WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental history predictors

  1. History of dental hygiene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  2. Predictors of dental avoidance among Australian adults with different levels of dental anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armfield, J.M.; Ketting, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: It has been proposed that avoidance of dental visits might be the main determinant of poor oral health outcomes in people with high dental anxiety (HDA). This study aimed to determine the predictors of dental avoidance among people with HDA and also whether these predictors differed from

  3. Predictors of dental avoidance among Australian adults with different levels of dental anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armfield, J.M.; Ketting, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: It has been proposed that avoidance of dental visits might be the main determinant of poor oral health outcomes in people with high dental anxiety (HDA). This study aimed to determine the predictors of dental avoidance among people with HDA and also whether these predictors differed from

  4. Surfing for history: dental library and dental school websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinbring, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Library and academic websites are among the most reliable Internet resources available today. Schools of all types use the Internet as a means of sharing information; and libraries provide broader access to their collections via the Web. For researchers seeking specific, authoritative resources on dental history, library and dental school websites are most helpful in identifying print and online resources, in describing manuscript collections, and in presenting a history of the host institution. A library site often can provide sufficient information online to eliminate the need for an in-person visit to the library. On the other hand, a library site may tantalize the historian with enough information on unique collections that a trip can be justified.

  5. History of the Dental Trauma Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Ahrensburg, Søren Steno

    2012-10-01

    The history of the Dental Trauma Guide dates back to 1965, where guidelines were developed for trauma records and treatment of various trauma entities at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Hospital in Copenhagen. In 1972, a unique possibility came up at the Serum Institute in Copenhagen to test various dental trauma procedures in monkeys, which served as kidney donors in the polio vaccine production. Over the years, 40 000 dental trauma patients were treated at the Trauma Centre according to established guidelines, and 4000 of these have been enrolled in long-term follow-up of various trauma entities. This has resulted in 79 clinical studies, and 64 studies in monkeys have examined the effect of various treatment procedures and the aetiology of most healing complications.

  6. History of the Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    The history of the Dental Trauma Guide dates back to 1965, where guidelines were developed for trauma records and treatment of various trauma entities at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Hospital in Copenhagen. In 1972, a unique possibility came up at the Serum...... Institute in Copenhagen to test various dental trauma procedures in monkeys, which served as kidney donors in the polio vaccine production. Over the years, 40 000 dental trauma patients were treated at the Trauma Centre according to established guidelines, and 4000 of these have been enrolled in long......-term follow-up of various trauma entities. This has resulted in 79 clinical studies, and 64 studies in monkeys have examined the effect of various treatment procedures and the aetiology of most healing complications....

  7. Dental assisting experience as a predictor of dental hygiene academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, S; Goral, V

    1995-01-01

    Selecting dental hygiene students who ultimately will be successful in their formal education and board examinations is critical to dental hygiene education and the profession. This study examined prior dental assisting experience as a predictor of performance during dental hygiene education as well as on licensure examinations. The study included all 132 female students who graduated from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Dental Hygiene, from 1989 through 1993. The prior assisting group (n = 43) consisted of students with at least six months of dental assisting experience as reported by the student and/or previous dentist employers. The nonassisting group (n = 89) had no dental assisting experience prior to admission. Student records were used to compile evaluative data for each subject including: prerequisite college science grade-point average (GPA); dental hygiene GPA at the end of the first year of the program; dental hygiene GPA at the end of the second year; combined GPA for the three semesters of clinical dental hygiene coursework; quality points for specific dental hygiene courses including preclinical dental hygiene instrumentation, dental hygiene clinic I, dental anatomy, and dental materials; and National Board Dental Hygiene Examination Scores and performance on the Southern Regional Board Examination. Student's t-test analysis was used to compare the prerequisite college science GPA for the assisting and nonassisting groups. Multivariate analysis was used for all other measures of comparison. Student's t-test analysis revealed no significant differences in terms of the prerequisite college science GPA as a control for this extraneous variable. The results of multivariate analysis demonstrated that the prior dental assisting group had significantly higher cumulative clinic GPAs as well as clinic I quality points. No significant differences were noted in first-year GPA, cumulative program GPA, dental materials, preclinical

  8. Predictors of poor dental arch relationship in young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yuh-Jia; Liao, Yu-Fang; Shetty, Akshai

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional outcome study using retrospective data capture of treatment histories was to examine the characteristics of young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate who had poor dental arch relationship (i.e., Goslon 5). The study sample comprised 120 children born with nonsyndromic complete unilateral cleft lip and palate between 1995 and 2003, and were aged between 5.0 and 7.0 years (mean age, 5.1 years) at the time of data collection. The dental arch relationship was assessed using the Goslon yardstick from intraoral dental photographs. An independent investigator recorded treatment histories from the clinical notes. The inter- and intraexaminer agreements evaluated by weighted kappa statistics were high. There was no association between dental arch relationship and the type of presurgical orthopedics or pharyngeal flap. Dental arch relationship was associated with the initial cleft size (odds ratio, OR = 1.3; 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.1-1.5, p palate repair (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 1.2-19.9, p cleft, high-volume surgeon, and primary gingivoperiosteoplasty are predictors of poor dental arch relationship outcome in young children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. These findings may improve treatment outcome by modifying the treatment protocol for patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate.

  9. Risk indicators and risk predictors of dental caries in schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Pereira da Silva Tagliaferro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify risk indicators of high caries level at baseline (HCLB based on cross-sectional data and predictors of high caries increment (HCI based on a 7-year-follow-up examination in 6-8-year-old schoolchildren. Two hundred and six schoolchildren were examined in 1997 and in 2004 by the same two calibrated dentists, in Piracicaba, Brazil. At baseline, dental caries, presence of sealants, fluorosis, and oral hygiene status were recorded. The children's parents completed a questionnaire concerning socioeconomic level, fluoride use, dental service utilization, dietary and oral hygiene habits. HCLB and HCI were defined considering the upper quartile of the total caries experience distribution (dmfs+DMFS and caries increment distribution, respectively. Logistic regression models were adjusted estimating the Odds Ratio (OR, 95% confidence intervals and p-values. Having white spot lesions (OR=5.25 was found to be a risk indicator of HCLB. Schoolchildren with dental fluorosis (OR=0.17 or those who brushed the teeth more than two times a day (OR=0.37 presented less probability of HCLB. The predictors of HCI were: dmfs>0 (OR=2.68 and mothers' educational level up to 8 years of schooling (OR=2.87. Clinical and socioeconomic variables were found to be risk indicators and/or predictors of dental caries in schoolchildren.

  10. The History of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    The historiography of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program (Program) presents a historical journey of health care, as it relates to oral health, in the United States, in Ohio, and in Lima. This study bridges the gap between the history of higher education and the history of an academic program, dental hygiene. Prior to this study, there…

  11. The History of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    The historiography of the Rhodes State College Dental Hygiene Program (Program) presents a historical journey of health care, as it relates to oral health, in the United States, in Ohio, and in Lima. This study bridges the gap between the history of higher education and the history of an academic program, dental hygiene. Prior to this study, there…

  12. Dental History Predictors of Caries Related Dental Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    proportion of caries-related emergencies among all emergencies, as compared to other incidence studies (3,4). However, the high prevalence of DT in the...towards those individuals who have the greatest prevalence of caries. Most recall systems presently used by the Navy employ as primary criteria the time...Trauma related emergencies Recent .05 .06 .18 >72 hrs 0 0 .01 Combined .05 .06 .20 Pericoronitis .29 .04 .11 Periodontally related .25 .02 .10

  13. [Dental ceramics: its history and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau, Thomas; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an historical background of dental ceramics. It synthesises the evolution of such material and its technical improvements from the stone-age to our time. Focusing on the importance of dental aesthetics, it shows the investigations realised to upgrade the prosthetic results.

  14. Wire-bending test as a predictor of preclinical performance by dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, E C; Ngan, P W; Wilson, S; Kunovich, R

    1990-10-01

    Traditional Dental Aptitude Test and academic grade point average have been shown to be poor predictors of clinical performance by dental students. To refine predictors of psychomotor skills, a wire-bending test was given to 105 freshmen at the beginning of their dental education. Grades from seven restorative preclinical courses in their freshman and sophomore years were compared to scores on wire bending and the three traditional predictors: GPA, academic aptitude, and perceptual aptitude scores. Wire-bending scores correlated significantly with six out of seven preclinical restorative courses. The predictive power for preclinical performance was doubled when wire bending was added to traditional predictors in stepwise multiple regression analysis. Wire-bending scores identified students of low performance. These preliminary results suggest that the wire-bending test shows some potential as a screening test for identifying students who may hae psychomotor difficulties, early in their dental education.

  15. Predictors of Success in Dental Hygiene Education: A Six-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Mary C.; Collins, Marie A.; Browning, William D.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the predictive reliability of incoming grade point average (GPA), incoming math/science GPA, and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores in predicting success in dental hygiene education. Found that GPA was the most significant predictor of success. (EV)

  16. Predictors of Job Satisfaction in Dental Professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhic, Edin; Plancak, Darije; Lajnert, Vlatka; Muhic, Asja

    2016-09-01

    Working in a healthy work environment is the ultimate goal of every employee. Dentistry is a stressful career, and the reasons for dissatisfaction are numerous. The aim of this study was to determine the factors of work satisfaction in dental professionals of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation. A total of 134 dental professionals selected randomly from the Registry of Dental Chamber of Bosnia and Herzegovina Federation were included in the study. All of them filled out the Demographic Questionnaire and Job Satisfaction Scale (JSS). An increase in the influence of work on the quality of life as well as an increase in its frequency results in leaving the job and significantly reducing the overall job satisfaction. General dental practitioners are significantly more satisfied as compared with specialists. Significant predictors of the job satisfaction are employment status, type of the practice, and availability of dental assistants. General dental practitioners with a dental assistant employed at a private practice are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs. Employment status, practice type and availability of dental assistants are significant predictors of job satisfaction. General dental practitioners working in a private practice with a dental assistant are most likely to be satisfied.

  17. Dental Treatment in a State-Funded Primary Dental Care Facility: Contextual and Individual Predictors of Treatment Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyonyi, Kristina L; Radford, David R; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2017-01-01

    This study examined individual and contextual factors which predict the dental care received by patients in a state-funded primary dental care training facility in England. Routine clinical and demographic data were extracted from a live dental patient management system in a state-funded facility using novel methods. The data, spanning a four-year period [2008-2012] were cleaned, validated, linked by means of postcode to deprivation status, and analysed to identify factors which predict dental treatment need. The predictive relationship between patients' individual characteristics (demography, smoking, payment status) and contextual experience (deprivation based on area of residence), with common dental treatments received was examined using unadjusted analysis and adjusted logistic regression. Additionally, multilevel modelling was used to establish the isolated influence of area of residence on treatments. Data on 6,351 dental patients extracted comprised of 147,417 treatment procedures delivered across 10,371 courses of care. Individual level factors associated with the treatments were age, sex, payment exemption and smoking status and deprivation associated with area of residence was a contextual predictor of treatment. More than 50% of children (dental service and show that individual and contextual factors predict common treatments received. Implications of this research include the importance of making provision for our aging population and ensuring that preventative care is available to all. Further research is required to explain the interaction of organisational and system policies, practitioner and patient perspectives on care and, thus, inform effective commissioning and provision of dental services.

  18. Predictors of dental anxiety in Brazilian 5-7 years old children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, Fernanda Cunha; Lima, R. A.; Santos, Carolina da Franca Bandeira Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the predictors of dental anxiety in 5 to 7-year-old children in a two years follow-up. Materials and methods: This is a longitudinal study conducted with 784 children with 5 to 7 years old. A face-to-face interview was conducted with the parents....... The Dental Anxiety Question (DAQ) answers were categorized as presence or absence of dental anxiety. The possible predictor factors analyzed were: related to the children (age, sex, parentage, childbirth, physical activity, body satisfaction, psychological well-being, physical well-being, dentist visit......); and related to the parents or guardians (excessive alcohol consumption, smoke, family income, number of children). Forward stepwise logistic binary regression was performed for the multivariate analysis. The analysis was controlled by gender. Results: The prevalence of dental anxiety was 17.4%. Children...

  19. Predictors of Dental Care Use: Findings from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Garcia, Raul I.; Visotcky, Alexis (Dye); Szabo, Aniko

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine longitudinal trends and associated factors in dental service utilization by adolescents progressing to early adulthood in the United States. Data Source The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health from Waves I (1994-95), II (1996), III (2001-2002) and IV (2007-2008). Study Design This is a retrospective, observational study of adolescents' transition to early adulthood. We obtained descriptive statistics and performed logistic regression analyses to identify the effects of baseline and concurrent covariates on dental service utilization from adolescence to early adulthood over time. Principal Findings Dental service utilization within the prior 12 months peaked at age 16 (72%), gradually decreased until age 21 (57%), and thereafter remained flat. Whites and Asians had a 10-20 percentage points higher proportion of dental service utilization at most ages compared to Blacks and Hispanics. Dental service utilization at later follow-up visits was strongly associated with baseline utilization with OR= 10.7, 2.4 and 1.5 at the 1-year, 7-year and 13-year follow-ups respectively. These effects decreased when adjusted for current income, insurance and education. Compared to Whites, Blacks were consistently less likely to report any dental examination. Conclusion Dental service utilization was highest in adolescents. Gender, education, health insurance and income in young adulthood were significant predictors of reporting a dental examination. Blacks had lower odds of reporting a dental examination either as adolescents or as young adults. PMID:23850156

  20. Predictors of academic performance for applicants to an international dental studies program in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitigoi-Aron, Gabriela; King, Patricia A; Chambers, David W

    2011-12-01

    The number of U.S. and Canadian dental schools offering programs for dentists with degrees from other countries leading to the D.D.S. or D.M.D. degree has increased recently. This fact, along with the diversity of educational systems represented by candidates for these programs, increases the importance of identifying valid admissions predictors of success in international dental student programs. Data from 148 students accepted into the international dental studies program at the University of the Pacific from 1994 through 2004 were analyzed. Dependent variables were comprehensive cumulative GPA at the end of both the first and second years of the two-year program. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and both Parts I and II of the National Board Dental Examination (NBDE) were significant positive predictors of success. Performance on laboratory tests of clinical skill in operative dentistry and in fixed prosthodontics and ratings from interviewers were not predictive of overall success in the program. Although this study confirms the predictive value of written tests such as the TOEFL and NBDE, it also contributes to the literature documenting inconsistent results regarding other types of predictors. It may be the case that characteristics of individual programs or features of the applicant pools for each may require use of admissions predictors that are unique to schools.

  1. A correlational study of preadmission predictor variables and dental school performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, G C; Dogon, I L

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive validity of preadmission scores on the performance of 131 students from nine successive classes at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. The predictors included high school rank, SAT Verbal and Quantitative, selectivity of undergraduate college, college GPA, and DAT Academic, and PAT averages. The performance scores included science GPA, clinical GPA, oral examination scores, and scores on Parts I and II of the dental National Board examinations. Correlation coefficients were calculated between each predictor and performance measure. Only one was significantly greater than zero: DAT Academic average was positively related to Part II Board scores (r = .29). The apparent lack of validity of the other predictors was attributed to their restricted range.

  2. Did we push dental ceramics too far? A brief history of ceramic dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubenreich, James E; Robinson, Fonda G; West, Karen P; Frazer, Robert Q

    2005-01-01

    Humankind has developed and used ceramics throughout history. It currently has widespread industrial applications. Dental ceramics are used for fabricating highly esthetic prosthetic denture teeth, crowns, and inlays. However, ceramic's biocompatibility and compressive strength are offset by its hardness and brittleness. Nonetheless, a single crystal sapphire aluminum oxide endosseous implant was developed in 1972 as an alternative to metal. It was more esthetic than its metallic counterparts and was eventually produced in a variety of shapes and sizes. Clinical studies demonstrated its excellent soft and hard tissue biocompatibility, yet the range of problems included fractures during surgery, fractures after loading, mobility, infection, pain, bone loss, and lack of osseointegration. Ultimately, single crystal sapphire implants fell into irredeemable disfavor because of its poor impact strength, and dentists and surgeons eventually turned to other implant materials. However, bioactive ceramic coatings on metal implants have kept ceramics as a key component in dental implantology.

  3. Dental Treatment in a State-Funded Primary Dental Care Facility: Contextual and Individual Predictors of Treatment Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, David R.; Gallagher, Jennifer E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study examined individual and contextual factors which predict the dental care received by patients in a state-funded primary dental care training facility in England. Methods Routine clinical and demographic data were extracted from a live dental patient management system in a state-funded facility using novel methods. The data, spanning a four-year period [2008–2012] were cleaned, validated, linked by means of postcode to deprivation status, and analysed to identify factors which predict dental treatment need. The predictive relationship between patients’ individual characteristics (demography, smoking, payment status) and contextual experience (deprivation based on area of residence), with common dental treatments received was examined using unadjusted analysis and adjusted logistic regression. Additionally, multilevel modelling was used to establish the isolated influence of area of residence on treatments. Results Data on 6,351 dental patients extracted comprised of 147,417 treatment procedures delivered across 10,371 courses of care. Individual level factors associated with the treatments were age, sex, payment exemption and smoking status and deprivation associated with area of residence was a contextual predictor of treatment. More than 50% of children (tooth extraction’ (3%; p = 0.001), and ‘instruction and advice’ (3%; p = 0.001). Smokers had a higher likelihood of receiving all treatments; and were notably over four times more likely to receive ‘instruction and advice’ than non-smokers (OR 4.124; 95% CI: 3.088–5.508; p = 0.01). A further new finding from the multilevel models was a significant difference in treatment related to area of residence; adults from the most deprived quintile were more likely to receive ‘tooth extraction’ when compared with least deprived, and less likely to receive preventive ‘instruction and advice’ (p = 0.01). Conclusion This is the first study to model patient management data from a

  4. Differences in knowledge related to dental implants between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken, Yukawa; Tachikawa, Noriko; Kasugai, Shohei

    2017-09-01

    This aim of this study was to investigate the differences between patients with and without a treatment history of dental implants by use of a questionnaire survey in order to determine the information that is required for patients undergoing dental implants. The questionnaires were given to 4512 patients who visited the Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital for oral implants between January 2012 and December 2014, and 2972 (66%) valid questionnaires were collected. There were 857 patients with a treatment history of dental implants and 2115 patients without. "Preservation of an adjacent tooth" was the reason that 32% of these patients chose implant therapy, and the patients without treatment history were significantly higher than the patients with one. Significantly, more patients without a treatment history of dental implants selected the after-effects of surgery and pain after surgery as their main concerns for implant therapy compared to those with a treatment history. In the question "Pain after surgery," the patients without treatment history did not know significantly lower than the patients with one. Patients without a treatment history of dental implants placed more importance on the preservation of healthy teeth. Because patients, in particular those without a treatment history of dental implants, are anxious about surgery, we should provide them with more information on treatment than we already do and explain the risks of treatment to them. To keep the credence between doctors and patients, informed consent and patient education on treatment are six important concerns. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Predictors of student success in an entry-level baccalaureate dental hygiene program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Mohammad J; Thomson, Evelyn M; Bauman, Deborah Blythe

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the utility of various predictors used by the Old Dominion University Gene W. Hirschfeld School of Dental Hygiene baccalaureate degree dental hygiene program in selecting dental hygiene students who are most likely to graduate and be successful in passing the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination (NBDHE). The following factors were examined: grade point average (GPA); science GPA; final grade in various prerequisite courses; final grade in first-year dental hygiene courses; academic setting where prerequisite courses were completed; multiple attempts to achieve a passing course grade; and admissions criteria points (ACP). The sample selected for study consisted of the academic records of dental hygiene students admitted to the program from 1998 to 2002 (n = 235), who would have been eligible to take the NBDHE from 2000 to 2004. Data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression to determine success as measured by graduation (n = 146). With NBDHE as the criterion variable, data were analyzed using the multiple linear regression to determine successful entry into the profession (n = 130); significance was predetermined at the 0.05 level. Data analysis revealed that final course grade in oral pathology was a significant predictor of successful graduation (P = 0.0008). Variables that predicted NBDHE success were final course grade in oral pathology, final course grade in oral anatomy and histology, and the ACP rating (P performance after admission to the program to improve the likelihood of success. Additionally, when this institution's admission variables were combined into a cluster of variables (ACP), they proved significant at predicting success.

  6. Socioeconomic and psychosocial predictors of dental healthcare use among Brazilian preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machry, Rômulo Vaz; Tuchtenhagen, Simone; Agostini, Bernardo Antonio; da Silva Teixeira, Carlos Roberto; Piovesan, Chaiana; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado

    2013-10-31

    Disparities in utilization of oral healthcare services have been attributed to socioeconomic and individual behavioral factors. Parents' socioeconomic status, demographics, schooling, and perceptions of oral health may influence their children's use of dental services. This cross-sectional study assessed the relationships between socioeconomic and psychosocial factors and the utilization of dental health services by children aged 1-5 years. Data were collected through clinical exams and a structured questionnaire administered during the National Day of Children's Vaccination. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Data were collected from a total of 478 children. Only 112 (23.68%) were found to have visited a dentist; 67.77% of those had seen the dentist for preventive care. Most (63.11%) used public rather than private services. The use of dental services varied according to parental socioeconomic status; children from low socioeconomic backgrounds and those whose parents rated their oral health as "poor" used dental services less frequently. The reason for visiting the dentist also varied with socioeconomic status, in that children of parents with poor socioeconomic status and who reported their child's oral health as "fair/poor" were less likely to have visited the dentist for preventive care. This study demonstrated that psychosocial and socioeconomic factors are important predictors of the utilization of dental care services.

  7. Validation of fingernail fluoride concentration as a predictor of risk for dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzalaf, M A R; Massaro, C S; Rodrigues, M H C; Fukushima, R; Pessan, J P; Whitford, G M; Sampaio, F C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the use of fingernail fluoride concentrations at ages 2-7 years as predictors of the risk for developing dental fluorosis in the permanent dentition. Fifty-six children of both genders (10-15 years of age) had their incisors and premolars examined for dental fluorosis using the Thylstrup-Fejerskov index. Fingernail fluoride concentrations were obtained from previous studies when children were 2-7 years of age. Data were analyzed by unpaired t test, ANOVA, and Fisher's exact test when the fingernail fluoride concentrations were dichotomized (≤ 2 or >2 µg/g). Children with dental fluorosis had significantly higher fingernail fluoride concentrations than those without the condition, and the concentrations tended to increase with the severity of fluorosis (r(2) = 0.47, p dental fluorosis. The high positive predictive value indicates that fingernail fluoride concentrations should be useful in public health research, since it has the potential to identify around 80% of children at risk of developing dental fluorosis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. [The developmental history of the dental filling materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yi

    2008-10-01

    Caries may cause substantial defects in the hard tissue of teeth. The dental filling for defects is an effective method to resume teeth complete form and masticatory function as well as aesthetic effects. The filling material is artificial restorative material to fill the dental defects. Tracing back the developing process of dental filling materials, we can see the advancement of stomotology of human beings. There was a revolutionary change in the filling materials from filling dental cavity with Chinese medicinal herbs to silver paste, from establishing the composition and proportion standardization of the silver amalgam filling materials to the application of new macromolecule compound resin. This is a continuous improvement and renewal in the idea and technology of dental filling treatment so that perfects the dental filling method and enables the retention of more healthy dental tissue. In addition, it pushes the development of dental aesthetics, adhesives and technology. With the improvement of people's health standard, aesthetic demands and environmental awareness, compound resin restorative materials has become clinically preferred dental filling materials of doctors and patients in clinic.

  9. The history of dental hygiene in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nancy K

    2011-01-01

    This historical narrative highlights the origin and development of the dental hygiene profession in South Korea. The legacy of early American missionaries to Korea includes profound and long-lasting contributions in medicine, education and theology. Many of Korea's top universities today have their roots in the missionary schools of the late nineteenth century, including Yonsei University, home of the first dental hygiene program in Korea. From Yonsei in Seoul, the dental hygiene profession spread throughout the country, includingtheAmerican missionary-based program in Kwangju in 1977. Contributions included clinical and didactic education, as well as professional leadership and development. American dental missionaries developed the profession of dental hygiene in Korea, and provided guidance to Korean dentists and hygienists for its growth and expansion.

  10. History of dental caries and need for dental treatment of children with visual disabilities, Chile, 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Guidotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Objetivo: Determinar la historia de caries y la necesidad de tratamiento odontológico de niños con discapacidad visual entre 6-12 años, pertenecientes a Escuelas Especiales de Chile, el año 2014. Material y método: Estudio observacional descriptivo de corte transversal. Se examinaron niños con discapacidad visual de escuelas especiales en Chile, según los criterios de la OMS, para obtener el ceod, COPD y la necesidad de tratamiento. Se registraron las lesiones de esmalte clínicamente detectables en superficies cavitadas y no cavitadas. Los resultados se analizaron mediante estadística descriptiva. Resultados: 94 niños fueron examinados, pertenecientes a 7 escuelas especiales. El ceod promedio fue 2,05 (SD ± 2,6 y el COPD fue de 0,96 (SD ± 1,3. A los 6 años el ceod/COPD fue de 3/0 respectivamente. A los 12 años el ceod fue 0,17 y COPD fue 1,42. La prevalencia de caries fue de 56,3%. El 95% necesita sellantes, el 50% necesita a lo menos una restauración de una cara, y el 29% una restauración de 2 o más superficies. En cuanto a las lesiones de esmalte, el 34% de los niños presentaban al menos una lesión no cavitada y un 48% de ellos tenían una lesión cavitada.Conclusión: La historia de caries es similar a lo descrito en la población general, sin embargo, existe una alta necesidad de tratamiento preventivo. Es necesario realizar más investigaciones que permitan esclarecer si poseen un mayor riesgo cariogénico debido a su alteración visual, para así establecer estrategias promocionales/preventivas efectivas. Abstract: Objective: To determine the history of dental caries and the need for dental treatment of children with visual disabilities 6-12 years, belonging to Chile Special Schools, 2014.Material and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional observational study. The target population was children with visual disabilities in special schools in Chile. A clinical examination was performed to obtain a deft, DMFT and

  11. Management of dental implant fractures. A case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Quran, Firas A M; Rashan, Bashar A; Al-Dwairi, Ziad N

    2009-01-01

    The widespread use of endosseous osseointegrated implants to replace missing natural teeth increases the chances of implant complications and failures, despite the high initial success rate reported in the literature. Implant fracture is one possible complication that results in ultimate failure of the dental implant. Such a complication poses a management crisis even for the most experienced clinician. This article reports on a case of implant fracture, its possible causes, and how the case was managed.

  12. A Correlational Study of Preadmission Predictor Variables and Dental School Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Gerard C.; Dogon, I. Leon

    1981-01-01

    Undergraduate performance and standardized test scores were correlated with dental school performance for 131 members of nine Harvard School of Dental Medicine classes to determine the predictive validity of the earlier variables. The only significant positive correlation was of the Dental Admission Test and dental National Board Examination, part…

  13. Frequency, impact, and predictors of persistent pain after root canal treatment: a national dental PBRN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, Donald R; Law, Alan S; Lindquist, Kimberly; Reams, Gregory J; Cole, Emery; Kanter, Keith; Nguyen, Ruby H N; Harris, D Robert

    2016-01-01

    Root canal treatment (RCT) is commonly performed surgery and persistent pain is known to occur, but little is known about how these patients are affected by this pain. Although biopsychosocial mechanisms are thought to be associated with the development of such pain, similar to persistent pain after surgery in other body sites, little is known about the baseline predictors for persistent pain. We assessed the frequency of persistent pain 6 months after RCT, measured the impact this pain had on patients, and determined predictive factors for persistent tooth pain in a multicenter prospective cohort study conducted within the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. Of 708 patients enrolled, 651 (91.9%) provided follow-up data, with 65 (10.0%) meeting criteria for pain 6 months after RCT. On average, these patients reported their pain as mild to moderate in intensity, present for approximately 10 days in the preceding month, and minimally interfered with daily activities. After adjusting for the type of dental practitioner and patient age, gender, and household income, pain duration over the week before RCT significantly increased the risk of developing persistent pain (odds ratio = 1.19 per 1 day increase in pain duration, 95% confidence interval: 1.07-1.33), whereas optimism about the procedure reduced the risk (odds ratio = 0.39, 95% confidence interval: 0.22-0.67). Our data suggest that persistent pain 6 months after RCT is fairly common, but generally does not have a large impact on those experiencing it. Furthermore, patient age and gender did not predict persistent pain, whereas preoperative pain duration and the patient's expectation did.

  14. Frequency, Impact, and Predictors of Persistent Pain Following Root Canal Treatment: A National Dental PBRN Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, Donald R.; Law, Alan S.; Lindquist, Kimberly; Reams, Gregory J.; Cole, Emery; Kanter, Keith; Nguyen, Ruby H.N.; Harris, D. Robert

    2015-01-01

    Root canal treatment (RCT) is commonly performed surgery and persistent pain is known to occur, but little is known about how these patients are affected by this pain. While biopsychosocial mechanisms are thought to be associated with the development of such pain, similar to persistent pain following surgery in other body sites, little is known about the baseline predictors for persistent pain. We assessed the frequency of persistent pain 6 months following RCT, measured the impact this pain had on patients, and determined predictive factors for persistent tooth pain in a multi-center prospective cohort study conducted within the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. Of 708 patients enrolled, 651 (91.9%) provided follow-up data, with 65 (10.0%) meeting criteria for pain 6 months following RCT. On average, these patients reported their pain as mild to moderate in intensity, present for about 10 days in the preceding month, and minimally interfered with daily activities. After adjusting for type of dental practitioner and patient age, gender and household income, pain duration over the week prior to RCT significantly increased the risk of developing persistent pain (odds ratio [OR]=1.19 per 1 day increase in pain duration, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07–1.33), whereas optimism about the procedure reduced the risk (OR=0.39, 95% CI: 0.22–0.67). Our data suggest that persistent pain following RCT is fairly common, but generally does not have a large impact on those experiencing it. Furthermore, patient age and gender did not predict persistent pain, while pre-operative pain duration and the patient’s expectation did. PMID:26335907

  15. The history and clinical application of a chairside CAD/CAM dental restoration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutes, Richard D

    2006-10-01

    Since its introduction by Sirona Dental Systems (Charlotte, North Carolina, USA and Bensheim, Germany) in 1985, the CEREC Chairside CAD/CAM restoration system has steadily earned a loyal following among dentists. This article describes the history and evolution of the CEREC System, its clinical application and treatment modality, the restorative materials used to fabricate the restorations and an overview of clinical findings regarding the in vivo performance of the materials.

  16. Dental development and life history in living African and Asian apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Jay; Schwartz, Gary T

    2010-01-19

    Life-history inference is an important aim of paleoprimatology, but life histories cannot be discerned directly from the fossil record. Among extant primates, the timing of many life-history attributes is correlated with the age at emergence of the first permanent molar (M1), which can therefore serve as a means to directly compare the life histories of fossil and extant species. To date, M1 emergence ages exist for only a small fraction of extant primate species and consist primarily of data from captive individuals, which may show accelerated dental eruption compared with free-living individuals. Data on M1 emergence ages in wild great apes exist for only a single chimpanzee individual, with data for gorillas and orangutans being anecdotal. This paucity of information limits our ability to make life-history inferences using the M1 emergence ages of extinct ape and hominin species. Here we report reliable ages at M1 emergence for the orangutan, Pongo pygmaeus (4.6 y), and the gorilla, Gorilla gorilla (3.8 y), obtained from the dental histology of wild-shot individuals in museum collections. These ages and the one reported age at M1 emergence in a free-living chimpanzee of approximately 4.0 y are highly concordant with the comparative life histories of these great apes. They are also consistent with the average age at M1 emergence in relation to the timing of life-history events in modern humans, thus confirming the utility of M1 emergence ages for life-history inference and providing a basis for making reliable life-history inferences for extinct apes and hominins.

  17. Sociodemographic and career history predictors of suicide mortality in the United States Army 2004–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, S. E.; Bromet, E. J.; Cox, K. L.; Colpe, L. J.; Fullerton, C. S.; Gruber, M. J.; Heeringa, S.G.; Lewandowski-Romps, L.; Millikan-Bell, A.M.; Naifeh, J. A.; Nock, M. K.; Petukhova, M. V.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoenbaum, M.; Stein, M. B.; Ursano, R. J.; Wessely, S.; Zaslavsky, A.M.; Kessler, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The US Army suicide rate has increased sharply in recent years. Identifying significant predictors of Army suicides in Army and Department of Defense (DoD) administrative records might help focus prevention efforts and guide intervention content. Previous studies of administrative data, although documenting significant predictors, were based on limited samples and models. A career history perspective is used here to develop more textured models. Method The analysis was carried out as part of the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS). De-identified data were combined across numerous Army and DoD administrative data systems for all Regular Army soldiers on active duty in 2004–2009. Multivariate associations of sociodemographics and Army career variables with suicide were examined in subgroups defined by time in service, rank and deployment history. Results Several novel results were found that could have intervention implications. The most notable of these were significantly elevated suicide rates (69.6–80.0 suicides per 100000 person-years compared with 18.5 suicides per 100000 person-years in the total Army) among enlisted soldiers deployed either during their first year of service or with less than expected (based on time in service) junior enlisted rank; a substantially greater rise in suicide among women than men during deployment; and a protective effect of marriage against suicide only during deployment. Conclusions A career history approach produces several actionable insights missed in less textured analyses of administrative data predictors. Expansion of analyses to a richer set of predictors might help refine understanding of intervention implications. PMID:25055175

  18. Predictors of academic performance of first year dental undergraduates in Sri Lanka: a re-evaluation following curriculum changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyasinghe, S; Pallegama, R

    2013-02-01

    The dentistry course in Sri Lanka is conducted in English, a second language for its students. A decade ago, English language proficiency was the key factor in predicting the academic performance of first year dental undergraduates. Since then, changes have been introduced to the teaching programme and examination format to minimise the effect of language proficiency on their performance. This study aimed at re-evaluating the factors influencing academic performance in a similar academic cohort. A total of 306 first year students in five consecutive academic years ranging in age from 20 to 24 years (77% of the total number registered, 36.3% men) were recruited, and a questionnaire was used to collect data regarding demographics, previous academic ability and perceived levels of difficulty of the first year course, English language and its sub-skills. Performances of the English language test and cumulative GPA of the first year course were used as objective indicators of language competency and academic performance respectively. The data were analysed using SPSS 11.5. Hierarchical Regression Analysis revealed that English language proficiency, gender and previous academic ability were the significant predictors of GPA. Students who received a lower GPA perceived English as considerably more difficult compared to the academic course itself; however, students who obtained a higher GPA perceived the opposite. Students' language competency remains the major predictor of academic performance, although previous academic ability and gender emerge as significant predictors. The perceived difficulty, however, of the dental course and of studying in English may also be predictors of student academic performance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Cognitive and learning styles as predictors of success on the National Board Dental Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, L S; Garvan, Cynthia W; Bowman, B J; Bulosan, M; Hancock, S; Johnson, M; Mutlu, B

    2011-04-01

    Using a deidentified retrospective dataset of three cohorts of matriculated dental students, we measured the degree to which selected student attributes, the Learning Type Measure, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and Dental Admission Test subtests scores predicted passage on the National Board Dental Examination (NBDE), Parts I and II. Gender, Myers-Briggs Type Indicators, and the Dental Admission Test subtests for academic average and biology were found to be predictive of passing the NBDE Part I. Gender, a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (thinking over feeling), and the Dental Admission Test subtests on reading and biology were found to be predictive of passing the NBDE Part II. The Learning Type Measure was not found to be predictive of passing the NBDE Part I or Part II. This study holds implications for heightening faculty members' awareness of students' aptitude and cognitive attributes, for teaching, and for the admissions process.

  20. Is mammography screening history a predictor of future breast cancer risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Bangsbøll; Törnberg, Sven; Kilpeläinen, Sini

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the model by Walter and Day for risk of cervical cancer following negative screens, one might hypothesize that women in a mammography screening programme with a certain number of negative screens had a lower remaining breast cancer risk than that of women in general. We studied whether...... number of negative screens was a predictor for a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Copenhagen and Funen. Data were collected from the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden (1989-2012), Copenhagen, Denmark (1991...... was not a predictor of a low remaining breast cancer risk in women participating in the mammography screening programmes in Stockholm, Sweden, Copenhagen and Funen, Denmark. The history of previous negative screens is therefore not suitable for personalisation of mammography screening....

  1. Explaining sex differences in dental caries prevalence: saliva, hormones, and "life-history" etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, John R; Largaespada, Leah L

    2006-01-01

    When dental caries rates are reported by sex, females are typically found to exhibit higher prevalence rates than males. This finding is generally true for diverse cultures with different subsistence systems and for a wide range of chronological periods. Exceptions exist, but are not common. In this paper, we present new data for sex differences in dental caries rates among the Guanches (Tenerife, Canary Islands), summarize results of meta-analyses of dental caries prevalence, and emphasize new research that stresses the critical role of female hormones and life-history events in the etiology of dental caries. Among the Guanches, corrected tooth-count caries rates for females (8.8%, 158/1,790) are approximately twice the frequency of caries among males (4.5%, 68/1,498). Higher caries prevalence among females is often explained by one of three factors: 1) earlier eruption of teeth in girls, hence longer exposure of girls' teeth to the cariogenic oral environment, 2) easier access to food supplies by women and frequent snacking during food preparation, and 3) pregnancy. Anthropologists tend to favor explanations involving behavior, including sexual division of labor and women's domestic role in food production. By contrast, the causal pathways through which pregnancy contributes to poorer oral health and higher caries rates are deemphasized or discounted. This paper presents recent research on physiological changes associated with fluctuating hormone levels during individual life histories, and the impact these changes have on the oral health of women. The biochemical composition of saliva and overall saliva flow rate are modified in several important ways by hormonal fluctuations during events such as puberty, menstruation, and pregnancy, making the oral environment significantly more cariogenic for women than for men. These results suggest that hormonal fluctuations can have a dramatic effect on the oral health of women, and constitute an important causal factor in

  2. Dental calculus evidence of Taï Forest Chimpanzee plant consumption and life history transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Robert C.; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Wittig, Roman M.; Freiberg, Martin; Henry, Amanda G.

    2015-01-01

    Dental calculus (calcified dental plaque) is a source of multiple types of data on life history. Recent research has targeted the plant microremains preserved in this mineralised deposit as a source of dietary and health information for recent and past populations. However, it is unclear to what extent we can interpret behaviour from microremains. Few studies to date have directly compared the microremain record from dental calculus to dietary records, and none with long-term observation dietary records, thus limiting how we can interpret diet, food acquisition and behaviour. Here we present a high-resolution analysis of calculus microremains from wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) of Taï National Park, Côte d’Ivoire. We test microremain assemblages against more than two decades of field behavioural observations to establish the ability of calculus to capture the composition of diet. Our results show that some microremain classes accumulate as long-lived dietary markers. Phytolith abundance in calculus can reflect the proportions of plants in the diet, yet this pattern is not true for starches. We also report microremains can record information about other dietary behaviours, such as the age of weaning and learned food processing techniques like nut-cracking. PMID:26481858

  3. Dental calculus evidence of Taï Forest Chimpanzee plant consumption and life history transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Robert C.; Salazar-García, Domingo C.; Wittig, Roman M.; Freiberg, Martin; Henry, Amanda G.

    2015-10-01

    Dental calculus (calcified dental plaque) is a source of multiple types of data on life history. Recent research has targeted the plant microremains preserved in this mineralised deposit as a source of dietary and health information for recent and past populations. However, it is unclear to what extent we can interpret behaviour from microremains. Few studies to date have directly compared the microremain record from dental calculus to dietary records, and none with long-term observation dietary records, thus limiting how we can interpret diet, food acquisition and behaviour. Here we present a high-resolution analysis of calculus microremains from wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) of Taï National Park, Côte d’Ivoire. We test microremain assemblages against more than two decades of field behavioural observations to establish the ability of calculus to capture the composition of diet. Our results show that some microremain classes accumulate as long-lived dietary markers. Phytolith abundance in calculus can reflect the proportions of plants in the diet, yet this pattern is not true for starches. We also report microremains can record information about other dietary behaviours, such as the age of weaning and learned food processing techniques like nut-cracking.

  4. Jargon: A barrier in case history taking? - A cross-sectional survey among dental students and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, R; Sanjeev, R; Kuruvilla, Suneesh; Joy, Mathew T; Muralikrishnan, B; Paul, John

    2017-01-01

    The use of jargon has become very common in the healthcare field, especially in medical/dental records. Although the use of standard medical jargon can be seen as professional, efficient shorthand, a lack of awareness regarding the standard medical abbreviations and incessant and overzealous use of slang among the healthcare professionals can act as a barrier to effective communication and understanding among patients and peers. The aim of this study was to assess the acceptance and use of jargon in case history taking among clinical dental students and dental teaching faculty members of dental colleges in Ernakulam and Idukki districts of Kerala. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey was carried out, consisting of 15 questions, to assess the objectives of the study. The study was conducted among clinical dental undergraduate students, house surgeons, postgraduate students and teaching faculty members of five dental colleges in Ernakulam and Idukki districts, Kerala. The results were expressed as a number and percentage of response for each question and Chi-squared test was used for inferential statistical analysis. All the 549 respondents used jargon in case history taking. Approximately 22.4% of the respondents admitted that they always used jargon and 55.8% admitted of using jargon only when there was a lack of time. The majority of the respondents (71.4%) learned the jargon from their colleagues. Approximately 50% of the respondents admitted use of jargon in a history section and about 32% of the respondents in all the sections of case history taking. Approximately 74% were of the opinion that abbreviations should be permitted in case history taking. This study showed widespread use of jargon/abbreviations in case history taking among the respondents. There is a lack of knowledge regarding standard medical abbreviations. Although the majority of the respondents were comfortable with the use of jargon, the majority of the postgraduates and faculty members

  5. Is the Level of Nitric Oxide in the Dental Follicular Tissues of Impacted Third Molars With a History of Recurrent Pericoronitis a True Marker of Oxidative Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendek, Meltem Karsiyaka; Şenses, Fatma; Kisa, Üçler; Aksoy, Nurkan; Tekin, Umut

    2017-04-13

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an indicator of oxidative stress in several tissues. Its role in dental follicular (DF) tissues of impacted third molars with a history of recurrent pericoronitis is not well elucidated. The present study compared NO levels between inflamed and noninflamed DF tissues of impacted third molars with a history of recurrent pericoronitis. A cross-sectional study was designed. The study sample included inflamed DF tissues (test group) with certain local inflammatory symptoms, such as pain, tenderness, swelling, and erythema and noninflamed DF tissues (control group) without local inflammatory symptoms of impacted mandibular third molars. Each patient contributed only 1 specimen to the samples. All tissues samples were biochemically investigated for NO levels as an indicator of oxidative stress. The primary predictor variable was inflammatory status; secondary predictor variables were age and gender. The primary outcome variable was NO level. Descriptive and comparative analyses were conducted. The test group consisted of 57 patients (28 men, 29 women; mean age, 23.28 ± 5.16 yr) and the control group consisted of 57 patients (30 men, 27 women; mean age, 23.02 ± 5.42 yr). No relevant intergroup differences were noted for demographic findings such as age and gender. NO levels were significantly higher in inflamed DF tissues of impacted third molars than in noninflamed DF tissues (P pericoronitis. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predictors of recall assignment decisions by general dental practitioners performing routine oral examinations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettes, Th.G.P.H.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Mulder, J.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the decision-making behavior of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in performing routine oral examinations (ROEs). Change over time was studied by comparing data from a cohort sample of participants in two surveys in 2000 and 2005. A written questionnaire was se

  7. [Career history and perceptions of dental hygiene education programs--questionnaire mail-in survey of alumni of the School of Dental Hygiene in Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naomi; Endo, Keiko; Kondo, Keiko; Sugimoto, Kumiko; Shimoyama, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yuzo

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the career history and perceptions about dental hygiene education programs among the alumni (1952-1999 graduates) of the School of Dental Hygiene in Tokyo Medical and Dental University. A questionnaire containing demographic, practice characteristics and views on the programs was mailed to 997 alumni in 1999, and 576 alumni (57.8%) responded. Three hundred and forty-one respondents worked as dental hygienists. The majority who responded were in clinical practice. One hundred and thirty-one of the respondents worked in private clinics, 76 in public health centers, and 72 in clinics in companies. The rate of them who worked in public health centers was much higher than the national average cited in the Statistical Report on Public Health Administration and Services. Two hundred and ninety-one respondents reported inadequate programs. The rate of them who reported inadequate programs was significantly higher in alumni who were working than in alumni who were not. The items cited as insufficiently taught at the school were clinical practice, instrumentation, foreign language, psychology, counseling, and nursing related subjects. Thus, many alumni suggested the need for better programs and continuing education. From these results, it was suggested that dental hygienists need to change their education programs in order to meet the present and future needs of more diversified society. This view was particularly prevalent among alumni who were working. The result showed that dental hygiene educators and dental hygienists urgently need to reconsider the professionalism of their field.

  8. Dental Caries and its Socio-Behavioral Predictors- An Exploratory Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santhosh; Tadakamadla, Jyothi; Duraiswamy, Prabu; Kulkarni, Suhas

    To assess dental caries status and oral health related behavior of 12 year old school children in relation to urbanization and gender; to analyze the effect of socio-demographic and behavioral variables on dental caries experience. Study sample comprised 831, 12 year old school children in, India. Caries status was assessed by Decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) index and a 16 item closed ended questionnaire was administered to children for assessing their oral health related knowledge, beliefs and behavior. Mean caries experience and prevalence was 1.94 and 64.9% respectively. Decay was the dominant component of DMFT. Greater proportion of female and urban children presented better oral health knowledge, beliefs and practices. Boys were more liable (OR=1.2, 95% CI=1.10-1.96) for having caries than girls. Children living in rural areas and whose parents were not professionals or semiprofessionals were more likely to experience caries. Children whose mothers were unskilled or house wives were more than twice likely to present caries (OR=2.14, 95% CI-2.03-2.45) than those children whose mothers were skilled or semi-skilled. Children of illiterate fathers and mothers were 1.09 (95% CI, 1.02-1.49) and 1.98 (95% CI, 1.13-1.99) times more likely to have dental caries than those children whose parents had greater than 10 years of education. Children, those who cleaned their teeth less than once a day presented an odds ratio of 1.36 (CI-1.17-1.86) also higher odds of dental caries was observed in children consuming sweets or soft drinks more than once a day. The prevalence and severity of dental caries was low among urban children and girls than their rural and boy counterparts. In general, oral health knowledge, beliefs and practices were low, predominantly in rural and male children. Caries experience was significantly associated with gender, location of residence, brushing frequency, frequency of consumption of soft drinks and sweets, parents' occupation and education.

  9. Are linear elastic material properties relevant predictors of the cyclic fatigue resistance of dental resin composites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the linear elastic material properties of direct dental resin composites and correlate them with their fatigue strength under cyclic loading. Bar specimens of twelve resin composites were produced according to ISO 4049 and tested for elastic modulus (Emod) in 3-point bending (n=10), flexural strength (FS) (n=15) and single-edge-notch-beam fracture toughness (FT) (n=15), both in 4-point bending. Using the same specimen geometry, the flexural fatigue strength (FFS) was determined using the staircase approach after 10(4) cycles at 0.5 Hz in 4-point bending (n=25). The observation of the fracture surface and fracture profiles was conducted using a scanning electron microscope in order to evaluate the respective fracture mechanisms according to the two different loading conditions. Materials were ranked differently according to the tested parameters. Only weak correlations were found between any of the initial properties and FFS or strength loss. The best correlation to FFS was found to be the Emod (r(2)=0.679), although only slightly. Crack path in both loading conditions was mainly interparticle, with the crack propagating mainly within the matrix phase for fatigued specimens and eventually through the filler/matrix interface for statically loaded specimens. Fracture of large particles or prepolymerized fillers was only observed in specimens of FS and FT. Initial properties were better associated with microstructural features, whereas the fatigue resistance showed to be more dependent on aspects relating to the matrix phase. Our results show that linear elastic properties such as elastic modulus, flexural strength and fracture toughness are not good descriptors of the fatigue resistance of dental resin composite under cyclic bending, and may therefore have limited clinical relevance. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of Epidemiological Predictors in Unraveling the Phylogeographic History of HIV-1 Subtype C in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancken, Bram; Maletich Junqueira, Dennis; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; Suchard, Marc A.; Lemey, Philippe; Esteves de Matos Almeida, Sabrina; Pinto, Aguinaldo Roberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The phylogeographic history of the Brazilian HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) epidemic is still unclear. Previous studies have mainly focused on the capital cities of Brazilian federal states, and the fact that HIV-1C infections increase at a higher rate than subtype B infections in Brazil calls for a better understanding of the process of spatial spread. A comprehensive sequence data set sampled across 22 Brazilian locations was assembled and analyzed. A Bayesian phylogeographic generalized linear model approach was used to reconstruct the spatiotemporal history of HIV-1C in Brazil, considering several potential explanatory predictors of the viral diffusion process. Analyses were performed on several subsampled data sets in order to mitigate potential sample biases. We reveal a central role for the city of Porto Alegre, the capital of the southernmost state, in the Brazilian HIV-1C epidemic (HIV-1C_BR), and the northward expansion of HIV-1C_BR could be linked to source populations with higher HIV-1 burdens and larger proportions of HIV-1C infections. The results presented here bring new insights to the continuing discussion about the HIV-1C epidemic in Brazil and raise an alternative hypothesis for its spatiotemporal history. The current work also highlights how sampling bias can confound phylogeographic analyses and demonstrates the importance of incorporating external information to protect against this. IMPORTANCE Subtype C is responsible for the largest HIV infection burden worldwide, but our understanding of its transmission dynamics remains incomplete. Brazil witnessed a relatively recent introduction of HIV-1C compared to HIV-1B, but it swiftly spread throughout the south, where it now circulates as the dominant variant. The northward spread has been comparatively slow, and HIV-1B still prevails in that region. While epidemiological data and viral genetic analyses have both independently shed light on the dynamics of spread in isolation, their combination

  11. Relationship of children's anxiety to their potential dental health behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, F A

    1980-08-01

    In this study of 200 New Zealand schoolchildren aged 7-13 years, a questionnaire interview was used to gain information related to estimating dental anxiety and general illness anxiety. Information related to sociodemographic differences, belief differences, and an estimate of potential health behaviour was also collected. Oral examinations were performed and the number of dental restorations present recorded. Dental anxiety was associated with memory of pain during a dental visit. The number of restorations present, and a history of pain during a dental visit, were important predictors of illness anxiety. Neither dental anxiety nor illness anxiety operating alone provided an estimate of future dental health behaviour. Dental anxiety and illness anxiety operated through a complex interplay of variables. A stepwise multiple regression technique was used to determine the possible pathways to potential dental health behaviour. Perceived vulnerability to dental caries and perceived severity of dental disease were important in the prediction of potential denture wearing; school attended and ethnic background were useful predictors of potential extraction seeking; and school grade and level of perceived internal control were predictors of potential preventive visitation.

  12. Assessment of dental caries predictors in 6-year-old school children - results from 5-year retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Mohd

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This was a retrospective cohort study undertaken to assess the rate and pattern of dental caries development in 6-year-old school children followed-up for a period of 5 years, and to identify baseline risk factors that were associated with 5 years caries experience in Malaysian children. Methods This 5-years retrospective cohort study comprised primary school children initially aged 6 years in 2004. Caries experience of each child was recorded annually using World Health Organization criteria. The rates of dental caries were recorded in prevalence and incidence density of carious lesions from baseline to final examination. Risk assessment was done to assess relative risk for caries after 5 years in children with baseline caries status. Simple and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to identify significant independent risk factors for caries. Results The sample consisted of 1830 school children. All components of DMFT showed significant differences between baseline and final examination. Filled teeth (FT component of the DMFT showed the greatest increases. Results revealed the initial baseline caries level in permanent dentition was a strong predictor for future caries after 5 years (RR=3.78, 95% CI=3.48-4.10, P0.001. Logistic regression analysis showed significant association between caries occurrence and residence (urban/rural (OR=1.80, Pp observed from baseline and after 5 years was 5.80 persons/100 person-year of observation. The rate of new caries-affected tooth (IDt in the period from baseline and after 5-years was 0.76 teeth/100 teeth-year of observation. Conclusion The majority of 12-year-old school children (70% were caries-free and most of the caries were concentrated in only a small proportion (30% of them. We found that the presence of caries in permanent teeth at the age of 6 years was a strong predictor of future caries development in this population. The strong evidence of early permanent teeth

  13. The natural history and predictors of persistent problem behaviours in cystic fibrosis: a multicentre, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Jane; Massie, John; Hay, Margaret; Jaffe, Adam; Glazner, Judith; Armstrong, David; Hiscock, Harriet

    2012-07-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), problems with sleep, eating/mealtime behaviours, physiotherapy adherence and parental mental health issues are common, yet their natural history and the extent of service use to address them are unknown. Follow up the 2007 cohort to determine: (1) prevalence of child sleep, eating/mealtime behaviours, physiotherapy adherence, and externalising/internalising problem behaviours and primary caregiver mental health status after a 3-year period; (2) natural history of child behaviours; (3) potentially modifiable predictors of persistent problems; and (4) service use for behaviours. Prospective cohort. Royal Children's Hospital, Monash Medical Centre and Sydney Children's Hospital (Australia) CF clinics. Caregivers, of children aged 3-8 years, who completed the baseline questionnaire. Child sleep, eating/mealtime behaviours, adherence with therapy and externalising and internalising behaviours. parenting style (low warmth), caregiver mental health status and sleep quality at baseline. 102 of 116 (88%) families participated. The prevalence of sleep and eating/mealtime problems at follow-up was similar to baseline. The prevalence of caregiver mental health symptoms remained higher than the community data. 71 out of 102 (70%) of the children experienced at least one persistent behaviour problem. Caregiver mental health difficulties predicted persistent child moderate to severe sleep problems (adjusted OR 6.5, 95% CI 1.2 to 36.2, p=0.03) and their persistently poor adherence to the physiotherapy regimen (adjusted OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3 to 9.2, p=0.01). Child problem behaviours are common in children with CF, persist and are often predicted by the mental health of the parent. Routine surveillance for and management of child problem behaviours are recommended.

  14. Human dental age estimation combining third molar(s) development and tooth morphological age predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, P W; Galiti, D; Willems, G

    2012-11-01

    In the subadult age group, third molar development, as well as age-related morphological tooth information can be observed on panoramic radiographs. The aim of present study was to combine, in subadults, panoramic radiographic data based on developmental stages of third molar(s) and morphological measurements from permanent teeth, in order to evaluate its added age-predicting performances. In the age range between 15 and 23 years, 25 gender-specific radiographs were collected within each age category of 1 year. Third molar development was classified and registered according the 10-point staging and scoring technique proposed by Gleiser and Hunt (1955), modified by Köhler (1994). The Kvaal (1995) measuring technique was applied on the indicated teeth from the individuals' left side. Linear regression models with age as response and third molar-scored stages as explanatory variables were developed, and morphological measurements from permanent teeth were added. From the models, determination coefficients (R (2)) and root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were calculated. Maximal-added age information was reported as a 6 % R² increase and a 0.10-year decrease of RMSE. Forensic dental age estimations on panoramic radiographic data in the subadult group (15-23 year) should only be based on third molar development.

  15. Using family history and health risk behaviors to determine predictors of depressive symptoms in Central American immigrant mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradiegue, Ann H; Lyon, Debra E; Meyers, Melanie F

    2013-06-01

    In this study, depressive symptomatology in Central American immigrant mothers with adolescent daughters living in the USA was explored. Using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Short Scale, the Family History Scale, an Acculturation Scale, and the core section of the Youth Conduct Disorder scale from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 101 Central American mothers were analyzed to identify predictors of depressive symptoms. Over one-third of the participants had depressive symptoms. There were no significant findings for acculturation as a predictor of depressive symptoms. Predictors that related to depressive symptomatology were a positive family history of depression, marital status (divorced), and having a daughter engaged in health risk behaviors. Clinicians working with mothers from Central America should consider risk of depression, whether there is a family history of depression; and additional stresses, such as the health risk behaviors of adolescents. Unprecedented levels of immigration around the world underscore the importance of meeting the healthcare needs of culturally-diverse groups.

  16. The Dental Hygiene Aptitude Tests and the American College Testing Program Tests as Predictors of Scores on the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenbecker, Sueann; Wood, Peter H.

    1984-01-01

    Scores from the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination (NBDHE) served as the criterion variable in a comparison of the predictive validity of the Dental Hygiene Aptitude Tests (DHAT) and the ACT Assessment tests. The DHAT-Science and Verbal tests combined to produce the highest multiple correlation with NBDHE scores. (Author/DWH)

  17. Major mental illness and violence history as predictors of institutional misconduct and recidivism: main and interaction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Glenn D; Crawford, Gregory

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether major mental illness (MMI) and violence history (VH) interact in their effect on institutional misconduct and recidivism. MMI and VH were measured in two overlapping groups of male medium security federal prisoners and correlated with institutional misconduct and recidivism. Age and the main effect of MMI were significant predictors of general and aggressive infractions in 2,627 male prison inmates before the MMI × VH interaction term was entered into a Cox regression equation. Once the interaction term was entered into the equation, the MMI × VH interaction predicted relative hazard (risk) but neither main effect (MMI, VH) was significant. There was no interaction effect, however, when age, prior substance abuse, MMI, VH, and the MMI × VH interaction were used to predict general and aggressive recidivism in a group of 1,163 male inmates previously released from custody. Age and the VH main effect achieved significance in both recidivism analyses whereas the MMI main effect failed to achieve significance in either analysis. Whereas major mental illness was not a risk factor for future antisocial behavior in current and former prison inmates, when paired with a history of violence it predicted increased risk of general and aggressive institutional misconduct. Violence history, on the other hand, was a consistent predictor of recidivism. These results indicate that it may be advisable to review both mental health and violence history when screening inmates as a prelude to managing concomitant MMI and violence propensity.

  18. Anti-dentine Salivary SIgA in young adults with a history of dental trauma in deciduous teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Fleury SEIXAS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-dentin autoantibodies are associated with inflammatory root resorption in permanent teeth and are modulated by dental trauma and orthodontic force. However, it is not known whether deciduous tooth trauma can stimulate the development of a humoral immune response against dentin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of salivary SIgA reactivity against human dentin extract in young adults with a history of trauma in the primary dentition. A sample of 78 patients, aged 18 to 25, who had completed an early childhood (0 to 5 years old caries prevention program years earlier at the Universidade Estadual de LondrinaPediatric Clinic, underwent radiographic examination and salivary sampling. Anti-dentin SIgA levels were analyzed by immunoenzymatic assay and Western blotting. Although dental trauma to deciduous teeth had occurred in 34 (43.6% of the patients, no differences in SIgA levels were detected between individuals who had experienced trauma and those who had not (p > 0.05. Multivariate regression analysis showed no association between dental trauma and SIgA levels (p > 0.05. Patients with a history of deciduous trauma presented low levels of anti-dentin antibodies, associated with orthodontic root resorption (p

  19. Application of Monolithic Zirconia Ceramics in Dental Practice: A Case History Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk; Yeo, In-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Monolithic zirconia restorations increasingly have been used in dental practice in recent years and demonstrate superior mechanical performance compared with porcelain-veneered zirconia restorations. Recent advances in manufacturing technology have made possible the fabrication of translucent monolithic zirconia ceramics. This case report describes three clinical examples of monolithic zirconia fixed dental prostheses being used in the anterior and posterior regions and exhibiting acceptable esthetic results.

  20. Learning climate and feedback as predictors of dental students' self-determined motivation: The mediating role of basic psychological needs satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, C; Binnie, V; Wilson, S; Villegas, M J

    2017-06-23

    The aim of this study was to test the mediating role of the satisfaction of dental students' basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence and relatedness on the association between learning climate, feedback and student motivation. The latter was based on the self-determination theory's concepts of differentiation of autonomous motivation, controlled motivation and amotivation. A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted where 924 students completed self-reported questionnaires measuring motivation, perception of the learning climate, feedback and basic psychological needs satisfaction. Descriptive statistics, Cronbach's alpha scores and bivariate correlations were computed. Mediation of basic needs on each predictor-outcome association was tested based on a series of regression analyses. Finally, all variables were integrated into one structural equation model, controlling for the effects of age, gender and year of study. Cronbach's alpha scores were acceptable (.655 to .905). Correlation analyses showed positive and significant associations between both an autonomy-supportive learning climate and the quantity and quality of feedback received, and students' autonomous motivation, which decreased and became negative when correlated with controlled motivation and amotivation, respectively. Regression analyses revealed that these associations were indirect and mediated by how these predictors satisfied students' basic psychological needs. These results were corroborated by the structural equation analysis, in which data fit the model well and regression paths were in the expected direction. An autonomy-supportive learning climate and the quantity and quality of feedback were positive predictors of students' autonomous motivation and negative predictors of amotivation. However, this was an indirect association mediated by the satisfaction of students' basic psychological needs. Consequently, supporting students' needs of autonomy, competence and

  1. Predictors of Academic Success for the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination and the Southern Regional Testing Agency Clinical Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efurd, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose for conducting this study was to investigate and describe the relationship between applicant criteria for a dental hygiene program and subsequent outcomes on credentialing exams: the National Board Dental Hygiene Exam and the Southern Regional Testing Agency clinical exam. Because admission criteria play a crucial role in applicant…

  2. Overjet, overbite and dental midline shift as predictors of tooth size discrepancy in a Bangladeshi population and a graphical overview of global tooth size ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Iida, Junichiro

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to measure and compare tooth size ratios in a Bangladeshi population across the following groups: those with normal occlusion, crowding or spacing; those with normal, increased or decreased overjet; those with normal, increased or decreased overbite; those with or without dental mid-line discrepancy; and those with or without lip competence. It also presents a graphical overview of the anterior and overall ratios from the study and using available global data. This study was performed on dental casts of 260 Bangladeshi individuals, comprising 114 males and 146 females (age range, 18-24 years, mean age = 20). The Bolton anterior ratio and overall ratio were determined for the following groups: those with normal occlusion, crowding or spacing; those with normal, increased or decreased overjet; those with normal, increased or decreased overbite; those with or without dental mid-line discrepancy; and those with or without lip competence. There were statistically significant differences in the anterior tooth size ratios between those with or without dental mid-line discrepancy, with a mean value of 78.83% and 80.05%, respectively. Statistically significant differences were also found in overall tooth size ratios between those with normal, increased or decreased overjet and also between those with normal, increased or decreased overbite. Graphical presentations of anterior and overall ratios from the present study and using global data showed variations between populations. In the Bangladeshi population, increased tooth size ratios in subjects with dental mid-line discrepancy (anterior ratio) and also in those with decreased overjet or decreased overbite (overall ratio) may be predictors of tooth size discrepancies. The graphical overview also suggests that different international ethnic groups display unique Bolton ratios.

  3. Natural history and long-term impact of dental fluorosis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Loc G; Ha, Diep H; Spencer, A John

    2016-01-18

    The study assessed longitudinal changes in the presentation of dental fluorosis and evaluated the impact of fluorosis on the perception of oral health among young adults. Prospective follow-up study during 2011-12 of a population-based study in South Australia conducted between 2003 and 2004. 8-13-year-old children initially examined in 2003 and 2004. Dental fluorosis was assessed with the Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF) Index. The impact on perceptions of oral health by the study participants and their parents was assessed with the Global Rating of Oral Health (GROH). Pairwise comparative analysis of the presentation of fluorosis was conducted at the individual and tooth levels. Multivariable models of changes in fluorosis were generated. An ordinal logistic regression model was used to evaluate the association between GROH with dental fluorosis, caries and other factors. A total of 314 participants completed the follow-up questionnaires and dental examination. Over 60% of teeth scored as TF 1 at baseline were scored as TF 0 at follow-up; 66% of teeth scored as TF 2 or 3 at baseline were scored as TF 0 or 1 at follow-up. In multivariable models, changes in fluorosis were not significantly associated with socio-economic factors or oral health behaviours, confirming that they were the result of a natural process. Perceptions of poor oral health were significantly associated with the number of untreated decayed tooth surfaces at follow-up, but not with fluorosis. Very mild and mild dental fluorosis diminished with time. Dental fluorosis did not have a negative impact on perceptions of oral health.

  4. Improving Clinical Practice: What Dentists Need to Know about the Association between Dental Fear and a History of Sexual Violence Victimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Houman Hadad

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests lack of dentist knowledge and uncertainty about how clinical practice can be improved when dealing with victims of sexual violence. This systematic review presents a synthesis of the available literature, which examined the association between dental fear and a history of sexual violence victimisation. All studies indicated, to various degrees, that dental fear is associated with a history of sexual violence victimisation. The analysis identified several common themes including a perception of lack of control, avoidance behaviours, experiences of flashbacks, feelings of embarrassment, difficulties with the physical proximity to the dentist, the sex of the dentist reminding patients of the perpetrator, being placed into a horizontal body position, the specific impact of fellatio, the smell of latex, experienced lack of knowledge of dental professionals leading to insensitive treatment as well as revictimisation experiences, and the occurrence of disproportionate dental problems among patients who had experienced event(s) of sexual violence. All these themes are discussed in detail. Specific strategies are offered to assist dental practitioners in providing sensitive treatment for patients with a history of sexual violence. Additionally, several suggestions are made that may assist both researchers and dental practitioners alike. PMID:25663839

  5. Improving Clinical Practice: What Dentists Need to Know about the Association between Dental Fear and a History of Sexual Violence Victimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Houman Hadad; Guggisberg, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests lack of dentist knowledge and uncertainty about how clinical practice can be improved when dealing with victims of sexual violence. This systematic review presents a synthesis of the available literature, which examined the association between dental fear and a history of sexual violence victimisation. All studies indicated, to various degrees, that dental fear is associated with a history of sexual violence victimisation. The analysis identified several common themes including a perception of lack of control, avoidance behaviours, experiences of flashbacks, feelings of embarrassment, difficulties with the physical proximity to the dentist, the sex of the dentist reminding patients of the perpetrator, being placed into a horizontal body position, the specific impact of fellatio, the smell of latex, experienced lack of knowledge of dental professionals leading to insensitive treatment as well as revictimisation experiences, and the occurrence of disproportionate dental problems among patients who had experienced event(s) of sexual violence. All these themes are discussed in detail. Specific strategies are offered to assist dental practitioners in providing sensitive treatment for patients with a history of sexual violence. Additionally, several suggestions are made that may assist both researchers and dental practitioners alike.

  6. Improving Clinical Practice: What Dentists Need to Know about the Association between Dental Fear and a History of Sexual Violence Victimisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houman Hadad Larijani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anecdotal evidence suggests lack of dentist knowledge and uncertainty about how clinical practice can be improved when dealing with victims of sexual violence. This systematic review presents a synthesis of the available literature, which examined the association between dental fear and a history of sexual violence victimisation. All studies indicated, to various degrees, that dental fear is associated with a history of sexual violence victimisation. The analysis identified several common themes including a perception of lack of control, avoidance behaviours, experiences of flashbacks, feelings of embarrassment, difficulties with the physical proximity to the dentist, the sex of the dentist reminding patients of the perpetrator, being placed into a horizontal body position, the specific impact of fellatio, the smell of latex, experienced lack of knowledge of dental professionals leading to insensitive treatment as well as revictimisation experiences, and the occurrence of disproportionate dental problems among patients who had experienced event(s of sexual violence. All these themes are discussed in detail. Specific strategies are offered to assist dental practitioners in providing sensitive treatment for patients with a history of sexual violence. Additionally, several suggestions are made that may assist both researchers and dental practitioners alike.

  7. An Analysis of Predictors of History Content Knowledge: Implications for Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Paul G.; Heafner, Tina L.; Lambert, Richard G.

    2017-01-01

    How and to what extent students learn history content is a complicated process, drawing from the instructional opportunities they experience; the policy prioritization of history/social studies instruction in schools; and their own cultural perspectives toward the past. In an attempt to better understand the complex inter-play among these…

  8. Concordance and Contrast Between Community-Based Physicians' and Dentist Anesthesiologists' History and Physicals in Outpatient Pediatric Dental Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thikkurissy, Sarat; Smiley, Megann; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare history and physical examinations (H&Ps) done by community-based physicians and dentist anesthesiologists for children undergoing general anesthesia for dental rehabilitation. One hundred sixty-eight records were evaluated from the Nationwide Children's Hospital Dental Surgery Center of patients anesthetized between June 2006 and March 2007. These patients had H&Ps completed by both a community-based physician and a dentist anesthesiologist prior to general anesthesia. H&P forms were reviewed by the 3 authors to identify missing data, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, and impact on care. There was a statistically significant difference with respect to 10 of 17 sections examined, with the community-based physicians' H&Ps tending to be incomplete more often. Over 20% of community-based physicians made no mention of the history of present illness. One third of all physician H&Ps were missing vital sign recordings. No significant difference was noted between the physicians' and dentist anesthesiologists' ratings of ASA status. The physician H&P altered course of anesthesia treatment in <1% of studied cases. Statistically significant deficiencies were noted in the physician H&P in 60% of categories. PMID:18547151

  9. Delirium and mental health history as predictors of aggression in individuals with dementia in inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Tracy; Paulson, Daniel; Macri, Lisa; Dubin, Leslie

    2016-09-27

    Aggressive behaviors by patients with dementia present risk to health care workers and patients. An information processing model, developed to study aggressive behaviors among children, was applied to study aggression among older hospital patients with dementia. Hypotheses were that delirium and mental health or depression history, would relate to increased risk of aggressive behaviors. Electronic medical records were sampled for one year (n = 5008) and screened using the EMERSE search engine and hand review for dementia (n = 505) and aggressive behavior in individuals with dementia (n = 121). Records were reviewed for mental health history and presence of delirium. Regression analyses found interaction effects representing delirium and mental health or depression history associated with greater risk of aggressive behavior. Significant main effects were found for both dementia and mental health or depression history. Of the lowest risk group, 12% of patients exhibited aggression compared to 24%-35% of those with delirium, mental health or depression history, or the combination of these risk factors. Delirium is the leading correlate of aggressive behaviors in hospitalized patients with dementia, and delirium or history of mental health diagnosis may lead to increased risk of aggressive behaviors in this setting.

  10. Dental development and life history in living African and Asian apes

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Jay; Schwartz, Gary T.

    2009-01-01

    Life-history inference is an important aim of paleoprimatology, but life histories cannot be discerned directly from the fossil record. Among extant primates, the timing of many life-history attributes is correlated with the age at emergence of the first permanent molar (M1), which can therefore serve as a means to directly compare the life histories of fossil and extant species. To date, M1 emergence ages exist for only a small fraction of extant primate species and consist primarily of data...

  11. Predictors of barefoot plantar pressure during walking in patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and a history of ulceration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Barn

    Full Text Available Elevated dynamic plantar foot pressures significantly increase the risk of foot ulceration in diabetes mellitus. The aim was to determine which factors predict plantar pressures in a population of diabetic patients who are at high-risk of foot ulceration.Patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and a history of ulceration were eligible for inclusion in this cross sectional study. Demographic data, foot structure and function, and disease-related factors were recorded and used as potential predictor variables in the analyses. Barefoot peak pressures during walking were calculated for the heel, midfoot, forefoot, lesser toes, and hallux regions. Potential predictors were investigated using multivariate linear regression analyses. 167 participants with mean age of 63 years contributed 329 feet to the analyses.The regression models were able to predict between 6% (heel and 41% (midfoot of the variation in peak plantar pressures. The largest contributing factor in the heel model was glycosylated haemoglobin concentration, in the midfoot Charcot deformity, in the forefoot prominent metatarsal heads, in the lesser toes hammer toe deformity and in the hallux previous ulceration. Variables with local effects (e.g. foot deformity were stronger predictors of plantar pressure than global features (e.g. body mass, age, gender, or diabetes duration.The presence of local deformity was the largest contributing factor to barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in high-risk diabetic patients and should therefore be adequately managed to reduce plantar pressure and ulcer risk. However, a significant amount of variance is unexplained by the models, which advocates the quantitative measurement of plantar pressures in the clinical risk assessment of the patient.

  12. Life history traits as predictors of plant rarity, with particular reference to hemiparasitic Orobanchaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, RM; Kwak, MM

    2005-01-01

    We made a comparison between life history and reproductive characteristics of a group of Dutch rare (30) and common (105) plant species, all dicotyledonous and insect-visited forbs. The traits life span, clonality, breeding system, seed production, seed dispersal, and soil seed bank longevity are co

  13. The History and Timing of Depression Onset as Predictors of Young Adult Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayman, Mathew D.; Lloyd, Donald A.; Ueno, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Depression often emerges early in the lifecourse and is consistently shown to be associated with poor self-esteem. The 3 main objectives of the current study are to (1) evaluate the association between a history major depression and self-esteem in young adulthood, (2) assess the relationship between timing of depression onset and young adult…

  14. Early Predictors of Dyslexia in Chinese Children: Familial History of Dyslexia, Language Delay, and Cognitive Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lam, Fanny; Lam, Catherine; Chan, Becky; Fong, Cathy Y. C.; Wong, Terry T. Y.; Wong, Simpson W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This work tested the rates at which Chinese children with either language delay or familial history of dyslexia at age 5 manifested dyslexia at age 7, identified which cognitive skills at age 5 best distinguished children with and without dyslexia at age 7, and examined how these early abilities predicted subsequent literacy skills.…

  15. Early Predictors of Dyslexia in Chinese Children: Familial History of Dyslexia, Language Delay, and Cognitive Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride-Chang, Catherine; Lam, Fanny; Lam, Catherine; Chan, Becky; Fong, Cathy Y. C.; Wong, Terry T. Y.; Wong, Simpson W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This work tested the rates at which Chinese children with either language delay or familial history of dyslexia at age 5 manifested dyslexia at age 7, identified which cognitive skills at age 5 best distinguished children with and without dyslexia at age 7, and examined how these early abilities predicted subsequent literacy skills.…

  16. The History and Timing of Depression Onset as Predictors of Young-Adult Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Donald A.; Ueno, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Depression often emerges early in the lifecourse and is consistently shown to be associated with poor self-esteem. The three main objectives of the current study are to (1) evaluate the association between a history major depression and self-esteem in young adulthood; (2) assess the relationship between timing of depression onset and young adult self-esteem; and (3) help rule out the alternative interpretation that the relationship between major depression and self-esteem is due to state dependence bias stemming from recent depressive symptoms and stressful life events. To address these objectives we use data from a two-wave panel study based on a community sample of young adults in Miami-Dade County, Florida (n = 1,197). Results indicated a history of major depression during sensitive periods of social development is associated with negative changes in self-esteem over a two-year period during the transition to young adulthood. Among those with a history of depression, earlier onset was more problematic than later onset for young adult self-esteem, although the difference disappeared once the level of self-esteem two years prior was controlled. The linkages between the history and timing of depression onset with self-esteem were observed net of recent depressive symptoms and stressful life events, and thus robust to an alternative interpretation of state dependence. The findings support the argument that major depression, especially if it develops earlier during child-adolescent development, has negative consequences for one’s self-esteem. PMID:21860585

  17. Whale baleen trace element signatures: a predictor of environmental life history?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox Freeburg, E.; Brault, S.; Mayo, C.; Oktay, S.; Hannigan, R.

    2009-12-01

    The analysis of trace element composition of biogenic structures (e.g., otoliths, feathers) by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) provides unique insights into the environmental life history of individuals. We studied the trace element chemistry of right whale baleens in an attempt to reconstruct migration patterns. Though much is known about the feeding and breeding habitats of these whales, little is known about the location in which they spend most of their adult years. Baleens, made of keratin, grow continuously and are metabolically inactive. Previous work showed that the stable isotope chemistry along the length of a baleen records changes in diet, such as weaning. Baleen chemistry should, therefore, also record the environmental life history of the individual. Trace metal chemistry along a single baleen plate from a right whale were analyzed by LA-ICP-MS. Semi-quantitative elemental signatures were obtained using NIST 612 (glass standard) and MACS-3 (calcium carbonate standard). These concentrations were then compared for accuracy to acid digested baleen laterally adjacent to the laser ablation site via aqueous ICP-MS. Elemental chemistry was compared to known feeding/breeding locations of the individual (water chemistry). Using these comparisons as well as principal components analysis, life history of the individual was reconstructed. Development of an in-house keratin standard is in progress and is expected to strengthen the confidence in results. Future work is expected to bring a more complete knowledge of right whale wintering habits.

  18. Gender differences in trauma history and symptoms as predictors of relapse to alcohol and drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Jaimee L; Blom, Thomas J; Anthenelli, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether there are gender-specific associations between trauma exposure and alcohol or drug relapse in alcohol-dependent adults. Participants were 51 men (n = 24) and women (n = 27) with alcohol dependence, 22 (43.1%) of whom relapsed during study participation. Severity of childhood trauma; number of lifetime events evoking fear, helplessness, or horror; and current trauma symptoms all predicted relapse in women, but not in men. These findings highlight the importance of assessing trauma history and providing treatment of trauma-related symptoms for individuals with alcohol and drug dependence, and for women in particular.

  19. The Natural History and Predictors for Intervention in Patients with Small Renal Mass Undergoing Active Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Bahouth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To describe the natural history of small renal mass on active surveillance and identify parameters that could help in predicting the need for intervention in patients with small renal masses undergoing active surveillance. We also discuss the need for renal biopsy in the management of these patients. Methods. A retrospective analysis of 78 renal masses ≤4 cm diagnosed at our Urology Department at Bnai Zion Medical Center between September 2003 and March 2012. Results. Seventy patients with 78 small renal masses were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 68 years (47–89. The mean follow-up period was 34 months (12–112. In 54 of 78 masses there was a growth of at least 2 mm between imaging on last available follow-up and diagnosis. Eight of the 54 (15% masses which grew in size underwent a nephron-sparing surgery, of which two were oncocytomas and six were renal cell carcinoma. Growth rate and mass diameter on diagnosis were significantly greater in the group of patients who underwent a surgery. Conclusions. Small renal masses might eventually be managed by active surveillance without compromising survival or surgical approach. All masses that were eventually excised underwent a nephron-sparing surgery. None of the patients developed metastases.

  20. Evaluating hair as a predictor of blood mercury: the influence of ontogenetic phase and life history in pinnipeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sarah H.; McHuron, Elizabeth A.; Kennedy, Stephanie N.; Ackerman, Josh; Rea, Lorrie D.; Castellini, J. Margaret; O'Hara, Todd M.; Costa, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) biomonitoring of pinnipeds increasingly utilizes nonlethally collected tissues such as hair and blood. The relationship between total Hg concentrations ([THg]) in these tissues is not well understood for marine mammals, but it can be important for interpretation of tissue concentrations with respect to ecotoxicology and biomonitoring. We examined [THg] in blood and hair in multiple age classes of four pinniped species. For each species, we used paired blood and hair samples to quantify the ability of [THg] in hair to predict [THg] in blood at the time of sampling and examined the influence of varying ontogenetic phases and life history of the sampled animals. Overall, we found that the relationship between [THg] in hair and blood was affected by factors including age class, weaning status, growth, and the time difference between hair growth and sample collection. Hair [THg] was moderately to strongly predictive of current blood [THg] for adult female Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus), adult female California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), and adult harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), whereas hair [THg] was poorly predictive or not predictive (different times of year) of blood [THg] for adult northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris). Within species, except for very young pups, hair [THg] was a weaker predictor of blood [THg] for prereproductive animals than for adults likely due to growth, variability in foraging behavior, and transitions between ontogenetic phases. Our results indicate that the relationship between hair [THg] and blood [THg] in pinnipeds is variable and that ontogenetic phase and life history should be considered when interpreting [THg] in these tissues.

  1. Simulation of patient encounters using a virtual patient in periodontology instruction of dental students: design, usability, and learning effect in history-taking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittek Janda, M; Mattheos, N; Nattestad, A; Wagner, A; Nebel, D; Färbom, C; Lê, D-H; Attström, R

    2004-08-01

    Simulations are important educational tools in the development of health care competence. This study describes a virtual learning environment (VLE) for diagnosis and treatment planning in oral health care. The VLE is a web-based, database application where the learner uses free text communication on the screen to interact with patient data. The VLE contains forms for history taking, clinical images, clinical data and X-rays. After reviewing the patient information, the student proposes therapy and makes prognostic evaluations of the case in free text. A usability test of the application was performed with seven dental students. The usability test showed that the software responded with correct answers to the majority of the free text questions. The application is generic in its basic functions and can be adapted to other dental or medical subject areas. A randomised controlled trial was carried out with 39 students who attended instruction in history taking with problem-based learning cases, lectures and seminars. In addition, 16 of the 39 students were randomly chosen to practise history taking using the virtual patient prior to their first patient encounter. The performance of each student was recorded on video during the patient sessions. The type and order of the questions asked by the student and the degree of empathy displayed towards the patient were analysed systematically on the videos. The data indicate that students who also undertook history taking with a virtual patient asked more relevant questions, spent more time on patient issues, and performed a more complete history interview compared with students who had only undergone standard teaching. The students who had worked with the virtual patient also seemed to have more empathy for the patients than the students who had not. The practising of history taking with a virtual patient appears to improve the capability of dental students to take a relevant oral health history.

  2. Predictors of dentists' behaviours in delivering prevention in primary dental care in England: using the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Huda; Kolliakou, Anna; Ntouva, Antiopi; Murphy, Marie; Newton, Tim; Tsakos, Georgios; Watt, Richard G

    2016-02-08

    To explore the factors predicting preventive behaviours among NHS dentists in Camden, Islington and Haringey in London, using constructs from the Theory of Planned Behaviour. A cross-sectional survey of NHS dentists working in North Central London was conducted. A self-completed questionnaire based on the theoretical framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour was developed. It assessed dentists' attitudes, current preventive activities, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control in delivering preventive care. In model 1, logistic regression was conducted to assess the relationship between a range of preventive behaviours (diet, smoking and alcohol) and the three TPB constructs attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control. Model 2 was adjusted for intention. Overall, 164 questionnaires were returned (response rate: 55.0%). Dentists' attitudes were important predictors of preventive behaviours among a sample of dentists in relation to asking and providing diet, alcohol and tobacco advice. A dentist was 3.73 times (95 % CI: 1.70, 8.18) more likely ask about a patient's diet, if they had a positive attitude towards prevention, when adjusted for age, sex and intention. A similar pattern emerged for alcohol advice (OR 2.35, 95 % CI 1.12, 4.96). Dentists who had a positive attitude were also 2.59 times more likely to provide smoking cessation advice. The findings of this study have demonstrated that dentists' attitudes are important predictors of preventive behaviours in relation to delivery of diet, smoking and alcohol advice.

  3. Predictors of HIV-risk sexual behavior: examining lifetime sexual and physical abuse histories in relation to substance use and psychiatric problem severity among ex-offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, John M; Rodriguez, Jaclyn; Bloomer, Craig; Jason, Leonard A

    2014-01-01

    Lifetime histories of sexual and physical abuse have been associated with increased HIV-risk sexual behavior, and some studies have identified other variables associated with these relationships. However, there is a dearth of literature that has critically examined abuse histories and HIV-risk sexual behavior in relation to these other variables. Predictors of HIV-risk sexual behavior were analyzed among a sample of ex-offenders who were completing inpatient substance dependence treatment to identify factors related to increases in HIV-risk sexual behavior beyond that of abuse histories. Hierarchical linear regression was conducted to examine sociodemographic characteristics, recent substance use, and current psychiatric problem severity in addition to lifetime histories of sexual/physical abuse in a cross-sectional design. Gender, substance use, and psychiatric problem severity predicted increases in HIV-risk sexual behavior beyond what was predicted by abuse histories. Proportionately more women than men reported abuse histories. In addition, significantly more unprotected sexual than safer sexual practices were observed, but differences in these practices based on lifetime abuse histories and gender were not significant. Findings suggest recent substance use and current psychiatric problem severity are greater risk factors for HIV-risk sexual behavior than lifetime abuse histories among persons who have substance use disorders.

  4. Parental history of premature myocardial infarction is a stronger predictor of increased carotid intima-media thickness than parental history of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, S; Gaeta, G; Cuomo, V; Guarini, P; Cuomo, S; Capozzi, G; Tudisca, G; Madrid, A; Trevisan, M

    2011-06-01

    An increased carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is detectable in young subjects with parental history of premature myocardial infarction (PHPMI) or hypertension (PHH). In this study we evaluated if PHPMI and PHH exert a different influence on carotid IMT and if their conjunction produces additive effects. High-resolution B-mode ultrasonographic evaluation of common carotid artery IMT was acquired from 48 subjects without PHPMI and PHH (22 males, 26 females; mean age 22.1±4.9 years; controls), 24 age- (±1 year) and sex-matched subjects with PHH without PHPMI (PHH-positive/PHPMI-negative subjects), 24 age- and sex-matched subjects with PHPMI without PHH (PHH-negative/PHPMI-positive subjects) and 24 age- and sex-matched subjects with both PHPMI and PHH (PHH/PHPMI-positive subjects). Lipid profile, resting blood pressure, smoking behaviour and body mass index (BMI) were also assessed. Carotid IMT was smaller in controls (0.41±0.07mm) compared to PHH-positive/PHPMI-negative subjects (0.47±0.10, p=0.023), to PHH-negative/PHPMI-positive subjects (0.54±0.11, p<0.001) and to PHH/PHPMI-positive subjects (0.52±0.10mm, p<0.001). Carotid IMT was greater in PHH-negative/PHPMI-positive (p=0.006) and in PHH/PHPMI-positive (p=0.031) than in PHH-positive/PHPMI-negative subjects. No difference in carotid IMT was evident between PHH-negative/PHPMI-positive and PHH/PHPMI-positive subjects (p=0.549). In the comparison among subjects using multiple regression analysis, only PHPMI, age and BMI were independently associated with carotid IMT. In healthy young subjects with PHPMI and/or PHH, carotid IMT is increased. PHPMI is a stronger predictor of increased carotid IMT than PHH. PHH in conjunction with PHPMI does not add any further detrimental effect on carotid IMT.

  5. Historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jens Aage

    Historie i serien handler om læreplaner og læremidler og deres brug i skolefaget historie. Bogen indeholder nyttige redskaber til at analysere og vurdere læremidler......Historie i serien handler om læreplaner og læremidler og deres brug i skolefaget historie. Bogen indeholder nyttige redskaber til at analysere og vurdere læremidler...

  6. C-reactive protein, waist circumference, and family history of heart attack are independent predictors of body iron stores in apparently healthy premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ortegón, M F; Arbeláez, A; Mosquera, M; Méndez, F; Aguilar-de Plata, C

    2012-08-01

    Ferritin levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prediction of ferritin levels by variables related to cardiometabolic disease risk in a multivariate analysis. For this aim, 123 healthy women (72 premenopausal and 51 posmenopausal) were recruited. Data were collected through procedures of anthropometric measurements, questionnaires for personal/familial antecedents, and dietary intake (24-h recall), and biochemical determinations (ferritin, C reactive protein (CRP), glucose, insulin, and lipid profile) in blood serum samples obtained. Multiple linear regression analysis was used and variables with no normal distribution were log-transformed for this analysis. In premenopausal women, a model to explain log-ferritin levels was found with log-CRP levels, heart attack familial history, and waist circumference as independent predictors. Ferritin behaves as other cardiovascular markers in terms of prediction of its levels by documented predictors of cardiometabolic disease and related disorders. This is the first report of a relationship between heart attack familial history and ferritin levels. Further research is required to evaluate the mechanism to explain the relationship of central body fat and heart attack familial history with body iron stores values.

  7. Dental education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people.

  8. Self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history as predictors of future falls in older women: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, A; Viljanen, A

    2010-01-01

    We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation, described as modification of task performance without perception of difficulty, predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. Our results suggest that combined measure of self-reported preclinical mobility limitation...... and fall history may offer one possibility for inexpensive fall-risk evaluation in clinical practice. INTRODUCTION: We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. METHODS: The study population consisted of 428 community...... mobility limitation. Fall history was recalled for previous 12 months and dichotomized. The incidence of future falls over 12 months was followed up with fall calendars. RESULTS: During the fall follow-up, a total of 440 falls were reported by 201 participants. Among those with fall history, women...

  9. Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been broadly termed dental fluorosis. What is dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is a condition that causes ... less than 2 milligrams per liter. What causes dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in ...

  10. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  11. The Developmental history of the dental filling materials%牙齿充填材料的改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚怡

    2008-01-01

    Caries may cause substantial defects in the hard tissue of teeth.The dental filling for de feets is an effective method to resume teeth complete form and masticatory function as well a8 aesthetic effects.The filling material is artificial restorative material to fill the dental defects.Tracing back the devel oping process of dental filling materials,we can see the advancement of stomotology of human beings.There was a revolutionary change in the filling materials from filling dental cavity with Chinese medicinal herbs to silver paste,from establishing the composition and proportion standardization of the silver amalgam filling materials to the application of new macromolecule compound resin.This is a continuous improvement and renewal in the idea and technology of dental filling treatment 80 that perfects the dental filling method and enables the retention of more healthy dental tissue.In addition,it pushes the development of dental aesthet ics,adhesives and technology.With the improvement of people's health standard,aesthetic demands and environmental awareness,compound resin restorative materials has become clinically preferred dental filling materials of doctors and patients in clinic.%龋病会造成牙体硬组织的实质性缺损,对缺损的充填是修复牙齿完整形态、恢复其咀嚼功能和美观的有效方法.充填材料是用于填补牙齿缺损的人工修复材料.追述牙齿充填材料的发展历程,可以看到人类口腔医学的进步.从中草药填塞牙洞到银膏补牙,从建立银汞合金充填材料成分与比例的标准化到新型高分子复合树脂的应用,牙齿充填材料发牛了革命性变化,使得牙齿充填治疗的理念与技术也在不断改进与更新,进一步完善了牙齿充填方法,使保留更多健康牙体组织成为可能,同时也推动了美学牙科、粘接材料和技术的发展.随着人们对健康标准和审美要求的不断提高,以及环保意识的增强,复合树脂修复

  12. Weight loss history as a predictor of weight loss: results from Phase I of the weight loss maintenance trial

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Valerie H.; McVay, Megan A.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Hollis, Jack F.; Coughlin, Janelle W.; Funk, Kristine L.; Gullion, Christina M.; Jerome, Gerald J.; Loria, Catherine M.; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D; Stevens, Victor J; Svetkey, Laura P; Brantley, Phillip J.

    2012-01-01

    Past studies have suggested that weight loss history is associated with subsequent weight loss. However, questions remain whether method and amount of weight lost in previous attempts impacts current weight loss efforts. This study utilized data from the Weight Loss Maintenance Trial to examine the association between weight loss history and weight loss outcomes in a diverse sample of high-risk individuals. Multivariate regression analysis was conducted to determine which specific aspects of ...

  13. Climatic and geographic predictors of life history variation in Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus): A range-wide synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard B.; Adamski, John M.; Anton, Thomas G.; Bailey, Robyn L.; Baker, Sarah J.; Bieser, Nickolas D.; Bell, Thomas A.; Bissell, Kristin M.; Bradke, Danielle R.; Campa, Henry; Casper, Gary S.; Cedar, Karen; Cross, Matthew D.; DeGregorio, Brett A.; Dreslik, Michael J.; Faust, Lisa J.; Harvey, Daniel S.; Hay, Robert W.; Jellen, Benjamin C.; Johnson, Brent D.; Johnson, Glenn; Kiel, Brooke D.; Kingsbury, Bruce A.; Kowalski, Matthew J.; Lee, Yu Man; Lentini, Andrew M.; Marshall, John C.; Mauger, David; Moore, Jennifer A.; Paloski, Rori A.; Phillips, Christopher A.; Pratt, Paul D.; Preney, Thomas; Prior, Kent A.; Promaine, Andrew; Redmer, Michael; Reinert, Howard K.; Rouse, Jeremy D.; Shoemaker, Kevin T.; Sutton, Scott; VanDeWalle, Terry J.; Weatherhead, Patrick J.; Wynn, Doug; Yagi, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating how life history traits vary geographically is important to understanding variation in population dynamics. Because many aspects of ectotherm life history are climate-dependent, geographic variation in climate is expected to have a large impact on population dynamics through effects on annual survival, body size, growth rate, age at first reproduction, size–fecundity relationship, and reproductive frequency. The Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus) is a small, imperiled North American rattlesnake with a distribution centered on the Great Lakes region, where lake effects strongly influence local conditions. To address Eastern Massasauga life history data gaps, we compiled data from 47 study sites representing 38 counties across the range. We used multimodel inference and general linear models with geographic coordinates and annual climate normals as explanatory variables to clarify patterns of variation in life history traits. We found strong evidence for geographic variation in six of nine life history variables. Adult female snout-vent length and neonate mass increased with increasing mean annual precipitation. Litter size decreased with increasing mean temperature, and the size–fecundity relationship and growth prior to first hibernation both increased with increasing latitude. The proportion of gravid females also increased with increasing latitude, but this relationship may be the result of geographically varying detection bias. Our results provide insights into ectotherm life history variation and fill critical data gaps, which will inform Eastern Massasauga conservation efforts by improving biological realism for models of population viability and climate change. PMID:28196149

  14. Predictors of dental caries among children 7-14 years old in Northwest Ethiopia: a community based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayele, Fenta A; Taye, Belaynew W; Ayele, Tadesse A; Gelaye, Kassahun A

    2013-01-18

    Dental caries in children remains a significant public health problem. It is a disease with multifactorial causes. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of dental caries among children between 7 to 14 years old. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Gondar town from June 2011 to September 2011. A total of 842 children were involved in the study. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select the children. Pretested and structured questionnaires were used to collect data from mothers. Clinical examination of children was done using dental caries criteria set by world health organization. Data were entered, cleaned and edited using EPI Info version 3.5.1 and exported to SPSS version 16.0 for analysis. Binary multiple logistic regression analyses was applied to test the association. Four hundred sixty three (55%) children were females. The prevalence of dental caries was 306(36.3%).The educational status of children's father (AOR=0.3, 95%CI, 0.17, 0.80), monthly household income (AOR=0.59, 95%CI, 0.01, 0.45), regular teeth brushing (AOR=0.08, 95% CI, 0.03, 0.20) and using mouth rinsing (AOR=0.40, 95% CI, 0.2, 0.80) were found statistically significantly associated with dental caries. Dental caries were high among children in Gondar town. Low socioeconomic status and poor oral hygiene practices were the influencing factors for dental caries. Oral hygiene, dietary habits and access to dental care services are supreme important for the prevention of the problem.

  15. Policy on reintegration of women with histories of substance abuse: A mixed methods study of predictors of relapse and facilitators of recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VanDeMark Nancy R

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The predominant U.S. policy approach toward individuals with substance abuse problems has relied on stigma and punishment by withholding access to education, cash assistance, housing, social support, and normal social roles. In contrast to this approach, the theory of reintegrative shaming asserts that providing individuals with the opportunity to reconnect with society is more effective in reducing potential to relapse to crime and drug abuse. Strategies that promote such reconnection include expanding access to basic needs and supportive relationships along with increasing opportunities to fully participate in mainstream social roles. Methods The present cross-sectional study examined the predictors of relapse and the facilitators of recovery in a sample of 325 women with histories of substance abuse. Analysis of secondary data, collected as part of a national cross-site study, employed a mixed methods approach conducting (1 logistic regression to examine the predictors of relapse and (2 an inductive qualitative analysis of responses from open-ended items to explore the women's perceptions of barriers to and facilitators of recovery. Results Results suggest that lower levels of instrumental support, affective support, and participation in normal roles (such as parent, employee, student, and citizen are significant predictors of relapse to drug use and criminal behaviors. Qualitative findings support the quantitative results, revealing that participating women perceived the variables of support and role participation as critical in facilitating their recovery. They also noted the importance of individual characteristics such as optimism and strength and emphasized the significance of their relationship with their children in motivating them to avoid relapse. Findings suggest that punitive policies toward women with substance abuse histories may be ineffective. Conclusion The author concludes that current policies designed to

  16. Girls with Emotional Disturbance and a History of Arrest: Characteristics and School-Based Predictors of Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Josephs, Nikki L.; Lunde, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that girls receiving special education services for Emotional Disturbance (ED) may have unique characteristics and needs. Similarly, juvenile justice research has identified unique characteristics of court-involved girls. This study examined characteristics of girls with ED and a history of arrest. Additionally, classroom-based…

  17. DENTAL HOT-COLD SENSITIVITY AND TRAUMATIC DENTAL INJURIES

    OpenAIRE

    Traebert, Jefferson; Martins,Luiz Gustavo Teixeira; Traebert, Eliane Silva de Azevedo; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Although several studies have indicated negative impacts of traumatic dental injuries on children’s quality of life, virtually none of them have explored the possible association between them and the occurrence and dental hot-cold sensitivity. The aim of this study was to study the possible association of hot-cold dental sensitivity and history of traumatic dental injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving a representative sample of 11- to 14-year-old schoolchildre...

  18. Hominin life history: reconstruction and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Shannen L; Wood, Bernard

    2008-04-01

    In this review we attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary history of hominin life history from extant and fossil evidence. We utilize demographic life history theory and distinguish life history variables, traits such as weaning, age at sexual maturity, and life span, from life history-related variables such as body mass, brain growth, and dental development. The latter are either linked with, or can be used to make inferences about, life history, thus providing an opportunity for estimating life history parameters in fossil taxa. We compare the life history variables of modern great apes and identify traits that are likely to be shared by the last common ancestor of Pan-Homo and those likely to be derived in hominins. All great apes exhibit slow life histories and we infer this to be true of the last common ancestor of Pan-Homo and the stem hominin. Modern human life histories are even slower, exhibiting distinctively long post-menopausal life spans and later ages at maturity, pointing to a reduction in adult mortality since the Pan-Homo split. We suggest that lower adult mortality, distinctively short interbirth intervals, and early weaning characteristic of modern humans are derived features resulting from cooperative breeding. We evaluate the fidelity of three life history-related variables, body mass, brain growth and dental development, with the life history parameters of living great apes. We found that body mass is the best predictor of great ape life history events. Brain growth trajectories and dental development and eruption are weakly related proxies and inferences from them should be made with caution. We evaluate the evidence of life history-related variables available for extinct species and find that prior to the transitional hominins there is no evidence of any hominin taxon possessing a body size, brain size or aspects of dental development much different from what we assume to be the primitive life history pattern for the Pan-Homo clade. Data for

  19. Long-term implant prognosis in patients with and without a history of chronic periodontitis: a 10-year prospective cohort study of the ITI Dental Implant System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoussis, Ioannis K; Salvi, Giovanni E; Heitz-Mayfield, Lisa J A; Brägger, Urs; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Lang, Niklaus P

    2003-06-01

    The aim of this 10-year study was to compare the failure, success and complication rates between patients having lost their teeth due to periodontitis or other reasons. Fifty-three patients who received 112 hollow screw implants (HS) of the ITI Dental Implant System were divided into two groups: group A - eight patients with 21 implants having lost their teeth due to chronic periodontitis; group B - forty five patients with 91 implants without a history of periodontitis. One and 10 years after surgical placement, clinical and radiographic parameters were assessed. The incidences of peri-implantitis were noticed over the 10 years of regular supportive periodontal therapy. Success criteria at 10 years were set at: pocket probing depth (PPD) periodontitis (group A) was 90.5%, while for the group with no past history of periodontitis (group B) it was 96.5%. Group A had a significantly higher incidence of peri-implantitis than group B (28.6% vs. 5.8%). With the success criteria set, 52.4% in group A and 79.1% of the implants in group B were successful. With a threshold set at PPD periodontitis demonstrated lower survival rates and more biological complications than patients with implants replacing teeth lost due to reasons other than periodontitis during a 10-year maintenance period. Furthermore, setting of thresholds for success criteria is crucial to the reporting of success rates.

  20. Identification of fall risk predictors in daily life measurements: gait characteristics' reliability and association with self-reported fall history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispens, Sietse M; van Schooten, Kimberley S; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Beek, Peter J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-01-01

    Background. Gait characteristics extracted from trunk accelerations during daily life locomotion are complementary to questionnaire- or laboratory-based gait and balance assessments and may help to improve fall risk prediction. Objective. The aim of this study was to identify gait characteristics that are associated with self-reported fall history and that can be reliably assessed based on ambulatory data collected during a single week. Methods. We analyzed 2 weeks of trunk acceleration data (DynaPort MoveMonitor, McRoberts) collected among 113 older adults (age range, 65-97 years). During episodes of locomotion, various gait characteristics were determined, including local dynamic stability, interstride variability, and several spectral features. For each characteristic, we performed a negative binomial regression analysis with the participants' self-reported number of falls in the preceding year as outcome. Reliability of gait characteristics was assessed in terms of intraclass correlations between both measurement weeks. Results. The percentages of spectral power below 0.7 Hz along the vertical and anteroposterior axes and below 10 Hz along the mediolateral axis, as well as local dynamic stability, local dynamic stability per stride, gait smoothness, and the amplitude and slope of the dominant frequency along the vertical axis, were associated with the number of falls in the preceding year and could be reliably assessed (all P 0.75). Conclusions. Daily life gait characteristics are associated with fall history in older adults and can be reliably estimated from a week of ambulatory trunk acceleration measurements.

  1. Perceived Impact of Dental Pain on the Quality of Life of Preschool Children and Their Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marayza Alves Clementino

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the perceived impact of dental caries and dental pain on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL among preschool children and their families. A cross-sectional study was conduct with 843 preschool children in Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered a questionnaire on socio-demographic information, their child's general/oral health and history of dental pain. The Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale was administered to determine the perceived impact of caries and dental pain on OHRQoL. The children underwent an oral examination. Logistic regression for complex sample was used to determine associations between the dependent and independent variables (OR: Odds ratio, α = 5%. The independents variables that had a p-value <0.20 in the bivariate analysis were selected for the multivariate model. The prevalence of dental caries and dental pain was 66.3% and 9.4%, respectively. Order of birth of the child, being the middle child (OR: 10.107, 95%CI: 2.008-50.869 and youngest child (OR: 3.276, 95%CI: 1.048-10.284 and dental pain (OR: 84.477, 95%CI: 33.076-215.759 were significant predictors of the perceived impact on OHRQOL for children. Poor perception of oral health was significant predictor of the perceived impact on OHRQOL for family (OR=7.397, 95%CI: 2.190-24.987. Dental caries was not associated with a perceived impact on the ORHQoL of either the children or their families. However, order of child birth and dental pain were indicators of impact of OHRQoL on preschool children and poor perception of oral health was indicators of impact on families.

  2. Life history as a predictor of salamander recovery rate from timber harvest in southern appalachian forests, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connette, Grant M; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2013-12-01

    Forest management often represents a balance between social, economic, and ecological objectives. In the eastern United States, numerous studies have established that terrestrial salamander populations initially decline in abundance following timber harvest, yet the large-scale and long-term consequences are relatively unknown. We used count data from terrestrial survey points to examine the relation between salamander abundance and historic timber harvest while accounting for imperfect detection of individuals. Overall, stream- and terrestrial-breeding salamanders appeared to differ by magnitude of population decline, rate of population recovery, and extent of recolonization from surrounding forest. Specifically, estimated abundance of both species groups was positively associated with stand age and recovery rates were predicted to increase over time for red-legged salamanders (Plethodon shermani) and decrease in stream-breeding species. Abundance of stream-breeding salamanders was predicted to reach a peak by 100 years after timber harvest, and the population growth rate of red-legged salamanders was predicted to undergo a significant increase 100 years after harvest. Estimated abundance of stream-breeding salamanders in young forest stands was also negatively associated with the distance to adjacent forest, a result that suggests immigration has a role in the recovery of these species. Our results indicate that salamander abundance in young forest stands may be only modestly lower than in more mature forest but that full recovery from timber harvest may take a substantial amount of time and that species life history may affect patterns of recovery. Historia de Vida como un Vaticinador de la Tasa de Recuperación de una Salamandra a la Colecta de Madera en los Bosques del Sur de los Apalaches, E.U.A.

  3. Latex Allergy in Dental Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermata A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber latex is found in numerous medical and dental products. Adverse latex reactions in dental patients and practitioners have significantly increased since the introduction of universal precautions for infection control. These reactions range from contact dermatitis to potentially life-threatening hypersensitivity. Patients with a history of spina bifida, urogenital anomalies, multiple surgical procedures, allergic reactions or atopy, health care personnel and latex production workers are at increased risk of latex allergy. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical history and laboratory tests. Identification of latex sources and the avoidance of latex exposure are critical for protecting both dental patients and dental personnel.

  4. Dental fluorosis in populations from Chiang Mai, Thailand with different fluoride exposures – Paper 1: assessing fluorosis risk, predictors of fluorosis and the potential role of food preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrady Michael G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the severity of dental fluorosis in selected populations in Chiang Mai, Thailand with different exposures to fluoride and to explore possible risk indicators for dental fluorosis. Methods Subjects were male and female lifetime residents aged 8–13 years. For each child the fluoride content of drinking and cooking water samples were assessed. Digital images were taken of the maxillary central incisors for later blind scoring for TF index (10% repeat scores. Interview data explored previous cooking and drinking water use, exposure to fluoride, infant feeding patterns and oral hygiene practices. Results Data from 560 subjects were available for analysis (298 M, 262 F. A weighted kappa of 0.80 was obtained for repeat photographic scores. The prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+ for subjects consuming drinking and cooking water with a fluoride concentration of 0.9 ppm F the prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+ rose to 37.3%. Drinking and cooking water at age 3, water used for infant formula and water used for preparing infant food all demonstrated an increase in fluorosis severity with increase in water fluoride level (p  Conclusions The consumption of drinking water with fluoride content >0.9 ppm and use of cooking water with fluoride content >1.6 ppm were associated with an increased risk of aesthetically significant dental fluorosis. Fluoride levels in the current drinking and cooking water sources were strongly correlated with fluorosis severity. Further work is needed to explore fluorosis risk in relation to total fluoride intake from all sources including food preparation.

  5. Dental fluorosis in populations from Chiang Mai, Thailand with different fluoride exposures - paper 1: assessing fluorosis risk, predictors of fluorosis and the potential role of food preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Michael G; Ellwood, Roger P; Srisilapanan, Patcharawan; Korwanich, Narumanas; Worthington, Helen V; Pretty, Iain A

    2012-06-21

    To determine the severity of dental fluorosis in selected populations in Chiang Mai, Thailand with different exposures to fluoride and to explore possible risk indicators for dental fluorosis. Subjects were male and female lifetime residents aged 8-13 years. For each child the fluoride content of drinking and cooking water samples were assessed. Digital images were taken of the maxillary central incisors for later blind scoring for TF index (10% repeat scores). Interview data explored previous cooking and drinking water use, exposure to fluoride, infant feeding patterns and oral hygiene practices. Data from 560 subjects were available for analysis (298 M, 262 F). A weighted kappa of 0.80 was obtained for repeat photographic scores. The prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+) for subjects consuming drinking and cooking water with a fluoride concentration of 0.9 ppm F the prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+) rose to 37.3%. Drinking and cooking water at age 3, water used for infant formula and water used for preparing infant food all demonstrated an increase in fluorosis severity with increase in water fluoride level (p fluorosis was 0.53 for exposure to high fluoride drinking (≥0.9 ppm) and cooking water (≥1.6 ppm). The consumption of drinking water with fluoride content >0.9 ppm and use of cooking water with fluoride content >1.6 ppm were associated with an increased risk of aesthetically significant dental fluorosis. Fluoride levels in the current drinking and cooking water sources were strongly correlated with fluorosis severity. Further work is needed to explore fluorosis risk in relation to total fluoride intake from all sources including food preparation.

  6. Dental fluorosis in populations from Chiang Mai, Thailand with different fluoride exposures – Paper 1: assessing fluorosis risk, predictors of fluorosis and the potential role of food preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the severity of dental fluorosis in selected populations in Chiang Mai, Thailand with different exposures to fluoride and to explore possible risk indicators for dental fluorosis. Methods Subjects were male and female lifetime residents aged 8–13 years. For each child the fluoride content of drinking and cooking water samples were assessed. Digital images were taken of the maxillary central incisors for later blind scoring for TF index (10% repeat scores). Interview data explored previous cooking and drinking water use, exposure to fluoride, infant feeding patterns and oral hygiene practices. Results Data from 560 subjects were available for analysis (298 M, 262 F). A weighted kappa of 0.80 was obtained for repeat photographic scores. The prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+) for subjects consuming drinking and cooking water with a fluoride concentration of 0.9 ppm F the prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+) rose to 37.3%. Drinking and cooking water at age 3, water used for infant formula and water used for preparing infant food all demonstrated an increase in fluorosis severity with increase in water fluoride level (p fluorosis was 0.53 for exposure to high fluoride drinking (≥0.9 ppm) and cooking water (≥1.6 ppm). Conclusions The consumption of drinking water with fluoride content >0.9 ppm and use of cooking water with fluoride content >1.6 ppm were associated with an increased risk of aesthetically significant dental fluorosis. Fluoride levels in the current drinking and cooking water sources were strongly correlated with fluorosis severity. Further work is needed to explore fluorosis risk in relation to total fluoride intake from all sources including food preparation. PMID:22720834

  7. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Domb, Ivor

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  8. Outcome of dental implants in patients with and without a history of periodontitis: a 5-year pragmatic multicentre retrospective cohort study of 1727 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianserra, Rodolfo; Cavalcanti, Raffaele; Oreglia, Francesco; Manfredonia, Massimo Francesco; Esposito, Marco

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of dental implants placed in patients with a history of periodontitis. Patients with no or mild history of periodontitis served as controls. A total of 1727 patients were consecutively treated in four private practices. Patients were divided into three groups according to their initial periodontal conditions assessed with a modified periodontal screening and recording (PSR) index: 630 patients were in the severe periodontitis (SP) group, 839 in the moderate periodontitis (MP) group, and 258 had no periodontitis (NP). Patients requiring periodontal treatment were treated prior to implantation. Various implant systems and procedures were used. In total, 3260 implants and 1707 implant-supported prostheses were placed in the SP group, 2813 implants and 1744 implant-supported prostheses in the MP group, and 647 implants and 424 implant-supported prostheses in the NP group. Mixed implant–tooth supported prostheses (98 prostheses in 89 patients) were not considered. Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant survival. Two-hundred and fifty patients were lost to follow-up 5 years after loading. Regarding prosthesis failures, 13 prostheses could not be placed or failed in 13 patients of the SP group (0.8%), 11 prostheses could not be placed or failed in 9 patients of the MP group (0.7%), and 3 prostheses failed in 3 patients of the NP group (0.9%). For implant failures, 130 (4.5%) implants failed in the SP group, 74 (3.1%) implants failed in the MP group, and 15 (3.0%) implants failed in the NP group. Most of the implant failures (90%) occurred before implant loading. Fitting a logistic regression for early implant failures and total implant failures, taking into account the clustering of implants in patients, there were no statistically significant differences between the three PSR groups (P > 0.05). Owing to the retrospective nature of this study, conclusions need to be interpreted with caution. A previous history of periodontal disease may not

  9. Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  10. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  11. Preditores da realização de consultas odontológicas de rotina e por problema em pré-escolares Predictores de la realización de consultas odontológicas de rutina y por problema en preescolares Predictors of dental visits for routine check-ups and for the resolution of problems among preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatriz Junqueira Camargo

    2012-02-01

    ógicos por preescolares y factores asociados. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal con 1.129 niños de cinco años de edad de la Cohorte de Nacimientos de Pelotas 2004, RS, de septiembre de 2009 a enero de 2010. Se registró el uso de servicio odontológico por lo menos una vez en la vida y el motivo para la primera consulta odontológica del niño. Las categorías del resultado fueron: haber realizado la primera consulta por rutina, para resolver un problema, o no haber ido nunca al dentista. Los exámenes bucales y las entrevistas se realizaron en los domicilios. Aspectos socioeconómicos y variables independientes ligadas a la madre y al niño fueron analizados por medio de regresión logística multinomial. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia de uso por cualquier motivo fue de 37,0%. Los principales predictores para consulta de rutina fueron nivel económico más elevado, madre con mayor escolaridad y haber recibido orientación sobre prevención. Los principales predictores para consulta por problema fueron haber sentido dolor en los últimos seis meses, madre con mayor escolaridad y haber recibido orientación sobre prevención. Cerca de 45,0% de las madres recibieron orientación de cómo prevenir caries, principalmente suministrada por dentistas. Hijos de madres con historia de mayor adherencia a programas de salud tuvieron mayor probabilidad de haber hecho una consulta odontológica de rutina. CONCLUSIONES: La tasa de utilización de los servicios odontológicos por preescolares fue inferior a la de consultas médicas (puericultura. Además de la renta y de la escolaridad, conductas maternas tienen papel importante en el uso por rutina. Relato de dolor en los últimos seis meses y número elevado de dientes afectados por caries, independientemente de los demás factores, estuvieron asociados al uso para resolver problema. Es necesaria la integración de acciones de salud bucal en los programas materno-infantiles.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of dental visits among preschool

  12. Perceived Impact of Dental Pain on the Quality of Life of Preschool Children and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementino, Marayza Alves; Gomes, Monalisa Cesarino; Pinto-Sarmento, Tássia Cristina de Almeida; Martins, Carolina Castro; Granville-Garcia, Ana Flávia; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the perceived impact of dental caries and dental pain on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among preschool children and their families. A cross-sectional study was conduct with 843 preschool children in Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered a questionnaire on socio-demographic information, their child's general/oral health and history of dental pain. The Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale was administered to determine the perceived impact of caries and dental pain on OHRQoL. The children underwent an oral examination. Logistic regression for complex sample was used to determine associations between the dependent and independent variables (OR: Odds ratio, α = 5%). The independents variables that had a p-value perceived impact on OHRQOL for children. Poor perception of oral health was significant predictor of the perceived impact on OHRQOL for family (OR=7.397, 95%CI: 2.190-24.987). Dental caries was not associated with a perceived impact on the ORHQoL of either the children or their families. However, order of child birth and dental pain were indicators of impact of OHRQoL on preschool children and poor perception of oral health was indicators of impact on families.

  13. Disparities in unmet dental need and dental care received by pregnant women in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Astha; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Garcia, A Isabel; Adams, Amy B; Cheng, Diana

    2014-09-01

    To examine prenatal dental care needs, utilization and oral health counseling among Maryland women who delivered a live infant during 2001-2003 and identify the factors associated with having a dental visit and having an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System is an ongoing population based surveillance system that collects information of women's attitudes and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. Logistic regression was used to model dental visits and unmet dental need using predictor variables for Maryland 2001-2003 births. Less than half of all women reported having a dental visit and receiving oral health advice during pregnancy. Twenty-five percent of women reported a need for dental care, of which 33 % did not receive dental care despite their perceived need. Multivariate modeling revealed that racial minorities, women who were not married and those with annual income dental visit. Women who were not married, had low annual income, were older than 40 years of age, had an unintended pregnancy and received prenatal care later than desired were most likely to have an unmet dental need during pregnancy. Despite reported needs and existing recommendations to include oral health as a component of prenatal care, less than half of pregnant women have a dental visit during their pregnancy. One-third of women with a dental problem did not have a dental visit highlighting the unmet need for dental care during pregnancy.

  14. The prevalence, causes, and relativity of dental anxiety in adult patients to irregular dental visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, Balgis O; Alagl, Adel S; Al-Ansari, Asim A

    2014-06-01

    To assess the frequency and causes of dental anxiety and their relation to irregular dental visits among adult dental patients. The Dental Anxiety Question (DAQ) included within a self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1025 patients attending the Interns' Dental Clinics in the Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from March 2012 to February 2013. A cross-sectional study design was used. The questionnaire consisted of 22 closed-ended questions divided into 4 sections; 1) demographics, 2) regularity of dental visits, and related causes, 3) DAQ, cancellation of dental appointments, history of previous trauma, dental anxiety provoking factors within dental environment and procedures, and 4) patients' status in dental clinics, preferences of dentists, and perceptions regarding dental anxiety. The prevalence of dental anxiety among the study sample was 27%. Anesthetic injection was the main factor of dental fear (88.2%), while dental surgical procedures (35.7%) and extractions (23%) were the most terrifying dental procedures. Lack of time (79.5%), cost (71.5%), far-situated dental services (62.2%), and fear (57.1%) were causes listed for irregular dental visits; while 31.3% had no specific reason. Irregular dental visits were not related to dental anxiety. Dental anxiety continues to be an obstacle despite the vast improvement in dentistry; and this raises an alert regarding personal and communication factors in the patient-dentist relationship. Factors such as equal distribution of dental services, time, and cost should also be addressed.

  15. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  16. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  17. Dental Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips ... offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants ...

  18. Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z INDEX | OOH SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Healthcare > Dental Assistants PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary What They ... of workers and occupations. What They Do -> What Dental Assistants Do About this section Assistants prepare and ...

  19. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  20. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  1. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  2. Tooth loss and dental caries in community-dwelling older adults in northern Manhattan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northridge, Mary E.; Ue, Frances V.; Borrell, Luisa N.; De La Cruz, Leydis D.; Chakraborty, Bibhas; Bodnar, Stephanie; Marshall, Stephen; Lamster, Ira B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine tooth loss and dental caries by sociodemographic characteristics from community-based oral health examinations conducted by dentists in northern Manhattan. Background The ElderSmile programme of the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine serves older adults with varying functional capacities across settings. This report is focused on relatively mobile, socially engaged participants who live in the impoverished communities of Harlem and Washington Heights/Inwood in northern Manhattan, New York City. Materials and Methods Self-reported sociodemographic characteristics and health and health care information were provided by community-dwelling ElderSmile participants aged 65 years and older who took part in community-based oral health education and completed a screening questionnaire. Oral health examinations were conducted by trained dentists in partnering prevention centres among ElderSmile participants who agreed to be clinically screened (90.8%). Results The dental caries experience of ElderSmile participants varied significantly by sociodemographic predictors and smoking history. After adjustment in a multivariable logistic regression model, older age, non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic race/ethnicity, and a history of current or former smoking were important predictors of edentulism. Conclusion Provision of oral health screenings in community-based settings may result in opportunities to intervene before oral disease is severe, leading to improved oral health for older adults. PMID:21718349

  3. Relative Importance of History of Heart Failure Hospitalization and N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Level as Predictors of Outcomes in Patients With Heart Failure and Preserved Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren L; Jhund, Pardeep S; Køber, Lars

    2015-01-01

    about the value of a history of HF hospitalization as a predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with HF and HF-PEF. METHODS: We estimated rates and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for the composite endpoint of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization, according to history of recent HF.......49 (95% CI: 4.04 to 4.99) per 100 person-years, respectively (HR: 2.71; 95% CI: 2.33 to 3.16). For patients with NT-proBNP concentrations >360 pg/ml (n = 1,299), the event rate was 11.51 (95% CI: 10.54 to 12.58) compared to 3.04 (95% CI: 2.63 to 3.52) per 100 person-years in those with a lower level...... of NT-proBNP (n = 1468) (HR: 3.19; 95% CI: 2.68 to 3.80). In patients with no recent HF hospitalization and NT-proBNP ≤360 pg/ml (n = 1,187), the event rate was 2.43 (95% CI: 2.03 to 2.90) compared with 17.79 (95% CI: 15.77 to 20.07) per 100 person-years when both risk predictors were present (n = 523...

  4. Dental amalgam: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations.

  5. Current trends in dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L.

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evoluti...

  6. Dental stories for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Ian W; Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; McKinney, Christy M; Scott, JoAnna M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate caregivers' preference regarding dental stories to prepare children with autism for dental visits. Caregivers of children with autism were allowed use of dental stories available via different media (paper, tablet computer, computer) and image types (comics or drawings, photographs, video). Caregivers completed pre- and postintervention surveys. Fisher's exact tests were used to determine associations between predictive factors and preferences. Forty initial and 16 follow-up surveys were completed. Subjects were primarily male (85%). Mean child age was 6.7 years. Nine (64%) caregivers found the dental story useful for themselves and their child. Two (14%) caregivers found the aid only helpful for themselves. Preferred media type was associated with language understanding (p = .038) and home media preference (p = .002). Practitioners should consider using dental stories to help prepare families and children for dental visits. Individual preferences for dental stories vary; using prior history can aid in selection. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Association between History of Dental Amalgam Fillings and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Chuang; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Hsin-Lin; Chuang, Chuan-Chung; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Li, Wan-Yun; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Fu, Earl

    2016-01-01

    The impact of dental amalgam on the development of Parkinson's disease (PD) is still uncertain, although a positive association between dental amalgam and PD has been found in a few case-control studies. The patients with amalgam fillings restored between 2000 and 2008 were identified by using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The same number of patients who had no new amalgam filling restored was matched by sex, age, and treatment date. Both cohorts were followed up from the treatment date until the date of diagnosis of PD, death, or the end of the year 2008. The individuals who received amalgam fillings had a significantly higher risk of PD afterward (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=1.583, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.122-2.234, p=0.0089) than those who did not. In the individuals who received amalgam fillings, being diagnosed with diabetes or hyperlipidemia demonstrated a significantly lower HR of PD occurrence than in the patients without diabetes or hyperlipidemia (HR=0.449, 95% CI=0.254-0.794, p=0.0059; HR=0.445, 95% CI=0.260-0.763, p=0.0032) after adjusting for comorbidities and Charlson-Deyo Comorbidity Index (CCI) scores. Meanwhile, hypertension increased the hazard risk of PD (HR=1.645, 95% CI=1.098-2.464, p=0.0159). The patients exposed to dental amalgam fillings were 1.583 times more likely to have PD afterward compared to their non-exposed counterparts after adjusting for comorbidities and CCI scores.

  8. Association between History of Dental Amalgam Fillings and Risk of Parkinson’s Disease: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Chuang; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Hsin-Lin; Chuang, Chuan-Chung; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Li, Wan-Yun; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Fu, Earl

    2016-01-01

    The impact of dental amalgam on the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is still uncertain, although a positive association between dental amalgam and PD has been found in a few case-control studies. The patients with amalgam fillings restored between 2000 and 2008 were identified by using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The same number of patients who had no new amalgam filling restored was matched by sex, age, and treatment date. Both cohorts were followed up from the treatment date until the date of diagnosis of PD, death, or the end of the year 2008. The individuals who received amalgam fillings had a significantly higher risk of PD afterward (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=1.583, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.122–2.234, p=0.0089) than those who did not. In the individuals who received amalgam fillings, being diagnosed with diabetes or hyperlipidemia demonstrated a significantly lower HR of PD occurrence than in the patients without diabetes or hyperlipidemia (HR=0.449, 95% CI=0.254–0.794, p=0.0059; HR=0.445, 95% CI=0.260–0.763, p=0.0032) after adjusting for comorbidities and Charlson-Deyo Comorbidity Index (CCI) scores. Meanwhile, hypertension increased the hazard risk of PD (HR=1.645, 95% CI=1.098–2.464, p=0.0159). The patients exposed to dental amalgam fillings were 1.583 times more likely to have PD afterward compared to their non-exposed counterparts after adjusting for comorbidities and CCI scores. PMID:27906991

  9. Dental Hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  10. Talent predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Lorenzo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of talent predictors is the initial point for building diagnosis and encouragement procedures in this field. The meaning of word predictor is to anticipate the future, to divine. Early prediction of high performance is complex problem no resolute by the science yet. There are many discrepancies about what measure and how to do. The article analyze the art state in this problematic because the excellence is determined by the interaction between internal and environmental factors.

  11. Correlation of admissions criteria with academic performance in dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Donald A; Lind, Samuel L; Plesh, Octavia; Finzen, Frederick C

    2007-10-01

    Our purpose was to compare admissions criteria as predictors of dental school performance in underachieving and normally tracking dental students. Underachieving dental students were identified by selecting ten students with the lowest class grade point average following the first year of dental school from five classes, resulting in a pool of fifty students. Normally tracking students served as a control and were randomly selected from students who had completed their first year of dental school not in the underachieving group. Admission measures of college grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), academic average (AA), Perceptual Ability Test (PAT), college rigor, and academic load in college were evaluated with descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression analysis with first-year and graduating GPA as the dependent variables. Admissions criteria were generally weak predictors of first-year and graduating GPA. However, first-year dental school GPA was a strong predictor (R(2)=0.77) of graduating GPA for normally tracking students and a moderate predictor (R(2)=0.58) for underachieving students. Students who completed the first year of dental school having a low GPA tended to graduate with a low GPA. Therefore, remediation and monitoring would be important during the dental school experience for these students.

  12. Predictors of Success for Allied Health Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Steven C.

    1989-01-01

    A study of 424 allied health students (259 dental hygiene, 104 radiologic technology, and 61 respiratory therapy) found that the greater predictors of their academic success were the natural science subscore on the American College Test (ACT), high school grade point average, and class rank, age, and composite ACT score. (SK)

  13. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  14. Dental Corps Structure: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    mouth extractions with subsequent complete dentures , 155 partial dentures , 897 crowns or bridges, and 1229 scalings and prophylaxes. ɠ> The number... history of professional service to the soldier. In war, the mission of the Dental corps is to preserve the fighting strength by the restoration and...and distinguished history of professional service to the soldier. In war, the mission of the Dental Corps is to preserve the fighting strength by the

  15. Conversion from bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) to bipolar I or II in youth with family history as a predictor of conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Molly S; Fristad, Mary A

    2013-06-01

    Bipolar disorder-not otherwise specified (BD-NOS) is an imprecise, heterogeneous diagnosis that is unstable in youth. This study reports rates of conversion from BD-NOS to BD-I or II in children aged 8-12, and investigates the impact of family history of bipolar disorder and depression on conversion. As part of the Multi-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (MF-PEP) study, 27 children (6-12 years of age) diagnosed with BD-NOS at baseline were reassessed every 6 months over an 18-month period. Family history of bipolar disorder and depression was assessed at baseline. One-third of the sample converted from BD-NOS to BD-I or II over 18-months. Having a first-degree relative with symptoms of bipolar disorder and having a loaded pedigree for diagnosis of depression each were associated with conversion from BD-NOS to BD-I or II (odds ratio range: 1.09-3.14; relative risk range: 1.06-2.34). This study had very low power (range: 10-45) given the small sample size, precluding statistical significance of non-parametric Fisher's Exact test findings. This study replicates the previous finding of a high rate of conversion from BD-NOS to BD-I or II among youth, and suggests conversion is related to symptoms of bipolar disorder or depression diagnoses in the family history. Additional research is warranted in a larger sample with a longer follow-up period. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lifetime history of depression and anxiety disorders as a predictor of quality of life in midlife women in the absence of current illness episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Hadine; Chang, Yuefang; Dhaliwal, Sammy; Hess, Rachel; Thurston, Rebecca; Gold, Ellen; Matthews, Karen A; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2012-05-01

    It is unknown whether a history of depression, anxiety disorders, or comorbid depression and anxiety affects subsequent health-related quality of life (HRQOL) during midlife in women when vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and sleep disturbance commonly disrupt QOL. To evaluate whether previous affective illness is associated with low HRQOL during midlife in the absence of current illness episodes and whether low HRQOL is explained by VMS or sleep disruption. Longitudinal, community-based study. Western Pennsylvania. A total of 425 midlife women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation who completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) annually during 6 years of follow-up. Scores on the SF-36 scales of social functioning (SF), role-emotional (RE), role-physical (RP), body pain (BP), and vitality. Ninety-seven women (22.8%) had comorbid affective illness histories, 162 (38.1%) had previous depression only, and 21 (4.9%) had previous anxiety only. Those with comorbid illness histories and depression alone were more likely to report low HRQOL on the SF, RE, RP, and BP domains (odds ratio [OR] = 2.31-3.54 and 1.59-2.28, respectively) than were women with neither disorder. After adjustment for VMS and sleep disturbance, the comorbid group continued to have low HRQOL on these domains (OR = 2.13-3.07), whereas the association was significant on SF and BP only for the depression-alone group (OR = 2.08 and 1.95, respectively). Compared with women with neither disorder, the anxiety-only group had low HRQOL on the RP domain (OR = 2.60). Sleep disturbance, but not VMS, was independently associated with low HRQOL on all the domains except RE. A history of both depression and anxiety has the most robust negative effect on HRQOL in women during midlife, an association not explained by VMS or sleep disturbance. For the depression-alone group, sleep disturbance may partially explain the negative impact of previous

  17. Ethnic classification in primary dental care and dental health services research: time to pause for thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, D J; Malik, S; Murphy, N; Patel, V; Singh, S; Syed, B; Vora, N

    2001-04-01

    'Ethnicity' is an important concept in dental health services research and in enabling general dental practitioners to gain insight into their patients values and expectations. Since more health services research is being undertaken in primary dental care settings it is becoming an important issue for dental professionals and researchers in primary care to be aware of. Ethnicity is thought to be related to dental health inequalities and access and is often used as a stratifying variable in many dental studies. The meaning and use of the term however differs among researchers and among the public. It is clear that researchers and professionals need to pause for thought when considering what this often bandied about term actually means and the impact of different definitions. This is illustrated using examples from the authors' own research and published papers in the medical and dental literature. There is also much debate about whether ethnicity--however defined--is an important predictor of differences in dental health in itself or is merely a marker for other factors such as social deprivation or the impact of 'place' on dental health. While the jury on this debate is out we suggest guidelines on the reporting of ethnicity should be outlined in the dental literature--perhaps updating those published in 1996 in the British Medical Journal.

  18. AIDS and dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbert, B; Badner, V; Maguire, B

    1988-01-01

    Dental health care workers (DHCWs) can provide important diagnostic, treatment, and referral services for patients with AIDS and at risk for AIDS. They also have a responsibility to protect all patients in their practices, and themselves, from infectious disease transmission through the use of infection control. To determine the extent to which DHCWs are prepared to assume these responsibilities, a randomized survey of California DHCWs was conducted. Responses were obtained from 297 dentists, 128 hygienists, and 177 dental assistants. DHCWs who expressed a greater willingness to treat people with AIDS or HIV infection also practiced more thorough infection control. Respondents in all groups who perceived a greater percent of their patients to be at risk for AIDS were more likely to use infection control procedures (P less than .0001). They also were more willing to treat such patients (P less than .004) and were more likely to assess patients for AIDS by taking a thorough medical history (P less than .02) and sexual history (P less than .04). Since attitudes toward AIDS and perception of the percent of patients at risk in one's practice affect patient assessment and infection control procedures used by dental health care workers, educational programs designed to enhance DHCWs' response to the HIV epidemic should alert them to the extent of the problem and help them cope with their concerns.

  19. Blood Donation, Being Asian, and a History of Iron Deficiency Are Stronger Predictors of Iron Deficiency than Dietary Patterns in Premenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L. Beck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated dietary patterns and nondietary determinants of suboptimal iron status (serum ferritin < 20 μg/L in 375 premenopausal women. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, determinants were blood donation in the past year [OR: 6.00 (95% CI: 2.81, 12.82; P<0.001], being Asian [OR: 4.84 (95% CI: 2.29, 10.20; P<0.001], previous iron deficiency [OR: 2.19 (95% CI: 1.16, 4.13; P=0.016], a “milk and yoghurt” dietary pattern [one SD higher score, OR: 1.44 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.93; P=0.012], and longer duration of menstruation [days, OR: 1.38 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.68; P=0.002]. A one SD change in the factor score above the mean for a “meat and vegetable” dietary pattern reduced the odds of suboptimal iron status by 79.0% [OR: 0.21 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.50; P=0.001] in women with children. Blood donation, Asian ethnicity, and previous iron deficiency were the strongest predictors, substantially increasing the odds of suboptimal iron status. Following a “milk and yoghurt” dietary pattern and a longer duration of menstruation moderately increased the odds of suboptimal iron status, while a “meat and vegetable” dietary pattern reduced the odds of suboptimal iron status in women with children.

  20. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  1. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  2. Physiological and Psychological Predictors of Short-Term Disability in Workers with a History of Low Back Pain: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Jean-Daniel; Cantin, Vincent; Piché, Mathieu; Descarreaux, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Despite an elusive pathophysiology, common characteristics are often observed in individuals with chronic low back pain (LBP). These include psychological symptoms, altered pain perception, altered pain modulation and altered muscle activation. These factors have been explored as possible determinants of disability, either separately or in cross-sectional studies, but were never assessed in a single longitudinal study. Therefore, the objective was to determine the relative contribution of psychological and neurophysiological factors to future disability in individuals with past LBP. The study included two experimental sessions (baseline and six months later) to assess cutaneous heat pain and pain tolerance thresholds, pain inhibition, as well as trunk muscle activation. Both sessions included the completion of validated questionnaires to determine clinical pain, disability, pain catastrophizing, fear-avoidance beliefs and pain vigilance. One hundred workers with a history of LBP and 19 healthy individuals took part in the first experimental session. The second experimental session was exclusively conducted on workers with a history of LBP (77/100). Correlation analyses between initial measures and disability at six months were conducted, and measures significantly associated with disability were used in multiple regression analyses. A first regression analysis showed that psychological symptoms contributed unique variance to future disability (R2 = 0.093, p = .009). To control for the fluctuating nature of LBP, a hierarchical regression was conducted while controlling for clinical pain at six months (R2 = 0.213, p < .001) where pain inhibition contributed unique variance in the second step of the regression (R2 change = 0.094, p = .005). These results indicate that pain inhibition processes may constitute potential targets for treatment to alleviate future disability in individuals with past or present LBP. Then again, the link between psychological symptoms and

  3. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    , exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental......Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  4. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  5. Assessment of Final Year Dental Students' Views of Science Education in Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MajidReza Mokhtari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dental student's concepts about dental implant education which can be used in dentistry doctorate curriculum revision and could be useful for professors of periodontology, prosthodontics and maxillofacial surgery.Materials & Methods: This was an educational research which was conducted in Mashhad dental school in 2011 and 58 end year dental students were participated in this study and filled out questionnaires about dental implant education and the concepts of these students about theoretical and practical aspects of dental implant education were evaluated.Results: A total of 98.27% of the students were agreed about education of simple implant surgery so that they could put a simple implant and 87.94% of the students were agreed about education of dental implant as a single course credit and about creation of a dental educational group, 96.56% were agreed. About dental implant educational topics, the most educational need was education of principles of implant surgery followed by education of putting a simple frontal implant, and the least, was introduction and history of dental implants.Conclusions: Because of necessity of development for new sciences in order to promote health in the society, education of dental implant for general dentistry students and revision of general dentistry curriculum seems necessary.

  6. Birmingham's new dental school and hospital - A real Peter Pan of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, I L C

    2016-09-23

    A look at the history of Birmingham Dental Hospital which, since it was first founded in 1858 as Birmingham Dental Dispensary, has moved six times, the sixth move being to its new Pebble Mill site on 1 April 2016.

  7. Spectral Predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  8. Dental students' attitudes toward tobacco cessation counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Patrick L; Davis, Elaine L; McCall, W D

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine if level of education, gender, and tobacco history affected attitudes of dental students toward tobacco cessation counseling. A secondary objective was to examine the psychometric properties of the survey instrument. First- and fourth-year dental students at one school of dental medicine completed a survey examining attitudes toward tobacco cessation and perceived barriers to performing tobacco cessation counseling in a dental setting. Analyses were conducted to determine whether there were differences in attitudes by gender, level of education, or personal and family tobacco use. A main effect for education level was discovered. Fourth-year students were more likely than first-year students to consider the prescription of nicotine gum and transdermal patches to be within the scope and responsibility of the dental profession. No significant differences were seen with regard to gender or students' personal and family tobacco histories. Dental students were in general agreement that tobacco cessation counseling is within the responsibility of the dental profession, is within the scope of dental practice, and can be effective. Psychometric analysis revealed reliability of the survey instrument.

  9. Reforming dental workforce education and practice in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, P L; Nakazono, T T; Carreon, D C; Gutierrez, J J; Shahedi, S; Andersen, R M

    2011-05-01

    The USA dental education programmes are facing challenges similar to those confronting countries around the globe, particularly amongst the industrialised nations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the educational programmes of 15 USA dental schools to determine their impact on improving workforce diversity and oral health care access. The study investigates the predictors of public service plans of dental school seniors in Pipeline and non-Pipeline Program dental schools. We analysed baseline and post-intervention data collected in the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Annual Survey of Dental School Seniors and a set of contextual variables. Public service plans (dependent variable) was predicted by four types of independent variables: intervention, contextual, community-based dental education (CBDE), and student characteristics. Findings from the study show that access to a state or federally sponsored loan repayment program was the most significant predictor of public service plans and that increasing educational debt was the most significant barrier. In the short-term we may be able to sustain the USA loan repayment programs to motivate senior dental students to provide public service to address the oral health care access crisis. However, in the long-term, a new workforce development initiative will be required to transform dental education and practice, modelled after the well-respected licensure programmes for Physician Assistants and/or Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, to expand oral health care access, particularly amongst vulnerable population subgroups, such as low-income children and families.

  10. Dental Training Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  11. Child dental fear and behavior: The role of environmental factors in a hospital cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Suprabha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Information on the origin of dental fear and uncooperative behavior in a child patient is important for behavior management strategy. The effects of environmental factors have been comparatively less studied, especially in an Indian scenario. Objectives: To find the association of (1 age, gender, family characteristics, previous medical, and dental experiences with dental fear and behavior (2 dental fear with dental behavior. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study involving 125 children aged between 7 and 14 years undergoing dental treatment under local anesthesia. The parent completed a questionnaire on family situation, medical history, and past dental experiences of the child. Child′s dental fear was recorded using Children′s Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale and behavior was rated using Frankl Behaviour Rating Scale. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using chi square test and binary logistic regression analysis. Results: Unpleasant experience in dental clinic and age of the child significantly influenced dental behavior. Visited pediatrician in the past one year, prior history of hospital admission, previous visit to dentist, experience at the first dental visit, and age of the child were contributing factors for dental fear. There was also significant association between dental fear levels and behavior. Conclusions: In 7 to 14 year olds, dental fear influences dental behavior, but the factors affecting them are not the same. Although dental fear decreases and dental behavior improves with age, experiences at the previous dental visits seem to influence both dental fear and behavior. Past medical experiences are likely to influence dental fear but not dental behavior.

  12. Unmet Dental Needs and Barriers to Dental Care among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bien; Milano, Michael; Roberts, Michael W.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Mail-in pilot-tested questionnaires were sent to a stratified random sample of 1,500 families from the North Carolina Autism Registry. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the significance of unmet dental needs and other predictors. Of 568 surveys returned (Response Rate = 38%), 555 were complete and usable. Sixty-five…

  13. Unmet Dental Needs and Barriers to Dental Care among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bien; Milano, Michael; Roberts, Michael W.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Mail-in pilot-tested questionnaires were sent to a stratified random sample of 1,500 families from the North Carolina Autism Registry. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the significance of unmet dental needs and other predictors. Of 568 surveys returned (Response Rate = 38%), 555 were complete and usable. Sixty-five…

  14. Dental trauma related to general anesthesia: should the anesthesiologist perform a preanesthetic dental evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Saeed Riad; Fujimura, Kazuma; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2014-06-01

    Perioperative dental damage is one of the most common anesthesia-related adverse events and is responsible for the greatest number of malpractice claims against anesthesiologists; therefore, several dental considerations are warranted. A thorough evaluation may necessitate a dentist's help, requires that anesthesiologists receive more formal training regarding oral and dental anatomy, and enables performing the treatments necessary to minimize the risks of dental injuries. Nevertheless, this preanesthetic assessment is frequently overlooked by surgeons and anesthesiologists. The present study aimed to investigate, for both dentists and anesthesiologists, how often and under what circumstances dental trauma occurs during general anesthesia as well as isolate possible anatomical, dental, and anesthesiological risk factors, based on which suggestions for preventive measures could be made. Anesthesiologists must perform a thorough preoperative oral evaluation to help identify the dentition at risk; the evaluation should include the patient's dental history, oral/dental examination, and a specific discussion with the patient about any existing dentures or crowns. The dental examination should especially include an assessment of the patient's upper incisors--the teeth most likely to be injured during the perioperative period--for pre-existing damage. Preoperative notes should record any damages or missing teeth. In addition, anesthesiologists must take adequate intraprocedure precautions to prevent/minimize iatrogenic dental injury.

  15. Dental health behavior in a migrant perspective: use of dental services of Pakistani immigrants in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selikowitz, H S; Holst, D

    1986-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the utilization pattern of dental services in a group of Pakistani immigrants in Norway. Use was related to sociodemographic characteristics, level of urbanization in Pakistan, knowledge and belief about dental diseases and evaluated and perceived dental health. A total of 160 immigrants were clinically examined and interviewed by a structured questionnaire. The effect change analysis was performed, and separate analyses were performed for men and women. Altogether 60% had visited the dentist during the last 3 yr. While 69% coming from the cities had been to the dentist in Norway, this was the case for only 38% of those from the villages of Pakistan. Pain was given as the main reason for dental visits, and the data indicated insufficient ability to perform self-assessment of own dental health. The independent variables could explain more of the variance in use of dental services among the Pakistani men (R2 = 40%) than among the women (R2 = 21%). While number of decayed teeth and level of urbanization were among the strongest predictors among the men, dental behavior in Pakistan and number of years in Norway were of importance among the women. The latter variable indicated that the women in terms of dental behavior had a higher degree of acculturation than the men, leading to a change in traditional health behavior.

  16. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes and Oral Health > Diabetes: Dental Tips Diabetes: Dental Tips Main Content Diabetes can cause serious problems ... FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, ...

  17. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they're most treatable. When to have a dental exam Various factors might determine how frequently your ... wisdom teeth (third molars) at the appropriate age. Dental X-ray A dental X-ray (radiograph) allows ...

  18. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share with Women Dental Care in Pregnancy Why is dental care in pregnancy important? During pregnancy, you are more likely to have problems ... There are 2 major reasons women can have dental problems during pregnancy: Pregnancy gingivitis— During pregnancy, changes ...

  19. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  20. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  1. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  3. Dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  4. Aesthetic management of dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Nayak, Prathibha Anand; Ninawe, Nupur

    2013-05-22

    Significant numbers of patients visiting the paediatric dental clinics have aesthetically objectionable brown stains and desire treatment for them. Intrinsic tooth discolouration can be a significant aesthetic, and in some instances, functional, problem. Dental fluorosis, tetracycline staining, localised and chronological hypoplasia, and both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta can all produce a cosmetically unsatisfactory dentition. The aetiology of intrinsic discolouration of enamel may sometimes be deduced from the patient's history, and one factor long associated with the problem has been a high level of fluoride intake. Optimal use of topical fluorides leads to a decrease in the caries prevalence but may show an increase in the prevalence of fluorosis staining because of metabolic alterations in the ameloblasts, causing a defective matrix formation and improper calcification. A 12-year-old male patient was screened at the dental clinic for routine dental care. He wanted us to remove and/or minimise the noticeable brown/yellow staining of his teeth. He requested the least invasive and most cost-effective treatment to change his smile. Various treatment modalities are present for the treatment of fluorosis stains. This report discusses the microabrasion technique in the patient having dental fluorosis.

  5. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  6. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  7. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Student Resources National Exam Student Advisor Resources Dental Hygiene Programs Scholarships and Grants Research Center Transforming Dental Hygiene Education Advocacy Practice Issues Direct Access Scope ...

  8. [Dental technician's pneumoconiosis; a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman Eyüboğlu, Canan; Itil, Oya; Gülşen, Aşkin; Kargi, Aydanur; Cimrin, Arif

    2008-01-01

    Since 1939, it has been known that, silicosis and extrinsic allergic alveolitis can be seen among dental technicians. The interstitial disease caused by the exposure to complex substances used by dental technicians is classified as a special group called dental technician's pneumoconiosis. A 36-year-old man, who has no smoking history, presented with severe dyspnea. He had worked in different dental laboratories for 22 years, but he did not have respiratory symptoms until five years ago. After that date, he had hospitalized and had been examined for respiratory pathologies for many times. He had came to our clinic, because of the progression of his dyspnea. Diffuse pulmonary parenchymal infiltrates which can be related with pneumoconiosis and chronic type 1 respiratory deficiency had been diagnosed as the result of the examinations. While he has no history of smoking or any other risk factors or diseases in his medical history, the case was accepted as dental technician's pneumoconiosis. The factors related with the pathogenesis of dental technician's pneumoconiosis are; the complex compound of the substances (metal dusts, silica, plaster, wax and resins, chemical liquids, methyl methacrylate) used in this sector and their effects on the lung parenchyma. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis related with methyl methacrylate has been reported. The most important factor to acquire an occupational lung disease is a complex occupational exposure. The insufficient workplace airing and the lack of preventive measures added on this exposure, the risks become much more greater.

  9. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  10. Tweezer dexterity aptitude of dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundergan, William P; Soderstrom, Elizabeth J; Chambers, David W

    2007-08-01

    The rationale for using the Perceptual Ability Test (PAT) as a component in admissions decisions for dental schools is that candidates vary in an underlying aptitude that is predictive of degree of success in technique course performance and perhaps in clinical performance. There have been periodic attempts to identify tests that more directly measure manual dexterity aptitude that would supplement the predictive power of admissions decisions. Previous research has demonstrated that a commercially available "speeded" tweezer dexterity test (Johnson O'Connor Test #32022) is not associated with performance in dental school or dental practice. Our research investigated both Test #32022 and Test #18 that measure both speed and accuracy as potential predictors of dental school performance in technical and clinical courses. This article reports the results of a longitudinal, comparative study of tweezer dexterity scores for students at the University of the Pacific School of Dentistry during their first and last quarters in school. The goals of the study were to 1) evaluate the correlation between beginning students' scores on two different types of tweezer dexterity tests; 2) compare dental students' scores to normative data for the general population; 3) determine the effect of a dental curriculum on students' performance on Test #18; and 4) evaluate the two tests as potential dental school admission screening instruments in comparison to the PAT. Fifty first-quarter students were tested from a class of 134. Forty-nine of these students were retested on Test #18 during their final quarter. The predictor value of the initial scores for the two dexterity tests was assessed for seven outcome measures reflecting student technique performance. Analysis showed a significant correlation (r=0.318, ptests. The difference between the norm mean (41.58) and the dental student mean for Test #18 (40.42) was not significant (p>0.05). The correlation between the first and final

  11. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  12. Prevalence of Systemic Diseases in Patients with Dental Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Mohsen Khoshniat Nikoo; Mohammad Bayat; Fatemeh Afshar Hezarkhani

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of diabetes and other risk factors in patients with dental infections.Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients who preferred in maxillofacial word of shariaty hospital with acute dental infections in 9 months. A self-administered questionnaire was administered during a dental appointment in order to gather demographic information and recorded past history of systemic disease, OPG...

  13. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p dental care (p dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts.

  14. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Rai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG. Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials.

  15. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  16. Salivary cortisol, salivary alpha amylase, and the dental anxiety scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Hana; Finkelman, Matthew; Rosenberg, Morton

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between dental anxiety, salivary cortisol, and salivary alpha amylase (sAA) levels. Furthermore, the aim was to look into individual differences such as age, race, gender, any existing pain, or traumatic dental experience and their effect on dental anxiety. This study followed a cross-sectional design and included a convenience sample of 46. Every patient was asked to complete the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and a basic demographic/dental history questionnaire. A saliva sample, utilizing the method of passive drooling, was then collected in 2-mL cryovials. Samples were analyzed for salivary cortisol and sAA levels by Salimetrics. Significant associations were observed between DAS scores and presence of pain and history of traumatic dental experience. However, no significant correlations were observed between DAS, cortisol, and sAA levels. Our study reconfirms that dental anxiety is associated with presence of pain and a history of traumatic dental experience. On the other hand, our study was the first to our knowledge to test the correlation between the DAS and sAA; nevertheless, our results failed to show any significant correlation between dental anxiety, cortisol, and sAA levels.

  17. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Home > Medicaid > Benefits > Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  18. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  19. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  20. Use of dental services among Danish youths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissau, I; Holst, D; Friis-Hasché, E

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the separate effect and the total effect of the social environment, the individual and the delivery system on frequency of use of dental services among youths. The variables of use were divided into the three main groups according to Coleman (12......). Information concerning use of dental services, individual and structural variables was obtained by a self-administered questionnaire to 756 Danes 20-21 yr old in 1984-85. Information concerning social environmental variables was obtained by a postal questionnaire to the mothers of the individuals in 1974 (16......). Information from 552 mothers was available. Firstly, the variables concerning the social environment were inserted into a multiple dummy regression analysis as independent variables, and it was found that the following characteristics of the mothers were significant predictors: regularity of dental visits...

  1. Psychophysiological reactivity of currently dental phobic-, remitted dental phobic- and never-dental phobic individuals during exposure to dental-related and other affect-inducing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannemueller, André; Adolph, Dirk; Joehren, Hans-Peter; Blackwell, Simon E; Margraf, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    Psychophysiological responses indicating the preparation of defensive behaviour, such as heart rate (HR)-increase and startle-response (SR) potentiation, have often been reported amongst individuals suffering from phobic disorders when exposed to phobia-related information. Although exposure is widely considered the 'gold standard' for treatment of Specific Phobia, it is unclear to what extent psychophysiological defensive response patterns change following treatment, and whether any changes are maintained. We assessed the acoustic SR- and HR-response to neutral, positive, negative and phobia-related pictures and sounds in 41 individuals currently suffering from dental phobia, 22 formerly dental phobic individuals who had remitted following an exposure-based treatment eight months prior to assessment, and 29 control individuals with no history of dental phobia. We observed SR-potentiation to dental-related stimuli in controls combined with HR-deceleration. In contrast, amongst phobic individuals SR-potentiation was accompanied by HR-acceleration to dental pictures. Successfully treated individuals showed inhibited startle reactivity in combination with HR-deceleration to dental related materials of both modalities. Our findings suggest inappropriate fight-flight preparation amongst individuals with dental phobia, reflecting overactivation of the defensive system. However, successful treatment results in inhibited physiological defence preparation, with remitted individuals displaying a response pattern that differed from that of phobic individuals and controls.

  2. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni g

  3. Predictors of oral health behaviors among elderly Japanese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehnelt, D; Kiyak, H A; Beach, B H

    1990-01-01

    As part of a series of studies on oral health behaviors of older persons, 81 elderly Japanese Americans were interviewed regarding their dental service utilization patterns, oral health attitudes, and dental status. The sample consisted of 35 Issei (first generation) and 46 Nisei (second generation) Japanese Americans. Because of the significant age difference between the Issei and Nisei, it was difficult to examine generational differences between the two groups. When age differences were controlled, there was no difference between the two generations in interval since their last dental visit. However, reasons for dental visits differed between the two groups, with the Issei more likely to seek help with dentures or general restorative work while the Nisei were more likely to schedule appointments for dental check-ups and cleaning. The best predictors of dental service utilization for the entire sample were the use of complete dentures, age, and education (R2 = .38), but when the respondent's perceived importance of oral health was entered into the equation, this variable accounted for more variance than age or education. The combination of complete dentures, importance, and age accounted for 41% of the variance in recency of dental service utilization. Locus of control, the belief component of attitudes, and overall attitude scores did not add significantly to the prediction of dental utilization.

  4. A Dental Education Perspective on Dental Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1985-01-01

    Two issues related to dental health policy are examined: the contribution of dental education to the process by which dental health policy is established, and the nature of dental education's response to established policies. (MLW)

  5. Dental management of special needs patients who have epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2009-04-01

    Patients who have developmental disabilities and epilepsy can be safely treated in a general dental practice. A thorough medical history should be taken and updated at every visit. A good oral examination to uncover any dental problems and possible side effects from antiepileptic drugs is necessary. Stability of the seizure disorder must be taken into account when planning dental treatment. Specific considerations for epileptic patients include the treatment of oral soft tissue side effects of medications and damage to the hard and soft tissue of the orofacial region secondary to seizure trauma. Most patients who have epilepsy can and should receive functionally and esthetically adequate dental care.

  6. A retrospective of America's second National Dental Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummett, Clifton O; Dummett, Lois D

    2003-01-01

    This article describes one hundred and fifty years of history concerning organized dentistry among African Americans. African Americans were welcomed in the National Negro Medical Association of Physicians, Dentists and Pharmacists (NMA) as early as 1895 and later created a dental professional group, the Interstate Dental Association, in the mid-Atlantic states. The "second" National Dental Association, a national-wide African American association was created in 1932. African Americans earned full membership in the American Dental Association in 1964. This article traces these developments against the background of changing American society and concludes by mentioning some of the recent accomplishments and collaborative relationships of the current NDA.

  7. Factors influencing the use of public dental services: An application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer A John

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited evidence of the influence of psychosocial factors and health beliefs on public dental patient's patterns of service use in Australia. The research aims were to examine associations between dental attitudes and beliefs of public dental service users and dental visiting intention and behaviour using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Methods 517 randomly selected adult public dental patients completed a questionnaire assessing dental attitudes and beliefs which was matched with electronic records for past and future dental service use. A questionnaire measured intentions, attitudes, subjective norms and perceptions of behavioural control and self-efficacy in relation to visiting public dentists. A measure of dental attendance at public dental clinics was obtained retrospectively (over 3 1/2 years and prospectively (over a one year period following the return of the questionnaire by accessing electronic patient clinical records. Results Participants had positive attitudes, subjective norms and self-efficacy beliefs towards dental visiting but perceived a lack of control over visiting the dentist. Attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy and perceived control were significant predictors of intention (P Conclusion Public dental patients held favourable attitudes and beliefs but perceived a lack of control towards dental visiting. Reducing structural barriers may therefore improve access to public dental services.

  8. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fikawati; Ita Yulita

    2015-01-01

    Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training cons...

  9. Oral breathing and dental malocclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicari, A M; Albani, F; Ntrekou, P; Rugiano, A; Duse, M; Mattei, A; Marzo, G

    2009-06-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate existing correlations between oral breathing and dental malocclusions. The study was conducted on a paediatric group of 71 oral breathers selected at the Allergology and Paediatric Immunology Department of Umberto I General Hospital, University of Rome "La Sapienza" (Italy). The children were selected based on inclusion/exclusion criteria. Children aged 6 to 12 years with no history of craniofacial malformations or orthodontic treatment were included. The results were compared with a control group composed of 71 patient aged 6 to 12 years with nasal breathing. After their medical history was recorded, all patients underwent orthodontic/otolaryngological clinical examinations. The following diagnostic procedures were then performed: latero-lateral projection teleradiography, orthopantomogram, dental impressions, anterior rhinomanometry before and after administering a local vasoconstrictor, nocturnal home pulse oximetry (NHPO) recording, spirometry test, skin prick test, study cast evaluation and cephalometric analysis following Tweed's principles. The intraoral examination assessed: dental class type, overbite, overjet, midlines, crossbite, and presence of parafunctional oral habits such as atypical swallowing, labial incompetence, finger sucking and sucking of the inner lip. Evaluation of the study casts involved arch perimeter and transpalatal width assessment, and space analysis. The results showed a strong correlation between oral breathing and malocclusions, which manifests itself with both dentoskeletal and functional alterations, leading to a dysfunctional malocclusive pattern. According to the authors' results, dysfunctional malocclusive pattern makes it clear that the association between oral breathing and dental malocclusions represents a self-perpetuating vicious circle in which it is difficult to establish if the primary alteration is respiratory or maxillofacial. Regardless, the problem needs to be addressed and

  10. Prevalence of Systemic Diseases in Patients with Dental Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Khoshniat Nikoo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of diabetes and other risk factors in patients with dental infections.Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 patients who preferred in maxillofacial word of shariaty hospital with acute dental infections in 9 months. A self-administered questionnaire was administered during a dental appointment in order to gather demographic information and recorded past history of systemic disease, OPG radiography, gingival examination, and the result of lab tests such as CBC , FBS, PT, Bilirubin , Creat, T3, T4, TSH, HIVAb and HBSAg.Results: 28% of the subjects and diabetes, 28% Anemia, 4% Hepatitis and 4% suffered from thyroid deficiency.28% were smokers and 18% declared using alcohol. 6% of this population was addicted to narcotic substances.There was a significant correlation between age, education, diabetes and dental infections (P<0.05. DMFT forpeople with dental infections without any systemic disease were 8, for diabetic patients, smokers and alcohol users were respectively 17.16, 17 and 14.Conclusion: Diabetes found highly prevalent in patients with dental infection and high DMFT.It indicates a need to establish a comprehensive oral health promotion program based on whole examination and blood glucose control in diabetic patients who have acute dental infection by collaboration between dental and general health care professionals. Moreover, it is recommended that all patients should be educated in dental and oral health forprevention of dental infections.

  11. Dental Encounter System (DES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Dental Encounter System (DES) is an automated health care application designed to capture critical data about the operations of VA Dental Services. Information on...

  12. Dental Care in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Care in Scleroderma People living with scleroderma face unique challenges while trying to maintain their oral ... They are more likely to be affected by dental conditions such as small mouth, dry mouth, jaw ...

  13. Dental care - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002213.htm Dental care - child To use the sharing features on ... and rinsing daily. It also includes having routine dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, ...

  14. AUTHORITARIANISM AND DENTAL CARIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    in particular. If so, dental decay among nonauthoritarians might well progress further than among authoritarians. To determine whether or not there...is any relationship between dental decay and authoritarianism is the purpose of the present study. (Author)

  15. Dental Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview and documents for Dental Office Category regulation (40 CFR Part 441); comprising pretreatment standards for discharges of dental amalgam pollutants, including mercury, into publicly owned treatment works (POTWs).

  16. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  17. Smile dental journal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    "Smile dental journal is quarterly issued, peer-reviewed open access journal. Subject coverage is dentistry, dealing with all specialties of dentistry, its management, besides dental health related subjects...

  18. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

  19. Dental Practice Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    the population. Private dental practices in Romania require personnel specialized in dental management. Success in dentistry depends, on the one hand, on the management of clinical aspects, and equallyon the efficient management of the dental practice. Patient satisfaction is influenced by factors related to the communication between the physicianand the patient, technical competence and by the environment provided by dental practice. The realization of the paper followed a review...

  20. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  1. [Dental records and responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, W.G.

    2006-01-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist i

  2. Stress Among Dental Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Alzahem (Abdullah)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Dental students are facing many stressors in dental education, causing many negative outcomes. The most common are the exams and the clinical requirements. We suggest exposing the dental students to patient care as early as possible in their curriculum. This can help to bal

  3. Dental Assistant, Advanced. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    a jaw fracture, leukemia, dental caries, and periodontal disease. Dental diabetes mellitus , rheumatic fever, allergies, car- disease can be prevented...Dentistry ........................ 4-1 5. Oral Surgery, Endodontics, and Periodontics ................ 5-1 6. Prosthodontics...Diagnosis Periodontics Medical clinics may have branch clinics subor- Operative Dentistry Preventive Dentistry dinate to them. Although dental

  4. Ancient DNA analysis of dental calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrich, Laura S; Dobney, Keith; Cooper, Alan

    2015-02-01

    Dental calculus (calcified tartar or plaque) is today widespread on modern human teeth around the world. A combination of soft starchy foods, changing acidity of the oral environment, genetic pre-disposition, and the absence of dental hygiene all lead to the build-up of microorganisms and food debris on the tooth crown, which eventually calcifies through a complex process of mineralisation. Millions of oral microbes are trapped and preserved within this mineralised matrix, including pathogens associated with the oral cavity and airways, masticated food debris, and other types of extraneous particles that enter the mouth. As a result, archaeologists and anthropologists are increasingly using ancient human dental calculus to explore broad aspects of past human diet and health. Most recently, high-throughput DNA sequencing of ancient dental calculus has provided valuable insights into the evolution of the oral microbiome and shed new light on the impacts of some of the major biocultural transitions on human health throughout history and prehistory. Here, we provide a brief historical overview of archaeological dental calculus research, and discuss the current approaches to ancient DNA sampling and sequencing. Novel applications of ancient DNA from dental calculus are discussed, highlighting the considerable scope of this new research field for evolutionary biology and modern medicine.

  5. Postdoctoral Education in Dentistry: Preparing Dental Practitioners To Meet the Oral Health Needs of America in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Paul; Meyerowitz, Cyril

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the history of postdoctoral programs in dentistry and medicine, focusing on postdoctoral general dentistry education, and describes the changing health-care environment in which future dental professionals will practice, relating the dental postdoctoral experience to that in medicine. A strategy is presented to prepare dental practitioners…

  6. Novel dental pattern in a Mesozoic mammal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yaoming; WANG Yuanqing; Fox Richard C; LI Chuankui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Therian mammals have two families of postcanine teeth, premolars and molars, which primitively are morphologically distinct, but within each family, structure of the crowns changes in an evenly graded series from mesial to distal loci. Here we report a new Mesozoic basal therian in which the boundary between premolars and molars is transitional but the molars form three abruptly discontinuous morphological groups, containing m1, m2―4, and m5―6, respectively. This molar pattern is not reported in the dental morphology or development of living mammals, implying a reservoir of ontogenetic process and pattern, and hence potential for evolution, otherwise hidden in mammalian dental history.

  7. The admission index in the dental school admissions process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staat, R H; Yancey, J M

    1982-08-01

    Preprofessional students' grade point averages (GPAs) and aptitude test scores have been moderately successful in predicting student performance in dental school. The authors attempted to improve the predictability of the school's admission process by combining several preprofessional academic averages and selected nongraded personal attributes into a single Admission Index (AI) score. A Pearson r of 0.67 was found for the relationship between the AI and first-year dental school GPA for University of Louisville dental students accepted into the class of 1984. The correlation coefficient generated from the AI and first-year dental school GPA was markedly superior to those generated by any single predictor. The authors propose that the AI is of value not only for its use in the admission process, but also in the development of an interceptive student monitoring program for the less-qualified student.

  8. Categorical analysis of factors affecting needs and demands for removable dentures among Alexandria Dental Research Center clientele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeid, W M; Mohamed, M H; Mahdy, N H; El-Tabakh, S M

    1999-01-01

    An accurate assessment of dental needs is important to public health planners. With this information, it is possible to assess future treatment needs and demands for services including those for removable dentures. The present work aimed to estimate the magnitude and types of needs, and demands for partial or complete removable dentures, to study some factors that may affect the identified needs and demands for removable dentures, in addition to studying the factors that may affect satisfaction with the dentures. The present study was conducted in "Alexandria Dental Research Center". Data were collected by means of interview questionnaire, followed by dental examination of all patients attending the center for the sake of removable dental restorations for a period of 6 months. A further follow up over a period of three months was undertaken to the 330 cases recorded. About one third of the cases demanded partial and/or complete dentures and were above 60 years old. The first purpose for construction of new dentures was mastication, followed by cosmetics. Only one quarter of cases decided to have delayed immediate dentures. Diabetics and those having chronic diseases showed more demand for complete dentures. The most discriminating variable between the demand for different dentures was the missing in the lower anterior teeth followed by missing in the upper both anterior and posterior and then missing in the upper anterior teeth. Satisfaction score increased with advance of age, among males, among those for complete dentures, and those who had had previous dentures. Stepwise logistic regression revealed that the best predictor for overall satisfaction was the history of having previous dentures. Results of the present study, suggest that early screening and treatment of diabetic patients, gathering detailed information by means of a questionnaire before new dentures fabrication may be an important tool for the dentist in predicting and consequently enhancing patient

  9. Dental caries vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in humans. In modern times, it has reached epidemic proportions. Dental caries is an infectious microbiologic disease of the teeth that results in localized dissolution and destruction of the calcified tissue. Dental caries is a mulitifactorial disease, which is caused by host, agent, and environmental factors. The time factor is important for the development and progression of dental caries. A wide group of microorganisms are identified from carious lesions of which S. mutans , Lactobacillus acidophilus , and Actinomyces viscosus are the main pathogenic species involved in the initiation and development of dental caries. In India, surveys done on school children showed caries prevalence of approximately 58%. Surveys among the U.S. population showed an incidence of 45.3% in children and 93.8% in adults with either past or present coronal caries. Huge amounts of money and time are spent in treating dental caries. Hence, the prevention and control of dental caries is the main aim of public health, eventually the ultimate objective of public health is the elimination of the disease itself. Recently, dental caries vaccines have been developed for the prevention of dental caries. These dental caries vaccines are still in the early stages.

  10. Dental hygiene in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciak-Donsberger, C; Krizanová, M

    2004-08-01

    This article reports on the development of the dental hygiene profession in Slovakia from a global perspective. The aim is to inform about current developments and to examine, how access to qualified dental hygiene care might be improved and how professional challenges might be met. For an international study on dental hygiene, secondary source data were obtained from members of the House of Delegates of the International Federation of Dental Hygienists (IFDH) or by fax and e-mail from experts involved in the national professional and educational organization of dental hygiene in non-IFDH member countries, such as Slovakia. Responses were followed-up by interviews, e-mail correspondence, visits to international universities, and a review of supporting studies and reference literature. Results show that the introduction of dental hygiene in Slovakia in 1992 was inspired by the delivery of preventive care in Switzerland. Initiating local dentists and dental hygienists strive to attain a high educational level, equitable to that of countries in which dental hygiene has an established tradition of high quality care. Low access to qualified dental hygiene care may be a result of insufficient funding for preventive services, social and cultural lack of awareness of the benefits of preventive care, and of limitations inherent in the legal constraints preventing unsupervised dental hygiene practice. These may be a result of gender politics affecting a female-dominated profession and of a perception that dental hygiene is auxiliary to dental care. International comparison show that of all Eastern European countries, the dental hygiene profession appears most advanced in Slovakia. This is expressed in high evidence-based academic goals, in extensive work with international consultants from the Netherlands and Switzerland, in annual congresses of high professional quality, and in the establishment of a profession, which has not been introduced in all Western EU countries.

  11. Trajectories of dental anxiety in a birth cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, W. M.; Broadbent, J. M.; Locker, D.; Poulton, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine predictors of dental anxiety trajectories in a longitudinal study of New Zealanders. Methods Prospective study of a complete birth cohort born in 1972/73 in Dunedin, New Zealand, with dental anxiety scale (DAS) scores and dental utilization determined at ages 15, 18, 26 and 32 years. Personality traits were assessed at a superfactor and (more fine-grained) subscale level via the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire at age 18 years. Group-based trajectory analysis was used to identify dental anxiety trajectories. Results DAS scores from at least three assessments were available for 828 participants. Six dental anxiety trajectories were observed: stable nonanxious low (39.6%); stable nonanxious medium (37.9%); recovery (1.6%); adult-onset anxious (7.7%); stable anxious (7.2%) and adolescent-onset anxious (5.9%). Multivariate analysis showed that males and those with higher DMFS at age 15 years were more likely to be in the stable nonanxious low trajectory group. Membership of the stable nonanxious medium group was predicted by the dental caries experience at age 15 years. Participants who had lost one or more teeth between ages 26 and 32 years had almost twice the relative risk for membership of the adult-onset anxious group. Personality traits predicted group membership. Specifically, high scorers (via median split) on the ‘stress reaction’ subscale had over twice the risk of being in the stable anxious group; low scorers on the traditionalism subscale were more likely to be members of the recovery trajectory group; and high scorers on the ‘social closeness’ subscale had half the risk of being in the stable anxious group. Dental caries experience at age 5 years was also a predictor for the stable anxious group. Membership of the late-adolescent-onset anxious group was predicted by higher dental caries experience by age 15 years, but none of the other predictors was significant. Conclusion Six discrete trajectories of dental anxiety

  12. Predicting Performance in Technical Preclinical Dental Courses Using Advanced Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Riki; Baechle, Mary A; Janus, Charles; Lanning, Sharon K

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether advanced simulation parameters, such as simulation exam scores, number of student self-evaluations, time to complete the simulation, and time to complete self-evaluations, served as predictors of dental students' preclinical performance. Students from three consecutive classes (n=282) at one U.S. dental school completed advanced simulation training and exams within the first four months of their dental curriculum. The students then completed conventional preclinical instruction and exams in operative dentistry (OD) and fixed prosthodontics (FP) courses, taken during the first and second years of dental school, respectively. Two advanced simulation exam scores (ASES1 and ASES2) were tested as predictors of performance in the two preclinical courses based on final course grades. ASES1 and ASES2 were found to be predictors of OD and FP preclinical course grades. Other advanced simulation parameters were not significantly related to grades in the preclinical courses. These results highlight the value of an early psychomotor skills assessment in dentistry. Advanced simulation scores may allow early intervention in students' learning process and assist in efficient allocation of resources such as faculty coverage and tutor assignment.

  13. Dietary behaviours and dental fluorosis among Gaza Strip children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhaloob, L; Abed, Y

    2013-07-01

    A high prevalence of dental fluorosis has been identified among children in the Gaza Strip. This study aimed to determine the history of breastfeeding and dietary behaviours among children in the Gaza Strip and to examine potential associations with the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis. A cross-sectional study recruited a stratified cluster random sample of 350 children aged 12-18 years and their mothers. Data about dietary behaviours in the first 7 years of life were collected by interview questionnaire. Dental fluorosis was determined using the Thyllstrup-Fejerskov index. A majority of children were breastfed exclusively in the first 6 months (82.9%) but 98.1% were given tea in the first year of life. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was 78.0%. Both intake of animal proteins and plant proteins were negatively associated with the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis. Further studies to investigate fluoride intake is required to plan preventive interventions.

  14. Dental education and special-needs patients: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTigue, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric dentists have, by tradition and default, provided care for persons with special health care needs (PSHCN), regardless of age. Deinstitutionalization of PSHCN in the 1960s, however, overwhelmed the dental care system, and oral health care became one of the greatest unmet needs of this population. This presentation follows the history of training for dentists in this aspect of care, from the first demonstration programs in the 1970s to the current educational programs in U.S. dental schools. Today's dental students must be competent in assessing the treatment needs of PSHCN, but accreditation standards do not require competency in the treatment of this group of patients. Recommendations to rectify this include revising dental school curricula to be more patient-centered, improving technology in schools, earlier clinical experiences for dental students, and the use of community-based clinics.

  15. THERMOVISION IN DENTAL ALLERGOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dencheva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we aimed to optimize the thermal imaging method for evaluation of skin patch test reactions in dental clinical allergology. A total of 30 patients without a history of allergic diseases were included in the study - 12 men and 18 women, age 21 - 32 years. Skin patch testing was performed with a set of 20 standardized allergens. The thermographic investigations were performed with the FlirT620 infrared camera with a temperature resolution of 0,06°C. Thermograms were analysed using the Flir Reporter Professional software 2013. The statistical analysis of the results revealed an average correlation between the clinical evaluation of the results according to the cheme of ICDRG and the thermal image diagnostic (rphi = 0.538, p = 0.001. Absolute matching of clinical and thermal image results was observed only for the negative ones. For the clinically positive skin patch results matching with thermal image method was observed in 60.7% of the cases. Optimization of thermal imaging as a method for evaluation of skin patch test results could serve as a safe, accurate and non-invasive method, especially to distinguish weak (+, doubtful and irritant reactions, although not standardized criteria to distinguish these reactions have been elaborated yet. Crucial factor for the accurate interpretation of results is the precise diagnosing performed by well-trained physicians in this area, with clinical relevance, to minimize the role of subjective factors.

  16. Noncognitive predictors of academic performance. Going beyond the traditional measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Susan

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine comparatively the use of an atypical, noncognitive predictor of academic achievement, the Problem Solving Inventory (PSI), with the traditional cognitive measures of American College Testing (ACT) score and grade point average (CPA). A review of relevant literature on noncognitive variables as predictors of academic success is provided, followed by a general overview of the PSI and pertinent literature. In this study, the PSI was administered to 28 dental hygiene students, and a series of models were tested. The first model examined the relationship between the traditional cognitive predictors of academic success (ACT score and entering GPA) on academic outcomes (National Board Dental Hygiene Examination score and exit CPA). A second model examined the influence of the PSI composite score when added to the cognitive predictors. A third model examined the addition of the three PSI factor scores to the cognitive predictors. The addition of PSI scores in the second and third models increased the predictive capacity of the respective model. Bivariate correlations indicated a significant inverse relationship (p GPA, although its usefulness in augmenting these traditional measures used in the student selection process requires further investigation. The PSI factor score of personal control may provide insight into a student's coping skills, potentially having implications on academic achievement.

  17. EAMJ Jan. Dental 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... the prevalence of dental caries and gingivitis among. 12-year-old children .... chemical, bacterial and mechanical irritation from dental plaque and ..... We thank the School of Dental Sciences and Colgate. Palmolive for part ...

  18. Dental Hypotheses: Seeks to Publish Hypotheses from All Areas of Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward F. Rossomando

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Starting a new open access journal in a rapid growing scientific panorama is a severe challenge. However, the first issue of dental hypotheses is now history and the even skeptics can appreciate that dental hypotheses is a success - it is a journal of high quality that provides an outlet for publication of articles that encourage readers to question dental paradigms. But dental hypotheses readers might have noticed that the majority of the articles published in the first issue of dental hypotheses concern clinical dentistry. However, dental hypotheses editors recognize that there are many other areas in dentistry that present challenges and that our readers may offer suggestions for their solution. Some of these challenges relate to: dental education; digital dental technology; teledentistry and access to dental care; dental practice issues, such as, dental office design, dental office management, the slow rate of acceptance of innovative technology in the dental office; and issues related to innovation and dental entrepreneurship including intellectual property protection. Nevertheless, the dental profession faces many challenges - in many areas - and with the publication of dental hypotheses our profession has a venue for presentation of possible solutions. If you have developed a hypothesis that might help, please share it with your colleagues. As many have noted, the intellectual power of the global village in which we now live is formidable. The internet has provided the technology to bring us together and dental hypotheses has provided the venue. Please use it. New radical, speculative and non-mainstream scientific ideas are always welcome.

  19. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  20. Dental erosion, summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M; Imfeld, T

    1996-04-01

    Although reports on dental erosion have always appeared in the dental literature, there is currently a growing interest among researchers and clinicians. Potential risk factors for dental erosion are changed lifestyle and eating patterns, with increased consumption of acidic foods and beverages. Various gastrointestinal and eating disorders expose the dentition to frequent contacts with very acidic gastric content, which may lead to erosion. Whether these factors indeed lead, on a population scale, to a higher prevalence and incidence of erosion is yet to be established. This article summarizes the different aspects of the prevalence, pathology, etiology, assessment, prevention and treatment of dental erosion, and concludes with recommendations for future research.

  1. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...... dental pain, they expect that the dentist starts treatment at once and that the treatment should provide pain relief. In this situation many patients are fragile, anxious and nervous. If the dentist is able to manage emergency treatment of acute dental pain this will build confidence and trust between...

  2. Dental Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  3. Dental Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Oshida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities.

  4. Dental therapists and dental hygienists educated for the New Zealand environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dawn E; Kardos, Thomas B; Moffat, Susan M; Kardos, Rosemary L

    2009-08-01

    New Zealand has a long history of dental care provided by school dental nurses, now known as dental therapists. The nature of their training courses, although delivered in different centers, had remained relatively constant until 1999 when educational responsibility was transferred to the universities. Dental hygienists were not trained in New Zealand until 1994, with the exception of the New Zealand Army hygienists. Since 2001, the education of both dental therapists and dental hygienists has been the responsibility of the universities. Significant and progressive changes in educational delivery have occurred since then, which have culminated in three-year degree qualifications for dual-trained oral health professionals. Factors influencing this change included increased professionalism associated with the new legislative requirements for registration, workforce shortages, and enhanced educational and clinical practice requirements. The Bachelor of Oral Health degree at the University of Otago has an added emphasis on social sciences and incorporates aspects of learning relating to New Zealand's cultural heritage. We explore in this article the rationale for the introduction of a Bachelor of Oral Health in New Zealand and how it is designed to equip graduates as professionals in oral health.

  5. Dental vs. Medical Students' Comfort with Smoking Cessation Counseling: Implications for Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Staci Robinson; Kritz-Silverstein, Donna

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if dental and medical students have similar feelings of professional responsibility, comfort, and confidence with counseling patients about smoking cessation during their clinical years. All third- and fourth-year osteopathic medical (N=580) and dental students (N=144) at Western University of Health Sciences were invited to participate in a survey in April-July 2014, either electronically or in person, regarding their perceived professional responsibility, comfort, and confidence in counseling smokers about quitting and major constraints against counseling smokers about quitting. Respondents' demographic characteristics, smoking history, and history of living with a smoker were also assessed. Response rates were 21% (124/580) for medical and 82% (118/144) for dental students. Most of the responding medical (99.2%) and dental (94.9%) students reported feeling it was their professional responsibility to counsel patients about smoking cessation. Medical student respondents were significantly more comfortable and confident counseling patients about smoking cessation than dental student respondents (p0.10). There were no differences by age, but students who were former smokers were significantly more comfortable and confident counseling about smoking cessation than were nonsmokers (p=0.001). While almost all of the responding students reported feeling responsible for counseling patients about smoking cessation, the medical students and former smokers were more comfortable and confident performing this counseling. These results suggest the need for additional training in counseling techniques for dental students and nonsmokers. Future studies should assess the impact of medical and dental students' smoking cessation counseling.

  6. History of early abuse as a predictor of treatment response in patients with fibromyalgia : A post-hoc analysis of a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pae, Chi-Un; Masand, Prakash S.; Marks, David M.; Krulewicz, Stan; Han, Changsu; Peindl, Kathleen; Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We conducted a post-hoc analysis to determine whether a history of physical or sexual abuse was associated with response to treatment in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release (CR) in fibromyalgia. Methods. A randomized, double-blind,

  7. History of early abuse as a predictor of treatment response in patients with fibromyalgia : A post-hoc analysis of a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pae, Chi-Un; Masand, Prakash S.; Marks, David M.; Krulewicz, Stan; Han, Changsu; Peindl, Kathleen; Mannelli, Paolo; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We conducted a post-hoc analysis to determine whether a history of physical or sexual abuse was associated with response to treatment in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of paroxetine controlled release (CR) in fibromyalgia. Methods. A randomized, double-blind, placeb

  8. Utilization of dental health care services in context of the HIV epidemic- a cross-sectional study of dental patients in the Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åstrøm Anne

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV infected patients should be expected in the Sudanese dental health care services with an increasing frequency. Dental care utilization in the context of the HIV epidemic is generally poorly understood. Focusing on Sudanese dental patients with reported unknown HIV status, this study assessed the extent to which Andersen's model in terms of predisposing (socio-demographics, enabling (knowledge, attitudes and perceived risk related to HIV and need related factors (oral health status predict dental care utilization. It was hypothesized that enabling factors would add to the explanation of dental care utilization beyond that of predisposing and need related factors. Methods Dental patients were recruited from Khartoum Dental Teaching Hospital (KDTH and University of Science and Technology (UST during March-July 2008. A total of 1262 patients (mean age 30.7, 56.5% females and 61% from KDTH were examined clinically (DMFT and participated in an interview. Results A total of 53.9% confirmed having attended a dental clinic for treatment at least once in the past 2 years. Logistic regression analysis revealed that predisposing factors; travelling inside Sudan (OR = 0.5 were associated with lower odds and females were associated with higher odds (OR = 2.0 for dental service utilization. Enabling factors; higher knowledge of HIV transmission (OR = 0.6 and higher HIV related experience (OR = 0.7 were associated with lower odds, whereas positive attitudes towards infected people and high perceived risk of contagion (OR = 1.3 were associated with higher odds for dental care utilization. Among need related factors dental caries experience was strongly associated with dental care utilization (OR = 4.8. Conclusion Disparity in the history of dental care utilization goes beyond socio-demographic position and need for dental care. Public awareness of HIV infection control and confidence on the competence of dentists should be improved to

  9. Dental Treatment Needs in Vancouver Inner-City Elementary School-Aged Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Samim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine the dental treatment needs of inner-city Vancouver elementary school-aged children and relate them to sociodemographic characteristics. Methods. A census sampling comprising 562 children from six out of eight eligible schools was chosen (response rate was 65.4%. Dental treatment needs were assessed based on criteria from the World Health Organization. Results. Every third child examined needed at least one restorative treatment. A higher proportion of children born outside Canada were in need of more extensive dental treatments such as pulp care and extractions compared to the children born in Canada. There were no statistically significant differences in dental treatment needs between age, gender, or income groups or between children with or without dental insurance (Chi Squared P>0.05. The best significant predictors (Linear Multiple Regression, P>0.05 of higher dental treatment needs were being born outside Canada, gender, time of last dental visit, and family income. Having dental insurance did not associate with needing less treatment. Conclusion. A high level of unmet dental treatment needs (32% was found in inner-city Vancouver elementary school-aged children. Children born outside Canada, particularly the ones who recently arrived to Canada, needed more extensive dental treatments than children born in Canada.

  10. Predictors of Clinical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Edward; And Others

    1974-01-01

    In a search for predictors of clinical competence, 50 third-year medical students studying pediatrics were videotaped during their interview and physical examination of outpatients. Consideration should be given to the possible value of psychological tests as predictors of clinical competence. (Author)

  11. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  12. Dental anxiety and its relationship with self-perceived health locus of control among Indian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Shashidhar; Sangam, Dattatreya Krishnarao

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess dental anxiety and study its relationship with the perceived Health Locus of Control (HLC) among students in an Indian dental school. A total of 325 students returned completed history forms that consisted of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scale and the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS). 'Fear of the needle' was the greatest stimulus of dental anxiety with a mean score of 3.3, which was followed by 'tooth drilling' whose mean score was 2.7. There was also a statistically significant decrease in the mean scores for all of the MDAS items from 1st year to 4th year, except the item related to local anaesthetic injection, whose mean score remained high throughout. The mean scores of the three aspects of the MHLC scale (internal, chance and powerful others) were compared with respect to dental anxiety. The results showed that 'internal' was the most powerful of the three aspects of MHLC among all three anxiety groups. The mean 'internal' score for the low anxiety group was 4.4, which reduced to 4.1 for the high anxiety group. A statistically significant inverse correlation was also found between the 'internal' dimension of MHLC and dental anxiety. Perceived HLC was found to play an important role in predicting the dental anxiety among dental students.

  13. Dental fraud: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Max H

    2003-01-01

    A manager of a dental benefits program defines fraud and abuse in the dental context. Such practices may cost as much as four billion dollars annually and have a damaging effect on the trust the profession places in the profession and on the way dentists relate to each other.

  14. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  15. [Dental practice and AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanawatsirivej, S

    1991-01-01

    In Thailand nowadays AIDS is not completely under control. This is evident from reports which show an increasing number of HIV-positive patients. Since an unknown number of HIV-infected persons who are either undiagnosed or asymptomatic come to get dental service, fears of getting infected with HIV have been developed among dental professionals. This article summarizes a number of past studies and reports on HIV transmission in dental work and discusses the possibility of AIDS infection and dental occupational risk. It also urges dental professionals to take effective safety precaution against the infection. This is for their own and their patients' well-being and hopefully for Thailand's success in controlling AIDS.

  16. What is dental ecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Sinus lift and dental implantation after endosurgical treatment of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoliatin, S P; Sysoliatin, P G; Palkina, M O; Solop, M V

    2013-01-01

    The long-term results of dental implant placement in patients with the history of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis are assessed in retrospective study. Maxillary sinusotomy and endoscopic surgery procedures are compared in regard to complications risks after subsequent sinus lift and dental implantation, the latter proving to be method of choice in such cases.

  18. The Colyer Collection of First World War dental radiographs and casts at the Hunterian Museum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Kristin

    2014-07-01

    The Colyer Collection of First World War dental radiographs and casts is a unique teaching resource with a fascinating history. The story of the radiographs illuminates the role of dental surgery and Sir J. Frank Colyer (1866-1954) in the treatment of maxillofacial injuries during this period.

  19. Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Richard John

    2016-01-01

    Thesis submitted to the University of Manchester by Richard Macey for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy entitled “Detection of Common Dental Diseases by Dental Hygiene-Therapists”, February 2016.Many adult patients that attend NHS dental practices on a regular basis are asymptomatic and do not need any further treatment other than a routine dental examination (“check-up”). As the oral health of the adult population is predicted to improve further, using the General Dental Practitioner to und...

  20. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth"…

  1. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to Mexicali... Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix Corporation, Including On-Site Leased...

  2. Predictors of Wellness and American Indians

    OpenAIRE

    Hodge, Felicia S.; Nandy, Karabi

    2011-01-01

    Wellness is an important American Indian (AI) concept, understood as being in balance with one’s body, mind, and environment. Wellness predictors are reported in this paper within the context of health. A cross-sectional randomized household survey of 457 AI adults at 13 rural health care sites in California was conducted. Measures included wellness perceptions, barriers, health status/health conditions, spirituality, cultural connectivity, high-risk behaviors and abuse history. Statistical a...

  3. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Della Bona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different substrates, which has offered a great challenge to dental zirconia research and development. This study characterizes zirconia as a dental biomaterial, presenting the current consensus and challenges to its dental applications.

  4. A study of dental anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sook; Kim, Jae Duck [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to find out the prevalence of dental anomalies in 600 normal persons (male:363, female:237) at age 14 to 39 years, through history taking, oral examination, and radiographic observations of subjects. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence of individual dental anomalies were as follows; Congenitally missing teeth 7%; supernumerary teeth 1.33%; ectopic eruption 8.50%; transposition 0.33%; rotation 23.67%; microdontia 11.16% (peg lateral is 5.33%; third molar 5.83%); prolonged retention of deciduous teeth 1.33%; crowding 49.83%; and spacing 15.17%. 2. Alterations in numbers of teeth : The most frequently missing teeth were mandibular lateral incisors, followed by mandibular second premolars and maxillary second premolars. In numbers of congenitally missing teeth per person, 52.38% had one missing tooth and 30.95% had two missing teeth. In supernumerary teeth, there was higher rate in male than in female. Most supernumerary teeth were mesiodens of median area in maxilla and the eruption pattern of that teeth generally was unerupted state. 3. In transposition, exchange of position of teeth involved the canine and first premolar. 4. Congenital missing rate of permanent successors in prolonged retention of deciduous teeth was 69.23%. 5. Crowding and spacing had respectively higher rate in mandible and in maxilla.

  5. Difficult factors in Management of Impacted Dental Prosthesis in Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efiaty A. Soepardi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A dental prosthesis which ingested and impacted in esophagus, is an emergency case and life threatening, so require immediate esophagoscopy intervention for removing. The objective of this study is to assess some factors can caused dtfficulties in diagnosing and treating the ingested and impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus and their complications. This retrospective study analyzed patient’s chart whose underwent esophagoscopy for removing the impacted dental prosthesis in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia during a period between January 1997 and December 2003. Neck-chest X-ray and esophagoscopy were performed in all patients to identify the existence of the dental prosthesis as a diagnostic and treatment procedure. The length of time for removing the dental prosthesis was recorded and stated as a less difficult esophagoscopy when it takes time less than 60 minutes and as a difficult  esophagoscopy takes 60 minutes or longer. Some risk difficulties factors were statistically analyzed. There were 53 patients of ingested dental prosthesis in esophagus. Only 51 cases were analyzed According to the length of time for removing the dental prosthesis by esophagoscopy, 22 patients were recorded as less difficult cases and 29 patients as difficult cases. Two cases among the cases needed cervicotomy after unsuccessful esophagoscopy removal. The difficulties to diagnose an impacted dental prosthesis in the esophagus caused by unreliable clinical history, unclear signs and symptoms, unable to be detected by X-ray and was not found during esophagoscopy. The difficulties in treating due to mucosal laceration, edema, bleeding, failure of the first extraction and conformity with the size and shape, the wire outside the dental prosthesis and the length of time stayed in the esophagus. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 33-6Keywords: ingested dental prosthesis, radioluscent foreign body, length of time of esophagoscopy

  6. Equine dental advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S K

    2001-08-01

    The reintroduction and development of safe motorized instruments, the increased availability of continuing education, and the understanding and implementation of appropriate procedures allow practitioners to provide better dental care. Veterinarians realize that sedation, analgesia, a full-mouth speculum, and proper instrumentation are necessary to provide these services. Continued instrument design, future research, and new treatment and prophylactic protocols should have a positive impact on the future of equine dental health. New and rediscovered procedures for equilibrating equine occlusion are allowing horses to masticate more efficiently, carry a bit more comfortably, and experience improved performance. The horse, the horse owner, and the veterinary profession all benefit from providing complete equine dental care.

  7. Dental pulp stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashri, N. Y.; Ajlan, S. A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable...... scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from...... an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors....

  8. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  9. Feline dental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P; Williams, C A

    1986-09-01

    Periodontal disease and chronic gingivitis/stomatitis are the most common feline dental diseases. With routine dental care and increased emphasis on home oral hygiene, these diseases can be controlled. Cats can be seen with a number of other dental disorders, and improved treatment methods such as restorations of early subgingival resorptive lesions, endodontic therapy, and orthodontic therapy can be performed successfully. More study and research are necessary about the gingivitis/stomatitis syndrome and subgingival resorptive lesions so that improved prevention and treatment recommendations can be made.

  10. Depression, anxiety and stress in dental students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binanzan, Najla; Alhassan, Aseel

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To measure the occurrence and levels of depression, anxiety and stress in undergraduate dental students using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in November and December of 2014. A total of 289 dental students were invited to participate, and 277 responded, resulting in a response rate of 96%. The final sample included 247 participants. Eligible participants were surveyed via a self-reported questionnaire that included the validated DASS-21 scale as the assessment tool and questions about demographic characteristics and methods for managing stress.  Results Abnormal levels of depression, anxiety and stress were identified in 55.9%, 66.8% and 54.7% of the study participants, respectively. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed multiple predictors: gender (for anxiety b=-3.589, p=.016 and stress b=-4.099, p=.008), satisfaction with faculty relationships (for depression b=-2.318, p=.007; anxiety b=-2.213, p=.004; and stress b=-2.854, pstress b=-2.854, pstress b=-2.648, p=.045). The standardized coefficients demonstrated the relationship and strength of the predictors for each subscale. To cope with stress, students engaged in various activities such as reading, watching television and seeking emotional support from others. Conclusions The high occurrence of depression, anxiety and stress among dental students highlights the importance of providing support programs and implementing preventive measures to help students, particularly those who are most susceptible to higher levels of these psychological conditions. PMID:28553831

  11. The potential impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement on American dental licensure: a European community model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D P

    2000-01-01

    Appropriate licensure is a significant barrier to entry to the practice of dentistry. The history of dental licensure in the United States is briefly examined, and current dental licensure requirements in the United States and Mexico are noted. The impact that establishment of the European Community had on dental licensure in Europe is examined, noting that changes were the result of political, rather than professional, input. Requirements of NAFTA are examined to see how they will impact current American dental licensure requirements. Some migration of dental professionals between the United States and Mexico is expected as a result of NAFTA.

  12. Asymptotic dental score and prevalent coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janket, Sok-Ja; Qvarnström, Markku; Meurman, Jukka H; Baird, Alison E; Nuutinen, Pekka; Jones, Judith A

    2004-03-09

    Oral infections have been postulated to produce cytokines that may contribute to the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD). We hypothesized that by estimating the combined production of inflammatory mediators attributable to several oral pathologies, we might be able to explain CHD with better precision. A total of 256 consecutive Finnish cardiac patients from Kuopio University Hospital with angiographically confirmed CHD and 250 age-, gender-, and residence-matched noncardiac patients (controls) were recruited. All dental factors expected to generate inflammatory mediators, including pericoronitis, dental caries, dentate status, root remnants, and gingivitis, were examined, and an asymptotic dental score (ADS) was developed by logistic regression analyses with an appropriate weighting scheme according to the likelihood ratio. We validated the explanatory ability of ADS by comparing it to that of the Total Dental Index and examining whether the ADS was associated with known predictors of CHD. A model that included ADS, C-reactive protein, HDL, and fibrinogen offered an explanatory ability that equaled or exceeded that of the Framingham heart score (C statistic=0.82 versus 0.80). When ADS was removed from this model, the C-statistic decreased to 0.77, which indicates that the ADS was a significant contributor to the explanatory ability of a logistic model. ADS may be useful as a prescreening tool to promote proactive cardiac evaluation among individuals without overt symptoms of CHD. However, additional prospective study is needed to validate the use of an oral health score as a predictor of incident CHD.

  13. Risk factors for dental caries in children with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braúna, Ana Paula Vasques Sales; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães de; Resende, Vera Lúcia Silva; Castilho, Lia Silva de

    2016-06-14

    The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for dental caries in children with developmental disabilities who were treated at a clinical reference service for patients with special needs in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. This is a retrospective cohort study that evaluated 401 dental charts of individuals without dental caries or restorations in their first dental appointment. The dependent variable was the time of occurrence of new dental caries or restorations and was measured in months. Gender, age, International Code of Diseases (ICD), mother´s education, sugar consumption, use of fluoride toothpaste, oral hygiene, mouth breathing, reports of xerostomia, gingival status, use of psychotropic or asthma drugs, and history of asthma were covariates. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the raw and adjusted hazard ratios and their respective 95% confidence intervals. The average time that individuals remained free of dental caries/restoration was equal to 107.46 months (95%CI 95.41 to 119.51), with a median of caries-free children up to 94 months. For each point increase in the scale of sucrose consumption, the increase in caries risk was 1.07 (95%CI 1.01 to 1.15). Sucrose consumption was the only risk factor for dental caries found in this group of individuals with developmental disabilities.

  14. The Brisbane Dental Hospital Building: "The Palace" An Era Ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Harry F; Foley, Michael A; Brown, John P

    2015-01-01

    Constitutional, educational, humanitarian and political considerations underpinned the design and construction of the Brisbane Dental Hospital Building, often colloquially referred to as "The Palace." The Queensland Heritage Council's listing of the Brisbane Dental Hospital Building on The Queensland Heritage Register in 1999 confirms the cultural significance of Nowland's architectural signature, the historical importance of the Wickham Park precinct and prior students' connection with the building. Influences on decisions determining the location, grand design and timing of construction of the Brisbane Dental Hospital Building emanated from a far bigger and largely unrecorded political picture. The authors argue that the political context in two tiers of government, the timing and nature of the proposal, town planning issues, the exigencies of the caries epidemic and Forgan Smith's post-Depression economic reconstruction across Queensland underpinned the project. Hanlon's personal attributes and disdain for the autonomy of the dental profession, together with his desire to reform dental education and to establish statewide government-administred dental clinics, were also relevant. Accordingly, the BDHD portrayed aspiration, purpose, symbolism, and vision. This paper, essentially an integration of dental and mainstream history, assembles and analyzes hitherto scattered and unpublished evidence to fill a gap in the current literature.

  15. Unintentional overdose of analgesia secondary to acute dental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, M D; Graham, C A

    2002-08-24

    Three cases of unintentional overdose with simple analgesics are presented. Over a two month period, these patients presented to the accident and emergency (A&E) department with acute dental pain, outside normal working hours, having been unable to access emergency dental care. In one case the patient's reason for attendance was to obtain further supplies of analgesics. The patients required admission for assessment of the severity of the overdose in addition to advice about appropriate use of analgesics and advice on access to dental care. None of the patients required treatment for the overdose. These cases serve as a timely reminder of the importance of taking an accurate drug history in emergency situations. They also raise issues of patient education for self medication and access to emergency dental services outside normal working hours.

  16. A discourse on dental hygiene education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, Z; Sunell, S; Boschma, G; Imai, P; Craig, B J

    2011-11-01

    Over the past decade, the discourse on dental hygiene education has gained momentum in Canada. This review provides insights into the evolution of dental hygiene education in Canada, briefly exploring the history and professional influences for diploma and baccalaureate education within the profession. The profession in Canada has yet to implement a national standardized entry-to-practice educational model, but the recent development of national educational competencies may prove to be a promising beginning. The review also discusses efforts to advance dental hygiene education in recent years, while exploring the political and professional pressures and challenges that remain. Further discourse on education and outcomes-related research can be effective in positively influencing governmental, professional and public opinions of higher entry-level education for dental hygiene which may ultimately result in regulatory change and improved client outcomes.

  17. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  18. Xilitol and dental caries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Marten Titus

    1987-01-01

    Dental caries is a widespread multifactoral disease. The main sympthons are minaral loss from tooth enemal and dentine, eventually leading to total destruction of the teeth, pain, impairment of mastication and problems with facial esthetics. ... Zie: Summary

  19. Syllabus of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    York: Plenum Pub Co, 1975:635. V ".. PROPERTIES OF DENTAL MATERIALS--WOOLSEY 11 14. Ringle RD, Webber RL, Anusavice KJ, Fairhurst CW. Thermal... Anusavice et al (8) have demonstrated in silver-palladium metals, the presence of surface nodules created by internal oxidation of tin during the...683-689. 7. Ringle RD, Webber RL, Anusavice KJ, Fairhurst CW. Thermal expansion contraction behavior of dental porcelain-alloy systems. J Dent Res

  20. Use of virtual patients in dental education: a survey of U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Robert A; Bentley, Dan A; Halpin, Richard; Valenza, John A

    2012-10-01

    The use of virtual patients in dental education is gaining acceptance as an adjunctive method to live patient interactions for training dental students. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which virtual patients are being utilized in dental education by conducting a survey that was sent to sixty-seven dental schools in the United States and Canada. A total of thirty dental schools responded to the web-based survey. Sixty-three percent of the responding dental schools use virtual patients for preclinical or clinical exercises. Of this group, 31.3 percent have used virtual patients in their curricula for more than ten years, and approximately one-third of those who do use virtual patients expose their students to more than ten virtual patient experiences over the entirety of their programs. Of the schools that responded, 90.5 percent rated the use of virtual patients in dental education as important or very important. An additional question addressed the utilization of interactive elements for the virtual patient. Use of virtual patients can provide an excellent method for learning and honing patient interviewing skills, medical history taking, recordkeeping, and patient treatment planning. Through the use of virtual patient interactive audio/video elements, the student can experience interaction with his or her virtual patients during a more realistic simulation encounter.

  1. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  2. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  3. Dental patients' use of the Internet.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-12-19

    To determine the use of the Internet by patients attending a range of dental clinics to search for information regarding dental procedures, and also to investigate their interest in online dental consultations and \\'dental tourism\\'.

  4. Community History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Helen M.

    1997-01-01

    Recounts the experience of researching community history in Ivanhoe, Virginia, between 1987 and 1990. The Ivanhoe History Project involved community members in collecting photographs, memorabilia, and oral histories of their town. Subsequent published volumes won the W. D. Weatherford Award and inspired a quilt exhibit and a theatrical production.…

  5. Does pneumoconiosis of dental technician cause to calcific pleural lesions? (Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman ŞENYİĞİT

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The articles about various pneumoconiosis in dental technicians who work in inconvenient conditions have been increasing in recent years. Exposure to dust and fume that occur during the dental procedure may play role in pneumoconiosis of dental technicians.A 53 years old male patient conveyed that he has worked in dental prosthesis procedures for 22 years (1968-1990.Environmental asbestosis was not established in the history of the case but there were calcified pleural plaques in the chest x-ray graphy.There were appearance of calcific asbest plaques in many section of thorax CT.A case of pneumoconiosis in dental technician who work in unadequate preventive conditions was reported in this paper. Probably ,exposure to the asbest fibers that occurs during the procedure of dental prosthesis were the main reason for developing calcific pleural lesions.

  6. Latex glove allergy in dental workers: complications and predisposing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaee M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dermal- respiratory reactions to latex glove is a common problem and sometimes life threatening. Among health care workers, dental working personnel have extensive use of latex gloves. A few numbers of researches have been done in Iran about prevalence of these reactions but there is no comprehensive study for dental workers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate reactions to latex gloves amongst dental workers in military dental health centers.Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive survey, dental workers with a minimum of three months length of employment and most often use of latex gloves were asked to fill standard questionnaire (derived from South Carolina Medical University regarding latex related clinical manifestation and personal medical history and predisposing factors Data analysis was done by χ2 and Student's t test.Results: In our study 330 personnel were assessed. The mean age and length of employment was 31.6 and 8 years respectively. The most occupation was dentistry. A total of 232 subjects (70.3% reported latex gloves-allergic symptoms. 72 (21.8% of persons have history of atopy and food allergy was seen in 114 (34.5%. 63 (19.1% of subjects reported history of hand dermatitis. All of these predisposing factors had positive regression with dermal and respiratory reactions.Conclusion: In this survey the prevalence of allergic reactions was higher than similar studies which may be due to type of gloves, lack of preemployment assessments and other factors. Use of diagnostic methods such as serologic measures, SPT and pulmonary function testing (such as spirogram could be considered as tools for confirmatory and differential diagnosis and important complementary for these studies. Because of relationship between allergic reactions to latex gloves and some medical histories, it seems to be necessary for preemployment evaluation and periodic health surveillance of dental workers.

  7. Diagnostic Methods for Dental Caries Used by Private Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-06

    Mar 6, 2017 ... types of diagnostic tools and methods used by private dental practitioners in. Ankara for .... and treatment approaches, and patient records. ..... detection aids. ... approximal and occlusal dental caries in a low risk population.

  8. Childhood dental injuries: a resiliency model of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, Jenny M; Rodd, Helen D; Baker, Sarah R

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of research examining how children and their families adapt to traumatic dental injuries. This study examined how clinical and psychosocial factors influence adaptation to this oral stressor using a theoretical framework of resiliency and adaptation. Children with traumatised permanent teeth, who were attending a UK dental hospital, completed questionnaires at baseline and at a 6 month follow-up. Child questionnaires assessed coping styles, social support, and quality of life outcomes. Parents were also asked to complete questionnaires, which assessed previous stressors/strains on the family, social support, healthcare satisfaction, and family impacts. Data related to the child's dental injury were collected from clinical notes. Structural equation modelling and regression analyses were employed to analyse data. One hundred and eight children and 113 parents participated at baseline. Children's gender, coping style, social support, and family functioning significantly predicted children's oral health-related quality of life. Parents' satisfaction with their children's dental care significantly predicted parental quality of life outcomes. Children's close friend support and healthcare satisfaction remained significant predictors of positive outcomes at follow-up. The findings revealed important psychosocial factors that influence child and family adaptation to childhood dental trauma. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Predictors of calf cramping in rugby league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Katherine M; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Callister, Robin

    2014-03-01

    Exercise-associated muscle cramps (EAMC) in the calf are common in rugby league. To date, the etiology and predictors of calf cramping are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to undertake a prospective investigation to identify predictors of calf cramping in rugby league players. Demographic and anthropometric data and calf cramp and injury history were collected in the preseason. Hydration status, number of games played, and calf cramps were recorded on game days. Male rugby league players (n = 103, mean age 18.8 ± 4.1 years) were classified as either EAMC (experienced at least 1 incident of calf cramps in the season) or no EAMC (no calf cramps). The following were investigated as possible predictors of EAMC using logistic regression modeling: competition level, age, ethnicity, playing position, history of cramping, precramping, low back pain, foot orthotic usage, foot posture, foot strike, muscle flexibility, calf girth, hydration status, and number of games played. Half the players, n = 52, experienced at least 1 incidence of calf cramping. Playing in a senior competition level (odds ratio: 0.21; 95% confidence interval: 0.06-0.75; p = 0.016), a history of calf cramping (10.85; 2.16-54.44; p = 0.004), and a history of low back pain resulting in missed field minutes (4.50, 1.37-14.79; p = 0.013) were found to predict EAMC. This study suggests that there is a high incidence of calf cramping in rugby league, especially at senior competition levels, and supports preseason screening in senior players to idetify those at risk of calf cramping and the development of possible preventative strategies.

  10. RS-predictor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaretzki, Jed; Bergeron, Charles; Rydberg, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    This article describes RegioSelectivity-Predictor (RS-Predictor), a new in silico method for generating predictive models of P450-mediated metabolism for drug-like compounds. Within this method, potential sites of metabolism (SOMs) are represented as "metabolophores": A concept that describes...... vector that encodes regioselectivity trends across all cases in a training set. The resulting pathway-independent (O-dealkylation vs N-oxidation vs Csp(3) hydroxylation, etc.), isozyme-specific regioselectivity model may be used to predict potential metabolic liabilities. In the present work, cross...

  11. An association between sella turcica bridging and dental transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Rosalia; Farella, Mauro; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine any association between tooth transposition and bridging of the sella turcica, given the evidence of common embryonic origins associated with these structures and a genetic basis underlying these two conditions. Clinical records of subjects demonstrating dental transposition and normal controls were collected from several hospital orthodontic departments and specialist orthodontic practices. All cases and controls were documented with good quality lateral cephalometric radiographs and dental panoramic tomograms (DPTs). The study sample consisted of 21 Caucasian subjects (7 males and 14 females; mean age 14.5 years; SD 2.2 years), demonstrating either maxillary or mandibular dental transposition. The control group, matched for age and gender to the study sample, comprised 70 Caucasians (31 males and 39 females; mean age 13.8 years; SD 1.8 years) without dental anomalies randomly selected from subjects referred for orthodontic treatment within the same departments. The extent of sella turcica bridging was quantified from each profile radiograph using comparative measurement of length and diameter. Sella turcica bridging was found more frequently in subjects diagnosed with dental transposition than in the controls, with the difference being statistically significant [chi-square=7.4; degrees of freedom (df)=2; P=0.025; Fisher's exact test; P=0.042]. The increased frequency of complete and partial bridging of the sella turcica in subjects with dental transposition provides further evidence of a genetic basis to this condition. As calcification and bridging of this region can present during early childhood, it may act as a useful diagnostic predictor of susceptibility to local dental problems.

  12. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  13. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  14. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a ... Your e-mail address: Personal message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here ...

  15. Dental modification in the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Pia; Alexandersen, Verner

    2003-01-01

    Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction......Skeleton remains from Denmark, Greenland, Faeroe Islands, dental care, drillling in the past, tooth extraction...

  16. Medical and Dental Patient Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A RadiationAnswers.org Ask the Experts Medical and Dental Patient Issues What's My Risk? The risks of ... developed by our topic editors for this category: Dental-Patient Issues Medical CT Reference Books and Articles ...

  17. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing ... that collects around and between teeth. The home dental plaque identification test shows where plaque builds up. ...

  18. Dental Health: The Basic Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dental Health THE BASIC FACTS MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS Kim, diagnosed in 1986 People with a chronic disease may neglect their general health and wellness, research shows. Dental care is no exception. A tendency to focus ...

  19. Dental Care - Medicaid and Chip

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dental health is an important part of peoples overall health. States are required to provide dental benefits to children covered by Medicaid and the Childrens Health...

  20. 77 FR 4469 - Dental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... purposes. This amendment clarifies that principles governing determinations by VA's Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) for service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of establishing eligibility for dental treatment by VA's Veterans Health Administration (VHA), apply only when VHA requests...

  1. Opinions of Romanian Dental Students Toward Tobacco Use Interventions in the Dental Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, A L; Ibric, S; Ibric-Cioranu, V

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess smoking habits as well as attitudes toward smoking cessation counseling among Romanian dental students in order to build an evidence base for further undergraduate curriculum development. A 38-item self-administered questionnaire was delivered to first to sixth dental students enrolled at the University "Lucian Blaga" Sibiu. The questionnaire covered sociodemographics, smoking habits, knowledge concerning health effects, attitudes, and confidence toward smoking cessation counseling. Smoking was reported by 37 % of participants and was more prevalent among clinical (48.98 %) than preclinical (29.58 %) and basic science students (35.93 %). Students' knowledge that tobacco affects general and oral/dental health and knowledge of dental students regarding the smoking and alcohol behavior taken during medical history varied according to academic year and smoking status, but not according to gender. Only 51.1 % of all students agreed or strongly agreed that they were adequately trained to provide tobacco cessation education. 58.6 %, respectively 52.9 %, strongly agreed that is part of their role as a dentist to assist their patients to stop smoking and to prevent patients from starting to use tobacco products, while only 35.8 % believed that smoking cessation counseling provided by a dentist can be effective in helping patients stop smoking. The main determinants of student's attitudes toward smoking cessation counseling were academic year, clinical experience in the dental settings, and knowledge of smoking adverse effects. Dental school should offer adequate training in tobacco dependence and available continuing education in tobacco intervention in aim to encourage oral health care practitioners to have up-to-date information in aim to play their role effectively in the overall smoking cessation and prevention activities.

  2. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  3. Degradability of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-09-01

    The degradation of dental ceramics generally occurs because of mechanical forces or chemical attack. The possible physiological side-effects of ceramics are their tendency to abrade opposing dental structures, the emission of radiation from radioactive components, the roughening of their surfaces by chemical attack with a corresponding increase in plaque retention, and the release of potentially unsafe concentrations of elements as a result of abrasion and dissolution. The chemical durability of dental ceramics is excellent. With the exception of the excessive exposure to acidulated fluoride, ammonium bifluoride, or hydrofluoric acid, there is little risk of surface degradation of virtually all current dental ceramics. Extensive exposure to acidulated fluoride is a possible problem for individuals with head and/or neck cancer who have received large doses of radiation. Such fluoride treatment is necessary to minimize tooth demineralization when saliva flow rates have been reduced because of radiation exposure to salivary glands. Porcelain surface stains are also lost occasionally when abraded by prophylaxis pastes and/or acidulated fluoride. In each case, the solutes are usually not ingested. Further research that uses standardized testing procedures is needed on the chemical durability of dental ceramics. Accelerated durability tests are desirable to minimize the time required for such measurements. The influence of chemical durability on surface roughness and the subsequent effect of roughness on wear of the ceramic restorations as well as of opposing structures should also be explored on a standardized basis.

  4. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Della Bona; Oscar E. Pecho; Rodrigo Alessandretti

    2015-01-01

    Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different subs...

  5. Zirconia as a Dental Biomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro Della Bona; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rodrigo Alessandretti

    2015-01-01

    Ceramics are very important in the science of dental biomaterials. Among all dental ceramics, zirconia is in evidence as a dental biomaterial and it is the material of choice in contemporary restorative dentistry. Zirconia has been applied as structural material for dental bridges, crowns, inserts, and implants, mostly because of its biocompatibility, high fracture toughness, and radiopacity. However, the clinical success of restorative dentistry has to consider the adhesion to different subs...

  6. Predictors of wellness and American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Felicia S; Nandy, Karabi

    2011-08-01

    Wellness is an important American Indian (AI) concept, understood as being in balance with one's body, mind, and environment. Wellness predictors are reported in this paper within the context of health. A cross-sectional randomized household survey of 457 AI adults at 13 rural health care sites in California was conducted. Measures included wellness perceptions, barriers, health status/health conditions, spirituality, cultural connectivity, high-risk behaviors and abuse history. Statistical analysis obtained the best predictive model for wellness. Predictors of wellness were general health status perception, participation in AI cultural practices and suicide ideation. Significant differences in wellness status were observed depending on experience of adverse events in childhood and adulthood (neglect, physical abuse, and sexual abuse). Cultural connectivity (speaking tribal language, participating in AI practices, and feeling connected to community) was also associated with perceptions of wellness. Recommendations are for culturally-appropriate education and interventions emphasizing community and cultural connectivity for improving wellness status.

  7. Predictors of human rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  8. RS-WebPredictor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaretzki, J.; Bergeron, C.; Huang, T.-W.;

    2013-01-01

    . RS-WebPredictor is the first freely accessible server that predicts the regioselectivity of the last six isozymes. Server execution time is fast, taking on average 2s to encode a submitted molecule and 1s to apply a given model, allowing for high-throughput use in lead optimization projects...

  9. Preventive dental care among Medicaid-enrolled senior adults: from community to nursing facility residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mary C; Caplan, Daniel J; Bern-Klug, Mercedes; Cowen, Howard J; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Marchini, Leonardo; Momany, Elizabeth T

    2017-09-08

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether the utilization rate of preventive oral health care services while senior adults were community-dwelling differed from the rate after those same senior adults were admitted to nursing facilities. A secondary objective was to evaluate other significant predictors of receipt of preventive oral health procedures after nursing facility entry. Iowa Medicaid claims from 2007-2014 were accessed for adults who were 68+ years upon entry to a nursing facility and continuously enrolled in Medicaid for at least three years before and at least two years after admission (n = 874). Univariate, bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted. During the five years that subjects were followed, 52.8% never received a dental exam and 75.9% never received a dental hygiene procedure. More Medicaid-enrolled senior adults received ≥1 preventive dental procedure in the two years while residing in a nursing facility compared to the three years before entry. In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictor of preventive oral health care utilization after entry was the receipt of preventive oral health services before entry (p dental procedures in the two years after nursing facility entry was the receipt of dental procedures in the three years before entry while community-dwelling. This underscores the importance of the senior adult establishing a source of dental care while community-dwelling. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  10. Perceived Sources of Stress among Junior & Mid-Senior Egyptian Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedky, Nabila A

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the sources of stress among dental students enrolled at Pharos University in Alexandria (PUA) - Egypt, and to explore the role of gender, level of undergraduate study and residence with parents on perceived stressors. A thirty-item self-reported modified version of the Dental Environment Stress (DES) questionnaire was administered to 537 junior and mid-senior undergraduate dental students during the academic fall semester 2010, with a response rate of 79.89%. Workload, performance pressure, and self-efficacy beliefs constituted the most stress-provoking factors. Female students experienced greater stress than males for all stressor items except for "Self-Efficacy Beliefs" and "Faculty & Administration" with no statistically significant difference by gender. Mid-senior dental students registered higher levels of perceived stress for "Workload", "Self-Efficacy Beliefs", and "Personal Factors" stressors in comparison to their junior peers. Those students who lived away of their parents were at higher risk of perceived stress than those students who lived with their parents. "Uncertainty about future dental career" was the first best predictor variable by gender. Whereas, "Difficulty of classwork" was the first predictor variable by both level of undergraduate study and residence with parents. Female dental students had higher mean overall problem scores compared to their male counterparts, mid-senior students showed some higher perceived problems compared to junior students, and students who lived away from their parents revealed higher levels of perceived stress.

  11. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  12. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  13. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  14. Dental operatory design and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M

    1993-08-01

    Improving and expanding the dental services of a practice can involve purchasing new equipment and even modifying or expanding the physical plant. Operatory design is important to the efficiency with which dental procedures can be performed. Equipment purchases to outfit the dental operatory should be made based on the specific needs and functions of a practice.

  15. Stereoscopy in Dental Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kreiborg, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether stereoscopy can play a meaningful role in dental education. The study used an anaglyph technique in which two images were presented separately to the left and right eyes (using red/cyan filters), which, combined in the brain, give enhanced depth...... perception. A positional judgment task was performed to assess whether the use of stereoscopy would enhance depth perception among dental students at Osaka University in Japan. Subsequently, the optimum angle was evaluated to obtain maximum ability to discriminate among complex anatomical structures. Finally...... practice, they did recognize its merits for education. These results suggest that using stereoscopic images in dental education can be quite valuable as stereoscopy greatly helped these students' understanding of the spatial relationships in complex anatomical structures....

  16. Dental implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Dental Implant Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  18. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... combined, the result is that more than 100 trauma scenarios exist, when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios has a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnosis and treatment, it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.DentalTrauma...

  19. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  20. Dental formulations for the prevention of dental erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to a therapeutic method for preventing and/or inhibiting dental erosion in a mammalian subject, and the provision of a dental care product for performing the method. The dental care product of the invention comprises a starch-degrading enzyme of E. C. 3.2.1.1, wherein said...... product comprises less than 1 wt.% ionic surfactant, and preferably is substantially free of endoprotease and/or lipase. The properties of the dental care product serve to prevent and/or inhibit dental erosion in a subject that typically results from repeated exposure of the patient's tooth surfaces...

  1. Entangled histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotler, Jordan; Wilczek, Frank

    2016-12-01

    We introduce quantum history states and their mathematical framework, thereby reinterpreting and extending the consistent histories approach to quantum theory. Through thought experiments, we demonstrate that our formalism allows us to analyze a quantum version of history in which we reconstruct the past by observations. In particular, we can pass from measurements to inferences about ‘what happened’ in a way that is sensible and free of paradox. Our framework allows for a richer understanding of the temporal structure of quantum theory, and we construct history states that embody peculiar, non-classical correlations in time.

  2. Bleeding disorders in dental practice: A diagnostic overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhirup Goswami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental health care workers are increasingly called upon to provide quality dental care to individuals whose bleeding and clotting mechanisms have been altered by inherited or acquired diseases. This provides an opportunity for the dentist who is trained in the recognition of oral and systemic signs of altered hemostasis to assist in the diagnosis of the underlying condition. A number of dental procedures result in the risk of bleeding that can have serious consequences, such as severe hemorrhage or possibly death, for the patient with a bleeding disorder. Oral care providers must be aware of the impact of bleeding disorders on the management of their patients. These disorders must be recognized from history, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations, if indicated, prior to surgical procedures including those in dental surgery to prevent bleeding related complications. Safe dental care may require consultation with the patient′s physician, systemic management, and dental treatment modifications. The purpose of this article is how to identify these patients with bleeding disorders.

  3. Prevalence of dental erosion among people with gastroesophageal reflux disease in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhao; Liu, Jingming; Chen, Su; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Zhenting

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is typically diagnosed based on symptoms of regurgitation and heartburn, although it may also manifest as asthma-like symptoms, laryngitis, or dental erosion. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of dental erosion in people with GERD and to evaluate the association between GERD and dental erosion. The presence, severity, and pattern of dental erosion was assessed in 51 participants with GERD and 50 participants without GERD using the Smith and Knight tooth wear index. Medical, dietary, and dental histories were collected by questionnaire. Factors potentially related to dental erosion, including GERD, were evaluated by logistic regression. Dental erosion was observed in 31 (60.8%) participants with GERD and 14 (28%) participants without GERD. Bivariate analysis revealed that participants with GERD were more likely to experience dental erosion (crude odds ratio [cOR]: 2.74; 95% CI: 1.19, 6.32) than participants without GERD. Multivariate analysis also revealed that participants with GERD had a higher risk of dental erosion (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.97; 95% CI: 1.45, 10.89). Consumption of grains and legumes, the most frequently consumed foods in China, did not correlate with dental erosion. However, carbonated beverage consumption was significantly associated with GERD and dental erosion (aOR: 3.34; 95% CI: 1.01, 11.04; P=.04). GERD was positively correlated with dental erosion. Carbonated beverage consumption can increase the risk of both GERD and dental erosion. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epilepsy in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, J J; McArdle, N S; Wilson, M H; Stassen, L F A

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological condition characterised by seizure activity. It has an approximate incidence of 1%. General dental practitioners will encounter these patients in practice. This article discusses the types of epilepsy, the medical management and considerations in dental management of epileptic patients. General recommendations are made, based on current evidence, with respect to prescribing of medications. The management of an epileptic seizure is discussed. Status epilepticus is a rare but serious complication of epileptic seizures. An easy-to-follow algorithm is provided to assist the practitioner in managing seizures.

  5. [Hardening of dental instruments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasev, G P

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the service life of stomatological instruments by the local hardening of their working parts is discussed. Such hardening should be achieved by using hard and wear-resistant materials. The examples of hardening dental elevators and hard-alloy dental drills are given. New trends in the local hardening of instruments are the treatment of their working parts with laser beams, the application of coating on their surface by the gas-detonation method. The results of research work and trials are presented.

  6. Dental caries: an infectious and transmissible disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caufield, Page W; Li, Yihong; Dasanayake, Ananda

    2005-05-01

    By definition, dental caries is an infectious and transmissible disease because it is caused by bacteria colonizing the tooth surfaces. Unlike most infectious diseases affecting humans, caries is the result of an imbalance of the indigenous oral biota rather than a nonindigenous, exogenous pathogen. The introduction of refined sugar into modern society's diet has tipped the balance from health to disease. New insight into the natural history of the leading cariogenic bacteria, the mutans streptococci, may contribute ways to control or prevent this infectious disease. Here, we use the host-parasite model as a platform for viewing the pathogenicity of the caries process in contrast to other infectious diseases.

  7. Predictors of clinical outcome following lumbar disc surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Fritz, Julie; Koppenhaver, S.L.;

    2016-01-01

    of leg pain to LBP, pain medication use, greater time to surgery, and no history of previous physical or injection therapy. Physical examination predictors were a positive straight or cross straight leg raise test, diminished lower extremity strength, sensation or reflexes, and the presence of postural...

  8. Intellectual History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In the 5 Questions book series, this volume presents a range of leading scholars in Intellectual History and the History of Ideas through their answers to a brief questionnaire. Respondents include Michael Friedman, Jacques le Goff, Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Jonathan Israel, Phiip Pettit, John Pocock...

  9. Intellectual History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In the 5 Questions book series, this volume presents a range of leading scholars in Intellectual History and the History of Ideas through their answers to a brief questionnaire. Respondents include Michael Friedman, Jacques le Goff, Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Jonathan Israel, Phiip Pettit, John Pocock...

  10. Romerrigets historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Erik

    Romerrigets historie fra Roms legendariske grundlæggelse i 753 f.v.t. til Heraklios' tronbestigelse i 610 e.v.t.......Romerrigets historie fra Roms legendariske grundlæggelse i 753 f.v.t. til Heraklios' tronbestigelse i 610 e.v.t....

  11. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis with distinct dental, skeletal and developmental abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph; Guelmann, Marcio; Barak, Shlomo

    2002-01-01

    A case of a 9-year-old child with hereditary gingival fibromatosis, supernumerary tooth, chest deformities, auricular cartilage deformation, joint laxity and undescended testes is described. The exact mode of inheritance is unclear; a new mutation pattern is possible. These features resemble but differ from the previously reported Laband syndrome. The dental treatment consisted of surgical removal of the fibrous tissue and conservative restorative treatment under general anesthesia. The dental practitioner should be alert for developmental abnormalities such as supernumerary teeth and delayed tooth eruption. A comprehensive medical history and physical systemic evaluation is essential to rule out other systemic abnormalities. Genetic consultation is mandatory for future family planing.

  12. Quantum Histories

    CERN Document Server

    Kent, A

    1998-01-01

    There are good motivations for considering some type of quantum histories formalism. Several possible formalisms are known, defined by different definitions of event and by different selection criteria for sets of histories. These formalisms have a natural interpretation, according to which nature somehow chooses one set of histories from among those allowed, and then randomly chooses to realise one history from that set; other interpretations are possible, but their scientific implications are essentially the same. The selection criteria proposed to date are reasonably natural, and certainly raise new questions. For example, the validity of ordering inferences which we normally take for granted --- such as that a particle in one region is necessarily in a larger region containing it --- depends on whether or not our history respects the criterion of ordered consistency, or merely consistency. However, the known selection criteria, including consistency and medium decoherence, are very weak. It is not possibl...

  13. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly.

  14. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Feng Lin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed.

  15. Advances in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  16. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  17. Central Dental Evacuation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    20 High-Vacuum Oral Evacuation System (HIVAC) for Oral Surgery, Periodontics, and Endodontics Treatment Rooms..................... 20...handpiece. Inlets to this system are required throughout the dental facility for all disciplines of patient treatment where coolant and irrigation liquids...System (HIVAC) for Oral Surgery, Periodontics, and Endodontics Treatment Rooms The HIVAC system is designed to build and sustain high vacuum pressures

  18. Dental fluorosis in cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narozny, J.

    1965-01-01

    Dental fluorosis in cattle was used as an indicator of toxic effects produced by fluorine emissions from an aluminium factory. Data are presented on the effects of a ten-year exposure to fluorides on cattle teeth. Emissions from the factory were observed in two directions from the factory, and extended as far as 16 km from the source.

  19. Kondensasi Pada Dental Amalgam

    OpenAIRE

    Batubara, Runi Syahriani

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam merupakan campuran dari dua atau beberapa logam (alloy) yang salah satunya adalah merkuri. Kata amalgam juga didefenisikan untuk menggambarkan kombinasi atau campuran dari beberapa bahan seperti merkuri, perak, timah, tembaga, dan lainnya. Dental amalgam sendiri adalah kombinasi alloy dengan merkuri melalui suatu proses yang disebut amalgamasi. Pemanipulasian amalgam meliputi triturasi, kondensasi, carving, dan polishing. Kondensasi merupakan penekanan amalgam setelah triturasi p...

  20. Dental Hygiene Student Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lynda J.; Fellows, Avis L.

    1981-01-01

    A study to determine differences between graduating and withdrawing students in the University of Minnesota Dental Hygiene program is discussed. The identification of differences may prove useful in the selection process for future classes through identification of students likely to complete their education. (MLW)

  1. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dental Practice Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    The realization of the paper followed a review of specialty literature, through which the mainaspects of dental office management have been analyzed, rendering the management solutionsavailable to all of those interested from an economic, deontological point of view, as well asmethods of managing human resources in order to obtain the best feedback possible from patients.

  3. Mouth and dental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, C.; van der Waal, I.; Jackson, S.H.D.; Jansen, P.A.F.; Mangoni, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: • Introduction • Periodontal disease • Dental caries • Odontogenic infections • Alveolar osteitis • Xerostomia and hyposalivation • Candidiasis • Angular cheilitis • Denture stomatitis • Burning mouth syndrome • Recurrent aphthous stomatitis • Recurrent

  4. Contemporary medico-legal dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Brad

    2012-03-01

    The advent of extraoral radiology in general dental practice has become more widespread since 2000, particularly with digital systems. With this comes a range of medico-legal risks for dentists not adverted to previously. These risks include a higher than expected radiation dose for some surveys, and the risk of a 'loss of a chance' for a patient whereby the images may disclose pathology not diagnosed by general dental practitioners using OPG and CBVT radiology. Practitioners need to apply relevant legal principles in deciding which surveys to order and record, and also need to explain to patients the dosages of the radiation that they will likely receive. Practitioners also need to assess whether the resultant survey ought to be interpreted by a radiologist to diagnose any wider pathology with which a general practitioner may not be familiar. Extra caution needs to be used in ordering high dose radiology in paediatric patients. Dentists should not assume patients fully understand the nature of CBVT and MCT, and its risks and benefits. Consideration ought to be given to the volume of CBVT ordered dependent on factors such as patient age, symptoms, history and procedural intent. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Dental caries, parents educational level, family income and dental service attendance among children in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianetti, S; Lombardo, G; Lupatelli, E; Rossi, G; Abraha, I; Pagano, S; Paglia, L

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether socioeconomic determinants, such as parents' educational level, family income and dental service attendance by children, are associated with the presence of caries among an Italian population of children. An observational retrospective study was carried out in a population of children aged 4-14 years who visited the Paediatric Dentistry Department of the University of Perugia, Italy. Children were stratified according to familial socioeconomic level (father's and mother's educational level, family income) and dental service attendance of children. Age- and sex- adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated by means of multivariate logistic regression models. A sample of 231 children (mean age 8.1 yrs, SD 2.6; 127 males, 104 females) was recruited. One hundred and sixty three (70.46%) children in the study had caries. Caries presence in children was higher in children where the mothers' educational level was lower (OR =6.1; 95% CI = 3.1 to 12.7), in children where the fathers' educational level was lower (OR =2.9; 95% CI =1.6 to 5.5) and in children with lower family income (OR = 9.9; 95% 95% CI = 5.1 to 20.1). No statistically significant difference were observed in terms of caries presence between the children who were visited at least once by a dentist and children who were not previously seen by a dental practitioner (OR = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.4 to 1.6). Socioeconomic level was an important predictor of caries presence among children. Both low income and low parental educational level were related to an increased presence of caries, whereas previous dental visits experience did not affect caries presence in children.

  6. Factors influencing a patient's decision to choose the type of treatment to improve dental esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gržić Renata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgroung/Aim. Interest in dental esthetics has increased rapidly during the last few decades among both patients and dentists, and the creation of a natural dental appearance has become an important task in all fields of dentistry, especially in prosthodontics and restorative dentistry. The aim of this research was to investigate factors influencing a patient's decision to choose the type of treatment to improve dental esthetics. Methods. A total of 700 Caucasian subjects participated in the crosssectional study (261 men, 439 women, aged 18-86 years, mean age 46.2 ± 18.6. The study included clinical examination and a self-administrated questionnaire based on self-perceived esthetics, satisfaction with the appearance of their maxillary anterior teeth and previous dental experience. Multiple logistic regression was used in statistical analysis. Results. Hiding teeth during smile was the most important predictor for choosing fixed prosthetic restorations (OR 9.1, followed by self-perceived bad fixed prosthesis, malpositioned teeth and female gender (OR 2.9, 2.4, and 1.5, respectively. The increase in satisfaction with dental appearance and previous orthodontic therapy reduced chances for seeking prosthetic therapy (each OR 0.4. The significant predictors for bleaching choosing were hiding teeth during smiling, already done bleaching, female gender, lower levels of satisfaction with dental appearance and the absence of the previous orthodontic therapy (OR 5.8, 2.4, 1.8, 0.5 and 0.4, respecitively. Hiding teeth during smile, self-perceived malposition and crowding, and lower levels of satisfaction, were significant predictors for choosing orthodontic treatment (OR 3.1, 2.4, 2.2 and 0.6, respectively. None of current dental statuses was statistically significant predictor for choosing prosthodontic, bleeching nor orthodontic therapy. Conclusion. The psychological elements and female gender are the main predictors of seeking dental therapy

  7. Predictors of weight maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W.J.; Saris, W.H.M.; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To obtain predictors of weight maintenance after a weight-loss intervention. Research Methods and Procedures: An overall analysis of data from two-long intervention studies [n = 67 women; age: 37.9±1.0 years; body weight (BW): 87.0±1.2 kg; body mass index: 32.1±0.5 kg·m-2; % body fat: 42.

  8. Predictors of weight maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W.J.; Saris, W.H.M.; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To obtain predictors of weight maintenance after a weight-loss intervention. Research Methods and Procedures: An overall analysis of data from two-long intervention studies [n = 67 women; age: 37.9±1.0 years; body weight (BW): 87.0±1.2 kg; body mass index: 32.1±0.5 kg·m-2; % body fat: 42.

  9. Predictors of weight maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W.J.; Saris, W.H.M.; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To obtain predictors of weight maintenance after a weight-loss intervention. Research Methods and Procedures: An overall analysis of data from two-long intervention studies [n = 67 women; age: 37.9±1.0 years; body weight (BW): 87.0±1.2 kg; body mass index: 32.1±0.5 kg·m-2; % body fat:

  10. Dental anxiety and salivary cortisol levels before urgent dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegane, Kazue; Penha, Sibele S; Munhoz, Carolina D; Rocha, Rodney G

    2009-12-01

    Dental anxiety is still prevalent, despite advances in treatment, and affects the utilization of health care services. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine if patients with different degrees of dental anxiety and pain undergoing emergency dental care have different stress reactions as measured by salivary cortisol. Seventy three patients completed the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and described any previous dental traumatic experience. Their socio-demographic characteristics were also recorded. They also rated pain intensity on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS). A saliva sample was collected before the procedure, and analyzed by enzyme immunoassay. Thirty patients were dentally anxious and forty one complained of pain. In this sample, dental anxiety was not related to gender, age, educational level and family income; however, a previous traumatic event was related to dental anxiety. There was no association between salivary cortisol concentrations and gender or dental anxiety. Patients with pain showed higher cortisol levels. When gathering patient information, the dentist should note patients' negative dental experiences in order to provide more effective, less traumatic treatment.

  11. Antipsychotic medications and dental caries in newly diagnosed schizophrenia: A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai-Fang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Wen, Yen-Hsia; Hsieh, Kun-Pin; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Chun-Hung Richard

    2016-11-30

    We investigated the association between antipsychotic medications and the risk of dental caries in patients with schizophrenia. We enroled a nationwide cohort of patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia within 1 year of dental caries development. Exposure to antipsychotics and other medications was categorised according to their type and duration, and the association between exposure and dental caries was assessed through logistic regressions. Of the 3610 patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia, 2149 (59.5%) exhibited an incidence of treated dental caries. Logistic regression analysis identified a younger age, female sex, high income, a 2-year history of dental caries, and exposure to first-generation antipsychotics, and antihypertensives as independent risk factors for treated dental caries in patients with schizophrenia. Hyposalivation, the adverse effect of first-generation antipsychotics and antihypertensives, was associated with an increased risk of treated dental caries. However, hypersalivation from first-generation antipsychotics for dental caries was associated with a protective factor. These findings suggest that clinicians should pay attention to the aforementioned risk factors for dental caries in patients with schizophrenia, particularly while prescribing first-generation antipsychotics and antihypertensives to such patients.

  12. Ingestión accidental de prótesis dental fija (cantilever en paciente con historia de carcinoma de colon Accidental swallowing of fixed denture (cantilever in a patient with history of colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Fonseca

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de ingestión accidental de un puente de tipo cantilever metalocerámico de tres unidades en un paciente masculino de 51 años con historia de remoción quirúrgica de carcinoma colorrectal y colostomía provisoria (ano contranatura para recuperación intestinal cuatro años antes. Aun cuando la naturaleza del objeto ingerido y las condiciones patológicas previas intestinales ponderan una conducta quirúrgica de remoción preventiva, dado el carácter asintomático y el control radiográfico del desplazamiento normal del objeto durante las primeras 24 horas, se optó por una conducta expectante que se resolvió finalmente con la excreción espontánea del mismo. Si bien la rehabilitación protésica fija debería brindar seguridad y estabilidad, un diseño sesgado del puente (indicación errónea del cantilever y pernos cortos puede originar importantes daños potenciales (aspiración, perforación de esófago, absceso y fístula enterocólica, obstrucción intestinal, terapéuticas fuertemente invasivas e incluso la misma muerte del paciente, todos sucesos con claras connotaciones legales.This clinical report describes a case of accidental swallowing of three units cantilever porcelain fused metal bridge in a 51-years-old male with history of colon cancer and reversible colostomy four years ago. While the kind of the ingested foreign body and the prior gastrointestinal conditions recommend a surgical management decision to avoid the risks for perforation or obstruction, in our case the management decision was the conservative approach because of the asymptomatic condition and the radiographic observation of the normal pass the alimentary tract without complications. The fixed dentures should be secure and stable but an incorrect design of the bridge (wrong indication of cantilever; short post systems are at increased risk of important potential harms (inhalation, oesophageal perforation, enterocolic fistula, intestinal

  13. What I wish I'd learned at dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, G R; Lynch, C D; Chadwick, B L; Santini, A; Wilson, N H F

    2016-08-26

    Background Much concern appears to exist as to the scope and content of contemporary dental school programmes, with the oft-cited criticism being made that dental graduates are 'no longer as good as they used to be'.Aim The aim of this project was to survey the views of dentists - both new graduates and more established practitioners - on aspects of their own dental school training they felt had been deficient as well as commenting on what aspects of dental school education they would like to see improved/enhanced in current times.Methods An invitation to complete an Internet-based questionnaire was emailed to the Fellows and Members of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK). Topics in the questionnaire included the respondent's own dental education history, how well they felt their dental school training had covered certain clinical and non-clinical topics; and their opinions on areas they felt should be included in contemporary dental school programmes.Results Six hundred and forty-nine responses were received from 3,348 emailed invitations (response rate = 19.4%). Sixty-one percent (395) of respondents were qualified for 10 years or more. Among clinical skills and techniques, a majority of respondents reported they felt they had not had sufficient teaching/training in dental school in surgical endodontics (76%), conscious sedation (72%), root surface debridement (71%), fixed orthodontic appliances (68%), porcelain veneers (63%), implants (56%) and posterior composites (53%). If designing a new dental school programme, the most common topics respondents would seek to include/increase were business and practice management (21%), communication skills (including patient management and leadership skills) (10%), and increased clinical time and experience (8%).Conclusions The findings of this project are of interest and relevance to those working with student dentists and young dental practitioners. A greater emphasis is needed on the teaching of certain non

  14. Renewing professionalism in dental education: overcoming the market environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2007-02-01

    The most important mission of dental education is development of student professionalism. It is only within the context of professionalism that specialized knowledge and technical expertise find meaning. Altruism, integrity, caring, community focus, and commitment to excellence are attributes of professionalism. Its backbone is the obligation of service to people before service to self--a social contract. Professionalism can and should be acquired by targeted interventions, not as an assumed by-product of dental education. Top-down, rule-based professionalism is contrasted with its experience-based, mentor-mediated, socially driven counterpart. Moral principles are inherent in professional development and the professional way of life. Unfortunately, American society, including higher education, glorifies a market mentality centered on expansion and profit. Through formal and hidden curricula, dental schools send mixed messages to students about the importance of professionalism. Institutional consensus on professionalism should be developed among faculty, administration, and students through passionate advocacy and careful analysis of dentistry's moral convictions. The consensus message should communicate to stakeholders that morality and ethics "really count." Maximum student exposure to faculty exemplars, substantial service-learning experiences, and portfolio use are likely to enhance professionalism, which should be measured for every student, every semester, along with faculty and institutional assessment. Research reveals a significant relationship between levels of student moral reasoning and measures of clinical performance and shows that moral reasoning ability can be enhanced in dental students. Valid and reliable surveys exist to assess student moral reasoning. Documented student unprofessional behavior is a predictor of future state professional board disciplinary action against practitioners, along with low admissions test scores and course failures in

  15. Dental Therapy Assistant: Attitudes of Army Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    The U. S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a formal program based on the concept that dental care can be more efficiently and effectively provided with treatment teams composed of one dental officer, two dental therapy assistants, one basic assistant, and the shared support of other auxiliary personnel. Such a team will use three dental treatment…

  16. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  17. 50(th) Anniversary of the Central Dental Library of School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borić, Vesna

    2014-12-01

    Libraries have an exceptional place in the history, culture, education and scientific life of a nation. They collect all aspects of our linguistics and literacy, all out theoretical assumptions as well as all the results of experience and practice. The importance of a library is not mirrored only in the national and historical role and heritage, but in a more permanent, informational role, since a modern library must, above all, be an effective information system. Since a library of a university operates as a part of its matrix, it is easily shadowed by other forms of educational and scientific infrastructure. 50(th) anniversary of the Central Dental Library of the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb is an excellent opportunity to make a call to the institution and public to its unique and irreplaceable role.

  18. General dental practitioners and hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messano, Giuseppe Alessio; Petti, Stefano

    2012-10-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) remains a problem among dentists Hearing loss at speech frequencies was recently reported among dentists and dental hygienists. This study aimed to investigate prevalence and factors associated with perceived HI among dentists. In 2009-2010, 100 general dental practitioners (GDPs) and 115 general (medical) practitioners (GPs) (mean ages, 43.7 and 44.4 years) from Rome (Italy), who commenced practice ≥ 10 years ago, were interviewed on a series of occupation- and recreation-related HI risk factors and on HI-associated symptoms (tinnitus, sensation of fullness, hypoacusis). Prevalence of presumptive HI (≥ 1 symptom perceived during workdays and weekends) was assessed and factors associated with presumptive HI were investigated. Prevalence was 30.0% (95% confidence interval, 21.0-39.0%) and 14.8% (95% confidence interval, 8.3-21.3%) among GDPs and GPs, respectively. Occupation (GDP vs. GP), family history of hypoacusis, hypertension, ear diseases and smoking were significantly associated with presumptive HI. Within GDPs alone, significant associations were found for frequent use of ultrasonic scalers, use of dental turbines aged≥1 year and prosthodontics as prevalent specialty. GDPs experienced HI risk than GPs. Such a risk was not generalized to all dentists, but was specific for those who frequently used noisy equipment (aged turbines, ultrasonic scalers) during their daily practice. GDPs with 10 or more years of practice who routinely use potentially noisy equipment, could be at risk of HI. In order to prevent such condition, daily maintenance and periodical replacement of dental instruments is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  20. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  1. Family History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your family history includes health information about you and your close relatives. Families have many factors in common, including their genes, ... as heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Having a family member with a disease raises your risk, but ...

  2. Validity of the UKCAT in applicant selection and predicting exam performance in UK dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Rizwana; Wood, Duncan; Baker, Sarah

    2013-09-01

    The United Kingdom's Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) aims to assess candidates' "natural talent" for dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of the UKCAT for dental school applicant selection. The relationship of the UKCAT with demographic and academic variables was examined, assessing if the likelihood of being offered a place at a UK dental school was predicted by demographic factors and academic selection tools (predicted grades and existing school results). Finally, the validity of these selection tools in predicting first-year dental exam performance was assessed. Correlational and regression analyses showed that females and poorer students were more likely to have lower UKCAT scores. Gender and social class did not, however, predict first-year dental exam performance. UKCAT scores predicted the likelihood of the candidate being offered a place in the dental course; however, they did not predict exam performance during the first year of the course. Indeed, the only predictor of dental exam performance was existing school results. These findings argue against the use of the UKCAT as the sole determinant in dental applicant selection, instead highlighting the value of using existing school results.

  3. Predictors of extubation failure in myasthenic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Janaka; Mandrekar, Jay; Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2008-07-01

    The ideal timing for extubation of patients with myasthenic crisis (MC) and the factors that influence extubation outcome are not well established. To assess the risk of extubation failure in MC and to identify predictors of extubation failure. We reviewed consecutive episodes of MC treated with endotracheal intubation from January 1, 1987, through December 31, 2006. Mayo Clinic. Patients Forty patients with 46 episodes of MC underwent endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The main outcome measures were extubation failure and reintubation. Extubation failure was defined as reintubation, tracheostomy, or death while intubated. Reintubation was also analyzed as a separate end point. Univariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of extubation failure and reintubation. Of the 46 episodes of MC, extubation failure occurred in 20 (44%), including 9 of 35 episodes (26%) of reintubation. Male sex, history of previous crisis, atelectasis, and intubation for more than 10 days were associated with extubation failure. Lower pH and lower forced vital capacity on the time of extubation, atelectasis, and bilevel intermittent positive airway pressure use after extubation predicted the need for reintubation. Atelectasis showed the strongest association with both end points. Extubation failure and reintubation were associated with significant prolongation in intensive care unit and hospital length of stay. Extubation failure is relatively common in patients with MC. Atelectasis is the strongest predictor of this complication.

  4. Dental manifestations of patient with Vitamin D-resistant rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Pereira SOUZA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Vitamin D-resistant rickets have abnormal tooth morphology such as thin globular dentin and enlarged pulp horns that extend into the dentino-enamel junction. Invasion of the pulp by microorganisms and toxins is inevitable. The increased fibrotic content of the pulp, together with a reduced number of odontoblasts, decreases the response to pulp infection. The most important oral findings are characterized by spontaneous gingival and dental abscesses occuring without history of trauma or caries. Radiographic examinations revealed large pulp chambers, short roots, poorly defined lamina dura and hypoplastic alveolar ridge. These dental abscesses are common and therefore the extraction and pulpectomy are the treatment of choice. The purpose of this article is to report a case of Vitamin D-resistant rickets in a 5 year-old boy, describing the dental findings and the treatment to be performed in these cases.

  5. Prevention of dental caries through the effective use of fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    , lifestyles, and the existence of preventive oral health programmes. Research conducted in high income countries documents that systematic use of fluoride reduces the burden of dental caries; such research is scarce in low and middle income countries. Objectives: This article reviews the evidence on effective...... use of fluoride, highlights the public health approach to fluoridation, and clarifies how automatic fluoridation contributes to breaking social inequities in dental caries. Data collection: Scientific publications on fluoride administration stored in PubMed/Medline and caries data from the WHO...... databank. Outcome: Dental caries identified from national surveys or country relevant data; extraction of scientific reports is based on their public health relevance. Conclusions: The article outlines the history of fluoridation programmes and describes the sound evidence on automatic fluoridation through...

  6. New antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs. Considerations for dental patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Harold V; Quek, Samuel Y P; Subramanian, Gayathri; Abbas, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A recent occurrence in dental practice is the noting of new "blood thinners" when the clinician is reviewing a patient's medical history and medications. "Doc, I take Pradaxa or Effient or Xarelto" etc. After many years of the widespread use of aspirin and Coumadin there has appeared a new generation of medications focused on reducing thromboembolic events in patients at risk. This trend has been driven by a need for drugs providing better drug efficacy based on patient biologic processing of the medications and the frequency and cost factors associated with the monitoring the degree of anticoagulation. Guidelines for assessing bleeding risk and managing patients on these new medications in dental practice are not yet defined and are empirically based on medical practitioner experience. This paper will review these new medications and will discuss current considerations for dental patient care. (Note that not all new antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications will be reviewed in this paper.)

  7. Dental radiology instructors in United States dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, A G; Hunter, N; Grammer, S

    1985-09-01

    A survey of dental radiology instructors in accredited United States dental hygiene programs found the majority of such faculty members to be registered dental hygienists with only very limited formal training in radiology. Most of the radiography faculty had less than 5 years' experience teaching that subject. Most instructors spent less than a quarter of each week teaching radiology. Student: faculty ratios varied considerably from program to program.

  8. Importance of Dental Records in Forensic Dental Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Waleed, Petro; Baba, Feras; Alsulami, Salem; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The patient’s record maintains all the diagnostic information with regards to patients and contains valuable information that can be beneficial to the dentist as well as legal authorities during forensic human identification. Aim: Objective of the study was to compare dental records with an ideal dental record form, as well as to compare between dental records of private clinics and academic hospitals and to assess the awareness and the knowledge of the dentists regarding the ma...

  9. A comprehensive oral and dental management of an epileptic and intellectually deteriorated adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Ramesh Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy along with intellectual deterioration and other neurological disorders can have social, physical, and psychological consequences, especially, when they begin in childhood. Moreover, the seizure episode along with mental deterioration may compromise the oral and dental care resulting in numerous decayed teeth. This report presents the case history of an adolescent with poor oral hygiene and numerous decayed teeth. This report also presents the comprehensive endodontic, surgical, and prosthodontic management of epileptic mentally challenged patient in the dental office. Epilepsy along with intellectual deterioration and other neurological disorders can have social, physical, and psychological consequences, especially, when they begin in childhood. Moreover, the seizure episode along with mental deterioration may compromise the oral and dental care resulting in numerous decayed teeth. This report presents the case history of an adolescent with poor oral hygiene and numerous decayed teeth. This report also presents the comprehensive endodontic, surgical, and prosthodontic management of epileptic mentally challenged patient in the dental office.

  10. A comprehensive oral and dental management of an epileptic and intellectually deteriorated adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sourabh Ramesh; Pendyala, Gowri Swaminatham; Saraf, Veena; Choudhari, Shantanu; Mopagar, Viddyasagar

    2013-07-01

    Epilepsy along with intellectual deterioration and other neurological disorders can have social, physical, and psychological consequences, especially, when they begin in childhood. Moreover, the seizure episode along with mental deterioration may compromise the oral and dental care resulting in numerous decayed teeth. This report presents the case history of an adolescent with poor oral hygiene and numerous decayed teeth. This report also presents the comprehensive endodontic, surgical, and prosthodontic management of epileptic mentally challenged patient in the dental office. Epilepsy along with intellectual deterioration and other neurological disorders can have social, physical, and psychological consequences, especially, when they begin in childhood. Moreover, the seizure episode along with mental deterioration may compromise the oral and dental care resulting in numerous decayed teeth. This report presents the case history of an adolescent with poor oral hygiene and numerous decayed teeth. This report also presents the comprehensive endodontic, surgical, and prosthodontic management of epileptic mentally challenged patient in the dental office.

  11. The attitudes of dental interns to the use of the rubber dam at Riyadh dental colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bander Mohammed Al-Abdulwahhab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The rubber dam is one of the best tools for tooth isolation and infection control in the dental field. Our aim is to evaluate the attitudes toward the use of rubber dams by dental interns in Riyadh Dental Colleges (RCsDP and determine the barriers to their use. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and used for data collection. 150 questionnaires were distributed by hand to the dental interns of RCsDP over a period of two weeks. Information sought included the attitudes toward and difficulties for the use of the rubber dam, the time needed to apply the rubber dam, and the patients′ allergic history of the rubber dam. Respondents were asked to state their preference on a five point Likert type scale ranging from "strongly dislike" to "strongly like". The information and data of the completed questionnaires were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test and Friedman test. Results: Of 150 questionnaires distributed, 150 were completed and returned (response rate = 100%. Of those, 46.7% were males and 53.3% were females. In general; (43.3%, interns strongly liked the use of the rubber dam and the rest (46.7% liked the use of the rubber dam. The majority of respondents liked to use rubber dam in direct restorations more than in indirect restorations and 46.7% strongly liked to use it in posterior teeth for composite restoration. Most dental interns felt that they would strongly like to use a rubber dam for endodontic treatment whether in posterior teeth (73.3% or anterior teeth (68.7%. 66.7% of interns asked their patients if they had an allergy to latex prior to the use of the rubber dam. Child behavior (mean rank about seven is the most important reason for not using rubber dam. The time is taken to apply the rubber dam was less than five minutes in most cases. Conclusion: Most dental interns prefer to use rubber dams in the general dental field and are enthusiastic to use it in future.

  12. The Monitor Practice Programme: is non-invasive management of dental caries in private practice cost-effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, B; Warren, E; Pollicino, C; Evans, R W; Schwarz, E; Sbaraini, A

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a non-invasive approach to dental caries management in private dental practice. Private dental practices from a variety of locations in New South Wales were randomly allocated to either non-invasive management of caries, or continue with usual care. Patients were followed for three years and caries incidence assessed. A patient-level decision analytic model was constructed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the intervention at two years, three years, and hypothetical lifetime. Twenty-two dental practices and 920 patients were recruited. Within the clinical trial there was a significant difference in caries increment favouring non-invasive therapy at both two and three years. Efficacy was independent of age, gender, medical concerns, fluoride history, or previous history of dental caries, in a population of patients attending for treatment in private dental practices, in a variety of locations both urban and rural. Cost per DMFT avoided estimate was A$1287.07 (two years), A$1148.91 (three years) decreasing to A$702.52 in (medium) and A$545.93 (high) risk patients (three years). A joint preventive and non-invasive therapeutic approach appears to be cost-effective in patients at medium and high risk of developing dental caries when compared to the standard care provided by private dental practice. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined......, the result is, that more than 100 trauma scenario exist when the two dentitions are combined. Each of these trauma scenarios have a specific treatment demand and prospect for healing. With such a complexity in diagnose and treatment it is obvious that even experienced practitioners may have problems may have...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  14. Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health > Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver's Guide Main Content ... appointments easier. Back to To Prepare for Every Dental Visit: Your Role Be prepared for every appointment. ...

  15. Teething & Dental Hygiene for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health & Hygiene for Young Children Page Content Article ... and lead to future dental problems. Teaching Good Dental Habits The best way to protect your child's ...

  16. Nigerian Dental Technology Students and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study of dental technology students of Federal School of Dental Therapy and Technology. Enugu .... to care for HIV-infected patients among this group of dental professionals in ... and upper class) and the expressed willingness to care for.

  17. Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Debora C; Brillant, Martha G S; Clovis, Joanne B; McNally, Mary E; Filiaggi, Mark J; Kotzer, Robert D; Lawrence, Herenia P

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation Objectives To examine predictors of participation and to describe the methodological considerations of conducting a two-stage population-based oral health survey. Methods An observational, cross-sectional survey (telephone interview and clinical oral examination) of community-dwelling adults aged 45–64 and ≥65 living in Nova Scotia, Canada was conducted. Results The survey response rate was 21% for the interview and 13.5% for the examination. A total of 1141 participants completed one or both components of the survey. Both age groups had higher levels of education than the target population; the age 45–64 sample also had a higher proportion of females and lower levels of employment than the target population. Completers (participants who completed interview and examination) were compared with partial completers (who completed only the interview), and stepwise logistic regression was performed to examine predictors of completion. Identified predictors were as follows: not working, post-secondary education and frequent dental visits. Conclusion Recruitment, communications and logistics present challenges in conducting a province-wide survey. Identification of employment, education and dental visit frequency as predictors of survey participation provide insight into possible non-response bias and suggest potential for underestimation of oral disease prevalence in this and similar surveys. This potential must be considered in analysis and in future recruitment strategies. PMID:21916953

  18. Evaluation of applicants to predoctoral dental education programs: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Richard R; Wilson, Margaret B; Bennett, Robert B

    2005-10-01

    This review finds that college GPA and DAT scores provide dental schools in the United States and Canada with defensible methods for selecting students. College GPA seems the best predictor of academic performance in dental school. The academic average (AA) of the DAT is a better predictor than is the perceptual ability test (PAT), but dental educators who believe that evidence of manual dexterity or perceptual ability must be a part of the admissions decision can find enough supporting evidence to justify doing so. When added to college GPA and the AA, information from the PAT may in fact enhance predictability. There is also evidence, however, that manual skills can be learned during routine dental curricular experiences. Overall, conventional admissions criteria at best account for about 40 percent of the variance in dental school performance, and most of this variance occurs during the early years of the curriculum. Studies are lacking for evaluating criteria that may predict success in admitting students for preferentially addressing current challenges, including achieving diversity of the workforce, ensuring access to care for all, interprofessional health care, ethics and professionalism, filling faculty positions, and conducting needed research. Schools should periodically validate all of their admissions criteria against expected performances and make corresponding adjustments.

  19. [Phenomenon of dental fear].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R; Birn, H

    1990-01-01

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle of dental fear. The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists. The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has other psychologic problems (in 20% of cases), such as serious phobias and/or neuroses. A strategy of researching and thus tackling the problem is presented which focuses on three essential targets that require studying and change: 1) the community at large and their image of the dentist, 2) the patient role and 3) the dentist role. Various model projects are presented along with their diagnostic systems. These are seen to focus in varying degrees on different elements of the target groups that effect the dentist-patient relationship but the need to come out into the community and make the social environment right for these patients is an important factor in all strategies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. TRICARE Dental Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Contract: Effective 1 October 2008  New Benefits – Dental Implants – 1 and 2 surface Posterior composite resins (white fillings)  Expanded Overseas...JAN 6, 2011  Follow-on Contract includes the following benefit enhancements – Composite resin fillings on posterior teeth – Increase of annual maximum...Specialists  Tendency for different materials ( amalgam , gold crowns and porcelain-fused to metal crowns (PFMs))  ADDP is Benefits Administration – no

  1. Dental calculus: Nanocharacterization

    OpenAIRE

    Grga, Đurica; Marjanović, Marina; Hut, Igor; Dželetović, Bojan; Koruga, Đuro

    2012-01-01

    Emerging technologies and new nanoscale information have potential to transform dental practice by improving all aspects of diagnostics and therapy. Nanocharacterization allows understanding of oral diseases at molecular and cellular levels which eventually can increase the success of prevention and treatment. Opto-magnetic spectroscopy (OMS) is a promising new technique based on light-matter interaction which allows insight into the quantum state of matter. Since biomolecules and tissues are...

  2. A PORTABLE DENTAL STERILIZING CYLINDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes an aluminum cylinder in which dental instruments could be sterilized under emergency field conditions and at the same time be...protected against corrosion. The procedure involves loading the cylinder with dental instruments, flushing it with ethylene oxide-Freon gas, closing it...and then immersing it in boiling water for l hour. In preliminary experiments with a prototype of the sterilizing cylinder, dental instruments were

  3. Systemic disorders affecting dental pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Milan R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective overview of systemic disorders which might be associated with dental pathology is made. They are grouped as follows: (a congenital dental developmental disorders, (b chromosomal anomalies, (c radiations, (d immune disorders, (e intoxications, (f neurological alterations, (g gastrointestinal diseases, (h osteodystrophy and associated conditions, (i skin diseases, (j metabolic and endocrine disorders, (k craniofacial malformation syndromes and other congenital general malformations. The associated dental pathology is described in each case.

  4. Dental Implants: Dual Stabilization Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    More recent epidemiological data seem to show an increasing trend of tooth loss due to periodontal reasons rather than caries; the presence of initial attachment loss, bone height and the habit of smoking significantly increase the risk of tooth mortality. A dental implant is a titanium screw which is placed into bone to replace missing teeth. The implant mimics the root of a tooth in function. Dental Implants have changed the face of dentistry over the last three decades. Success of dental i...

  5. Dental materials with antibiofilm properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhejun; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus

    2014-02-01

    Oral bacteria have evolved to form biofilms on hard tooth surfaces and dental materials. The antibiofilm effect of materials used for the restoration of oral function affects oral health. In this review we describe the features involved in the formation of oral biofilms on different surfaces in the oral cavity and the antibiofilm properties of dental materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1987 to 2013 was performed with PubMed, ScienceDirect and Google search engines using the following search terms: antibiofilm, dental material, dental hard tissue, endodontic material, implant material, oral biofilm, and restorative material. Selected inclusion criteria resulted in 179 citations from the scientific, peer-reviewed literature. Oral biofilms form not only on dental hard tissue, but also on a wide range of dental materials used in cariology, endodontics, restorative dentistry and periodontology, resulting in destruction of dental hard tissue and even infection. Therefore, there has been a continuous effort to develop the antibiofilm properties of dental materials used for different purposes. Specific antimicrobial design in the composition and application of new materials (e.g. bioceramic sealer, resin composite, implant coating) demonstrates an improvement of the antibiofilm properties of these materials compared to earlier generations. A significant number of dental materials have been shown to affect biofilm growth by inhibiting the adhesion of bacteria, limiting their growth or killing microbes in the biofilms formed in vitro. Incorporation of an appropriate amount of antibacterial agent could provide dental materials with antibiofilm activity without significantly influencing their mechanical properties. However, more randomized and double-blind clinical studies of sufficient length with these materials are needed to confirm long term success following their use in the dental clinic. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by

  6. Predictors of Readmission after Inpatient Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Jain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Understanding risk factors that increase readmission rates may help enhance patient education and set system-wide expectations. We aimed to provide benchmark data on causes and predictors of readmission following inpatient plastic surgery. Methods The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset was reviewed for patients with both "Plastics" as their recorded surgical specialty and inpatient status. Readmission was tracked through the "Unplanned Readmission" variable. Patient characteristics and outcomes were compared using chi-squared analysis and Student's t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis was used for identifying predictors of readmission. Results A total of 3,671 inpatient plastic surgery patients were included. The unplanned readmission rate was 7.11%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; confidence interval [CI], 1.12-3.60; P=0.020, previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI (OR, 2.69; CI, 1.21-5.97; P=0.015, hypertension requiring medication (OR, 1.65; CI, 1.22-2.24; P<0.001, bleeding disorders (OR, 1.70; CI, 1.01-2.87; P=0.046, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA class 3 or 4 (OR, 1.57; CI, 1.15-2.15; P=0.004, and obesity (body mass index ≥30 (OR, 1.43; CI, 1.09-1.88, P=0.011 to be significant predictors of readmission. Conclusions Inpatient plastic surgery has an associated 7.11% unplanned readmission rate. History of COPD, previous PCI, hypertension, ASA class 3 or 4, bleeding disorders, and obesity all proved to be significant risk factors for readmission. These findings will help to benchmark inpatient readmission rates and manage patient and hospital system expectations.

  7. The utility of dental patterns in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-de-Las-Heras, Stella; Valenzuela, Aurora; Luna, Juan de Dios; Bravo, Manuel

    2010-02-25

    The comparison of antemortem and postmortem dental patterns, which reflect a combination of dental states, can be quantified for human identification. However, the utility derived from the uniqueness of these patterns is limited by variations in oral health status related to population, age, and birth cohort. We analyzed dental pattern diversity from reference datasets that documented differences in oral health. Our analysis was based on full dentitions and partial dentitions available in forensic situations. To analyze the diversity of dental patterns, data from 3166 adults were extracted from the last 3 contemporary Spanish National Oral Health Examination Surveys, corresponding to the years 1993, 2000, and 2005. Each survey comprised 2 adult age groups (35-44 years and 65-74 years), therefore six datasets were available for our study. Our six samples showed substantial variability in oral health status (caries history) and dental code distribution, not only between age groups within the same survey year, but also between different survey years for the same age group. To test the overall diversity of dental patterns in each datasets, pairwise comparisons were performed and the total number of pattern matches was generated. We calculated total and conditional diversity (excluding individuals in whom all teeth were classified as unrestored or missing) for each forensic situation. To test the homogeneity of diversity estimates among the six datasets we used a random effect model that requires a parameter estimate together with its standard error. Total diversity values were low and heterogeneous. However, conditional diversities were high and homogeneous, which allowed all data to be pooled into a single database. Once data were pooled, high combined diversity values (above 0.99) were obtained for each forensic situation. This indicates their usefulness for forensic purposes. We conclude that the conditional diversity value derived from dental patterns is a

  8. Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking Among Dental Practitioners: Prevalence and Health Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar-Odeh, Najla; Alnazzawi, Ahmad; Shoqair, Noora; Al-Shayyab, Mohammad H; Abu-Hammad, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Waterpipe tobacco smoking prevalence, practice, and the associated health perceptions among dental practitioners have not been previously reported. This study aims to determine the prevalence of waterpipe smoking among dental practitioners and to evaluate their awareness of health hazards of waterpipe smoking, particularly the adverse effects on oral health. This was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey among dental practitioners. Surveyed dental practitioners practiced dentistry in the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, a city in the Central-Western Region of Saudi Arabia, and the study was conducted during March 2015. The questionnaire consisted of questions on demographic data, history and practices of tobacco use, and perceptions toward the health hazards of smoking. Dentists were approached at their work places and invited to participate. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample's demographic and smoking characteristics, while cross-tabulation and chi-square test were used to determine the statistical significance of association between the groups (P ≤ 0.05). One hundred dental practitioners participated in the survey, with 55 males and 45 females. Twenty-six percent indicated that they were waterpipe smokers. Male gender and cigarette smoking were the only factors to be significantly associated with waterpipe smoking (P = 0.008 and P = 0.000, respectively). Most participants stated that waterpipe smoking is harmful to health, and the most commonly reported health hazard was respiratory disease, which was reported by 81% of participants. Prevalence of waterpipe smoking among dental practitioners is comparable to adult populations but lower than younger populations of university students. Health awareness of dental practitioners regarding waterpipe smoking was judged to be insufficient.

  9. Managing Intraoral Lesions in Oral Cancer Patients in a General Dental Practice: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Reuben Han-Kyu; Yang, Paul; Sung, Eric C

    2016-02-01

    As medical technology advances in the area of cancer therapeutics, dental practitioners will encounter patients with active cancer or a history of cancer. Typically, these patients may have had or are undergoing therapies such as surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or a combination of therapies. These patients may present with multiple side effects that dental practitioners can manage or prevent. We discuss some of these concerns and provide management strategies.

  10. The impact of current alternative herbal remedies on dental patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, K

    1999-01-01

    With the recent boom in holistic and herbal medicine and an ever-growing trend among the general population to refer to herbal remedies as an alternative to traditional pharmaceutical therapies, dental health care providers must be aware of the wide consumption of such products and understand their nature. It becomes imperative, therefore, to include questions regarding the use of herbal preparations as a matter of routine in the patient's drug history, since this may impact a safe dental patient care delivery.

  11. Dental management considerations for the patient with an acquired coagulopathy. Part 1: Coagulopathies from systemic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lockhart, P.B.; Gibson, J; Pond, S.H.; Leitch, J

    2003-01-01

    Current teaching suggests that many patients are at risk for prolonged bleeding during and following invasive dental procedures, due to an acquired coagulopathy from systemic disease and/or from medications. However, treatment standards for these patients often are the result of long-standing dogma with little or no scientific basis. The medical history is critical for the identification of patients potentially at risk for prolonged bleeding from dental treatment. Some time-honoured laborator...

  12. Sensibilidad dentaria Dental sensibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Tortolini

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available La sensibilidad dentaria l es un problema común que se presenta entre el 9 y el 30% de la población adulta. La teoría hidrodinámica es aceptada como uno de los mecanismos de inducción de la respuesta pulpar dolorosa, debido a que los estímulos provocan el movimiento del fluido y para ello es necesario que la dentina este expuesta y que los túbulos dentinarios estén abiertos y permeables a la pulpa. Es fundamental realizar el diagnostico diferencial con otras causas de dolor dental e identificar los factores etiológicos y predisponentes.Dental sensitivity is a common problem and it affect 9 and 30% the adult poblation. The hidrodynamyc theory is cited as the menchanism of induction of a painful pulpal response and implies that stimuli tranmission across dentine increase the rate of fluid flow through dentinal tubules and for this to accur the dentinal tubules must be opened andpermeable to the pulp. An appropiate tretametn needs a diferential diagnosis eith other causes of dental pain and the identification of predisponing etiologic factors.

  13. Hygiene in dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, L; Mosca, G; Giuliani, A R

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hygienic quality of dental practices on the basis of the self-awareness expressed by dentists respondents to a self-reported questionnaire about the health/hygiene characteristics of practice, the knowledge of biologic/toxicological risks and the preventive procedures and devices improvements in professional practice. Of the 127 practitioners contacted, 108 (85%) agreed to participate. The knowledge of infective risks was self- evaluated as good only in 24%: even if vaccinated, most of the dentists (57%) considered HBV the main infective agent to fear, not giving the same importance to the air-borne transmission of diseases. The presence of a single dental unit per surgery (90%) was considered an index of good health/hygiene education but, in spite of the use of disposable gloves, caps and masks, the dentists do not always change their coats or wash their hands between patients yet. The management of dental instruments can be considered efficient as long as they are sterilised in an autoclave (97%) and undergo periodic sterilization efficacy tests (76%). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION The results indicate a good structural and organisational status, but there is the need for continuous education concerning the prevention of cross-infections.

  14. Children's experiences of dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Annie G; Rodd, Helen D; Porritt, Jenny M; Baker, Sarah R; Creswell, Cathy; Newton, Tim; Williams, Chris; Marshman, Zoe

    2017-03-01

    Dental anxiety is common among children. Although there is a wealth of research investigating childhood dental anxiety, little consideration has been given to the child's perspective. This qualitative study sought to explore with children their own experiences of dental anxiety using a cognitive behavioural therapy assessment model. Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with dentally anxious children aged 11-16 years. The Five Areas model was used to inform the topic guide and analysis. Data were analysed using a framework approach. In total, 13 children were interviewed. Participants described their experiences of dental anxiety across multiple dimensions (situational factors and altered thoughts, feelings, physical symptoms, and behaviours). Participants placed considerable value on communication by dental professionals, with poor communication having a negative influence on dental anxiety and the dentist-patient relationship. This study confirms the Five Areas model as an applicable theoretical model for the assessment of childhood dental anxiety. Children provided insights about their own dental anxiety experiences that have not previously been described. © 2016 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Strategies for combating dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bare, Lyndsay C; Dundes, Lauren

    2004-11-01

    Dental anxiety and subsequent avoidance of dental care and deterioration of oral health pose a significant problem for the dental profession. In an attempt to elucidate preferences of anxious dental patients, we gathered survey data from 121 persons at a small, private liberal arts college in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Half of the respondents experienced dental anxiety, and most of these (66 percent) attributed anxiety to fear of anticipated pain. The majority of anxious patients preferred a dentist to be friendly (93 percent), talkative (82 percent), and to have an office with adorned walls (89 percent) and a slightly cool temperature (63 percent). Patients who identified themselves as anxious also indicated that music in the background (89 percent) and magazines and books in the dental office (75 percent) were helpful. Anxious patients were more likely than non-anxious patients to prefer a male dentist (77 percent versus 52 percent). This finding was especially marked among anxious male respondents, 93 percent of whom preferred a male dentist compared to 73 percent of anxious female respondents. These survey data may assist dental professionals in understanding and combating patients' dental anxiety, in order to increase the frequency of dental visits and to prompt a corresponding restoration or maintenance of oral health.

  16. Confronting shibboleths of dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-10-01

    Shibboleths are common expressions presented as indisputable truths. When used in educational discussions, they reflect "motherhood and apple pie" viewpoints and tend to bring debate to a halt. Use of shibboleths may precede a desired imposition of "locksteps" in educational programming and are easily perceived as paternalistic by recipients. Nine shibboleths are presented as common beliefs of dental faculty and administrators. Evidence contradicting the veracity of the "obvious truths" is offered. The traditional "splendid isolation" of dentistry contributes to parochialism and belief in false shibboleths. Sound principles of higher and health professions education, student learning, and dental practice apply to dental education as to all health disciplines. Student passivity in dental education is not the best preparation for proficiency in dental practice. The master teacher possesses a repertoire of methodologies specific to meeting defined educational objectives. Active learning experiences bear close resemblances to professional duties and responsibilities and internally motivate future doctors of dental medicine. The difficulty in achieving curricular change leads to curricular entrenchment. Dentistry and dental education should not trade their ethical high ground for the relatively low ethical standards of the business world. Principles of professional ethics should govern relationships between dentists, whether within the dental school workplace or in practice. Suggestions are made on how to confront shibboleths in dental school settings.

  17. Cognitive vulnerability and dental fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer A John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cognitive Vulnerability Model proposes that perceptions of certain characteristics of a situation are critical determinants of fear. Although the model is applicable to all animal, natural environment and situational fears, it has not yet been applied specifically to dental fear. This study therefore aimed to examine the association between dental fear and perceptions of dental visits as uncontrollable, unpredictable and dangerous. Methods The study used a clustered, stratified national sample of Australians aged 15 years and over. All participants were asked in a telephone interview survey to indicate their level of dental fear. Participants who received an oral examination were subsequently provided with a self-complete questionnaire in which they rated their perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness associated with dental visiting. Results 3937 participants were recruited. Each of the three vulnerability-related perceptions was strongly associated with the prevalence of high dental fear. In a logistic regression analysis, uncontrollability and dangerousness perceptions were significantly associated with high dental fear after controlling for age and sex. However, unpredictability perceptions did not have a statistically significant independent association with dental fear after controlling for all other variables. Conclusion Results are mostly consistent with the Cognitive Vulnerability Model of the etiology of fear, with perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness each showing a strong bivariate relationship with high dental fear prevalence. However, more extensive measures of vulnerability perceptions would be valuable in future investigations.

  18. Medical emergencies in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wilson, M H

    2009-06-01

    Serious medical emergencies are fortunately a rare occurrence in the dental practice environment; however, if an emergency situation is encountered a delay in treatment may result in potentially avoidable consequences. The risk of mortality or serious morbidity can be reduced by ensuring that basic emergency equipment and medications are in place, and that the dental team is appropriately trained in basic life support measures. This article aims to provide an overview of the basic emergency medications and equipment that should be present in dental practices, and to discuss specific responses to some of the more common adverse medical events that can present while providing dental treatment.

  19. Dental fear and satisfaction with dental services in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armfield, Jason M; Enkling, Norbert; Wolf, Christian A; Ramseier, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Dental satisfaction is associated with continuity of dental care, compliance with dentist advice, and positive health outcomes. It is expected that people with higher dental fear might have less dental satisfaction because of more negative dental experiences. The objective of this study was to examine satisfaction and reasons for satisfaction with dental practitioners in Switzerland and variations by dental fear. A national sample of 1,129 Swiss residents aged 15-74 (mean = 43.2 years) completed a personal interview at their home with questions assessing dental fear, dental service use, general satisfaction with their dentist, and reasons for satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Overall, 47.9 percent of participants responded that they were satisfied with their dentist and 47.6 percent that they were very satisfied. Satisfaction differed significantly by gender, language spoken, region of residence, and educational attainment. Greater dental fear was significantly associated with greater dissatisfaction with the dentist. The percentage of people who were very satisfied with the dentist ranged from 56.0 percent among people with no fear to 30.5 percent for participants with "quite a lot" of fear but was higher (44.4 percent) for people who stated that they were "very much" afraid of the dentist. The most common reasons attributed for satisfaction with dentists were interpersonal characteristics of the dentist and staff. People with "quite a lot" of fear were found to endorse these sentiments least. Although higher dental fear was associated with more dissatisfaction with the dentist, the level of satisfaction among fearful individuals in Switzerland is still high. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  20. Dental visits and access to dental care among Maryland schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Mark D; Wagner, Mark L; Goodman, Harold S; Manz, Michael C; Marrazzo, Ilise D

    2005-04-01

    Regular dental visits afford an opportunity for dentists to provide preventive services and to diagnose and treat disease. Not all children, however, have equal access to these services. The authors conducted this study to describe access to and utilization of oral health care services for Maryland schoolchildren in kindergarten and third grade. They obtained data from a questionnaire filled out by parents or guardians participating in the Survey of the Oral Health Status of Maryland School Children, 2000-2001 (N = 2,642). Outcome variables included having a dental visit in the last year, prophylaxis in the last year, usual source of medical care and usual source of dental care. Descriptor variables included region, grade, race/ethnicity, eligibility for free or reduced-fee meals, parents' or guardians' education and dental insurance status. Overall, general dental visit and dental prophylaxis visit rates were similar (74.1 and 71.3 percent, respectively). Schoolchildren, however, were more likely to have had a usual source of medical care than of dental care (96.0 and 82.9 percent, respectively). Third graders, those ineligible for free or reduced-fee meals and those with some dental insurance coverage were more likely to have received a prophylaxis in the last year and were more likely to have a usual source of dental care. Non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black schoolchildren also were more likely to have had a usual source of dental care than were Hispanics. Schoolchildren most likely to have received regular preventive dental care were those who had parents or guardians with financial resources. Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) provide safety nets, but these programs could be improved. Dentistry's challenge is to determine which characteristics are unique to those who visit the dentist regularly and use this information to help meet the needs of the underserved.

  1. Ethno-dentistry: popular medicinal plants used for dental diseases in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Bhardwaj

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a long and venerable history of the use of plants to improve dental health and promeote oral hygiene. Plant contain phytochemicals such as alkanoids, tannins, essential oils and flavanoids which have pronounced defensive and curative activity. India is a vast country with people from different cultures and communities. There are many species of medicinal plants belonging to various families which are being used, traditionally, to control and cure a variety of dental problems by the Indian population. The proper documentation of traditional knowledge may be helpful to promote further research in dental science. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2012; 1(1.000: 62-65

  2. Comfort Levels Among Predoctoral Dental and Dental Hygiene Students in Treating Patients at High-Risk for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natto, Zuhair S; Aladmawy, Majdi; Rogers, Thomas C

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the impact of the training program for predoctoral dental and hygiene students at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry (LLUSD) with regard to issues related to treating patients with a high risk of having HIV/AIDS. LLUSD offers a training program for fourth-year dental hygiene and predoctoral dental students that addresses the oral health care needs of persons with HIV disease. The training occurs in small groups 2 days per week at a community clinic serving HIV-positive individuals. Three academic quarters are required to train all fourth-year students each year. Evaluation of program effectiveness is conducted by means of pre- and post-session surveys. Dental hygiene and dental students completed the pre-survey during the spring quarter of their third year in public health dentistry courses. The same students completed the post-session survey at the end of their weekly training sessions during the fourth year. The overall change in all areas related to the students' comfort level in treating patients in the 3 defined categories is in a positive direction (p-valuedental hygiene students compared with predoctoral dental students. A comparison of pre- and post-session surveys reveals a significant improvement in students' perception of and comfort level with treating patients who are homosexual/bisexual or intravenous drug users, or who have a history of blood transfusion in both student groups upon completion of the HIV and the Dentist training program at LLUSD. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  3. Analysis of dental implants' biointegration in animals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parshina, Valentina I; Vatnikov, Yury A; Kulikov, Evgeny V; Krasnikov, Alexander V; Annikov, Vyacheslav V; Sotnikova, Elena D

    2016-01-01

    This article presents characterization study of new coatings for dental implants, defines their basic requirements, and discusses the prospects of thermal oxide coatings application in animals' dental implantology...

  4. Matematikkens historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Matematikkens historie i syv kapitler: 1. Matematik i støbeskeen; 2. Matematikkens græske arv; 3. Den gyldne tidsalder for hinduer og arabere; 4. Matematik i Kina; 5. Renæssancens matematik; 6. Regning med infinitesimaler ser dagens lys; 7. Matematik i det tyvende århundrede.......Matematikkens historie i syv kapitler: 1. Matematik i støbeskeen; 2. Matematikkens græske arv; 3. Den gyldne tidsalder for hinduer og arabere; 4. Matematik i Kina; 5. Renæssancens matematik; 6. Regning med infinitesimaler ser dagens lys; 7. Matematik i det tyvende århundrede....

  5. Linjefaget historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch-Christensen, Andreas

    Afhandlingen er en undersøgelse af linjefaget historie ved læreruddannelsen. Med fokus på subjektperspektivet peger afhandlingen på en række afgørende udviklingsperspektiver for læreruddannelsen, uddannelsen af historielærere og folkeskolens historieundervisning.......Afhandlingen er en undersøgelse af linjefaget historie ved læreruddannelsen. Med fokus på subjektperspektivet peger afhandlingen på en række afgørende udviklingsperspektiver for læreruddannelsen, uddannelsen af historielærere og folkeskolens historieundervisning....

  6. Matematikkens historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Matematikkens historie i syv kapitler: 1. Matematik i støbeskeen; 2. Matematikkens græske arv; 3. Den gyldne tidsalder for hinduer og arabere; 4. Matematik i Kina; 5. Renæssancens matematik; 6. Regning med infinitesimaler ser dagens lys; 7. Matematik i det tyvende århundrede.......Matematikkens historie i syv kapitler: 1. Matematik i støbeskeen; 2. Matematikkens græske arv; 3. Den gyldne tidsalder for hinduer og arabere; 4. Matematik i Kina; 5. Renæssancens matematik; 6. Regning med infinitesimaler ser dagens lys; 7. Matematik i det tyvende århundrede....

  7. Environmental history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawson, Eric; Christensen, Andreas Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    Environmental history is an interdisciplinary pursuit that has developed as a form of conscience to counter an increasingly powerful, forward-looking liberal theory of the environment. It deals with the relations between environmental ideas and materialities, from the work of the geographers George...... risks”. These are exposed by environmental history’s focus on long-run analysis and its narrative form that identifies the stories that we tell ourselves about nature. How a better understanding of past environmental transformations helps to analyse society and agency, and what this can mean...... for solutions and policies, is the agenda for an engaged environmental history from now on....

  8. Innovation of dental education system for researcher, dentist, dental hygienist and dental technician in Hiroshima University

    OpenAIRE

    Kurihara, Hidemi

    2006-01-01

    Hiroshima University Faculty of Dentistry's goal is to become the worldwide research and education center in Dentistry. It seems to constitute the dental education by two missions: core and characteristic. Hiroshima University Faculty of Dentistry has clarified their characteristic mission and improved dental education system to reinforce the innovative part of the education. We started two programs to cultivate researchers/educators who will be a world-wide leader of dental research and educ...

  9. Prediction of Future High Caries Increments for Children in a School Dental Service and in Private Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imfeld, Thomas N.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A method for predicting high dental caries increments for children, based on previous research, is presented. Three clinical findings were identified as predictors: number of sound primary molars, number of discolored pits/fissures on first permanent molars, and number of buccal and lingual smooth surfaces of first permanent molars with white…

  10. The Swedish national dental insurance and dental health care policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1981-01-01

    Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described.......Sweden initiated a dental health care insurance in 1973. The health insurance is outlined, current problems and political issues are described. The benefits and limitations are described....

  11. Mandatory Clinical Practice for Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Dental and dental hygiene faculty should maintain their clinical skills through regular practice, to improve their ability to relate to students through instruction, provide an additional source of income, and improve their image in the community. Institutional policies fostering and regulating faculty practice plans are suggested. (Author/MSE)

  12. Historia del Departamento de Patología de la Facultad de Estomatología de La Habana, en el período 1965-1972 History of the Pathology Department of the Dental School of Havana in the 1965-1972 period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Delgado Fernández

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El Departamento de Patología de la Facultad de Estomatología de la Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de La Habana, desde su creación, ha jugado un importante rol en la formación de profesionales de la estomatología. Su labor ha estado dirigida hacia la preparación científica - técnica y asistencial en las ciencias relacionadas con los medios de diagnóstico, incluyendo la Patología Bucal clínica. El objetivo de este trabajo es realizar un recuento histórico del desarrollo de este departamento, en una primera etapa, desde su creación en 1965 hasta 1972 y destacar los logros y hechos más importantes. Se consultaron libros y documentos relacionados con la historia del departamento, y se realizaron entrevistas a profesores fundadores y a otros con más de 30 años de desempeño en la institución. Dentro de sus principales aportes estuvieron la consolidación de un departamento que logró la integración de asignaturas que antes de su creación se impartían como cátedras independientes. Se pudo concluir que el Departamento de Patología, fundado el 10 de diciembre de 1965, consolidó una unidad docente-asistencial-investigativa con asignaturas relacionadas con los medios de diagnósticos, tales como la Anatomía Patológica, la Radiología, la Microbiología y la Patología Bucal clínica; además se creó un Laboratorio de Anatomía Patológica y una Clínica de Patología Bucal por primera vez en Estomatología.The department of pathology of the Dental School of the Medical Sciences University of Havana has played an important role in the formation of dental professionals since its foundation. Its work has been directed to scientific, technical and assistance training related with diagnostic media, including clinical oral pathology. The objectives of this paper was to make a historical account of the development of the department, in a first stage from its creation in 1965 to 1972 and to highlight the most important facts and

  13. Cultural history as polyphonic history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke, Peter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This texts offers a reflection on the origins and actual development of the field of cultural history through a comparison with the term that has served as title for this seminar: “polyphonic history”. The author provides an overview of the themes that have structured the seminar (the history of representations, the history of the body and the cultural history of science with the aim of making explicit and clarifying this plurality of voices in the field of history as well as its pervasiveness in other research areas.

    En este texto se ofrece una reflexión sobre el origen y actual desarrollo del campo de la historia cultural a través de una comparación con el término que ha dado título a este seminario: “historia polifónica”. El autor propone un recorrido por las áreas temáticas que han conformado la estructura del seminario (la historia de las representaciones, la historia del cuerpo y la historia cultural de la ciencia con el objeto de explicitar y explicar esta pluralidad de voces en el campo de la historia, así como su repercusión en otras áreas del conocimiento.

  14. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wotman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Wotman1, Catherine A Demko1, Kristin Victoroff1, Joseph J Sudano2, James A Lalumandier11Department of Community Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Center of Health Care Research and Policy, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction.Keywords: dental practice, dental practice core activities, direct observation of dental practice, Dental Davis Observation Code, dentist, hygienist patient behaviors

  15. Why History?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the way in which studying history contributes to intellectual development. Identifies five mental attributes it enhances: perspective--gained from placing people, events, institutions against larger background; encounter--confronting great ideas, personalities, etc.; relativism in a pluralistic world--developed from immersion in other…

  16. Bulletproof History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that the writers and producers of the television documentary, "The Valour and the Horror," provided a false impression of an event to fit preconceived and erroneous interpretations of history. Points out specific examples of inaccurate historical presentations and provides contradictory historical interpretations. (CFR)

  17. Business History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per H.

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that a cultural and narrative perspective can enrich the business history field, encourage new and different questions and answers, and provide new ways of thinking about methods and empirical material. It discusses what culture is and how it relates to narratives. Taking...

  18. Potted history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2010-01-01

    The Jordan Valley was once populated by a people, now almost forgotten by historians, with whom the pharaoh of Egypt sought favour. That is the conclusion reached by Niels Groot, the first researcher to take a PhD at the Delft-Leiden Centre for Archaeology, Art History and Science.

  19. Knowledge and Confidence of a Convenience Sample of Australasian Emergency Doctors in Managing Dental Emergencies: Results of a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Samaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aimed to determine Australasian Specialist Emergency Physicians’ and Emergency Physicians in Training (Trainees’ level of knowledge of common dental emergencies. We also explored confidence in managing dental emergencies; predictors of confidence and knowledge; and preferences for further dental education. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed electronically (September 2011 and directly (November 2011 to Fellows and Trainees of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine. It explored demographics, confidence, knowledge of dental emergencies, and educational preferences. Results. Response rate was 13.6% (464/3405 and college members were proportionally represented by region. Fewer than half (186/446; 42% had received dental training. Sixty-two percent (244/391, 95% CI 57.5–67.1 passed (>50% a knowledge test. More than 60% incorrectly answered questions on dental fracture, periodontal abscess, tooth eruption dates, and ulcerative gingivitis. Forty percent (166/416 incorrectly answered a question about Ludwig’s Angina. Eighty-three percent (360/433 were confident in the pharmacological management of toothache but only 26% (112/434 confident in recognizing periodontal disease. Knowledge was correlated with confidence (r=0.488. Interactive workshops were preferred by most (386/415, 93%. Conclusions. The knowledge and confidence of Australasian Emergency Physicians and Trainees in managing dental emergencies are varied, yet correlated. Interactive training sessions in dental emergencies are warranted.

  20. Knowledge and Confidence of a Convenience Sample of Australasian Emergency Doctors in Managing Dental Emergencies: Results of a Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaei, Hossein; Weiland, Tracey Joy; Dilley, Stuart; Jelinek, George Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background. We aimed to determine Australasian Specialist Emergency Physicians' and Emergency Physicians in Training (Trainees') level of knowledge of common dental emergencies. We also explored confidence in managing dental emergencies; predictors of confidence and knowledge; and preferences for further dental education. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed electronically (September 2011) and directly (November 2011) to Fellows and Trainees of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine. It explored demographics, confidence, knowledge of dental emergencies, and educational preferences. Results. Response rate was 13.6% (464/3405) and college members were proportionally represented by region. Fewer than half (186/446; 42%) had received dental training. Sixty-two percent (244/391, 95% CI 57.5–67.1) passed (>50%) a knowledge test. More than 60% incorrectly answered questions on dental fracture, periodontal abscess, tooth eruption dates, and ulcerative gingivitis. Forty percent (166/416) incorrectly answered a question about Ludwig's Angina. Eighty-three percent (360/433) were confident in the pharmacological management of toothache but only 26% (112/434) confident in recognizing periodontal disease. Knowledge was correlated with confidence (r = 0.488). Interactive workshops were preferred by most (386/415, 93%). Conclusions. The knowledge and confidence of Australasian Emergency Physicians and Trainees in managing dental emergencies are varied, yet correlated. Interactive training sessions in dental emergencies are warranted. PMID:25821600

  1. A Triservice Comparison of Dental Scaling Devices: Sonic and Ultrasonic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    literature and contains a short history of the development of power scalers. It also contains a discus- sion of the relationship between dental scalers and...phenomenon caused by ultrasound. High intensity, alternating pressure waves passing through water at the tip of the scaler force air bub- bles in the...devices such as microwave ovens, electric shavers, electro- cautery, diathermy , vitalometers, and even electric toothbrushes have the potential to

  2. Predictors of male microchimerism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2012-01-01

    logistic regression and thereafter random forest modeling to evaluate the ability of a range of reproductive, lifestyle, hospital or clinic visit history, and other variables to predict whether women tested positive for male microchimerism. We found some indication that current use of contraceptive pills...

  3. Dental extractions for preradiation dental clearance and incidence of osteoradionecrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See Toh, Yoong L; Soong, Yoke L; Chim, Yi X; Tan, Li T; Lye, Weng K; Teoh, Khim H

    2017-09-01

    The aims of the present retrospective study were to evaluate the outcomes of dental extractions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who had undergone dental clearance pre- and post-radiotherapy (RT) with intensity-modulated RT, and to report on the incidence and timing of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in these patients. A total of 231 patients were seen pre-, mid-, and postradiation therapy. Information on patient demographics, smoking history, staging, treatment modalities, dental extraction indications, and number and site of dental extractions was gathered. Wilcoxon two-sample tests and Fisher's exact test were used to test the association between groups for patient variables. The mean number of teeth removed was 4.1 teeth per patient. A total of 334 (35.2%) teeth were removed for periodontal reasons, 322 (34.03%) were removed prophylactically, and the remaining teeth were removed because of deep caries, retained roots, partial impaction, endodontic lesions, and prosthodontic reasons. Patients had an average of 19.6 teeth remaining after dental clearance, and only 97 (42%) required prosthetic intervention. The statistical analysis showed that there was no correlation between dental extractions pre- or post-RT and the development of ORN. No specific parameter was directly associated with dental extractions, although smoking and increased number of teeth removed preradiation seemed to be prevalent in patients who developed ORN. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Music interventions for dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, J; Teague, A

    2016-11-25

    Anxiety is a significant issue in the dental care of adults and children. Dental anxiety often leads to avoidance of dental care which may result in significant deterioration of oral and dental health. Non-pharmacological anxiety management interventions such as music listening are increasingly used in dental care. Although efficacy for music's anxiolytic effects has been established for pre-operative anxiety, findings regarding the use of music listening for dental anxiety are inconclusive, especially for children. The use of music for passive distraction may not be adequate for children and highly anxious adults. Instead, interventions offered by a trained music therapist may be needed to optimize music's anxiolytic impact. Music therapy interventions are individualized to the patient's presenting needs and geared at enhancing patients' active engagement in the management of their anxiety. Interventions may include (i) active refocusing of attention, (ii) music-guided deep breathing, (iii) music-assisted relaxation, and (iv) music-guided imagery. In addition, music therapists can teach patients music-based anxiety management skills prior to dental treatments, offer them the opportunity to express emotions related to the upcoming procedure, and help them gain a sense of control and safety. Clinical guidelines for the use of music listening by dental practitioners are offered.

  5. Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

  6. Drawing Links within Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines results of a practical drawing task given to a cohort of first year dental surgery students at Kings College Dental Institute, London. It compares and relates their success in drilling and removing caries and pulp tissue from a virtual tooth using the hapTEL virtual learning system, with each individuals' drawing skills.…

  7. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in New York State is presented. In addition to identifying licensing requirements/procedures for dentists and dental hygienists, general provisions of Title VIII of the Education Law are covered, along with state management, professional misconduct,…

  8. Dental problems in epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zioło, Anna; Mielnik-Błaszczak, Maria

    2004-01-01

    On the grounds of literature and own clinical experience, pathological changes in epilepitic patients have been described. Dental management procedures in these patients have also been presented. The unquestionable importance of prophylaxis, which may markedly minimize the impact of epilepsy on the incidence of mouth diseases, has been emphasised. It has also been stated that epileptic patients should receive specialised and integrated dental treatment.

  9. [The impact of dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the introduction of dental implants can only be understood when the historical context is clarified. In the past, the main treatment carried out by dentists consisted of filling or, in unfortunate cases, removal of painful teeth. Only since the introduction of dental implants did

  10. SYSTEMIC DISORDERS AFFECTING DENTAL PATHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Knezevic R. Milan; Andjelic S. Gordana; Knezevic M. Milena

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective overview of systemic disorders which might be associated with dental pathology is made. They are grouped as follows: (a) congenital dental developmental disorders, (b) chromosomal anomalies, (c) radiations, (d) immune disorders, (e) intoxications, (f) neurological alterations, (g) gastrointestinal diseases, (h) osteodystrophy and associated conditions, (i) skin diseases, (j) metabolic and endocrine disorders, (k) craniofacial malformation syndromes and other congenital g...

  11. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  12. Dental prosthesis aspiration: An uncommon cause of respiratory distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wilde, Belphine A L; Malfait, Thomas L; Bonte, Katrien; Malfait, Thomas L A

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of a 66-year-old Caucasian man with acute respiratory distress. The patient had a history of multiple cerebrovascular accidents which resulted in left hemiplegia, swallowing problems, and aphasia. He was tentatively diagnosed with aspiration pneumonia. However, because of clinical deterioration further investigations concluded to the aspiration of a dental prosthesis. After intubation and stabilization, the prosthesis could be manually extracted. However, the patient developed a Staphylococcus epidermidis sepsis and despite adequate antibiotic therapy, he eventually died. Dental prosthesis aspiration is a medical situation associated with a higher morbidity and mortality rate compared to ingested foreign bodies. It requires a high level of suspicion to ensure a timely diagnosis and life-saving treatment. Thorough history taking is of great importance in case of tracheobronchial aspiration, which is in the adult population mostly secondary to an underlying disorder. In impaired adults with missing dental prostheses there should be extra awareness for this problem. This case report illustrates the importance of a detailed history in case of tracheobronchial aspiration and shows the limitations in the diagnostic usefulness of bedside chest radiography.

  13. Survival of dental implants in post-menopausal bisphosphonate users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, Sreenivas; Babu, Nivedhitha Malli Suresh; Norell, Aaron

    2010-07-01

    To determine whether post-menopausal women with a history of bisphosphonate use are at greater risk for implant failure or osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) than an age- and gender-matched population with no history of bisphosphonate use. A retrospective chart review and phone interview was conducted of patients seen at the Mayo Clinic who had implants placed after November 2006. Bisphosphonate users were identified by medical chart review. Dental implant survival and ONJ incidence were determined in a total of 82 post-menopausal non-bisphosphonate users and 55 post-menopausal bisphosphonate users using a phone interview. Implant failures were recorded and survival percentages were calculated for comparison. ONJ was not observed consequent to implant placement in any of the bisphosphonate users or non-users. In non-users, 163 out of 166 implants were surviving for a cumulative survival rate of 98.19%. In bisphosphonate users, 120 out of 121 implants were surviving for a cumulative survival rate of 99.17%. Dental implants placed in post-menopausal women have the same survival potential regardless of whether patients have a history of bisphosphonate use. Bisphosphonate users who undergo dental implant surgery are at low risk for osteonecrosis of the jaw and a bisphosphonate "drug holiday" is not indicated in these patients. Copyright 2010 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Competition and dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, J; Sørensen, R

    2000-07-01

    Dental services for adults are different from all other Norwegian health services in that they are provided by private producers (dentists) who have full freedom to establish a practice. They have had this freedom since the end of World War II. A further liberalization of the market for dental services occurred in November 1995, when the so-called normal tariff was repealed. The system changed from a fixed fee system to a deregulated fee system. In principle, the market for dental services for adults operates as a free competitive market, in which dentists must compete for a market share. The aim of this study was to study the short-term effects of competition. A comprehensive set of data on fees, practice characteristics, treatment profiles and factors that dentists take into account when determining fees was analysed. The main finding was that competition has a weak effect. No support was found for the theory that the level of fees is the result of monopolistic competition or monopoly. The results also provided some evidence against the inducement hypothesis. At this stage, it is interesting to notice that dentists do not seem to exploit the power they have to control the market. One explanation, which is consistent with the more recent literature, is that physicians' behaviour to a large extent is influenced by professional norms and caring concerns about their patients. Financial incentives are important, but these incentives are constrained by norms other than self-interest. The interpretation of the results should also take into account that the deregulation has operated for a short time and that dentists and patients may not yet have adjusted to changes in the characteristics of the market.

  15. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  16. Dental Forensics: Bitemark Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Forensic odontology (dental forensics can provide useful evidence in both criminal and civil cases, and therefore remains a part of the wider discipline of forensic science. As an example from the toolbox of forensic odontology, the practice and experience on bitemark analysis is reviewed here in brief. The principle of using visible bitemarks in crime victims or in other objects as evidence is fundamentally based on the observation that the detailed pattern of dental imprints tend to be practically unique for each individual. Therefore, finding such an imprint as a bitemark can bear a strong testimony that it was produced by the individual that has the matching dental pattern. However, the comparison of the observed bitemark and the suspected set of teeth will necessarily require human interpretation, and this is not infallible. Both technical challenges in the bitemarks and human errors in the interpretation are possible. To minimise such errors and to maximise the value of bitemark analysis, dedicated procedures and protocols have been developed, and the personnel taking care of the analysis need to be properly trained. In principle the action within the discipline should be conducted as in evidence-based dentristy, i.e. accepted procedures should have known error rates. Because of the involvement of human interpretation, even personal performance statistics may be required from legal expert statements. The requirements have been introduced largely due to cases where false convictions based on bitemark analysishave been overturned after DNA analysis.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i2.76

  17. Sensibilidad dentaria Dental sensibility

    OpenAIRE

    P. Tortolini

    2003-01-01

    La sensibilidad dentaria l es un problema común que se presenta entre el 9 y el 30% de la población adulta. La teoría hidrodinámica es aceptada como uno de los mecanismos de inducción de la respuesta pulpar dolorosa, debido a que los estímulos provocan el movimiento del fluido y para ello es necesario que la dentina este expuesta y que los túbulos dentinarios estén abiertos y permeables a la pulpa. Es fundamental realizar el diagnostico diferencial con otras causas de dolor dental e identific...

  18. The american dental dream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The American Dental Dream-the cultural desire for straight, white teeth-is difficult, if not impossible, for poor and working-class people to achieve. Using ethnographic fiction, autoethnography, poetry, and qualitative interviewing, I brush away the taken-for-granted assumptions about teeth. I explore the personal, relational, and structural consequences of this cultural desire, and show how social class writes itself on our bodies. I write these culture-centered teeth tales to show how one might cope with their teeth.

  19. Business History as Cultural History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Jørgensen, Ida

    The paper engages with the larger question of how cultural heritage becomes taken for granted and offers a complimentary view to the anthropological ʻCopenhagen School’ of business history, one that draws attention to the way corporate wealth directly and indirectly influences the culture available...

  20. Assessment of Various Risk Factors for Success of Delayed and Immediate Loaded Dental Implants: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasant, M C; Thukral, Rishi; Kumar, Sachin; Sadrani, Sannishth M; Baxi, Harsh; Shah, Aditi

    2016-10-01

    Ever since its introduction in 1977, a minimum of few months of period is required for osseointegration to take place after dental implant surgery. With the passage of time and advancements in the fields of dental implant, this healing period is getting smaller and smaller. Immediate loading of dental implants is becoming a very popular procedure in the recent time. Hence, we retrospectively analyzed the various risk factors for the failure of delayed and immediate loaded dental implants. In the present study, retrospective analysis of all the patients was done who underwent dental implant surgeries either by immediate loading procedure or by delayed loading procedures. All the patients were divided broadly into two groups with one group containing patients in which delayed loaded dental implants were placed while other consisted of patients in whom immediate loaded dental implants were placed. All the patients in whom follow-up records were missing and who had past medical history of any systemic diseases were excluded from the present study. Evaluation of associated possible risk factors was done by classifying the predictable factors as primary and secondary factors. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses and chi-square test were used for assessment of level of significance. In delayed and immediate group of dental implants, mean age of the patients was 54.2 and 54.8 years respectively. Statistically significant results were obtained while comparing the clinical parameters of the dental implants in both the groups while demographic parameters showed nonsignificant correlation. Significant higher risk of dental implant failure is associated with immediate loaded dental implants. Tobacco smoking, shorter implant size, and other risk factors play a significant role in predicting the success and failure of dental implants. Delayed loaded dental implant placement should be preferred

  1. Impact of Dental Disorders and its Influence on Self Esteem Levels among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Puneet; Singh, Simarpreet; Mathur, Anmol; Makkar, Diljot Kaur; Aggarwal, Vikram Pal; Batra, Manu; Sharma, Anshika; Goyal, Nikita

    2017-04-01

    Self esteem is more of a psychological concept therefore, even the common dental disorders like dental trauma, tooth loss and untreated carious lesions may affect the self esteem thus influencing the quality of life. This study aims to assess the impact of dental disorders among the adolescents on their self esteem level. The present cross-sectional study was conducted among 10 to 17 years adolescents. In order to obtain a representative sample, multistage sampling technique was used and sample was selected based on Probability Proportional to Enrolment size (PPE). Oral health assessment was carried out using WHO type III examination and self esteem was estimated using the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale score (RSES). The descriptive and inferential analysis of the data was done by using IBM SPSS software. Logistic and linear regression analysis was executed to test the individual association of different independent clinical variables with self esteem. Total sample of 1140 adolescents with mean age of 14.95 ±2.08 and RSES of 27.09 ±3.12 were considered. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was applied and best predictors in relation to RSES in the descending order were Dental Health Component (DHC), Aesthetic Component (AC), dental decay {(aesthetic zone), (masticatory zone)}, tooth loss {(aesthetic zone), (masticatory zone)} and anterior fracture of tooth. It was found that various dental disorders like malocclusion, anterior traumatic tooth, tooth loss and untreated decay causes a profound impact on aesthetics and psychosocial behaviour of adolescents, thus affecting their self esteem.

  2. Craniodentofacial characteristics, dental esthetics-related quality of life, and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavric, Anja; Mirceta, Dubravka; Jakobovic, Mario; Pavlic, Andrej; Zrinski, Magda Trinajstic; Spalj, Stjepan

    2015-06-01

    Self-esteem is a psychological trait that may develop in interaction with craniodentofacial esthetics. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship among craniodentofacial characteristics, dental esthetics-related quality of life, and self-esteem in adolescents and young adults. The study was cross-sectional; the sample included 200 pupils and university students (58% female) aged 13 to 33 years. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire were used. Craniodentofacial features were estimated by the method of Martin and Saller, the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need, and the Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need. When malocclusion severity increases, dental esthetics-related quality of life decreases. The multiple linear regression showed that with the control of all other predictors in the model, the social impact of dental esthetics, borderline dental self-confidence, and facial type contribute the most to explain the variability of self-esteem, accounting for 3.2%, 1.3%, and 1.4%, respectively, of the variability values. The whole model accounts for 24.2% of the variability of self-esteem. In adolescents and young adults, self-esteem appears to be more influenced by the self-perceived psychosocial impacts of dental esthetics than the normative level of malocclusion, craniofacial typology, sex, or age. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary language spoken at home and children's dental service utilization in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyce, Matthew; Szabo, Aniko; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Jackson, Scott; Bradley, T Gerard; Okunseri, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Language barriers have been well documented as a contributing factor to disparities in the receipt of medical services, especially for Hispanic children. However, there is a paucity of information on the effect of language barriers on children's dental service utilization. We examined the association of primary language spoken at home with the receipt of preventive and routine dental care for children in the United States. We analyzed data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2002-2004), which contains data on 21,049 children weighted to represent 75.8 million children nationally. Among children aged 1-18 years, 13 percent spoke a language other than English at home. Whites, females, children between the ages of 7 and 12 years, and those whose parents spoke English at home had the highest marginal rates of preventive and routine dental visits. However, the large marginal effect of language, even among Hispanics, was not significant after adjusting for other covariates. Parental education and having a primary provider were the strongest predictors of preventive and routine dental visits. Children that did not speak English at home were less likely to receive preventive or routine dental care. However, after adjusting for other socio-economic factors, our study suggests that language barriers may not play as pronounced a role in the receipt of dental care as that documented for medical services.

  4. Sommerferiens historie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Karin

    2011-01-01

    favourite ways for com- mon people to spend their holidays, and with the introduction of holiday pay in the 1930s almost everybody could take a couple of weeks off work in the sum- mer. With the introduction of charter tourism many people went off to Southern Europe to spend their holidays on the same...... pattern. Finally, the history of the special holiday camps is told, which were established by American Jews because they were excluded from many hotels....

  5. [Dental prostheses and dental impressions from a hygienic viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, J P

    1986-12-01

    Dentures, dental impressions, removable orthodontic appliances and all dental technical devices, which are part of any dental treatment are parts as well of a potential crosscontamination chain in dental treatment. Most of those items do not tolerate heat as a sure sterilization medium. For disinfection, chemical disinfectant solutions may be used as far as they work properly and as they are tolerated by the materials in question. Though, one can report some progress in disinfection of dentures and impressions, there are still questions open depending on safety and/or compatibility of the particular materials. For disinfection of removable dentures chlorine-yielding preparations such as Maranon can be recommended. Peracid preparations, such as Sekusept, Sekusept steril and Dentavon may be useful for disinfection of dental impressions. To do the possible means to reduce the infection risk for all persons involved in the dental treatment, patient, dentist, dental technician and all auxiliary persons. This includes both, active hygiene provisions as sterilization and disinfection, as well as possible passive self protection.

  6. Correlation of upper airway radiographic measurements with risk status for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in young dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adisen, Mehmet Zahit; Misirlioglu, Melda; Yorubulut, Serap; Nalcaci, Rana

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare radiographic measurements of the upper airway (UA) in young adult patients with different levels of risk status for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The study included 50 patients between 18 and 30 years of age who were referred for dental examination and evaluation of impacted third molars. Case record forms, including habit history, along with the Berlin Questionnaire and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, were completed by the patients and their relatives. According to the answers, 25 low-risk patients and 25 high-risk patients were selected. Cephalometric radiographs and cone beam computed radiography images were obtained for radiographic analysis when the patients were admitted into the study. There were significant differences in body mass index, neck circumference measurements, Epworth score, and smoking status between risk groups. There were significant differences for UA measurements on radiographic evaluation. Body mass index (BMI) was found to be correlated positively with neck circumference and Epworth scores and negatively with UA measurements for all patients. Velopharyngeal measurements showed the highest correlation with Epworth scores, BMI, and neck circumference. The radiographic findings correlated with the survey results. Our data suggest that radiographic measurements of UA may be used as a predictor of risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a young population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Predictors of Atrial Arrhythmias for Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    history of preoperative COPD documented on their history and/or physical . History of smoking: classified as a nonsmoker, past smoker, or current smoker. A...term anticoagulant therapy (Leitch et al., 1990; Lowe, Hendry, Hendrickson, & Wells, 1991; Frost et al., 1992; Nystrom, Edvardsson, Berggren, 2...and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( COPD ) as predictors of postoperative atrial arrhythmias for CABG patients. Cigarette smoking was a

  8. Perceived sources and levels of stress, general self-efficacy and coping strategies in clinical dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersan, Nilüfer; Fişekçioğlu, Erdoğan; Dölekoğlu, Semanur; Oktay, İnci; İlgüy, Dilhan

    2017-02-06

    The aims of this study were to identify sources of stress among clinical students and to evaluate the students' perceived levels of stress, general self-efficacy and effective coping strategies in a private dental school environment. The study group consisted of 130 undergraduate clinical dental students in a Turkish private dental school, during the academic year 2014-2015. The students were surveyed using modified version of the dental environment stress (DES) survey, the perceived stress scale, the general self-efficacy scale (G-SES) and the brief coping scale. Age, sex, year of study, history of psychiatric treatment and factors that affected the choice of dentistry were also recorded. Final year and female clinical dental students, who were found to be the most stressful students, had moderate to high perceived stress scores. Total and 'Faculty and administration' related DES scores increased with the year of study. Stressors related to 'Workload' and 'Clinical training' affected females more than males. G-SES scores were higher in male students and students, who had no history of psychiatric treatment. The most and the least common coping strategies were 'Planning' and 'Substance abuse', respectively. 'Religion' was found to be one of the main coping strategies. Stress factors affecting Turkish clinical dental students studying at private dental school differed from the previously reported stress factors affecting students studying at a governmental dental school. Advanced year and female students experienced more stress than the other students.

  9. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is a... between the teeth to reduce tooth decay. The fibers of the device may be coated with wax for easier...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of...

  11. Dental Therapy Assistant: Effect on Team Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Theodore H.

    The U.S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a formal program based on the concept that dental care can be more efficiently and effectively provided with treatment teams composed of one dental officer, two dental therapy assistants (DTAs), one basic assistant, and the shared support of other auxiliary personnel. Such a team will use three dental…

  12. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  13. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment.

  14. Intergrated dental care in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, P.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with integrated dental care in nursing homes. First, the dental treatment needs were ascertained of 432 residents in three Dutch nursing homes that offer integrated dental care. Dentist researchers intra-orally examined the residents and found that 72% required dental treatment. How

  15. Dental photography today. Part 1: basic concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    CASAGLIA, A.; DE DOMINICIS, P.; ARCURI, L.; GARGARI, M.; OTTRIA, L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY This paper is the first article in a new series on digital dental photography. Part 1 defines the aims and objectives of dental photography for examination, diagnosis and treatment planning, legal and forensic documentation, publishing, education, marketing and communication with patients, dental team members, colleagues and dental laboratory. PMID:28042424

  16. Epidemiological predictors of metabolic syndrome in urban West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasthi Narayan Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metabolic syndrome is one of the emerging health problems of the world. Its prevalence is high in urban areas. Though pathogenesis is complex, but the interaction of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, dietary, and genetic factors are known as contributing factors. Community-based studies were very few to find out the prevalence or predictors of the syndrome. Objectives: To ascertain the prevalence and epidemiological predictors of metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: A total of 690 study subjects were chosen by 30 clusters random sampling method from 43 wards of Durgapur city. Data were analyzed in SPSS version 20 software and binary logistic regression was done to find out statistical significance of the predictors. Results: Among 32.75% of the study population was diagnosed as metabolic syndrome according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definition with a modification for Asia Pacific cut-off of waist circumference. Odds were more among females (2.43, upper social class (14.89, sedentary lifestyle (17.00, and positive family history. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was high in urban areas of Durgapur. Increased age, female gender, higher social status, sedentary lifestyle, positive family history, and higher education were the statistically significant predictors of metabolic syndrome.

  17. Dentoalveolar abscess among children attending a dental clinic in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, C C; Chukwumah, N M; Ezeja, E B

    2012-09-01

    To determine the incidence and causes of dentoalveolar abscess among children attending an outpatient dental clinic in Nigeria. This is a retrospective study of paediatric dental patients treated in University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City from October 2010 to September 2011. The incidence of dentoalveolar abscess was 6.4% (53/824). However only 42 cases had their case notes retrieved for final research analysis. It occurred mostly in the lower right quadrant of the mouth. The affected children were majorly males and first or second child of monogamous family. A total 17 (40.5%) of the affected children were in the 6-11 years age group. This was the first dentist consultation among 35 (83.3%) of the children. The presenting complaint was toothache among two-thirds of the children. History of asthma, tonsillitis, peptic ulcer disease and previous surgery were medical history elicited from 6 (14.3) of the patients. The most implicated tooth was deciduous first molar. The causes of abscess include untreated dental caries 35 (83.3%), trauma 5 (11.9%), failed restoration 1 (2.4%) and periodontal diseases 1 (2.4%). Periapical radioluscency was predominant radiological finding among affected children. Tooth extraction was commonest treatment done. The incidence of dentoalveolar abscess among children was significant. The high frequency of untreated dental caries as the cause of dentoalveolar abscess indicates the need for school and community-based preventive strategies like encouraging infant oral health and preventive dentistry programs and early treatment intervention and dental health education.

  18. Developing core dental public health competencies for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Atchison, Kathryn Ann

    2015-01-01

    Dental professionals are an "underutilized" workforce, when it comes to advocating for prevention and wellness in populations. The goal of this HRSA-funded project is to develop dental public health (DPH) competencies and curriculum for US predoctoral dental and dental hygiene programs. These competencies and accompanying curriculum are designed to better prepare the oral health workforce to meet the needs of the entire population, including the chronically underserved, those challenged by poor health literacy, or communities encountering barriers to accessing oral health care. By increasing the DPH competency of all graduating dental providers, in population-based approaches to preventing oral diseases rather than the existing exclusive focus on treatment, the number of providers who can respond to a population or the public's unmet needs and challenges, both in private practices and publicly supported clinics, will increase. This paper describes the competency development process and the eight competencies that were identified.

  19. Dental caries: Therapeutic possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Tamara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary tendencies in dentistry are based on the concept of maximal protection of healthy tooth tissues. Caries removal has been done traditionally with mechanical rotary instruments that are fast and precise. However, conventional cavity preparation has potential adverse effects to the pulp due to heat, pressure and vibrations. Moreover, drilling often causes pain and requires local anaesthesia, and these procedures are frequently perceived as unpleasant. Etiology, development and prevention of dental caries are better understood today and new restorative materials that bond micromechanically and/or chemically to dental tissues have been introduced. Thus, development of a new, less destructive caries removal technique is allowed. In the last decades, many alternative methods have been introduced in an attempt to replace rotary instruments. These are claimed to be efficient and selective for diseased tissues and to offer comfortable treatment to the patients. New methods include air abrasion, air polishing, ultrasonic, polymer burs, enzymes, systems for chemo-mechanical caries removal, and lasers. The aim of this paper was to discuss various caries removal techniques and possibilities of their use in clinical practice. Based on the literature review it can be concluded that none of the new caries removal methods can completely replace conventional rotary instruments.

  20. [Dental anatomy of dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisian, E G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate dog teeth anatomy as animal model for study of etiopathogenesis of caries disease and physiological tooth wear in human. After examining the dog's dental system, following conclusions were drawn: the dog has 42 permanent teeth, which are distributed over the dental arches not equally, and so the upper dentition consists of 20, and the lower of 22 teeth. The largest are considered upper fourth premolar and lower first molars, which are called discordant teeth. Between discordant teeth and fangs a dog has an open bite, which is limited to the top and bottom conical crown premolar teeth. Thus, in the closed position of the jaws, behind this occlusion is limited by discordant teeth, just in contact are smaller in size two molars. Only large dog's molars in a valid comparison can be likened to human molars, which allows us to use them in an analog comparison between them with further study of the morphological features ensure durability short-crown teeth and their predisposition to caries.

  1. Does dental health education affect inequalities in dental health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Wight, C

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the Lothian 1991 dental health campaigns on 5-year-old schoolchildren's oral hygiene and gingival health in relation to deprivation. A stratified random sample of 486 children was selected from 92 primary schools in the city of Edinburgh. Clinical examinations......-home materials were distributed to all children. Dental officers provided 20 minute information sessions for each class and encouraged teachers to continue dental health activities within the classes. For the purpose of the evaluation, schools were categorised as deprived and non-deprived according...

  2. Predicting academic and National Board Dental Hygiene Examination performance based on Academic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchmoyer, Susan M; Carr, Michele P; Clutter, Jill E; Hoberty, Phillip D

    2004-01-01

    Numerous studies have explored reliable variables that predict student success in dental hygiene programs and on the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination (NBDHE). However, no studies were found using data collected since the NBDHE format changed in 1998 to investigate if traditional predictors hold true. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between pre-admission requirements, basic college science requirements, site of academic preparation, cumulative dental hygiene grade point average (CDHYGPA) and the NBDHE score. Data from the academic records of 173 graduates of the dental hygiene program at The Ohio State University from 1998 through 2002 were entered into an Excel spreadsheet using identification numbers. Demographic information for the description of the subjects, course transfer data, course grades in program prerequisites and basic science requirements, CDHYGPA, and NBDHE scores were entered. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social sciences (SPSS-version 10), Pearson's r correlations, regression analysis, and ANOVA with a predetermined level of significance at .05. Of the 173 records entered, 132 had complete data (76.3%). Results indicate the existing prerequisites for the dental hygiene program remain strong predictors for success. A strong correlation was noted between human nutrition courses and the CDHYGPA. Other core science courses completed while in the program-anatomy, physiology and microbiology--also rendered a moderately strong correlation to the CDHYGPA. The greatest predictors for success on the NBDHE were the student's CDHYGPA and the prerequisite three science GPA. Consistency in site of science preparation also revealed a positive correlation to the CDHYGPA. This study confirmed the continued use of the three science GPA pre-requisite and entering GPA for predicting success in this dental hygiene program and on the NBDHE even after the format changed to include case-based items. Other

  3. Dietary and training predictors of stress fractures in female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Laurel; Liu, Pei-Yang; Ilich, Jasminka Z; Haymes, Emily M

    2012-10-01

    To compare female runners with and without a history of stress fractures to determine possible predictors of such fractures. 27 female runners (age 18-40 yr) who had had at least 1 stress fracture were matched to a control sample of 32 female runners without a history of stress fractures. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (iDXA). Subjects answered questionnaires on stress-fracture history, training, menstrual status, and diet. No significant differences were found in menstrual characteristics, diet and dairy intake, or bone measurements. Weekly servings of milk during middle school significantly predicted BMD at the femur (p = .010), femoral neck (p = .002), Ward's triangle (p = .014), and femoral shaft (p = .005). Number of menstrual cycles in the previous year predicted femoral-neck BMD (p = .004). Caffeine intake was negatively associated with BMD of the femur (p = .010), femoral neck (p = .003), trochanter (p = .038), and femoral shaft (p = .035). Weekly hours of training were negatively associated with total-body BMD (p = .021), total-body bone mineral content (p = .028), and lumbar-spine BMD (p = .011). Predictors for stress fractures included the number of years running, predominantly running on hard ground, irregular menstrual history, low total-body BMD, and low current dietary calcium intake when controlling for body-mass index (Nagelkerke R2 = .364). Servings of milk during middle-school years were positively correlated with hip BMD, although current calcium intake, low BMD, irregular menstrual history, hard training surface, and long history of training duration were the most important predictors of stress fractures.

  4. Perception of Laypeople and Dental Professionals of Smile Esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Saffarpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess and compare the perception of laypersons and dental professionals of smile esthetics based on two factors namely gingival display and alignment of teeth.Materials and Methods: A total of 32 females were randomly selected among dental students in the International Campus of School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran with no previous history of esthetic dental work. Frontal photographs were obtained and cropped from the subnasal to menton areas of subjects to standardize the size of pictures. Three series of slides were prepared of the pictures using Microsoft PowerPoint software. The first series of slides were shown to familiarize the observers with the images. The second and third series were displayed for the observers and they were then asked to fill out a questionnaire. The group of observers included 10 dental specialists and 10 laypersons. Each observer was given a visual analog scale (VAS chart for scoring (1-10. After completion of the questionnaires, data were transferred to a computer and the differences in judgments of professionals and laypeople were analyzed using the Mann Whitney test.Results: No significant difference was found in the judgments of professionals and laypeople on evaluating overall smile esthetics, gingival display and alignment of teeth except for the slide showing a reverse smile arc.Conclusions: Laypeople and professionals had similar perceptions of smile esthetics. Thus, it appears that clinicians can rely on the judgment of laypersons in esthetic dental treatments.Keywords: Smiling; Perception; Esthetics, Dental

  5. Dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression among adult patients with dental anxiety but with different dental-attendance patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernson, Jenny M; Elfström, Magnus L; Hakeberg, Magnus

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression in relation to regularity of dental treatment among persons with either regular dental care or phobic avoidance, whilst controlling for sociodemographic factors. Psychometric questionnaires on dental anxiety, dental coping strategies, general anxiety, and depression were delivered to 263 adult patients with dental phobic avoidance behavior who were seeking help from a specialized dental fear clinic and to 141 adult patients with dental anxiety who were receiving regular dental care from various public dental clinics. The results showed that the levels of dental and general anxiety and of depression were significantly higher among irregular attendees compared with regular attendees. Irregular attendees admitted fewer adaptive coping strategies. Predictive of irregular dental care were gender, dental anxiety, general anxiety, and the nonuse of the coping strategy 'optimism'. This study further confirms earlier preliminary results that the use of optimistic thinking is predictive for regular dental attendance habits and that male gender is a risk factor for irregular attendance. Moreover, this study adds that a high level of general anxiety indicates a higher risk for irregular dental care.

  6. Clinical Predictors of Psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Caraveo Anduaga

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders affect up to one third of patients with non-psychiatric diseases.1-5 Nevertheless, despite the high prevalence of psychopathology in general medical patients, only between 30-50% of all cases are detected.2,6-8 Some have suggested that the difficulty in the detection and diagnosis of mental disorders among patients who seek medical attention for other reasons, lies in the lack of screening questions that might alert the physician to the possibility of a psychiatric co-morbidity.9 Such questions would identify medical patients at high risk of psychiatric problems. Previous work on clinical predictors of psychopathology have identified the following: specific physical symptoms10-11; patient report of severity of illness11; recent stress12,13; low self-perception of health status13; and age less than 50.14 Two specific studies on the detection of psychopathology in the general medical population are worth highlighting. The first, by Jackson and his research team13 updating a 2001 study evaluating a prediction model with four parameters (recent stress, severity of physical symptoms, five or more specific symptoms, self-assessment of physical condition. They found that those patients who report recent stress, have five or more physical symptoms or a low self-perception of their health state are at a higher risk of having a psychiatric disorder. The second study, by Lowe et al. published in 2003,9 examines a series of factors that could serve as indicators of psychopathology in ambulatory medical (i.e. non-psychiatric patients. After evaluating several different models they found that the combination of four of factors (taken as a group had a high sensitivity (86%, specificity (100%, positive predictive value (100%, and negative predictive value (91%. This suggests that a physician could use the combination of these four indicators to evaluate for the presence of co morbid mental disorders. These factors are: self

  7. Dental considerations in patients with respiratory problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Claramunt Lozano, Ariadna; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia; Gavaldá Esteve, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Many respiratory disorders can compromise routine dental care and require special treatment for the affected patients. Patients often visit the dental clinic with respiratory problems already diagnosed by other specialists. The dental professional therefore must provide correct dental care in the context of such a diagnosis. The present study offers a literature review of those respiratory disorders which can have implications for dental care. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (CO...

  8. Incidence of dental caries in chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Surrinder

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Three hundred patients of chronic urticaria were screened for dental affections. Sixty two (20.66% patients were detected to have dental caries. Among the control group which com-prised of 100 patients, 20% had dental caries. There was thus no increased incidence of dental caries among patients with urticaria. Only 2 patients had remission of urticaria following treat-ment of caries. Dental caries therefore is probably not a cause of chronic urticaria.

  9. A Survey of Civilian Dental Computer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    r.arketplace, the orthodontic community continued to pioneer clinical automation through diagnosis, treat- (1) patient registration, identification...profession." New York State Dental Journal 34:76, 1968. 17. Ehrlich, A., The Role of Computers in Dental Practice Management. Champaign, IL: Colwell...Council on Dental military dental clinic. Medical Bulletin of the US Army Practice. Report: Dental Computer Vendors. 1984 Europe 39:14-16, 1982. 19

  10. Community dental clinics: providers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Bruce B; MacEntee, Michael I; Harrison, Rosamund; Hole, Rachelle; Mitton, Craig

    2013-06-01

    Not-for-profit community dental clinics attempt to address the inequities of oral health care for disadvantaged communities, but there is little information about how they operate. The objective of this article is to explain from the perspective of senior staff how five community dental clinics in British Columbia, Canada, provide services. The mixed-methods case study included the five not-for-profit dental clinics with full-time staff who provided a wide range of dental services. We conducted open-ended interviews to saturation with eight senior administrative staff selected purposefully because of their comprehensive knowledge of the development and operation of the clinics and supplemented their information with a year's aggregated data on patients, treatments, and operating costs. The interview participants described the benefits of integrating dentistry with other health and social services usually within community health centres, although they doubted the sustainability of the clinics without reliable financial support from public funds. Aggregated data showed that 75% of the patients had either publically funded or no coverage for dental services, while the others had employer-sponsored dental insurance. Financial subsidies from regional health authorities allowed two of the clinics to treat only patients who are economically vulnerable and provide all services at reduced costs. Clinics without government subsidies used the fees paid by some patients to subsidize treatment for others who could not afford treatment. Not-for-profit dental clinics provide dental services beyond pain relief for underserved communities. Dental services are integrated with other health and community services and located in accessible locations. However, all of the participants expressed concerns about the sustainability of the clinics without reliable public revenues. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Uncovering History for Future History Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Fritz

    2010-01-01

    The art of history teaching is at a crossroads. Recent scholarship focuses on the need to change the teaching of history so students can better learn history, and insists that history teachers must move beyond traditional structures and methods of teaching in order to improve their students' abilities to think with history. This article presents…

  12. Ildens historier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Henrik Roesgaard

    In December 2012 a manuscript entitled "Tællelyset" ['The Tallow Candle'] was discovered in an archive. The story was subsequently presented to the world as Hans Christian Andersen's first fairy tale and rather bombastically celebrated as such. In this book it is demonstrated that the text cannot...... from a point-by-point tracing of 'the origins and history' of Hans Christian Andersen's famous fairy tales. Where did the come from? How did they become the iconic texts that we know today? On this background it becomes quite clear that "Tællelyset" is a modern pastiche and not a genuine Hans Christian...... Andersen fairy tale....

  13. Factors influencing students' performance in a Brazilian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Erica Tatiane da; Nunes, Maria de Fátima; Queiroz, Maria Goretti; Leles, Cláudio R

    2010-01-01

    Comprehensive assessment of students' academic performance plays an important role in educational planning. The aim of this study was to investigate variables that influence student's performance in a retrospective sample including all undergraduate students who entered in a Brazilian dental school, in a 20-year period between 1984 and 2003 (n=1182). Demographic and educational variables were used to predict performance in the overall curriculum and course groups. Cluster analysis (K-means algorithm) categorized students into groups of higher, moderate or lower performance. Clusters of overall performance showed external validity, demonstrated by Chi-square test and ANOVA. Lower performance groups had the smallest number of students in overall performance and course groups clusters, ranging from 11.8% (clinical courses) to 19.2% (basic courses). Students' performance was more satisfactory in dental and clinical courses, rather than basic and non-clinical courses (pstudent's performance was predicted by lower time elapsed between completion of high school and dental school admission, female gender, better rank in admission test, class attendance rate and student workload hours in teaching, research and extension (R(2)=0.491). Findings give evidence about predictors of undergraduate students' performance and reinforce the need for curricular reformulation focused on with improvement of integration among courses.

  14. Initial dental needs and a projection of needed dental capacity in the Iowa Department of Corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringgenberg, Wendy J

    2011-04-01

    The dental health data for the Iowa Department of Corrections (IDOC) inmate population were analyzed to better understand dental health issues experienced by inmates and IDOC's system for responding to those dental needs. Each inmate is given a dental health assessment upon admission to Iowa's prison system. These data were analyzed for frequency of dental health needs and frequency of dental health services. In addition, emergency dental health services were analyzed. The findings show that each inmate has approximately 7.6 dental codes, including the initial exam, dental services provided, and dental needs not yet addressed. When reviewing only dental needs (and not the initial exam), 32% (5,110) identified dental needs were completed and 66% (10,572) were not.

  15. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulev Assen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  16. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  17. Dental implants in growing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of teeth by implants is usually restricted to patients with completed craniofacial growth. The aim of this literature review is to discuss the use of dental implants in normal growing patients and in patients with ectodermal dysplasia and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. It is recommended that while deciding the optimal individual time point of implant insertion, the status of skeletal growth, the degree of hypodontia, and extension of related psychological stress should be taken into account, in addition to the status of existing dentition and dental compliance of a pediatric patient.

  18. Library service to dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashin, E R

    1983-01-01

    Dental school libraries offer resources of value to dental practitioners, but do not always consider practitioners to be primary clientele. A survey was conducted among the sixty U.S. dental school libraries to examine policies and attitudes toward service to practitioners. Although library use by dentists is estimated to be low, most libraries are willing to serve them as long as it does not reduce the libraries' ability to assist students and faculty. Of the respondents, 57% replied that they do not use promotional methods to inform dentists of available services. Greater involvement in marketing activities may benefit both libraries and dentists. PMID:6652300

  19. Impact of a risk management plan on Legionella contamination of dental unit water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Erica; Dallolio, Laura; Stagni, Francesca; Sanna, Tiziana; D'Alessandro, Giovanni; Piana, Gabriela

    2015-02-23

    The study aimed to assess the prevalence of Legionella spp. in dental unit waterlines of a dental clinic and to verify whether the microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality were correlated with Legionella contamination. A risk management plan was subsequently implemented in the dental health care setting, in order to verify whether the adopted disinfection protocols were effective in preventing Legionella colonization. The water delivered from syringes and turbines of 63 dental units operating in a dental clinic, was monitored for counts of the heterotrophic bacteria P. aeruginosa and Legionella spp. (22 °C and 37 °C). At baseline, output water from dental units continuously treated with disinfection products was more compliant with the recommended standards than untreated and periodically treated water. However, continuous disinfection was still not able to prevent contamination by Legionella and P. aeruginosa. Legionella was isolated from 36.4%, 24.3% and 53.3% of samples from untreated, periodically and continuously treated waterlines, respectively. The standard microbiological parameters used as indicators of water quality proved to be unreliable as predictors of the presence of Legionella, whose source was identified as the tap water used to supply the dental units. The adoption of control measures, including the use of deionized water in supplying the dental unit waterlines and the application of a combined protocol of continuous and periodic disinfection, with different active products for the different devices, resulted in good control of Legionella contamination. The efficacy of the measures adopted was mainly linked to the strict adherence to the planned protocols, which placed particular stress on staff training and ongoing environmental monitoring.

  20. Family stressors as predictors of codependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J A; Warner, R M

    2000-02-01

    Codependency has been defined as an extreme focus on relationships, caused by a stressful family background (J. L. Fischer, L. Spann, & D. W. Crawford, 1991). In this study the authors assessed the relationship of the Spann-Fischer Codependency Scale (J. L. Fischer et al., 1991) and the Potter-Efron Codependency Assessment (L. A. Potter-Efron & P. S. Potter-Efron, 1989) with self-reported chronic family stress and family background. Students (N = 257) completed 2 existing self-report codependency measures and provided family background information. Results indicated that women had higher codependency scores than men on the Spann-Fischer scale. Students with a history of chronic family stress (with an alcoholic, mentally ill, or physically ill parent) had significantly higher codependency scores on both scales. The findings suggest that other types of family stressors, not solely alcoholism, may be predictors of codependency.

  1. Pediatricians’ assessments of caries risk and need for a dental evaluation in preschool aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk-based prioritization of dental referrals during well-child visits might improve dental access for infants and toddlers. This study identifies pediatrician-assessed risk factors for early childhood caries (ECC and their association with the need for a dentist’s evaluation. Methods A priority oral health risk assessment and referral tool (PORRT for children Results In total 1,288 PORRT forms were completed; 6.8% of children were identified as needing a dentist evaluation. Behavioral risk factors were prevalent but not strong predictors of the need for an evaluation. The child’s overall caries risk was the strongest predictor of the need for an evaluation. Cavitated (OR = 17.5; 95% CI = 8.08, 37.97 and non-cavitated (OR = 6.9; 95% CI = 4.47, 10.82 lesions were the strongest predictors when the caries risk scale was excluded from the analysis. Few patients (6.3% were classified as high risk, but their probability of needing an evaluation was only 0.36. Conclusions Low referral rates for children with disease and prior to disease onset but at elevated risk, indicate interventions are needed to help improve the dental referral rates of physicians.

  2. What is the relationship between emotional intelligence and dental student clinical performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoroff, Kristin Zakariasen; Boyatzis, Richard E

    2013-04-01

    Emotional intelligence has emerged as a key factor in differentiating average from outstanding performers in managerial and leadership positions across multiple business settings, but relatively few studies have examined the role of emotional intelligence in the health care professions. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and dental student clinical performance. All third- and fourth-year students at a single U.S. dental school were invited to participate. Participation rate was 74 percent (100/136). Dental students' EI was assessed using the Emotional Competence Inventory-University version (ECI-U), a seventy-two-item, 360-degree questionnaire completed by both self and other raters. The ECI-U measured twenty-two EI competencies grouped into four clusters (Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness, and Relationship Management). Clinical performance was assessed using the mean grade assigned by clinical preceptors. This grade represents an overall assessment of a student's clinical performance including diagnostic and treatment planning skills, time utilization, preparation and organization, fundamental knowledge, technical skills, self-evaluation, professionalism, and patient management. Additional variables were didactic grade point average (GPA) in Years 1 and 2, preclinical GPA in Years 1 and 2, Dental Admission Test academic average and Perceptual Ability Test scores, year of study, age, and gender. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. The Self-Management cluster of competencies (b=0.448, pManagement competencies were emotional self-control, achievement orientation, initiative, trustworthiness, conscientiousness, adaptability, and optimism. In this sample, dental students' EI competencies related to Self-Management were significant predictors of mean clinical grade assigned by preceptors. Emotional intelligence may be an important predictor of clinical performance, which has

  3. Dental responsibility loadings and the relative value of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, D N; Ju, X; Brennan, D S

    2017-09-01

    To estimate responsibility loadings for a comprehensive list of dental services, providing a standardized unit of clinical work effort. Dentists (n = 2500) randomly sampled from the Australian Dental Association membership (2011) were randomly assigned to one of 25 panels. Panels were surveyed by questionnaires eliciting responsibility loadings for eight common dental services (core items) and approximately 12 other items unique to that questionnaire. In total, loadings were elicited for 299 items listed in the Australian Dental Schedule 9th Edition. Data were weighted to reflect the age and sex distribution of the workforce. To assess reliability, regression models assessed differences in core item loadings by panel assignment. Estimated loadings were described by reporting the median and mean. Response rate was 37%. Panel composition did not vary by practitioner characteristics. Core item loadings did not vary by panel assignment. Oral surgery and endodontic service areas had the highest proportion (91%) of services with median loadings ≥1.5, followed by prosthodontics (78%), periodontics (76%), orthodontics (63%), restorative (62%) and diagnostic services (31%). Preventive services had median loadings ≤1.25. Dental responsibility loadings estimated by this study can be applied in the development of relative value scales. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  4. TQM in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, R

    2001-01-01

    Society now expects more from its doctors and dentists, and these increasing demands can be summed up in one relatively new term for the medical profession: "quality management" (QM). Doctors and dentists formerly took the view that their performance could be assessed solely on the basis of their technical skills, ethics and expertise, but are now confronted with a new social imperative, from outside the profession--quality management. The author, prize-winner of the European Quality Award 2000 describes his approach to introduce the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model in his dental practice. He shows that the EFQM model is well suited as a basis for a quality management system in healthcare.

  5. DENTAL FLUOROSIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Imandel

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Some children of Borazjan area have minute white flecks, yellow or brown spot areas scattered irregularly over the tooth surface, the causative factor was attributed to excess of fluoride in water. To verify this matter short chemical examination of water samples from endemic area was carried out. The results of water analysis by colorimetric method, using zirconium a1izarin reagent after distillation the samples, showed that the average mount of fluoride of Borazjan and the mixture of treated. Water of Boshigan River with water piped of Borazjan wells were 4 and 2 times respectively more than recommended control limits for fluoride and confirmed that this was the causative agent of mottled, teeth (Dental Fluorosis.

  6. Biofilm and Dental Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Øilo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All treatment involving the use of biomaterials in the body can affect the host in positive or negative ways. The microbiological environment in the oral cavity is affected by the composition and shape of the biomaterials used for oral restorations. This may impair the patients’ oral health and sometimes their general health as well. Many factors determine the composition of the microbiota and the formation of biofilm in relation to biomaterials such as, surface roughness, surface energy and chemical composition, This paper aims to give an overview of the scientific literature regarding the association between the chemical, mechanical and physical properties of dental biomaterials and oral biofilm formation, with emphasis on current research and future perspectives.

  7. Management of periodontal destruction caused by overhanging dental restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misnova Misnova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal tissue inflammations are occasionally caused by positions of restoration margins, particularly if they are placed subgingivally. A 44-year old male was referred to the Dental and Mouth Hospital of Dentistry Faculty Hasanuddin University with the chief complaint of severe pain at right posterior maxillary. Clinical examinations demonstrate a 7-mm periodontal pocket at buccal aspect of 16 teeth with tooth mobility °2. Overhanging dental composite restorations of Class V were detected at the subgingival areas of 15, 16, and 17. Radiographic results show vertically and horizontally alveolar bone loss. This case report is aimed to describe the management of periodontal tissue destruction as a result of overhanging dental composite restorations. Scaling and root planing were conducted as the initial therapy. The periodontal surgery was performed a week after the initial therapy. A full-thickness flap design with sulcular incision from 14 to 18 was made before the pocket curretage and necrotic tissue debridement along with restoration recontouring. The flap was sutured with simple suture technique. Periodontal dressing was packed for a week. Antibiotics, analgetics and antiinflammatory drugs were prescribed per orally. There was no history of pain a week after the surgical procedure. Tooth mobility was decreased to °1 and the periodontal pocket was reduced to 3 mm. Overhanging dental restorations may lead to periodontal tissue destruction. The subgingivally placement of those restorations should consider the health of periodontal tissues.

  8. Multiple dental anomalies and aggressive periodontitis: a coincidence or an association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, A R; Patel, Swati Pradeep

    2009-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) comprises a group of rare, often severe, rapidly progressive forms of periodontitis mostly characterized by an early age of clinical manifestation and a distinctive tendency for cases to aggregate in families. Abnormal dental morphology and position have been associated with severe periodontal diseases. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of multiple dental anomalies associated with AgP. This paper reports a case of unusual association of multiple dental anomalies to AgP. Clinical findings and history led to the diagnosis of localized AgP, and radiologically. It was associated with multiple dental anomalies, especially supernumerary roots. Thus, the present case represents a very interesting demonstration of AgP association with supernumerary roots and the nature of this association merits further investigations.

  9. Multiple dental anomalies and aggressive periodontitis: A coincidence or an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive periodontitis (AgP comprises a group of rare, often severe, rapidly progressive forms of periodontitis mostly characterized by an early age of clinical manifestation and a distinctive tendency for cases to aggregate in families. Abnormal dental morphology and position have been associated with severe periodontal diseases. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of multiple dental anomalies associated with AgP. This paper reports a case of unusual association of multiple dental anomalies to AgP. Clinical findings and history led to the diagnosis of localized AgP, and radiologically. It was associated with multiple dental anomalies, especially supernumerary roots. Thus, the present case represents a very interesting demonstration of AgP association with supernumerary roots and the nature of this association merits further investigations.

  10. Oral findings and dental treatment in a child with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Rômulo Rocha; Rocha, Cristiane Tomaz; Torres, Carolina Paes; Queiroz, Ivna Fernandes; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2009-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is a rare, severe form of epilepsy that typically manifests early in infancy. It is considered a malignant condition that combines episodes of spasms that occur in clusters (infantile spasm), hypsarrhythmia on the electroencephalogram, and neuropsychomotor delay. Although WS has been widely investigated from a medical standpoint, few reports have focused on the oral findings in patients with this syndrome. This article reports the case history of a 7-year-old child diagnosed with WS. The major clinical features were generalized tooth wear and gingival enlargement, altered chronology and sequence of dental eruption, primary canine cusp-to-cusp relationship, ectopic dental eruption, and mildly arched palate. Multiple white spot lesions were also observed, possibly associated with poor oral hygiene, due to a fermentable carbohydrate-rich diet, and continuous use of sugar-containing medications. Dental care management of patients with special needs is discussed and the dental treatment for this child with WS is described.

  11. Lip Lifting: Unveiling Dental Beauty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Kyle; Caligiuri, Matthew; Schlichting, Luís Henrique; Bazos, Panaghiotis K; Magne, Michel

    2017-01-01

    The focus for the achievement of complete success in the esthetic zone has traditionally been on addressing deficiencies of intraoral hard and soft tissue. Often, these deficiencies are accompanied by esthetic concerns regarding the lips that are routinely neglected by the dental team. A predictable plastic surgery technique - the lip lift - has been used for decades to enhance lip esthetics by shortening the senile upper lip to achieve a more youthful appearance. Over the years, this technique has been refined and used in many different ways, allowing its routine incorporation into full facial esthetic planning. Through restoration of the upper lip to its optimal position, the artistry of the dentist and dental technician can truly be appreciated in the rejuvenated smile. By the introduction of this minimally invasive surgical technique to the dental community, patients stand to benefit from a comprehensive orofacial approach to anterior dental esthetic planning.

  12. Clinical Medicine for Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Norman S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A program providing instruction in medical topics throughout the dental curriculum at Tufts University is described, and the results of a survey indicating alumni satisfaction with training in physical evaluation techniques and ability to detect medical problems are discussed. (MSE)

  13. Doctor, Clinic, and Dental Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral Suppression Doctor, Clinical & Dental Visits Treatment Adherence Mental Health Substance Abuse Issues Sexual Health Nutrition & Food Safety Exercise Immunizations Aging with HIV/AIDS Women’s Health Housing ...

  14. The Phenomenon of Dental Fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    Odontophobia is a rather unique phobia with special psychosomatic components that impact on the dental health of odontophobic persons. It also has psychosocial components largely as a result of destruction of the teeth and subsequent embarrassment that can affect a person and cause a vicious cycle...... of dental fear (see fig. 1). The phenomenon is facilitated by misunderstandings and myths generated by both patients and dentists (see table 1 for examples). The most common reasons given in the literature for such strong fears of dental treatment are: 1) bad experiences in childhood for 85% of cases, 2......) feeling of powerlessness and lack of control over personal emotional reactions and over the social situation in the dental chair, 3) social learning processes in which the image of the dentist is cast in a negative light by the mass media or by the person's relatives or friends and 4) that the person has...

  15. Dental Services Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) has a data highlight based on the 2012 Cost and Use Research Files. This work highlights dental information collected...

  16. Musculoskeletal dysfunction in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakim A. Larbi and Dmitry Ye. Suyetenkov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights the comparative statistics of musculoskeletal system deseases depending on a type of dental method. The practical recommendations on prevention of diseases of joints, ligaments and spine were done.

  17. Dental insurance! Are we ready?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi SS Toor

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI bill which was put forward in the winter session of the Lok Sabha (2008 focused on increasing the foreign investment share from the existing 26% to 49% in the insurance companies of India. This will allow the multibillion dollar international insurance companies to enter the Indian market and subsequently cover all aspects of insurance in India. Dental insurance will be an integral a part of this system. Dental insurance is a new concept in Southeast Asia as very few countries in Southeast Asia cover this aspect of insurance. It is important that the dentists in India should be acquainted with the different types of plans these companies are going to offer and about a new relationship which is going to emerge in the coming years between dentist, patient and the insurance company.

  18. Musculoskeletal dysfunction in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyetenkov D.Ye.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Shows the comparative statistics of diseases of musculoskeletal system, depending on the type of dental reception. Recommendations on prevention of diseases of joints, ligaments and spine

  19. Clinical Medicine for Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Norman S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A program providing instruction in medical topics throughout the dental curriculum at Tufts University is described, and the results of a survey indicating alumni satisfaction with training in physical evaluation techniques and ability to detect medical problems are discussed. (MSE)

  20. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed.

  1. Electronic Dental Records System Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovicz-Finkelsztain, Renata; Barsottini, Claudia G N; Marin, Heimar Fatima

    2015-01-01

    The use of Electronic Dental Records (EDRs) and management software has become more frequent, following the increase in prevelance of new technologies and computers in dental offices. The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate the use of EDRs by the dental community in the São Paulo city area. A quantitative case study was performed using a survey on the phone. A total of 54 offices were contacted and only one declinedparticipation in this study. Only one office did not have a computer. EDRs were used in 28 offices and only four were paperless. The lack of studies in this area suggests the need for more usability and implementation studies on EDRs so that we can improve EDR adoption by the dental community.

  2. Dental insurance! Are we ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Ravi S S; Jindal, R

    2011-01-01

    Dental insurance is insurance designed to pay the costs associated with dental care. The Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) bill which was put forward in the winter session of the Lok Sabha (2008) focused on increasing the foreign investment share from the existing 26% to 49% in the insurance companies of India. This will allow the multibillion dollar international insurance companies to enter the Indian market and subsequently cover all aspects of insurance in India. Dental insurance will be an integral a part of this system. Dental insurance is a new concept in Southeast Asia as very few countries in Southeast Asia cover this aspect of insurance. It is important that the dentists in India should be acquainted with the different types of plans these companies are going to offer and about a new relationship which is going to emerge in the coming years between dentist, patient and the insurance company.

  3. The 'simple' general dental anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient who receives dental treatment under general anaesthesia is usually a child, one with special ... under various anaesthetic techniques and .... preoperatively in the presence of a parent or .... helpful in counteracting the stress caused.

  4. Predictors of neurobehavioral symptoms in a university population: a multivariate approach using a postconcussive symptom questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettenhofer, Mark L; Reinhardt, Lindsay E; Barry, David M

    2013-10-01

    Several factors have been linked to severity of postconcussive-type (neurobehavioral) symptoms. In this study, predictors of neurobehavioral symptoms were examined using multivariate methods to determine the relative importance of each. Data regarding demographics, symptoms, current alcohol use, history of traumatic brain injury (TBI), orthopedic injuries, and psychiatric/developmental diagnoses were collected via questionnaire from 3027 university students. The most prominent predictors of symptoms were gender, history of depression or anxiety, history of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or learning disability diagnosis, and frequency of alcohol use. Prior mild TBI was significantly related to overall symptoms, but this effect was small in comparison to other predictors. These results provide further evidence that neurobehavioral symptoms are multi-determined phenomena, and highlight the importance of psychiatric comorbidity, demographic factors, and health behaviors to neurobehavioral symptom presentation after mild TBI.

  5. Rheological characterization of dental waxes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kehao

    2004-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rheological behaviour of new experimental dental waxes in dependent on temperature. Material and method Seven experimental dental waxes, provided by Dentaurum GmbH, were tested. No.018 was chosen as a control. Rheological experiments were performed at different temperatures using a Paar Physica Rheometer UDS200 equiped with a parallel plate cell. The temperature was regulated with a Peltier system (TEK130P) and a thermostat un...

  6. Dental aid in the Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylands, V

    1992-03-07

    From January to July of 1991, I worked on a dental project in Dharamsala, Northern India whose aim was to leave the Tibetan community there dentally self-sufficient. Since 1959, following the Chinese invasion of Tibet, India and Nepal have become home to thousands of Tibetan refugees. Dharamsala is home to His Holiness the Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader of Tibet, and also of the largest Tibetan refugee communities (approximately 15,000).

  7. [Visual activity in dental treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, M; Osorio, R

    1990-10-01

    We've done an analitical study in 60 dental clinics about their illuminating systems in clinical and no clinical areas. We propose ideal values for light intensity in oral and ambiental illumination in clinical areas. Following these instructions you'll get: An increasing in productivity and rentability due to a bigger comfort in your working areas. To decrease the visual fatigue for you and your dental assistants.

  8. Dental Continuing Education Preference Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    the 63A9Ds and 34.9% for the 63A00s, selected Comprehensive Dentistry as their specialty preference. For the 63A9Ds, orthodontics , periodontics, and...prosthodontics were the next most frequently selected specialties. For the 63A00s, it was orthodontics , prosthodontics, and endodontics. Nearly 10% of...education. International Dental Journal , 28(2): 149-153, 1978. 7. Haroth, R.W. & Halpern, D.F. Maryland Continuing Dental Education Survey: "Your

  9. Is dental practice science based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, C W

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores the thesis that the changing medical needs of dental patients, advances in biomedical research, and the confluence of the financing of medical and dental care will result in closer linkages between the medical and dental care delivery systems during the next century. Five trends have been documented in support of this thesis: the increasing number of elderly and their retention of teeth means there is a greater need for restorative dental care than in previous generations; the elderly have chronic diseases and are taking more medications; younger patients are presenting more frequently with infectious, systemic diseases such as HIV/AIDS. New scientific discoveries are opening new possibilities for patient care, which generate even higher expectations on the part of future consumers of medical and dental services. The health and fitness trend is not a fad; new knowledge regarding diet, nutrition, and exercise is identifying systemic risk factors related to common oral pathologies. Medical and dental educators are paying increased attention to the application of basic sciences to patient care. HMOs are increasing their market share of medical care delivery and expanding their services with preventive care and total patient care, including dental services. Data are provided documenting that dentists see these trends occurring in their private practices. The paper concludes that the application of advances in science and technology to oral health will improve the quality of dentistry. However, only new, effective preventive agents will decrease the cost of care, while improved diagnostics and restorative technologies could increase dental care costs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. [Functional dental anatomy and amalgam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernier, B; Colon, P

    1989-01-01

    Very often, the functional dental anatomy are reflected during the rehabilitation of posterior quadrants. However, the placement, the shaping in correct relation of the different dental components are indispensable conditions to respect, in order to achieve an adequate integration of the restoration within the neuro-muscular system. A clinical protocol is proposed in order to reconcile the anatomical and biological prerequisite and the setting time of modern alloys.

  11. Factors affecting dental service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Ravangard, Ramin; Baldacchino, Donia

    2015-01-01

    Measuring dental clinic service quality is the first and most important factor in improving care. The quality provided plays an important role in patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to identify factors affecting dental service quality from the patients' viewpoint. This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study was conducted in a dental clinic in Tehran between January and June 2014. A sample of 385 patients was selected from two work shifts using stratified sampling proportional to size and simple random sampling methods. The data were collected, a self-administered questionnaire designed for the purpose of the study, based on the Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model of service quality which consisted of two parts: the patients' demographic characteristics and a 30-item questionnaire to measure the five dimensions of the service quality. The collected data were analysed using SPSS 21.0 and Amos 18.0 through some descriptive statistics such as mean, standard deviation, as well as analytical methods, including confirmatory factor. Results showed that the correlation coefficients for all dimensions were higher than 0.5. In this model, assurance (regression weight=0.99) and tangibility (regression weight=0.86) had, respectively, the highest and lowest effects on dental service quality. The Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model is suitable to measure quality in dental services. The variables related to dental services quality have been made according to the model. This is a pioneering study that uses Parasuraman and Zeithaml's model and CFA in a dental setting. This study provides useful insights and guidance for dental service quality assurance.

  12. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Graduate Students' and Faculty Perspectives on Dental Hygienists' Professional Role and the Potential Contribution of a Peer Teaching Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Martha J; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    The changing role of dental hygienists deserves dental and dental hygiene educators' attention. The first aim of this survey study was to assess University of Michigan dental, dental hygiene, and graduate students' and faculty members' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles; their attitudes and behaviors related to clinical interactions between dental and dental hygiene students; and perceived benefits of engaging dental hygiene students as peer teachers for dental students. The second aim was to assess whether one group of dental students' experiences with dental hygiene student peer teaching affected their perceptions of the dental hygiene profession. Survey respondents were 57 dental hygiene students in all three years of the program (response rate 60% to 100%); 476 dental students in all four years (response rate 56% to 100%); 28 dental and dental hygiene graduate students (response rate 28%); and 67 dental and dental hygiene faculty members (response rate 56%). Compared to the other groups, dental students reported the lowest average number of services dental hygienists can provide (p≤0.001) and the lowest average number of patient groups for which dental hygienists can provide periodontal care (phygiene and dental students (phygiene student peer teaching (phygiene student peer teaching, the dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles, attitudes about clinical interactions with dental hygienists, and perceived benefits of dental hygiene student peer teachers improved and were more positive than the responses of their peers with no peer teaching experiences. These results suggest that dental hygiene student peer teaching may improve dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles and attitudes about intraprofessional care.

  13. Dental Attitudes, Perceptions, and Treatment Needs in a University Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Leonard A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Dental attitudes of college students were examined: frequency of past visits; subceptibility to dental conditions; seriousness, preventability, and treatability of dental conditions; and satisfaction with dentists, practices, and other dental conditions. (Authors/CJ)

  14. Public History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gouveia de Oliveira Rovai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como proposta apresentar o conceito e as práticas de História Pública como um novo posicionamento da ciência histórica em diálogo com profissionais da comunicação, no sentido de produzir e divulgar as experiências humanas. Para isso, discute-se a origem do conceito de História Pública e as diferentes formas de educação histórica que a utilização das novas tecnologias podem proporcionar (dentre elas a internet. Nesse sentido, convida-se o leitor para a reflexão sobre as possibilidades de publicização e de democratização do conhecimento histórico e da cultura, ampliando-se a oportunidade de produção, de divulgação e de acesso do público a diferentes formas experiências no tempo. O artigo também intenciona chamar atenção dos profissionais que lidam com a História e com a Comunicação para os perigos de produções exclusivamente submetidas ao mercado que transformam a popularização da História no reforço de estigmas culturais.   PALAVRAS-CHAVE: História Pública; Educação histórica e Comunicação; democratização e estigmatização.     ABSTRACT This article aims to present the concept and practices of Public History as a new positioning of historical science in dialogue with communication professionals, in the sense of producing and disseminating human experiences. For this, the origin of the concept of Public History and the different forms of historical education that the use of the new technologies can provide (among them the Internet is discussed. In this sense, the reader is invited to reflect on the possibilities of publicizing and democratizing historical knowledge and culture, expanding the opportunity for production, dissemination and public access to different forms of experience in time. The article also intends to draw attention from professionals dealing with History and Communication to the dangers of exclusively commercialized productions that transform the popularization

  15. Patients' attitudes about rapid oral HIV screening in an urban, free dental clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Craig Allan; Ablah, Elizabeth; Reznik, David; Robbins, Darcy K

    2008-03-01

    The 2006 Centers for Disease Control recommendations for routine HIV screening in all health care settings could include dental clinics an important testing venue. However, little is known about patients' attitudes regarding the routine use of rapid oral HIV screening at an urban free dental clinic. This pilot study seeks to evaluate the patient perspective on rapid HIV screening in this setting. In June 2007, patients at a free dental clinic in Kansas City, Missouri, were provided an attitude assessment survey prior to their dental visit. This dental clinic serves a diverse patient population consisting of approximately 37% white, 47% black, 6% Hispanic, 4% Asian, and 1% Native American uninsured patients. Results were analyzed for acceptance of testing and potential barriers. Of the 150 respondents, 73% reported they would be willing to take a free rapid HIV screening test during their dental visit. Overall, 91% of Hispanics, 79% of Caucasians, and 73% of African American patients reported they would be willing to be screened. Patients with a history of multiple prior screening tests for HIV were more likely to agree to oral rapid HIV screening in the dental clinic. The majority (62%) reported that it did not matter who provided them with the screening result, although some (37%) preferred their dentist above any other provider. Low self-perception of risk (37%) and having already received screening elsewhere (24%) were the main reasons for not accepting a free, rapid HIV screening. Overall, dental clinic patients widely accepted the offer of rapid oral HIV screening. Rapid HIV screening in the dental clinic setting is a viable option to increase the number of individuals who know their HIV status.

  16. Association between Childhood Dental Experiences and Dental Fear among Dental, Psychology and Mathematics Undergraduates in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júnia M. Serra-Negra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between childhood dental experiences and dental fear in adulthood among dentistry, psychology and mathematics undergraduate students. A cross-sectional study of 1,256 students from the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, was performed. Students responded to the Brazilian version of the Dental Fear Survey (DFS and a questionnaire regarding previous dental experiences. Both the DFS and the questionnaire were self-administered. Association was tested using descriptive, bivariate and multivariate linear regression analysis, with a 5% significance level. Dentistry undergraduates reported lower scores than psychology (p < 0.001 and mathematics undergraduates (p < 0.05 for all three dimensions of the DFS. Negative dental experiences in childhood was associated with dimensions of Avoidance (B = 2.70, p < 0.001, Physiological arousal (B = 1.42, p < 0.001 and Fears of specific stimuli/situations (B = 3.44, p < 0.001. The reason for first visit to dentist was associated with dimensions of Physiological arousal (B = 0.76, p < 0.01 and Fears of specific stimuli/situations (B = 1.29, p < 0.01. Dentists should be encouraged to evaluate the dental fear of their patients before treatment. The DFS has been found to be an effective instrument for this purpose.

  17. The Future of History and History Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commager, Henry Steele

    1983-01-01

    Technical history, a quantitative record of history strengthened by new techniques in mathematics, computer science, and other fields has advantages over former approaches to history--history as philosophy and historical theology. For example, it makes available more source materials. However, it has drawbacks, e.g., it directs research to highly…

  18. The Future of History and History Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commager, Henry Steele

    1983-01-01

    Technical history, a quantitative record of history strengthened by new techniques in mathematics, computer science, and other fields has advantages over former approaches to history--history as philosophy and historical theology. For example, it makes available more source materials. However, it has drawbacks, e.g., it directs research to highly…

  19. The Symposium on Second Generation Clinical Databases and the Electronic Dental Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, John

    1991-01-01

    The article reports on initial efforts of a consortium of 19 dental schools to cooperate in developing clinical databases and associated hardware and software. The article lists initial members, committee members, and follow-up activities, working toward development of databases on patient history, oral status, diagnosis, treatment evaluation,…

  20. Minimal intervention dentistry for managing dental caries - a review: report of a FDI task group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frencken, J.E.; Peters, M.C.; Manton, D.J.; Leal, S.C.; Gordan, V.V.; Eden, E.

    2012-01-01

    This publication describes the history of minimal intervention dentistry (MID) for managing dental caries and presents evidence for various carious lesion detection devices, for preventive measures, for restorative and non-restorative therapies as well as for repairing rather than replacing defectiv