from the palatal mucosa in contact with it. Subsequently, the samples were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar, observing macro and microscopic characteristics.RESULT: In the present study, we did not find any significant relationship between the gender and disease onset. Based on the Newton classification, 36.3% of the patients presented with DS and 89.0% were colonized by yeasts; of these subjects, 50% had type I lesions, 33.3% had type II lesions, and 16.6% had type III lesions. All of the qualitative and local factors, except the use of mouthwash, were clinically relevant to the development of disease.CONCLUSION: Denture stomatitis in denture users in northern Brazil was multifactorial, involving local, functional and microbiological factors.

  10. MPC-polymer reduces adherence and biofilm formation by oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, K; Yumoto, H; Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, N; Murakami, K; Hoshino, Y; Matsuo, T; Miyake, Y

    2011-07-01

    Oral biofilms such as dental plaque cause dental caries and periodontitis, as well as aspiration pneumonia and infectious endocarditis by translocation. Hence, the suppression of oral biofilm formation is an issue of considerable importance. Mechanical removal, disinfectants, inhibition of polysaccharide formation, and artificial sugar have been used for the reduction of oral biofilm. From the viewpoint of the inhibition of bacterial adherence, we investigated whether aqueous biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-polymer can reduce streptococcal colonization and biofilm formation. We examined the effects of MPC-polymer on streptococcal adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and oral epithelial cells, and the adherence of Fusobacterium nucleatum to streptococcal biofilm. MPC-polymer application markedly inhibited both the adherence and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and streptococcal adherence to oral epithelial cells, and reduced the adherence of F. nucleatum to streptococcal biofilms. A small-scale clinical trial revealed that mouthrinsing with MPC-polymer inhibited the increase of oral bacterial numbers, especially of S. mutans. These findings suggest that MPC-polymer is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence and biofilm development, and may be useful to prevent dental-plaque-related diseases. (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000003471).

  11. An alternative approach in fabrication of fixed complete dentures using a duplicate denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Fatemeh S; Hallas, Matthew B; Knoernschild, Kent L

    2012-10-01

    The traditional prosthetic steps in the fabrication of a fixed complete denture after implant osseointegration include final impression, verification of implant positioning in the working cast, mounting of the working cast, and mock denture wax trial insertion prior to the laboratory fabrication of the metal substructure; however, in patient scenarios of immediate loading of implants, the interim conversion prosthesis can be used to advance from the final impression to the milling of the underlying framework in one appointment. Consistency in the initial wax trial insertion, radiographic guide, and intraoral positioning of the conversion prosthesis can result in a well-designed definitive prosthesis in less time with the use of the existing duplicate complete denture. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Effect of Lactobacillus species on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Dachang, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Jianjun, Liu; Juanjuan, Qiu; Yi, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary pathogen responsible for initiating dental caries and decay. The presence of sucrose, stimulates S. mutans to produce insoluble glucans to form oral biofilm also known as dental plaque to initiate caries lesion. The GtfB and LuxS genes of S. mutans are responsible for formation and maturation of biofilm. Lactobacillus species as probiotic can reduces the count of S. mutans. In this study effect of different Lactobacillus species against the formation of S. mutans biofilm was observed. Growing biofilm in the presence of sucrose was detected using 96 well microtiter plate crystal violet assay and biofilm formation by S. mutans in the presence of Lactobacillus was detected. Gene expression of biofilm forming genes (GtfB and LuxS) was quantified through Real-time PCR. All strains of Lactobacillus potently reduced the formation of S. mutans biofilm whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus reduced the genetic expression by 60-80%. Therefore, probiotic Lactobacillus species can be used as an alternative instead of antibiotics to decrease the chance of dental caries by reducing the count of S. mutans and their gene expression to maintain good oral health.

  13. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm and planktonic cells

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    Lissel J Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival dental plaque, as part of a mature biofilm, has been strongly implicated in the onset and progression of chronic periodontitis. In this study using DNA microarray we compared the global gene expression of a P. gingivalis biofilm with that of its planktonic counterpart grown in the same continuous culture. Results Approximately 18% (377 genes, at 1.5 fold or more, P-value P. gingivalis genome was differentially expressed when the bacterium was grown as a biofilm. Genes that were down-regulated in biofilm cells, relative to planktonic cells, included those involved in cell envelope biogenesis, DNA replication, energy production and biosynthesis of cofactors, prosthetic groups and carriers. A number of genes encoding transport and binding proteins were up-regulated in P. gingivalis biofilm cells. Several genes predicted to encode proteins involved in signal transduction and transcriptional regulation were differentially regulated and may be important in the regulation of biofilm growth. Conclusion This study analyzing global gene expression provides insight into the adaptive response of P. gingivalis to biofilm growth, in particular showing a down regulation of genes involved in growth and metabolic activity.

  14. Tobacco smoke augments Porphyromonas gingivalis-Streptococcus gordonii biofilm formation.

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    Juhi Bagaitkar

    Full Text Available Smoking is responsible for the majority of periodontitis cases in the US and smokers are more susceptible than non-smokers to infection by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. P. gingivalis colonization of the oral cavity is dependent upon its interaction with other plaque bacteria, including Streptococcus gordonii. Microarray analysis suggested that exposure of P. gingivalis to cigarette smoke extract (CSE increased the expression of the major fimbrial antigen (FimA, but not the minor fimbrial antigen (Mfa1. Therefore, we hypothesized that CSE promotes P. gingivalis-S. gordonii biofilm formation in a FimA-dependent manner. FimA total protein and cell surface expression were increased upon exposure to CSE whereas Mfa1 was unaffected. CSE exposure did not induce P. gingivalis auto-aggregation but did promote dual species biofilm formation, monitored by microcolony numbers and depth (both, p<0.05. Interestingly, P. gingivalis biofilms grown in the presence of CSE exhibited a lower pro-inflammatory capacity (TNF-α, IL-6 than control biofilms (both, p<0.01. CSE-exposed P. gingivalis bound more strongly to immobilized rGAPDH, the cognate FimA ligand on S. gordonii, than control biofilms (p<0.001 and did so in a dose-dependent manner. Nevertheless, a peptide representing the Mfa1 binding site on S. gordonii, SspB, completely inhibited dual species biofilm formation. Thus, CSE likely augments P. gingivalis biofilm formation by increasing FimA avidity which, in turn, supports initial interspecies interactions and promotes subsequent high affinity Mfa1-SspB interactions driving biofilm growth. CSE induction of P. gingivalis biofilms of limited pro-inflammatory potential may explain the increased persistence of this pathogen in smokers. These findings may also be relevant to other biofilm-induced infectious diseases and conditions.

  15. Roles of oral bacteria in cardiovascular diseases--from molecular mechanisms to clinical cases: Treatment of periodontal disease regarded as biofilm infection: systemic administration of azithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pao-Li

    2010-01-01

    Periodontal disease as a biofilm infectious disease is considered. Periodontal disease-associated bacteria formed biofilm in periodontal pockets or on the surface of cementum. Planktonic bacteria from biofilm invade into periodontal tissues and lead to inflammation and destruction of tissues directly and indirectly by eliciting the host defense mechanism. Supragingival dental plaques (biofilm) are easily removed by professional mechanical tooth cleaning, while subgingival dental plaques and bacteria invading into periodontal tissues are difficult to remove. Therefore, the development of a method for periodontal disease based on the concept that regards periodontal disease as a biofilm infectious disease is needed. Hereby, I report the effect of antibiotics on an in vitro biofilm model of periodontal disease and the systemic administration of azithromycin for early-onset (aggressive) periodontitis like a treatment resistant periodontitis.

  16. Süperpozisyon apareyleri (*) (Overlay Dentures)

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    Muğan, Nuri; Cansevergil, Esengün

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARYRemovable partial or complete prothèses which are used to alleviate maxillary constriction and discrepancies in vertical -dimension are called « overlay dentures». The patients maxillary teeth or ridge is overiayed by acriylic and the artificial teeth are positioned in accordance with the mandibular teeth to establish a better occlusion as well as to improve the estetios of the individual. The improved anterior tooth relationships also provide the anatomic basis for the correct produc...

  17. Not chewing food among the Thai elderly with complete denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viwatwongkasem, Chukiat; Kudngaongarm, Romanee; Chaisupamongkollarp, Somchai; Thamsoonthorn, Chanida; Naovaratsophon, Anchalee; Nipattasat, Prapon; Vichathai, Weeranun; Pakdethanakul, Chaweewan; Jareinpituk, Suthi; Satitvipawee, Pratana

    2013-12-01

    The study aims to investigate the use of a complete denture in terms of not chewing food and determining the strength of association between not chewing food and several potential risk factors among the Thai elderly. Under the support of the "Khao Aroi" or "Delicious Rice" or "Dental Implant" Project of Institute of Dentistry, Department of Medical Services, Ministry of Public Health, and in co-operation with the Ministry of Science and Technology during 2007-2011, a cross-sectional survey by multi-stage cluster sampling was conducted in 2008, in 21 provinces, 87 hospitals, with 2,676 Thai elderly. The sample was drawn from a sampling frame of 58,043 target Thai people aged 60 years and over under the Dental Prosthesis Service Campaign (DPSC) project during 2005 and 2007. All Thai elderly, who received a complete denture from the DPSC project at least three months prior were surveyed from May to October 2008 through questionnaires. Data were analyzed by a set of descriptive analyses and binary logistic regression models. Not chewing food among the Thai elderly, after receiving a complete denture, was 12.5%, quite a bit more effective than ordinary work. Nontaluck found 38% for the proportion not wearing dentures in the 30-baht health care program. This finding is confirmed by the work of Dalodom et al that the use of dentures by Thai elderly was 93% in the DPSC project. The important risk factors that influenced not to chew food were satisfaction with dentures, patients satisfaction with the denture fitting and care, while controlling the amount of dentures, respectively. Satisfaction of patients with their dentures, good oral health care in fitting denture work, and good communication between dentists and patients are important keys affecting the use of dentures.

  18. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  19. Biofilm Fixed Film Systems

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    Dipesh Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The work reviewed here was published between 2008 and 2010 and describes research that involved aerobic and anoxic biofilm treatment of water pollutants. Biofilm denitrification systems are covered when appropriate. References catalogued here are divided on the basis of fundamental research area or reactor types. Fundamental research into biofilms is presented in two sections, Biofilm Measurement and Characterization and Growth and Modeling. The reactor types covered are: trickling filters, rotating biological contactors, fluidized bed bioreactors, submerged bed biofilm reactors, biological granular activated carbon, membrane bioreactors, and immobilized cell reactors. Innovative reactors, not easily classified, are then presented, followed by a section on biofilms on sand, soil and sediment.

  20. Filifactor alocis - involvement in periodontal biofilms

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    Göbel Ulf B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria in periodontal pockets develop complex sessile communities that attach to the tooth surface. These highly dynamic microfloral environments challenge both clinicians and researchers alike. The exploration of structural organisation and bacterial interactions within these biofilms is critically important for a thorough understanding of periodontal disease. In recent years, Filifactor alocis, a fastidious, Gram-positive, obligately anaerobic rod was repeatedly identified in periodontal lesions using DNA-based methods. It has been suggested to be a marker for periodontal deterioration. The present study investigated the epidemiology of F. alocis in periodontal pockets and analysed the spatial arrangement and architectural role of the organism in in vivo grown subgingival biofilms. Results A species-specific oligonucleotide probe, FIAL, was designed and evaluated. A total of 490 subgingival plaque samples were submitted to PCR and subsequent dot blot hybridization to compare the prevalence of F. alocis in patients suffering from generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP, chronic periodontitis (CP, and control subjects resistant to periodontitis. Moreover, a specially designed carrier system was used to collect in vivo grown subgingival biofilms from GAP patients. Subsequent topographic analysis was performed using fluorescence in situ hybridization. While the majority of patients suffering from GAP or CP harboured F. alocis, it was rarely detected in the control group. In the examined carrier-borne biofilms the organism predominantly colonized apical parts of the pocket in close proximity to the soft tissues and was involved in numerous structures that constitute characteristic architectural features of subgingival periodontal biofilms. Conclusions F. alocis is likely to make a relevant contribution to the pathogenetic structure of biofilms accounting for periodontal inflammation and can be considered an excellent marker

  1. Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chladek, Grzegorz; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Kasperski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL) materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL) materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs), are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics. PMID:28788163

  2. Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Chladek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs, are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics.

  3. The Relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs) and Overall Denture Conditions in Complete Denture Wearers

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is any relationship between the condition of complete dentures and TMDs. Methods: The sample consisted of 61 consecutive patients (35 females and 26 males) who were admitted to the Department of Prosthodontics of Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry for fabrication of new complete dentures.  The age range of the participants was between 32 and 80 years, with the mean age of 57.05±10.26 years. The patients were examined by two prosth...

  4. Saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans MT8148 associates with dental plaque and caries experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotoyodome, A; Kobayashi, H; Tokimitsu, I; Hase, T; Inoue, T; Matsukubo, T; Takaesu, Y

    2007-01-01

    Colonization of enamel surfaces by Streptococcus mutans is thought to be initiated by the attachment of bacteria to a saliva-derived conditioning film (acquired pellicle). However, the clinical relevance of the contribution of saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion in biofilm formation has not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to correlate saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion with biofilm formation in humans. We correlated all measurements of salivary factors and dental plaque formation in 70 healthy subjects. Dental plaque development after thorough professional teeth cleaning correlated positively with S. mutans adhesion onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite pellets and the glycoprotein content of either parotid or whole saliva. Saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion and glycoprotein content were also positively correlated with each other in parotid and whole saliva. By contrast, neither salivary mutans streptococci, Lactobacillus nor Candida correlated with biofilm formation. Parotid saliva-mediated S. mutans adhesion was significantly higher in 12 caries-experienced (CE) subjects than in 9 caries-inexperienced (CI) subjects. Salivary S. mutans adhesion was significantly less (p adhesion, modulated by salivary protein adsorption onto the enamel surface, as a possible correlate of susceptibility to dental plaque and caries. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. A microbiological evaluation of the use of denture cleansers in combination with an oral rinse in complete denture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Murali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim : Patients with complete dentures more occasionally neglect their denture and oral health by improper maintenance of dentures, resulting in bad oral and denture hygiene. This may lead to a host of multiple local and systemic problems such as stomatitis, bacterial and fungal infections, reservoirs for distant infections, denture stains and bad breath. Most denture wearers maintain their dentures with simple manual cleansing methods, which are not adequate to effectively sanitize the reservoir of microorganisms inhabiting the denture surfaces. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the use of a denture cleanser and compare it with an adjunct use of chlorhexidine mouth rinse along with the denture cleanser and possibly suggest it as a suitable protocol. Materials and Methods : Two groups of complete denture patients were selected for the study. The total number of patients in each group was 12 and the total period of the study was 21 days. Three sets of microbiological samples were collected from each patient: before the start of the study, on day 8 and on day 21 of the study. The first sample was collected after an initial washover period (7 days with plain water before the start of the study and the second set after 1 week of study initiation, where group-1 followed protocol-I (denture cleanser only and group-2 followed protocol-II (denture cleanser and mouth rinse. A second washout period of 7 days followed and a crossover of the protocol was performed for the groups and followed for 1 week. Then, a third set of samples were collected. The colony-forming units were calculated for each patient for each sample and statistically analyzed. Friedman test for non-parametric analysis was employed for the comparison within the groups and a Mann-Whitney test was used for the statistical comparison between the groups. Results : There was a definite reduction in the bacterial numbers and a significant statistical difference

  6. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture relining... device composed of materials such as methylmethacrylate, intended to reline a denture surface that contacts tissue, to repair a fractured denture, or to form a new denture base. This device is not...

  7. The effect of a chlorhexidine regimen on de novo plaque formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekino, Satoshi; Ramberg, Per; Uzel, Naciye Guzin; Socransky, Sigmund; Lindhe, Jan

    2004-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of a pretreatment regimen that combined meticulous mechanical tooth cleaning with the daily use of chlorhexidine (rinse, gargle and tongue application) on de novo plaque formation and on the recolonization of various microbiological species in plaque and saliva during a 4-day period of no oral hygiene. Ten subjects aged 24-36 years with gingivitis were recruited. The study was designed as a double blind cross-over clinical trial including two phases. Each experimental phase comprised one preparatory period of 7 days and one plaque accumulation period of 4 days. During the preparatory period, the volunteers (i) performed meticulous mechanical tooth cleaning using toothbrush and dentifrice and (ii) were, in addition, given two sessions of professional tooth cleaning (PTC) The final PTC was delivered after bacterial sampling had been made on Day 0. In the Control group, no additional plaque control measures were included. In the Test group, the participants in addition to the mechanical measures (i) rinsed twice daily, for 60 s each time with a 0.2% chlorhexidine solution, (ii) gargled twice daily for 10 s with the chlorhexidine preparation, and finally (iii) brushed the dorsum of the tongue for 60 s, twice daily, with a 1.0% chlorhexidine gel. During the 4-day plaque accumulation period, the participants abstained from all mechanical and chemical plaque control measures. On Days 0, 1, 2 and 4 the quantity and quality of plaque formed was assessed by clinical means and by DNA probe techniques. The microbiota of the saliva was studied in samples obtained on Days 0 and 4. It was demonstrated that chlorhexidine used as a mouthrinse combined with gargling and tongue application during the preparatory period significantly retarded the amount of plaque that formed on tooth surfaces during the following 4 days of no oral hygiene. Further, the number of microorganisms present in the biofilm representing Days 0, 1 and 2 of the "plaque accumulation period

  8. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3540 OTC denture cushion or pad. (a...-counter. (b) Classification. (1) Class I if the device is made of wax-impregnated cotton cloth that the... denture cushion or pad is made of a material other than wax-impregnated cotton cloth or if the...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3520 - OTC denture cleanser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3520 OTC denture cleanser. (a) Identification. An OTC denture cleanser is a device that consists of material in the form of a powder, tablet, or paste that is intended to remove debris from removable prosthetic dental appliances, such as bridges...

  10. The "Amex" cast aluminum denture of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyson, J M; Whitehorne, J W

    2001-07-01

    In 1917-18, the U.S. Army revived a denture technique first introduced in 1866 by Dr. James Baxter Bean, the Confederate dental surgeon who established the first military maxillofacial hospital trauma ward in Atlanta, Georgia, during the American Civil War--the cast aluminum wartime denture.

  11. Risk factors associated with denture stomatitis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, J D; Rivera-Hidalgo, F; Beach, M M

    2005-07-01

    This study reports denture stomatitis (DS) prevalence from a large USA probability sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994 (NHANES III). Oral examinations were performed on 3450 individuals 18-90+ years of age (mean: 59.2; SD: 0.50 years), 57.7% male and 42.3% female. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted for DS using sociodemographic, denture quality, blood analytes, alcohol and tobacco use, history of diabetes, and current antibiotic use as covariates. Odds ratios (OR), adjusted for other covariates in each model (AOR) are presented. Of 3450 removable denture wearers, 963 (27.9%) had DS. DS prevalence was associated with wearing maxillary (AOR: 6.20) and mandibular (AOR: 5.21) complete dentures continuously; smoking >/=15 cigarettes day (maxillary complete: AOR = 1.31; mandibular complete: AOR = 1.50; maxillary partial: AOR = 2.04); vitamin A deficiency (mandibular complete: AOR = 5.97; maxillary partial: AOR = 5.67; mandibular partial: AOR = 24.42). Maxillary dentures with inadequate relines had approximately half the OR of DS than those with adequate relines (maxillary complete: AOR = 0.42; mandibular complete: AOR = 0.50). Denture stomatitis prevalence is associated with the amount of tissue covered by dentures, low vitamin A levels, cigarette smoking, and constant denture wear.

  12. [Serious complications following removal of an ingested partial denture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, M.H. de; Damme, P.A. van; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Complications occurred in a 41-year-old woman following an attempt to remove a partial denture by oesophagoscopy. These were: laceration of the oesophagus with subsequent mediastinitis, pneumothorax, and pneumopericardium. At a second oesophagoscopy the denture was removed from the oesophagus using

  13. [Serious complications following (removal after) ingestion of a partial denture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, M.H. de; Damme, P.A. van; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2008-01-01

    Complications occurred in a 41-year-old woman (case 1) following a first attempt to remove a partial denture by oesophagoscopy. These were: laceration of the oesophagus with subsequent mediastinitis, pneumothorax, and pneumopericardium. With a second oesophagoscopy the denture was removed from the o

  14. New clinical technique for fabrication immediate partial denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Ali Zwiad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immediate partial denture is a choice of treatment due to various cases of teeth extraction such as badly carious teeth, periodontal disease, eruption problems, trauma, and other reasons. Many choices are used to replace the lost teeth; one of these choices is a removable plastic denture in which hot cured acrylic resin should be used to fabricate such denture. Aim of Study: To provide an applicable technique to fabricate an immediate partial denture by reducing and declining the prosthetic steps and some materials in proportional to the conventional method. Clinical Procedures: Maxillary and mandibular stone casts are mounted to a simple articulator and the procedures are explained as step by step to fabricate an immediate partial denture without using the conventional methods and material, just using a small quantity of white cold cure acrylic resin to fabricate the artificial teeth, hot cure acrylic resin for the denture base and mold made of a silicon impression material are used to fabricate an immediate partial denture. Conclusion: The finished immediate partial denture showed a good retention and produced the exact shapes and sizes of the extracted teeth with low cost and less time for a dentist and patient.

  15. Endodontic Biofilm: Quo Vadis?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tatiana Ramírez Mora

    2016-01-01

    .... However, the evidence of biofilm along the root canal system and the inability of current instruments and irrigants to eliminate bacterial biofilm have built a barrier toward a higher favorable...

  16. Biofilms of Clostridium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaléon, Véronique; Bouttier, Sylvie; Soavelomandroso, Anna Philibertine; Janoir, Claire; Candela, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The biofilm is a microbial community embedded in a synthesized matrix and is the main bacterial way of life. A biofilm adheres on surfaces or is found on interfaces. It protects bacteria from the environment, toxic molecules and may have a role in virulence. Clostridium species are spread throughout both environments and hosts, but their biofilms have not been extensively described in comparison with other bacterial species. In this review we describe all biofilms formed by Clostridium species during both industrial processes and in mammals where biofilms may be formed either during infections or associated to microbiota in the gut. We have specifically focussed on Clostridium difficile and Clostridium perfringens biofilms, which have been studied in vitro. Regulatory processes including sporulation and germination highlight how these Clostridium species live in biofilms. Furthermore, biofilms may have a role in the survival and spreading of Clostridium species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Hultqvist, Louise Dahl; Givskov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biopsies from infectious sites, explanted tissue and medical devises have provided evidence that biofilms are the underlying cause of a variety of tissue-associated and implant-associated recalcitrant human infections. With a need for novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies, research...... in biofilm infection microbiology, biofilm formation mechanisms and biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance has become an important area in microbiology. Substantial knowledge about biofilm formation mechanisms, biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance and immune evasion mechanisms has been obtained...... through work with biofilms grown in in vitro experimental setups, and the relevance of this information in the context of chronic infections is being investigated by the use of animal models of infection. Because our current in vitro experimental setups and animal models have limitations, new advanced...

  18. Assessment of plaque regrowth with a probiotic toothpaste containing Lactobacillus paracasei: A spectrophotometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Srinivasan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer health benefits on the host. Commonly, most of the organisms ascribed as having probiotic properties belong to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium and milk is the most commonly used vehicle. Objectives: The study was aimed at analyzing the biofilm formation by plaque regrowth method upon the usage of a probiotic toothpaste containing Lactobacillus paracasei by measuring the optical density using a spectrophotometer.Materials and Methods: A commercially available probiotic toothpaste, PerioBiotic (spearmint flavored from the company Designs for Health, has been tested. The toothpaste contains the strain L. paracasei, which has been found to co-aggregate with Streptococcus mutans (MS. The Plaque Glycolysis and Regrowth Method (PGRM was used for the evaluation of the antimicrobial effects on plaque metabolism in vivo. PGRM is based on the observation that natural fasted dental plaque, sampled from different quadrants of the dentition, exhibits similar metabolic and regrowth properties when suspended at equal “biomass” in standardized media. Conclusion: The results suggest that L. paracasei-based toothpaste, PerioBiotic, is effective in the reduction of MSmonospecies biofilm, but the activity appears short lived when high sucrose exposure is administered.

  19. Prolonged Impacted Denture in the Esophagus: A Case Report and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulzar Ahmad Dar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body ingestion and aspiration is among the most common causes of emergency department visit associated with high morbidity and mortality. Ingested and aspirated denture is rare conditions being scarcely reported in the literature. We herein report a 57-year-old man who presented with 2-day history of liquid and solid dysphagia who was diagnosed to have impacted denture in esophagus since 3 years prior to presentation. He was diagnosed to have esophagus adenocarcinoma and had undergone esophageal radiotherapy. The denture was removed successfully using esophagoscopy and the patient was discharged after 48-hour care with good condition. To prevent accidental ingestion, dentures should be made to fit properly. Damaged or malfitting dentures should be discarded and replaced. Patients should be strongly advised against wearing them during sleep-time.

  20. Imaging findings of swallowed dentures: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Ashish; Bosco, Jerome; Subramanian, Manickam; Chokkapan, Kabilan; Shenoy, Jagadish; Lim, Tze Chwan

    2015-12-01

    Dental prosthesis is an uncommon ingested non-food foreign body in adults. Once swallowed, it can lead to serious complications and morbidity. Hence, early localization of the offending foreign body is crucial for timely management. As the dentures are usually made up of non-metallic material and often impacted at or below the level of C7 vertebra, conventional radiograph has limited role in their evaluation. We describe the clinical history and imaging findings of swallowed partial dentures in four patients who presented to the emergency department. The dentures were localized using unenhanced CT of the neck that showed the characteristic mildly hyperdense curvilinear or irregular appearance of the dentures within the upper esophagus. Multiplanar CT reconstructions provide an orientation of the ingested denture within the esophagus, thus guiding the endoscopist.

  1. Simplified versus comprehensive fabrication of complete dentures: patient ratings of denture satisfaction from a randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydecke, Guido; Vogeler, Michael; Wolkewitz, Martin; Türp, Jens C; Strub, Joerg R

    2008-02-01

    To determine if patient ratings of their ability to chew are dependent on the method of complete denture fabrication. Twenty edentulous patients participated in a randomized within-subject crossover trial. Each participant received 2 sets of new complete dentures. One pair (Gerber prosthesis) was manufactured based on tracings (to determine centric relation) and facebow transfer; semianatomic teeth with a lingualized and balanced occlusal pattern were used. The other set of complete dentures was made using a simplified procedure without facebow transfer; jaw relations were recorded with wax occlusion rims, and anatomic teeth were set with a canine and premolar guidance (Gysi prosthesis). The 2 dentures were delivered in randomized order, and each was worn for 3 months. Three months after insertion, patients' ratings of each new prosthesis were obtained on visual analog scales for general satisfaction, comfort, ability to speak, stability, esthetics, ease of cleaning, and ability to chew. Patients rated their general satisfaction, stability, and esthetic appearance significantly better for the Gysi prostheses ( P denture treatment methods were detected for ability to speak, comfort, chewing ability, and the ease of cleaning the dentures. A comprehensive method for the fabrication of complete dentures using lingualized teeth does not appear to positively influence patient ratings of denture satisfaction when compared to a simple procedure with anatomic teeth.

  2. Biofilms: A microbial home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms. PMID:21976832

  3. Biofilms: A microbial home

    OpenAIRE

    Chandki, Rita; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    Microbial biofilms are mainly implicated in etiopathogenesis of caries and periodontal disease. Owing to its properties, these pose great challenges. Continuous and regular disruption of these biofilms is imperative for prevention and management of oral diseases. This essay provides a detailed insight into properties, mechanisms of etiopathogenesis, detection and removal of these microbial biofilms.

  4. [Three dimensional changes of the denture base of the complete denture following polymerization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y

    1990-02-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify some of the dimensional change patterns of the denture base of the complete denture following polymerization. Dimensional changes of three polymerization method types were compared. The complete dentures were measured by using the three dimensional measurement system. The results obtained were summarized as follows. 1. Dimensional changes from the original model immediately after polymerization of complete upper and lower dentures were recorded and all three polymerization methods produced shrinkage on all three axes toward the center. Heat cured resin samples and microwave cured resin samples showed the same shrinkage with pour type resin samples only showing 1/2 that amount. 2. The gradual dimensional changes occurring after polymerization up until 4 weeks were also recorded. The heat cured resin samples showed no additional changes but remained in its shrunken state. The pour-type resin samples began to enlarge until almost all of them reached the original model size within 4 weeks. The microwave cured resin samples began to enlarge but only slightly and then soon stopped changing. 3. All polymerization method types showed more dimensional change in the lower plate than in the upper plate.

  5. Sucrose substitutes affect the cariogenic potential of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, S C; Vieira, L M; Cruz, J N S; Azevedo, C S; Rodrigues, P H; Simionato, M R L

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is considered the primary etiologic agent of dental caries and contributes significantly to the virulence of dental plaque, especially in the presence of sucrose. To avoid the role of sucrose on the virulence factors of S. mutans, sugar substitutes are commonly consumed because they lead to lower or no production of acids and interfere with biofilm formation. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of sugar substitutes in the cariogenic potential of S. mutans biofilms. Thus, in the presence of sucrose, glucose, sucralose and sorbitol, the biofilm mass was quantified up to 96 h, the pH of the spent culture media was measured, the expression of biofilm-related genes was determined, and demineralization challenge experiments were conduct in enamel fragments. The presence of sugars or sugar substitutes profoundly affected the expression of spaP, gtfB, gtfC, gbpB, ftf, vicR and vicX in either biofilm or planktonic cells. The substitution of sucrose induced a down-regulation of most genes involved in sucrose-dependent colonization in biofilm cells. When the ratio between the expression of biofilm and planktonic cells was considered, most of those genes were down-regulated in biofilm cells in the presence of sugars and up-regulated in the presence of sugar substitutes. However, sucralose but not sorbitol fulfilled the purpose of reducing the cariogenic potential of the diet since it induced the biofilm formation with the lowest biomass, did not change the pH of the medium and led to the lowest lesion depth in the cariogenic challenge.

  6. Effect of different denture cleansers on surface roughness and microhardness of artificial denture teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzugullu, Bulem; Cetinsahin, Cem; Celik, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different denture cleansers on the surface roughness and microhardness of various types of posterior denture teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS 168 artificial tooth specimens were divided into the following four subgroups (n=42): SR Orthotyp PE (polymethylmethacrylate); SR Orthosit PE (Isosit); SR Postaris DCL (double cross-linked); and SR Phonares II (nanohybrid composite). The specimens were further divided according to the type of the denture cleanser (Corega Tabs (sodium perborate), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and distilled water (control) (n=14)) and immersed in the cleanser to simulate a 180-day immersion period, after which the surface roughness and microhardness were tested. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal–Wallis test, Conover's nonparametric multiple comparison test, and Spearman's rank correlation analysis (P<.05). RESULTS A comparison among the denture cleanser groups showed that NaOCl caused significantly higher roughness values on SR Orthotyp PE specimens when compared with the other artificial teeth (P<.001). Furthermore, Corega Tabs resulted in higher microhardness values in SR Orthotyp PE specimens than distilled water and NaOCl (P<.005). The microhardness values decreased significantly from distilled water, NaOCl, to Corega Tabs for SR Orthosit PE specimens (P<.001). SR Postaris DLC specimens showed increased microhardness when immersed in distilled water or NaOCl when compared with immersion in Corega Tabs (P<.003). No correlation was found between surface roughness and microhardness (r=0.104, P=.178). CONCLUSION NaOCl and Corega Tabs affected the surface roughness and microhardness of all artificial denture teeth except for the new generation nanohybrid composite teeth. PMID:27826382

  7. Dental Biofilm and Laboratory Microbial Culture Models for Cariology Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollie Yiru Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries form through a complex interaction over time among dental plaque, fermentable carbohydrate, and host factors (including teeth and saliva. As a key factor, dental plaque or biofilm substantially influence the characteristic of the carious lesions. Laboratory microbial culture models are often used because they provide a controllable and constant environment for cariology research. Moreover, they do not have ethical problems associated with clinical studies. The design of the microbial culture model varies from simple to sophisticated according to the purpose of the investigation. Each model is a compromise between the reality of the oral cavity and the simplification of the model. Researchers, however, can still obtain meaningful and useful results from the models they select. Laboratory microbial culture models can be categorized into a closed system and an open system. Models in the closed system have a finite supply of nutrients, and are also simple and cost-effective. Models in the open system enabled the supply of a fresh culture medium and the removal of metabolites and spent culture liquid simultaneously. They provide better regulation of the biofilm growth rate than the models in the closed system. This review paper gives an overview of the dental plaque biofilm and laboratory microbial culture models used for cariology research.

  8. COMPARISON OF BOND STRENGTH OF THREE DENTURE TEETH MADE IN IRAN WITH RESIN BASES AND IVOCLAR DENTURE TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R MOSHARRAF

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the most common repairs in removable prostheses is, substitution debonded teeth in their places. In the other hand, with the incrased use of implants & the commensurate increase in force applied to prosthetic components, it is probable that tooth debonding will become an even greater clinical problem. Therefore in this study we are trying to select the strongest bond strength of Iranian denture teeth with respect to lvoclar denture teeth (Approved and recommended by ADA. Methods. In this study the upper anterior set of three Iranian denture teeth (called Berelian, Marjan and Supernevoclar and lvoclar denture teeth were used. of each type of denture teeth, 21 specimens was selected and the denture teeth glaze was removed in each specimen. Then the laboratory procedures (removal of wax & resin packing according to British Standard 3990 (BS 3990 or ISO 3336 was done. Each specimen was tested by an Instron machine. The tensile test used with the cross-head speed of 5mm/min until fracture occured. Results. The mean bond strength in Berelian teeth uppermost, afterward Marjan, Ivoclar and Super nevoclared in second, third and fourh rank respectively. But statistical analysis showed no significanrt difference among the mean bond strength in four groups of denture teeth. The percentage of cohesive fracture (sum of acrylic farcture and dental fracture in Berelian specimens was uppermost, afterward Supernevoclar and Marjan were placed in second, third & fourth rank respectively. But statistical analysis showed no significant difference among the percentage of cohesive fracture in different groups of denture teeth. Discussion. The bond strength and the percentage of cohesive fracture of Iranian denture teeth is the same & competitive to lvoclar denture teeth (approved and recommended by ADA.

  9. The effect of blue light on periodontal biofilm growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Carla R; Song, Xiaoqing; Polymeri, Angeliki; Goodson, J Max; Wang, Xiaoshan; Soukos, Nikolaos S

    2015-11-01

    We have previously shown that blue light eliminates the black-pigmented oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella melaninogenica. In the present study, the in vitro photosensitivity of the above black-pigmented microorganisms and four Fusobacteria species (Fusobacterium nucleatum ss. nucleatum, F. nucleatum ss. vincentii, F. nucleatum ss. polymorphum, Fusobacterium periodonticum) was investigated in pure cultures and human dental plaque suspensions. We also tested the hypothesis that phototargeting the above eight key periodontopathogens in plaque-derived biofilms in vitro would control growth within the dental biofilm environment. Cultures of the eight bacteria were exposed to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 80 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 4.8 J/cm2. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of bacteria was performed to demonstrate the presence and amounts of porphyrin molecules within microorganisms. Suspensions of human dental plaque bacteria were also exposed once to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 50 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 12 J/cm2. Microbial biofilms developed from the same plaque were exposed to 455 nm blue light at 50 mW/cm2 once daily for 4 min (12 J/cm2) over a period of 3 days (4 exposures) in order to investigate the cumulative action of phototherapy on the eight photosensitive pathogens as well as on biofilm growth. Bacterial growth was evaluated using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. The selective phototargeting of pathogens was studied using whole genomic probes in the checkerboard DNA-DNA format. In cultures, all eight species showed significant growth reduction (p biofilms, respectively, (p biofilms. The cumulative blue light treatment suppressed biofilm growth in vitro. This may introduce a new avenue of prophylactic treatment for periodontal diseases.

  10. En plaque meningioma with angioinvasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basu Keya

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available En plaque meningioma is a rare type of meningioma characterized by infiltrative nature, sheet-like growth and at times invading the bone. We report here a case of en plaque meningioma with typical grade I histomorphology along with unusual feature of angioinvasion. The patient was a 55-year-old man presenting with headache and painful proptosis of right eye. Imaging modalities revealed an en -plaque meningioma extending into the right sylvian fissure, with thickening of right temporal calvarium, greater wing of sphenoid and extension into the orbit. Magnetic resonance angiography showed medial displacement of right middle cerebral artery. The tumor was removed from the sylvian fissure and right temporal convexity. However, only subtotal removal of the intraorbital part was possible. Histology showed a meningothelial meningioma with low tumor cell proliferation, but infiltration into the bone, skeletal muscle and angioinvasion. Recognition of meningiomas en plaque is useful, as these tumors are difficult to resect completely, and are more prone to undergo recurrence or malignant change. In addition, angioinvasion seen in this tumor may have additional prognostic significance.

  11. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque, iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque, and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque. Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging

  12. Denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward patient education in denture care among dental practitioners of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India

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    Vinay Suresan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: It may be concluded that the study subjects had limited knowledge of denture cleansing materials and denture hygiene importance. Attitudes varied among the subjects when it came to sharing information with their patients.

  13. Telescopic Partial Dentures-Concealed Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Tushar Vitthalrao; Walke, Ashwini Nareshchandra

    2015-01-01

    The ideal goal of good dentist is to restore the missing part of oral structure, phonetics, his look and the most important is restored the normal health of the patient, which is hampered due to less or insufficient intake of food. Removable partial denture (RPD) treatment option is considered as a notion, which precludes the inevitability of “floating plastic” in edentulous mouth, that many times fail to fulfill the above essential of the patients. In modern dentistry, though the dental implants or fixed partial denture is the better options, but they have certain limitations. However, overdentures and particularly telescopic denture is the overlooked technology in dentistry that would be a boon for such needy patients. Telescopic denture is especially indicated in the distal edentulous area with minimum two teeth bilaterally present with a good amount of periodontal support. This treatment modality is sort of preventive prosthodontics remedy, which in a conservative manner preserve the remaining teeth and helps in conservation of alveolar bone ultimately. There are two tenets related to this option, one is constant conservation edentulous ridge around the retained tooth and the most important is the endless existence of periodontal sensory action that directs and monitor gnathodynamic task. In this option the primary coping or inner coping are cemented on the prepared tooth, and a similar removable outer or inner telescopic crown placed tightly by using a mechanism of tenso-friction, this is firmly attached to a removable RPD in place without moving or rocking of the prosthesis, which is the common compliant of almost all patients of RPD. Copings are also protecting the abutment from tooth decay and also offers stabilization and maintaining of the outer crown. The outer crown engages the inner coping and gives as an anchor for the remainder of the dentition. This work is the review of telescopic prosthesis which is well supported by the case discussion, and

  14. Esthetic designs of removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C H; Chow, T W

    2003-01-01

    The increased emphasis on physical appearance in contemporary society has increased the demand for esthetic dental restorations. Although the success of implant dentistry has expanded the scope of esthetic fixed prostheses, many patients demand a removable partial denture (RPD) for health, anatomic, psychological, or financial reasons. Fabricating an esthetically pleasing RPD while avoiding the unsightly display associated with conventional clasp assemblies often presents a challenge to dentists. This article examines using lingual clasps, proximal undercuts (also known as rotational path insertion), and acetal resin clasps as simple and effective means of improving RPD esthetics.

  15. Turning points in removable partial denture philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, Michael P

    2010-10-01

    This article discusses key turning points in removable partial denture (RPD) philosophy. Early advancements tended to focus upon improving the technical quality of the prosthesis itself. The beginning of the 20th century brought significant public pressure upon the dental profession due to consequences associated with poor quality fixed prostheses. The result was dramatic improvement and heavy demand for RPDs. Technical and efficiency issues conspired to temper this enthusiasm, eventually resulting in reduced respect for RPDs. By highlighting key writings and technical issues during these periods of change it is hoped the reader will gain a more precise understanding of the current status of RPD philosophy.

  16. Complication rates and patient satisfaction with removable dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilhan, Hakan; Erdogan, Ozge; Ergin, Selen; Celik, Melahat; Ates, Gokcen

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the frequency and type of prosthetic complications in relation to type and properties of removable dentures and to investigate the influence of these complications and several data about the existing dentures on patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety nine patients (44 males and 55 females) wearing removable dentures have been included in the study. The complications of the patients were recorded; patient satisfaction was determined with a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the relationship of complications and patient satisfaction with several data about the dentures such as denture age, type of denture, centric relation and vertical dimension was investigated. Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney U and Chi square tests were used for statistical analyses. The results were evaluated statistically at a significance level of Pdentures with correct centric relations was found to be significantly lower than dentures with wrong centric relations (Pdentures with wrong centric relations caused need for addition of artificial teeth. PMID:22737317

  17. A conventional microwave oven for denture cleaning: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario Augusto; Samim, Firoozeh; Feng, Hong

    2012-06-01

    Denture cleaning should be quick and easy to perform, especially in long-term care facilities. The lack of proper oral hygiene can put older adults at higher risk from opportunistic oral infections, particularly fungal. As an alternative to regular brushing, the use of a microwave oven has been suggested for cleaning and disinfecting dentures. To synthesise and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the use of a conventional microwave oven for cleaning and disinfecting complete dentures. A brief literature search focused on papers dealing with microwave therapy for denture cleaning through PubMed Central, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Google Scholar, Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process, and Scifinder Scholar. One hundred and sixty-seven manuscripts published in English with full text were found, and 28 were accepted and discussed in the light of the advantages and disadvantages of the use of conventional microwave oven for cleaning and disinfecting complete dentures. There was no standardisation for microwave use for denture cleaning. Manual cleaning still seemed to be the optimal method for controlling fungal infection and denture stomatitis. However, such a daily routine appeared to be underused, particularly in long-term care facilities. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review

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    Mahroo Vojdani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms “nylon denture base” and “polyamide denture base”. Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia. Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended.

  19. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Giti, Rashin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms “nylon denture base” and “polyamide denture base”. Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon) denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia.  Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended. PMID:26106628

  20. Masticatory Function of Subjects Rehabilitated with Conventional Complete Denture

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    Marisa Martins da Silva PRADO

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate masticatory function of subjects rehabilitated with conventional complete denture, considered adequate or good (index of Kapur, by means of objective and subjective tests and to verify influence of quality and denture time use. Method: Masticatory performance tests (MP, using test food Optocal, had been carried through with 20 and 40 chewing strokes in 21 subjects with complete denture (group CD and 15 with natural dentition (group ND. Masticatory performance index was taken by means of the calculation of the Average Geometric Diameter of chewed and sifted particles. Results: After analysis statistics (Tukey b, p<0.05, observed that group CD obtainable 12% and 31% of the performance reached for group ND subjects, after 20 and 40 strokes, respectively, being that literature quantifies masticatory performance from 20% to 30% of the natural dentition. Statistical significant differences (t-test student, p<0.05 between MP and masticatory ability had not been verified, as well as denture quality of group CD. In relation to denture use period, users with more than six months had obtainable better resulted, possibly for being more adapts to the denture. Conclusion: In the limit of this study, it could be possible conclude that complete dentures users considered adequate or good had improved its MP after use six months. Standing out that with 20 strokes, in test food related, the result (12% was worst to in literature described.

  1. Effect of acid shock on protein expression by biofilm cells of Streptococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welin, J; Wilkins, J C; Beighton, D

    2003-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a component of the dental plaque biofilm and a major causal agent of dental caries. Log-phase cells of the organism are known to induce an acid tolerance response (ATR) at sub-lethal pH values ( approximately 5.5) that enhances survival at lower pH values such as those enc...

  2. Simultaneous amplification of two bacterial genes: more reliable method of Helicobacter pylori detection in microbial rich dental plaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Saima; Idrees, Muhammad; Izhar, Mateen; Butt, Arshad Kamal; Khan, Ayyaz Ali

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR) assay is considered superior to other methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in oral cavity; however, it also has limitations when sample under study is microbial rich dental plaque. The type of gene targeted and number of primers used for bacterial detection in dental plaque samples can have a significant effect on the results obtained as there are a number of closely related bacterial species residing in plaque biofilm. Also due to high recombination rate of H. pylori some of the genes might be down regulated or absent. The present study was conducted to determine the frequency of H. pylori colonization of dental plaque by simultaneously amplifying two genes of the bacterium. One hundred dental plaque specimens were collected from dyspeptic patients before their upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and presence of H. pylori was determined through PCR assay using primers targeting two different genes of the bacterium. Eighty-nine of the 100 samples were included in final analysis. With simultaneous amplification of two bacterial genes 51.6% of the dental plaque samples were positive for H. pylori while this prevalence increased to 73% when only one gene amplification was used for bacterial identification. Detection of H. pylori in dental plaque samples is more reliable when two genes of the bacterium are simultaneously amplified as compared to one gene amplification only.

  3. Targeted profiling of oral bacteria in human saliva and in vitro biofilms with quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R R; Viscount, H B; Stanley, M C; Leung, K-P

    2007-01-01

    An in vitro plaque model based on the use of human salivary bacteria and tooth-like surfaces was previously developed for studying the formation of oral biofilm and its use for pre-clinical testing of candidate antimicrobial or antiplaque agents. In this study, a quantitative Taqman PCR assay (QPCR) was developed to compare the bacterial compositions of in vitro biofilms to parent saliva samples, and to determine the relative contributions of different species in the formation of the oral biofilm. In addition, the growth inhibition of saliva-derived plaque was evaluated by chlorhexidine. With this assay, which consisted of primer/probe sets targeting either 16S rDNA sequences present in public databases or cloned ribosomal intergenic spacer region (ISR) sequences, 15 oral bacteria derived from saliva as well as those that were responsible for biofilm formation in an in vitro plaque model were rapidly identified and quantified. Among the target organisms were Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Micromonas micros, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Tannerella forsythensis, and Veillonella parvula. Primer and probe sets developed were both sensitive and specific. The relative profiles of a number of bacteria in 45-h-old biofilms were determined and, when compared to saliva samples, it was found that most of the bacteria identified in saliva also populated the in vitro plaque, including some anaerobes. Brief exposure of biofilms to chlorhexidine resulted in significant losses in viability. This new broad spectrum QPCR assay in combination with the in vitro plaque model will be of significant value in the quantitative study of the microbial composition of human saliva, saliva-derived plaque, and pre-clinical evaluation of potential antimicrobial and antiplaque molecules.

  4. Deterioration of polymethyl methacrylate dentures in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Hanako; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Sasaki, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-made prostheses used in the oral cavity were evaluated by multimodal assessment in order to elucidate the biodeterioration of PMMA. In used dentures (UD), the micro-Vickers hardness of the polished denture surface and denture basal surface was lower than that of the torn surface (pPMMA deteriorated during long-term use in the oral cavity in terms of hardness and volatile content with component alteration, and suggests the involvement of biodeterioration, possibly due to saliva and oral microbiota.

  5. Glass fiber reinforcement in repaired acrylic resin removable dentures: preliminary results of a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallittu, P K

    1997-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of continuous E-glass partial fiber reinforcement of acrylic resin removable dentures was evaluated an average 13 months after the insertion of the fibers. Twelve removable complete dentures and ten removable partial dentures with a history of recurrent fracture were selected for this study. The partial fiber reinforcement was incorporated into the denture at the time of repair. One complete denture and one removable partial denture fractured in the region of reinforcement during the examination period. These fractures were most likely caused by faulty placement of the fiber reinforcement in the denture in the dental laboratory. In six dentures, new fractures occurred in regions without partial fiber reinforcement. The results revealed the importance of both the correct positioning of the partial fiber reinforcement in the denture and the use of accurate laboratory techniques.

  6. Cold atmospheric plasma in combination with mechanical treatment improves osteoblast growth on biofilm covered titanium discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duske, Kathrin; Jablonowski, Lukasz; Koban, Ina; Matthes, Rutger; Holtfreter, Birte; Sckell, Axel; Nebe, J Barbara; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus Dieter; Kocher, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Treatment of implants with peri-implantitis is often unsuccessful, because an instrumented implant surface and residual microbial biofilm impedes re-osseointegration. The application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) could be a simple and effective strategy to overcome the inherent problems of peri-implantitis treatment. CAP is able to destroy and eliminate bacterial biofilms. Additionally, it increases the wettability of titanium, which supports cellular attachment. In this study, the behaviour of osteoblasts on titanium discs was analysed after treatment of bacterial biofilms with CAP, brushing, or a combination of both. A human plaque biofilm was cultured on titanium discs. Treatment with a brush (BR), 1% oxygen/argon CAP (PL), or brushing combined with CAP (BR+PL) was used to eliminate the biofilm. Discs without biofilm (C), autoclaved biofilm (AUTO) and untreated biofilm (BIO) served as controls. Subsequently, human osteoblastic cell growth (MG-63) was observed after 1 and 24 h. Biofilm remnants on BR and PL impaired osteoblastic cell development, whereas the BR+PL provided an increased area of osteoblastic cells. A five-day cell growth was only detectable on BR+PL treated discs. The combination of established brushing and CAP application may be a promising strategy to treat peri-implantitis.

  7. Effect of Cast Modification on Denture Base Adaptation Following Maxillary Complete Denture Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Mohammed E; Porwal, Amit; Ehrenberg, David; Weiner, Saul

    2017-01-19

    To investigate the effect of cast modifications on denture base adaptation in coronal and sagittal projections following maxillary complete denture processing. A total of 60 edentulous maxillary casts (n = 10) were distributed among six groups. Group 1 was the control group with no modification, groups 2 through 6 included a butterfly postdam preparation, groups 3 and 4 also included a 10-mm wide/4-mm deep box with addition of four round holes in group 4, and groups 5 and 6 also included a 20-mm wide/4-mm deep box with addition of four round holes in group 6. The boxes were prepared at the mid-heel area of the casts. Two layers of baseplate wax (1 mm each) were used to standardize denture base thickness across the groups. A standard technique was used to replicate the denture tooth set-up, and standardized processing was done for all the groups. Following deflasking, casts with the dentures were sectioned in the coronal and sagittal directions. Microscopic pictures were taken at preselected points. Data were organized in tables, and statistical analyses were performed using repeated measure ANOVA, Tukey post hoc tests, and post hoc comparison tests set at 5% level of significance. Maximum gaps were measured at the mid-palatal area followed by nearby areas and the areas near ridge crests in both coronal and sagittal projections. The analyses revealed significant differences between the groups in coronal projection (1/2, 3/4, 5/6) and sagittal projection (1, 2, 3/4, 5/6) without significant differences within the pairs. The groups were ranked from the highest group 1 to the lowest group 6 relative to the gap means. Post hoc comparisons showed that points 1C and 2A had the highest gap means across the study groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be extrapolated that the denture base adaptation can be effectively increased with the box preparation at the mid-heel aspect of the casts. Significant reduction of gaps was seen when the box size increased from

  8. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ashish; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. Materials and Methods For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. Results It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (pdenture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures. PMID:26155561

  9. Evaluation of flexural strength and color stability of different denture base materials including flexible material after using different denture cleansers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vrinda R.; Shah, Darshana Nilesh; Chauhan, Chirag J.; Doshi, Paras J.; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Present study aimed at evaluating the colour stability and flexural strength of flexible denture base materials (Valplast) and Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base material (Meliodent) processed by two different methods (Injection moulding and compression moulding) after immersing them in three different denture cleansers with acidic, basic and neutral PH. Methods and Materials: Total 120 specimens (65 × 10 × 3 mm3), 40 specimens of each material (Valplast, Meliodent compression moulding and injection moulding) were immersed in denture cleansers having different PH; Valclean (Acidic), Clinsodent (Basic) and Polident (Neutral) as well as Distilled Water. Color changes were measured with a spectrophotometer after 1 month, 3 months and 6 months of immersion cycle. A flexural 3-point bending test was carried out by using an Instron universal testing machine after 6 months of soaking. Data were analyzed using SPSS software Results: Maximum effect on colour stability was noted with Clinsodent followed by Valclean. Least color changes were observed after immersion in Polident. Colour difference was increased significantly as the immersion time increased. For both Meliodent and Nylon resins, statistically significant change in flexural strength occurred with immersion in all denture cleansers. Clinsodent has greater effect as compared to Valclean and Polident. Conclusions: Polident and Valclean can be safely used as denture cleanser for both nylon and acrylic resin denture base materials as far as colour stability and flexural strength both are concerned. PMID:26929541

  10. Is the red fluorescence of dental plaque related to its cariogenicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, Daniela G.; Pontes, Laura Regina A.; Calvo, Ana Flávia B.; Novaes, Tatiane F.; Braga, Mariana M.; Freitas, Patrícia M.; Tabchoury, Cinthia P. M.; Mendes, Fausto M.

    2014-06-01

    It has been speculated that the red fluorescence emitted by dental plaque could be related to its cariogenicity. To test this hypothesis, we designed this crossover in situ study, with two experimental phases of 14 days each. Seventeen volunteers, wearing a palatal appliance with bovine enamel blocks, were instructed to drip a 20% sucrose solution (experimental group) or purified water (control group) onto the enamel blocks eight times daily. The specimens were removed after 4, 7, 10, and 14 days, and the red fluorescence of dental plaque formed on the enamel blocks was assessed using a quantitative light-induced fluorescence device. After the plaque removal, surface and cross-sectional microhardness tests were performed to assess the mineral loss. The comparisons were made by a multilevel linear regression analysis. We observed a significant increase in the red fluorescence of the dental plaque after longer periods of formation, but this trend was verified in both groups. The mineral loss assessed by the microhardness techniques, contrariwise, showed a significant increase only in the experimental group. In conclusion, the red fluorescence emitted by the dental plaque indicates a mature biofilm, but this fact is not necessarily associated with its cariogenicity.

  11. Laser welding of removable partial denture frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudvik, James S; Lee, Seungbum; Croshaw, Steve N; Reimers, Donald L; Reimers, Dave L

    2008-01-01

    To identify and measure distortions inherent in the casting process of a Class III mandibular cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) framework to illustrate the problems faced by the laboratory technician and the clinician and to measure the changes that occur during the correction of the fit discrepancy using laser welding. Five identical castings of a Co-Cr alloy partial denture casting were made and measured between 3 widely separated points using the x, y, and z adjustments of a Nikon Measurescope. The same measurements were made after each of the following clinical and laboratory procedures: sprue removal, sectioning of the casting into 3 parts through the posterior meshwork, fitting the segments to the master cast, picking up the segments using resin, and laser welding of the 3 segments. Measurements of all 5 castings showed a cross-arch decrease after sprue removal, an increase after fitting the segments to the master cast, and a slight decrease after resin pickup and laser welding. Within the limitations of this study, the findings suggest that precise tooth-frame relations can be established by resin pickup and laser welding of segments of Co-Cr removable partial denture frameworks.

  12. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis of Candida albicans isolates colonizing acrylic dentures before and after denture replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Khai How; Lee, Hee Ji; Knight, Nicholas J; Holmes, Ann R; Cannon, Richard D

    2017-08-01

    Yeast, in particular Candida albicans, are the principal fungal cause of denture stomatitis, and can also be present as a commensal in many individuals. Few studies, however, have examined oral retention of yeast strains over time. We analyzed the yeast present in saliva samples and from the dentures of 10 individuals colonized with yeast but with no signs of stomatitis, before new complete maxillary dentures were fitted and also at 1, 3, and 6 months after denture replacement. Yeast species were presumptively identified on selective agar plates and were present in nine individuals before denture replacement and in six at the 6-month time point. C. albicans was detected in seven individuals pre-replacement, and in three by 6 months post-replacement. Sixty-two isolates (up to five from each C. albicans-positive sample) were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (33 from saliva and 29 from dentures). Six MLST allele profiles were identified that were common to several individuals. These profiles included three previously reported diploid sequence types (DSTs) and three novel DSTs. Two of the novel DSTs were closely related variants of a previously reported DST, and both showed loss of heterozygosity polymorphisms within one of the seven MLST gene sequences. For three individuals, at least one DST that was present before denture replacement was still detected in either saliva or on dentures at subsequent sampling times. Our results indicate that denture replacement reduces but does not remove, colonising yeast and confirm previous observations of C. albicans strain microevolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Silver colloidal nanoparticles: antifungal effect against adhered cells and biofilms of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, D R; Gorup, L F; Silva, S; Negri, M; de Camargo, E R; Oliveira, R; Barbosa, D B; Henriques, M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silver nanoparticles (SN) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms. SN (average diameter 5 nm) were synthesized by silver nitrate reduction with sodium citrate and stabilized with ammonia. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests were performed for C. albicans (n = 2) and C. glabrata (n = 2) grown in suspension following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute microbroth dilution method. SN were applied to adhered cells (2 h) or biofilms (48 h) and after 24 h of contact their effect was assessed by enumeration of colony forming units (CFUs) and quantification of total biomass (by crystal violet staining). The MIC results showed that SN were fungicidal against all strains tested at very low concentrations (0.4-3.3 μg ml(-1)). Furthermore, SN were more effective in reducing biofilm biomass when applied to adhered cells (2 h) than to pre-formed biofilms (48 h), with the exception of C. glabrata ATCC, which in both cases showed a reduction ∼90%. Regarding cell viability, SN were highly effective on adhered C. glabrata and respective biofilms. On C. albicans the effect was not so evident but there was also a reduction in the number of viable biofilm cells. In summary, SN may have the potential to be an effective alternative to conventional antifungal agents for future therapies in Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  14. Prevalence of eight putative periodontal pathogens in atherosclerotic plaque of coronary artery disease patients and comparing them with noncardiac subjects: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaideep Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: It is concluded that CAD subjects had higher prevalence of periodontal pathogens in subgingival biofilms as compared to the non cardiac subjects. Further, the number of bacteria was significantly associated between the subgingival and atherosclerotic plaques of the cardiac patients in south Indian population.

  15. An oral multispecies biofilm model for high content screening applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommerein, Nadine; Stumpp, Sascha N.; Müsken, Mathias; Ehlert, Nina; Winkel, Andreas; Häussler, Susanne; Behrens, Peter; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Stiesch, Meike

    2017-01-01

    Peri-implantitis caused by multispecies biofilms is a major complication in dental implant treatment. The bacterial infection surrounding dental implants can lead to bone loss and, in turn, to implant failure. A promising strategy to prevent these common complications is the development of implant surfaces that inhibit biofilm development. A reproducible and easy-to-use biofilm model as a test system for large scale screening of new implant surfaces with putative antibacterial potency is therefore of major importance. In the present study, we developed a highly reproducible in vitro four-species biofilm model consisting of the highly relevant oral bacterial species Streptococcus oralis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Veillonella dispar and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The application of live/dead staining, quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and urea-NaCl fluorescence in situ hybridization (urea-NaCl-FISH) revealed that the four-species biofilm community is robust in terms of biovolume, live/dead distribution and individual species distribution over time. The biofilm community is dominated by S. oralis, followed by V. dispar, A. naeslundii and P. gingivalis. The percentage distribution in this model closely reflects the situation in early native plaques and is therefore well suited as an in vitro model test system. Furthermore, despite its nearly native composition, the multispecies model does not depend on nutrient additives, such as native human saliva or serum, and is an inexpensive, easy to handle and highly reproducible alternative to the available model systems. The 96-well plate format enables high content screening for optimized implant surfaces impeding biofilm formation or the testing of multiple antimicrobial treatment strategies to fight multispecies biofilm infections, both exemplary proven in the manuscript. PMID:28296966

  16. Antibacterial coatings on titanium surfaces: a comparison study between in vitro single-species and multispecies biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Wang, Zhejun; Shen, Ya; Manero, José M; Gil, Francisco J; Rodriguez, Daniel; Haapasalo, Markus

    2015-03-18

    Dental plaque is a biofilm that causes dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Most of the studies in antibacterial coatings have been conducted by in vitro single-species biofilm formation, but oral biofilm involves more than 700 different bacterial species that are able to interact. Therefore, new studies are focused on in vitro multispecies biofilm models that mimic in vivo biofilms. The aim of the present work was to study different antibacterial coatings onto titanium surfaces and evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial properties of the surfaces on two different bacterial species and an oral biofilm. The lactate dehydrogenase assay determined that treated samples did not affect fibroblast viability. In addition, the viability of microorganisms on modified samples was evaluated by a LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability kit. Although a decrease in viable bacteria onto treated samples was obtained, the results showed differences in effectiveness when single-biofilm and oral plaque were tested. It confirms, as we expected, the distinct sensitivities that bacterial strains have. Thus, this multispecies biofilms model holds a great potential to assess antibacterial properties onto samples for dental purposes.

  17. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals - clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human studies, abstracts, review articles.

  18. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals – clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human) studies, abstracts, review articles. PMID:23633764

  19. The effect of denture design and fixatives on the retention of mandibular complete dentures tested on a novel in-vitro edentulous model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A; Al-Kaisy, N; Miller, C A; Martin, N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the design (extension and adaptation) of a mandibular complete acrylic denture and the use of denture adhesives using a novel in-vitro edentulous model. The model is a highly anatomically accurate replica based on a moderately resorbed human mandibular edentulous arch. The model has been designed and fabricated by means of an elaborate clinical and technical process that employs synthetic elastomeric materials with properties that attempts to reproduce in-vitro characteristics of the soft tissues overlying the ridges and immediate reflected tissues. This model was used to measure and compare the retention of mandibular dentures ofvarying designs (well-fitting, over- and under-extended) with and without the aid of denture fixatives. Retention tests were conducted with different volumes of artificial saliva at a cross head speed of 50 mm/min with 4 equidistant holding points on the denture occlusal surface, using a universal tensile testing machine in an axial pull direction. The effect of three denture adhesives on denture retention was also tested on the same denture types at different times over a period of 5 hours and beyond. The in-vitro model presented can be effectively used to test the retention of mandibular complete dentures. The speed of dislodgement force and amount of saliva are important variables in mandibular denture retention. The retention of well-fitting dentures was statistically higher than that of ill-fitting dentures. A significantly higher retention force was needed to dislodge mandibular dentures (well and ill-fitting dentures) when using a denture adhesive.

  20. Effects of different denture cleaning methods to remove Candida albicans from acrylic resin denture based material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Er Lee

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Compared to other methods, brushing, soaking in a commercial cleansing tablet solution, or a combination of both methods can significantly reduce the adherence of C albicans to denture samples. Compared to soaking in distilled water, soaking in a commercial mouthwash solution or irradiation with UV-light had more significant cleaning effects, but these methods were not as effective as the aforementioned three methods.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  2. Peer Review and Quality Assessment in Complete Denture Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novetsky, Marvin; Razzoog, Michael E.

    1981-01-01

    A program in peer review and quality assessment at the University of Michigan denture department is described. The program exposes students to peer review in order to assess the quality of their treatment. (Author/MLW)

  3. Use of Amorolfine in Candida- associated Denture Stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Denture stomatitis (DS is an inflammatory lesion, in which there is redness of theoral mucosa underneath a removable denture. Although Candida albicans is a component ofnormal microbial flora, local and systemic factors can cause opportunistic infections. Poorlyfitting or unhygienic dentures leads to the presence of yeasts attached to it., and causeinflammation. Treatment procedures include correction of ill-fitting dentures, plaquecontrol, and topical and systemic antifungal therapy. Nystatin and Amphoteresin B are usedtopically as suspension. Since candidiasis is highly resistant to antifungal agents, systemicusage of ketoconazole, fluconazole or itraconazole are necessary. But the systemic use ofthese drugs can cause side effects like liver toxicity, drug interactions etc. Lucio; Lorengoetal had conducted a study of the efficacy of amorolfine antifungal varnish, by localapplication, and found that it suppresses the nystatin resistant Candida associated denturestomatitis.

  4. The various methods and benefits of denture labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Datta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Labeled dentures can be important in identifying the owners in case of an accident, loss of memory, states of unconsciousness, being inadvertently misplaced on admission to a hospital or, in identifying the bodies of those who have died in a calamity. Positive identification through labeled dentures plays a key role in forensic scenario. Marking dentures has been considered as an important part of forensic dentistry, although no standardized method is followed. A number of labeling systems are available and can be broadly separated into either surface marking methods or inclusion systems. Each of the commonly described techniques is assessed with respect to their strengths and weaknesses. The more contemporary methods, though hi-tech, are expensive and may not be suitable for all dental practitioners to use. This article reviews the strengths and weaknesses of various methods involved in labeling dentures concluding by recommending that this valuable topic be included in the dental curriculum in India.

  5. Rotational path removable partial denture: an esthetic alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Raymond; Frazer, Robert Q; Herren, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Missing teeth can be replaced using any of a number of methods. Patients may choose to replace missing teeth with a prosthesis that is either removable, fixed, or retained with implants. When it is necessary to replace anterior or posterior teeth, a properly designed and fabricated rotational path removable partial denture can be both successful and esthetically pleasing to the patient. However, while a patient's functional and esthetic needs can be met successfully, rotational path removable partial dentures can be more demanding for the laboratory technician to fabricate and for the dentist to seat in the mouth. Rotational path removable partial dentures frequently are overlooked as a viable means of treating missing teeth. This article reviews the principles of rotational path removable partial dentures, as well as their categories, advantages, and disadvantages, in the hope that more dentists will consider them when the need arises.

  6. Fabricating complete dentures with CAD/CAM technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Luis; Yilmaz, Burak; McGlumphy, Edwin; Finger, Israel

    2014-05-01

    Conventional complete denture prosthetics require several appointments to register the maxillomandibular relationship and evaluate the esthetics. The fabrication of milled complete dental prostheses with digital scanning technology may decrease the number of appointments. The step-by-step method necessary to obtain impressions, maxillomandibular relation records, and anterior tooth position with an anatomic measuring device is described. The technique allows the generation of a virtual denture, which is milled to exact specifications without the use of conventional stone casts, flasking, or processing techniques.

  7. Denture identification using unique identification authority of India barcode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhindra Mahoorkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature for personal identification. They have been broadly divided into surface marking and inclusion methods. In this technique, patient′s unique identification number and barcode printed in the patient′s Aadhaar card issued by Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI are used as denture markers. This article describes a simple, quick, and economical method for identification of individual.

  8. Removable partial denture with a lateral rotational path of insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharav, H; Ben-Ur, Z; Laufer, B Z; Cardash, H S

    1995-08-01

    A removable partial denture with a lateral path of insertion is useful when unsightly facial clasps are objectional to the patient. Rounded rest seat preparations allow extensions of the minor connector to rotate laterally into embrasure undercuts, providing retention. Guiding planes on the contralateral side ensure a different path of withdrawal from the retentive elements. A Kennedy Class IV arch with a long edentulous span is used to illustrate the denture design.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Marginal Accuracy of a Cast Fixed Partial Denture Compared to Soldered Fixed Partial Denture Made of Two Different Base Metal Alloys and Casting Techniques: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jei, J Brintha; Mohan, Jayashree

    2014-03-01

    The periodontal health of abutment teeth and the durability of fixed partial denture depends on the marginal adaptation of the prosthesis. Any discrepancy in the marginal area leads to dissolution of luting agent and plaque accumulation. This study was done with the aim of evaluating the accuracy of marginal fit of four unit crown and bridge made up of Ni-Cr and Cr-Co alloys under induction and centrifugal casting. They were compared to cast fixed partial denture (FPD) and soldered FPD. For the purpose of this study a metal model was fabricated. A total of 40 samples (4-unit crown and bridge) were prepared in which 20 Cr-Co samples and 20 Ni-Cr samples were fabricated. Within these 20 samples of each group 10 samples were prepared by induction casting technique and other 10 samples with centrifugal casting technique. The cast FPD samples obtained were seated on the model and the samples were then measured with travelling microscope having precision of 0.001 cm. Sectioning of samples was done between the two pontics and measurements were made, then the soldering was made with torch soldering unit. The marginal discrepancy of soldered samples was measured and all findings were statistically analysed. The results revealed minimal marginal discrepancy with Cr-Co samples when compared to Ni-Cr samples done under induction casting technique. When compared to cast FPD samples, the soldered group showed reduced marginal discrepancy.

  10. Peel bond strength of resilient liner modified by the addition of antimicrobial agents to denture base acrylic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane S. Alcântara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to prolong the clinical longevity of resilient denture relining materials and reduce plaque accumulation, incorporation of antimicrobial agents into these materials has been proposed. However, this addition may affect their properties. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of the addition of antimicrobial agents into one soft liner (Soft Confort, Dencril on its peel bond strength to one denture base (QC 20, Dentsply. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Acrylic specimens (n=9 were made (75x10x3 mm and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 48 h. The drug powder concentrations (nystatin 500,000U - G2; nystatin 1,000,000U - G3; miconazole 125 mg - G4; miconazole 250 mg - G5; ketoconazole 100 mg - G6; ketoconazole 200 mg - G7; chlorhexidine diacetate 5% - G8; and 10% chlorhexidine diacetate - G9 were blended with the soft liner powder before the addition of the soft liner liquid. A group (G1 without any drug incorporation was used as control. Specimens (n=9 (75x10x6 mm were plasticized according to the manufacturers' instructions and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h. Relined specimens were then submitted to a 180-degree peel test at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Data (MPa were analyzed by analysis of variance (α=0.05 and the failure modes were visually classified. RESULTS: No significant difference was found among experimental groups (p=0.148. Cohesive failure located within the resilient material was predominantly observed in all tested groups. CONCLUSIONS: Peel bond strength between the denture base and the modified soft liner was not affected by the addition of antimicrobial agents.

  11. Studying bacterial multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    and drawbacks of varying the degree of complexity. This review aims to facilitate multispecies biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge on interspecies interactions. Recent technological advances have enabled total diversity analysis of highly complex and diverse microbial communities...... at the microscale of complex communities, including biofilms.Studies of multispecies biofilms and the interactions shaping these are conducted in traditional approaches used for single-species biofilms with some adjustments; but a crucial point for consideration is which strains to combine and where these should...

  12. Survival analysis of mandibular complete dentures with acrylic-based resilient liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Murakami, Hiroshi; Gunji, Atsuko; Ito, Nana; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this long-term randomised controlled trial was to compare the longevity of dentures constructed using a conventional acrylic resin (CAR) to that of dentures constructed using an acrylic-based resilient liner (ARL). The follow-up study was essentially carried out by annual telephone calls to each of the 67 participants. The Kaplan-Meier method and life-table analysis were used for univariate analyses. The Cox proportional-hazards test was used as a final model for statistically adjusting predictor variables such as sex, clinician type, mandibular denture type and age at denture delivery. The denture type was likely to affect the survival time of the dentures, while the sex and clinician type were not. The group using acrylic-based resilient denture liners had twice the risk of having shorter denture-survival times than those using conventional acrylic resin dentures. Younger participants were likely to have a reduced risk of having shorter denture-survival times than older participants. We conclude that mandibular complete dentures constructed using ARL are twice as likely as dentures constructed using CAR to have shorter denture survival times, mainly because of material deterioration. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A Study of Factors Contributing to Denture Stomatitis in a North Indian Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Vinayak Naik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Factors like oral and denture hygiene, presence of saliva, age of the denture, and degree of colonization with Candida albicans are to be evaluated as local contributing factors for causing denture stomatitis. 100 patients aged 30 to 70 years were selected for the study. Among these, 70 patients were labeled test group showing signs of stomatitis and 30 patients as control group as they showed no inflammatory signs. Clinical tests included oral and denture hygiene evaluation, salivary measurements, and age of the dentures, and microscopic investigations were done. Results showed no significant differences between the two groups in terms of saliva, oral and denture hygiene habits, and denture age. Test group showed stomatitis in patients who were wearing dentures for 5 to 10 years compared to control group who were wearing dentures for 10 years and above. Denture age was proportional to Candida colonization and not to degree of inflammation. Significant differences were found in Candida colonization of the fitting surface of the denture between stomatitis and control groups. Poor denture hygiene habits are the most prominent contributing factor for denture stomatitis and colonization.

  14. Vulnerable Plaques, Inflammation and Newer Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia V

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, inflammation is considered to be the central player in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. It leads to the formation of multiple plaques in the arterial beds including coronary vasculature. Recent studies using the latest imaging techniques have shown that in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS multiple plaques are ruptured and have thrombus formation on them. Various factors make these plaques unstable, these include structural components of plaque like thin fibrous cap, high lipid content of the plaque core and inflammation, both localized and generalized. It has been shown that most of the ACS are caused by plaques causing non-critical stenosis as seen on traditional X-ray angiography. Also, the phenomenon of remodelling makes angiography a poor technique for plaque visualization. Hence newer modalities are required to identify these 'vulnerable plaques'. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS, thermography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI are a few such promising techniques. Here we review the invasive and non-invasive modalities that can be helpful in the identification of these plaques before they become unstable and cause ACS, and also the available therapies to stabilize these plaques.

  15. Probing oral microbial functionality--expression of spxB in plaque samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhu

    Full Text Available The Human Oral Microbiome Database (HOMD provides an extensive collection of genome sequences from oral bacteria. The sequence information is a static snapshot of the microbial potential of the so far sequenced species. A major challenge is to connect the microbial potential encoded in the metagenome to an actual function in the in vivo oral biofilm. In the present study we took a reductionist approach and identified a considerably conserved metabolic gene, spxB to be encoded by a majority of oral streptococci using the HOMD metagenome information. spxB encodes the pyruvate oxidase responsible for the production of growth inhibiting amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and has previously been shown as important in the interspecies competition in the oral biofilm. Here we demonstrate a strong correlation of H2O2 production and the presence of the spxB gene in dental plaque. Using Real-Time RT PCR we show that spxB is expressed in freshly isolated human plaque samples from several donors and that the expression is relative constant when followed over time in one individual. This is the first demonstration of an oral community encoded gene expressed in vivo suggesting a functional role of spxB in oral biofilm physiology. This also demonstrates a possible strategy to connect the microbial potential of the metagenome to its functionality in future studies by identifying similar highly conserved genes in the oral microbial community.

  16. Synergistic phage-antibiotic combinations for the control of Escherichia coli biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Elizabeth M; Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y; Donnelly, Ryan F; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2012-07-01

    The potential application of phage therapy for the control of bacterial biofilms has received increasing attention as resistance to conventional antibiotic agents continues to increase. The present study identifies antimicrobial synergy between bacteriophage T4 and a conventional antibiotic, cefotaxime, via standard plaque assay and, importantly, in the in vitro eradication of biofilms of the T4 host strain Escherichia coli 11303. Phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS) is defined as the phenomenon whereby sub-lethal concentrations of certain antibiotics can substantially stimulate the host bacteria's production of virulent phage. Increasing sub-lethal concentrations of cefotaxime resulted in an observed increase in T4 plaque size and T4 concentration. The application of PAS to the T4 one-step growth curve also resulted in an increased burst size and reduced latent period. Combinations of T4 bacteriophage and cefotaxime significantly enhanced the eradication of bacterial biofilms when compared to treatment with cefotaxime alone. The addition of medium (10(4) PFU mL(-1)) and high (10(7) PFU mL(-1)) phage titres reduced the minimum biofilm eradication concentration value of cefotaxime against E. coli ATCC 11303 biofilms from 256 to 128 and 32 μg mL(-1), respectively. Although further investigation is needed to confirm PAS, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that synergy between bacteriophage and conventional antibiotics can significantly improve biofilm control in vitro.

  17. pH landscapes in a novel five-species model of early dental biofilm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schlafer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite continued preventive efforts, dental caries remains the most common disease of man. Organic acids produced by microorganisms in dental plaque play a crucial role for the development of carious lesions. During early stages of the pathogenetic process, repeated pH drops induce changes in microbial composition and favour the establishment of an increasingly acidogenic and aciduric microflora. The complex structure of dental biofilms, allowing for a multitude of different ecological environments in close proximity, remains largely unexplored. In this study, we designed a laboratory biofilm model that mimics the bacterial community present during early acidogenic stages of the caries process. We then performed a time-resolved microscopic analysis of the extracellular pH landscape at the interface between bacterial biofilm and underlying substrate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Strains of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus downei and Actinomyces naeslundii were employed in the model. Biofilms were grown in flow channels that allowed for direct microscopic analysis of the biofilms in situ. The architecture and composition of the biofilms were analysed using fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both biofilm structure and composition were highly reproducible and showed similarity to in-vivo-grown dental plaque. We employed the pH-sensitive ratiometric probe C-SNARF-4 to perform real-time microscopic analyses of the biofilm pH in response to salivary solutions containing glucose. Anaerobic glycolysis in the model biofilms created a mildly acidic environment. Decrease in pH in different areas of the biofilms varied, and distinct extracellular pH-microenvironments were conserved over several hours. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The designed biofilm model represents a promising tool to determine the effect of potential therapeutic agents on biofilm growth

  18. [Comparative analysis of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture by using finite element method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radović, Katarina; Čairović, Aleksandra; Todorović, Aleksandar; Stančić, Ivica; Grbović, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Various mobile devices are used in the therapy of unilateral free-end saddle. Unilateral dentures with precise connectivity elements are not used frequently. In this paper the problem of applying and functionality of unilateral free- end saddle denture without major connector was taken into consideration. The aim was to analyze and compare a unilateral RPD (removable partial denture) and a classical RPD by calculating and analyzing stresses under different loads. 3D models of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture with casted clasps were made by using computer program CATIA V5 (abutment teeth, canine and first premolar, with crowns and abutment tissues were also made). The models were built in full-scale. Stress analyses for both models were performed by applying a force of 300 N on the second premolar, a force of 500 N on the first molar and a force of 700 N on the second molar. The Fault Model Extractor (FME) analysis and calculation showed the complete behaviour of unilateral removable partial denture and abutments (canine and first premolar), as well as the behaviour of RPD under identical loading conditions. Applied forces with extreme values caused high stress levels on both models and their abutments within physiological limits. Having analyzed stresses under same conditions, we concluded that the unilateral RPD and classical RPD have similar physiological values

  19. The effect of denture stability on bite force and muscular effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloss, R; Al-Arab, M; Finn, R A; Throckmorton, G S

    2011-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that denture instability limits the amount of voluntary muscular effort generated by denture wearers. Seventeen edentulous subjects (seven men, 10 women; mean age 60·3 ± 13·0 years) with newly acquired implant-retained mandibular overdentures and a conventional maxillary denture participated. Maximum bite forces and corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity from the temporalis and masseter muscles (bilaterally) were recorded under two experimental conditions: (i) Unilateral premolar and molar bites without additional support, and (ii) premolar and molar bites with bite block support on the opposite side. In addition, EMG values alone were recorded during maximum clenching without any transducer between the upper and lower dentures. The level of muscular effort was significantly higher with greater denture support. These results indicate that denture instability probably prevents denture wearers from using the full potential of their jaw muscles, especially during unilateral biting and chewing, even with two implants supporting the mandibular dentures.

  20. Reestablishment of Occlusal Vertical Dimension in Complete Denture Wearing in Two Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Omar Mendoza Marin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment and reestablishment of the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD are considered important factors in the treatment of complete denture wearers. The long-time use of a complete denture can result in jaw displacement due to abrasion of the artificial teeth and residual ridge resorption, causing esthetic complications. Most patients with old dentures and incorrect OVD accept reestablishment of the OVD with new complete dentures, even if they were used to their old dentures. The present clinical report describes a method of gradual reestablishment of OVD using a diagnostic acrylic splint on artificial teeth in old complete dentures before the manufacture of new complete dentures. Clinical Significance. The use of a reversible treatment for reestablishment of the OVD in old complete dentures with a diagnostic occlusal acrylic splint allows for the reestablishment of the intermaxillary relationship, providing physiological conditions of masticatory performance associated with the recovery of facial esthetics in edentulous patients.

  1. Elastic modulus and flexural strength comparisons of high-impact and traditional denture base acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour M. Ajaj-ALKordy

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the high-impact acrylic resin is a suitable denture base material for patients with clinical fracture of the acrylic denture.

  2. Reestablishment of Occlusal Vertical Dimension in Complete Denture Wearing in Two Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Danny Omar Mendoza; Leite, Andressa Rosa Perin; de Oliveira Junior, Norberto Martins; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio; Pero, Ana Carolina; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir

    2015-01-01

    The assessment and reestablishment of the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) are considered important factors in the treatment of complete denture wearers. The long-time use of a complete denture can result in jaw displacement due to abrasion of the artificial teeth and residual ridge resorption, causing esthetic complications. Most patients with old dentures and incorrect OVD accept reestablishment of the OVD with new complete dentures, even if they were used to their old dentures. The present clinical report describes a method of gradual reestablishment of OVD using a diagnostic acrylic splint on artificial teeth in old complete dentures before the manufacture of new complete dentures. Clinical Significance. The use of a reversible treatment for reestablishment of the OVD in old complete dentures with a diagnostic occlusal acrylic splint allows for the reestablishment of the intermaxillary relationship, providing physiological conditions of masticatory performance associated with the recovery of facial esthetics in edentulous patients.

  3. Atherosclerotic plaque regression: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Nesan; Román-Rego, Ana; Ong, Peter; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2010-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is the major cause of death in the western world. The formation and rapid progression of atheromatous plaques can lead to serious cardiovascular events in patients with atherosclerosis. The better understanding, in recent years, of the mechanisms leading to atheromatous plaque growth and disruption and the availability of powerful HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins) has permitted the consideration of plaque regression as a realistic therapeutic goal. This article reviews the existing evidence underpinning current therapeutic strategies aimed at achieving atherosclerotic plaque regression. In this review we also discuss imaging modalities for the assessment of plaque regression, predictors of regression and whether plaque regression is associated with a survival benefit.

  4. Hydraulic resistance of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Dreszer, C.

    2013-02-01

    Biofilms may interfere with membrane performance in at least three ways: (i) increase of the transmembrane pressure drop, (ii) increase of feed channel (feed-concentrate) pressure drop, and (iii) increase of transmembrane passage. Given the relevance of biofouling, it is surprising how few data exist about the hydraulic resistance of biofilms that may affect the transmembrane pressure drop and membrane passage. In this study, biofilms were generated in a lab scale cross flow microfiltration system at two fluxes (20 and 100Lm-2h-1) and constant cross flow (0.1ms-1). As a nutrient source, acetate was added (1.0mgL-1 acetate C) besides a control without nutrient supply. A microfiltration (MF) membrane was chosen because the MF membrane resistance is very low compared to the expected biofilm resistance and, thus, biofilm resistance can be determined accurately. Transmembrane pressure drop was monitored. As biofilm parameters, thickness, total cell number, TOC, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were determined, it was demonstrated that no internal membrane fouling occurred and that the fouling layer actually consisted of a grown biofilm and was not a filter cake of accumulated bacterial cells. At 20Lm-2h-1 flux with a nutrient dosage of 1mgL-1 acetate C, the resistance after 4 days reached a value of 6×1012m-1. At 100Lm-2h-1 flux under the same conditions, the resistance was 5×1013m-1. No correlation of biofilm resistance to biofilm thickness was found; Biofilms with similar thickness could have different resistance depending on the applied flux. The cell number in biofilms was between 4×107 and 5×108 cellscm-2. At this number, bacterial cells make up less than a half percent of the overall biofilm volume and therefore did not hamper the water flow through the biofilm significantly. A flux of 100Lm-2h-1 with nutrient supply caused higher cell numbers, more biomass, and higher biofilm resistance than a flux of 20Lm-2h-1. However, the biofilm thickness

  5. Real-time imaging of anti-biofilm effects using CP-OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Karin; Reilly, Cavan; Li, Yuping; Jones, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method to reliably and reproducibly assess the physical properties of in vitro multi-species plaque derived biofilms. A custom flow cell (FC) was designed to model oral cavity shear stresses on biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite (HA) discs. A finite-element program (ANSYS 13) modeled flow velocities and wall shear stresses on the interior 3D dimensions. For the experiment, 1% chlorhexidine (CHX), 5 M urea, and a 1× phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were flown through the FC simulating oral rinsing. Near infrared cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) non-destructively imaged the fluid immersed biofilms in real time (20 frames/s). During low flow, the swell of the biofilm caused from 5 M urea was quite pronounced increase in vertical dimension. Biofilms exposed to 1% CHX showed a slight collapse in the vertical dimension of the biofilm during low flow. During high flow/high sheer stress, the 5 M urea solution effectively removed the biofilm, while both 1% CHX and 1× PBS did not remove biofilms even under high velocity/shear stress conditions.

  6. Efficacy of conventional and experimental techniques for denture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rached, R N; Powers, J M; Del Bel Cury, A A

    2004-11-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of one experimental and three conventional techniques for denture repair. Forty maxillary dentures were constructed in dental stone casts duplicated from an edentulous copper-aluminium maxillary master cast. Two groups of 20 dentures each were prepared with Lucitone 199 (water-bath, 8 h/74 degrees C) or Acron MC (microwave, 3 min/500 W) denture base materials processed in gypsum moulds. The 40 dentures were all separated sagittally in the middle. After that, five dentures of each denture base material were repaired with one of the four following techniques: L (Lucitone 199, water-bath, 8 h/74 degrees C, gypsum mould), A (Acron MC, microwave, 3 min/500 W, gypsum mould), AR (Acron MC/R, autopolymerized, 60 psi/45 degrees C/15 min) and the experimental technique AS (Acron MC, 1 min/500 W + 1 min/0 W + 1 min/500 W, hard silicone mould). The parameters denture accuracy (DA), horizontal (HC) and vertical changes (VC) of the occlusal plane measured the efficacy of the repair techniques. The DA was determined by weighing a film of silicone impression material set in contact to the tissue surface of the denture seated on the metallic master die. For HC, cross-arch measurements were made among reference marks drilled on the teeth 11, 21, 16 and 26. The VC was obtained by calculating the relative differences in height between similar teeth of each semi-arch (pairs 13-23, 14-24, 15-25 e 16-26). For DA, HC and VC, the percentage differences between the percentage means obtained before and after repair were calculated and grouped for comparisons. Analysis of variance (SuperANOVA) and means compared by Tukey-Kramer intervals (0.05) revealed that AR repair had the best percentage difference value for DA [0.5% (P 0.05)]. For HC, there was a statistical difference (P 0.05). Denture accuracy was not affected by the interaction of base material-repair technique; repair with AR technique gave the best adaptation; the interaction of base material

  7. Plaque accumulation and Streptococcus mutans levels around self-ligating bracket clips and elastomeric modules: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Fadia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the effect of two different ligating systems that is, elastomeric modules and self-ligating (SL bracket systems (Smartclip - 3M Unitek with respect to harboring bacterial plaque in fixed orthodontic treatment. Objectives: To assess, evaluate, and compare the amount of plaque accumulation and Streptococcus mutans colonization around elastomeric ligation and SL clips in the smart clip appliance. Materials and Methods: A total of 111 orthodontic patients scheduled for fixed orthodontic treatments were selected for this split maxillary arch study. All the patients were bonded with smart-clip (3M Unitek SL brackets, and the wire was placed into the bracket slots, on the randomly selected hemi arch, elastomeric modules were placed for the study to be conducted. Microbial and periodontal plaque accumulation was recorded at 3-time intervals post ligation. Plaque index-by Silness and Loe, modified Quigely Hein index, bleeding on probing were evaluated, and biofilm was collected from the tooth surface after 30 days and placed in petri dishes containing Mitis Salivarius agar for bacterial culturing. Result: It was observed that the side where ligation was done with elastomeric modules accumulated more plaque and increase in S. mutans colony forming units as compared to the side without external ligation (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Reduced bacterial colonization and better plaque control was seen with SL orthodontic bracket appliance system as compared to conventional ligation method.

  8. Accuracy of coronary plaque detection and assessment of interobserver agreement for plaque quantification using automatic coronary plaque analysis software on coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laqmani, A.; Quitzke, M.; Creder, D.D.; Adam, G.; Lund, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclearmedicine; Klink, T. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of automatic plaque detection and the interobserver agreement of automatic versus manually adjusted quantification of coronary plaques on coronary CT angiography (cCTA) using commercially available software. 10 cCTA datasets were evaluated using plaque software. First, the automatically detected plaques were verified. Second, two observers independently performed plaque quantification without revising the automatically constructed plaque contours (automatic approach). Then, each observer adjusted the plaque contours according to plaque delineation (adjusted approach). The interobserver agreement of both approaches was analyzed. 32 of 114 automatically identified findings were true-positive plaques, while 82 (72 %) were false-positive. 20 of 52 plaques (38 %) were missed by the software (false-negative). The automatic approach provided good interobserver agreement with relative differences of 0.9 ± 16.0 % for plaque area and -3.3 ± 33.8 % for plaque volume. Both observers independently adjusted all contours because they did not represent the plaque delineation. Interobserver agreement decreased for the adjusted approach with relative differences of 25.0 ± 24.8 % for plaque area and 20.0 ± 40.4 % for plaque volume. The automatic plaque analysis software is of limited value due to high numbers of false-positive and false-negative plaque findings. The automatic approach was reproducible but it necessitated adjustment of all constructed plaque contours resulting in deterioration of the interobserver agreement.

  9. IN VITRO WEAR RESISTANCE OF THREE TYPES OF POLYMETHYL METHACRYLATE DENTURE TEETH

    OpenAIRE

    Katia Rodrigues Reis; Gerson Bonfante; Luiz Fernando Pegoraro; Paulo Cesar Rodrigues Conti; Pedro Cesar Garcia de Oliveira; Osvaldo Bazzan Kaizer

    2008-01-01

    The wear resistance of denture teeth is important to the longevity of removable prostheses of edentulous patients. The ability of denture teeth to maintain a stable occlusal relationship over time may be influenced by this property. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the wear resistance of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture teeth based on their chemical composition when opposed by a ceramic antagonist. The maxillary canines (n=10) of 3 PMMA denture teeth (Trubyte Biotone, ...

  10. Rotational path of insertion for removable partial dentures with an anterior saddle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Kevin H-K; Fang, Daniel T-S; Smales, Roger J; Newsome, Philip R H; Chow, Tak W

    2003-01-01

    The provision of removable partial dentures remains a viable treatment modality for many partially dentate patients. Replacing missing anterior teeth with a removable partial denture using a rotational path of insertion provides improved retention and appearance. The use of a rotational path of insertion also provides additional retention for a removable partial denture restoring combined anterior and posterior bounded saddles. Two case reports demonstrate the use of the rotational path of insertion for partial denture design.

  11. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  12. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  13. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus salivarius on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C-C; Lin, C-T; Wu, C-Y; Peng, W-S; Lee, M-J; Tsai, Y-C

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries arises from an imbalance of metabolic activities in dental biofilms developed primarily by Streptococcus mutans. This study was conducted to isolate potential oral probiotics with antagonistic activities against S. mutans biofilm formation from Lactobacillus salivarius, frequently found in human saliva. We analysed 64 L. salivarius strains and found that two, K35 and K43, significantly inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation with inhibitory activities more pronounced than those of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), a prototypical probiotic that shows anti-caries activity. Scanning electron microscopy showed that co-culture of S. mutans with K35 or K43 resulted in significantly reduced amounts of attached bacteria and network-like structures, typically comprising exopolysaccharides. Spot assay for S. mutans indicated that K35 and K43 strains possessed a stronger bactericidal activity against S. mutans than LGG. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of genes encoding glucosyltransferases, gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD was reduced when S. mutans were co-cultured with K35 or K43. However, LGG activated the expression of gtfB and gtfC, but did not influence the expression of gtfD in the co-culture. A transwell-based biofilm assay indicated that these lactobacilli inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation in a contact-independent manner. In conclusion, we identified two L. salivarius strains with inhibitory activities on the growth and expression of S. mutans virulence genes to reduce its biofilm formation. This is not a general characteristic of the species, so presents a potential strategy for in vivo alteration of plaque biofilm and caries.

  14. Microbiota diversity and gene expression dynamics in human oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Simón-Soro, Aurea; Mira, Alex

    2014-04-27

    Micro-organisms inhabiting teeth surfaces grow on biofilms where a specific and complex succession of bacteria has been described by co-aggregation tests and DNA-based studies. Although the composition of oral biofilms is well established, the active portion of the bacterial community and the patterns of gene expression in vivo have not been studied. Using RNA-sequencing technologies, we present the first metatranscriptomic study of human dental plaque, performed by two different approaches: (1) A short-reads, high-coverage approach by Illumina sequencing to characterize the gene activity repertoire of the microbial community during biofilm development; (2) A long-reads, lower-coverage approach by pyrosequencing to determine the taxonomic identity of the active microbiome before and after a meal ingestion. The high-coverage approach allowed us to analyze over 398 million reads, revealing that microbial communities are individual-specific and no bacterial species was detected as key player at any time during biofilm formation. We could identify some gene expression patterns characteristic for early and mature oral biofilms. The transcriptomic profile of several adhesion genes was confirmed through qPCR by measuring expression of fimbriae-associated genes. In addition to the specific set of gene functions overexpressed in early and mature oral biofilms, as detected through the short-reads dataset, the long-reads approach detected specific changes when comparing the metatranscriptome of the same individual before and after a meal, which can narrow down the list of organisms responsible for acid production and therefore potentially involved in dental caries. The bacteria changing activity during biofilm formation and after meal ingestion were person-specific. Interestingly, some individuals showed extreme homeostasis with virtually no changes in the active bacterial population after food ingestion, suggesting the presence of a microbial community which could be

  15. Simplified Complete Denture: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ye; Sun, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Many procedures are used to construct traditional (T) complete dentures; however, a simplified (S) method requiring fewer steps and less time is available. This systematic review intends to summarize the modeling of simplified methods for complete dentures and evaluate the differences between the T method and S method. With this review, we hope to lay the foundation for proposing a standardized fabrication method for "simplified dentures." The MEDLINE (via PubMed) and EMBASE databases were searched for articles on simplified complete dentures published in English before April 2014. Eleven articles were included. One was about one-step complete dentures, two were about SET (simplified treatment of edentulous patients), and the others were about the normal simplified method, which includes impression, occlusal registration, and try-in. Seven were randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). The time, cost, patient satisfaction, clinical effects, masticatory performance, masticatory ability, and professional evaluation reported in these studies were compared. We summarized the different techniques of fabricating complete dentures and discussed the RCTs of the normal complete technique. None of the RCTs identified significant differences between the S and T groups in terms of patient ratings for general satisfaction, OHIP-edentulous scale, denture quality, or masticatory ability. At the same time, the T method was significantly more expensive and required more time to complete than the S method. Current scientific evidence suggests that the S method can replace or partly replace the T method. Moreover, specific rules should be devised to restrict the simplified construction, and detailed research should be conducted. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Photoelastic analysis of stresses transmitted by complete dentures lined with hard or soft liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Izabella P; Consani, Rafael L X; Mesquita, Marcelo F; Nóbilo, Mauro A A

    2015-10-01

    Stresses transmitted on the alveolar bone ridge by lined conventional complete mandibular dentures can decrease the bone absorption level. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the stresses induced on the alveolar bone ridge of lined conventional complete mandibular dentures by using photoelastic analysis. One maxillary and three mandibular conventional dentures were developed for the following treatments: 1 - Unlined denture (control), 2 - Denture lined with resin-based material, and 3 - Denture lined with silicone-based material. The photoelastic analysis took place with the dentures in the position of maximum intercuspation, and the mandibular photoelastic models were axially loaded with 10 kgf (98 N). Unlined denture (control) presented stresses along the model, especially on the anterior and left lateral sides with less stresses on the right side. On the left lateral side, the denture base lined with resin-based material demonstrated similar stresses to that of the control; however, lower stresses occurred in the premolar and retromolar regions. Denture bases lined with silicone-based material showed decreased fringe orders and homogeneous distribution of induced stresses. Both lined dentures exhibited lower stresses when compared to unlined dentures. Silicone-based material provided a more homogeneous distribution of stresses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between various parameters of complete denture quality and patients' satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadda, Sara A

    2014-09-01

    Patients' appreciation of their conventional complete dentures might be affected by the quality of the dentures. A random sample of 33 edentulous patients who were rehabilitated by means of conventional complete dentures participated in the study. Three independent investigators who underwent technique calibration evaluated the dentures on the basis of seven clinical criteria by using a validated examination form. The patients filled out a validated denture satisfaction scale. The author used Pearson product-moment correlation and analysis of covariance to identify possible correlations. The study results showed that most patients were between "reasonably satisfied" and "very satisfied" with their dentures. The author found nominally higher satisfaction among those receiving both mandibular and maxillary dentures and significant positive correlations between the overall denture satisfaction score and the stability of the mandibular denture (P = .039) and retention of the mandibular denture (P = .005). In contrast, esthetic lip support and lower lip line, occlusion, and maxillary stability and retention were not correlated with participants' overall satisfaction level (P > .064). The results of this study show that a clinically stable mandibular denture was the most important determinant of patients' satisfaction. The study findings highlight the most important denture quality parameters that can aid clinicians in meeting their patients' expectations.

  18. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  19. Complete denture wearing and fractures among edentulous patients treated in university clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Aline S; Monteiro, Douglas R; Marra, Juliê; Compagnoni, Marco A; Barbosa, Debora B

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of wearing and fracture of complete dentures was evaluated among edentulous patients treated in two dental schools in Brazil. Acceptance and wearing of complete dentures are related to adaptive behaviour of edentulous patients. However, one reason that could interfere with the wearing dentures is their potential to fracture, which is still a common complication in denture rehabilitation practice. Two hundred and twenty-four edentulous patients rehabilitated with complete dentures from 2000 to 2005 in Araçatuba and Araraquara Dental School, University of State of São Paulo, were assessed in 2006 and 2007 to answer a questionnaire about wearing and fracture of their dentures. Statistical analysis were performed using Epi Info software and chi-squared test to compare maxillary and mandibular data (α = 0.05). Almost 26% of the patients did not wear their dentures, and among the remainder, the majority wore the maxillary denture. About 30% of the dentures were fractured, with higher prevalence in the maxillary arch (p = 0.003). Discontinuation of wearing dentures was quite high, especially considering the treatment which was carried out in university clinics. Prevalence of fractures was also high, greater for the maxillary denture, and was one of the main reasons for non-wearing of complete dentures. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Spectrogram Analysis of Complete Dentures with Different Thickness and Palatal Rugae Materials on Speech Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada Zaki Mahross

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the influence of reproduction of different thickness and palatal rugae materials on complete dentures speech using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL (spectrogram. Materials and Methods. Three completely edentulous male patients (aged 50–60 years were selected for reading a paragraph. Twelve upper dentures were constructed, four for each patient. The patients’ speech groups were divided into five groups, Group I: patients without dentures; Group II: patients rehabilitated with conventional acrylic dentures; Group III: patients with conventional acrylic dentures with rugae reproduction; Group IV: patients with dentures with metallic framework of minimal thickness and direct ragged metallic palatal surface at rugae area; Group V: patients with dentures with palatal rugae constructed from resilient acrylic resin material with thickness less than conventional denture. Speech samples were recorded after insertion of each denture for groups using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL (spectrogram. The sounds selected were lingopalatal /s/z/sh/t/d/ and /l/. Results. Group III produced high mean significant difference with /sh/t/ sound. For Group IV, the difference was noticed with /s/z/sh/t/ and /d/ sounds, while for Group V the difference was shown with /z/l/ sound (P<0.05. Conclusion. It is recommended to reproduce the rugae area in complete denture because the phonetic quality of complete denture with rugae is superior to the conventional denture.

  1. Effect of denture adhesive on the micro-organisms in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozkan, Yasemin Kulak; Ucankale, Mert; Ozcan, Mutlu; Uner, Nurver

    2012-01-01

    Background: Denture adhesives increase the retention and stability of dentures in edentulous patients, especially in cases where salivary flow is impaired or in the management of traumatised oral mucosa. Objectives: The effect of a denture adhesive on the oral flora at different time intervals. Meth

  2. Removable partial denture use among a selected group of Nigerian undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C C Azodo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the self-reported prevalence of removable partial denture use among a selected group of Nigerian undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Four hundred non-dental undergraduates of University of Benin recruited over four week′s period were studied. Results: The prevalence of removable partial denture use among the respondents was 1.8%. Denture use was more among those aged 17-25 years, females and right handed individuals. Removable partial denture users were less likely to have received professional instruction on tooth brushing and brush their teeth more than once-daily than non-denture users. Removable partial denture users were more likely to be cigarette smokers, regular soft drink consumer and report perceived efficacy in oral self-care and prevention of gingivodental diseases than non-denture users. Removable partial denture users were also more likely to have opened bottled drink with their teeth and experienced shocking sensation from their teeth than non-denture users. Conclusion: The prevalence of removable partial denture use was low among the respondents. The denture wearer were more likely to report higher perceived efficacy in oral self-care and prevention of gingivodental disease despite indulgence in unhealthy oral health practices and lower receipt of professional instruction on tooth brushing. The implication of this study is that dental practitioner should endeavor to give oral health instruction to removable partial denture users to improve their oral health practices and decrease the risk of preventable oral diseases.

  3. Evaluation of Prevalence of Oral Candidiasis in Patients Using Complete Denture Wears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Tavakkol

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Denture stomatotos os a common problem of the denture wears, and its etiology is not clear from the literatures. Some studies show that the aetiology is candida albicans, while other reports point out the other agents including candida albicans. The present study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of oral candidiasis in patients using complete denture with different datas. 50 subjects all wearing complete denture participated in this study. The palatal mucosa was swabbed and swabs were cultured in Sabourauds medium containing 0.005% chloramphenicol then cultures were tested with common mycological lab tests. In 80% of patients oral candidiasis have been diagnosed. In the investigation a direct relation between the oral candidiasis and removal of denture at night, denture cleanliness, presence of any suction and symptoms of denture stomatitis was shown. No relation between the oral candidiasis and sex, smoking habit, succeptible disease, angular cheilitis; the recent condition of denture and the retention of denture were found. The findings of our investigation indicates that candida albicans is the causative agent of denture stomatitis while other factors such as denture cleanliness, removal of denture at night and presence of any suction may be considered as well.

  4. 21 CFR 872.3400 - Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... denture adhesive. 872.3400 Section 872.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive is a device composed of karaya and sodium borate with...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3410 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. 872.3410 Section 872.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3410 Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. (a) Identification. An ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive is a...

  6. Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuel, Samuel Alberg

    Aterosklerose er den hyppigste årsag til død og svær invaliditet i verden. Sygdommen danner aterosklerotiske plaques, som består af lipidkerner dækket af en fibrøs kappe. Såfremt kappen brister, dannes overliggende tromber, som kan føres med blodstrømmen og forårsage strokes hvis kappen brister i...... mekaniske kræfter, som påvirker den fibrøse kappe, for at være en medvirkende årsag til plaqueruptur. Endvidere er stress-niveauerne i den fibrøse kappe en risikomarkør, som påvirkes af såvel den fibrøse kappetykkelse som lipid kerne størrelsen, blodtryk og graden af forsnævring. Imidlertid har hidtidige...... for at få fjernet deres plaques (carotis endarterektomi). Dernæst blev skanningerne segmenteret i lipid-kerne, fibrøs kappe, blodbane, karvæg og calcificationer. Endvidere blev blodets hastighed, blodtryk og karvægs deformationer målt. Disse data blev benyttet til longitudinelle fluid-struktur interaktions...

  7. Effects of Autolog Saliva on Biofilm Formation of Streptococcus mutans Isolated from Caries and Caries-free Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Paramita

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Saliva and Streptococcus mutans play role in biofilm formation. Saliva and S.mutans virulence are different between subjects with and without caries. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of autolog saliva on biofilm formation of S. mutans isolated from caries and caries-free subjects. Materials and Methods: Saliva and plaque samples are obtained from caries and caries-free subjects. Plaque samples were cultured on TYS20B for 3 days. Selected colonies were picked and cultured on TSB for 3 days. After colony counting, biofilm assay was conducted and inoculated for one day. The biofilm was tested using crystal violet binding assay and quantified by measuring the optical density at 655 nm wavelength. Result: The optical density of S. muttans biofilm isolated from subjects with caries were different from taste with no caries. Biofilm formation of S. muttans isolated from caries and caries-free subjects with and without the presence of autolog saliva were different. Conclusion: Autolog saliva influences S. mutans biofilm formation and there is a tendency that is higher than those from subjects with no caries.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v17i2.48

  8. A structural equation model relating oral condition, denture quality, chewing ability, satisfaction, and oral health-related quality of life in complete denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaga, Eijiro; Sato, Yusuke; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between mandibular ridge form, stability and retention of mandibular complete denture, accuracy of jaw relation recording, patients' perception of chewing ability, satisfaction with dentures and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in complete denture wearers. A total of 183 edentulous patients, who visited the Dental Hospital of Tokyo Medical and Dental University for new complete dentures, were recruited. Oral examination was performed. Cawood and Howell's method was used to grade the mandibular ridge form. The stability and retention of the mandibular complete denture were assessed using Kapur method. Accuracy of jaw relation recording was evaluated using a newly developed jaw relation index. Patients' perception of chewing ability was rated using a food intake questionnaire. Patients' satisfaction with complete dentures was assessed on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. OHRQoL was measured using the Japanese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile for edentulous subjects. A structural equation model was constructed based on the hypothesis that oral condition and denture quality would be related to chewing ability, satisfaction and OHRQoL. Significant relationships were found between mandibular ridge form, stability of mandibular complete denture, accuracy of jaw relation recording, perceived chewing ability, satisfaction and OHRQoL. Various fit indices were within acceptable limits. Oral condition and denture quality were related to patients' perception of chewing ability, satisfaction with dentures and OHRQoL in complete denture wearers. A favourable oral condition and denture quality are important for successful complete denture therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Daily biofilm control and oral health: consensus on the epidemiological challenge--Latin American Advisory Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Sigmar de Mello; Gimenez, Xiomara; Montoya, Victoria Criado; Gómez, Mariel; Blanc, Silvia Lopez de; Medina, Marco; Salinas, Elmer; Pedroza, Janeth; Zaldivar-Chiapa, Rosi Maria; Pannuti, Claudio Mendes; Cortelli, José Roberto; Oppermann, Rui Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of dental plaque biofilm has evolved since the nonspecific plaque hypothesis that considered plaque as a nonspecific mass of native microorganisms that, because of lack of oral hygiene, builds up in proportions great enough to overcome the host resistance threshold and affect the tooth structure and tooth supporting tissues. A great diversity of microorganisms-over 700 species-was detected in the oral cavity, and evidence shows that the investigation of specific microorganisms or associations of microorganisms as etiological agents for periodontal diseases and caries is not a simplistic approach. Although clinical evidence shows that oral mechanical hygiene is fundamental to prevent and control caries and periodontal disease, it is important to highlight that optimal control is not achieved by most individuals. Thus the complementary use of chemotherapeutic agents has been investigated as a way to overcome the deficiencies of mechanical oral hygiene habits, insofar as they reduce both plaque formation and gingival inflammation, and represent a valid strategy to change the biofilm and maintain dental and periodontal health. The role of the dental professional is to monitor patients and offer them the best recommendations to preserve oral health throughout their life. With this in mind, chemical control should be indicated as part of daily oral hygiene, together with mechanical procedures, for all individuals who present supragingival and/or subgingival biofilm, taking into account age, physical and/or psychological limitations, allergies, and other factors.

  10. Daily biofilm control and oral health: consensus on the epidemiological challenge - Latin American Advisory Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigmar de Mello Rode

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of dental plaque biofilm has evolved since the nonspecific plaque hypothesis that considered plaque as a nonspecific mass of native microorganisms that, because of lack of oral hygiene, builds up in proportions great enough to overcome the host resistance threshold and affect the tooth structure and tooth supporting tissues. A great diversity of microorganisms-over 700 species-was detected in the oral cavity, and evidence shows that the investigation of specific microorganisms or associations of microorganisms as etiological agents for periodontal diseases and caries is not a simplistic approach. Although clinical evidence shows that oral mechanical hygiene is fundamental to prevent and control caries and periodontal disease, it is important to highlight that optimal control is not achieved by most individuals. Thus the complementary use of chemotherapeutic agents has been investigated as a way to overcome the deficiencies of mechanical oral hygiene habits, insofar as they reduce both plaque formation and gingival inflammation, and represent a valid strategy to change the biofilm and maintain dental and periodontal health. The role of the dental professional is to monitor patients and offer them the best recommendations to preserve oral health throughout their life. With this in mind, chemical control should be indicated as part of daily oral hygiene, together with mechanical procedures, for all individuals who present supragingival and/or subgingival biofilm, taking into account age, physical and/or psychological limitations, allergies, and other factors.

  11. [Removing biofilm from a endoscopic: evaluation of disinfection methods currently used].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Ana Cristina; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa; Schneider, René Peter; Antunes Junior, Manoel; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida

    2012-10-01

    Laboratory experimental study that compared the effectiveness of five methods of disinfection for the removal of biofilm in gastrointestinal endoscopes. New transparent tubes of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon®) were used as specimens to simulate the channels of flexible endoscopes. After pre-cleaning the tubes were intentionally contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and subjected to disinfection methods. As a result, none removed 100% of these biofilms. What else physically removed biofilm was 2% glutaraldehyde in an automatic processor, probably justified by the double clean, since the equipment has this phase at the beginning of your cycle. The method less effective for removing plaque and other debris was the acidic electrolytic water. These results suggest that the cleaning is most striking in the removal of biofilms that disinfection of consecutive since glutaraldehyde disinfectant by machine is more efficient, it is a fastener organic waste.

  12. Current status of vulnerable plaque detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharif, Faisal

    2012-02-01

    Critical coronary stenoses have been shown to contribute to only a minority of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and sudden cardiac death. Autopsy studies have identified a subgroup of high-risk patients with disrupted vulnerable plaque and modest stenosis. Consequently, a clinical need exists to develop methods to identify these plaques prospectively before disruption and clinical expression of disease. Recent advances in invasive and noninvasive imaging techniques have shown the potential to identify these high-risk plaques. The anatomical characteristics of the vulnerable plaque such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid pool can be identified with angioscopy, high frequency intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, and optical coherence tomography. Efforts have also been made to recognize active inflammation in high-risk plaques using intravascular thermography. Plaque chemical composition by measuring electromagnetic radiation using spectroscopy is also an emerging technology to detect vulnerable plaques. Noninvasive imaging with MRI, CT, and PET also holds the potential to differentiate between low and high-risk plaques. However, at present none of these imaging modalities are able to detect vulnerable plaque neither has been shown to definitively predict outcome. Nevertheless in contrast, there has been a parallel development in the physiological assessment of advanced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Thus recent trials using fractional flow reserve in patients with modest non flow-limiting stenoses have shown that deferral of PCI with optimal medical therapy in these patients is superior to coronary intervention. Further trials are needed to provide more information regarding the natural history of high-risk but non flow-limiting plaque to establish patient-specific targeted therapy and to refine plaque stabilizing strategies in the future.

  13. Inhibition of biofilm formation and antibacterial properties of a silver nano-coating on human dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy; Handy, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    The survival of pathogenic bacteria in the oral cavity depends on their successful adhesion to dental surfaces and their ability to develop into biofilms, known as dental plaque. Bacteria from the dental plaque are responsible for the development of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, stomatitis and peri-implantitis. Certain metal nanoparticles have been suggested for infection control and the management of the oral biofilm. Here, it is shown that application of a silver nano-coating directly on dentine can successfully prevent the biofilm formation on dentine surfaces as well as inhibit bacterial growth in the surrounding media. This silver nano-coating was found to be stable (>98.8%) and to maintain its integrity in biological fluids. Its antibacterial activity was compared to silver nitrate and the widely used clinical antiseptic, chlorhexidine. The bacterial growth and cell viability were quantitatively assessed by measuring the turbidity, proportion of live and dead cells and lactate production. All three bioassays showed that silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate dentine coatings were equally highly bactericidal (>99.5%), while inhibiting bacterial adhesion. However, the latter caused significant dentine discolouration (ΔE* = 50.3). The chlorhexidine coating showed no antibacterial effect. Thus, silver nanoparticles may be a viable alternative to both chlorhexidine and silver nitrate, protecting from dental plaque and secondary caries when applied as a dentine coating, while they may provide the platform for creating anti-biofilm surfaces in medical devices and other biomedical applications.

  14. Multimodality Imaging of the Effects of a Novel Dentifrice on Oral Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdaharian, Janet; Dadkhah, Mohammad; Sabokpey, Sara; Biren-Fetz, John; Chung, Na Eun; Wink, Cherie; Wilder-Smith, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Objective Oral biofilm formation and progression on the surface of the tooth can lead to advanced oral disease such as gingivitis. The purpose of this randomized, controlled, double-blinded study was to evaluate the effects of a novel dental gel on oral plaque biofilm using multimodal imaging techniques. Materials and Methods Twenty-five subjects with moderate gingival inflammation (Löe and Silness Gingival Index ≥ 2) and pocket depths <4 were randomly assigned to brush twice daily for 21 days with the test or the control dental gel. In vivo multimodality in situ imaging was performed over a 3-week period using in vivo Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Non-Linear Optical microscopy (NLOM). Plaque levels, gingival inflammation and gingival bleeding were also charted on days 0, 7, 14, and 21 using standard clinical indices. Results After 3 weeks, OCT and NLOM images showed a macroscopic break-up of the plaque layer and smaller, fragmented residual deposits in the test group with no apparent changes in the pellicle. Biofilm was also reduced in the control group, but to a lesser degree with regard to thickness, continuity and surface area. Paralleling these imaging results, clinical indices were significantly improved in both groups (P <0.05) and significantly lower in the test group (P <0.05). Conclusion Both dental gels reduced oral biofilm with the test gel showing greater efficacy (P <0.05) as determined by clinical and imaging parameters. PMID:24916419

  15. In vitro comparison of the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kore, Doris R; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Hall, Dan B; Bahjri, Khaled

    2013-12-01

    With several denture adhesives available, it is important for dentists to make appropriate patient recommendations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture base materials at time intervals of up to 24 hours. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, Effergrip, and SeaBond denture adhesives were tested with 3 denture base materials: 2 heat-polymerized (Lucitone 199 and SR Ivocap) and 1 visible-light-polymerized (shade-stable Eclipse). Artificial saliva with mucin was used as a control. Tensile bond strength was tested in accordance with American Dental Association specifications at 5 minutes, 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after applying the adhesive. Maximum forces before failure were recorded in megapascals (MPa), and the data were subjected to a 2-way analysis of variance (α=.05). All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond had higher tensile bond strength values than Effergrip. All adhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength at 5 minutes and the least at 24 hours. The 3 denture bases produced significantly different results with each adhesive (Padhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength, followed by Ivocap and Eclipse. All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control, and all 4 adhesives were strongest at the 5-minute interval. On all 3 types of denture bases, Effergrip produced significantly lower tensile bond strength, and Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond produced significantly higher tensile bond strength. At 24 hours, the adhesive-base combinations with the highest tensile bond strength were Fixodent on Lucitone 199, Fixodent on Eclipse, Fixodent on Ivocap, and Super Poligrip on Ivocap. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Alveolar ridge rehabilitation to increase full denture retention and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mefina Kuntjoro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrophic mandibular alveolar ridge generally complicates prostetic restoration expecially full denture. Low residual alveolar ridge and basal seat can cause unstable denture, permanent ulcer, pain, neuralgia, and mastication difficulty. Pre-proshetic surgery is needed to improve denture retention and stability. Augmentation is a major surgery to increase vertical height of the atrophic mandible while vestibuloplasty is aimed to increase the denture bearing area. Purpose: The augmentation and vestibuloplasty was aimed to provide stability and retentive denture atrophic mandibular alveolar ridge. Case: A 65 years old woman patient complained about uncomfortable denture. Clinical evaluate showed flat ridge in the anterior mandible, flabby tissue and candidiasis, while residual ridge height was classified into class IV. Case management: Augmentation using autograph was conducted as the mandible vertical height is less than 15 mm. Autograph was used to achieve better bone quantity and quality. Separated alveolar ridge was conducted from left to right canine region and was elevated 0.5 mm from the previous position to get new ridge in the anterior region. The separated alveolar ridge was fixated by using T-plate and ligature wire. Three months after augmentation fixation appliances was removed vestibuloplasty was performed to increase denture bearing area that can make a stable and retentive denture. Conclusion: Augmentation and vestibuloplasty can improve flat ridge to become prominent.Latar belakang: Ridge mandibula yang atrofi pada umumnya mempersulit pembuatan restorasi prostetik terutama gigi tiruan lengkap (GTL. Residual alveolar ridge dan basal seat yang rendah menyebabkan gigi tiruan menjadi tidak stabil, menimbulkan ulser permanen, nyeri, neuralgia, dan kesulitan mengunyah. Tujuan: Augmentasi dan vestibuloplasti pada ridge mandibula yang atrofi dilakukan untuk menciptakan gigi tiruan yang stabil dan retentive. Kasus: Pasien wanita

  17. Biomechanics and inflammation in atherosclerotic plaque erosion and plaque rupture: implications for cardiovascular events in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian C Campbell

    Full Text Available Although plaque erosion causes approximately 40% of all coronary thrombi and disproportionally affects women more than men, its mechanism is not well understood. The role of tissue mechanics in plaque rupture and regulation of mechanosensitive inflammatory proteins is well established, but their role in plaque erosion is unknown. Given obvious differences in morphology between plaque erosion and rupture, we hypothesized that inflammation in general as well as the association between local mechanical strain and inflammation known to exist in plaque rupture may not occur in plaque erosion. Therefore, our objective was to determine if similar mechanisms underlie plaque rupture and plaque erosion.We studied a total of 74 human coronary plaque specimens obtained at autopsy. Using lesion-specific computer modeling of solid mechanics, we calculated the stress and strain distribution for each plaque and determined if there were any relationships with markers of inflammation. Consistent with previous studies, inflammatory markers were positively associated with increasing strain in specimens with rupture and thin-cap fibroatheromas. Conversely, overall staining for inflammatory markers and apoptosis were significantly lower in erosion, and there was no relationship with mechanical strain. Samples with plaque erosion most closely resembled those with the stable phenotype of thick-cap fibroatheromas.In contrast to classic plaque rupture, plaque erosion was not associated with markers of inflammation and mechanical strain. These data suggest that plaque erosion is a distinct pathophysiological process with a different etiology and therefore raises the possibility that a different therapeutic approach may be required to prevent plaque erosion.

  18. Biofilm Cohesive Strength as a Basis for Biofilm Recalcitrance: Are Bacterial Biofilms Overdesigned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Srijan; Stewart, Philip S; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are highly resistant to common antibacterial treatments, and several physiological explanations have been offered to explain the recalcitrant nature of bacterial biofilms. Herein, a biophysical aspect of biofilm recalcitrance is being reported on. While engineering structures are often overdesigned with a factor of safety (FOS) usually under 10, experimental measurements of biofilm cohesive strength suggest that the FOS is on the order of thousands. In other words, bacterial biofilms appear to be designed to withstand extreme forces rather than typical or average loads. In scenarios requiring the removal or control of unwanted biofilms, this emphasizes the importance of considering strategies for structurally weakening the biofilms in conjunction with bacterial inactivation.

  19. Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) evaluation of crystal and plaque formation associated with biocorrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, S L; Ross, T J; Barton, L L

    1993-08-01

    The biofilm attributed to Desulfovibrio vulgaris growing in the presence of ferrous metals was examined with an environmental scanning electron microscope. This novel microscope produced images of iron sulfide colloids and other iron containing structures that had not been reported previously. A plaque composed of iron sulfide enveloped the surface of the corroding metal while crystals containing magnesium, iron, sulfur, and phosphorus were present in the culture where corrosion was in progress. A structure resembling the tubercule found in aerobic corrosion was observed on stainless steel undergoing biocorrosion and the elements present in this structure included sulfur, iron, chloride, calcium, potassium, and chromium.

  20. A randomised controlled trial of complete denture impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T P; Craddock, H L; Gray, J C; Pavitt, S H; Hulme, C; Godfrey, M; Fernandez, C; Navarro-Coy, N; Dillon, S; Wright, J; Brown, S; Dukanovic, G; Brunton, P A

    2014-08-01

    There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7-67.3%, pUnilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. "Denture marking" as an aid to forensic identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Jayashree; Kumar, C Dhinesh; Simon, Paul

    2012-09-01

    "Identification through forensic science is an art of giving the corpse a name A real life detective work that would put even Sherlock Homes to shame." Forensic dentistry deals with proper handling and examination of dental evidence and proper evaluation and presentation of dental findings in interest of justice. Denture marking or labeling is not a new concept in either Prosthetic or Forensic dentistry and its routine practice has been urged by Forensic dentists internationally for many years. Denture marking is accepted as a means of identifying dentures and persons in geriatric institutions or post mortem during war, crimes, and civil unrest, natural and mass disasters. Prosthodontists are playing very important role in forensic dentistry as they are concerned with fabrication of various prostheses which can serve as an important tool for identification. Identification is essential requirement of any medico-legal investigation because a wrong identity may pose a problem in delivering justice. The main objective of this article is to discuss the various methods of denture marking and to emphasize the importance of denture marking for person identification in medico legal investigations.

  2. Study protocol for a multi-center, randomized controlled trial to develop Japanese denture adhesive guidelines for patients with complete dentures: the Denture Adhesive Guideline trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Gunji, Atsuko; Kondo, Hisatomo; Nomura, Taro; Murakami, Tomohiko; Tsuboi, Akito; Hong, Guang; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Sato, Yusuke; Ohwada, Gaku; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Hoshi, Noriyuki; Saita, Makiko; Yoneyama, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yohei; Morokuma, Masakazu; Okazaki, Joji; Maeda, Takeshi; Nakai, Kenichiro; Ichikawa, Tetsuo; Nagao, Kan; Fujimoto, Keiko; Murata, Hiroshi; Kurogi, Tadafumi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Nishi, Yasuhiro; Murakami, Mamoru; Hosoi, Toshio; Hamada, Taizo

    2016-10-18

    Denture adhesives, characterized as medical products in 1935 by the American Dental Association, have been considered useful adjuncts for improving denture retention and stability. However, many dentists in Japan are hesitant to acknowledge denture adhesives in daily practice because of the stereotype that dentures should be inherently stable, without the aid of adhesives. The aim of this study is to verify the efficacy of denture adhesives to establish guidelines for Japanese users. The null hypothesis is that the application of denture adhesives, including the cream and powder types, or a control (isotonic sodium chloride solution) would not produce different outcomes nor would they differentially improve the set outcomes between baseline and day 4 post-application. This ten-center, randomized controlled trial with parallel groups is ongoing. Three hundred edentulous patients with complete dentures will be allocated to three groups (cream-type adhesive, powder-type adhesive, and control groups). The participants will wear their dentures with the denture adhesive for 4 days, including during eight meals (three breakfasts, two lunches, and three dinners). The baseline measurements and final measurements for the denture adhesives will be performed on the first day and after breakfast on the fourth day. The primary outcome is a general satisfaction rating for the denture. The secondary outcomes are denture satisfaction ratings for various denture functions, occlusal bite force, resistance to dislodgement, masticatory performance, perceived chewing ability, and oral health-related quality of life. Between-subjects comparisons among the three groups and within-subjects comparisons of the pre- and post-intervention measurements will be performed. Furthermore, a multiple regression analysis will be performed. The main analyses will be based on the intention-to-treat principle. A sample size of 100 subjects per group, including an assumed dropout rate of 10 %, will be

  3. Fluoride bioavailability in saliva and plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Different fluoride formulations may have different effects on caries prevention. It was the aim of this clinical study to assess the fluoride content, provided by NaF compared to amine fluoride, in saliva and plaque. Methods Eight trained volunteers brushed their teeth in the morning for 3 minutes with either NaF or amine fluoride, and saliva and 3-day-plaque-regrowth was collected at 5 time intervals during 6 hours after tooth brushing. The amount of collected saliva and plaque was measured, and the fluoride content was analysed using a fluoride sensitive electrode. All subjects repeated all study cycles 5 times, and 3 cycles per subject underwent statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results Immediately after brushing the fluoride concentration in saliva increased rapidly and dropped to the baseline level after 360 minutes. No difference was found between NaF and amine fluoride. All plaque fluoride levels were elevated after 30 minutes until 120 minutes after tooth brushing, and decreasing after 360 minutes to baseline. According to the highly individual profile of fluoride in saliva and plaque, both levels of bioavailability correlated for the first 30 minutes, and the fluoride content of saliva and plaque was back to baseline after 6 hours. Conclusions Fluoride levels in saliva and plaque are interindividually highly variable. However, no significant difference in bioavailability between NaF and amine fluoride, in saliva, or in plaque was found. PMID:22230722

  4. PLAQUE ASSAY OF NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sardjono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Newcastle disease virus (NDV was isolated from a 3 months-old indigenous chicken (buras or kampung chicken which showed clinical signs of Newcastle disease (ND. For viral isolation a small part of the spleen and lung were inoculated into 10 days-old embryonated chicken eggs. The physical characteristics of the isolate (A/120 were studied. The hemagglutination of chicken red blood cell showed slow elution, thermostability of hemagglutinin at 56°C was 120 minutes. The vims was able to agglutinate horse erythrocytes but not those of sheep. The biological characteristics on mean death time (MDT of embryonated chicken egg and plaque morphology on chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF primary cell cultures were studied. The MDT was 56 hours, the isolate was velogenic NDV. There were three different plaque morphologies on CEF : 2 mm clear plaques, 1 mm clear plaques, and minute clear plaques which were visible only with microscopic examination.

  5. Comparative Study of Acceptance and Adaptation to New Complete Dentures, Using Two Construction Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakidis, Savvas N; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki; Sofou, Afrodite; Pissiotis, Argirios L

    2016-10-01

    To validate patients' acceptance and adaptation to new complete dentures, fabricated using two construction protocols. Evaluation was achieved by means of two psychometric questionnaires and registration of total number of sore spots. Twenty complete denture wearers, who sought replacement dentures because of complaints (material degradation or unsatisfactory repaired fracture) associated with them, were selected according to specific inclusion criteria. The denture construction protocols were randomly assigned to the study participants. Ten participants received complete dentures using a duplication construction protocol with a bilateral balanced occlusal (BBO) scheme (duplicate complete denture group); ten participants received complete dentures using a traditional construction protocol with BBO (traditional complete denture group). All study participants completed the Complete Denture Satisfaction and the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) questionnaires before they received the new complete dentures (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months post-treatment. At the initial adaptation/adjustment visits, the location and number of sore spots were identified. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate differences between groups and within each group pre- and post-treatment. Denture satisfaction and oral health related quality of life scores were independent of the complete denture construction protocol. Within the traditional complete denture group there was a statistically significant increase in denture satisfaction and equivalent decrease (improvement) in OHIP-20 scores between pre- and post-treatment (both at 3-month and 6-month visits). This finding was consistent for OHIP-20 scores within the duplicate complete denture group, but not for denture satisfaction, which was not statistically significant. The total number of recorded sore spots was approximately double for the traditional complete denture group compared to the duplicate complete denture group

  6. Extensive fixed partial dentures on mandibular canine teeth: a 5-year recall study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, B R; Yontchev, E; Carlsson, G E

    1989-01-01

    Twelve patients were followed for 5 years after treatment with a 12-unit cantilever fixed partial denture on the mandibular canines opposed by a complete maxillary denture. Two fixed dentures had to be removed, one because of an abutment tooth root-fracture and one because of rapid marginal bone loss in a terminal stage of leukemia. Caries and periodontal lesions were rare, but other complications, principally related to endodontics, occurred. All complications were amenable to standard treatment procedures. Extensive mandibular cantilever fixed partial dentures may be used in the rehabilitation of patients with a very reduced dentition and a history of difficulties in adapting to removable dentures.

  7. Evaluation of the effect of denture adhesives on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mahmoud; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of four commercially available denture adhesives (DAs) on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base materials. Materials and Methods: Fifty specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate, and another fifty specimens of light-cured urethane dimethacrylate were divided into five groups (n = 10), each was immersed in four prepared DAs (Corega Super Cream, Corega Ultra Powder, Olivafix Cream, Protefix Cream) as well as distilled water (control group). The mean surface roughness (Ra) of the polished and unpolished surfaces of the specimens was recorded using profilometer device. T-test for paired observation was used to indicate any changes in surface roughness between the baseline and after 30 days of immersion in the DA. Results: Almost all the tested DAs had no significant effect on the roughness of polished and unpolished surfaces of both denture base materials. The Corega super cream DA produced significant increase in the roughness of the polished surfaces of both types of acrylic specimens (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The majority of the investigated DAs appears not to affect the surface roughness of denture base materials. Only Corega super cream DA produced detectable increase in the roughness of polished surfaces of denture base specimens. PMID:27403047

  8. Haemodynamical stress in mouse aortic arch with atherosclerotic plaques: Preliminary study of plaque progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Assemat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic plaques develop at particular sites in the arterial tree, and this regional localisation depends largely on haemodynamic parameters (such as wall shear stress; WSS as described in the literature. Plaque rupture can result in heart attack or stroke and hence understanding the development and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques is critically important. The purpose of this study is to characterise the haemodynamics of blood flow in the mouse aortic arch using numerical modelling. The geometries are digitalised from synchrotron imaging and realistic pulsatile blood flow is considered under rigid wall assumptions. Two cases are considered; arteries with and without plaque. Mice that are fed under fat diet present plaques in the aortic arch whose size is dependent on the number of weeks under the diet. The plaque distribution in the region is however relatively constant through the different samples. This result underlines the influence of the geometry and consequently of the wall shear stresses for plaque formation with plaques growing in region of relative low shear stresses. A discussion of the flow field in real geometry in the presence and absence of plaques is conducted. The presence of plaques was shown to alter the blood flow and hence WSS distribution, with regions of localised high WSS, mainly on the wall of the brachiocephalic artery where luminal narrowing is most pronounced. In addition, arch plaques are shown to induce recirculation in the blood flow, a phenomenon with potential influence on the progression of the plaques. The oscillatory shear index and the relative residence time have been calculated on the geometry with plaques to show the presence of this recirculation in the arch, an approach that may be useful for future studies on plaque progression.

  9. Enhancing retention of partial dentures using elastomeric retention rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakkirala Revathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents an alternative method for the retention of partial dentures that relies on the engagement of tooth undercuts by a lining material. The lab procedures are also presented. A new maxillary and mandibular acrylic partial dentures were fabricated using elastomeric retention technique for a partially dentate patient. A partially dentate man reported difficulty in retaining his upper removable partial denture (RPD. The maxillary RPD was designed utilizing elastomeric retention technique. During follow-up, it was necessary to replace the retention rings due to wear. The replacement of the retention rings, in this case, was done through a chairside reline technique. Elastomeric retention technique provides exceptionally good retention can be indicated to stabilize, cushion, splint periodontally involved teeth, no enough undercut for clasps, eliminate extractions, single or isolated teeth.

  10. Prefabricated light-polymerizing plastic pattern for partial denture framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Takaichi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to report an application of a prefabricated light-polymerizing plastic pattern to construction of removable partial denture framework without the use of a refractory cast. A plastic pattern for the lingual bar was adapted on the master cast of a mandibular Kennedy class I partially edentulous patient. The pattern was polymerized in a light chamber. Cobalt-chromium wires were employed to minimize the potential distortion of the plastic framework. The framework was carefully removed from the master cast and invested with phosphate-bonded investment for the subsequent casting procedures. A retentive clasp was constructed using 19-gauge wrought wire and was welded to the framework by means of laser welding machine. An excellent fit of the framework in the patient′s mouth was observed in the try-in and the insertion of the denture. The result suggests that this method minimizes laboratory cost and time for partial denture construction.

  11. POST INSERTION PROBLEMS AND THEIR MANAGEMENT IN COM PLETE DENTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : Edentulism is considered a poor health outcome and may compromise the quality of life. Although the number of adult losing their natural teeth is diminishing, there are still large numbers of edentulous adults in the population. Man y patients experience difficulties in wearing or using dentures. In some cases they may n ot be prepared to accept the limited efficiency of dentures when compared to natural teet h they replace. Patient satisfaction is critical determinant in the success or failure of c omplete denture therapy. The prosthodontist needs a thorough knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pa thology and psychology to treat these problems. This article is intended to assist practiti oners in the management of those problems that in our experience occur most frequently

  12. Different types of antagonists modify the outcome of complete denture renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteretche, Marie Violaine; Frot, Amélie; Woda, Alain; Pereira, Bruno; Hennequin, Martine

    2015-01-01

    The effect of renewing removable dentures on masticatory function was evaluated according to the occlusion offered by different types of mandibular arches. Twenty-eight patients with complete maxillary dentures were subdivided into three groups in terms of mandibular dentition type: dentate, partial denture, and complete denture. The participants were observed before and 8 weeks after maxillary denture renewal. The mandibular denture was also renewed in the partial and complete denture groups. The participants masticated carrots, peanuts, and three model foods of different hardnesses. The particle size distribution of the boluses obtained from natural foods was characterized by the median particle size (d50) in relation to the masticatory normative indicator (MNI). Chewing time (CT), number of chewing cycles (CC), and chewing frequency (CF) were video recorded. A self-assessment questionnaire for oral health-related quality of life (Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index [GOHAI]) was used. Statistical analyses were carried out with a mixed model. Renewal of the dentures decreased d50 (P Denture renewal improves masticatory function. The complete denture group benefited least from renewal; the dentate group benefited most. This study confirmed the usefulness of denture renewal for improving functions and oral health- related quality of life.

  13. Biomechanical factors related to occlusal load transfer in removable complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żmudzki, Jarosław; Chladek, Grzegorz; Kasperski, Jacek

    2015-08-01

    Owing to economic conditions, removable dentures remain popular despite the discomfort and reduced chewing efficiency experienced by most denture wearers. However, there is little evidence to confirm that the level of mucosal load exceeds the pressure pain threshold. This discrepancy stimulated us to review the current state of knowledge on the biomechanics of mastication with complete removable dentures. The loading beneath dentures was analyzed in the context of denture foundation characteristics, salivary lubrication, occlusal forces, and the biomechanics of mastication. The analysis revealed that the interpretation of data collected in vivo is hindered due to the simultaneous overlapping effects of many variables. In turn, problems with determining the pressure beneath a denture and analyzing frictional processes constitute principal limitations of in vitro model studies. Predefined conditions of finite element method simulations should include the effects of oblique mastication forces, simultaneous detachment and sliding of the denture on its foundation, and the stabilizing role of balancing contacts. This review establishes that previous investigations may have failed because of their unsubstantiated assumption that, in a well-working balanced occlusion, force is only exerted perpendicular to the occlusal plane, allowing the denture to sit firmly on its foundation. Recent improvements in the simulation of realistic biomechanical denture behavior raise the possibility of assessing the effects of denture design on the pressures and slides beneath the denture.

  14. The oral health-related quality of life in edentulous patients treated with conventional complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaker, Abdulaziz M

    2013-03-01

    To compare the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) between patients with both maxillary and mandibular complete denture and those with either the maxillary or the mandibular complete denture. Satisfaction of denture wearers can be estimated using the OHRQoL questionnaires like the OHIP-EDENT and the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI). Two questionnaires were used to compare the OHRQoL between edentulous patients who had conventional removable complete denture on both jaws and those who had on either one of the jaws. The age of the participants ranged from 42 to 75 years, with the mean age of 58 ± 8.12 years. The mean OHIP-EDENT scores were significantly high among those who wore conventional dentures in both jaws (54.12 ± 5.21), compared with the participants who only had denture either on upper or lower jaw (46.52 ± 7.35). It was noticed that the mean GOHAI score was significantly lower (p denture on both upper and lower jaw (28.25 ± 3.67), as compared to those who had conventional denture only on one arch (35.12 ± 2.11). Patients with complete dentures in both jaw (Group I) were less satisfied than patients with single complete denture (Group II). The result obtained in this study shows dissatisfaction with conventional dentures among edentulous patients. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Clinical Observation of Oral Self-maintenance after Implant Denture Repair in Periodontitis Patients%牙周炎患者种植义齿修复后口腔自我维护的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张飞

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of dental plaque disclosing agent on oral maintenance in patients with peri-odontitis after implant denture repair. Methods 62 patients underwent implant denture repair with 78 implants in total in the hospital from May 2013 to February 2015 were selected as the subjects and randomly divided into observation group and control group, with 31 patients and 39 implants in each group. For the oral self-maintenance, both groups were given the general maintenance, in addition, the observation group were given dental plaque disclosing agent. And the periodontal parameters and incidence of peri-implant mucositis of the two groups were compared. Results Two weeks after the implant denture repair, the difference in PLI, SBI, PD and dental plaque indexes between the two groups had no statistical signifi-cance(P>0.05). Three months after the repair, these indexes for patients in the observation group were better than those in the control group(P0.05);修复3个月后所有患者观察组PLI、SBI、PD和菌斑指数均优于对照组(P<0.05);种植修复后1年内,观察组种植体周围粘膜炎平均发生率为45.6%,对照组为59.4%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论系统的口腔自我维护能够显著降低牙周炎患者种植体周围黏膜炎的发生率,使用菌斑显示剂让患者对菌斑有良好的自我控制效果显著。

  16. Chlorhexidine with or without alcohol against biofilm formation: efficacy, adverse events and taste preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Gabriela Otero Dos; Milanesi, Fernanda Carpes; Greggianin, Bruna Frizon; Fernandes, Marilene Issa; Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Weidlich, Patricia

    2017-05-04

    In recent years, different chlorhexidine formulations have been tested, including an alcohol-free alternative, but the effect of this solution on early biofilm formation is not clear. A crossover, randomized, double-blind clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of two chlorhexidine solutions against supra- and subgingival biofilm formation (NCT#02656251). Thirty-five participants were randomized and asked to rinse twice daily with 15 ml of an alcohol-containing 0.12% chlorhexidine solution, an alcohol-free 0.12% chlorhexidine solution, or placebo. The study was conducted in three experimental periods of 4 days each, with a 10-day washout between the periods. All the experimental periods followed the same protocol, except that the solutions were switched. Biofilm distribution was evaluated every 24 hours by the Plaque-Free Zone Index, during 96 hours. Adverse events were self-reported and sensory evaluation was performed using a hedonic scale. Compared to the placebo, the chlorhexidine solutions resulted in a significantly higher number of surfaces free of plaque over 96 hours (p < 0.01), and were able to prevent subgingival biofilm formation (p < 0.01). The alcohol-free chlorhexidine solution was associated with a lower incidence of adverse events, compared with alcohol-containing chlorhexidine (p < 0.05); it also received better sensory evaluation and acceptance by trial participants, compared with the alcohol-containing chlorhexidine (p = 0.007), and had a similar inhibitory effect on the formation of supra- and subgingival biofilms.

  17. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation, extracellular polysaccharide production, and virulence by an oxazole derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lulu; Ren, Zhi; Zhou, Xuedong; Zeng, Jumei; Zou, Jing; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries, a biofilm-related oral disease, is a result of disruption of the microbial ecological balance in the oral environment. Streptococcus mutans, which is one of the primary cariogenic bacteria, produces glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) that synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs). The EPSs, especially water-insoluble glucans, contribute to the formation of dental plaque, biofilm stability, and structural integrity, by allowing bacteria to adhere to tooth surfaces and supplying the bacteria with protection against noxious stimuli and other environmental attacks. The identification of novel alternatives that selectively inhibit cariogenic organisms without suppressing oral microbial residents is required. The goal of the current study is to investigate the influence of an oxazole derivative on S. mutans biofilm formation and the development of dental caries in rats, given that oxazole and its derivatives often exhibit extensive and pharmacologically important biological activities. Our data shows that one particular oxazole derivative, named 5H6, inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms and prevented synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides by antagonizing Gtfs in vitro, without affecting the growth of the bacteria. In addition, topical applications with the inhibitor resulted in diminished incidence and severity of both smooth and sulcal surface caries in vivo with a lower percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Our results showed that this oxazole derivative has the capacity to inhibit biofilm formation and cariogenicity of S. mutans.

  18. The influence of mandibular ridge anatomy on treatment outcome with conventional complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jaiane A M; de Resende, Camila M B M; Lopes, Ana L C; Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Carreiro, Adriana da F P

    2014-01-01

    Since prognostic indicators are likely to take on increasing importance as a diagnostic tool for selection of patients for implant provision, this study investigated the influence of the shape and resiliency of the mandibular alveolar ridge on the retention and stability of conventional complete dentures. Ninety- three edentulous patients wearing both maxillary and mandibular conventional complete dentures composed the sample. Data were collected regarding shape and resiliencyof the mandibular residual ridge. Dentures were assessed for retention and stability using an objective and reproducible tool.The associations between the clinical characteristics of the mandibular alveolar ridge and denture retention and stability were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact tests (a = 0.05). A significant association between ridge shape and denture stability (p denture retention (p complete dentures.

  19. Digitally planned and fabricated mandibular fixed complete dentures. Part 2. Prosthodontic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Goodacre, Charles J; Lozada, Jaime L; Garbacea, Antoanela

    2015-01-01

    Part 1 of this patient report described a prosthetically driven protocol that used computer-aided engineering for the fabrication of a mandibular conversion denture and maxillary provisional complete denture using the AvaDent Digital Denture system. The report demonstrated that this system combined with NobelClinician implant-planning software can be used to efficiently convert a digital denture into an immediately loaded provisional implant-supported fixed complete denture (hybrid prosthesis). Part 2 of the patient report describes the technique and steps involved in the fabrication of a digitally planned and fabricated mandibular fixed complete denture with incorporated titanium milled bar opposed by a definitive computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture-milled maxillary complete denture.

  20. Phonetics and tongue position to improve mandibular denture retention: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, David M; Garcia, Lily T

    2007-11-01

    The fabrication, use, and wear instructions for complete dentures are often the factors determining success. The dentist must help guide the mental attitude of the skeptical patient to foster acceptance and success of complete dentures. A "feeling of looseness" may be a condition experienced while patients learn to wear a new mandibular complete denture. Some patients may not understand the reasons given by dentists for the lack of retention of a new mandibular denture. This type of patient requires more explanation, more advice, and more instruction. A phonetic training technique, to demonstrate to the patient how to retain and stabilize the mandibular denture, may be needed for some denture patients. This article reports the clinical use of phonetics and its effect on tongue position to improve the retention and stability of a mandibular complete denture.

  1. Ceramic dentures manufactured with ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werelius, Kristian; Weigl, Paul

    2004-06-01

    Conventional manufacturing of individual ceramic dental prosthesis implies a handmade metallic framework, which is then veneered with ceramic layers. In order to manufacture all-ceramic dental prosthesis a CAD/CAM system is necessary due to the three dimensional shaping of high strength ceramics. Most CAD/CAM systems presently grind blocks of ceramic after the construction process in order to create the prosthesis. Using high-strength ceramics, such as Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIP)-zirconia, this is limited to copings. Anatomically shaped fixed dentures have a sculptured surface with small details, which can't be created by existing grinding tools. This procedure is also time consuming and subject to significant loss in mechanical strength and thus reduced survival rate once inserted. Ultra-short laser pulses offer a possibility in machining highly complex sculptured surfaces out of high-strength ceramic with negligible damage to the surface and bulk of the ceramic. In order to determine efficiency, quality and damage, several laser ablation parameters such as pulse duration, pulse energy and ablation strategies were studied. The maximum ablation rate was found using 400 fs at high pulse energies. High pulse energies such as 200μJ were used with low damage in mechanical strength compared to grinding. Due to the limitation of available laser systems in pulse repetition rates and power, the use of special ablation strategies provide a possibility to manufacture fully ceramic dental prosthesis efficiently.

  2. Complete denture analyzed by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Todea, Carmen; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-02-01

    The complete dentures are currently made using different technologies. In order to avoid deficiencies of the prostheses made using the classical technique, several alternative systems and procedures were imagined, directly related to the material used and also to the manufacturing technology. Thus, at the present time, there are several injecting systems and technologies on the market, that use chemoplastic materials, which are heat cured (90-100°C), in dry or wet environment, or cold cured (below 60°C). There are also technologies that plasticize a hard cured material by thermoplastic processing (without any chemical changes) and then inject it into a mold. The purpose of this study was to analyze the existence of possible defects in several dental prostheses using a non invasive method, before their insertion in the mouth. Different dental prostheses, fabricated from various materials were investigated using en-face optical coherence tomography. In order to discover the defects, the scanning was made in three planes, obtaining images at different depths, from 0,01 μm to 2 mm. In several of the investigated prostheses we found defects which may cause their fracture. These defects are totally included in the prostheses material and can not be vizualised with other imagistic methods. In conclusion, en-face OCT is an important investigative tool for the dental practice.

  3. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J.C.; Pavitt, S.H.; Hulme, C.; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C.; Navarro-Coy, N.; Dillon, S.; Wright, J.; Brown, S.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Results Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7–67.3%, p silicone impressions were preferred by patients. Clinical significance Given the strength of the clinical findings within this paper, dentists should consider choosing silicone rather than alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 01528038.

 This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. PMID:24995473

  4. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  5. Biofilm in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpaul, Kumal

    2015-03-01

    A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial.

  6. Interactions in multispecies biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Ren, Dawei; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The recent focus on complex bacterial communities has led to the recognition of interactions across species boundaries. This is particularly pronounced in multispecies biofilms, where synergistic interactions impact the bacterial distribution and overall biomass produced. Importantly, in a number...

  7. The Effect of a Silver Nanoparticle Polysaccharide System on Streptococcal and Saliva-Derived Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigina Cellini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we studied the antimicrobial properties of a nanocomposite system based on a lactose-substituted chitosan and silver nanoparticles: Chitlac-nAg. Twofold serial dilutions of the colloidal Chitlac-nAg solution were both tested on Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Streptococcus oralis planktonic phase and biofilm growth mode as well as on saliva samples. The minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of Chitlac-nAg were evaluated together with its effect on sessile cell viability, as well as both on biofilm formation and on preformed biofilm. In respect to the planktonic bacteria, Chitlac-nAg showed an inhibitory/bactericidal effect against all streptococcal strains at 0.1% (v/v, except for S. mitis ATCC 6249 that was inhibited at one step less. On preformed biofilm, Chitlac-nAg at a value of 0.2%, was able to inhibit the bacterial growth on the supernatant phase as well as on the mature biofilm. For S. mitis ATCC 6249, the biofilm inhibitory concentration of Chitlac-nAg was 0.1%. At sub-inhibitory concentrations, the Streptococcal strains adhesion capability on a polystyrene surface showed a general reduction following a concentration-dependent-way; a similar effect was obtained for the metabolic biofilm activity. From these results, Chitlac-nAg seems to be a promising antibacterial and antibiofilm agent able to hinder plaque formation.

  8. Levorotatory carbohydrates and xylitol subdue Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei C; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Ottobelli, Marco; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Dietary carbohydrates and polyols affect the microbial colonization of oral surfaces by modulating adhesion and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a select group of l-carbohydrates and polyols on either Streptococcus mutans or Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation in vitro. S. mutans or C. albicans suspensions were inoculated on polystyrene substrata in the presence of Tryptic soy broth containing 5% of the following compounds: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-glucose, l-mannose, d- and l-glucose (raceme), d- and l-mannose (raceme), l-glucose and l-mannose, sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Microbial adhesion (2 h) and biofilm formation (24 h) were evaluated using MTT-test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Xylitol and l-carbohydrates induced the lowest adhesion and biofilm formation in both the tested species, while sorbitol and mannitol did not promote C. albicans biofilm formation. Higher adhesion and biofilm formation was noted in both organisms in the presence of d-carbohydrates relative to their l-carbohydrate counterparts. These results elucidate, hitherto undescribed, interactions of the individually tested strains with l- and d-carbohydrates, and how they impact fungal and bacterial colonization. In translational terms, our data raise the possibility of using l-form of carbohydrates and xylitol for dietary control of oral plaque biofilms.

  9. Oral biofilms: molecular analysis, challenges, and future prospects in dental diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Do T

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Thuy Do,1 Deirdre Devine,1 Philip D Marsh1,21Department of Oral Biology, Leeds Dental Institute, Leeds, 2Health Protection Agency Microbiology Services, Salisbury, UKAbstract: Oral biofilms are functionally and structurally organized polymicrobial communities that are embedded in an extracellular matrix of exopolymers on mucosal and dental surfaces. These biofilms are found naturally in health, and provide benefits to the host. However, this relationship can break down, and disease can occur; disease is associated with a shift in the balance of the species within these biofilms. Simple diagnostic tests have been developed that involve the culture of selected bacteria, eg, those implicated in dental caries, facilitating an assessment of risk of further disease in individual patients. However, oral diseases have a complex etiology, and because only around 50% of oral biofilm can be grown at present, culture-independent molecular-based approaches are being developed that give a more comprehensive assessment of the presence of a range of putative pathogens in samples. The diversity of these biofilms creates challenges in the interpretation of findings, and future work is investigating the ability of novel techniques to detect biological activity and function in oral biofilms, rather than simply providing a catalogue of microbial names.Keywords: oral biofilms, dental plaque, dental diagnostics, molecular techniques, polymerase chain reaction, next-generation sequencing

  10. A quantitative proteomic analysis of biofilm adaptation by the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Roy, Sumita; Noirel, Josselin; Douglas, Ian; Wright, Phillip C; Stafford, Graham P

    2010-09-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative anaerobe that is one of the most prominent inhabitants of the sub-gingival plaque biofilm, which is crucial for causing periodontitis. We have used iTRAQ proteomics to identify and quantify alterations in global protein expression of T. forsythia during growth in a biofilm. This is the first proteomic study concentrating on biofilm growth in this key periodontal pathogen, and this study has identified several changes in protein expression. M