WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental faculty perceptions

  1. Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment and Job Satisfaction at a Southeastern University, College of Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the American Dental Education Association 2007 Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment survey at A Southeastern University, College of Dentistry. The study examined dental faculty perceptions of academic workplace variables including culture and environment, as well as professional development…

  2. Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment and Job Satisfaction at a Southeastern University, College of Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate the American Dental Education Association 2007 Dental Faculty Perceptions of Workplace Environment survey at A Southeastern University, College of Dentistry. The study examined dental faculty perceptions of academic workplace variables including culture and environment, as well as professional development…

  3. Faculty and student perceptions of academic integrity at U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Kenneth G; Smith, Linda A; Henzi, David; Demps, Elaine

    2007-08-01

    The issues of cheating and plagiarism in educational settings have received a large amount of attention in recent years. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which academic integrity issues currently exist in the dental schools throughout the United States and Canada. An online survey was developed to gather data pertaining to this topic from two key groups in dental education: faculty and students. Responses were obtained from 1,153 students and 423 faculty members. The results of the survey clearly reveal that cheating is a significant problem in dental schools and that significant differences exist between students' and faculty members' perceptions of academic integrity. The challenge for dental schools is to identify effective strategies to prevent cheating opportunities and to implement and enforce effective means of dealing with specific examples of cheating.

  4. Perceptions and practices of dental school faculty regarding evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Teresa A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Qian, Fang; Finkelstein, Michael W

    2013-02-01

    Successful integration of critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) concepts throughout didactic and clinical dental curricula require faculty support. Critical thinking and EBD definitions and practice continue to evolve, and not all dental faculty members were exposed to such concepts during their education. The objective of this study was to understand faculty members' perspectives on both critical thinking and EBD. An online survey was designed to assess full- and part-time faculty members' understanding, practice and teaching of critical thinking and EBD, interest in and perceived significance of EBD, and perceived barriers to teaching critical thinking and EBD at one U.S. dental school. Forty-three faculty members completed the survey for a 41 percent response rate. Most respondents (46 percent) defined critical thinking as the use of evidence or the scientific method in decision making and EBD as clinical practice based on "science only" (39 percent) or "quality science only" (34 percent). Based on their individual definitions, over 75 percent of the respondents reported incorporating critical thinking into didactic and clinical teaching; 79 percent and 47 percent, respectively, reported incorporating EBD into their didactic and clinical teaching. While these faculty members confirmed the importance of teaching students EBD, they identified barriers to teaching as time, knowledge, and resources. These results, which reflect one school's efforts to understand faculty perceptions and practices of EBD, suggest that faculty training and resource support are necessary for successful curricular integration of critical thinking and EBD.

  5. Dental Hygiene Program Directors' Perceptions of Graduate Dental Hygiene Education and Future Faculty Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Rebecca S.; Mann, Ginger; Tishk, Maxine

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 161 dental-hygiene-program directors investigated perceived future needs for faculty, preferences for type of faculty degree for selection and promotion, the extent to which master's programs are meeting those needs in both numbers and skills, and how the programs can better prepare graduates for the millennium. (MSE)

  6. Perception of Uncivil Classroom Behavior Among the Faculty Members and the Students in an Indian Dental Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantala Satyanrayana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Students and faculty members in the health professions classroom are expected to exhibit professional behaviors that are conducive to maintaining a positive learning environment. Aim: To assess the perception of uncivil classroom behavior among the students and the faculty members in a private dental institute in Hyderabad city, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among the dental students and the faculty members. The mean perceptions of uncivil classroom behavior were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire of Rowland and Srisukho containing 18 items. Results: A statistically significant difference was noted between the students and the faculty members for mean perception of uncivil classroom behavior (P = 0.002. When based on gender, no significant difference was observed among the students and the staff, but when individual items were considered, most of the male students and the faculty members perceived uncivil behaviors. Among all students, the mean perception of uncivil classroom behavior was significantly high among the undergraduates (68.17 ± 14.5 and least in postgraduates (62.67 ± 22.7, and among the faculty members, it was more among the professors (82.63 ± 4.0. Conclusion: Overall, the issue of uncivil classroom behavior remains a major concern, because 88.6% of the students agreed that they were involved in uncivil classroom behavior previously.

  7. U.S. dental hygiene faculty perceptions of learner outcomes in distance education courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corum, Kathrine A; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Johnson, Kerry; Strait, Tia M

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine perceptions of full-time, entry-level dental hygiene educators regarding the ability to achieve interaction in their distance education courses and the impact of interaction on learning outcomes. The specific interactions explored were student-instructor, student-content, and student-student. A survey was developed, pilot tested, revised, and mailed to 287 educators across the United States, generating an overall response rate of 22.3 percent. The majority of respondents perceived interaction to be achievable in their distance courses, to increase through technology, and to positively influence learning outcomes. Nearly 90 percent reported student-instructor interaction as achievable, 95.3 percent reported student-content interaction as achievable, and 79.7 percent reported student-student interaction as achievable. Learning outcomes were defined in this study as the student's achievement of course objectives and competencies at course completion. Approximately 81 percent of the respondents reported a positive influence from student-instructor interaction, 79.7 percent from student-content interaction, and 70.3 percent from student-student interaction. This study also examined which modalities were perceived as being most influential in achieving interaction. The results demonstrated a prevalence of discussion board posting in an environment in which numerous Web 2.0 tools are available and respondents were not as positive about their ability to achieve student-student interaction in the distance learning environment. The authors conclude that faculty development is critical in achieving quality outcomes in dental hygiene distance education courses.

  8. Perceptions of Canadian dental faculty and students about appropriate penalties for academic dishonesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplitsky, Paul E

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to a) compare the opinions of Canadian faculty and students as regards to what they felt was an appropriate penalty for particular academic offenses and b) to analyze the results and create a jurisprudence grid to serve as a guideline for appropriate disciplinary action. Two hundred questionnaires were distributed to the ten dental colleges in Canada. Each college was asked to have ten faculty and ten students complete the survey. A response rate of 100 percent was achieved for students and 92 percent for faculty. The questionnaire required respondents to select what they felt were appropriate penalties for a list of fifteen academic offenses and to render judgment on three specific cases. Statistical analysis of survey responses led to the following conclusions: 1) students gave equal or more lenient penalties than faculty for the same offense; 2) extenuating circumstances introduced via case presentations altered penalty choice only slightly; and 3) offenses could be grouped to correspond with appropriate penalties, thereby establishing a jurisprudence grid that may serve as a guideline for adjudication committees.

  9. Development of ethical practices and social responsibility in dental education at the university of Chile: student and faculty perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcota, M; Ruiz de Gauna, P; González, F E

    2013-02-01

    The authors argue that dental curricula in Latin America are noted for providing highly technical and individualistic training that may fail to address society's problems or instil in the dentist the idea that he/she has a social responsibility to contribute to his/her community. This study's main objectives were to determine whether the curriculum and the faculty teaching practices of the School of Dentistry at the University of Chile contribute to its students' commitment to ethical and social responsibility. This was a qualitative study that investigated the perceptions of sixteen subjects (eight students and eight faculty members). Data were collected in thorough deep interviews. The interview process model conceptualised and organised the information into sets of dimensions and categories. The dimensions studied were ethical commitment and social responsibility. The categories assessed within ethical commitment were honesty, tolerance, responsibility and respect. In the social responsibility dimension, the categories were solidarity, teamwork and concern for and communication with the patient. Analysis of the textual data was performed using a method of content analysis based upon constructed qualitative matrices. Our results show that students and scholars alike realise that ethical commitment and a sense of social responsibility are not promoted in the curriculum. They do, however, recognise the importance of these qualities in dental practitioners. These results indicate that the current curriculum and teaching practices used in our School of Dentistry need to be reviewed and that programmes promoting professionals' commitment to their role in society need to be implemented. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Dental school deans' perceptions of the organizational culture and impact of the ELAM program on the culture and advancement of women faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, Sharon A; McLaughlin, Jean M; Gleason, Katharine A; Dolan, Teresa A; McDade, Sharon A; Richman, Rosalyn C; Morahan, Page S

    2009-06-01

    In 2006, deans of the sixty-four U.S. and Canadian dental schools were surveyed to gain their perspectives on their institutions' organizational culture for faculty, family-friendly policies, processes used by deans to develop faculty leadership, and the impact of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women. The deans reported (52 percent response rate) an improved climate in terms of gender equity, yet recognized that inequities still exist. Of fifteen family-friendly policies, only three were available at more than 50 percent of the schools, with little indication that additional policies were under consideration. The deans reported active engagement in behaviors to develop the leadership of their faculty members. Of the nine processes, 50 percent of the deans indicated three they believed to be particularly effective with women. They agreed that ELAM has had a positive impact on their alumnae and their schools. Results are discussed in terms of how the deans' perceptions compare to faculty perceptions and within the larger context of higher education and other organizations. The responsibility of the dean to shape the dental school's culture, particularly in the face of the changing demographics of dental faculty, adds to the importance of the unique perspective provided by the deans.

  11. Evaluation of student and faculty perceptions of the PBL curriculum at two dental schools from a student perspective: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, N; Sedghizadeh, P P; Shuler, C F; Ferati, D; Christersson, C

    2007-02-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) research has primarily highlighted issues related to medical education and less evaluation has been reported from the field of dental education. Furthermore, literature reports tend to focus mainly on PBL from a pedagogic and curriculum constructional view and up to this date, studies from a student perspective are lacking. The aim of this study was to approach the evaluation of student and staff perceptions of PBL curricula from a student perspective at two separate schools: the Faculty of Odontology at the University of Malmö, Sweden and the dental school of the University of Southern California, School of Dentistry (USCSD), Los Angeles, CA, USA. The study was initiated and conducted by two of the authors, at the time senior students at the Faculty of Odontology in Malmö, Sweden. The study was comprised of a literature search, a 2 week field trip to USCSD, USA, survey distribution to students and faculty in both schools, analysis of the data and a written report for oral defence. The results from the survey were intended to provide feedback on student and faculty perceptions regarding the PBL curriculum. The results indicate a general student and faculty satisfaction with the PBL curriculum. Perhaps, surprisingly their perceptions did not differ significantly despite differences in geography, culture and implementation of PBL pedagogy.

  12. Faculty Perceptions of Basic Skills Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michelle Moreau

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of faculty regarding why they choose to attend basic skills faculty development; what they choose to implement in their classrooms; and how they determine the effectiveness of the strategies selected. A survey was completed by 173 full and part-time faculty from a large, suburban single-campus community…

  13. University Faculty Gender Roles Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Sue; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed 400 college faculty men and women to determine gender role preferences and perceptions. Perceptions of the ideal woman, ideal man, most women, most men, and self were measured. Results from the Sex Role Trait Inventory show that both men and women faculty preferences and perceptions were generally very similar. Implications are discussed.…

  14. Mandatory Clinical Practice for Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Dental and dental hygiene faculty should maintain their clinical skills through regular practice, to improve their ability to relate to students through instruction, provide an additional source of income, and improve their image in the community. Institutional policies fostering and regulating faculty practice plans are suggested. (Author/MSE)

  15. Dental, Dental Hygiene, and Graduate Students' and Faculty Perspectives on Dental Hygienists' Professional Role and the Potential Contribution of a Peer Teaching Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Martha J; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    The changing role of dental hygienists deserves dental and dental hygiene educators' attention. The first aim of this survey study was to assess University of Michigan dental, dental hygiene, and graduate students' and faculty members' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles; their attitudes and behaviors related to clinical interactions between dental and dental hygiene students; and perceived benefits of engaging dental hygiene students as peer teachers for dental students. The second aim was to assess whether one group of dental students' experiences with dental hygiene student peer teaching affected their perceptions of the dental hygiene profession. Survey respondents were 57 dental hygiene students in all three years of the program (response rate 60% to 100%); 476 dental students in all four years (response rate 56% to 100%); 28 dental and dental hygiene graduate students (response rate 28%); and 67 dental and dental hygiene faculty members (response rate 56%). Compared to the other groups, dental students reported the lowest average number of services dental hygienists can provide (p≤0.001) and the lowest average number of patient groups for which dental hygienists can provide periodontal care (phygiene and dental students (phygiene student peer teaching (phygiene student peer teaching, the dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles, attitudes about clinical interactions with dental hygienists, and perceived benefits of dental hygiene student peer teachers improved and were more positive than the responses of their peers with no peer teaching experiences. These results suggest that dental hygiene student peer teaching may improve dental students' perceptions of dental hygienists' roles and attitudes about intraprofessional care.

  16. A national study on the attitudes of Irish dental faculty members to faculty development.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E M

    2010-02-01

    International studies suggest that dental faculty are resistant to the concept and practice of faculty development. This paper analyses the demographic and educational profile of Irish Dental Faculty, exploring their attitudes to educational initiatives.

  17. Student Evaluations of Teaching: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Andrew C; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore dental and dental hygiene students' and faculty members' perceptions of student evaluations of teaching (SET) and determine whether dental vs. dental hygiene student, beginning vs. advanced student, and faculty vs. student responses differed. Perceived benefits, challenges, and suggestions for conducting SETs optimally were also assessed. Survey data were collected from 329 dental students (D1: 108; D2: 91; D3&4: 130) and 68 dental hygiene students (DH2: 26; DH3: 19; DH4: 23) (overall response rates 76%/92%) and 56 dental and eight dental hygiene faculty members (response rates 41%/100%). Faculty respondents were more positive about SETs than students (five-point scale with 1=disagree: 3.85 vs. 3.39; pstudents should complete SETs (3.87 vs. 3.61; p=0.068), with faculty agreeing more strongly than students that all courses should be evaluated (4.32/4.04; p=0.046). Students agreed more strongly than faculty that SETs should occur during regular class time (3.97/3.44; pstudents (4.03/3.57; p=0.002). Open-ended responses showed that students perceived more benefits of SETs for faculty members than for students and that the most frequently mentioned problem was that SETs do not result in changes. Faculty members were generally more positive than students (especially seniors) about SETs. These findings suggest that, according to these respondents, SETs should be completed by all students for all courses, be short, provide opportunities for open-ended comments, and be administered in class to improve response rate. In addition, SET results and how SETs are used to improve courses should be shared with students.

  18. Faculty Perceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarapata, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  19. Faculty Perceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarapata, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  20. Perceptions of Faculty Status among Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Quinn; Garrison, Melissa; Hales, Whitney

    2016-01-01

    This study measures the opinions of ARL librarians concerning the benefits and disadvantages of faculty status in academic librarianship. Average responses from faculty and nonfaculty librarians, as well as from tenured and tenure-track librarians, are analyzed to determine the general perceptions of each group. Overall, faculty librarians…

  1. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more.

  2. Nursing Faculty Perceptions on Teaching Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Doris A.

    2010-01-01

    The perceptions of nursing faculty teaching critical thinking (CT) affective attributes and cognitive skills are described in this quantitative, descriptive study. The study sample consisted of nurse educators from the National League of Nursing database. The purpose of the study was to gain nursing faculty perception of which teaching strategies…

  3. Perception of Dental Professionals towards Biostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Manu; Gupta, Mudit; Dany, Subha Soumya; Rajput, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Biostatistics is becoming an integral part of dental sciences. Awareness regarding the subject is not thoroughly assessed in the field of dentistry. So the study was conducted to assess dental professionals' knowledge, attitude, and perception toward biostatistics at an academic dental institution. An anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among all the faculty and postgraduate students of two dental colleges in Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh. The responses were assessed on 5-point likert scale. The survey response rate was 73.71%. Two-thirds of respondents believed biostatistics to be a difficult subject and at the same time half of them did not consider it to be more difficult than other subjects in dentistry. Females were less competent than males in applying biostatistical skills which was found to be statistically significant. Results suggested that dentists with research or academics as an adjunct to their clinical practice had better command over the subject. The current study shows that there is lack of command over the subject of biostatistics among dental professionals although they were aware of its importance in dentistry. There is a need of changing the training pattern of biostatistics for dental professionals which would make them confident enough to apply biostatistics in their clinical practice.

  4. Collaboration between dental faculties and National Dental Associations (NDAs) within the World Dental Federation-European Regional Organization zone: an NDAs perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamalik, Nermin; Mersel, Alex; Cavalle, Edoardo; Margvelashvili, Vladimer

    2011-12-01

    Although improvements in certain oral health measures have been achieved, many global oral health matters and challenges exist. Collaborations and partnerships among various institutions are crucial in solving such problems. The main aim of the present study was to analyse the nature and extent of the partnership between dental faculties and National Dental Associations (NDAs). A questionnaire was developed, focusing on the relationship between NDAs and dental faculties within the World Dental Federation-European Regional Organization (FDI-ERO) zone with regard to major professional activities, such as dental education (both undergraduate and continuing education), workforce issues, improvement of national oral health, and science and knowledge transfer. The questionnaire was sent to all member NDAs within the ERO zone. The response rate was 21/41 (53.65%). The major activities in which NDAs were found to be involved were improvement of national oral health (100%), followed by continuing education activities (90%), whereas the activity which received least involvement was the development of an undergraduate dental curriculum (52%). The NDAs perceived their relationship with dental faculties to be quite satisfactory in the fields of continuing education, science and knowledge transfer, and the implementation of new technologies into daily dental practice. However, it was suggested that their relationship needed significant improvement with regard to the development of an undergraduate dental education curriculum, dental workforce issues and negotiations with the authorities regarding professional matters/issues. As the two important elements of organised dentistry, NDAs and dental faculties have a significant role to play in the improvement of oral health and in finding solutions to global oral health challenges; therefore, their collaboration and partnership are crucial for this purpose. On the basis of the perceptions of NDAs regarding their relationship with

  5. Teaching Evaluations: Perceptions of Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherji, Sandip; Rustagi, Narendra

    2008-01-01

    This study conducts a survey of students and faculty at a business school on critical issues regarding student evaluations of teaching and identifies several significant differences between their perceptions. Students agreed more strongly than faculty that evaluations are higher in courses where the instructor teaches effectively and students…

  6. Assessing Cultural Competence among Florida's Allied Dental Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cyndi W; Su, Yu; Feng, Xiaoying; Catalanotto, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    The Commission on Dental Accreditation requires that dental, dental hygiene and dental assisting schools offer educational experiences to ensure that prospective dental health care providers become culturally competent, socially responsible practitioners. To assert that these mandates are met requires that the faculty are knowledgeable and capable of providing this type of training. Currently, little is known about the cultural competence of the state of Florida allied dental faculty. The purpose of this study was to assess the cultural competence among the dental hygiene and dental assistant faculty in the state of Florida. One hundred ninety-three faculty were invited to take the Knowledge, Efficacy and Practices Instrument (KEPI), a validated measure of cultural competence. Respondents included 77 (74%) full-time and 27 (26%) part-time faculty. Data were analyzed descriptively and reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) were computed. Mean scores and internal estimates of reliability on the KEPI subscales were: knowledge of diversity 3.3 (ɑ=0.88), culture-centered practice 3.6 (ɑ=0.88) and efficacy of assessment 2.9 (ɑ=0.74). The participant's score of 3.6 on the culture-centered practice exceeds scores among dental students and faculty who participated in previous studies suggesting the allied dental faculty have a greater awareness of sociocultural and linguistically diverse dental patients' oral health needs. Participants' score on knowledge of diversity subscales suggests a need for moderate training, while their score on the efficacy of assessment subscale indicates a need for more intense training. Assessing faculty beliefs, knowledge and skills about cultural competency is critically important in ensuring that accreditation standards are being met and represents one step in the process of ensuring that faculty demonstrate the type of sensitivity and responsiveness, which characterizes behaviors associated with cultural competence. Copyright © 2016 The

  7. Distance Education in Dental Hygiene Bachelor of Science Degree Completion Programs: As Perceived by Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokris, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated student and faculty perceptions of their experiences with online learning in dental hygiene Bachelor of Science degree completion programs on the dimensions of: quality of learning, connectedness to the learning environment, technology factors and student satisfaction. The experiences of dental hygiene students who took…

  8. Attitudes of Dental Faculty toward Individuals with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Leonard A.; Grace, Edward G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of one dental school's faculty concerning attitudes toward homosexual or heterosexual patients with either Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) or leukemia found significant negative biases both toward individuals with AIDS and toward homosexuals. (MSE)

  9. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  10. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    Academic dentistry, as a career track, is not attracting sufficient numbers of new recruits to maintain a corps of skilled dental educators. The Faculty Development Program (FDP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School received federal funds to institute a 7-component program to enhance faculty recruitment and retention and provide training in skills associated with success in academics including:(1) a Teaching Excellence and Academic Skills (TExAS)Fellowship, (2) training in research methodology,evidence-based practice research, and information management, (3) an annual dental hygiene faculty development workshop for dental hygiene faculty, (4) a Teaching Honors Program and Academic Dental Careers Fellowship to cultivate students' interest in educational careers, (5) an Interprofessional Primary Care Rotation,(6) advanced education support toward a master's degree in public health, and (7) a key focus of the entire FDP, an annual Career Transition Workshop to facilitate movement from the practice arena to the educational arm of the profession.The Career Transition Workshop is a cap stone for the FDP; its goal is to build a bridge from practice to academic environment. It will provide guidance for private practice, public health, and military dentists and hygienists considering a career transition into academic dentistry. Topics will be addressed including: academic culture, preparation for the academic environment,academic responsibilities, terms of employment,compensation and benefits, career planning, and job search / interviewing. Instructors for the workshop will include dental school faculty who have transitioned from the practice, military, and public health sectors into dental education.Objectives of the Overall Faculty Development Program:• Provide training in teaching and research skills,career planning, and leadership in order to address faculty shortages in dental schools and under representation of minority

  11. Reflections on academic careers by current dental school faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogér, James M; Wehmeyer, Meggan M H; Milliner, Matthew S

    2008-04-01

    During the inaugural year (2006-07) of the Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program (ADCFP), 110 faculty members at ten different dental schools were interviewed by dental students who were participating as ADCFP fellows in this year-long program designed to introduce them to faculty roles and activities and help them gain an appreciation for the rewards and issues associated with academic life. The goals, format, and components of the ADCFP are described in a companion article in this issue of the Journal of Dental Education. One of the fellows' assignments during the ADCFP was to interview faculty at various academic ranks who had differing degrees of work emphasis in teaching, research, service/patient care, and administration. Sixty-nine (63 percent of the total) of these interviews were reviewed and analyzed by the authors, who were student fellows in the ADCFP during 2006-07. The purpose of these interviews was to provide the fellows with insight into the positive aspects and challenges in becoming and remaining a dental school faculty member. This aggregate perspective of the interviews conducted at ten dental schools highlights the motivations and challenges that confront a dentist during the process of choosing a career in academic dentistry and determining if dental education is a good fit for each individual who elects to pursue this pathway. Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed several factors consistently identified by faculty across the schools as being positive influences on the quality of the academic work environment and career satisfaction: mentorship and student interaction, opportunities for scholarship (research and discovery), job diversity, intellectual challenge, satisfaction with the nature of academic work, lifestyle/family compatibility, flexibility, lifelong learning, professional duty, and lab responsibility. A series of negative themes were also consistently identified: bureaucracy/administrative burdens and barriers, time

  12. Dental school faculty and the academic environment from 1936 to 2011: familiar features in a new context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisko, Connie L; Whittaker, Lynn Page

    2012-01-01

    From its first issue in 1936 until today, no subject has been more central to the work published in the Journal of Dental Education (JDE) and to dental education itself than the dental school faculty. William Gies's vision in 1926 of the professionalization of dental educators was key to the professionalization of dental education. His focus on the need to develop these teachers as both instructors and researchers established the model by which a "dental educator" became a distinct professional, different from a dentist who happens to teach. This article for the seventy-fifth anniversary issue of the JDE thus starts from the obvious but not always acknowledged point that faculty members are central to the entire enterprise of dental education and relate to change over time as both cause and effect. Whether the profession today is evolving to incorporate new science and curricular models or becoming more interprofessional or meeting the needs of diverse patient populations or adopting new educational methodologies and technologies, developments in these areas will have a direct impact on the way individual faculty members do their jobs. To give a taste of the rich variety published over the past seventy-five years, the first section touches briefly on three significant types of research regarding faculty as exemplified by articles published in the JDE. These three are faculty development, educational methodologies, and faculty recruitment and retention. The second section addresses an increasingly important area of research: faculty members' perceptions of the academic work environment. After considering some trends that will affect this environment over the next decade, the article concludes with additional reasons the JDE is a valuable resource for faculty members in dental schools and allied and advanced dental education programs.

  13. A Snapshot of Organizational Climate: Perceptions of Extension Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Leslie E.; Bowen, Elaine; Alkadry, Mohamad G.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a snapshot of the perceptions of workplace climate of Extension faculty at a land-grant, research-high activity university, compared with the perceptions of non-Extension faculty at the same university. An online survey was conducted with a validated instrument. The response rate for university faculty was 44% (968); the…

  14. A Snapshot of Organizational Climate: Perceptions of Extension Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Leslie E.; Bowen, Elaine; Alkadry, Mohamad G.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a snapshot of the perceptions of workplace climate of Extension faculty at a land-grant, research-high activity university, compared with the perceptions of non-Extension faculty at the same university. An online survey was conducted with a validated instrument. The response rate for university faculty was 44% (968); the…

  15. Faculty Perception of Support to Do Their Job Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Charissa K.; Osgood, Aurea K.; Cigrand, Dawnette L.; Dunbar, Ann-Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Research has commonly suggested that adequate and appropriate mentoring and faculty perception of support for a work-life balance are important factors in the recruitment, development, and retention of university faculty. To better understand the role of these factors in faculty job performance at teaching universities, faculty from such a…

  16. Color-Blind Racial Beliefs Among Dental Students and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2017-09-01

    Providing culturally competent patient care requires an awareness of racial and cultural norms as well as a recognition of racism. Yet, there is a paucity of research devoted to this problem. In dental education, increased attention has focused on eliminating oral health care disparities due to ethnicity and race. Further investigation to determine the relationship between color-blind attitudes (failing to recognize the impact of race and racism on social justice) and dental educators' cultural competence is needed. The aim of this study was to determine dental faculty and student baseline color-blind racial attitudes scale scores, using the color-blind racial attitudes scale (CoBRAS). This 20-item instrument that measures three subscales of color-blind racial attitudes (Unawareness of Racial Privilege, Institutional Discrimination, and Blatant Racial Issues) was administered to student and faculty groups at one U.S. dental school. Out of a total 245 students in three class years, 235 responded to all items, for a response rate of 96%; out of a total 77 faculty members invited to participate, 71 responded to all items, for a response rate of 92%. Underrepresented minority (URM) faculty scored significantly higher on the Institutional Discrimination subscale and lower on Unawareness of Racial Privilege compared to non-URM students. Males scored significantly higher on Institutional Discrimination and Blatant Racial Issues compared to females. Compared to white students, URM students scored lower on all three subscales. The findings were consistent with previous studies indicating that female and URM students were more sensitive to racism compared to male and majority students. The findings that white faculty had higher awareness of racial privilege than white students and that URM faculty were less aware of institutional discrimination than URM students provided new information. These findings suggest that dental faculty members need professional development

  17. Identifying Noncognitive Skills That Contribute to Dental Students' Success: Dental Faculty Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Pendergast, Laura; Tellez, Marisol; Waldron, Elizabeth; Ismail, Amid

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were to identify noncognitive factors that dental faculty members perceived to contribute to dental students' success and to assess dental faculty members' ratings of the relative importance of these factors to academic performance, clinical performance, and overall success. Out of 184 eligible faculty members at one U.S. dental school, 43 respondents (23.3%) completed a survey in 2015-16. The survey asked respondents to rank the importance of seven noncognitive factors to academic performance, clinical performance, and overall success. Descriptive analysis was conducted to determine the ratings on importance of each noncognitive factor. Two additional open-ended questions asked faculty members to 1) think of dental students who performed very well and list the noncognitive factors they believed contributed to those students' success and 2) identify the two most important of those factors that contributed to success. Qualitative analysis was conducted to identify themes in the open-ended responses. The respondents rated professionalism and preparedness highest in importance for overall success. Preparedness was rated highest in importance for academic performance, and communication was highest in importance for clinical performance. Six themes were identified in the open-ended responses: communication/interpersonal skills, approach to learning, personal characteristics, professionalism, diverse experiences, and technical abilities. On both open-ended items, the most frequently cited noncognitive skill was communication/interpersonal skills followed by approach to learning. In this study, dental faculty members perceived communication, preparedness, and professionalism as important skills contributing to dental students' success.

  18. Triple jump examination evaluation of faculty examiners by dental student examinees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, Mahvash; Rich, Sandra K; Keim, Robert G

    2014-05-01

    The triple jump examination (TJE) is an oral examination that poses challenges for objective assessment. Student satisfaction levels with faculty assessment can provide information on quality of teaching and students' perceptions of the learning environment. The purpose of this study was to determine scale and interrater reliability of an instrument used by approximately 576 first-year dental students at one U.S. dental school for assessment of their faculty evaluators following midterm and final TJEs over a three-year period. One hundred and one faculty members served as administrators of the TJE with a range of one to 187 times (mean=44.10, median=29, mode=11). The grand mean for six items on a six-point Likert scale was 5.39 with a pooled standard deviation of 1.01. Results indicate positive agreement toward performance of examiners with strong interrater reliability (Average Measures ICC=0.936, Single Measures ICC=0.708) (F5,23475 = 51.564, p<0.001) and consistency across all items (Cronbach's α=0.936). The a priori assumption that students would rate faculty higher as they gained experience over time was rejected (r=0.018, p=0.429). Indications are that faculty members, who are relatively inexperienced with TJE examining, can perform acceptable assessment from the students' perspective. Overall, these students expressed a high level of satisfaction with TJE faculty performance.

  19. Impact of Faculty Development Workshops in Student-Centered Teaching Methodologies on Faculty Members' Teaching and Their Students' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricio, Jorge A; Montt, Juan E; Ormeño, Andrea P; Del Real, Alberto J; Naranjo, Claudia A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, after one year, the impact of faculty development in teaching and learning skills focused on a learner-centered approach on faculty members' perceptions of and approaches to teaching and on their students' learning experiences and approaches. Before training (2014), all 176 faculty members at a dental school in Chile were invited to complete the Approaches to Teaching Inventory (ATI) to assess their teaching approaches (student- vs. teacher-focused). In 2015, all 496 students were invited to complete the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) to assess their learning approaches (deep or surface) and the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) to measure their teaching quality perceptions. Subsequently, faculty development workshops on student-centered teaching methodologies were delivered, followed by peer observation. In March 2016, all 176 faculty members and 491 students were invited to complete a second ATI (faculty) and R-SPQ-2 and CEQ (students). Before (2014) and after (2016) the training, 114 (65%) and 116 (66%) faculty members completed the ATI, respectively, and 89 (49%) of the then-181 faculty members completed the perceptions of skills development questionnaire in September 2016. In 2015, 373 students (75%) completed the R-SPQ-2F and CEQ; 412 (83%) completed both questionnaires in 2016. In 2014, the faculty results showed that student-focused teaching was significantly higher in preclinical and clinical courses than in the basic sciences. In 2016, teacher-focused teaching fell significantly; basic science teaching improved the most. Students in both the 2015 and 2016 cohorts had lower mean scores for deep learning approaches from year 1 on, while they increased their scores for surface learning. The students' perceptions of faculty members' good teaching, appropriate assessment, clear goals, and e-learning improved significantly, but perception of appropriate workload did not. Teaching and learning skills development

  20. Scholarship and Dental Education: New Perspectives for Clinical Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, Judith E.

    1984-01-01

    Career advancement in academic dentistry appears to demand success in teaching, scholarship, and service, but foremost in research or scholarship. As a result, many dental faculty believe they are forced to choose between providing excellent professional preparation for their students or ensuring their academic careers. (MLW)

  1. Faculty Member Perceptions of Academic Leadership Styles at Private Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidman, Lori Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The leadership style of academic leaders was studied through the eyes of faculty members. This empirical study looked at faculty perceptions of academic leadership with the use of a numerical survey as the basis for observation. Faculty members at six private liberal arts institutions completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) in…

  2. Faculty Perception of Support to Do Their Job Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charissa K. Eaton, PhD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Research has commonly suggested that adequate and appropriate mentoring and faculty perception of support for a work-life balance are important factors in the recruitment, development, and retention of university faculty. To better understand the role of these factors in faculty job performance at teaching universities, faculty from such a university were surveyed about their experiences with these forms of support and the factors that influenced their perception of the ability to do their job well. Results indicate that faculty mentoring was an important predictor for support at the department level. Additionally, perceived work-life balance was a significant factor at the college and university levels.

  3. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues in dental school environments: dental student leaders' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joan I; Patterson, April N; Temple, Henry J; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the study reported in this article were to assess dental student leaders' perceptions of educational efforts concerning lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) topics and the cultural climate concerning LGBT issues in dental schools in the United States and Canada. In addition, the perceptions of student leaders who self-identified as belonging to the LGBT community and of students with a heterosexual orientation were compared. Data were collected from 113 dental student leaders from twenty-seven dental schools in the United States and three in Canada. Fifty student leaders were females, and sixty-two were males. Only 13.3 percent of the respondents agreed that their dental education prepared them well to treat patients from LGBT backgrounds. The more the student leaders believed that their university has an honest interest in diversity, the better they felt prepared by their dental school program to treat patients from LGBT backgrounds (r=.327; pLGBT orientations, the more they agreed that persons can feel comfortable regardless of their sexual orientation (r=.585; pLGBT backgrounds and that staff, faculty, students, and patients from these backgrounds are not discriminated against.

  4. Faculty's Perceptions of Teaching Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSagheer, Abdullah; Al-Sagheer, Areej

    2011-01-01

    This paper addressed the faculty's perception of engineering ethics and leadership training. The study looks into the present state of and methodologies for teaching engineering ethics and leadership and aims to determine the faculty's perception of an identified gap in this aspect of engineering education. Engineering education has strong ethics…

  5. Attitudes towards students who plagiarize: a dental hygiene faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Bhakta, Hemali G; Muzzin, Kathleen B; Dewald, Janice P; Campbell, Patricia R; Buschang, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine baccalaureate dental hygiene faculty members' attitudes and practices regarding student plagiarism. An email containing a link to a thirty-two-item survey was sent to fifty-two baccalaureate dental hygiene program directors in the United States; thirty of those agreed for their faculty members to participate. Of the 257 faculty members who received the survey link, 106 completed the survey, for a response rate of 41.2 percent. The responding faculty members reported thinking plagiarism is a rising concern in their dental hygiene programs (54.5 percent, 54/99). The majority said they check for plagiarism on student class assignment/projects (67.1 percent, 53/79). For those who did not check for plagiarism, 45.8 percent (11/24) stated it took "too much time to check" or it was "too hard to prove" (16.6 percent, 4/24). The most frequent form of student plagiarism observed by the respondents was "copying directly from a source electronically" (78.0 percent, 39/50). Most respondents reported checking for plagiarism through visual inspection (without technological assistance) (73.0 percent, 38/52). Of those who said they use plagiarism detection software/services, 44.4 percent (16/36) always recommended their students use plagiarism detection software/services to detect unintentional plagiarism. For those faculty members who caught students plagiarizing, 52.9 percent (27/51) reported they "always or often" handled the incident within their dental hygiene department, and 76.5 percent (39/51) said they had never reported the student's violation to an academic review board.

  6. A faculty development course to enhance dental hygiene distance education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone-Dodge, Vicki; Bowen, Denise M; Calley, Kristin H; Peterson, Teri S

    2014-09-01

    This article describes the implementation and evaluation of a dental hygiene faculty development course to enhance online teaching practices that foster a sense of community and satisfaction. The sampled population was drawn from the forty-seven U.S. dental hygiene programs that the American Dental Hygienists' Association identified as offering bachelor's degree completion or master's degree programs with 76-100 percent of coursework delivered in an online format. This requirement was applied to exclude programs using hybrid instruction (combination of online and face-to-face). Of the thirty-four faculty members who self-identified as meeting the criteria, seven agreed to participate (21 percent response rate); however, only five completed all parts of the study (a final response rate of 15 percent). A Community of Inquiry framework was the basis for the author-designed Distance Education Best Practices Survey used as a pretest and posttest to assess participants' use of and perceived importance of twenty-five best practices before and after taking the online faculty development course. Frequency of use ratings ranged from 4.0 (regularly) to 5.0 (always) on a response scale from 1.0 to 5.0. The results showed significant increases from before to after the course in participants' perceptions of the importance of four practices: activities promoting relevant, lifelong learning (p=0.03); faculty communication fostering a sense of community (p=0.04); encouraging students' self-introduction (p=0.04); and encouraging productive dialogue and respecting diverse opinions (p=0.04). The findings indicate a potential value for a faculty development course designed to enhance online teaching, sense of community, and satisfaction, even for faculty members with high self-ratings regarding best practices.

  7. Faculty and student perceptions of the feasibility of individual student-faculty meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, B F; Erich, M H; Borleffs, J C C; Elgersma, A F; Cohen-Schotanus, J

    2012-05-01

    The extent to which students feel involved in their education positively influences academic achievement. Individual student-faculty meetings can foster student involvement. To be effective, faculty acknowledgement of the benefit of these meetings is a prerequisite. The aim of this study was to explore faculty perceptions of individual student-faculty meetings. In addition we investigated students' perceptions. As part of the undergraduate programme, mandatory individual intake and follow-up meetings between first-year medical students (n = 425) and senior faculty members (n = 34) have been implemented from 2009 onwards. We administered a questionnaire on faculty perceptions of the benefit and impact of intake meetings. Subsequently, after both meetings had been held, strong and weak points of the mandatory programme were explored using open-ended questions. Students' perceptions were investigated by open-ended questions as a part of the curriculum evaluation process. Faculty enjoyed the meetings (90 %), perceived the meetings to be beneficial (74 %) and expected a positive effect on student involvement (74 %). Faculty appreciated the opportunity to give advice tailored to students' personal needs and levels of performance. The students appreciated the meetings and the attention given to their personal situation and study progress. Faculty and student appreciation of the meetings seems to support the assumption that the individual meetings increase students' social and academic involvement. Further research should focus on the impact of individual student-faculty meetings on students' learning behaviours.

  8. Adjunct Faculty Perception of Professional Development and Support Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Okema S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to investigate the adjunct faculty's perception of professional development and support services offered and needed at Tidewater Community College, a multicampus community college. This study involved adjunct faculty only. A survey was created and contained 58 survey questions. The majority of these were…

  9. A Comparison of Faculty and Student Perceptions of Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molluzzo, John C.; Lawler, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a concern for any college or university. Digital harassment incidents continue to be featured frequently in the news. The authors of this study compare the perceptions of faculty and students on cyberbullying at an urban university. From the findings of surveys distributed to faculty and students in all schools of the university,…

  10. Role Perceptions and Job Satisfaction of Community College Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Saladin K. T.

    This study examined the role perceptions of full-time faculty members at a large mid-Atlantic community college, focusing on role conflicts and levels of job satisfaction. One hundred and seventy-seven faculty members responded to surveys, and 20 participated in four focus groups organized according to race and gender, which yielded descriptive…

  11. Multiculturalism and the Liberal Arts College: Faculty Perceptions of Pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ana M. Martinez; Salkever, Katya

    This is a qualitative study of faculty perceptions of the relationship between pedagogy, liberal education, and multiculturalism. The incompatibility of liberal education and multiculturalism ground this study along with the assertion that teaching and learning are central to the liberal education mission. Nineteen faculty members participated in…

  12. Faculty Perception on International Students in Turkey: Benefits and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study is to examine faculty perceptions on international students with respect to benefits and challenges of having them in a liberal arts university located in Istanbul, Turkey. The research data were collected through evaluation of pertinent documents of the school and interviews with sixteen faculty members…

  13. Faculty Perceptions of Multicultural Teaching in a Large Urban University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigatti, Sylvia M.; Gibau, Gina Sanchez; Boys, Stephanie; Grove, Kathy; Ashburn-Nardo, Leslie; Khaja, Khadiji; Springer, Jennifer Thorington

    2012-01-01

    As college graduates face an increasingly globalized world, it is imperative to consider issues of multicultural instruction in higher education. This study presents qualitative and quantitative findings from a survey of faculty at a large, urban, midwestern university regarding perceptions of multicultural teaching. Faculty were asked how they…

  14. Student Perceptions of Faculty Credibility Based on Email Addresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Jeffrey A.; Scafe, Marla G.; Wiechowski, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate students' perceptions of faculty credibility based on email addresses. The survey was conducted at an upper division business school in Michigan where all students have completed at least two years of college courses. The survey results show that a faculty member's selection of an email address does…

  15. Faculty Perceptions of Critical Thinking at a Health Sciences University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowles, Joie; Morgan, Christine; Burns, Shari; Merchant, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The fostering of critical thinking skills has become an expectation of faculty, especially those teaching in the health sciences. The manner in which critical thinking is defined by faculty impacts how they will address the challenge to promote critical thinking among their students. This study reports the perceptions of critical thinking held by…

  16. Dental students perception of orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baswaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The relationship between physical appearance and perception of an esthetic deviation, and the impact of such deviation on self-esteem and body image are important issues in determining the benefits of orthodontic treatment. Aim: To assess dental students′ perception of orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: A total of 230 undergraduate dental students of Government Dental College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka formed the study group. Each classroom of the participants was visited, and self-administered questionnaire was given. An analysis of variance was done between the groups to test for statistical difference. Categorical variables were evaluated using a Chi-square test with the level of significance of P < 0.001. Results: About 75% of the students were aware of their dental esthetics. About 75% of females were satisfied with the attractiveness of their teeth when compared to 69% in males. House surgeons had more positive attitude compared to the 1 st year students. Conclusion: The dental students had good knowledge about the orthodontic treatment and had a positive attitude toward it. Females had very good knowledge, satisfaction and positive attitude compared to the males regarding dental esthetics and treatment. House surgeons were much more aware, very much satisfied and had a more positive attitude than 1 st year students.

  17. The Undergraduate Spanish Major Curriculum: Realities and Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Tammy Jandrey; Dings, Abby

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the quantitative and qualitative results of a nationwide survey of Spanish department faculty on the components of their undergraduate Spanish major curriculum and their perceptions of these components, as well as their perceptions of recent Modern Language Association (MLA) reports (2007, 2009) and the reports'…

  18. Faculty perceptions of key factors in interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loversidge, Jacqueline; Demb, Ada

    2015-01-01

    Embedding interprofessional education (IPE) into academic programs presents structural, curricular and human factor challenges. Nurses and physicians comprise the dominant dyad in healthcare, and therefore nursing and medical faculty are key in guiding future IPE approaches. However, faculty experiences with IPE are rarely reported. This paper presents perceptions of medical and nursing faculty about key factors related to IPE for pre-licensure medical and nursing students. Semi-structured interviews with 32 faculty from three Midwest universities were analyzed thematically in this phenomenological study based on collaboration and cooperation theories. Findings clustered into six categories. Specific subthemes little discussed in the literature are addressed in detail. Study participants felt the most powerful interprofessional student experiences were authentic and faculty-facilitated, that constructive clinical environments were crucial, that curriculum design challenges included disparities between undergraduate and graduate education, and that leadership commitment to full-time and adjunct faculty engagement and development was imperative.

  19. Senior Faculty Perceptions of Social Work Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnaan, Ram A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 421 senior faculty in graduate social work education investigated the familiarity and perceived quality of 120 professional journals in the field. Resulting ratings are presented for use by faculty seeking to publish their work in appropriate journals and those assessing the scholarly contribution of social work educators. (Author/MSE)

  20. Student versus Faculty Perceptions of Missing Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, Merry J.; Ritzer, Darren R.; Casey, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    Examines and compares student and faculty attitudes towards students missing classes and class attendance. Surveys undergraduate students (n=231) in lower and upper level psychology courses and psychology faculty. Reports that students found more reasons acceptable for missing classes and that the amount of in-class material on the examinations…

  1. Predoctoral dental students' perceptions and experiences with prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhima, Matilda; Petropoulos, Vicki C; Salinas, Thomas J; Wright, Robert F

    2013-02-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) investigate the perceptions and experiences of predoctoral dental students and advanced standing students on mentorship, exposure to prosthodontics, and future need for the specialty, and (2) establish a baseline of students' perceptions of the impact of prosthodontics on salary, personal and patient quality of life, and the profession of dentistry. A survey was distributed to 494 predoctoral and advanced standing students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine. Questions focused on the perceptions and experiences with the specialty of prosthodontics. A total of 410 surveys were analyzed using Chi Square tests and univariate and multivariate analysis with statistical software. Response rate was 83%. A positive initial introduction to prosthodontics was reported by 57% of students. Most students had positive experiences with prosthodontic faculty and enjoyed laboratory work and challenging/complex dentistry. A greater need for prosthodontists in the future was perceived by 82% of respondents, with 63% reporting that the future of prosthodontics had been emphasized. Students reported (1) a preclinical course directed by prosthodontists and (2) working in the clinic with prosthodontic faculty (p prosthodontics. A desire to pursue training or a career in prosthodontics was reported by 3.4% of the respondents, with 1.7% of them pursuing prosthodontics. Enjoyment of providing care in prosthodontics was the most important factor for those who decided to pursue prosthodontic postgraduate training. When compared to other specialties, prosthodontics ranked low with regards to its impact on salary (7(th) ), personal quality of life (5(th) ), patient quality of life (4(th) ), and strengthening of the dental field (7(th) ). Reasons few students are interested in prosthodontics as a career, despite a positive first introduction and high perceived future need for prosthodontists may be attributed to a number of factors

  2. An assessment of faculty and dental student decision-making in ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Catalanotto, Frank A; Garvan, Cynthia Wilson; Hudson-Vassell, Charisse

    2014-01-01

    This study reports and compares dental student and dental faculty scores to national norms for the Defining Issues Test 2, a measure of ethical decision-making competency. The findings showed that dental students and faculty tend to make decisions that promote self-interest, paralleling the ethical orientation of business professionals. Differences associated with gender, language, and norms from previous studies were observed. The findings underscore the importance of raising dental faculty and student awareness of their own ethical decision-making approaches. More importantly, the findings highlight the need to ensure that dental faculty have both the knowledge and skills to train dental students about the central role that ethical decision-making must play in patient care.

  3. Sex Differences in Pediatric Dental Pain Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gabriela F; Longo, Daniele L; Trevizan, Mariana; de Carvalho, Fabrício K; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Küchler, Erika C; Queiroz, Alexandra M

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate sex-related differences in dental pain perception in children. Fifty-two children who received a dental procedure with local anesthesia were selected to participate. Pain perception levels were assessed with the Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale. Twenty-four and 48 hours following the procedure, the parents were contacted by phone for a verbal survey to assess their child's postoperative pain. Age, type of dental procedure, and behavior were also evaluated as covariables. The data were analyzed using Epi Info 7.0 software and GraphPad Prism 5.0 software. Chi-square or t test were performed with a significance level of five percent. The mean age of the children was 6.7 (±2.4 [SD]) years. Twenty-seven (51.9 percent) were boys. None of the parents reported pain at 48 hours. None of the covariables were differentially distributed among the sexes (P>0.05). There was no statistical difference between sex and pain perception immediately after the procedure (P=0.64) and after 24 hours (P=0.41). However, when the analysis was performed according to age group, a borderline association was found. Female preschoolers reported more pain immediately after the procedure than male preschoolers (P=0.06). There was no statistical difference in pain perception between sexes.

  4. Allied dental and dental educators' perceptions of and reporting practices on academic dishonesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhney, Kelly A; Campbell, Patricia R

    2010-11-01

    Highly publicized reports and current research on cheating in dental schools and dental hygiene programs have created a resurgence of proactive measures in the deterrence of academic dishonesty. A majority of administrators and faculty members are of the opinion that cheating does occur at their schools and may have been personally involved with incidents of cheating through observation or student reporting. With the information age and the diverse makeup of today's student body, there may be differences in what is considered academic dishonesty between students and educators. The purpose of this study was to elicit perceptions on those differences, ascertain the number of cheating incidents that educators personally witnessed or about which they received information, and determine how they resolved those incidents. Another aim of this study was to determine if having an honor code, adequate ethics training, honor pledges, dialogue in the classroom, and formal due process policy were related to the number of cheating incidents. Surveys were distributed at the educational program of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Section on Dental Hygiene Education at the 2009 ADEA Annual Session & Exhibition. Results show the majority of these educators had had experience with cheating occurrences and believe that there are disparities between students and educators and among cultural groups in defining academic dishonesty. No differences or patterns emerged between academic integrity characteristics and occurrences or reports of cheating.

  5. A Training Program Using an Audience Response System to Calibrate Dental Faculty Members Assessing Student Clinical Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Michael J; Metz, Cynthia J; Durski, Marcelo T; Aiken, Sean A; Mayfield, Theresa G; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of calibration training of departmental faculty and competency graders using an audience response system on operative dentistry concepts across 12 months. The training sessions were designed to further solidify the process and equilibration of clinical opinions among faculty members and provide a more calibrated grading assessment during patient care for student performance feedback. Four (quarterly) calibration sessions occurred over 12 months in 2015. The first session was considered the baseline (control value) for this study. Pre- and post-calibration interrater agreement was assessed. Additionally, a pre and post assessment with ten Likert-scale questions was used to measure students' perceptions of instructional consistency. The results showed that a statistically significant increase in conceptual knowledge scores occurred for both departmental faculty members and competency graders across each of the four sessions (one-factor ANOVA; paudience response system for departmental and competency graders was found to be effective in facilitating a discussion forum, calibrating clinical assessments, and improving student perceptions. The positive results from this study support the value of dental schools' introducing faculty development programs to ensure consistent instruction for assessing dental student competence.

  6. Dental anatomy carving computer-assisted instruction program: an assessment of student performance and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Elizabeth T; Lanning, Sharon K; Gunsolley, John C

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of students exposed to two different instructional modalities for dental anatomy wax carving: CAI (computer-assisted instruction) using DVD technology, or traditional laboratory instruction. Students' self-assessment scores were also compared to faculty scores, and students' perceptions of their teaching modality were analyzed. Seventy-three first-year dental students (response rate 81 percent) participated in this randomized single blind trial, in which faculty graders were blinded to student group assignment. There were no statistical differences, as determined by the Wilcoxon non-parametric test and a t-test, between the faculty grades on the wax carving from the two teaching methods the students experienced. The student self-assessments revealed higher mean grades (3.0 for the DVD-only group and 3.1 for the traditional group) than the faculty actual mean grades (2.2 for both the DVD-only group and the traditional group) by almost one grade level on a 4.0 grade scale. Similar percentages of students in the traditional group had either favorable or unfavorable perceptions of their learning experience, while more students in the DVD-only group reported favorable perceptions. Students from both groups said they wanted more faculty feedback in the course. Based on these objective and subjective data, merging CAI and traditional laboratory teaching may best enhance student learning needs.

  7. Accounting Students' Perceptions of Effective Faculty Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfraih, Mishari M.; Alanezi, Faisal S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the attributes of an effective accounting faculty from the student perspective. It also examines similarities and differences in the perceived importance of these attributes between bachelor's and associate's accounting degree students in two public higher education institutions in Kuwait, namely, Kuwait…

  8. Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism at Queensborough Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sara; Beck, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    The researchers surveyed English and Speech & Theater faculty members at Queensborough Community College on their perceptions of and attitudes toward plagiarism. The researchers used the Queensborough Community College Academic Integrity Policy as the basis for their analysis. Based on the responses received, it was determined that 50% of the…

  9. Students' and Faculty's Perception of Academic Integrity in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Theresa; Ng, Hing-Man; Kai-Pan, Mark; Wong, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to compare students' and faculty members' perceptions of academic integrity; their understanding of experiences pertaining to different aspects of academic misconduct (e.g. plagiarism); and to examine the underlying reasons behind academic integrity violations in a Hong Kong context.…

  10. Understanding University Faculty Perceptions about Innovation in Teaching and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Rieber, Lloyd P.; Walker, Brandy B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to understand faculty perceptions about innovation in teaching and technology in a college of education in a research-intensive university. This study was motivated by the creation of a new initiative begun in a large college of education at a Carnegie Research-Intensive university to promote innovation in teaching…

  11. Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism at Queensborough Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sara; Beck, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    The researchers surveyed English and Speech & Theater faculty members at Queensborough Community College on their perceptions of and attitudes toward plagiarism. The researchers used the Queensborough Community College Academic Integrity Policy as the basis for their analysis. Based on the responses received, it was determined that 50% of the…

  12. Faculty-Student Perceptions about Entrepreneurship in Six Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Mark; Sesen, Harun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In what may be the first study of its kind in business and entrepreneurship, the purpose of this paper is to compare faculty and student perceptions and beliefs about entrepreneurship motives and barriers and student aspirations in order to explore implications for entrepreneurship education (EE). Design/Methodology/Approach: The authors…

  13. Faculty-Student Perceptions about Entrepreneurship in Six Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Mark; Sesen, Harun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In what may be the first study of its kind in business and entrepreneurship, the purpose of this paper is to compare faculty and student perceptions and beliefs about entrepreneurship motives and barriers and student aspirations in order to explore implications for entrepreneurship education (EE). Design/Methodology/Approach: The authors…

  14. Faculty Perceptions of Student Credibility Based on Email Addresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Jeffrey A.; Wiechowski, Linda S.; Scafe, Marla G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate faculty perceptions of student credibility based on email addresses. The survey was conducted at an upper division business school in Michigan where all students have completed at least two years of college courses. The survey results show that a student's selection of an email address does influence the…

  15. Perceptions of Education Faculty Students on Teaching Methods and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmer, Elif; Güven, Gülçin; Aydin, Oktay; Özden, Bülent; Efe, Kadriye; Sener, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Individual differences have an influence on a wide range of education fields. These differences can range from organizing teaching environments to the techniques and strategies that the teacher uses. This study focused on individual differences of pre-service teachers and aimed to investigate the perceptions of Education Faculty students on…

  16. Exploring faculty perceptions towards electronic health records for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Y; Chan, S W C; Wang, L; Wang, W

    2014-12-01

    The use of electronic health records in nursing education is rapidly increasing worldwide. The successful implementation of electronic health records for nursing education software program relies on students as well as nursing faculty members. This study aimed to explore the experiences and perceptions of nursing faculty members using electronic health records for nursing education software program, and to identify the influential factors for successful implementation of this technology. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted using in-depth individual interviews at a university in Singapore. Seven faculty members participated in the study. The data were gathered and analysed at the end of the semester in the 2012/2013 academic year. The participants' perceptions of the software program were organized into three main categories: innovation, transition and integration. The participants perceived this technology as innovative, with both values and challenges for the users. In addition, using the new software program was perceived as transitional process. The integration of this technology required time from faculty members and students, as well as support from administrators. The software program had only been implemented for 2-3 months at the time of the interviews. Consequently, the participants might have lacked the necessary skill and competence and confidence to implement it successfully. In addition, the unequal exposure to the software program might have had an impact on participants' perceptions. The findings show that the integration of electronic health records into nursing education curricula is dependent on the faculty members' experiences with the new technology, as well as their perceptions of it. Hence, cultivating a positive attitude towards the use of new technologies is important. Electronic health records are significant applications of health information technology. Health informatics competency should be included as a required competency

  17. Faculty and student perceptions of effective study strategies and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Katie J; Bell, Gillian C; Franks, Andrea S

    2011-12-15

    To evaluate faculty members' and students' perceptions of study strategies and materials. Focus groups were conducted with course directors and first- and second-year students to generate ideas relating to use of course materials, technology, class attendance, and study strategies for mastering class concepts. Students and faculty members differed in their opinions about the utility of textbooks and supplemental resources. The main learning method recommended by students and faculty members was repeated review of course material. Students recommended viewing classroom lectures again online, if possible. Course directors reported believing that class attendance is important, but students based their opinions regarding the importance of attendance on their perceptions of lecture and handout quality. Results did not differ by campus or by student group (first-year vs. second-year students). Students and faculty members have differing opinions on the process that could influence learning and course design. Faculty members should understand the strategies students are using to learn course material and consider additional or alternative course design and delivery techniques based on student feedback.

  18. Faculty members' use of power: midwifery students' perceptions and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantek, Filiz; Gezer, Nurdan

    2010-08-01

    the power dynamics of relationships/interactions between faculty members and students are of crucial importance for positive student outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the perceptions and expectations of midwifery students in relation to the use of power by faculty members and bases of power. descriptive, quantitative study. a school for health sciences in Turkey. 122 midwifery students at the school. data were collected using a perceived leadership power survey, and analysed by frequency distribution, arithmetic mean, variance analysis and Cronbach's alpha. the students perceived that faculty members used coercive power most often and used reward power least often. Students expected their instructors to use expert power. In addition, in the examination of relationships between power bases, it was determined that there were positive correlations between legitimate, referent, reward and expert power, but coercive power was only positively correlated with legitimate power. this study found that students expect faculty members to use expert power, and faculty members need to reconsider their power bases. The factors affecting the perceptions of midwifery students regarding the use of power should be analysed in more detail. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Knowledge and Attitude of Faculty Members Working in Dental Institutions towards the Dental Treatment of Patients with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Sharma, Nilima; Mohanty, Vikrant; Marya, Charumohan; Rekhi, Amit; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dentists have an ethical responsibility to provide treatment to HIV-infected patients, particularly because oral lesions are common among these patients. However, there are no official guidelines as to how to treat people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (PLWHA) or how to screen for potentially infectious people. Materials and Method. A descriptive cross-sectional questionnaire based study which assessed the knowledge and attitude of the faculty members towards the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS was carried out in the Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Sciences, Faridabad, and Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. Results. The willingness to treat patients with HIV was found to be 86.0% among the faculty members in the present study. The majority (79%) of the faculty members thought that treating an HIV-positive patient is ethical responsibility of the dentist. There was a positive attitude (88.0%) among faculty members that routine dental care should be a part of the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS. Conclusion. The level of knowledge regarding HIV and AIDS was acceptable in the present study. However, continuing dental education (CDE) programmes should be conducted on a regular basis for updating the knowledge level of the faculty members towards the dental treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:27379262

  20. Educational Faculty Members' Perceptions on Multicultural Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, Rafet; Aslan, Dolgun

    2016-01-01

    This purpose of this study is to determine how the perceptions of teaching personnel members were conceptualized through use of metaphorical images with regard to the multicultural teacher. In this study, a phenomenological design, a type of qualitative research design was used. A total of 323 teaching personnel members employed at 71 educational…

  1. College Faculty Perceptions about Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Carol

    2006-01-01

    Most postsecondary institutions are committed to internationalization of their curricula, global awareness, and appreciation for multiculturalism. However, proficiency in a foreign language plays a marginal role, at best, in reaching these goals. In an attempt to understand the perceptions about the role of foreign language in postsecondary…

  2. Use of information and communication technology among dental students and registrars at the faculty of dental sciences, University of Lagos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butali, A; Adeyemo, W L; Akinshipo, A O; Fashina, A; Savage, K O

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of information technology amongst dental students, dental nursing students and resident doctors in training at the faculty of dental Surgery University of Lagos. A structured questionnaire was distributed to 58 clinical dental students in 4 th and 5 th years of training in the 2010/2011 academic year, 36 dental nursing students and 63 resident doctors undergoing specialist training. All participants have access to the computers, 2.5% within the University and 31% at home and internet cafes and about 50% have the basic skills required. A significant difference was observed between the resident doctors and clinical dental students (P = 0.003), between resident doctors and dental nursing students (P = 0.0001) when the use of computer for study was compared. Over 95% of participants have access to internet and about 50% of them use the internet for their studies. A significant difference (P = 0.005) was observed between clinical dental students and dental nursing students that use the internet and word processing. The resident doctors used the computers for multimedia and MedLine search tools more than clinical dental students (P = 0.004) and dental nursing students (0.0006). The findings of the study show that dental students and resident doctors in training have the requisite knowledge to operate the computer for use in their study and personal activities.

  3. Methods used by accredited dental specialty programs to advertise faculty positions: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Armbruster, Paul C; Gallo, John R

    2011-01-01

    The various reasons for the current and projected shortages of dental faculty members in the United States have received much attention. Dental school deans have reported that the top three factors impacting their ability to fill faculty positions are meeting the requirements of the position, lack of response to position announcement, and salary/budget limitations. An electronic survey sent to program directors of specialty programs at all accredited U.S. dental schools inquired about the number of vacant positions, advertised vacant positions, reasons for not advertising, selection of advertising medium, results of advertising, and assistance from professional dental organizations. A total of seventy-three permanently funded full-time faculty positions were reported vacant, with 89.0 percent of these positions having been advertised in nationally recognized professional journals and newsletters. Networking or word-of-mouth was reported as the most successful method for advertising. The majority of those responding reported that professional dental organizations did not help with filling vacant faculty positions, but that they would utilize the American Dental Association's website or their specialty organization's website to post faculty positions if they were easy to use and update.

  4. Saudi dental students’ perceptions of pediatric behavior guidance techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Jobair, Asma M; Al-Mutairi, Manal A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental students receive theoretical and clinical training in pediatric behavioral guidance techniques at university. Therefore, the content of the educational course and the degree of training in behavioral techniques may have an impact on the students’ perceptions and practice of such techniques. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Saudi dental students’ perceptions of behavior guidance techniques used in pediatric dentistry, and to assess the changes in their perceptions af...

  5. Dental Students' Perceptions of Learning Value in PBL Groups with Medical and Dental Students Together versus Dental Students Alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Maryam; Zulla, Rosslynn; Gaudet-Amigo, Gisele; Patterson, Steven; Murphy, Natalie; Ross, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    At a dental school in Canada, problem-based learning (PBL) sessions were restructured from an integrated dental-medical model to a separate dental model, resulting in three groups of students available for study: those who had participated in the two-year dental and medical combined, the one-year dental and medical combined, the one-year dental alone, and the two-year dental alone. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the extent to which the PBL structure affected the dental students' perceptions of the learning value of PBL in the different models. A total of 34 first-, second-, and third-year dental students participated in six focus groups in May and June 2011 (34% of students in those total classes). Semistructured questions explored their experiences in the different PBL structures. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was employed. The results showed positive and negative perceptions for both the combined dental and medical settings and the settings with dental students alone. For students in the combined PBL groups, positive perceptions included gaining information from medical peers, motivation to learn, and interdisciplinary collaborations. The negative perceptions mainly related to irrelevant content, dominating medical students, and ineffective preceptors. Members of the separate dental groups were more positive about the content and felt a sense of belonging. They appreciated the dental preceptors but were concerned about the inadequacy of their medical knowledge. Overall, the dental students valued the combined PBL experience and appreciated the opportunity to learn with their medical colleagues. Close attention, however, must be paid to PBL content and the preceptor's role to optimize dental students' experience in combined medical and dental groups.

  6. Are Home Offices Feasible in a University?: Faculty Perceptions of a Home Office Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kathy J.; Halley, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    Examines faculty perceptions of how the new technologies of e-mail and voice mail (widely adopted as a result of a university's home office experiment) changed faculty ways. Discusses first- and second-level effects of communication technologies in three areas: faculty interaction within the department and on campus; student/faculty interaction;…

  7. Nursing Faculty Shortage Nurses' Perceptions as a Key to Administrative Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Evelyn M.

    2009-01-01

    The nursing faculty shortage is well documented. Higher education administrators turn away qualified student applicants because of the lack of qualified nursing faculty. Furthermore, they find recruitment and retention of qualified nursing faculty a challenge. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of the nursing faculty role, causes…

  8. The demographic and academic profile of Irish dental school faculty members.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Eleanor M

    2010-04-23

    AIM: This paper reviews the demographic, academic and professional profile of Irish dental school faculty members. Faculty duties are explored. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Custom-designed questionnaires were distributed to faculty members for self-completion, adopting a \\'mixed-method\\' approach with quantitative and qualitative components. Response rate was 64.60%. RESULTS: Demographic profile reveals a male-dominated regime (64%). Males also occupy a disproportionate number of senior academic positions. The age profile mirrors international trends with 75% of staff over 40 and c.33% over 50, including 78% of professorial staff (p < 0.001). Dental school faculties are comprised of highly educated professionals with the following qualifications: 89% BDS, 43% FDS, 39% Masters, 16% Doctorates. Most (77%) have 10+ years of clinical experience, while 47% have over 20 years\\' experience. Clinical experience varied by age, rank (p < 0.001) and gender (p < 0.05). A review of contractual agreements and duties confirms the major role of part-time clinical staff in dental education, comprising the largest single group (48%) delivering the bulk of the clinical teaching. However, 54% of part-time clinical staff have less than five years teaching experience. This study also explores staff views of various faculty roles. CONCLUSIONS: This report provides a benchmark profile of Irish dental school faculty members. It reflects on the heavily skewed age groups of our current dental educators and the impending retirement of many senior academics. Educational organisations need to explore ways to make a career in dental education financially and sociologically attractive and provide adequate support for existing faculty to ensure their development during these challenging times.

  9. Faculty professional development in emergent pedagogies for instructional innovation in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M; Bender, D; Nadershahi, N

    2017-05-01

    Innovative pedagogies have significantly impacted health professions' education, dental education included. In this context, faculty, defined in this study as instructor in higher education, has been increasingly required to hone their instructional skills. The purpose of this exploratory study was to share the design, implementation and preliminary outcomes of two programmes to enhance dental faculty's instructional skills, the Teaching and Learning Seminar Series and the Course Director Orientation. Data sources included faculty and student surveys developed and administered by the researchers; data extracted from the learning management system; reports from the learning analytics tool; and classroom observations. Participants' satisfaction, self-reported learning, instructional behavioural change, and impact on student learning behaviours and institutional practice were assessed borrowing from Kirkpatrick's 4-level model of evaluation of professional development effectiveness. Initial findings showed that faculty in both programmes reported positive learning experiences. Participants reported that the programmes motivated them to improve instructional practice and improved their knowledge of instructional innovation. Some faculty reported implementation of new instructional strategies and tools, which helped create an active and interactive learning environment that was welcomed by their students. The study contributes to literature and best practice in health sciences faculty development in pedagogy and may guide other dental schools in designing professional development programmes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Public perceptions of dental implants: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Gao, Xiaoli; Lo, Edward C M

    2015-07-01

    Dental implants have become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information on dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners at various levels/disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to evaluate the public's information acquisition and their perceptions of dental implants and the effects of these on their care-seeking and decision making. A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join six focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64 years of age, had never been engaged in dentally related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, and had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered into any dental consultation regarding dental implants. All of the focus groups discussions were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following a grounded theory approach. Participants acquired information on dental implants through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected dental implants to restore the patients' appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implants as a panacea for all cases of missing teeth, overestimated their functions and longevity, and underestimated the expertise needed to carry out the clinical procedures. They were deterred from seeking dental implant treatment by the high price, invasive procedures, risks, and complications. Members of the public were exposed to information of varying quality and had some unrealistic expectations regarding dental implants. Such perceptions may shape their care-seeking behaviours and decision-making processes in one way or another. The views and experiences gathered in this qualitative study could assist clinicians to better understand the public's perspectives, facilitate constructive patient-dentist communication, and contribute

  11. Political Ideology and Perceptions of Bias Among University Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Bullers

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to examine the political ideology and perceptions of bias among the faculty in a university in the southeast U.S.A. Findings regarding the overall dominance of a liberal political ideology as well as ideological differences among disciplines are consistent with previous research. Respondents did distinguish between political dominance and political bias and were relatively accurate in their perceptions of a liberal dominance. Reports of bias were much lower overall but all groups were more likely to report a bias against conservatives than against Liberal and Moderates. Reports of bias against conservatives were quite high among conservatives themselves (48.7%. Conservatives were more likely to report a need to conceal their political beliefs, while Moderates and Liberals were slightly more likely to report harassment or attacks for their political beliefs. The gender differences in political ideology show that women are significantly more likely to hold a liberal political ideology.

  12. Perceptions of Dental Hygiene Master's Degree Learners About Dental Hygiene Doctoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumath, Ursula G M; Walsh, Margaret

    2015-08-01

    To determine perceptions about dental hygiene doctoral education among dental hygiene master's degree program enrollees. In this cross-sectional national study, all dental hygiene master degree program directors were sent an email requesting they forward an attached consent form and online-survey-link to their graduate learners. The 29-item online survey assessed their perceptions about need for, importance of and interest in applying to proposed dental hygiene doctoral degree programs. A second-request was sent 1 month later to capture non-responders. Frequencies and cross-tabulations of responses were analyzed using the online software program, Qualtrics.™ Of the 255 graduate learners enrolled in 2014 reported by dental hygiene program directors, 159 completed the survey for a 62% response rate. The majority of respondents (77%) indicated that doctoral education in dental hygiene is needed for the advancement of the dental hygiene discipline and such programs are important to the dental hygiene profession (89%). Although most respondents supported both the PhD in dental hygiene and the Doctor of Dental Hygiene Practice (DDHP) degrees, more were interested in applying to a DDHP program (62%) than to a dental hygiene PhD program (38%). In addition, 43% expressed interest in enrolling in a doctoral degree program in the next 1 to 5 years and most preferred a hybrid online/onsite program format. The most frequently reported reasons for pursing a doctoral degree were: to become a better teacher, to expand clinical practice opportunities, to become a better researcher and to increase salary. Most dental hygiene master degree learners in this study believed doctoral dental hygiene education is needed and important to the dental hygiene discipline and profession, and were interested in applying to such programs. Future research is needed in this area. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  13. Faculty Perceptions of Online Teaching Effectiveness and Indicators of Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Debra Henline; Weatherspoon, Deborah; Hussey, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Online education programs in nursing are increasing rapidly. Faculty need to be competent in their role and possess the skills necessary to positively impact student outcomes. Existing research offers effective teaching strategies for online education; however, there may be some disconnect in the application of these strategies and faculty perceptions of associated outcomes. Focus groups were formed to uncover how nursing faculty in an online program define and describe teaching effectiveness and quality indicators in an asynchronous online environment. A semistructured interview format guided group discussion. Participants (n = 11) included nurse educators from an online university with an average of 15 years of experience teaching in nursing academia and 6 years in an online environment. Teaching effectiveness, indicators of quality, and student success were three categories that emerged from the analysis of data. What materialized from the analysis was an overarching concept of a “dance” that occurs in the online environment. Effective online teachers facilitate, connect, lead, and work in synchrony with students to obtain indicators of quality such as student success, student improvement over time, and student application of knowledge to the professional role.

  14. Faculty perceptions of the integration of SAP in academic programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Khoury

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to prepare students for the workforce, academic programs incorporate a variety of tools that students are likely to use in their future careers. One of these tools employed by business and technology programs is the integration of live software applications such as SAP through the SAP University Alliance (SAP UA program. Since the SAP UA program has been around for only about 10 years and the available literature on the topic is limited, research is needed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the SAP UA program. A collaborative study of SAP UA faculty perceptions of their SAP UAs was conducted in the fall of 2011. Of the faculty invited to participate in the study, 31% completed the online survey. The results indicate that most faculty experienced difficulty implementing SAP into their programs and report that a need exists for more standardized curriculum and training, while a large percentage indicated that they are receiving the support they need from their schools and SAP.

  15. Faculty Perceptions of Online Teaching Effectiveness and Indicators of Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Frazer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Online education programs in nursing are increasing rapidly. Faculty need to be competent in their role and possess the skills necessary to positively impact student outcomes. Existing research offers effective teaching strategies for online education; however, there may be some disconnect in the application of these strategies and faculty perceptions of associated outcomes. Focus groups were formed to uncover how nursing faculty in an online program define and describe teaching effectiveness and quality indicators in an asynchronous online environment. A semistructured interview format guided group discussion. Participants (n=11 included nurse educators from an online university with an average of 15 years of experience teaching in nursing academia and 6 years in an online environment. Teaching effectiveness, indicators of quality, and student success were three categories that emerged from the analysis of data. What materialized from the analysis was an overarching concept of a “dance” that occurs in the online environment. Effective online teachers facilitate, connect, lead, and work in synchrony with students to obtain indicators of quality such as student success, student improvement over time, and student application of knowledge to the professional role.

  16. Distance education in dental hygiene bachelor of science degree completion programs: As perceived by students and faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokris, Maureen

    This study investigated student and faculty perceptions of their experiences with online learning in dental hygiene Bachelor of Science degree completion programs on the dimensions of: quality of learning, connectedness to the learning environment, technology factors and student satisfaction. The experiences of dental hygiene students who took their core BS dental hygiene (BSDH) courses completely online were compared and contrasted with the perceptions of dental hygiene students who had taken a portion of the BSDH courses online and a portion in a traditional face-to-face classroom setting. Furthermore, this study compared and contrasted the perceptions of faculty on these same four dimensions based on the position held by the faculty member and the course format they are teaching in: online or a combination of online and a traditional face-to-face classroom setting. This study revealed several important differences and similarities between students who had taken their courses online and those who had taken a portion of the BSDH courses online and a portion in a traditional face-to-face classroom setting. The results showed students who had taken their courses online described factors related to the instructor as important to the quality of the learning experience such as: the experience and qualifications of the professor, the examples they provided and the instructors prompt response to questions. Students who had taken courses in both formats described factors related to the amount of effort they put into the course, their classmates' preparedness, the course materials and assignments as important to the quality of the learning experience. Although students who completed courses online reported difficulty participating in group activities, they were more positive regarding the level of interaction they experienced with their classmates online Findings indicated students who had taken their courses in both formats would have liked more opportunities to interact

  17. Emotional Intelligence, Job Satisfaction, and Students' Perceptions of the Quality of Online Adjunct Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Sara K.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between emotional intelligence and students' perceptions of quality of online adjunct faculty and the relationship between emotional intelligence and the job satisfaction of online adjunct faculty. Online adjunct faculty participants completed the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire--Short Form…

  18. Faculty Attitudes and Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty at a Career College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Academic dishonesty in postsecondary education can often transfer to dishonesty in the workplace. Dishonest behavior by students undermines the integrity of the entire institution, including its faculty. The purpose of this study was to explore faculty perceptions of goal orientation and its impact on student cheating behavior, faculty experiences…

  19. Faculty Attitudes and Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty at a Career College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Academic dishonesty in postsecondary education can often transfer to dishonesty in the workplace. Dishonest behavior by students undermines the integrity of the entire institution, including its faculty. The purpose of this study was to explore faculty perceptions of goal orientation and its impact on student cheating behavior, faculty experiences…

  20. Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Leadership at Christian Colleges and Universities with Missions of Servant Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Marila Dollahite

    2011-01-01

    This study examined differences in faculty perceptions of organizational leadership at Christian institutions with servant leadership missions. The study evaluated faculty members' perceptions based on the independent variables of employment status (full- or part-time/adjunct), number of years employed at the institution, and attendance at an…

  1. Student and Faculty Perceptions of ICT Use in Undergraduate Agriculture Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald M.; Edgar, Leslie D.; Cox, Casandra K.

    2013-01-01

    Students and faculty in a land-grant college of agriculture were surveyed to determine their perceptions of current and future Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use in undergraduate agriculture courses. There was a large, positive relationship (r = 0.83) between student and faculty perceptions of the extent to which 40 specific ICT…

  2. Levels of crystalline silica dust in dental laboratorium of Dental Health Technology Study Program of Vocational Faculty, Universitas Airlangga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Inayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silicosis is an occupational lung disease caused by inhaling particles of crystalline silica in a long time. The disease then results in inflammation and defects in lung tissue. Prosthesis construction is usually conducted in dental laboratory using a lot of materials containing crystalline silica, such as gypsum, ceramics, planting material, sandblast and others. Purpose: This research aims to determine levels of crystalline silica dust in the dental laboratory of Dental Health Technology Diploma Study Program, Vocational Faculty, Universitas Airlangga. Method: Three measurement points was determined, namely point 1, point 2 and point 3 in each dental laboratory space (I and II. Suctioning dust was performed at those points using Low Volume Dust Sampler (LVDS. Samples taken were divided into two groups, namely X and Y. Taking dust samples were carried out for 30 minutes. Elements of crystalline silica contained in the dust were quantitatively measured using XR Defractometry tool, while size and morphology of silica were measured using SEM EDX tool. Data obtained were statistically analyzed by paired t test. Result: The results showed significant differences in the levels of the total dust measured and crystalline silica in the form of quartz and cristobalite among those two dental laboratory spaces. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the levels of the total dust and silica quartz dust in the dental laboratory spaces I and II were greater than the Threshold Limit Value (TLV determined.

  3. Dental students' perception of patient anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, J; Tripp, G

    1993-04-01

    This study examined the ability of dental students to assess patients' anxiety during dental treatment, and the relationship between patients' general, waiting room and clinic levels of anxiety. Sixty-six restorative dental patients and 35 Final-year dental students participated in the study. Prior to a routine dental appointment, patients completed visual analogue scales indicating their general and waiting room levels of anxiety. During treatment, patients and dental students completed similar scales to indicate patients' levels of anxiety up to and at that time. Patients' general and waiting room levels of anxiety were found to correlate significantly with their reports of anxiety during treatment. Female patients reported higher levels of anxiety than male patients. The correlations between patient and student ratings of patients' anxiety were small and non-significant, suggesting the students were not accurate in their estimates of patients' anxiety during treatment. It is suggested, therefore, that dental students be encouraged to ask patients directly how they are feeling about the dental situation. Such discussion could take place prior to, or at the beginning of, the dental appointment.

  4. Perceptions of professionalism among nursing faculty and nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Baumann, Andrea; Kolotylo, Camille; Lawlor, Yvonne; Tompkins, Catherine; Lee, Ruth

    2013-02-01

    Although there is no consensus about the definition of professionalism, some generally recognized descriptors include knowledge, specialization, intellectual and individual responsibility, and well-developed group consciousness. In this study, Q-methodology was used to identify common viewpoints about professionalism held by nursing faculty and students, and four viewpoints emerged as humanists, portrayers, facilitators, and regulators. The humanists reflected the view that professional values include respect for human dignity, personal integrity, protection of patient privacy, and protection of patients from harm. The portrayers believed that professionalism is evidenced by one's image, attire, and expression. For facilitators, professionalism not only involves standards and policies but also includes personal beliefs and values. The regulators believed that professionalism is fostered by a workplace in which suitable beliefs and standards are communicated, accepted, and implemented by its staff. The differences indicate that there may be numerous contextual variables that affect individuals' perceptions of professionalism.

  5. Parents' perception of dental caries in intellectually disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckwerth, Solange Aparecida Modesto; Weckwerth, Giovana Maria; Ferrairo, Bunna Mota; Chicrala, Gabriela Moura; Ambrosio, Alexandre Macedo Natitucci; Toyoshima, Guilherme Hideki Lima; Bastos, José Roberto Magalhães; Pinto, Edu Cassiano; Velasco, Sofia Rafaela Maito; Bastos, Roosevelt Silva

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the parents' perception of dental caries in children with intellectual disability. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 6 to 14 years old schoolchildren: Group 1 (50 children diagnosed with intellectual disabilities) and Group 2 (50 children without it). The dental caries was assessed by the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for primary and permanent teeth. Parents' psychosocial perception was assessed by Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). Similar prevalence of caries free children was found between groups in both dentitions. In primary dentition the caries index was higher in Group 2, and the opposite occurred in permanent teeth. Group 1 presented higher impact (p dental caries on parents' perception of the oral health related quality of life of children with intellectual disabilities. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A comparison of millennial dental hygiene student and faculty classroom expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Gibson-Howell, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that Millennial students are different than students in previous generations. This study compares the expectations of the didactic environment of faculty and students in a baccalaureate dental hygiene program. Expectations of faculty and students were examined, and comparisons between Millennial and non-Millennial students and faculty were made in order to improve the educational experience of dental hygiene students. Students and faculty completed a survey adapted from McCargar's role expectations survey. Items were chosen from the survey to cover such areas as technology, group work and authority. The survey consisted of a Likert-type scale including strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree and strongly disagree. Data was entered into SPSS 15.0 database. Scoring on negative questions was reversed so that the score would be positive. Individual answers are given the following scoring assignments: Strongly Agree (+2), Agree (+1), Neutral (0), Disagree (-1) and Strongly Disagree (-2). Scores were added together to create a summative score for each item. Descriptive statistics and an unpaired t-test comparing responses were used to analyze data. Cronbach's alpha was run to measure the internal consistency of the instrument. Twelve faculty and 94 students returned surveys. Students felt strongly that copies of course notes should be available online and faculty should return emails within 24 hours. Statistically significant differences in the expectations of Millennial and non-Millennial students were found in regards to issues of authority, community service, attendance and evaluation. The majority of significant differences were found between Millennial students and faculty. Significant differences were found in interaction, community service, technology and homework. Faculty should examine the expectations of their students and should use the findings to create learning experiences that are more effective for students. Expectations change with

  7. Dental students' and faculty members' concepts and emotions associated with a caries risk assessment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, Gerardo; Isyutina, Olga

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify concepts and emotions associated with using an established Caries Risk Assessment (CRA) and Caries Risk Management (CRM) program in a dental school. Five focus groups with students and faculty members were conducted. Transcripts of the focus group discussions were qualitatively analyzed for emotions, using Plutchik's wheel of emotions, and were inductively evaluated for concepts (stability coefficients, Scott's π, 0.65-0.71). A total of twenty-five students took part in three focus groups (D2, D3, and D4 separately), and fifteen faculty members participated in two groups. Few frequency differences existed across students and faculty in terms of emotions (278 in faculty members' discourse; 276 in students'). From these, 535 concepts were assembled in seven groups of semantically distinct concepts. Faculty members verbalized more numerous concepts than students (300 vs. 235). Skepticism about the effectiveness of the CRA/CRM program represented the most significant barrier to comprehensive student and faculty support. The findings also suggested that, in order to dispel misconceptions, clearer messages, simpler forms and systems, and better tailored foci of the program for diverse patient, student, and faculty subgroups are needed. Ultimately, buy-in from users depends on CRA forms and programs that are seen as relevant, useful, and simple, offering tangible outcomes for patients and clinicians.

  8. Establishing a good dentist-patient relationship: skills defined from the dental faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Cesar A; Jerez, Oscar M

    2014-10-01

    The importance of developing good dentist-patient relationships has been well documented, but previous studies have focused on social techniques, not considering the psychological and behavioral characteristics of patients, and have used definitions and instruments that were not dental-specific. Therefore, the aims of this study were to propose a definition of dentist-patient relationship skills, derived from dental faculty members' criteria and informed by Emotional Intelligence concepts, and to propose a preliminary dental-specific, face-valid, and reliable self-assessment instrument. The study was conducted in three phases. Phases I and II defined dentist-patient relationship competence through literature analysis and semi-structured interviews with expert key informants, establishing the outcome skills. In Phase III, the instrument was constructed and piloted. Communication skills and basic psychological tools resulted in core topics for use in practice. The definition both specifies and broadens social interactions in dentistry by including dental faculty members' criteria and topics such as psychological tools and pre-, intra-, and postoperative topics appropriate for use during consultation, examination, and treatment. The instrument was found suitable, reasonable, and accessible with a Cronbach's alpha level of 0.95. Future studies are needed to confirm the definition, as well as the instrument's validity, reliability, transference, and sensitivity to the dental educational environment.

  9. Educating the dental team: exploring perceptions of roles and identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, S; Marley, J; Machniewski, S

    2011-11-25

    Interprofessional education (IPE) should help to promote a team-based approach to professional practice but there are barriers to its implementation including professional identity. The aim of this study was to use a qualitative research methodology to explore dental and dental care professional (DCP) students' perceptions of professional roles and identities in the dental team. Data were collected by means of focus groups from a purposive sample of dental and DCP students and were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed using an explanatory framework. Five common themes emerged around the issue of professional roles and identity in the dental team. The results indicate that professional identity was an important factor in team development and was determined by direct responsibility for patient care and by the amount of clinical experience acquired. Professional identity within a team context was perceived as different from professional identity per se. Dental students were found to lack confidence in their role as team leaders which was related to their lack of knowledge of team roles, responsibilities and experience. The role of the dental technician was perceived as 'outside' the dental team due to lack of patient interaction.

  10. Time Spent, Workload, and Student and Faculty Perceptions in a Blended Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer A; Schumacher, Christie; Arif, Sally

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To evaluate student perception and time spent on asynchronous online lectures in a blended learning environment (BLE) and to assess faculty workload and perception. Methods. Students (n=427) time spent viewing online lectures was measured in three courses. Students and faculty members completed a survey to assess perceptions of a BLE. Faculty members recorded time spent creating BLEs. Results. Total time spent in the BLE was less than the allocated time for two of the three courses by 3-15%. Students preferred online lectures for their flexibility, students' ability to apply information learned, and congruence with their learning styles. Faculty members reported the BLE facilitated higher levels of learning during class sessions but noted an increase in workload. Conclusion. A BLE increased faculty workload but was well received by students. Time spent viewing online lectures was less than what was allocated in two of the three courses.

  11. Time Spent, Workload, and Student and Faculty Perceptions in a Blended Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Christie; Arif, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate student perception and time spent on asynchronous online lectures in a blended learning environment (BLE) and to assess faculty workload and perception. Methods. Students (n=427) time spent viewing online lectures was measured in three courses. Students and faculty members completed a survey to assess perceptions of a BLE. Faculty members recorded time spent creating BLEs. Results. Total time spent in the BLE was less than the allocated time for two of the three courses by 3-15%. Students preferred online lectures for their flexibility, students’ ability to apply information learned, and congruence with their learning styles. Faculty members reported the BLE facilitated higher levels of learning during class sessions but noted an increase in workload. Conclusion. A BLE increased faculty workload but was well received by students. Time spent viewing online lectures was less than what was allocated in two of the three courses. PMID:27667839

  12. The Role of Organizational Context in the Creation and Sustainability of Dental Faculty Development Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Maureen; Motwaly, Suzanne M; Kamens, Tracy Ellen

    2015-11-01

    Dental faculty development programs exist for a variety of reasons: to improve teaching skills, develop and reinforce relationships among colleagues and mentors, foster career development, and support curricular initiatives and institutional priorities. These activities impact individual faculty members as well as the institutions in which they work. Each institution has a distinct culture that should be acknowledged and understood alongside conventional outcome measures. As such, this article provides an expanded view of faculty development programming, associated educational activities, and related organizational changes at the College of Dentistry, New York University (NYU) since 2005. Contextual factors include the existence of an Office of Professional Development established in 1999, an Academy of Distinguished Educators founded in 2010, and other programs for present and future educators that support the college's educational mission. Outcomes include a comparison study of one program, the creation of new courses, the sustainability and expansion of existing programs, participants' retention rate, and an increase in awards and other educational accomplishments such as publication of abstracts, oral presentations, and related activities by NYU faculty at national forums in dental education.

  13. Students' perceptions of a blended learning experience in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varthis, S; Anderson, O R

    2016-12-25

    "Flipped" instructional sequencing is a new instructional method where online instruction precedes the group meeting, allowing for more sophisticated learning through discussion and critical thinking during the in-person class session; a novel approach studied in this research. The purpose of this study was to document dental students' perceptions of flipped-based blended learning and to apply a new method of displaying their perceptions based on Likert-scale data analysis using a network diagramming method known as an item correlation network diagram (ICND). In addition, this article aimed to encourage institutions or course directors to consider self-regulated learning and social constructivism as a theoretical framework when blended learning is incorporated in dental curricula. Twenty (second year) dental students at a Northeastern Regional Dental School in the United States participated in this study. A Likert scale was administered before and after the learning experience to obtain evidence of their perceptions of its quality and educational merits. Item correlation network diagrams, based on the intercorrelations amongst the responses to the Likert-scale items, were constructed to display students' changes in perceptions before and after the learning experience. Students reported positive perceptions of the blended learning, and the ICND analysis of their responses before and after the learning experience provided insights into their social (group-based) cognition about the learning experience. The ICNDs are considered evidence of social or group-based cognition, because they are constructed from evidence obtained using intercorrelations of the total group responses to the Likert-scale items. The students positively received blended learning in dental education, and the ICND analyses demonstrated marked changes in their social cognition of the learning experience based on the pre- and post-Likert survey data. Self-regulated learning and social constructivism

  14. FACULTY PERCEPTION OF PBL CURRICULUM IN MELAKA MANIPAL MEDICAL COLLEGE,MANIPAL, INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Guruprasd Rao

    2013-01-01

    Present study was carried out to gauge the perception of the faculty members of Melaka Manipal Medical College (MMMC), Manipal, India regarding the problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. The faculty were divided into those with prior experience of PBL (group A) and those without it (group B) and were asked to respond to a Likert scale questionnaire regarding the PBL curriculum. Majority of the faculty members agreed that PBL curriculum helps students to acquire critical thinking skills and ...

  15. Perceptions of pharmacy students, faculty members, and administrators on the use of technology in the classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiVall, Margarita V; Hayney, Mary S; Marsh, Wallace; Neville, Michael W; O'Barr, Stephen; Sheets, Erin D; Calhoun, Larry D

    2013-01-01

    .... Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom...

  16. Developing a measure to capture marketing faculty's perceptions of unethical behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao, Tao (Tony); Sirgy, M. Joseph; Johar, J.S

    2010-01-01

    ... T. Toward a code of ethics for marketing educators. Journal of Business Ethics 2006; 63(1): 1-20] measure of marketing faculty's perceptions of unethical behavior and tests its predictive validity...

  17. Promotion Criteria, Faculty Experiences and Perceptions: A Qualitative Study at a Key University in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingning, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this micro-level, detailed qualitative study of a university faculty in a large city in China are threefold: to identify the sources of institutional promotion criteria, to illustrate the experiences of frontline faculty members with these criteria and their perceptions of them, and to discuss the possible bearings of the findings…

  18. Faculty Members' Ethical Behaviors: "A Survey Based on Students' Perceptions at Universities in Turkey"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Kenan; Balyer, Aydin; Servi, Tayfun

    2013-01-01

    As members of academic team, faculty behaviors have vital influence on students' lives at universities. This study purposes to discover students' perceptions about faculty behaviors concerning their professional responsibilities, dating/sexual harassment, behaviors inside and behaviors outside the classroom and relationship based on self-interest.…

  19. What are the associations between the quantity of faculty evaluations and residents' perception of quality feedback?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Blankush, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Resident perception of feedback is not correlated with number of faculty evaluations. An emphasis on faculty summative evaluation of resident performance is important but appears to miss the mark as a replacement for on-going, data-driven, structured resident feedback. Understanding the difference between evaluation and feedback is a global concept that is important for all medical educators and learners.

  20. A Comprehensive Survey on Cyberbullying Perceptions at a Major Metropolitan University--Faculty Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molluzzo, John C.; Lawler, James; Manneh, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a concern for any college or university. Digital harassment incidents are featured daily in the news. The authors of this study examine the perceptions of faculty on cyberbullying at a major metropolitan university. From the findings of a survey distributed to faculty in all schools of the university, the authors learn of high…

  1. Faculty Perceptions of Organizational Culture and Collegiality at Protestant Christian Universities in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jamie R.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on faculty perceptions of organizational culture and collegiality at denominationally affiliated Christian colleges and universities in the Pacific Northwest. It was found that while faculty members perceive tension around their experience of organizational culture, the extent of their relationships as cultivated through formal…

  2. "Mentoring Is Sharing the Excitement of Discovery": Faculty Perceptions of Undergraduate Research Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen; Miller, Paul C.; Peeples, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Although an increasing number of studies have examined students' participation in undergraduate research (UR), little is known about faculty perceptions of mentoring in this context. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate four aspects of mentoring UR, including how faculty define high-quality UR mentoring and operationalize it in…

  3. Faculty Use and Perception of Mobile Information and Communication Technology (m-ICT) for Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Chung, Chung Joo; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider faculty use and perception of mobile information and communication technology (m-ICT) for teaching practices. The researchers examined qualitative responses about specific m-ICT use and efficiency amongst Korean and US faculty (n = 59) at three different institutions. Findings from multi-level textual…

  4. "Mentoring Is Sharing the Excitement of Discovery": Faculty Perceptions of Undergraduate Research Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen; Miller, Paul C.; Peeples, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Although an increasing number of studies have examined students' participation in undergraduate research (UR), little is known about faculty perceptions of mentoring in this context. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate four aspects of mentoring UR, including how faculty define high-quality UR mentoring and operationalize it in…

  5. The Student Perception of Faculty Scale: Development, Testing and Practical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Thomas S.

    2017-01-01

    This study involved a sample group of students residing in residential halls at a state university in a qualitative and quantitative analysis to measure their perceptions of the university's faculty. Exploratory, then confirmatory, factor analysis revealed a 3-factor model representing teaching faculty: a negative, emotionally challenging…

  6. Faculty Perceptions of the Adoption and Use of Clickers in the Legal Studies in Business Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Denise M.; Park, Susan; Kaupins, Gundars

    2015-01-01

    The use of clickers in the classroom can improve student engagement and motivation. However, few studies have been conducted on faculty opinions of the use of clickers. The authors measured clicker use in legal studies among business faculty and investigated perceptions and factors associated with the adoption of clickers in the discipline. Survey…

  7. Retention in Higher Education: Faculty and Student Perceptions of Retention Programs and Factors Impacting Attrition Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Malinda; O'Leary, Erin; Webb, Shekeita

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine faculty and student perceptions of what factors are contributing to drop-out rates in a Northern Indiana higher educational facility and to study whether or not the drop-out prevention programs that are in place are effective. Survey links were sent out to all adjuncts and some full-time faculty at a local…

  8. Faculty Use and Perception of Mobile Information and Communication Technology (m-ICT) for Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Chung, Chung Joo; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider faculty use and perception of mobile information and communication technology (m-ICT) for teaching practices. The researchers examined qualitative responses about specific m-ICT use and efficiency amongst Korean and US faculty (n = 59) at three different institutions. Findings from multi-level textual…

  9. Employment Skills for 21st Century Workplace: The Gap between Faculty and Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Kay A.; Lear, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the perceptions of college business faculty and students regarding the business competencies needed to get a job after graduation. The population for this research consisted upper-level students (n = 254), who were enrolled in business classes at a Midwest university and faculty members (n = 37) teaching in the business area at…

  10. Role Perception among Faculty Members at Teacher Education Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobgeld, Esther; Teichman-Weinberg, Ariela; Wasserman, Egoza; Barchilon Ben-Av, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine how faculty members at academic colleges of education perceive their role and to consider elements of their work that need to be included in a professional profile definition. All faculty of one college of education were asked: "What are the tasks/obligations of a faculty member at a college of education?…

  11. Occupational exposure to contaminated biological material: perceptions and feelings experienced among dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila PINELLI

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dental students may be a particularly vulnerable group exposed to the risk of acquiring infections through occupational injuries.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the perceptions with regard to their occupational exposure to potentially infectious biologic materials.MATERIAL AND METHOD: Interviews were conducted by means of a script with open questions. The speeches were recorded, transcribed and qualitative analysis was performed with the aid of QUALIQUANTISOFT® software. The Collective Subject Discourse (CSD was obtained.RESULT: The feeling most frequently experienced was related to the fear of contagion. Most accidents occurred during the handling of sharp dental instruments. Respondents attributed the occurrence of accidents especially the lack of attention, carelessness while handling sharp instruments, and lack of use of Personal Protective Equipment. As regards the measures taken right after the exposure, they "washed the local area". Other respondents reported they "continued the dental treatment". They complained mostly about the fear of having been infected, and because they had to leave the faculty to take blood exams for HIV screening. As part of the learning experience the injured reported they paid more attention when handling sharp instruments. The students informed that any type of injury due to contact with contaminated material must be notified. However, they were neglectful about reporting their own injury.CONCLUSION: Education strategies for preventive measures related to occupational exposure must be restructured, because the knowledge and the fear of contagion among dental students were not always sufficient for a complete adherence to treatment protocols and notification.

  12. Blend or not to blend: a study investigating faculty members perceptions of blended teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet A Ocak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined faculty members’ perceptions of blended teaching from several perspectives. A total of 73 faculty members in Turkish Higher Education context participated in the study by completing an online survey that combined quantitative and qualitative approaches. Based on a data analysis, the faculty members’ perceptions were sorted into six categories: (a satisfaction with blended teaching, (b perceived impact on the role of the faculty, (c perceived impact on student learning, (d perceived impact on student motivation, (e advantages of blended teaching, and (f disadvantages of blended teaching. Findings indicated that faculty members were likely to agree that blended teaching provides a high degree of satisfaction and that it requires more time and commitment from the faculty. The faculty members perceived that blended teaching improves student learning and, to some extent, improves motivation. The faculty members also emphasized the importance of institutional support and the use of technology to mitigate student problems. This study presents these faculty members’ perceptions, which are helpful for those planning to implement a blended teaching approach, and makes suggestions for trouble-shooting and taking advantage of the opportunities in a blended environment successfully.

  13. Millennial Dental Hygiene Students' Learning Preferences Compared to Non-Millennial Faculty Members' Teaching Methods: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, April M; Prihoda, Thomas J; English, Dana K; Chismark, Aubreé; Jacks, Mary E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the learning preferences of millennial dental hygiene students (born between 1982 and 2002) in the U.S. with the teaching methods used by their non-millennial instructors. Cross-sectional surveys were developed with 21-item, five-point Likert scales to examine students' preferences for and faculty use of lecture, collaborative activities, technology, independent work, and group discussion. Surveys were emailed to U.S. dental hygiene program directors in September 2015. The respondents totaled 800 students and 343 faculty members-approximately 5% of all dental hygiene students and 6.8% of all dental hygiene faculty members in the U.S. The results showed that the responding faculty members (88.7%) used case studies more than the students (61.2%) preferred and that the students (71.4%) preferred games when learning more than the faculty members (57.2%) used them (pmillennial dental hygiene students in this study were consistent with previous research on millennial traits. This study found areas of disagreement between students and faculty members on the use of case studies, study guides, and group work. Although these students stated they preferred lecture over group work, trends in education stress using active learning over lecture.

  14. Autonomous versus Merged Marketing Departments: The Impact of Current Department Structure and Previous Restructuring Experience on Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neese, William T.; Batory, Stephen S.

    2005-01-01

    This study details faculty perceptions concerning administrative structure and its impact on issues such as collegiality or student success. Faculty members in autonomous marketing departments are compared with those in combined units. Then, faculty never involved with departmental change are compared with faculty previously involved splitting…

  15. Radiography Faculty Engaged in Online Education: Perceptions of Effectiveness, Satisfaction, and Technological Self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Shirley J; Flora, Bethany H

    2017-01-01

    To assess radiography faculty perceptions of the effectiveness of online courses. An original survey instrument was created by selecting items from 3 instruments used in prior research and adding unique questions designed to elicit demographic data from faculty. The sample included a national dataset of radiography faculty members employed in Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology-accredited programs in the United States. Findings showed that faculty perceptions of online course effectiveness are not affected significantly by faculty position, type of institution, faculty age, or years of teaching experience. Positive perceptions of the effectiveness of online courses moderately increased with years of teaching online courses, number of online courses taught in the past 5 years, and perceived competence with the use of technology. Faculty satisfaction with interaction in online courses moderately increased as the years of teaching online courses increased. However, the number of years of teaching online courses was not related to faculty satisfaction with teaching online courses or faculty satisfaction with institutional support. Online technology acceptance had a moderately positive relationship with perceived ease of use and a strong positive relationship with perceived usefulness of online technology. In addition, the use of technology-enhanced learning methods had a strong positive relationship with technological self-efficacy. Radiography faculty perceptions of the effectiveness of online courses improved with experience in teaching online courses and competence with use of technology. Perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of online technology were related directly to online technology acceptance. Furthermore, faculty members with technological self-efficacy were more likely to use technology-enhanced learning methods in the online environment.

  16. Perception of Laypeople and Dental Professionals of Smile Esthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Saffarpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess and compare the perception of laypersons and dental professionals of smile esthetics based on two factors namely gingival display and alignment of teeth.Materials and Methods: A total of 32 females were randomly selected among dental students in the International Campus of School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Tehran, Iran with no previous history of esthetic dental work. Frontal photographs were obtained and cropped from the subnasal to menton areas of subjects to standardize the size of pictures. Three series of slides were prepared of the pictures using Microsoft PowerPoint software. The first series of slides were shown to familiarize the observers with the images. The second and third series were displayed for the observers and they were then asked to fill out a questionnaire. The group of observers included 10 dental specialists and 10 laypersons. Each observer was given a visual analog scale (VAS chart for scoring (1-10. After completion of the questionnaires, data were transferred to a computer and the differences in judgments of professionals and laypeople were analyzed using the Mann Whitney test.Results: No significant difference was found in the judgments of professionals and laypeople on evaluating overall smile esthetics, gingival display and alignment of teeth except for the slide showing a reverse smile arc.Conclusions: Laypeople and professionals had similar perceptions of smile esthetics. Thus, it appears that clinicians can rely on the judgment of laypersons in esthetic dental treatments.Keywords: Smiling; Perception; Esthetics, Dental

  17. Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking Among Dental Practitioners: Prevalence and Health Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar-Odeh, Najla; Alnazzawi, Ahmad; Shoqair, Noora; Al-Shayyab, Mohammad H; Abu-Hammad, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Waterpipe tobacco smoking prevalence, practice, and the associated health perceptions among dental practitioners have not been previously reported. This study aims to determine the prevalence of waterpipe smoking among dental practitioners and to evaluate their awareness of health hazards of waterpipe smoking, particularly the adverse effects on oral health. This was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey among dental practitioners. Surveyed dental practitioners practiced dentistry in the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, a city in the Central-Western Region of Saudi Arabia, and the study was conducted during March 2015. The questionnaire consisted of questions on demographic data, history and practices of tobacco use, and perceptions toward the health hazards of smoking. Dentists were approached at their work places and invited to participate. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample's demographic and smoking characteristics, while cross-tabulation and chi-square test were used to determine the statistical significance of association between the groups (P ≤ 0.05). One hundred dental practitioners participated in the survey, with 55 males and 45 females. Twenty-six percent indicated that they were waterpipe smokers. Male gender and cigarette smoking were the only factors to be significantly associated with waterpipe smoking (P = 0.008 and P = 0.000, respectively). Most participants stated that waterpipe smoking is harmful to health, and the most commonly reported health hazard was respiratory disease, which was reported by 81% of participants. Prevalence of waterpipe smoking among dental practitioners is comparable to adult populations but lower than younger populations of university students. Health awareness of dental practitioners regarding waterpipe smoking was judged to be insufficient.

  18. Student and faculty perceptions of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynor, Lena M; Barrickman, Ashleigh Landis; Stamatakis, Mary K; Elliott, David P

    2013-10-14

    To describe students' and faculty members' perceptions of the impact of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. Second- and third-year pharmacy students and faculty members completed an anonymous survey instrument regarding their perceptions of lecture recording with 2 classroom lecture capture software programs, Camtasia Studio and Wimba Classroom. Most students (82%) responded that Camtasia was very helpful and almost half (49%) responded that Wimba Classroom was helpful (plecture recordings beneficial, and they use the recordings primarily to review the lecture. While faculty members reported concerns with decreased attendance, few students reported using recordings as an alternative to class attendance.

  19. Dental hygiene students' perceptions of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R Constance; Shockey, Alcinda Trickett; Long, D Leann

    2014-12-01

    Geriatric education is an important component of the dental hygiene curriculum because, in it, students acquire skills and attitudes to help provide quality care to older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine if off-site exposure to nursing home residents with supervised oversight had the potential to improve dental hygiene students' attitudes toward older adults. Senior dental hygiene students at one school completed a pre-nursing home experience questionnaire. A series of geriatric lectures and discussions, which included discussions about students' anxieties of working with institutionalized older adults, were held prior to the nursing home experience. The students then participated in two supervised four-hour nursing home experiences, were debriefed after the experiences, and completed a second questionnaire. Of thirty-nine potential participants in the study, thirty-two took part in the pre-nursing home experience questionnaire (82.1 percent). They had a mean split Fabroni score of 34.2 (95 percent confidence interval: 32.2, 36.3). The thirty participants in the post-experience questionnaire (76.9 percent of total) had a mean split score of 32.7 (95 percent confidence interval: 30.1, 35.3). This study failed to reject the null hypothesis of no mean difference between the pre- and post-nursing home experience; however, the post-experience mean score was lower than the pre-nursing home experience mean score, indicating a more positive attitude toward older adults after the experience.

  20. Influence of parental presence on the child’s perception of, and behaviour, during dental treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, I.C.J.; Krikken, J.B.; Veerkamp, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the influence of the presence of the parent in the dental operatory on their child's behaviour during dental treatment. METHODS: This study was a randomised controlled trial performed in a secondary paediatric dental care clinic. The child's perception of the dental treatment and its

  1. Influence of parental presence on the child’s perception of, and behaviour, during dental treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C.J. Cox; J.B. Krikken; J.S. Veerkamp

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the influence of the presence of the parent in the dental operatory on their child's behaviour during dental treatment. METHODS: This study was a randomised controlled trial performed in a secondary paediatric dental care clinic. The child's perception of the dental treatment and its

  2. Dental Students' Perceptions of Digital Assessment Software for Preclinical Tooth Preparation Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Carly F; Sheinbaum, Justin M; Tamada, Yasushi; Chandiramani, Raina; Lian, Lisa; Lee, Cliff; Da Silva, John; Ishikawa-Nagai, Shigemi

    2017-05-01

    Objective self-assessment is essential to learning and continued competence in dentistry. A computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) learning software (prepCheck, Sirona) allows students to objectively assess their performance in preclinical prosthodontics. The aim of this study was to evaluate students' perceptions of CAD/CAM learning software for preclinical prosthodontics exercises. In 2014, all third-year dental students at Harvard School of Dental Medicine (n=36) were individually instructed by a trained faculty member in using prepCheck. Each student completed a preclinical formative exercise (#18) and summative examination (#30) for ceramometal crown preparation and evaluated the preparation using five assessment tools (reduction, margin width, surface finish, taper, and undercut) in prepCheck. The students then rated each of the five tools for usefulness, user-friendliness, and frequency of use on a scale from 1=lowest to 5=highest. Faculty members graded the tooth preparations as pass (P), marginal-pass (MP), or fail (F). The survey response rate was 100%. The tools for undercut and taper had the highest scores for usefulness, user-friendliness, and frequency of use. The reduction tool score was significantly lower in all categories (psoftware as significantly more useful.

  3. Gender Role Preferences and Perceptions of University Students, Faculty, and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Sue; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 2,990 students, 520 faculty, and 270 administrators at 1 university investigated gender role preferences for "ideal woman,""ideal man," and perceptions of "most women,""most men," and "self". All groups preferred an androgynous "ideal woman" and a largely masculine sex-typed "ideal man". All described sex-typed perceptions of "most…

  4. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Service Quality: The Moderating Role of the Institutional Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duževic, Ines; Ceh Casni, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore key attributes of service quality in the Croatian higher education system. In particular, the study aims to compare student and faculty perceptions of service quality and to identify institutional aspects that may affect the perceptions of these two customers. Principal component analysis is used to define…

  5. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Service Quality: The Moderating Role of the Institutional Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duževic, Ines; Ceh Casni, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore key attributes of service quality in the Croatian higher education system. In particular, the study aims to compare student and faculty perceptions of service quality and to identify institutional aspects that may affect the perceptions of these two customers. Principal component analysis is used to define…

  6. U.S. Dental Hygiene Students' Perceptions of Interprofessional Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navickis, Marie A; Mathieson, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    Patients with complex medical conditions require collaboration among multiple health care providers, and dental hygienists must be prepared to communicate effectively with medical providers to provide comprehensive quality patient care. The aim of this study was to assess U.S. dental hygiene students' attitudes about interprofessional collaboration (IPC) and identify any differences based on age, year in program, and program location. Participants were limited to students enrolled in dental hygiene associate degree programs across the United States. In response to an email soliciting participation sent to all dental hygiene program directors, 504 students completed the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) online (response rate could not be calculated). The IEPS is a validated survey that measures attitudes about interprofessional collaboration. The majority of the respondents were female (97%) and under 30 years of age (74.6%). Their mean scores indicated positive attitudes about IPC. There were no statistically significant differences in scores by age (p=0.700) or program location (p=0.527). There were also no statistically significant differences between first- and second-year students for total mean scores (p=0.106); for the competency and autonomy subscale (p=0.125); and for the perception of actual cooperation subscale (p=0.890). There was a statistically significant difference between first- and second-year students on the perception of actual cooperation subscale, with first-year students scoring higher than second-year students (p=0.016). This study's findings of positive attitudes about IPC and that age and program location had little bearing on the responses suggest that associate degree dental hygiene students may welcome the interprofessional education that will prepare them for practice in the future.

  7. Dental Hygiene Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R. Constance; Shockey, Alcinda Trickett; Long, D. Leann

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric education is an important component of the dental hygiene curriculum because, in it, students acquire skills and attitudes to help provide quality care to older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine if off-site exposure to nursing home residents with supervised oversight had the potential to improve dental hygiene students’ attitudes toward older adults. Senior dental hygiene students at one school completed a pre-nursing home experience questionnaire. A series of geriatric lectures and discussions, which included discussions about students’ anxieties of working with institutionalized older adults, were held prior to the nursing home experience. The students then participated in two supervised four-hour nursing home experiences, were debriefed after the experiences, and completed a second questionnaire. Of thirty-nine potential participants in the study, thirty-two took part in the pre-nursing home experience questionnaire (82.1 percent). They had a mean split Fabroni score of 34.2 (95 percent confidence interval: 32.2, 36.3). The thirty participants in the post-experience questionnaire (76.9 percent of total) had a mean split score of 32.7 (95 percent confidence interval: 30.1, 35.3). This study failed to reject the null hypothesis of no mean difference between the pre- and post-nursing home experience; however, the post-experience mean score was lower than the pre-nursing home experience mean score, indicating a more positive attitude toward older adults after the experience. PMID:25480277

  8. Dental fear-related cognitive vulnerability perceptions, dental prevention beliefs, dental visiting, and caries: a cross-sectional study in Madrid (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Diaz, Maria; Crego, Antonio; Armfield, Jason M; Romero, Martin

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the role that psychosocial elements may play concerning dental attendance and oral health in children. In particular, we explored the associations among dental fear-related cognitive vulnerability perceptions, dental prevention beliefs, the pattern of dental visits, and the number of decayed teeth. A cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 250 Spanish schoolchildren who completed a questionnaire. Oral health status was evaluated by pediatric dentists. Statistical analyses were mainly based on binary logistic regression and multiple linear regression, which allowed us to test possible associations among variables as well as interaction and mediation effects. Children with more vulnerability-related cognitions (Adj. OR = 0.74 P dental prevention beliefs (Adj. OR = 1.47 P dental prevention beliefs and cognitive vulnerability perceptions was associated with more decayed teeth (β = -0.13 P dental visit, associated with fearful and unfavorable dental prevention cognitions, accounted for 20% of the effects of these variables on dental caries. The combination of greater cognitive vulnerability-related perceptions and low awareness of the benefits of dental prevention increased the risk of dental caries. Children with this profile also tended to demonstrate a more inadequate pattern of dental attendance. Preventive oral health programs would benefit from considering the role of children's cognitions on their oral health habits and dental health. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Perceptions of distance education among nursing faculty members in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Josephine M

    2009-06-01

    A strategy to increase access to nursing education, train nurses for practice, and prepare future nurse educators is distance education. Faculty member shortages are cited as the main reason for not accepting qualified applicants. Faculty members are the core of nursing education. In order to address nursing faculty members' concerns regarding distance education and to assist in faculty member recruitment, retention, growth, and development in order to improve and enhance the quality of distance education, one must answer the question: What are nursing faculty members' perceptions of distance education in nursing? Utilizing a number of databases to locate research specific to this topic, this article provides an integrative review of the nursing literature to ascertain the faculty members' perspective of distance education. The research was analyzed, findings summarized, and limitations mentioned. Utilizing a brief supplementary review of the literature, the implications, recommendations, and need for future research are discussed.

  10. Faculty and student perceptions of the feasibility of individual student-faculty meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, B.F.; Erich, M.H.; Borleffs, J.C.; Elgersma, A.F.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which students feel involved in their education positively influences academic achievement. Individual student-faculty meetings can foster student involvement. To be effective, faculty acknowledgement of the benefit of these meetings is a prerequisite. The aim of this study was to expl

  11. Comparison of Dental Students' Self-Directed, Faculty, and Software-Based Assessments of Dental Anatomy Wax-Ups: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Pauline H; Faraone, Karen L; Patzelt, Sebastian B M; Keaser, Michael L

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about self-directed and self-reflective assessment in preclinical dental curricula. The aim of this study was to evaluate a visual dental anatomy teaching tool to train dental students to self-assess their dental anatomy wax carving practical examinations. The students self-assessed two waxing practical examinations (tooth #8 and tooth #19) using high-quality digital images in an assessment tool incorporated into a digital testing program. Student self-assessments were compared to the faculty evaluations and the results of a software-based evaluation tool (E4D Compare). Out of a total 130 first-year dental students at one U.S. dental school, wax-ups from 57 participants were available for this study. The assessment data were submitted to statistical analyses (p<0.05). For tooth #8, the student self-assessments were significantly different from the faculty and software assessments at a 400 micrometer level of tolerance (p=0.036), whereas the faculty assessment was not significantly different from the software assessment at a 300 micrometer level of tolerance (p=0.69). The evaluation of tooth #19 resulted in no significant differences between faculty members (p=0.94) or students (p=0.21) and the software at a level of tolerance of 400 micrometers. This study indicates that students can learn to self-assess their work using self-reflection in conjunction with faculty guidance and that it may be possible to use software-based evaluation tools to assist in faculty calibration and as objective grading tools.

  12. Faculty Perceptions of Teaching in Undergraduate Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelzaher, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the attitudes of computer science faculty members towards undergraduate teaching. The questions addressed in this study are: (1) How important is effective teaching to computer science faculty members at the undergraduate level and how important do they perceive effective teaching to be to their…

  13. Faculty Perceptions of Teaching in Undergraduate Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelzaher, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the attitudes of computer science faculty members towards undergraduate teaching. The questions addressed in this study are: (1) How important is effective teaching to computer science faculty members at the undergraduate level and how important do they perceive effective teaching to be to their…

  14. Perceptions about Plagiarism between Faculty and Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Serene

    2010-01-01

    The problem. Through observation and the review of literature, students often receive inconsistent and vague messages about plagiarism from faculty. Marcoux (2002) and Roig (2001) found a lack of consensus between faculty concerning definitions and forms of plagiarism. Although some students develop skills in order to avoid plagiarism, almost half…

  15. Perceptions about Plagiarism between Faculty and Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Serene

    2010-01-01

    The problem. Through observation and the review of literature, students often receive inconsistent and vague messages about plagiarism from faculty. Marcoux (2002) and Roig (2001) found a lack of consensus between faculty concerning definitions and forms of plagiarism. Although some students develop skills in order to avoid plagiarism, almost half…

  16. Investigating Veterinary Medicine Faculty Perceptions of Lecture Capture: Issues, Concerns, and Promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Alison C; Demirbilek, Muhammet

    2016-01-01

    Lecture capture technology is becoming more pervasive in today's classrooms. Students are demanding their lectures be recorded, but many instructors remain resistant. The goal of this study was to investigate faculty perceptions of lecture capture and to understand their concerns with the technology. Through a review of the existing literature, three common reasons for not recording were identified: impact on class attendance, incompatible pedagogy, and technical concerns. To test the hypotheses, an electronic survey was created and distributed to the faculty of a veterinary college in the southeastern US. The survey included both quantitative and qualitative questions. An invitation was emailed to all 134 faculty members, garnering 50 responses. Results were consistent with the hypotheses. Impact on class attendance, teaching styles, and technical considerations have dissuaded many instructors from adopting lecture capture technology. However, a fourth theme that emerged was faculty lack of awareness/familiarity. According to the qualitative responses, many faculty either did not know lecture recording was available in their teaching spaces or were not trained in how to use the technology. Recommendations for future research include distributing the survey campus-wide and providing more opportunities for faculty training. It would also be worthwhile to repeat the survey after providing more information and training materials to faculty, or after switching from an opt-in to an opt-out approach, to see whether perceptions have changed among the college's faculty.

  17. Volunteerism among Dental Hygienists: The Relationship between a Practice Act Incentive, Behaviors, Perceptions and Motivational Orientations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilkie, Sandra D; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J

    2015-01-01

    ... courses This study compared registered dental hygienists' donations of time and professional expertise, perceptions of volunteerism and motivational orientations as they practice in both the presence...

  18. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Lecture Recording in a Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrickman, Ashleigh Landis; Stamatakis, Mary K.; Elliott, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To describe students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the impact of lecture recording in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. Methods. Second- and third-year pharmacy students and faculty members completed an anonymous survey instrument regarding their perceptions of lecture recording with 2 classroom lecture capture software programs, Camtasia Studio and Wimba Classroom. Results. Most students (82%) responded that Camtasia was very helpful and almost half (49%) responded that Wimba Classroom was helpful (pstudents reported being more likely to miss a class that was recorded; however, few students (10%) reported using recordings as a substitute for attending class. The most common concern of faculty members was decreased student attendance (27%). Conclusion. Pharmacy students consider lecture recordings beneficial, and they use the recordings primarily to review the lecture. While faculty members reported concerns with decreased attendance, few students reported using recordings as an alternative to class attendance. PMID:24159206

  19. GSBPP Faculty Perceptions of Synchronous Distance Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    number of products in live Web conferencing and eLearning for the corporate and academic sectors. Elluminate Live is their specific product for DL...limitations of online learning in the context of the student, the instructor, and the tenured faculty. International Journal on ELearning , 7(1), 5. Berg...Building upon an interdependent system. International Journal on ELearning , 7(2), 245. Hagner, P. R., & Schneebeck, C. A. (2001). Engaging the faculty

  20. Faculty perception of bullying in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Claudia A; Cannella, Barbara L; Wantland, Dean

    2013-01-01

    This article is a report of a study conducted to determine the prevalence of bullying among faculty members in schools or colleges of nursing. The issue of bullying of nursing faculty in the academic setting is of interest in terms of recruitment, retention, job satisfaction, and the overall quality of the work environment. This cross-sectional, descriptive study of faculty in three northeastern states of the United States was carried out in 2010. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) was used to survey faculty members in schools of nursing who award a baccalaureate degree (or higher) in nursing. A total of 473 faculty members met the inclusion criteria and responded to the NAQ-R. An iterative exploratory principal components analysis with orthogonal rotation was performed. Of the original 22 items, 13 were retained to measure the experiences of negative acts in the nursing faculty workplaces. The mean total score for the 13-item instrument was 17.90 (SD = 6.07) and ranged from 13 to 56. The resulting components structure produced three clear subscales identifying the experiences of verbal abuse, physical abuse, and devaluing. The revised 13-item instrument had a Cronbach's alpha value of .88. Experiences of bullying were reported in 169 of the 473 (36%) respondents. A significant correlation was found between meeting frequency and the report of bullying (r = .18, P ≤ .001). Administrators and senior faculty were more likely than expected to be the perpetrators of bullying. If the leaders are identified as bullies, the environment cannot be perceived as supportive and healthy. These unhealthy environments may have serious consequences related to retaining nursing faculty.

  1. 25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J E; de Vries, J; Iacopino, A M

    2008-12-01

    Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.

  2. Dental Hygiene Faculty Calibration Using Two Accepted Standards for Calculus Detection: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Lisa J; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J; Peterson, Teri; Bowen, Denise M

    2016-08-01

    Faculty calibration studies for calculus detection use two different standards for examiner evaluation, yet the only therapeutic modality that can be used for nonsurgical periodontal treatment is scaling/root debridement or planing. In this study, a pretest-posttest design was used to assess the feasibility of faculty calibration for calculus detection using two accepted standards: that established by the Central Regional Dental Testing Service, Inc. (CRDTS; readily detectible calculus) and the gold standard for scaling/root debridement (root roughness). Four clinical dental hygiene faculty members out of five possible participants at Halifax Community College agreed to participate. The participants explored calculus on the 16 assigned teeth (64 surfaces) of four patients. Calculus detection scores were calculated before and after training. Kappa averages using CRDTS criteria were 0.561 at pretest and 0.631 at posttest. Kappa scores using the scaling/root debridement or planing standard were 0.152 at pretest and 0.271 at posttest. The scores indicated improvement from moderate (Kappa=0.41-0.60) to substantial agreement (Kappa=0.61-0.80) following training using the CRDTS standard. Although this result differed qualitatively and Kappas were significantly different from 0, the differences for pre- to post-Kappas for patient-rater dyads using CRDTS were not statistically significant (p=0.778). There was no difference (p=0.913) in Kappa scores pre- to post-training using the scaling/root debridement standard. Despite the small number of participants in this study, the results indicated that training to improve interrater reliability to substantial agreement was feasible using the CRDTS standard but not using the gold standard. The difference may have been due to greater difficulty in attaining agreement regarding root roughness. Future studies should include multiple training sessions with patients using the same standard for scaling/root debridement used for

  3. Research-based assessment affordances and constraints: Perceptions of physics faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Adrian; McKagan, Sarah B.; Martinuk, Mathew Sandy; Bell, Alexander; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] To help faculty use research-based materials in a more significant way, we learn about their perceived needs and desires and use this information to suggest ways for the physics education research community to address these needs. When research-based resources are well aligned with the perceived needs of faculty, faculty members will more readily take them up. We used phenomenographic interviews of ordinary physics faculty and department chairs to identify four families of issues that faculty have around research-based assessments (RBAs). First, many faculty are interested in using RBAs but need help with the practicalities of administering RBAs: how to find them, which ones there are, and how to administer them. Second, at the same time, many faculty think that RBAs are limited and do not measure many of the things they care about, or are not applicable in their classes. They want assessments to measure skills, perceptions, and specific concepts. Third, many faculty want to turn to communities of other faculty and experts to help them interpret their assessment results and suggest other ways to do assessment. They want to better understand their assessment results by comparing to others and interacting with faculty from other schools to learn about how they do assessment. Fourth, many faculty consider their courses in the broader contexts of accountability and their departments. They want help with assessment in these broader contexts. We also discuss how a faculty member's role in their department and type of institution influence their perceived wants and needs around assessment.

  4. Faculty and second-year medical student perceptions of active learning in an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Alexander; Harris, David M

    2016-12-01

    Patients expect physicians to be lifelong learners who are able to interpret and evaluate diagnostic tests, and most medical schools list the development of lifelong learning in their program objectives. However, lecture is the most often utilized form of teaching in the first two years and is considered passive learning. The current generation of medical students has many characteristics that should support active learning pedagogies. The purpose of this study was to analyze student and faculty perceptions of active learning in an integrated medical curriculum at the second-year mark, where students have been exposed to multiple educational pedagogies. The first hypothesis of the study was that faculty would favor active learning methods. The second hypothesis was that Millennial medical students would favor active learning due to their characteristics. Primary faculty for years 1 and 2 and second-year medical students were recruited for an e-mail survey consisting of 12 questions about active learning and lecture. Students perceived that lecture and passive pedagogies were more effective for learning, whereas faculty felt active and collaborative learning was more effective. Students believed that more content should be covered by lecture than faculty. There were also significant differences in perceptions of what makes a good teacher. Students and faculty both felt that lack of time in the curriculum and preparation time were barriers for faculty. The data suggest that students are not familiar with the process of learning and that more time may be needed to help students develop lifelong learning skills.

  5. Student and faculty perceptions of effective clinical instructors in ADN programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac-Caille, A M; Oermann, M H

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perceptions of associate degree nursing (ADN) students and faculty of characteristics of effective clinical teachers and determine whether there were differences between these two groups. A survey was conducted of 292 students in various levels of their ADN programs and 59 faculty members from the same five programs, which were randomly selected from across Michigan. Data were collected using the Nursing Clinical Effectiveness Inventory, which includes 48 characteristics of effective clinical instructors arranged in five subscales. Students identified "demonstrates clinical skills and judgment" as the most important characteristic of effective clinical instructors, while faculty identified "explains clearly" as the most important characteristic. There was agreement on 6 of the top 10 characteristics identified by both groups. Both groups rated "directs student to useful literature in nursing" as the least important characteristic of effective clinical instructors. The students' and faculty's perceptions of effective clinical instructors differed by subscales, with students identifying evaluation characteristics as most important (mean = 4.73, SD = .42) and faculty identifying interpersonal relationships as most important (mean = 4.72, SD = .31). A t test indicated a significant difference between student and faculty means for the interpersonal relationships subscales, with faculty rating this group of characteristics as more important than students did (t = 2.49, p = .0 14).

  6. A Desire for Growth: Online Full-Time Faculty's Perceptions of Evaluation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith DeCosta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available College and universities evaluate the teaching performance of faculty members in a variety of ways. Benefits to effective faculty evaluation include advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning, as well as improving the functionality and innovation of courses, curriculum, departments, and ultimately the broader community (Boyer, 1990; Glassick, Huber, & Maeroff, 1997. While there is ample research related to the evaluation of faculty in traditional settings, there have been fewer studies examining online faculty members’ perceptions of evaluation processes. Further, due to the growth of online education, the existing evaluation scales, including those used in traditional settings, have been called into question (Berk, 2013; Hathorn & Hathorn, 2010; Rothman, Romeo, Brennan, & Mitchell, 2011. This qualitative study examines one university’s online full-time faculty and their perceptions of the tools and processes used to evaluate their teaching. Through a systematic qualitative content analysis of survey data, findings indicate that online faculty members have a desire to grow as instructors, focusing little on modality or task-oriented expectations as a means for growth. Participants expressed an interest in holistic, descriptive evaluation feedback by a range of stakeholders, particularly those with content knowledge. Study findings have implications for administrators and other stakeholders related to online full-time faculty, including the processes and documents through which they are evaluated.

  7. Mass Communication and Journalism Faculty's Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Email Communication with College Students: A Nationwide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Bradford L.; Adams, Jennifer Wood; Brunner, Brigitta R.

    2009-01-01

    Nearly 700 US journalism and mass communication faculty (all teaching personnel) reported their perceptions of student email use via a web-based survey. This nationwide study focused on the content of email sent by faculty to students, email's effectiveness, and email's effect on student learning. Comparisons were made based on faculty gender,…

  8. Mass Communication and Journalism Faculty's Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Email Communication with College Students: A Nationwide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Bradford L.; Adams, Jennifer Wood; Brunner, Brigitta R.

    2009-01-01

    Nearly 700 US journalism and mass communication faculty (all teaching personnel) reported their perceptions of student email use via a web-based survey. This nationwide study focused on the content of email sent by faculty to students, email's effectiveness, and email's effect on student learning. Comparisons were made based on faculty gender,…

  9. Assessment of the perception of smile esthetics by laypersons, dental students and dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cracel-Nogueira, Flávia; Pinho, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the esthetic perception of some components of the smile such as gingival exposure, level of the gingival margins, length of the crowns, maxillary midline and inter-incisor diastema by laypersons, dental students and dental professionals. Six hundred and thirty-four Portuguese people (292 laypersons, 241 dental students and 101 practitioners) assessed the esthetics of 13 altered pictures of the same smile arranged at random. The manipulated components (gingival exposure, level of the gingival margins, length of the crowns, maxillary midline and inter-incisor diastema) were altered using Adobe Photoshop® CS6 software. The classification of the pictures was done using the visual analogue scale (VAS), scored 1 to 10. The responses were then analyzed and processed with SPSS® version 21.0 using tests of average equality and correlation. The medium smile was the most appreciated smile, whereas the high smile and diastemas were considered to be the least esthetic. Among all the modified parameters, the midline shift was the least perceptible. The preference for asymmetry of the gingival margin at the maxillary lateral incisors (MLI) and the symmetry in the length of the crowns of the maxillary central incisors (MCI) reflected the importance given to MCI during smiling. Gender did not influence the scores given, except for gummy smiles, while younger people gave the highest scores. Regarding academic/professional training, there was an intra-group homogeneity of opinions as laypersons tended to give higher scores and professionals tended to give lower scores, but with no correlation between the variables. The fact that the laypersons had received orthodontic treatment, or not, had no influence on their perception. Laypersons, dental students and dental professionals had different perceptions of attractiveness when evaluating different modified features, except for diastemas, but with no significant differences between them. Gender

  10. The Effects of Political Culture of Fear on Student Perceptions of Leadership in Student-Faculty Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amin Marei Mosa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a political culture of fear and power distance on student perceptions regarding the leader-member exchange theory (LMX) relationship with faculty, and their perceptions of nature of leadership in Libyan business schools. 650 Faculty members and students from business school in seven Libyan…

  11. Evaluation of an outreach education model over five years: Perception of dental students and their outreach clinical mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisnert, L; Redmo Emanuelsson, I; Papia, E; Ericson, D

    2017-05-01

    The objective was to investigate changes in students' and clinical mentors' perceptions of a model for outreach education over a 5-year period, 2006-2010. Two cohorts of last-year students of a dental problem-based curriculum and their clinical mentors in the Public Dental Service (PDS) were invited to respond to a questionnaire. In 2006, 85% of 54 students and 72% of their 54 mentors responded; 98% of 40 students and 88% of 41 of the mentors did so in 2010. Participants scored their level of agreement with different statements on a numeric rating scale and gave comments. Dental students and their clinical mentors reported that they shared a consistent and favourable perception of this outreach education model over 5 years. The students reported increased professional confidence and self-reliance. Clinical mentors expressed a transfer of knowledge to their clinics. Differences in scoring were seen between students and mentors for two statements in 2006 and two statements in 2010 (P students perceived that they became self-reliant, which may facilitate their transition from being a student to becoming a professional. The current model supports exchange and professional development for students, faculty and outreach clinics. This leads us to look at outreach education as an opportunity to form a mutual learning community comprised of the outreach clinics and the dental school. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. U.S. Dental School Deans’ Perceptions of the Rising Cost of Dental Education and Borrowing Pressures on Dental Students: Report of Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Dora Elías; Garrison, Gwen E; Feldman, Cecile A; Anderson, Eugene L; Cook, Bryan J; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    This report presents findings from a survey of U.S. dental school deans designed to capture their perceptions regarding the rising cost of dental education and its impact on borrowing by dental students to finance their education. The survey included questions about factors influencing the cost of dental education, concerns about dental student borrowing, and financial awareness resources for students. The survey was distributed to the deans of all 63 U.S. dental schools in January 2013; 42 deans responded, for a 67% response rate. The results indicate that, according to the responding deans, new clinical technologies, technology costs, and central university taxes are the main factors that contribute to the increasing cost of dental education. Coupled with reduced state appropriations at public dental schools and declines in private giving at all dental schools, dental school deans face a perplexing set of financial management challenges. Tuition and fees are a primary source of revenue for all dental schools; however, many deans do not have total control over the cost of attending their schools since tuition and fees are often tied to mandates and policies from the parent university and the state legislature. The findings of this study indicate that U.S. dental school deans are aware of and concerned about the impact of increases in tuition and fees on dental student debt and that they are using a variety of strategies to address the growth in dental student borrowing.

  13. A One-Day Dental Faculty Workshop in Writing Multiple-Choice Questions: An Impact Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlFaris, Eiad; Naeem, Naghma; Irfan, Farhana; Qureshi, Riaz; Saad, Hussain; Al Sadhan, Ra'ed; Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2015-11-01

    Long training workshops on the writing of exam questions have been shown to be effective; however, the effectiveness of short workshops needs to be demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a one-day, seven-hour faculty development workshop at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, on the quality of multiple-choice questions (MCQs). Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model was used. Participants' satisfaction (Kirkpatrick's Level 1) was evaluated with a post-workshop questionnaire. A quasi-experimental, randomized separate sample, pretest-posttest design was used to assess the learning effect (Kirkpatrick's Level 2). To evaluate transfer of learning to practice (Kirkpatrick's Level 3), MCQs created by ten faculty members as a result of the training were assessed. To assess Kirkpatrick's Level 4 regarding institutional change, interviews with three key leaders of the school were conducted, coded, and analyzed. A total of 72 course directors were invited to and attended some part of the workshop; all 52 who attended the entire workshop completed the satisfaction form; and 22 of the 36 participants in the experimental group completed the posttest. The results showed that all 52 participants were highly satisfied with the workshop, and significant positive changes were found in the faculty members' knowledge and the quality of their MCQs with effect sizes of 0.7 and 0.28, respectively. At the institutional level, the interviews demonstrated positive structural changes in the school's assessment system. Overall, this one-day item-writing faculty workshop resulted in positive changes at all four of Kirkpatrick's levels; these effects suggest that even a short training session can improve a dental school's assessment of its students.

  14. Research-based assessment affordances and constraints: Perceptions of physics faculty

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    Madsen, Adrian; Martinuk, Mathew "Sandy"; Bell, Alexander; Sayre, Eleanor C

    2015-01-01

    To help faculty use research-based materials in a more significant way, we learn about their perceived needs and desires and use this information to suggest ways for the Physics Education Research community to address these needs. When research-based resources are well aligned with the perceived needs of faculty, faculty members will more readily take them up. We used phenomenographic interviews of ordinary physics faculty and department chairs to identify four families of issues that faculty have around research-based assessments (RBA). First, many faculty are interested in using RBAs but have practical needs around how to do so: how to find them, which ones there are, and how to administer them. They want help addressing these needs. Second, at the same time, many faculty think that RBAs are limited and don't measure many of the things they care about, or aren't applicable in their classes. They want assessments to measure skills, perceptions, and specific concepts. Third, many faculty want to turn to commu...

  15. FACULTY PERCEPTION OF PBL CURRICULUM IN MELAKA MANIPAL MEDICAL COLLEGE,MANIPAL, INDIA

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    Guruprasd Rao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Present study was carried out to gauge the perception of the faculty members of Melaka Manipal Medical College (MMMC, Manipal, India regarding the problem-based learning (PBL curriculum. The faculty were divided into those with prior experience of PBL (group A and those without it (group B and were asked to respond to a Likert scale questionnaire regarding the PBL curriculum. Majority of the faculty members agreed that PBL curriculum helps students to acquire critical thinking skills and has made them more responsible towards self-study. Majority of the inexperienced faculty members felt that students tend to selectively prepare for certain learning objectives rather than for the entire problem whereas majority of the experienced faculty disagreed (p<0.01. A greater majority of those in group A than group B opined that students initially reluctant to participate in PBL discussions improve their participation over the year (p<0.05. Majority of faculty in group A agreed that student assessment method currently followed in PBL is adequate to grade student involvement in PBL whereas half of those in group B disagreed. Most of the faculty members in both groups felt that the present PBL-lecture hybrid system is better than the entirely lecture-based curriculum. Most faculty in group B would like more PBL sessions to be introduced whereas most of those in group A disagreed. A good number in both groups felt that greater integration of the different disciplines in PBL is desirable.

  16. Engineering students' and faculty perceptions of teaching methods and the level of faculty involvement that promotes academic success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpilo, Lacy N.

    Student academic success is a top priority of higher education institutions in the United States and the trend of students leaving school prior to finishing their degree is a serious concern. Accountability has become a large part of university and college ratings and perceived success. Retention is one component of the accountability metrics used by accreditation agencies. In addition, there are an increasing number of states allocating funds based in part on retention (Seidman, 2005). Institutions have created initiatives, programs, and even entire departments to address issues related to student academic success to promote retention. Universities and colleges have responded by focusing on methods to retain and better serve students. Retention and student academic success is a primary concern for high education institutions; however, engineering education has unique retention issues. The National Science Board (2004) reports a significant decline in the number of individuals in the United States who are training to become engineers, despite the fact that the number of jobs that utilize an engineering background continues to increase. Engineering education has responded to academic success issues by changing curriculum and pedagogical methods (Sheppard, 2001). This descriptive study investigates the perception of engineering students and faculty regarding teaching methods and faculty involvement to create a picture of what is occurring in engineering education. The population was the engineering students and faculty of Colorado State University's College of Engineering. Data from this research suggests that engaging teaching methods are not being used as often as research indicates they should and that there is a lack of student-faculty interaction outside of the classroom. This research adds to the breadth of knowledge and understanding of the current environment of engineering education. Furthermore, the data allows engineering educators and other higher

  17. Faculty Retention factors at European Business Schools. How Deans and Faculty Perceptions Differ.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Moratis; P.J. van Baalen (Peter); L.H. Teunter (Linda); P.H.A.M. Verhaegen

    2005-01-01

    textabstractDevelopments in the management education environment present business schools with several challenges. Among these, perhaps the most important to address relates to a mission-critical resource for business schools: faculty retention. In this paper, we position and examine this problem

  18. Library School Faculty Member Perceptions Regarding Faculty Status for Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Paul Alan

    2010-01-01

    The faculties of the library schools listed as ALA-accredited are directly involved in setting the direction of the education provided to academic librarians through curriculum development and teaching. The curricula and teaching at ALA-accredited library schools revolve around aspects of librarianship such as providing research assistance at a…

  19. Faculty Use and Perceptions of Electronic Mail: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantz, Karen; Wilkins, Marilyn

    1995-01-01

    A survey received 58 responses from business faculty before and 46 after installation of a local area network. After installation, time spent on electronic mail and number of messages increased. Respondents were positive about speed, reliability, and paper reduction, negative about lack of user-friendliness and unclear instructions. (SK)

  20. Assessing Faculty Perceptions of Free Educational Resources: One Institution's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Providing financial incentives to faculty who adopt free educational resources in place of traditional textbooks is becoming more common in U.S. higher education institutions. The University of Mississippi (UM) offered liberal arts instructors the opportunity to apply for internal funding to replace one traditional textbook in their classroom with…

  1. Physical Education Pedagogy Faculty Perceptions of Journal Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Stephen; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Phillips, Sharon R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined perceived journal quality by physical education pedagogy faculty members. Participants (N = 273) were identified in three ways and recruited through e-mail. Based on research in other fields investigating journal quality and on publication patterns in physical education, a web-based survey was used to examine (a) whether…

  2. Perceptions of pharmacy students, faculty members, and administrators on the use of technology in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Hayney, Mary S; Marsh, Wallace; Neville, Michael W; O'Barr, Stephen; Sheets, Erin D; Calhoun, Larry D

    2013-05-13

    To gather and evaluate the perceptions of students, faculty members, and administrators regarding the frequency and appropriateness of classroom technology use. Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom. Upper-level administrators and information technology professionals were also interviewed to ascertain overall technology goals and identify criteria used to adopt new classroom technologies. Four hundred sixty-six students, 124 faculty members, and 12 administrators participated in the survey. The most frequently used and valued types of classroom technology were course management systems, audience response systems, and lecture capture. Faculty members and students agreed that faculty members appropriately used course management systems and audience response systems. Compared with their counterparts, tech-savvy, and male students reported significantly greater preference for increased use of classroom technology. Eighty-six percent of faculty members reported having changed their teaching methodologies to meet student needs, and 91% of the students agreed that the use of technology met their needs. Pharmacy colleges and schools use a variety of technologies in their teaching methods, which have evolved to meet the needs of the current generation of students. Students are satisfied with the appropriateness of technology, but many exhibit preferences for even greater use of technology in the classroom.

  3. Using the Virtual World of Second Life in Veterinary Medicine: Student and Faculty Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mary M; Artemiou, Elpida; McGonigle, Dee; Conan, Anne; Sithole, Fortune; Yvorchuk-St Jean, Kathleen

    2017-09-08

    Virtual worlds are emerging technologies that can enhance student learning by encouraging active participation through simulation in immersive environments. At Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM), the virtual world of Second Life was piloted as an educational platform for first-semester students to practice clinical reasoning in a simulated veterinary clinical setting. Under the supervision of one facilitator, four groups of nine students met three times to process a clinical case using Second Life. In addition, three groups of four clinical faculty observed one Second Life meeting. Questionnaires using a 4-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree to 4=strongly agree) and open-ended questions were used to assess student and clinical faculty perceptions of the Second Life platform. Perception scores of students (M=2.7, SD=0.7) and clinical faculty (M=2.7, SD=0.5) indicate that Second Life provides authentic and realistic learning experiences. In fact, students (M=3.4, SD=0.6) and clinical faculty (M=2.9, SD=1.0) indicate that Second Life should be offered to future students. Moreover, content analyses of open-ended responses from students and faculty support the use of Second Life based on reported advantages indicating that Second Life offers a novel and effective instructional method. Ultimately, results indicate that students and clinical faculty had positive educational experiences using Second Life, suggesting the need for further investigation into its application within the curriculum.

  4. Twitter in the Higher Education Classroom: A Student and Faculty Assessment of Use and Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemin, Stephen J.; Smelser, Lisa K.; Bernot, Melody J.

    2014-01-01

    Social networking has become a prominent communication method in recent years. The objective of this study was to assess social media use and perception of utility in higher education classrooms among faculty, graduate, and undergraduate cohorts. As a case study, Twitter was included into a semester course to disseminate relevant course…

  5. Perceptions of the Dilemma--Order versus Freedom at Managing Faculty: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaferye, Figen; Agaoglu, Esmahan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine the perceptions of the middle management (deans and heads of departments) and academicians on the dilemma order versus freedom at faculty management. It discusses how this dilemma is seen at an operational level and how it can be managed at university where both parties--with a managerial role or not--are…

  6. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty: A Qualitative Single-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Kristina R.

    2012-01-01

    Educators are concerned that academic dishonesty is increasing among students, particularly in higher education. There is not a single definition of academic dishonesty accepted by all stakeholders in the field of education. Most studies of academic dishonesty do not include both student and faculty perceptions of academic dishonesty. An in-depth…

  7. Faculty Perceptions Regarding Authentication of Online Students' Identities and Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Stephanie Renee

    2012-01-01

    This study explored undergraduate teaching faculty's perceptions regarding using biometric-based technologies to reduce academic dishonesty in online classes. The first objective was to develop a baseline of the respondents' concerns toward and experience with using biometrics; attitudes, experience, and mitigation strategies used to…

  8. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty: A Qualitative Single-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Kristina R.

    2012-01-01

    Educators are concerned that academic dishonesty is increasing among students, particularly in higher education. There is not a single definition of academic dishonesty accepted by all stakeholders in the field of education. Most studies of academic dishonesty do not include both student and faculty perceptions of academic dishonesty. An in-depth…

  9. Faculty Perceptions Regarding Authentication of Online Students' Identities and Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Stephanie Renee

    2012-01-01

    This study explored undergraduate teaching faculty's perceptions regarding using biometric-based technologies to reduce academic dishonesty in online classes. The first objective was to develop a baseline of the respondents' concerns toward and experience with using biometrics; attitudes, experience, and mitigation strategies used to…

  10. Academic Integrity, Remix Culture, Globalization: A Canadian Case Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Tokaryk, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a case study at a Canadian university that used a combination of surveys and focus groups to explore faculty members' and students' perceptions of plagiarism. The research suggests that the globalization of education and remix culture have contributed to competing and contradictory understandings of plagiarism…

  11. Academic Integrity, Remix Culture, Globalization: A Canadian Case Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Tokaryk, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a case study at a Canadian university that used a combination of surveys and focus groups to explore faculty members' and students' perceptions of plagiarism. The research suggests that the globalization of education and remix culture have contributed to competing and contradictory understandings of plagiarism…

  12. Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Integration, Affordances, and Challenges of Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtaiwa, Fawzi Fayez; Khaled, Ahmed; Dukmak, Samir

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, faculty members' perceptions of the integration, affordances, and challenges of mobile learning (m-learning) were investigated through semi-structured interviews. The results showed that participants' integration of m-learning varies and tends to focus on select activities. At the same time, participants recognized…

  13. Innovation pedagogy in the MARIHE program : A case study on faculty perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godonoga, Ana; Güney, Isil; Kopelyan, Sofya; Yasmin, Nowreen; Holz, Oliver; Aleksandrovich, Maria; Zoglowek, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    The paper promotes awareness of innovation pedagogy in European higher education by presenting the results of a mixed methods exploratory case study on faculty perceptions of innovation pedagogy standards in a Joint Master Degree program in Research and Innovation in Higher Education (MaRIHE) and on

  14. Multiculturalism and the American Liberal Arts College: Faculty Perceptions of the Role of Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ana M. Martinez; Salkever, Katya

    2004-01-01

    The incompatibility of American liberal education and multiculturalism ground this qualitative study. Given this assertion and that teaching and learning is central to the liberal educational mission, we explore faculty perceptions of the relationship between multiculturalism and liberal educational pedagogy. The findings of this study suggest…

  15. Dental Attitudes, Perceptions, and Treatment Needs in a University Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Leonard A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Dental attitudes of college students were examined: frequency of past visits; subceptibility to dental conditions; seriousness, preventability, and treatability of dental conditions; and satisfaction with dentists, practices, and other dental conditions. (Authors/CJ)

  16. [Innovative activity of dental faculty staff of Omsk State Medical University: results, problems and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, A I; Gudinova, Zh V

    2015-01-01

    The article summarizes innovative activity in Omsk State Medical University (OSMU) and contains the review of innovative developments of staff of dental faculty of OSMU (a line of gels for caries prevetion, the DENTEST diagnostic unit, technology of tooth shape modular restoration, personified therapy.of patients with periodontal disease, caries diagnosis and periodontontal disease prognosis software, a set of the training materials on esthetic modeling of teeth, personification of clinical approaches in oral bioaesthetic rehabilitation, etc.). The analysis of the factors stimulating and complicating innovative detail in medical school, problems of introduction of medical innovations, lack of system of an assessment of medical technologies in Russia, regulations of the organization of innovative activity in medical schools is carried out, the prospects of their solution connected with decision-making at the state level are formulated.

  17. Open access behaviours and perceptions of health sciences faculty and roles of information professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwoga, Edda T; Questier, Frederik

    2015-03-01

    This study sought to investigate the faculty's awareness, attitudes and use of open access, and the role of information professionals in supporting open access (OA) scholarly communication in Tanzanian health sciences universities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 librarians, while questionnaires were physically distributed to 415 faculty members in all eight Tanzanian health sciences universities, with a response rate of 71.1%. The study found that most faculty members were aware about OA issues. However, the high level of OA awareness among faculty members did not translate into actual dissemination of faculty's research outputs through OA web avenues. A small proportion of faculty's research materials was made available as OA. Faculty were more engaged with OA journal publishing than with self-archiving practices. Senior faculty with proficient technical skills were more likely to use open access than junior faculty. Major barriers to OA usage were related to ICT infrastructure, awareness, skills, author-pay model, and copyright and plagiarism concerns. Interviews with librarians revealed that there was a strong support for promoting OA issues on campus; however, this positive support with various open access-related tasks did not translate into actual action. It is thus important for librarians and OA administrators to consider all these factors for effective implementation of OA projects in research and academic institutions. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study focusing on the health sciences faculty's and librarians' behaviours and perceptions of open access initiatives in Tanzania and reveals findings that are useful for planning and implementing open access initiatives in other institutions with similar conditions. © 2015 Health Libraries Journal.

  18. Perceptions of veterinary faculty members regarding their responsibility and preparation to teach non-technical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, India F; Bogue, E Grady

    2010-01-01

    The development of non-technical competencies has become an important component of veterinary education. In this study, we determined faculty perspectives regarding their perceived involvement and ability in the cultivation of these competencies. A survey was administered to faculty members at five institutions. Respondents were asked whether the competency should be taught in their own courses and how prepared they felt to teach and evaluate the competency. Responses were analyzed by participant institution, gender, terminal degree and year, discipline, rank, and teaching experience. More than 90% of faculty respondents reported a personal responsibility to teach or cultivate critical thinking skills, communication skills, self-development skills, and ethical skills, with more than 85% also agreeing to a role in skills such as interpersonal skills, creativity, and self-management. The lowest percentages were seen for crisis and incident management (64%) and business skills (56%). Perceived preparedness to teach and evaluate these competencies paralleled the preceding findings, especially for the four consensus competencies and self-management. Faculty preparedness was lowest for business skills. Junior faculty were somewhat less likely than others to perceive a responsibility to teach non-technical competencies; however, instructors were more prepared to teach and evaluate business skills than were other faculty. Institutional trends were evident in faculty preparation. Although male faculty and non-DVM faculty tended to report a higher degree of preparedness, few differences reached statistical significance. Faculty perceptions of their responsibility to teach non-technical competencies vary by competency and parallel their perceived preparedness to teach and evaluate them.

  19. Perception of HIV/AIDS among preclinical dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboro, H O; Azodo, C C; Sede, M A

    2010-12-01

    To determine the knowledge, attitude and willingness of preclinical dental students to treat HIV/AIDS patients in the future. The sample comprised 150 students of both genders drawn from the third and fourth year dental students of the University of Benin, Benin City. One hundred and fifty questionnaires were self-administered, with 139 (92.6%) retrieval. The parameters measured were knowledge, status, immunization against hepatitis B virus, willingness to treat, knowledge of post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and its protocol in the of University of Benin Teaching hospital (UBTH). Data analysis showed that 100 (71.9%) students rated their knowledge of HIV/AIDS as high and very high. Sixty-three (45.3%) students thought that HIV was a contagious disease while 46 (33.1%) felt HIV was more infectious than tuberculosis or any of the strains of hepatitis virus. Only 59 (42.4%) students knew their HIV status. One hundred and twenty seven (91.4%) students felt that professional oral health care will be beneficial to HIV/AIDS patients; while fifty-one students (36.7%) are not prepared to administer dental care to HIV/AIDS patients in future. Majority of respondents adjudged health workers to be more at risk than sex workers. Forty students comprising 28.8% of the study population had been immunized against Hepatitis B. Ninety- four (67.7%) students had no knowledge of PEP while 122 (87.8%) students did not know the PEP protocol in UBTH. Although a large number of these students claim to be knowledgeable about HIV/AIDS. It is obvious that a true understanding is lacking. Concerted effort should be made to change their perception by implementing a curriculum designed to enhance the knowledge of dental students; if we hope to save HIV/AIDS patients from the discrimination of future healthcare givers.

  20. Loss of idealism or realistic optimism? A cross-sectional analysis of dental hygiene students' and registered dental hygienists' professional identity perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champine, J M; Inglehart, M R; Furgeson, D; Halaris, J F; Fitzgerald, M; Danciu, T E; Kinney, J S

    2017-06-21

    The dental hygiene profession in the U.S. is in the process of establishing a direct access model of care and contributing to the creation of the profession of a dental therapist. The objectives were to analyse the professional role perceptions of dental hygiene students and registered dental hygienists in these times of change. Specifically, it was explored whether dental hygiene students' current professional identities differ (i) from their expected future identities, and (ii) from dental hygienists' current and (iii) past identities. Survey data were collected from 215 dental hygiene students concerning their present and future role perceptions, and from 352 registered dental hygienists concerning their present and past professional identity perceptions. Students' future professional identity perceptions were even more positive than their very positive current perceptions of their professional role components. Students' current perceptions of professional pride, professional ambition, work ethic and patient relations were more positive than dental hygienists' current perceptions of these professional role components. A comparison of students' current perceptions with dental hygienists' current and retrospective descriptions showed that students were more positive than dental hygienists in each case. The fact that dental hygienists had less positive role perceptions than dental hygiene students might lead to the conclusion that a loss of idealism occurs over the course of a professional lifespan. However, dental hygienists actually improved their role perceptions over time and students' future descriptions were more positive than their current descriptions, supporting the interpretation that realistic optimism dominates professional role perceptions in these times of change. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Aesthetic perception of dental fluorosis--opinions of dentists and non-specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukleva, Maria P; Kondeva, Vesselina K; Isheva, Alexandra V; Petrova, Svetla G; Rimalovska, Sevda I

    2010-01-01

    Aesthetic perception of the changes in teeth appearance is one of the factors that makes a person undertake a dental treatment. The aim of this study was to survey dentists' and non-specialists' aesthetic perception of dental fluorosis. We recruited 120 young people (age range 18-22 years with little knowledge of dental fluorosis and 120 randomly selected dentists. Evaluation of the abnormalities in the teeth aesthetic appearance was conducted using cards specially designed for the purpose. The results suggest that changes in dental fluorosis, even in the mildest forms, are perceived as deviations in the aesthetic appearance of teeth. Non-specialists are more tolerant towards the changes characteristic of mild dental fluorosis compared with their reaction to other conditions that result in deviations in the type of dentition as a whole. Further studies are needed to more precisely determine the role of aesthetic perception in determining the indications for the complex treatment of dental fluorosis.

  2. The Use of Professionalism Scenarios in the Medical School Interview Process: Faculty and Interviewee Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Kleshinski, MD

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of professionalism scenarios on the medical school admissions process from applicant and faculty perspectives. Specifically, do completing professionalism scenarios as part of the medical school interview process have an impact on both the interviewee’s and the faculty’s perception of the process and outcome?Method: Ninety-one faculty interviewed 199 applicants from January 2007 through April 2007 at The University of Toledo College of Medicine. All applicants were asked one standard professionalism scenario in each of their two interviews. A total of six scenarios were used for the entire interviewing season in rotation every two months. A survey was administered by an admissions office staff member to both the interviewed applicants as well as faculty who conducted interviews about how these scenarios impacted their interview experience.Results: Asking applicants to respond to professionalism scenarios during the interview was described as having a positive influence on their interview experience. This was also associated with leaving an impression on the applicant about what our institution values in its students and contributed an element of personal reflection about what will be expected of them in the medical profession. Applicants more often reported that asking questions about professionalism was an important aspect of the interview than did faculty. Overall, there was an association between the interviewer’s perception of the applicant’s response and the interviewer’s assessment of professionalism.Conclusions: Professionalism scenarios can be a worthwhile tool for use in the admissions process. The interview process should encourage participation from faculty who value this as an important component in the evaluation of an applicant. Determinants of faculty perception of the role of assessing professionalism in the interview process should be investigated in future

  3. Students' Perceptions of Communications Provided by Faculty and Peer Leaders, Course Motivation, and Final Project Innovativeness in Capstone Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evert, Amanda Faith

    2011-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study. The purpose of this study was to assess students' perceptions of communications provided by faculty and peer leaders in relationship to both students' perceptions of their course motivation as well as their perceptions of the innovativeness of their final project in single and multidisciplinary capstone courses. The…

  4. Organizational Context and Female Faculty's Perception of the Climate for Women in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapinha, René; McCracken, Caitlin M; Warner, Erica T; Hill, Emorcia V; Reede, Joan Y

    2017-05-01

    Gender inequalities in the careers of faculty in academic medicine could partially be attributed to an organizational climate that can exclude or be nonsupportive of women faculty. This study explores the climate for women faculty from a systems perspective at the organizational and individual levels based on the perceptions of women faculty. Race differences were also investigated. Cross-sectional survey data from women faculty (N = 3127) at 13 purposively sampled medical schools and an institutional assessment of organizational characteristics were used. Organizational factors related to the climate for women were identified using bivariate statistics. The association between perceived climate for women and organizational characteristics, individual perceptions of the work environment and individual career, and personal characteristics with control variables were investigated using hierarchical linear regression models. Organizational effects by race/ethnicity were estimated using interaction terms. The climate for women faculty varied across institutions and by classification as minority-serving institutions (MSIs). Respondent's report of existence of an office for women's affairs, trust in leadership, and satisfaction with mentoring were positively associated with the climate for women. Perceived workplace discrimination and work-family conflict were inversely associated with a positive climate. No race/ethnicity differences were observed in the multivariable analysis. The climate for women faculty in academic medicine should not be regarded constant across organizations, specifically between MSIs and non-MSIs. Efforts to advance a positive climate for women could focus on improving trust in leadership, increasing support for structures/offices for women, and mitigating perceived discrimination and work-family conflict.

  5. Professional culture brokers: Nursing faculty perceptions of nursing culture and their role in student formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Susan M; Nickerson, Carolyn J

    2016-05-01

    Socialization, or formation of students to the professional nurse role, is an expectation of nursing education. This process is complex and challenging for students, who continue to experience culture shock moving from academe to practice settings. Viewing formation as enculturation is one way to address culture shock. Nursing faculty are key figures in this process, yet their views are not known. This focused ethnography study explored nursing faculty's perceptions about the culture of nursing and how they bring students into that culture. Data collected at two accredited, undergraduate pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs were analyzed using Leininger's four phases of data analysis. Four themes emerged: 1. The culture of nursing is multifaceted, multivalent and at times contradictory 2. Many factors interact and have influence on the culture of nursing 3. Navigating the subcultures (academia, service and organizational culture) is challenging for faculty, and 4. Nursing faculty believe that the right conditions facilitate the enculturation of students. Nursing faculty believe nursing has a professional culture and they bring students into that culture. Viewing the faculty role in enculturation to professional nursing as a culture broker can facilitate the process for students and mitigate the culture shock new graduate nurses experience.

  6. Awareness of Eco-Friendly Dentistry among Dental Faculty and Students of King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qarni, Mohammed A.; Alamri, Mohammed Abdullah; Alshaikh, Yahya A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Eco-friendly or green dentistry can be a reality by effectively designing dental clinics and using more eco-friendly materials in the clinical practice. Aim To determine the awareness of eco-friendly dentistry among dental faculty and students in preparation for future implementation. Materials and Methods Assessment of knowledge regarding eco-friendly dentistry was done using an 18 item self-administered questionnaire among 160 participants. After baseline data collection, the intervention was done by educating participants with a power point presentation. The post-intervention data was then collected for analysis. Statistical analysis was done using Wilcoxon’s signed rank test and one-way ANOVA. Results The educational intervention increased the knowledge about eco-friendly dentistry confirming the importance of continuing education. There was a statistically significant gain in knowledge among the participants after the presentation. The gain was highest for department of Preventive Dental Sciences (PDS) followed by Substitute Dental Sciences (SDS), No specialty, Maxillofacial Dental Sciences (MDS), and Restorative Dental Sciences (RDS) respectively. (F=5.5091, p<0.05). Conclusion Lack of knowledge of green dentistry amongst the dental fraternity is highly prevailing. The same can be substantiated with effective training in the respective fields if channelized through the curriculum in an educational set-up. PMID:27891464

  7. Awareness of Eco-Friendly Dentistry among Dental Faculty and Students of King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qarni, Mohammed A; Shakeela, Nasim Vahid; Alamri, Mohammed Abdullah; Alshaikh, Yahya A

    2016-10-01

    Eco-friendly or green dentistry can be a reality by effectively designing dental clinics and using more eco-friendly materials in the clinical practice. To determine the awareness of eco-friendly dentistry among dental faculty and students in preparation for future implementation. Assessment of knowledge regarding eco-friendly dentistry was done using an 18 item self-administered questionnaire among 160 participants. After baseline data collection, the intervention was done by educating participants with a power point presentation. The post-intervention data was then collected for analysis. Statistical analysis was done using Wilcoxon's signed rank test and one-way ANOVA. The educational intervention increased the knowledge about eco-friendly dentistry confirming the importance of continuing education. There was a statistically significant gain in knowledge among the participants after the presentation. The gain was highest for department of Preventive Dental Sciences (PDS) followed by Substitute Dental Sciences (SDS), No specialty, Maxillofacial Dental Sciences (MDS), and Restorative Dental Sciences (RDS) respectively. (F=5.5091, p<0.05). Lack of knowledge of green dentistry amongst the dental fraternity is highly prevailing. The same can be substantiated with effective training in the respective fields if channelized through the curriculum in an educational set-up.

  8. The child’s dental treatment: maternal perception

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    Marcelo Marcos de Oliveira Meira Filho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To verify the maternal perception of and behavior towards children’s dental treatment, as well as to analyze the opinion of the mothers on the need of their presence in the clinical attendance room and acceptance with regard to the techniques of behavioral management.Methods: The study involved interviews with 100 mothers whose children between 3 and 12 years old, had been in the Family Health Program of Vila Lacasa, in the city of Cachoeirinha, Pernambuco, Brazil, in the period from November to December of 2006. Data were collected from forms validated by the face-to-face method, and a descriptive analysis of the data was performed. The mothers were divided into groups considering the number of years of schooling and social-economic level. Results: It was verified that a significant number of the mothers were not afraid of dental treatment (68%, exerting a strong influence on the children’s opinion and behavior.The main causes of fear in the mothers was pain (45.8%. Irrespective of the educational level, the majority of the mothers preferred to be present in the attendance room (85%, since they believed their presence improved the child’s behavior (64%. The main reason why the mother sought dental treatment for her child was the prevention of caries (51%, followed by pain (29%. Conclusion: The interviewed mothers were shown to have a strong influence on the behaviour of the children and irrespective of their educational level most mothers preferred to be present in the attendance room,accepting the management techniques, provided that they were adequately informed.

  9. Dental measurements of Deuteromalayid Javanese students of the Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University

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    Myrtati Dyah Artaria

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental anthropology is a new field of study in Indonesia, hence there are few numbers of research that can be found in this field. Knowledge in this field is needed due to the large area and diversity of the people. Moreover, knowledge regarding the possibility to differentiate the sexes of skeletons is still needed for the purpose of identification. Purpose: This research intended to study the differences in mesio-distal measurements of the teeth of Deuteromalayid Javanese males and females studying in the Faculty of Dentistry in Airlangga University. Methods: This study used mesiodistal metric dental data, using dental caliper, to test the existence of sexual dimorphism. Sample were teeth of freshman students of the Airlangga University, from 52 individuals comprising 26 males and 26 females Deuteromalayid originated from Java (Indonesia studying in the Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University. Measurements were not performed on damaged casts due to caries or other reasons. Differences between males and females were tested using independent t-test. Results: The mean of mesiodistal measurements in males and females differs, where the males have greater size of mesiodistal measurements. The results showed that there were significant differences between sexes in the sample, in all field of teeth except the second upper and lower premolars. Reverse sexual dimorphism-female teeth measurement is larger than those of males-has not been found in these samples. The result of this study revealed that the range of mesiodistal measurements of every tooth in males and females overlapped. Conclusion: It is concluded that teeth measurement of males is bigger than females, except maxillary and mandibular second premolars. Latar belakang: Antropologi dental adalah bidang studi baru di Indonesia, dan karenanya penelitian di bidang ini masih sedikit dijumpai di Indonesia. Apalagi masih dibutuhkan pengetahuan mengenai apakah jenis kelamin dapat

  10. Perceptions of mentoring of full-time occupational therapy faculty in the United States.

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    Falzarano, Mary; Zipp, Genevieve Pinto

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence, nature and perception of the influence of mentoring for full-time occupational therapy faculty members who are on the tenure track or eligible for re-appointment in the United States. An online survey was sent during 2010 September, the beginning of the academic year, to all 818 potential participants in the United States entry-level and doctoral programmes. Fifty six of 107 participants who met the criteria reported being in a mentoring relationship and positively rated their perception of the influence of mentoring on academic success and academic socialization. The response of all participants to open-ended questions describes preferred mentoring characteristics (providing information, support), benefits (having someone to go to, easing the stress) and challenges (not enough time, mentoring not valued). Findings inform current and potential faculty of the current state of mentoring. Administrators can use this information when designing mentoring opportunities, educating mentors and mentees about the mentoring process, arranging mentors/mentees release time for engaging in the mentoring process and finally, managing the mentor/mentee needs. The cross-sectional survey of the United States occupational therapy faculty limits generalizability yet paves the way for future studies to explore retention and recruitment of mentored faculty across countries.

  11. Adult perceptions of dental fluorosis and select dental conditions-an Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rahul; Chuang, Janice Cheah Ping; Lee, Pauline Shih Jia; Leo, Song Jie; Yang, Naomi QiYue; Yee, Robert; Tong, Huei Jinn

    2016-04-01

    To compare lay people's perceptions with regard to various levels of dental fluorosis and select dental defects versus normal dentition. Adults rated digitally created photographs made showing lips (without retraction) and teeth depicting the following conditions: no apparent aesthetic defects (normal, Thylstrup- Fejerskov score 0 - TF0), 6 levels of fluorosis (TF1-6), carious lesions (two cavitated and one noncavitated), malocclusions (Class II, Class III, anterior open bite and greater spacing), extrinsic staining and an incisal chip. The photographs were displayed on colour-calibrated iPads(™) . Participants used a self-administered questionnaire to rate their perceptions on (Item 1) how normal teeth were, (Item 2) how attractive the teeth were, (Item 3) need to seek correction of teeth, (Item 4) how well the person took care of their teeth and (Item 5) whether the person was born like this. Data from Item 5 were excluded due to low reliability. Ratings for Item 1 showed that TF1-4 was similar or significantly better than TF0. For Item 2, TF1 and TF4 were significantly better than TF0, with TF2 and TF3 being similar. For Item 3, there was significantly lower need to seek correction with TF2 and TF4 versus TF0, whereas TF1 and TF3 were similar to TF0. TF5 and TF6 were rated significantly lower than TF0 for Item 1 and Item 2, and significantly higher rating for Item 3 (need to seek correction). Ratings for Item 4 were similar, with TF1, TF2 and TF4 being rated significantly higher than TF0, and TF5 and TF6 being rated lower. Cavitated caries and staining were generally perceived as being significantly less favourable than TF6, with higher need to seek correction as well. Noncavitated carious lesion and incisal chip were rated similar to TF0. Cavitated carious lesions were rated aesthetically similar or significantly worse than TF0 and TF6. Severe fluorosis (TF5 and 6) was perceived to be less aesthetically pleasing and received higher ratings for need to seek

  12. Young Faculty Job Perceptions in the Midst of Chinese Higher Education Reform: The Case of Zhejiang University

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    Li, Yan; Li, Jessica; Sun, Ye

    2013-01-01

    Chinese higher education is undergoing fundamental changes to meet the demand of producing high quantity and quality college students. These changes have significantly impacted the work lives of Chinese faculty members. This study investigated Chinese young faculty's job perceptions using four variables: intrinsic motivation, job burnout, job…

  13. A Study of Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Effect of the Globalization on Higher Education: The Case of Jordan

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    Ateyat, Khaled A.; Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of study was to investigate Jordanian higher education faculty members' perceptions of the phenomenon of globalization and its effect on higher education. The participants in this study were 6 faculty members from a Jordanian university. Four of the participants have leadership positions at the university. Two of them were deans, one…

  14. Students' Perceptions of Part-time and Tenured/Tenure-Track Faculty: Accessibility, Mentoring, and Extra-Class Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bippus, Amy M.; Brooks, Catherine F.; Plax, Timothy G.; Kearney, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Gives an overview of the differences between part-time and tenured/tenure-track faculty members, with particular attention to how these differences may impact students' perceptions of instructors' accessibility. Introduces the construct of extra-class communication (EEC) and explores how faculty employment status of instructors may affect…

  15. Awareness, Attitude, and Knowledge of Basic Life Support among Medical, Dental, and Nursing Faculties and Students in the University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangamesh, N C; Vidya, K C; Pathi, Jugajyoti; Singh, Arpita

    2017-01-01

    To assess the awareness, attitude, and knowledge about basic life support (BLS) among medical, dental, and nursing students and faculties and the proposal of BLS skills in the academic curriculum of undergraduate (UG) course. Recognition, prevention, and effective management of life-threatening emergencies are the responsibility of health-care professionals. These situations can be successfully managed by proper knowledge and training of the BLS skills. These life-saving maneuvers can be given through the structured resuscitation programs, which are lacking in the academic curriculum. A questionnaire study consisting of 20 questions was conducted among 659 participants in the Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences, Kalinga Institute of Medical Sciences, KIIT University. Medical junior residents, BDS faculties, interns, nursing faculties, and 3(rd)-year and final-year UG students from both medical and dental colleges were chosen. The statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software version 20.0 (Armonk, NY:IBM Corp). After collecting the data, the values were statistically analyzed and tabulated. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. The results with P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Our participants were aware of BLS, showed positive attitude toward it, whereas the knowledge about BLS was lacking, with the statistically significant P value. By introducing BLS regularly in the academic curriculum and by routine hands on workshops, all the health-care providers should be well versed with the BLS skills for effectively managing the life-threatening emergencies.

  16. Consensus training: an effective tool to minimize variations in periodontal diagnosis and treatment planning among dental faculty and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Vanchit; Lee, Seung-Jun; Prakasam, Sivaraman; Eckert, George J; Maupome, Gerardo

    2013-08-01

    Considerable disagreements and variations exist in diagnosis and treatment planning of periodontal disease. Achieving high interrater periodontal diagnosis can prove challenging. The objectives of this study were to measure variations in periodontal diagnosis and treatment planning among predoctoral periodontics faculty members after consensus training and to compare such variation with those identified in third- and fourth-year dental students. Nine electronically stored case vignettes and survey instruments were made available to eighteen faculty members and twenty dental students under standardized conditions. A chi-square test was used to compare responses between groups, and multirater kappa tests were used to evaluate interrater agreement/reliability. Of the nine cases, only one differed between groups significantly in terms of treatment. Also, third-year students differed from fourth-year students on the diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis versus chronic periodontitis. Most respondents were able to distinguish clearly among diagnoses of chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and gingivitis. This study established a baseline assessment of the current status of consensus after training. We will reassess variations after addressing the specific challenges identified. Programs designed and implemented to help decrease the variation in periodontal diagnosis and treatment planning among faculty members may ultimately translate into better agreement and better standardization of dental instruction.

  17. Student Perceptions of Effective Clinical Teaching Characteristics in Dental Hygiene Programs in Northeastern States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearor, Dawn E.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical education component provided to dental hygiene students is an essential part of their development as competent practitioners. Instructor approaches to clinical teaching are therefore critical in providing quality clinical learning experiences. This study sought to identify dental hygiene students' perceptions of "best" and…

  18. Student Perceptions of Effective Clinical Teaching Characteristics in Dental Hygiene Programs in Northeastern States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearor, Dawn E.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical education component provided to dental hygiene students is an essential part of their development as competent practitioners. Instructor approaches to clinical teaching are therefore critical in providing quality clinical learning experiences. This study sought to identify dental hygiene students' perceptions of "best" and…

  19. Dental Hygiene Students' Perceptions of Themselves and Their Professional Role in Regard to Feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christine M.

    Dental hygiene students' perceptions of themselves and the "typical dental hygienist" were assessed in relation to feminist attitudes at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Dempewolff's (1972) 56-item Feminism II Scale was administered to all first-year, second-year, and…

  20. INCIDENCE OF SECONDARY ROOT CARIES LESIONS IN PATIENTS REFERRED FOR TREATMENT IN THE FACULTY OF DENTAL MEDICINE – SOFIA.

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    Mirela Marinova-Takorova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the presented study was to determine the incidence of secondary root caries lesions in patients referred for treatment in the Faculty of Dental Medicine – Sofia. Material/Methods: The subjects who took part in the study were patients referred for treatment of caries lesions in the Faculty of Dental Medicine, Sofia. They were interviewed for smoking, presence of systematic diseases and medications and debris and plaque were removed from natural teeth prior to examination. Dental examination was carried out with a dental mirror and a probe. Decayed, missed and filled teeth (DMFT were recorded. Root caries lesions, restorations of those lesions and secondary caries lesions were recorded separately. Results: A total number of 603 patients were examined. The frequency of appearance of root caries in the investigated population was 33.5% (202 patients. The whole number of root caries lesions was 857. Three hundred forty three (41.4% of those lesions were restored. Presence of secondary caries lesions was observed in 138 cases (39.1%. Conclusions: Based on the data obtained from the presented study it may be concluded that most of the root caries lesions remain untreated (58.8%. Secondary carious was diagnosed in 39.1% of the root caries restorations. The patients with secondary caries lesions presented with higher incidence of concomitant diseases and lower incidence of smoking.

  1. Humanism in Dental Education: A Comparison of Theory, Intention, and Stakeholder Perceptions at a North American Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucinda; Itaya, Lisa E; Hoover, Terry; Booth, Mark T; Nadershahi, Nader

    2017-08-01

    In today's dental education environment, a humanistic culture is an expectation for all U.S. dental schools, codified in 2013 by its inclusion in the Commission on Dental Accreditation's standards for accreditation. The University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry has made an active commitment to humanism since the mid-1970s. The aim of this study was to determine how well the school's students and faculty and staff members perceived the school was living up to its formal aspirational values and who was benefitting from the humanistic culture. Using an electronic survey, data were collected from a total of 195 students, faculty members, and staff members in 2014. Respondents were 15% of the 492 full- and part-time faculty members; 9% of the total student population of 540; and 29% of 255 staff members. In the responses, humanism was described as manifest by attributes such as caring, understanding, respect, and compassion. Although the findings confirmed the value of a humanistic culture, some portions of the school's formal definition and goals, such as good work ethic, professional responsibility, high ethical standards, increasing independence, and attainment of competence, appeared less frequently in responses. Authentic assessment of institutional culture proved challenging. Focus groups offered additional ways to assess how effectively the school lives its core value of humanism. There was recognition that more varied, robust methods were needed to assess institutional alignment with stated goals for a humanistic learning environment.

  2. Knowledge and perceptions of family leave policies among female faculty in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Christine M; Freund, Karen M; Kaplan, Samantha A; Raj, Anita; Carr, Phyllis L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the knowledge and perceptions of family leave policies and practices among senior leaders including American Association of Medical College members of the Group on Women in Medicine and Science (GWIMS) to identify perceived barriers to career success and satisfaction among female faculty. In 2011 and 2012, GWIMS representatives and senior leaders at 24 medical schools were invited to participate in an interview about faculty perceptions of gender equity and overall institutional climate. An inductive, thematic analysis of the qualitative data was conducted to identify themes represented in participant responses. The research team read and reviewed institutional family leave policies for concordance with key informant descriptions. There were 22 GWIMS representatives and senior leaders in the final sample. Participants were all female; 18 (82%) were full professors with the remainder being associate professors. Compared with publicly available policies at each institution, the knowledge of nine participants was consistent with policies, was discrepant for six, with the remaining seven acknowledging a lack of knowledge of policies. Four major themes were identified from the interview data: 1) Framing family leave as a personal issue undermines its effect on female faculty success; 2) poor communication of policies impairs access and affects organizational climate; 3) discrepancies in leave implementation disadvantage certain faculty in terms of time and pay; and 4) leave policies are valued and directly related to academic productivity. Family leave policies are an important aspect of faculty satisfaction and academic success, yet policy awareness among senior leaders is lacking. Further organizational support is needed to promote equitable policy creation and implementation to support women in medical academia. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preparing for practice: Nursing intern and faculty perceptions on clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlThiga, Hanan; Mohidin, Sharifah; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2017-04-01

    Clinical experience and exposure to real patients are required elements of nursing education. Trainees in nursing are expected to be prepared adequately for the hard-working environment, increasing patient complexity, and higher-level competencies. This study investigates differences between nursing interns and clinical faculty on actual and perceived importance of educational preparation and development of clinical competencies, focusing on the nursing curriculum and transition to practice. A convenient sampling technique with a mixed-methods design was used to collect quantitative and qualitative data, by surveying and interviewing nursing interns and faculty members from King Abdul-Aziz University in Saudi Arabia; data collection occurred in December 2015. The survey (23 items) and focused interviews measured perceptions of clinical instruction and experience. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to analyze differences in mean ratings between actual and perceived importance. Themes collected from narrative interview data were summarized. Significant differences were found between nursing interns (n = 46) and faculty (n = 29) perceptions of actual clinical teaching and experiences and its importance including the clinical teaching and the development of clinical competence, p interns rated actual experiences of knowledge base and skills significantly lower than faculty perceptions, p = .001. Narrative data provided in-depth information on factors contributing and hindering the learning and teaching environment. Findings from this study call for clinical instruction and experiences to take a step further to meet current practice standards and to improve patient safety in the health professions education of nurses.

  4. Faculty and Students’ Perceptions of Student Experiences in a Medical School Undergoing Curricular Transition in the United Arab Emirates

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    Syed I Shehnaz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In 2008, the Gulf Medical College in the United Arab Emirates underwent a curricular change from a discipline-based to an organ-system-based integrated curriculum. In this context, this study aimed to compare the faculty and students’ perceptions of the student experiences with the new curriculum. Methods: Data were collected from faculty and second-year students in the integrated curriculum using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM. Data collected were transferred to Predictive Analytics Software, Version 18. Global and domain scores were assessed with the Wilcoxon Rank-Sum Test. Percentage agreement, disagreement and uncertainty were assessed by the z-test for proportion. Results: There were no significant differences between the total DREEM scores of faculty (139/200 and students (135/200. The faculty perceived that the students were experiencing significantly more positive learning as indicated by the domain score of “Students' Perceptions of Learning”. Proportions of agreement between faculty and students showed that more faculty members than students perceived the need for increased feedback to students and a greater emphasis on long term learning. Conclusion: The study showed that the faculty and students had similar perceptions about the student experiences in the integrated curriculum. Areas necessitating remedial measures were the need for faculty to learn constructive feedback techniques and an emphasis on long term learning in the new curriculum.

  5. Entrepreneurship perception in higher education. A comparative study among Students, Faculty Members and Directors

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    Alejandro Álvarez-Marín

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A set of variables affects the building of a university ecosystem fostering an entrepreneurial culture among students. The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of students, faculty members and directors of Higher Education Centers in the region of Coquimbo, Chile with respect to entrepreneurship, taking into account diverse variables in order to establish signifcant differences in these perceptions that could affect institutional policies or actions, which may ultimately have an impact in regional development. The descriptive study performed on a sample of twelve Higher Education institutions revealed signifcant differences between the perceptions of academics and students on the infuence of the following variables: infrastructure; networking; institutional experience; skills; risk-taking. Likewise, the directors showed signifcant differences in their appreciations of the relative importance of the variables: teaching strategies; academic skills; government programs and strategies covering students and/or academics.

  6. Faculty members' perceptions of advising versus mentoring: does the name matter?

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    Titus, Sandra L; Ballou, Janice M

    2013-09-01

    The recommendations, during the past 20 years, to improve PhD scientific training and graduate school success, have focused on the significance of mentoring. It is well established that PhD students with mentors have significantly more success in graduate school as demonstrated by publishing papers before they graduate and by making presentations. Have faculty and academic institutions embraced the mentoring role? This study explores the views of 3,500 scientists who have primary responsibilities to educate PhD and MD/PhD students. Faculty members report they are more likely to prefer being viewed as advisors (54 %) than mentors (38 %). Through an examination of perceptions about specific responsibilities of advisors and mentors, faculty members provide a description of their culture and the expectations they have about themselves and others. One would expect that because mentoring requires additional time and involvement that faculty would report differences between advising and mentoring. However, faculty members perceive few differences between advisors and mentors. We examine the implications of these findings. Future scientists need to be confident their education includes the opportunity to acquire the best possible research skills. To develop advisors who have the ability to provide this training, the process begins by defining role expectations and responsibilities and preparing advisors to interact with doctoral students in ways comparable to mentors. We expect faculty members to know how to teach and how to mentor; yet, we rarely discuss how to develop and shape the necessary skills of advisors so, that they more closely resemble those of mentors.

  7. Comparative evaluation of perceptions of dental students to three methods of teaching in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esan, T A; Oziegbe, E O

    2015-12-01

    The World Health Organization in 1994 recommended that dental education should be problem based, socially and culturally relevant, and community oriented. To explore the perceptions of Pre-phase II (pre-clinical II) dental students on three methods of teaching used during two academic sessions. All part IV dental students in two consecutive sessions undergoing pre phase II course in the Faculty of Dentistry, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife were recruited into the study. Three different modes of teaching that is, Problem based learning (PBL), hybrid PBL and traditional teaching were used to teach the students. A twenty two itemed anonymous questionnaire on a five point Likert scale was administered to the students at the end of the course. Six perceived factors were extracted from the questionnaire using factor analysis. There was a statistically significant difference (p method compared to the other methods of teaching. The perceived factor "communication with peers" had the highest mean score for PBL in both sessions (4.57 ± 0.58 and 4.09 ± 0.93 respectively). However, PBL method was very helpful in all the six perceived factors while the students perceived that the traditional method of teaching was not helpful in "interaction with tutors" and "challenge to critical thinking". The findings showed that students preferred the PBL method to other forms of teaching. PBL enhanced the students' communication skill, was very useful as pedagogic tool and improved their critical thinking.

  8. The perceived relevance of tooth carving in dental education: Views of practicing dentists and faculty in West India.

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    Nayak, Meghanand T; Sahni, Priya; Singhvi, Abhishek; Singh, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    Teaching dental anatomy includes observation and analysis of natural teeth and carving wax models to accurately reproduce the morphology of teeth. The aim of this survey was to assess the importance of tooth carving in its relevance to clinical practice in the opinion of practicing clinicians throughout west India. Faculties of 27 dental colleges and dental practitioners of the Rajasthan and Gujarat states in western India were contacted through e-mail, telephone and mail. A total of 1866 subjects were contacted of which 1722 responded. The perceived relevance of tooth carving in clinical practice was assessed through a 14-item multiple choice questionnaire. Questions ranged from the queries of clinicians' interest in tooth carvings, their opinion of the practical significance of this exercise during their training to their clinical practice, and their recommendations regarding tooth carving. A total of 69.1% of respondent practitioners believe that the tooth carving exercise influences their clinical practice, and 93.4% recommend tooth carving to be continued in the undergraduate dental curriculum. The results indicated that most dentists in west India valued what they learned through tooth carving and that they use this knowledge in their practice. This information supports the continued teaching of tooth carving in the undergraduate dental curriculum.

  9. Dental students and faculty members' attitudes towards care for underserved patients and community service: do community-based dental education and voluntary service-learning matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volvovsky, Mariya; Vodopyanov, Dmitry; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore 1) how students across the four years of a dental curriculum differed in attitudes towards underserved patients and community service at the beginning and end of each school year; 2) how these attitudes changed as a function of participating in required vs. voluntary community-based activities; and 3) what attitudes faculty members held about the effects of community service-learning on students. Surveys were distributed to 440 students at one dental school at the beginning and end of the school year. The overall response rate for those surveys was 75 percent, with variations among classes: first year, 94 percent; second year, 92 percent; third year, 69 percent; and fourth year, 43 percent. Survey data were also collected from twenty-two students (out of a possible forty-seven) who participated in voluntary service-learning and from fifty-four faculty members (out of approximately 150). The results showed that, at the beginning of the year, the first-year students' attitudes were more positive than the responses of students in all other cohorts. However, at the end of the year, their attitudes were less positive. Participating in voluntary service-learning improved students' attitudes towards treating underserved patients only in the short run, and experiencing ten weeks of community-based dental education did not improve their attitudes. The faculty respondents' attitudes, however, were quite positive. The decrease in students' positive attitudes towards treating underserved patients and participating in community service should raise questions about why this loss of idealism occurred.

  10. Motivation and Faculty Development: A Three-State Study of Presidential Perceptions of Faculty Professional Development Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Desna C.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the appropriate roles of community college faculty and administration in assuring access to meaningful faculty development opportunities. Describes this three-state study as using the motivational theories of Maslow and Porter to determine faculty qualities as perceived by college presidents. Contains seven references. Survey instrument…

  11. College Students' Comfort Level Discussing Death with Faculty and Perceptions of Faculty Support for Grief-Affected Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    Students' comfort discussing death with faculty, views regarding faculty's likelihood to provide accommodations to grief-affected students, and perceived empathy of faculty were assessed. Undergraduate students (n = 371) attending a Midwestern university completed the Student Survey on Grief Issues. Twenty-six percent reported the death of at…

  12. Perception of oral health by patients who use dental clinics

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    Lorena Marques da Nóbrega

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of clinical indicators to evaluate oral health status and the need for treatment is recognized as having limitations, and nowadays other factors, among them social and quality of life, have been used. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the self-perception of oral health in adults using the Dental clinics at a public university. METHODOLOGY: This cross-sectional study had a sample of 86 participants. A questionnaire consisting of sociodemographic data and application of the GOHAI index were used. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed with absolute and percentage data, using the Epi Info. version 6 software program. RESULT: The majority of users were women (89.7 %; marital status: married (69.8 %; age-range from 35 to 38 years (39.6 %, they had completed high school (32.6 %, and had a monthly income from 1 to 3 minimum wages (79.1 %. Results of the GOHAI index were classified as low, presenting a score value of 27.06. CONCLUSION: A low index and negative impact of oral health conditions on the daily lives of the evaluated users was verified.

  13. Improving Knowledge of General Dental Practitioners on Antibiotic Prescribing by Raising Awareness of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK Guidelines

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    Sana Zahabiyoun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cases of antimicrobial resistance are increasing, partly due to inappropriate prescribing practices by dentists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prescrib- ing practices and knowledge of dentists with regards to antibiotics. Moreover, this study aimed to determine whether the prescriptions comply with the recommended guidelines and whether clinical audit can alter the prescribing practices of dentists leading to better use of antibiotics in the dental service.Materials and Methods: A clinical audit (before/after non-controlled trial was carried out in two dental clinics in the northeast of England. Retrospective data were collected from 30 antibiotic prescriptions, analysed and compared with the recommended guide- lines. Data collected included age and gender of patients, type of prescribed antibiotics and their dosage, frequency and duration, clinical condition and reason for prescribing. The principles of appropriate prescribing based on guidance by the Faculty of General Dental Practice in the United Kingdom (UK, FGDP, were discussed with the dental clini- cians. Following this, prospective data were collected and similarly managed. Pre and post audit data were then compared. Changes were tested for significance using McNemar's test and P value<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: After intervention, data revealed that antibiotic prescribing practices of dentists improved, as there was an increase in the percentage of prescriptions that were in accor- dance with the FGDP (UK guidelines.Conclusion: In view of the limited data collected, this study concludes that there are inap- propriate antibiotic prescribing practices amongst general dental practitioners and that clinical audit can address this situation, leading to a more rational use of antibiotics in dental practice.

  14. Problem-based learning: Dental student's perception of their education environments at Qassim University

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhuwaiter, Shahad S.; Aljuailan, Roqayah I.; Banabilh, Saeed M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The objectives of this study were to assess perceptions of the Saudi dental students of the problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum and to compare their perceptions among different sex and academic years. Subjects and Methods: Data was collected through a questionnaire-based survey at Qassim College of dentistry. The questionnaire consisted of 19 questions regarding the perception of PBL curriculum and was distributed to 240 students. The chi-square test was used for statistical analysi...

  15. Knowledge and perception of oral health promotion in schools among dental nurses in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C J; Jallaludin, R L

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of a Health-Promoting School has received much interest. In Malaysia, dental nurses are ideally placed to play a lead role in promoting Oral Health within the school setting. This study aims to provide information on the knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion in schools, among dental nurses. A postal questionnaire was used to measure dental nurses' knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion. The majority (60%) of dental nurses had good knowledge of Oral Health Promotion. Generally, they perceived that they play an important role in promoting Oral Health in schools. However, a sizeable proportion (25%) did not think they had a role to play in working together with school authorities to provide children with healthy food choices in school canteens. The majority (60%) of dental nurses did not perceive Oral Health Promotion to be important as a whole. They had a good perception of the concepts: it supports behaviour change, it has appropriate goals, it integrates oral health and general health and relieves anxiety. However, they had a poorer perception of the concepts; diverse educational approaches, participation, focus on prevention, early intervention, "spread of effect" of dental health education and "make healthier choices the easier choices". Years of service was not significantly associated with knowledge and perception of Oral Health Promotion. Dental nurses should be reoriented towards a more holistic practice of Oral Health Promotion. Workshops that invite active participation from dental nurses should be conducted to equip them with the necessary knowledge and skills.

  16. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  17. Teaching and Understanding the Concept of Critical Thinking Skills within Michigan Accredited Associate Degree Dental Hygiene Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beistle, Kimberly S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores dental hygiene faculty's perceptions regarding the issues surrounding the concept of critical thinking skills integration within Michigan accredited associate degree dental hygiene programs. The primary research goals are to determine faculty understanding of the concept of critical thinking, identify personal and departmental…

  18. Teaching and Understanding the Concept of Critical Thinking Skills within Michigan Accredited Associate Degree Dental Hygiene Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beistle, Kimberly S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores dental hygiene faculty's perceptions regarding the issues surrounding the concept of critical thinking skills integration within Michigan accredited associate degree dental hygiene programs. The primary research goals are to determine faculty understanding of the concept of critical thinking, identify personal and departmental…

  19. Teaching and Understanding the Concept of Critical Thinking Skills within Michigan Accredited Associate Degree Dental Hygiene Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beistle, Kimberly S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores dental hygiene faculty's perceptions regarding the issues surrounding the concept of critical thinking skills integration within Michigan accredited associate degree dental hygiene programs. The primary research goals are to determine faculty understanding of the concept of critical thinking, identify personal and…

  20. Volunteerism among Dental Hygienists: The Relationship between a Practice Act Incentive, Behaviors, Perceptions and Motivational Orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Sandra D; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J

    2015-10-01

    Thirteen states in the nation authorize dental hygienists to satisfy re-licensure requirements in part, by performing pro bono oral health services in lieu of participating in continuing education courses This study compared registered dental hygienists' donations of time and professional expertise, perceptions of volunteerism and motivational orientations as they practice in both the presence and absence of a practice act statute intended to incentivize volunteerism. Volunteer behaviors, perceptions and motivational orientations of a non probability sample of 316 dental hygienists actively licensed by the states of Idaho or Utah, were assessed using an online survey which included the Self Determination Theory General Causality Orientations Scale (GCOS). Survey Monkey results were analyzed using Mann Whitney U tests, Chi-Square analysis and an Independent Samples t-test at the 0.05 level of significance. No statistically significant differences were found between dental hygienists' volunteer behaviors, perceptions of volunteerism or scores on the GCOS Autonomy and Impersonal subscales in the 2 states studied. Statistical analysis of dental hygienists' mean scores on the GCOS measure of Controlled motivational orientation yielded a significant difference (p=0.001) among Utah and Idaho dental hygienists. Dental hygienists require evidence based practice statutes and regulations that keep pace with the need to provide universal access to comprehensive oral care. Additional research is required to determine the effectiveness of legislation intended to encourage registered dental hygienists' altruistic expressions. Dental hygienists are frequently unaware of opportunities to volunteer their services and how state practice act regulations impact those opportunities. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  1. The Effect of Teaching Experience on Service-Learning Beliefs of Dental Hygiene Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Sharlee Shirley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental causal-comparative study was to determine if service-learning teaching experience affects dental hygiene faculty perceptions of service-learning benefits and barriers in the United States. Dental hygiene educators from entry-level dental hygiene education programs in the United States completed the Web-based…

  2. The Effect of Teaching Experience on Service-Learning Beliefs of Dental Hygiene Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Sharlee Shirley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental causal-comparative study was to determine if service-learning teaching experience affects dental hygiene faculty perceptions of service-learning benefits and barriers in the United States. Dental hygiene educators from entry-level dental hygiene education programs in the United States completed the Web-based…

  3. Issues in Dental Hygiene Education and Practice: Perceptions and Concerns of Dental Hygiene Program Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    League for Innovation in the Community Coll., Los Angeles, CA.

    A survey was conducted by the League for Innovation in the Community College and Johnson County Community College to determine the state of the dental hygiene profession. The study sought the opinions of all dental hygiene program administrators in the United States and Canada regarding the principal concerns facing dental hygiene education and…

  4. Stakeholders' Perceptions About a Newly Established Dental School with a Problem-Based, Student-Led, Patient-Centered Curriculum: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kamran; Tredwin, Christopher; Kay, Elizabeth; Slade, Anita

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of stakeholders regarding a newly established dental school with a problem-based, student-led, patient-centered curriculum in a community setting. Qualitative methods using 16 semistructured interviews and two focus groups were used to engage a range of stakeholders from students to faculty members to practitioners. Purposive sampling was employed with participants contacted through professional channels. Interview and focus group transcripts were transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed thematically using an inductive approach. Themes related to preparedness of dental graduates were identified during data analyses. Early clinical exposure with patients in the first year of the course, holistic care using a patient-centered approach, and the acquisition of communication skills, professionalism, team-working skills, reflective practice, and evidence-informed clinical practice were perceived to be key strengths of the curriculum. The participants also expressed the need to strengthen teaching of life sciences and provide additional clinical experience in simulated general dental practice clinics. This study provides insight into the perceptions of a wide range of stakeholders and provides a deeper understanding of the merits and challenges of an innovative undergraduate dental curriculum.

  5. Faculty Perceptions, Skills and Problems on Assessment in Undergraduate Programs in a State University Extension Campus in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Anania B. Aquino; Noraida P. Ramos; Celia J. Nolasco

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of student learning is a continuous process geared towards understanding and improving student learning hence an assurance of providing quality education. It is a fundamental function of higher education and one of the primary roles of its faculty. This research investigated perceptions, practices and skills of faculty of a university extension campus on assessment of student learning. It relied on descriptive survey method to investigate responses of 77 teachers. T...

  6. To jump or not to jump : community college faculty perceptions of administrative positions as a career path

    OpenAIRE

    Wojcik, Alketa

    2011-01-01

    Studies have sounded the alarm concerning the impending void of leadership that community colleges will face in the 21st century. One concern is that the pool of applicants from the traditional leadership pathway of existing community college faculty members has decreased dramatically in the past decade. This study explored faculty perceptions of the administration positions in California community colleges and their desire and willingness to step into these roles. The study also looked at th...

  7. What do patients expect from treatment with Dental Implants? Perceptions, expectations and misconceptions: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Li, Ming; Tang, Hua; Wang, Peng-Lai; Zhao, Yu-Xiao; McGrath, Colman; Mattheos, Nikos

    2017-03-01

    While research in terms of patient-centered care in implant therapy is growing, few studies have investigated patients' initial perceptions prior to consultation with the implant dentist. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to capture patients' initial information level, perceptions, as well as expectations from the implant therapy. A 34-item questionnaire was developed to investigate patients' preoperative information, perceptions and expectations from treatment with Dental Implants. The study was conducted in three locations (Hong Kong, SiChuan and JiangSu) during 2014-2015 with 277 patients. The main information source about implant therapy was the dentist or hygienist for less than half of the patients (n = 113, 42%). About 62.8% of participants considered that they were in general informed about implants, but only 17.7% felt confident with the information they had. More than 30% of the sample appeared to maintain dangerous misperceptions about Dental Implants: "Dental Implants require less care than natural teeth"; "Treatment with Dental Implants is appropriate for all patients with missing teeth"; "Dental Implants last longer than natural teeth"; and "Treatments with Dental Implants have no risks or complications." Patients were divided when asked whether "Dental Implants are as functional as natural teeth" (agreement frequency = 52.7%). Expectations from treatment outcome were commonly high, while there was a significant correlation between the overall mean of perception scores and outcome expectation scores (r = 0.32, P dental team would need to diagnose and correct prior to initiating implant treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Engineering curriculum change at a private Midwest school of dental medicine: a faculty innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Marsha A; Goldberg, Jerold S

    2008-03-01

    The national dental educational environment has been sensitized to the changing needs of the profession and students, resulting in an agenda for curriculum change in a number of dental schools. This report discusses the impetus for change at a private Midwestern school that has begun a multiyear implementation of an innovative curriculum. The process by which the innovations have been instituted, while unique to this school, may provide insights for change at other dental schools.

  9. Public knowledge/perceptions about AIDS transmission: concerns about use of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, E G; Cohen, L A; Ward, M A

    1994-02-01

    This telephone survey of 739 adults living in the State of Maryland (response rate 68.9%) examined the association between public perceptions and knowledge about the routes of transmission of AIDS, and concerns about contracting AIDS in a dental office and attitudes toward confidentiality of AIDS infected dentists and patients. The greatest areas of inaccuracies related to the risk of giving and receiving blood. Associations were demonstrated between public knowledge and concern about AIDS. Racial differences were found in both knowledge and concerns. Accurate dissemination of information to the public about AIDS is essential for the maintenance of public confidence and trust in the safety of dental offices and dental treatment.

  10. Prevalence and self perception of Dental Fluorosis among 15 year old school children in Prakasham district of south India

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, Guntipalli. M; Rahamthullah, S. A. K. Uroof; Kopuri, Raj Kumar Chowdary; Kumar, Y Anil; Suman, S V; Balaga, Ramesh Naidu

    2013-01-01

    Background: To assess the Prevalence and self perception of dental fluorosis among 15 - year old school children. Materials & Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 840, 15 - year old school children from 12 schools of Prakasam district. After taking informed consent from their parents or legal representatives, an interview was conducted using a pretested questionnaire to collect the data regarding self perception of dental fluorosis, dental behaviour, and source of water ...

  11. Investigating the Relationship of Sociodemographic and Personality Factors to Faculty Perceptions and Motivations Regarding the Use of Online Instruction in Radiologic and Imaging Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to investigate the relationship of sociodemographic and personality traits to faculty perceptions and motivations regarding the use of online instruction in radiologic and imaging sciences. A faculty perception and motivations survey of online instruction was administered online in order to…

  12. Perceptions of business skill development by graduates of the University of Michigan Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Michael; Wiesen, Robert; Arnold, Sara; Taichman, Russell S; Taichman, Linda Susan

    2011-04-01

    Many graduating dentists leave dental school feeling that they are not prepared to start and run a dental practice. The aim of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge and perceptions dental graduates have in the area of practice management. A twenty-item survey was mailed in the fall of 2008 to nearly half of the University of Michigan dental school alumni who had graduated between the years of 1997 and 2007. Respondents were asked about their demographics, practice characteristics, and perceptions of knowledge/experience regarding practice management skills at the present time as well as at graduation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The majority of respondents were general practitioners (84 percent) aged thirty to thirty-nine practicing between six and ten years with practice incomes reported to be greater than $300,000 per year (79 percent). Most dentists reported being either an owner or co-owner of the practice (57 percent), and 33 percent reported being an associate in the practice. Upon graduation, 7 percent of the respondents felt that they had a strong knowledge of accounting or human resource issues; this perception increased to 47 percent at the present time. Similarly, less than 6 percent of respondents felt they understood issues pertaining to dental insurance upon graduation; this perception increased to 68 percent after having spent time in the workforce. In contrast to the large increase in knowledge/experience in business aspects of dentistry that had accrued since graduation, most alumni reported only a 7 percent increase in their knowledge of the legal aspects of dental practice. Results from this study indicate that interventions are needed to increase graduating dentists' knowledge of practice management and close the gap between their knowledge and its application in real life. The majority of alumni believed there is a need to improve the curriculum focused on these aspects of dental practice.

  13. The extent to which students' perceptions of faculties' teaching strategies, students' context, and perceptions of learner empowerment predict perceptions of autonomy in BSN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Cynthia Glawe

    2006-10-01

    This descriptive correlational study examined the extent to which students' perceptions of faculties' teaching strategies, students' context, and perceptions of learner empowerment predicted perceptions of autonomy in senior female generic baccalaureate degree (BSN) students in Northeastern Pennsylvania, USA. Dunkin and Biddle's Model for Classroom Teaching (1974) provided the theoretical framework for this study. The sample of 198 female senior nursing students was drawn from 32 nursing programs accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission [National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) 2002. Directory of accredited programs. Retrieved July 16, 2002 from, http://www.nlnac.org/]. Three separate instruments were used in this study: (1) Learner Empowerment Measure [Frymier, A.B., Shulman, G.M., Houser, M., 1996. The development of a learner empowerment measure. Communication Education, 45, 181-199.]; (2) Autonomy, Caring Perspective [Boughn, S., 1995. An instrument for measuring autonomy related attitudes and behaviors in women nursing students. Journal of Nursing Education, 34, 106-113.] and (3) an investigator designed student demographic data questionnaire. Data were analyzed using stepwise multiple linear regression to estimate path coefficients. Inspection of the findings revealed that there was a significant direct effect (t = 4.299, p learner empowerment and perceptions of autonomy. Age was also found to have a statistically significant direct effect on perceptions of autonomy (t = 2.652, p = .009). The findings from this study support a link between learner empowerment, stated as a priority in nursing education, and autonomy identified as a priority in practice.

  14. Perceptions of dental students towards learning environment in an Indian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Jain

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental students constitute a stakeholder group that is able to provide unique information concerning the effectiveness of the dental curriculum. The purpose of this study was to determine students′ perceptions of the learning environment, intellectual climate and teacher student relationships in dental school. Methods : This study was conducted among 341 dental students of two dental college of Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. Response rate was 85%. In this study, the dental version of Medical Student Learning Environment Survey has been used. The questionnaires were divided in to 7 subscales like flexibility, student to student interaction, emotional climate, meaningful experience, organization, supportiveness, and breadth of interest. The students were divided in to two groups of preclinical and clinical for the purpose of comparison. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and t-test. Results: The results were statistically analyzed and differentiated in to preclinical and clinical phases. The preclinical and clinical students rated the student to student interaction as the most favorable whereas the lowest score was given to flexibility by both preclinical and clinical students. Preclinical students rated emotional climate as the lowest after flexibility whereas clinical students rated breadth of interest and meaningful experience as the lowest score after flexibility. Conclusion: This study emphasized the areas of improvement in dental school learning environment based on students′ perspective by making these required and much needed changes in the curriculum. Students′ satisfaction with their dental education can be increased.

  15. Comparison of Dental Esthetic Perceptions of Young Adolescents and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavand, Golnaz; Broffitt, Barbara; Levy, Steven M.; Warren, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare dental esthetic perceptions of adolescents at age 13 with those of parents and to assess associations with dental fluorosis. Methods As part of the Iowa Fluoride Study, 550 adolescents aged 13 underwent dental examinations for fluorosis on maxillary anterior teeth using the Fluorosis Risk Index. Adolescents and parents completed questionnaires concerning satisfaction with the adolescents’ dental appearance. McNemar and Bowker tests of symmetry were used for comparisons of esthetics ratings between parents and adolescents. Comparison of satisfaction between fluorosis and non-fluorosis subjects was made using Cochran-Armitage Trend and Fisher’s Exact tests. Results Excluding subjects with orthodontic treatment, 376 adolescents were included and 26% of them had definitive fluorosis, mostly at a mild level. Fifteen percent of adolescents were dissatisfied with dental appearance, and concerns were mainly about the tooth color (45%) and alignment (35%). Adolescents were less satisfied with overall dental appearance (PFluorosis status (yes/no) was not significantly associated with adolescents’ satisfaction or areas of concern (p>0.05). Parents of subjects with fluorosis were more dissatisfied with dental appearance (P=0.014) and color (Pfluorosis was negatively associated with both adolescent (P=0.03) and parent (P=0.002) satisfaction. Conclusion Adolescents generally had less satisfaction with dental appearance and color and they were more concerned with tooth shape than parents. For both parents and adolescents, decreased satisfaction was associated with the number of zones with definitive fluorosis. PMID:22364682

  16. Barriers to dental care for children with special needs: General dentists' perception in Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adyanthaya, Amith; Sreelakshmi, Natta; Ismail, Sajeela; Raheema, Marium

    2017-01-01

    Special children are among the underserved dental patient groups around the globe. Oral health care for disabled children remain an unmet challenge. One out of two persons with a significant disability cannot find a professional resource to provide appropriate dental care. Identification of barriers can be the first step in addressing the deficiencies in dental care for such patients. To investigate the perception of dental practitioners in Kerala, India regarding the hurdles faced by them in providing dental care to Special Needs Children including the challenges faced by them. 149 dental professionals were interviewed through a questionnaire for their perceived barriers to provide oral health care for children with special needs. The data was obtained and Chi-square test, Pearson correlation coefficient and logistic regression model were assessed using the SPSS version 20.0. All analyses were performed using a level of 0.05 for statistical significance. Greatest barriers as perceived by the practitioners were their level of training and lack of motivation of caretakers. Significant association was found between experience of the dentist with the frequency with which they reported seeing children with special needs (pConclusion: Findings from this study provide a valid picture of barriers to access for children with special needs within general dental private practice system. Recommendations for amendment of undergraduate dental curriculum is made in order to equip future graduates to deal with this group of children better.

  17. Barriers to dental care for children with special needs: General dentists' perception in Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amith Adyanthaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Special children are among the underserved dental patient groups around the globe. Oral health care for disabled children remain an unmet challenge. One out of two persons with a significant disability cannot find a professional resource to provide appropriate dental care. Identification of barriers can be the first step in addressing the deficiencies in dental care for such patients. Aim: To investigate the perception of dental practitioners in Kerala, India regarding the hurdles faced by them in providing dental care to Special Needs Children including the challenges faced by them. Materials and Method: 149 dental professionals were interviewed through a questionnaire for their perceived barriers to provide oral health care for children with special needs. Statistical analysis: The data was obtained and Chi-square test, Pearson correlation coefficient and logistic regression model were assessed using the SPSS version 20.0. All analyses were performed using a level of 0.05 for statistical significance. Results: Greatest barriers as perceived by the practitioners were their level of training and lack of motivation of caretakers. Significant association was found between experience of the dentist with the frequency with which they reported seeing children with special needs (p< 0.05. Conclusion: Findings from this study provide a valid picture of barriers to access for children with special needs within general dental private practice system. Recommendations for amendment of undergraduate dental curriculum is made in order to equip future graduates to deal with this group of children better.

  18. Knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes of dental students towards obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.H. Awan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Obesity-related education should be implemented as a formal component of dental student training. Oral health practitioners should also provide their patients with information about how weight loss is beneficial to both general and oral health.

  19. Faculty perception of medical council of India basic course workshop in medical education technologies as faculty development programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kumar Yadav

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: BCW must be an integral part of the faculty development programme at institute level but its modules should be regularly updated time to time. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 846-849

  20. Perception of Dental Public Health Competency among recent graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunkar, Ridhima B.; Basavarajappa, Puttaswamy; Raheel, Syed A.; Kujan, Omar B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to assess how competent the recent dental graduates perceive themselves to be in Dental Public Health. Materials and Methods: A 21-item structured, close-ended questionnaire study was carried out at the KLEVK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum, India. Students assessed their competencies using a three-point ordinal scale. One hundred and thirty-three students were asked to rate their proficiency on a 21-item matrix of the dental public health program. The responses were grouped using the Likert-type scale. Frequencies descriptive data were generated, and statistical analysis of examined variables was carried out using the Chi-square test. Mann–Whitney test was conducted to identify the correlation between variables. Results: The overall mean score was 22.61 ± 10.94, highlighting confidence of the graduates in managing the oral health problems at the community level. Females showed higher competencies in functions related “to develop activities to motivate the community development,” “to motivate health and oral health through health education,” and “to motivate health and oral health through the creation of healthy settings.” While males reported greater competency for the function “to adjust the dental practice to situations of restrictions that limits it.” Conclusion: Recent dental graduates at the Institute perceived themselves competent in managing oral and dental health problems at the public level. Additional countrywide evidence regarding teaching and learning of public health dentistry is essential to compare the current experiences of dental graduates and ultimately enhance patient care. PMID:27652246

  1. Dental hygienists' perceptions of barriers to graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Linda D; Bailey, Angela

    2011-08-01

    To advance the profession of dental hygiene, graduate education is necessary to support growth in research, education, administration, and practice in the discipline and to sustain credibility in a climate in which other health professions require entry-level master's and doctoral degrees. The purpose of this study was to explore what dental hygienists perceive as barriers to pursuing a graduate degree. A survey was developed based on the literature and other national surveys. Data were collected from 160 respondents to the survey: 50 percent held an entry-level baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene, while the rest held an entry-level associate degree (48 percent) or certificate (2 percent) in dental hygiene. All respondents had completed a bachelor's degree. The top five barriers these respondents identified in pursuing graduate education were as follows: 1) cost of graduate education, 2) family responsibilities are too great, 3) concerns about personal funding to pay for graduate education, 4) finding time for graduate school while working, and 5) fear of thesis research. Dental hygiene is one of the few health professions that still have entry-level degrees at the associate and baccalaureate levels. The profession needs to reduce such barriers to enable dental hygienists to pursue graduate education and thus ensure an adequate supply of future leaders, educators, and researchers.

  2. Does Internal Quality Management Contribute to More Control or to Improvement of Higher Education?: A Survey on Faculty's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Jan; Dolmans, Diana; Willems, Jos; van Hout, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore faculty's perceptions of quality management activities (QMA) within their departments, attention being paid to relevant quality aspects and whether quality management contributes to control or improvement of higher education. Furthermore, it examines differences between departments and relationships…

  3. Faculty Perceptions about Teaching Online: Exploring the Literature Using the Technology Acceptance Model as an Organizing Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Nancy Pope; Ivankova, Nataliya V.; Moss, Jacqueline A.

    2017-01-01

    Academic leaders can better implement institutional strategic plans to promote online programs if they understand faculty perceptions about teaching online. An extended version of a model for technology acceptance, or TAM2 (Venkatesh & Davis, 2000), provided a framework for surveying and organizing the research literature about factors that…

  4. Faculty and Student Perceptions Regarding Delivery of Online Courses in the Early Childhood Department of Select South Carolina Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Earlene

    2009-01-01

    The South Carolina Technical College System serves a diverse population of students who sometimes find it difficult to gain an education in the traditional format, such as attending scheduled classes as a full-time student. The purpose of this study was to investigate both faculty and student perceptions toward online learning, online teaching,…

  5. University Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Factors That Facilitate Technology Integration into Their Instruction: An Exploratory Case Study in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkouti, Ibrahim Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative, exploratory case study was designed to elicit faculty members' perceptions of the factors that facilitate technology integration into their instruction. The study was conducted at a midsized higher education institution in Qatar. Davis's (1986) technology acceptance model (TAM) is the conceptual framework that guided this study…

  6. Does Internal Quality Management Contribute to More Control or to Improvement of Higher Education?: A Survey on Faculty's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Jan; Dolmans, Diana; Willems, Jos; van Hout, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore faculty's perceptions of quality management activities (QMA) within their departments, attention being paid to relevant quality aspects and whether quality management contributes to control or improvement of higher education. Furthermore, it examines differences between departments and relationships…

  7. Understanding Faculty and Non-Traditional Student Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning in a Practical Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to identify and investigate nursing faculty and student perspectives of self-directed learning in a practical nursing program. It also explored the degree to which student's perceptions of self-directed learning exhibited factors consistent with that of critical thinking. This study is important because self-directed…

  8. Perceptions of African American Faculty in Kinesiology-Based Programs at Predominantly White American Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Joe W., Jr.; Harrison, Louis, Jr.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of African American faculty on their organizational socialization in kinesiology-based (i.e., sport pedagogy, exercise physiology, motor behavior, sport management/history) programs at predominantly White American (1) institutions of higher education (PW-IHE). Participants were 9 African…

  9. Uses and Perceptions of E-Mail for Course-Related Communication between Business Faculty and Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Technological advancements have facilitated the learning process by offering faculty members and students better access to resources, while increasing the potential for more interaction and communication flexibility (Firmin & Miller, 2005). Among these technologies is electronic mail or e-mail. The uses and perceptions of e-mail between business…

  10. Understanding Faculty and Non-Traditional Student Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning in a Practical Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to identify and investigate nursing faculty and student perspectives of self-directed learning in a practical nursing program. It also explored the degree to which student's perceptions of self-directed learning exhibited factors consistent with that of critical thinking. This study is important because self-directed…

  11. The Role of Ultrasound in Graduate Anatomy Education: Current State of Integration in the United States and Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Danielle F.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is increasingly taught in medical schools, where it has been shown to be a valuable adjunct to anatomy training. To determine the extent of US training in nonmedical anatomy programs, and evaluate anatomists' perceptions on the role of US in anatomy education, an online survey was distributed to faculty in anatomy Master's and…

  12. A Quantitative Study of Faculty Perceptions and Attitudes on Asynchronous Virtual Teamwork Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolusky, G. Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study used a web-based questionnaire to assess the attitudes and perceptions of online and hybrid faculty towards student-centered asynchronous virtual teamwork (AVT) using the technology acceptance model (TAM) of Davis (1989). AVT is online student participation in a team approach to problem-solving culminating in a written…

  13. Total saliva pH in patients with periodontal disease of UNMSM Dental Faculty Periodontal Service.

    OpenAIRE

    García Linares, Sixto; Departamento Médico-Quirúrgico. Facultad Odontología. UNMSM. Lima - Perú.; Bravo Castañola, Francis; Segunda Especialidad en Periodoncia. Facultad Odontología. UNMSM. Lima - Perú.; Ayala Luis, Jocelyn; Alumna Odontología pregrado. Facultad Odontología. UNMSM. Lima - Perú.; Bardales Cuzquén, Guadalupe; Alumna Odontología pregrado. Facultad Odontología. UNMSM. Lima - Perú.

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluates the relationship between salivary pH and periodontal disease. Sixty patients (30 gingivitis patients and 30 periodontitis patients) who went to UNMSM Dental School were evaluated. Also, we took a control group that included 20 dental students with healthy periodontum. We evaluated periodontal status and salivary samples were taken before and after phase I treatment. It was found a difference between control group that presented an average pH of 6.9 and gingivitis a...

  14. Students’ Perceptions about Role of Faculty and Administrative Staff in Business Education Service Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Arslanagić-Kalajdžić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on dimensions of the perceived service quality measurement for business schools. We propose an adapted SERVQUAL measure of expected and perceived quality, where employees at business schools are split into two groups: faculty and administrative staff, and assessed separately. This measure represents a tool for comparable service quality assessment at business schools. Empirical data were collected among undergraduate students in a developing economy. A total of 282 respondents were used to assess the overall fit of the proposed model and to test the differences between the expectations and the perceptions of service quality in a business school. The results support usability of the proposed adapted SERVQUAL measure. Therefore, the study contributes to the existing literature reporting the findings on service quality in an educational context.

  15. Faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Jeff; Shachar, Mickey

    2008-01-01

    This research study investigated the relationship between faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership and the effects of moderating demographic and institutional characteristics. Data for this study were collected utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire Form 5X and the self-designed Demographic and Institution Questionnaire. The study working sample included 184 graduate occupational therapy faculty members from 98 (65%) of all accredited academic occupational therapy programs in the United States for the 2005-06 academic year. Major findings from the study indicate that, in general, transformational leadership had a significant (p leadership outcomes whereas transactional leadership had a significant (p leadership attribute (although belonging to the transactional leadership construct) was found to be a positive predictor of leadership outcomes. Demographic and institutional characteristics did not have a significant (p > 0.01) influence on perceived leadership styles and leadership outcomes. The results of this research show that the most effective occupational therapy leaders in academia have been found to be those who adopt and utilize a full range of leadership styles that combine both transformational and transactional contingent reward leadership styles and suggest common effectiveness for other allied health fields.

  16. Collateral Opportunity for Increased Faculty Collaboration and Development through a Mentored Critical Thinking and Writing Exercise in a Dental School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Terry E.; Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines the collateral benefits to faculty from a guided learning literature review project for students. We describe a 3-year continuum of project creation and refinement designed to foster critical thinking and writing for second year dental students at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry. We discuss…

  17. Development and Implementation of an Electronic Clinical Formative Assessment: Dental Faculty and Student Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Michele L; Adams, Brooke N; Meadows, Melinda L; Jackson, Richard

    2016-06-01

    A traditional summative grading structure, used at Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD) for more than 30 years, was identified by faculty as outdated for assessing students' clinical performance. In an effort to change the status quo, a feedback-driven assessment was implemented in 2012 to provide a constructive assessment tool acceptable to both faculty and students. Building on the successful non-graded clinical evaluation employed at Baylor College of Dentistry, IUSD implemented a streamlined electronic formative feedback model (FFM) to assess students' daily clinical performance. An important addition to this evaluation tool was the inclusion of routine student self-assessment opportunities. The aim of this study was to determine faculty and student response to the new assessment instrument. Following training sessions, anonymous satisfaction surveys were examined for the three user groups: clinical faculty (60% response rate), third-year (D3) students (72% response rate), and fourth-year (D4) students (57% response rate). In the results, 70% of the responding faculty members preferred the FFM over the summative model; however, 61.8% of the D4 respondents preferred the summative model, reporting insufficient assessment time and low faculty participation. The two groups of students had different responses to the self-assessment component: 70.2% of the D4 respondents appreciated clinical self-assessment compared to 46% of the D3 respondents. Overall, while some components of the FFM assessment were well received, a phased approach to implementation may have facilitated a transition more acceptable to both faculty and students. Improvements are being made in an attempt to increase overall satisfaction.

  18. EVALUATION OF THE COMPUTER SELF-EFFICACY PERCEPTIONS OF STUDENTS FROM FACULTY OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat TUNCER

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-efficacy is defined by Bandura as an individual’s perception of himself on his capacity to arrange the necessary activities in order to achieve a certain performance and realize those activities successfully. When viewed from the point of view of teaching profession, it can be argued that teachers’ perceptions of self-efficacy will play an important role in their understanding technology-based effects and benefiting from opportunities. The beliefs of learners, on the other hand, about self-efficacy should be taken into account in the learning-teaching process. This research was carried out on candidate teachers, who will be employed as teachers in the future and have to rely on their computer skills frequently. It is believed that candidate teachers’ perceptions of computer self-efficacy will have a bearing on their professional success in the future. For this purpose, data was collected by applying the Computer self-efficacy scale (CSE to the 122 students at the Faculty of Education at Kahramanmaraş Sütçü İmam University. The collected was analyzed according to independent group’s t test and Anova test. According to the results of independent groups t test, while a significant difference was not found between candidate teachers’ perceptions of computer self-efficacy in terms of their sexes, ages, the class they study in and the places they live in before they enrolled in the program, there was a significant difference in terms of the departments they study at. They were also compared in terms of the secondary schools they finished and the the geographical regions they come from and a significant difference was not found.

  19. A comparison of professional-level faculty and student perceptions of active learning: its current use, effectiveness, and barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Active learning is an instructional method in which students become engaged participants in the classroom through the use of in-class written exercises, games, problem sets, audience-response systems, debates, class discussions, etc. Despite evidence supporting the effectiveness of active learning strategies, minimal adoption of the technique has occurred in many professional programs. The goal of this study was to compare the perceptions of active learning between students who were exposed to active learning in the classroom (n = 116) and professional-level physiology faculty members (n = 9). Faculty members reported a heavy reliance on lectures and minimal use of educational games and activities, whereas students indicated that they learned best via the activities. A majority of faculty members (89%) had observed active learning in the classroom and predicted favorable effects of the method on student performance and motivation. The main reported barriers by faculty members to the adoption of active learning were a lack of necessary class time, a high comfort level with traditional lectures, and insufficient time to develop materials. Students hypothesized similar obstacles for faculty members but also associated many negative qualities with the traditional lecturers. Despite these barriers, a majority of faculty members (78%) were interested in learning more about the alternative teaching strategy. Both faculty members and students indicated that active learning should occupy portions (29% vs. 40%) of face-to-face class time. PMID:25179615

  20. Evaluation of Child Self-perception Regarding Their Oro-dental Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina Mártha I.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the state of oral health and the self-perception of children regarding their oro-dental status, their knowledge and attitude towards oral health. Methods: A sample of 130 children (11-14 years and one of their parents were asked to complete a Child Perception Questionnaire (CPQ11-14 in Sfântu Gheorghe, Romania. From these, 69 children were examined and data was recorded about Decayed-Missing-Filled Teeth (DMFT, oral hygiene, dental malposition and malocclusion, Aesthetic Component of Index of Treatment Need (AC-IOTN. Consent of the parents was obtained. Statistical analyses were performed. Results: The optimal score of CPQ evaluation is 96 and the maximum score achieved was 93, the minimum was 43. 78.10 average score can be graded as medium. As the data points out, most of the children and their parents have a medium knowledge and self-perception. The clinical examination underline the main problems: dental caries (62%, occlusal coloration (23%, dental malposition (17%, rooftop deep bite (14%, dental rotation and crowding (12%, dental plaque and tartar (10%. As far as the AC-IOTN is concerned, 48 of 69 children have no need for treatment, 18 have a high need for treatment, and 3 have a moderate need for treatment. Conclusions: Overall, the children and their parents have a poor oral health knowledge, which is reflected in the medium level of the achieved CPQ scores, in the clinical examination and can be associated with high levels of dental caries and malocclusion

  1. Exploring dental students' perceptions of cultural competence and social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard W; Rustveld, Luis O; Weyant, Robert J; Close, John M

    2008-10-01

    The improvement of basic cultural competency skills and the creation of a greater community-minded spirit among dental students are important parts of dental education. The purpose of our study was to assess changes in dental students' attitudes and beliefs about community service and changes in cultural competencies after participation in a two-year program of non-dental community service (Student Community Outreach Program and Education, SCOPE). During 2003-07, two identical twenty-eight-item surveys were administered to SCOPE participants/completers. In the first, students reported on their attitudes after program completion. In the second, students reported retrospectively on their attitudes prior to starting the program. One hundred twenty-six post- and pre-intervention surveys were matched and assessed for changes in student attitudes after program participation. Based on factor analysis, four distinct scales were identified: 1) community service, 2) cultural competence, 3) communication, and 4) treatment perspective. Over time, statistically significant changes (pstudent attitudes and beliefs were found for scales 1 (p=.017), 2 (p=.001), and 3 (borderline significance, p=.057). Scale 4 showed no significant difference (p=.108). These scales indicate main focus areas to help guide future dentists in acquiring relevant sociocultural competencies and enabling community-minded attitudes. Overall, this study provides support for the addition of a non-dental community service-learning program into the preclinical curriculum.

  2. Reflections on a decade of research by ASEAN dental faculties: analysis of publications from ISI-WOS databases from 2000 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisinha, Stitaya; Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Phantumvanit, Prathip; Wittayawuttikul, Ruchareka

    2011-05-01

    This communication analyzed research publications in dentistry in the Institute of Scientific Information Web of Science databases of 10 dental faculties in the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) from 2000 to 2009. The term used for the "all-document types" search was "Faculty of Dentistry/College of Dentistry." Abstracts presented at regional meetings were also included in the analysis. The Times Higher Education System QS World University Rankings showed that universities in the region fare poorly in world university rankings. Only the National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University appeared in the top 100 in 2009; 19 universities in the region, including Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand, appeared in the top 500. Data from the databases showed that research publications by dental institutes in the region fall short of their Asian counterparts. Singapore and Thailand are the most active in dental research of the ASEAN countries.

  3. Predicting academic performance of dental students using perception of educational environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim A; El Tantawi, Maha M A

    2015-03-01

    Greater emphasis on student-centered education means that students' perception of their educational environment is important. The ultimate proof of this importance is its effect on academic performance. The aim of this study was to assess the predictability of dental students' grades as indicator of academic performance through their perceptions of the educational environment. The Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire was used to assess dental students' perceptions of their educational environment at the University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia, in academic year 2012-13. Aggregate grades in courses were collected at the end of the semester and related to levels of perception of the five DREEM domains using regression analysis. The response rate was 87.1% among all students in Years 2-6. As the number of students perceiving excellence in learning increased, the number of students with A grades increased. Perception of an environment with problems in the atmosphere and social life increased the number of students with D and F grades. There was no relation between any of the DREEM domains and past academic performance as measured by GPA. This study concludes that these students' academic performance was affected by various aspects of perceiving the educational environment. Improved perception of learning increased the number of high achievers, whereas increased perception of problems in atmosphere and social life increased the number of low achievers and failing students.

  4. Perceptions of undergraduate dental students at Makerere College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in written and verbal communication skills is a key component of health ... undergraduate dental students on the factors that affect this process and ... Patients' records, especially radiographs, were not well labelled and stored. ... the maintenance and storage of records, and to change to a more efficient electronic system.

  5. A One-Day Dental Faculty Workshop in Writing Multiple-Choice Questions: An Impact Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AlFaris, E.; Naeem, N; Irfan, F.; Qureshi, R.; Saad, H.; Sadhan, R. Al; Abdulghani, H.M.; Vleuten, C. van der

    2015-01-01

    Long training workshops on the writing of exam questions have been shown to be effective; however, the effectiveness of short workshops needs to be demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a one-day, seven-hour faculty development workshop at the College of Dentistry, King S

  6. Globalization, Internationalization and the Faculty: Culture and Perception of Full-Time Faculty at a Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Alison Izawa

    2012-01-01

    The processes of globalization have an impact on society in numerous ways. As a result, higher education institutions around the world attempt to adjust to these changes through internationalization efforts. Amongst the key stakeholders who play an important role in assuring that these efforts are successful is the faculty because it is this body…

  7. Climate Study of the Learning Environment for Faculty, Staff, and Students at a U.S. Dental School: Foundation for Culture Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch-Kinch, C A; Duff, R E; Ramaswamy, V; Ester, T V; Sponseller, S A; Seeley, J A

    2017-10-01

    -focused PPE process using mixed methods was effective for evaluating the dental school's climate for diversity and inclusion, as well as the learning environment for faculty, staff, and students.

  8. An investigation on the frequency of partial prosthesis classification in dental faculty, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zand S

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Tooth loss is a kind of handicap and losing a number of teeth makes an individual susceptible to this disability. Having knowledge about the prevalence of partial tooth loss, provides us with a better understanding of social hygiene. On the other hand, having access to such an information, students can be led properly to treat more prevalent cases. The goal of this retrospective study is to investigate the frequency of partial prosthesis classifications, among patients, referred to Shiraz dental faculty. Sexuality, tooth loss classification and its reason and the presence of additional space were studied about all patients (371 females, 205 males from (97-98 to the end of (99-2000. The results showed that females were more than males (64.4%, the lower jaw was treated more than the upper jaw (67.9%, dental caries were the most important reason for extraction (55.5%, class I among females (28.79% and class II mod I among males (29.73% had the most frequency, meaning that the most cases were free end, so more attention should be paid for the education of free end partial prosthesis, however, preventive steps should be taken to retain abutment teeth.

  9. FACULTY AND STUDENT PERCEPTIONS ON THE INTRODUCTION OF OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATION IN AN UNDERGRADUATE PHYSIOTHERAPY COURSE: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullai Dhinakaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical education methods in undergraduate physiotherapy training are well integrated but the methodology of the clinical skill assessment still remains subjective. Due to lack of objective clinical assessment, competency in clinical skills becomes compromised. Aim and Objectives: To introduce Objective Structured Clinical Examination to Physiotherapy faculty, students and determine the perception of Physiotherapy faculty and students about OSCE method of clinical assessment. Methodology: OSCE was conducted to undergraduate physiotherapy 4th year students (n – 20 by OSCE trained staff members (n -8 of College of Physiotherapy. CMC &H, Ludhiana. By the end of exam, self-administered questionnaires were distributed and piloted to both faculty and students. They answered each item on 5- point Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree to 5 (strongly agree. Results: The piloted data was analysed with descriptive statistics. The entire faculty perceived that OSCE helping to enhance the evaluation method of clinical assessment. More than 80% of the students felt that OSCE should be an effective clinical assessment tool. Both faculty and students felt that OSCE method of clinical assessment is less stressful but more exhausting and lengthy. Both groups were satisfied except more preparatory period for the exam as they expressed in open comments. Conclusions: This pilot study provided valuable feedback from faculty and students when OSCE assessment was introduced into undergraduate physiotherapy course. It helps for standardization of Physiotherapy clinical assessment.

  10. A comparison of Flow and Kodak dental X-ray films by means of perceptibility curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenson, B.; Petersson, A. (Centre of Oral Health Sciences, Univ. of Lund, Malmoe (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    Flow D- and E-speed group dental X-ray films (DX-58 and EX-58) have recently been introduced to the market. By means of perceptibility curves these films were compared with commonly used dental X-ray films (Kodak Ultraspeed and Ektaspeed). No major differences between the films were found with regard to contrast and the subjectively assessed number of small contrast differences. The exposure for EX-58 had to be lowered by 66% and Ektaspeed by 39% compared with Ultraspeed film to obtain the same density. DX-58 and Ultraspeed were of the same sensitivity. 26 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Students' Perceptions of Blended Learning and its Effectiveness As a Part of Second Year Dental Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varthis, Spyridon

    The field of dental medical education is one of the most rapidly evolving fields in education. Newer teaching methods are being evaluated and incorporated in dental institutions. One of the promising new methods is the blended learning approach that may involve a "flipped" instructional sequencing, where online instruction precedes the group meeting, allowing for more sophisticated learning through discussion and critical thinking. The author conducted a mixed method, experimental study that focused on second year dental students' perceptions of blended learning and its effectiveness. A sample size of 40 dental students in their second year from a Northeastern Regional Dental School were invited to participate in this study to evaluate a blended learning approach in comparison to a more traditional lecture format. Students who participated in the study, participated in group problem-solving, responded to Likert-type surveys, completed content exams, and were interviewed individually. Based on Likert survey data and interview responses, the participants in the blended learning treatment reported very positive opinions including positive perceptions of the organization, support of meaningful learning and potential merits for use in dental education. There also was evidence that the blended learning group achieved at least as well as the traditional lecture group, and excelled on certain content test items. The results of this study support the conclusion that blended instruction promotes active, in-depth and self-regulated learning. During blended learning, students set standards or goals regarding their learning, evaluate their progress toward these goals, and then adapt and regulate their cognition, motivation, and behavior in order to accomplish their goals. Overall, the results of this research on blended learning, including the use of problem-based learning in group discussions, supports the merits of incorporating blended earning in dental education curricula.

  12. Awareness and Perception of Copyright Among Teaching Faculty at Canadian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Di Valentino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the background, methodology, and results of a study undertaken in 2014 to determine university faculty awareness and perceptions of copyright as it affects their teaching. An online survey questionnaire was distributed to teaching faculty across Canada, seeking feedback about the copyright policies and training opportunities at their institutions, where they go for copyright assistance, and how they would respond to various copyright-related scenarios that may arise in the course of teaching. Most of the respondents are aware of the copyright policies or guidelines at their universities, but much fewer know whether or not their institution offers copyright training. Of those who are aware of training opportunities, only one third have taken advantage of them. When needing assistance, faculty members are most likely to go to a librarian or to the institution’s copyright policy. Responses to the four scenarios suggest that faculty members are more likely to share digital copyrighted materials (including online works with their students, whereas they are more likely to ask permission or guidance when it comes to print materials. Comments from the respondents touch upon issues of the complexity of copyright, and the often time-consuming process of obtaining permissions for the use of copyrighted materials in teaching. This study was supported by an Ontario Graduate Scholarship. Cet article décrit le contexte, la méthodologie, et les résultats d’une étude préliminaire entreprise en 2014 pour déterminer la sensibilisation et les perceptions du personnel universitaire du droit d’auteur en ce qui concerne l’enseignement et l’apprentissage. Un questionnaire d’un sondage en ligne était distribué (via les associations universitaires à l’équipe enseignante dans tout le Canada, cherchant des commentaires sur les politiques du droit d’auteur et les possibilités de formation aux institutions, où elle recherche

  13. Korean version of child perceptions questionnaire and dental caries among Korean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hye-Sun; Han, Dong-Hun; Shin, Myung-Seop; Lee, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Duck

    2015-01-01

    Although dental caries has been a major oral health problem for children, the association between dental caries and oral health related quality of life has been still controversial. This study aims to evaluate the association between the Korean version of the Child Perceptions Questionnaire (K-CPQ) and dental caries among Korean children. Eight hundred one school children aged 8 to 14 years participated in this study. After the K-CPQ was validated we performed an association study. The K-CPQ was self-reported. Dental caries were evaluated by dentists using the World Health Organization Index. Correlation analyses (intraclass correlation coefficient, Cronbach's alpha and Pearson's correlation coefficient [r]) and linear regression models (partial r) including age, gender and type of school were applied. Untreated deciduous dental caries was associated with the K-CPQ(8-10) overall score (partial r = 0.15, P caries (FT) was associated with the K-CPQ11-14 overall domain (partial r = 0.14, P = 0.002) as well as with the oral symptoms domain (partial r = 0.16, P = 0.001). This association was highlighted among public school children. Our data indicate that K-CPQ was independently associated with dental caries. The K-CPQ could be a practical tool to evaluate the subjective oral health among Korean children aged 8 to 14.

  14. Udbredelse og opfattelse af angst for tandbehandling blandt voksne danskere.[Prevalence and perceptions of dental anxiety among Danish adults.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod; Birn, H.; Brødsgaard, I.

    1993-01-01

    English summary: This telephone survey showed that 4.2% of Danish adults over 16 years old have extreme dental anxiety and 6% have moderate fear in a sample of 565 adults from Århus (Table 1). Common perceptions as to the causes of dental fear indicated that most believed it to be due to pain...

  15. Perceptions from Library School Faculty on Meaningful Matters to Academic Librarians: Additional Degrees, Sabbaticals, Evaluation, and Governance.A Review of: Wyss, P. A. (2010. Library school faculty member perceptions regarding faculty status for academic librarians. College & Research Libraries, 71(4, 375-388.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Young

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To survey the faculty members of American Library Association (ALA-accredited library schools to gain insight into their perceptions on academic librarians obtaining faculty status and how the library school curricula prepare academic librarians for faculty roles.Design – Survey questionnaire.Setting – An e-survey was distributed online to 57 ALA-accredited library schools during April 2007, using Zoomerang.Subjects – The population consisted of 906 tenure-track or tenured faculty members.Methods – The 24 item survey was designed to answer eight specific research questions and evoke responses scored on a five-point Likert scale that corresponded to (1 Strongly Disagree, (2 Disagree, (3 Neutral, (4 Agree, and (5 Strongly Agree. For the analysis of data in questions 1 and 3 through 8, the perceptions of faculty members of ALA-accredited library schools were determined by calculating the mean and standard deviation. For the analysis of question 2 a t test was used to determine differences in faculty members’ perceptions based on gender and tenure. A one-way analysis of variance, or ANOVA, was used to determine library school faculty members’ perceptions based on academic rank. Main Results – A total of 906 individuals were sent the link to the survey, and 187 individuals completed the survey, making the response rate 20.6%. Of the respondents, 38.5% were professors, 25.7% were associate professors, 33.7% were assistant professors, and 2.1% were lecturers. The majority of respondents were female (60.0% and tenured (65.0%.Faculty members of the ALA-accredited library schools agreed that courses in statistical concepts, procedures, and research (both experimental and non-experimental should be required of those seeking a master’s or doctoral degree. They agreed that the Master of Library Science (MLS degree is insufficient in preparing librarians for faculty status, and that additional graduate degrees improve performance

  16. Development of a rural outplacement programme for dental undergraduates: students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzar, M A; Burrow, M F; Morgan, M

    2009-11-01

    To describe the development and implementation of a new rural dental outplacement module in the final year curriculum and report initial student perceptions. The Melbourne Dental School, University of Melbourne, introduced a required 4-week rural outplacement [termed Rural Dental Rotation (RDR)] in July 2006 to provide education and clinical training to all final year students. Seventy dental students (Bachelor of Dental Science and Bachelor of Oral Health) were rostered in groups of 6-10 students to Shepparton (Victoria, Australia), from July 2006 to June 2007 for 4 weeks per group. Students were introduced to the culture and oral health needs of the indigenous population in the region, and were involved in oral health promotion in specific health programmes. At the end of each roster students provided feedback of their experiences through a voluntary anonymous questionnaire. The RDR offered a rural learning experience to all final year dental undergraduates and also provided dental services to the local community on a continuing basis. Students agreed that the RDR was a worthwhile experience (mean 4.77 +/- 0.46 on 1-5 scale) and was 'enjoyable' (mean 4.71 +/- 0.45). There was only one student who did not consider rural practice in future. This was because of family reasons. The majority (79.1%) expressed definite affirmation, whereas some (19.4%) indicated the possibility of taking up rural practice. Overall feedback indicated that the students found it a very positive and enjoyable experience. It provided an opportunity to appreciate cultural safety and understand the specific oral health needs of indigenous Australians. The key benefit of such a programme to the community is the increased likelihood of attracting new dental graduates to rural areas.

  17. Udbredelse og opfattelse af angst for tandbehandling blandt voksne danskere.[Prevalence and perceptions of dental anxiety among Danish adults.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod; Birn, H.; Brødsgaard, I.

    1993-01-01

    English summary: This telephone survey showed that 4.2% of Danish adults over 16 years old have extreme dental anxiety and 6% have moderate fear in a sample of 565 adults from Århus (Table 1). Common perceptions as to the causes of dental fear indicated that most believed it to be due to pain......, especially from drilling and thereafter trauma or negative experiences leading to distrust of the dentist (Table 1). It was interesting to note that although up to 40% of the sample expressed some degree of fear for dentistry, 81.1% said that they know of at least two persons who have dental fear (16.2% know...... anxiety by the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) indicated significant associations between high dental anxiety and gender (women) (Table 2) and low education (Table 3), but not income or age (Table 2). Other significant relationships with high dental fear were fear of specific dental procedures, negative...

  18. "YouTube Has Changed Everything"? Music Faculty, Librarians, and Their Use and Perceptions of Youtube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougan, Kirstin

    2014-01-01

    YouTube's accessibility, ease of use, and depth of content are strong lures for music students. But do music teaching faculty and librarians encourage this and do they use it in their own research, teaching, and work? This study surveyed over 9,000 music faculty and over 300 music librarians in the United States. It discovered that faculty rank is…

  19. Dental students' perceptions of and attitudes about poverty: a Canadian participatory case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Clarice M R; Rodriguez, Charo; Macaulay, Ann C; Bedos, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    This qualitative case study was conducted in a Canadian dental school using a participatory approach and was based on Paulo Freire's theoretical concept of conscientização, a form of critical consciousness that involves awareness of social reality and fosters action towards social justice. The aim of the study was to understand dental students' perceptions of and attitudes about poverty and dental care provided to people living in poverty. It also examined how these perceptions shape students' plans for their professional careers, as well as their opinions on educational strategies to prepare them to work with poor patients. The sources of data generation were semistructured interviews, participant observations, and document analysis. A deductive-inductive thematic strategy was used to analyze the data. Out of a class of thirty-five senior dental students, the authors interviewed a convenience sample of twelve: five male and seven female. The findings suggest that the students had incipient conscientização about poverty-related themes. They perceived poverty as a distant issue and as the responsibility of the government or of the poor individuals themselves. The students did not have plans to work with patients living in poverty in the future and struggled to envision ways to address these patients' needs other than volunteer work. This research supports the need for academic dental institutions to adopt strategies to increase students' critical consciousness about oral health inequities. Reducing oral health inequities is a matter of social justice, and dental care providers are key actors in this endeavor.

  20. Faculty perceptions of the strengths, weaknesses and future prospects of the current medical undergraduate experimental physiology curriculum in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paralikar, Swapnil; Shah, Chinmay

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, an opinion has emerged in India that the current practical curricula in medical schools fail to meet many of the objectives for which they were instituted. Hence, this study has assessed the perception of physiology faculty members regarding the current experimental physiology curriculum in one Indian state, Gujarat. The faculty were of the opinion that many of the topics currently taught in experimental physiology (amphibian nerve-muscle and heart muscle experiments) were outdated and clinically irrelevant: Therefore, the faculty advocated that duration of teaching time devoted to some of these topics should be reduced and topics with clinical relevance should be introduced at the undergraduate level. The faculty also felt that more emphasis should be laid on highlighting the clinical aspect related to each concept taught in experimental physiology . Moreover, a majority of faculty members were in favour of replacing the current practice in Gujarat of teaching experimental physiology only by explanation of graphs obtained from experiments conducted in the previous years, with computer assisted learning in small groups.

  1. Experience, awareness, and perceptions about medical emergencies among dental interns of Chennai city, India

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    L Leelavathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Every dental health professional should have the essential knowledge to identify, assess and manage a potentially life-threatening situation. Aim: To assess the experience, awareness, and perceptions about medical emergencies among dental interns in Chennai city, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out in four randomly selected dental colleges of Chennai city. Data were collected using a self-administered, structured, closed-ended 20-item questionnaire. It consists of questions on experience of medical emergencies encountered by interns during their graduation, awareness of the essential drugs and equipment, the amount of medical emergencies training undertaken by participants, preparedness of interns in handling medical emergencies. Descriptive statistics, independent sample t-test, were used. Results: Out of 335 interns, 157 (47% said that syncope was the most common medical emergency event encountered by the interns. Regarding awareness about essential drugs, about 161 (48% study participants answered oxygen, epinephrine, nitroglycerin, antihistamine, salbutamol, and aspirin as emergency drugs. About half of the study participants, 187 (56% were aware that pressure should be given to the affected site, with or without suturing if the greater palatine artery is inadvertently cut. The majority of the interns (93% preferred to have a specified training on the handling of medical emergencies in dental practice. Conclusions: Syncope was the most common medical emergency event. Awareness about the essential drugs, equipment, and preparedness of dental interns in handling medical emergencies was low.

  2. South African Dental Students' Perceptions of Most Important Nonclinical Skills According to Medical Leadership Competency Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Berg-Cloete, Sophy E; Snyman, Lorraine; Postma, Thomas C; White, John G

    2016-11-01

    Recent developmental frameworks suggest that dental curricula should focus on developing nonclinical skills in dental students. The aim of this study was to qualitatively map students' perceptions of the most important nonclinical skills against the Medical Leadership Competency Framework (MLCF). A representative sample of second- to fifth-year students (n=594; overall response rate 69%) from all four dental schools in South Africa participated in a cross-sectional survey in 2014-15 enquiring about nonclinical skills and dental practice management. One of the questions required students to list the four most important nonclinical skills required for a dentist. Students (n=541) most frequently noted competencies related to working with others (97.9%), personal qualities (72.3%), and managing services (42.9%) as the most important nonclinical skills. Very few students mentioned competencies related to the improvement of services (14.1%) and the provision of strategic direction (10.9%). The students' attention appeared to be on nonclinical skills generally required for clinical care with some realization of the importance of managing services, indicating a need for a stronger focus on leadership and management training in dental schools in South Africa. The results also helped to unravel some of the conceptual ambiguity of the MLCF and highlight opportunities for leadership research using the MLCF as a conceptual framework.

  3. Irrigation protocol among endodontic faculty and post-graduate students in dental colleges of India: A survey

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    Velayutham Gopikrishna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Irrigation protocol is the most critical step during the disinfection of an infected root canal system. Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the root canal irrigation trends being practiced among the endodontic teaching faculty and post-graduate students in the dental colleges present in India. Materials and Methods: A postal invitation to participate in this national survey was sent to the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontic of 294 Dental Colleges present in India. A total of 2389 forms were successfully delivered out of which 794 duly filled forms were received back. Survey participants were asked about their irrigant selection, irrigant concentration, smear layer removal protocol, and use of adjuncts during irrigation. Results: This survey elicited a positive response rate of 33.23%. Our data indicated that 92.8% of respondents use sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl as the primary endodontic irrigant, with 26 gauge needle being most preferred for syringe irrigation, with 49.3% of them using it at a concentration of 2.6-4.0%. 68% of our respondents aim to remove the smear layer during the endodontic treatment while 47% reported using ultrasonic activation as an adjunct during their irrigation protocol. Conclusions: The findings of this survey are that the majority of teaching institutions in India are employing NaOCl (2.6-4.0% as the primary endodontic irrigant. The concept of smear layer removal is high (68%, and there is a general trend (78% to modify the irrigation protocol according to the status of the pulp, status of the periapex and in retreatment cases.

  4. Senior dentists' perceptions of dental therapists' roles and education needs in Malaysia.

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    Nor, N A M; Murat, N A; Yusof, Z Y M; Gamboa, A B O

    2013-11-01

    To describe the perceptions of senior dental officers (SDOs) on the roles of dental therapists (DTs) and their education needs in Malaysia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a self-administered postal questionnaire targeting all 112 SDOs in the Malaysian Ministry of Health. The SDOs were asked about their perceptions of DT's roles in relation to clinical tasks, oral health promotion, administration and the dental team and their perceptions of DT's future education needs. Data were analysed using spss software, version 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The response rate was 60%. A majority of SDOs were women (68%) with a mean age of 44.9 (SD: 8.04). Generally, the majority of SDOs perceived the current roles of DT in non-complex clinical tasks such as examination and diagnosis, preventive treatment, extraction of deciduous teeth and oral health promotion as very important. Fewer than half of SDOs perceived DT's role in the extraction of permanent teeth as important. Most SDOs perceived the need to train DT in 'scaling and polishing for adults' (80.5%), 'delivering inferior alveolar nerve block' (57.3%) and 'pulp therapy' (59.2%). They also had positive perceptions of providing education for DT up to degree level (70.8%). This study suggests that Malaysian SDOs have positive perceptions of the current roles of DT and of the expansion of some of their clinical tasks to include broader client groups through further training and education. These findings indicate a need to revise the current curriculum and legislation pertaining to DT's education and scope of practice in Malaysia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Dentists' dietary perception and practice patterns in a dental practice-based research network.

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    Yoko Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Dental caries are largely preventable, and epidemiological evidence for a relationship between diet and oral health is abundant. To date, however, dentists' perceptions about the role of diet and dentists' practice patterns regarding diet counseling have not been clarified.THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO: (1 examine discordance between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual provision of diet counseling to patients, and (2 identify dentists' characteristics associated with their provision of diet counseling.The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey in Japan.The study queried dentists working in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan (JDPBRN, which aims to allow dentists to investigate research questions and share experiences and expertise (n = 282.Dentists were asked about their perceptions on the importance of diet and their practice patterns regarding diet counseling, as well as patient, practice, and dentist background data.The majority of participants (n = 116, 63% recognized that diet is "more important" to oral health. However, among participants who think diet is "more important" (n = 116, only 48% (n = 56 provide diet counseling to more than 20% of their patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that several variables were associated with providing diet counseling; dentist gender, practice busyness, percentage of patients interested in caries prevention, caries risk assessment, and percentage of patients who receive blood pressure screening.Some discordance exists between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual practice pattern regarding diet counseling to patients. Reducing this discordance may require additional dentist education, including nutritional and systemic disease concepts; patient

  6. Pilot Test of Survey to Assess Dental and Dental Hygiene Student Human Papillomavirus-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer Knowledge, Perceptions, and Clinical Practices.

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    Rutkoski, Holdunn; Fowler, Brynn; Mooney, Ryan; Pappas, Lisa; Dixon, Barbara L; Pinzon, Lilliam M; Winkler, James; Kepka, Deanna

    2017-01-14

    This was the first study to develop and pilot test an assessment tool for the examination of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) knowledge, perceptions, and clinical practices of oral health students. An interdisciplinary team developed the tool using surveys that examined this topic in other populations. The tool was then pilot tested at two different dental programs. Results from the pilot informed revisions to the final version of the tool. Of the 46 student participants, 18 were first-year dental hygiene and 28 were first-year dental students. The majority of participants were female (N = 29, 63%) and ages 18 to 29 years old (N = 41, 89%). Four scales used in the questionnaire were analyzed for reliability. Of these, the HPV and HPV-OPC knowledge and the HPV vaccination knowledge scales had Cronbach alphas of 0.71 and 0.79, respectively. Questions assessing HPV and the role of dental professionals had a correlation coefficient of 0.71. Questions assessing willingness to administer vaccines in the dental office had a correlation coefficient of 0.85. Assessing oral health students' HPV-OPC knowledge, perceptions, and clinical practices are important for future assessment of possible HPV-OPC cases. Dental professionals may be optimally positioned to provide HPV patient education. The tool developed and pilot tested in this study can help schools assess their students' knowledge and guide their dental curriculum to address deficiencies. Since this topic has not been effectively examined with dental health students, the results could help improve dental education and dental care.

  7. The Inquiry Approach in Dental Hygiene Education.

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    Scott, Ruth Lois; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study to assess the impact of an inquiry-oriented curriculum in a dental hygiene program is described. Two instruments, designed to measure student perception of personal and faculty inquiry and disinquiry behavior, were administered. The implications of the findings are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  8. [Satisfaction with life, dental experience and self-perception of oral health among the elderly].

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    Rigo, Lilian; Basso, Kenny; Pauli, Jandir; Cericato, Graziela Oro; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Garbin, Raissa Rigo

    2015-12-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the relationship between satisfaction with quality of life, self-perception of oral health and experience with dental surgeons. The study is cross-sectional epidemiological in structure with a sample of 326 elderly individuals over 60 years of age living in a city in the north of the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The instrument for data collection was a self-administered questionnaire with queries relating to self-perception in oral health (OHIP - Oral Health Impact Profile), Quality of Life Satisfaction scale and sociodemographic issues. The findings showed that the elderly with higher levels of quality of life satisfaction manifested an enhanced perception of their own oral health as well as a better perceived image of dental surgeons and less anxiety about their experiences with the dentist. It was proven that both the self-perception that the elderly have about oral health as well as their experience with dentists is associated with the quality of life satisfaction of the elderly. The results have important implications for decision-makers and formulators of public policy.

  9. Attitudes and perceptions of dental students in Tamil Nadu state toward their curriculum and profession

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    Sharath Asokan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medicine and engineering still seems to be the most chosen career and the decision in the choice is largely influenced by the parents. Right attitude toward the chosen profession and the perceptions about the existing curriculum are important for any student to be successful in the college as well as in the career. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among 466 undergraduate (bachelor of dental surgery students from randomly chosen dental colleges in Tamil Nadu to assess their attitude and perception toward their curriculum and profession. A validated closed ended questionnaire with 18 questions was used in this study. The information obtained were: Reason to opt for the dental course, the most-hated part of the curriculum, adequacy of lecture and clinical hours, number and duration of lecture classes and clinical hours preferred, reason for not liking a particular subject, and the most important factor to be considered to rate a teacher. The proportion of the response was calculated to assess the overall attitude and perceptions of the students. Results: Forty-two percent of the students opted for the dental course because they did not get admission to the medical course. Written assignments (52% were the most hated part of their curriculum. -42% of the students believed that the ideal attendance percentage should be 75%. Knowledge and teaching skills (79% was the most important factor that was considered to rate a teacher. Conclusion: Majority of the students developed passion toward their profession. There was no serious complains about the existing curriculum, but a newer education model that can enhance the problem solving, and critical evaluation skills of the student is warranted.

  10. A student operated, faculty mentored dental clinic service experience at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio for the underserved refugee community: an interprofessional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhi, Moshtagh R; Glass, Birgit Junfin; Gureckis, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    As the number of refugees settling in San Antonio increases, so will their health care needs. Due to limited resources and stress, they suffer from acute and chronic diseases, reducing their potential for success in their new host country. The need for proper health education coupled with a stable holistic health care facility is essential for their future success. In 2009, nursing students began serving the San Antonio refugee population. By 2011, dental and medical students joined to create the student-run San Antonio Refugee Health Clinic (SARHC). SARHC serves the refugees by providing free health care/education while connecting them to San Antonio's primary health care system. Select dental, medical, and nursing students under the mentorship of their faculty operate the SARHC clinic. The students work in collaborative teams where select members of the refugee community and bilingual students provide translational assistance. The nursing students take vital signs and medical students perform physical exams after gathering a history of present illness. Dental students provide oral health/nutritional education and screenings inclusive of head and neck examination and oral cancer risk assessment. Thirty-two dental, 83 medical, and 118 nursing students rotated through the clinic last year, serving patients with the most common chief complaints of dental, musculoskeletal, dermatological, and gastrointestinal nature. The most common dental findings for this population have been dental caries, periodontal disease, and other dental diseases requiring urgent care. Sub-programs such as the student interpreter program, ladies' health education, and the Refugee Accompaniment Health Partnership have resulted from the SARHC initiative to meet the refugees' needs. Currently under development is a future collaboration with local San Antonio clinics such as the San Antonio Christian Dental Clinic to serve as their dental home. The use of this interprofessional model has resulted

  11. Dental hygiene students' perceptions of distance learning: do they change over time?

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    Sledge, Rhonda; Vuk, Jasna; Long, Susan

    2014-02-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences dental hygiene program established a distant site where the didactic curriculum was broadcast via interactive video from the main campus to the distant site, supplemented with on-line learning via Blackboard. This study compared the perceptions of students towards distance learning as they progressed through the 21 month curriculum. Specifically, the study sought to answer the following questions: Is there a difference in the initial perceptions of students on the main campus and at the distant site toward distance learning? Do students' perceptions change over time with exposure to synchronous distance learning over the course of the curriculum? All 39 subjects were women between the ages of 20 and 35 years. Of the 39 subjects, 37 were Caucasian and 2 were African-American. A 15-question Likert scale survey was administered at 4 different periods during the 21 month program to compare changes in perceptions toward distance learning as students progressed through the program. An independent sample t-test and ANOVA were utilized for statistical analysis. At the beginning of the program, independent samples t-test revealed that students at the main campus (n=34) perceived statistically significantly higher effectiveness of distance learning than students at the distant site (n=5). Repeated measures of ANOVA revealed that perceptions of students at the main campus on effectiveness and advantages of distance learning statistically significantly decreased whereas perceptions of students at distant site statistically significantly increased over time. Distance learning in the dental hygiene program was discussed, and replication of the study with larger samples of students was recommended.

  12. A Study of Faculty Racial Diversity in Business Schools: Perceptions of Business Deans

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    Moshiri, Farrokh; Cardon, Peter Wilson

    2016-01-01

    For decades, business schools in the United States have attempted to increase faculty diversity. The goals and benefits of increasing faculty diversity include improved educational outcomes, social justice, and economic competitiveness. While Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business data shows that a gender gap still exists in…

  13. Residents' Engagement and Empathy Associated With Their Perception of Faculty's Teaching Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lases, S. S. Lenny; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Pierik, E. G. J. M. Robert; Heineman, Erik; Lombarts, M. J. M. H. Kiki

    2014-01-01

    Faculty members rely on residents' feedback about their teaching performance. The influence of residents' characteristics on evaluations of faculty is relatively unexplored. We aimed to evaluate the levels of work engagement and empathy among residents and the association of both characteristics wit

  14. Motivations, Costs and Results of AOL: Perceptions of Accounting and Economics Faculty

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    Eschenfelder, Mark J.; Bryan, Lois D.; Lee, Tanya M.

    2014-01-01

    The emphasis of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) on improving student learning through Assurance of Learning (AOL) makes faculty involvement in the process at AACSB accredited schools important. This study examines the attitudes of accounting and economics faculty at AACSB accredited institutions toward the AOL…

  15. Faculty Perceptions of Students in Life and Physical Science Research Labs

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    Gonyo, Claire P.; Cantwell, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study involved interviews of 32 faculty principle investigators at three research institutions and explored how they view the role of students within physical and life science labs. We used socialization theory and student engagement literature to analyze faculty views, which can contribute to student investment in STEM fields.…

  16. Perceptions of Preservice Teachers regarding the Integration of Information and Communication Technologies in Turkish Education Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Yavuz; Odabasi, H. Ferhan; Kuzu, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the views of pre-service teachers regarding the indicators of information and communication technologies (ICT) at Turkish education faculties. A cross-sectional survey design was implemented with graduating students enrolled in Turkish education faculties. A combination of stratified random sampling and systematic sampling was…

  17. The effects of camera lenses and dental specialties on the perception of smile esthetics

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    Sajjadi, Seyed Hadi; Khosravanifard, Behnam; Esmaeilpour, Mozhgan; Rakhshan, Vahid; Moazzami, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether different camera lenses and dental specialties can affect the perception of smile esthetics. Methods: In the first phase of this study, 40 female smile photographs (taken from dental students) were evaluated by six orthodontists, three specialists in restorative dentistry, and three prosthodontists to select the most beautiful smiles. The 20 students with the best smile ranks were again photographed in standard conditions, but this time with two different lenses: Regular and then macro lenses. Each referee evaluated the beauty of the smiles on a visual analog scale. The referees were blinded of the type of lenses, and the images were all coded. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests (alpha = 0.05, alpha = 0.0167). Results: The lenses led to similar scores of beauty perception (Mann–Whitney P = 0.8). There was no difference between subjective beauty perception of specialties (Kruskal–Wallis P = 0.6). Two-way ANOVA indicated no significant role for lenses (P = 0.1750), specialties (P = 0.7677), or their interaction (P = 0.7852). Conclusion: The photographs taken by a regular lens and then digitally magnified can be as appealing as close-up photographs taken by a macro lens. Experts in different specialties (orthodontics, prosthodontics, and restorative dentistry) showed similar subjective judgments of smile beauty. PMID:26952147

  18. Students' Perception of Important Teaching Behaviors in Classroom and Clinical Environments of a Community College Nursing and Dental Hygiene Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough-Walls, Vickie J.

    2012-01-01

    Student success is dependent on effective instruction. Yet, effective teaching is difficult to define and described differently by students, faculty, and administrators. Nursing and dental hygiene education programs require faculty to teach in both classroom and clinical environments. However, accreditation agencies for these programs mandate…

  19. Students' Perception of Important Teaching Behaviors in Classroom and Clinical Environments of a Community College Nursing and Dental Hygiene Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough-Walls, Vickie J.

    2012-01-01

    Student success is dependent on effective instruction. Yet, effective teaching is difficult to define and described differently by students, faculty, and administrators. Nursing and dental hygiene education programs require faculty to teach in both classroom and clinical environments. However, accreditation agencies for these programs mandate…

  20. Patients' Perceptions of Dental Students' Empathic, Person-Centered Care in a Dental School Clinic in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Muneer Gohar; Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Yong, Wong Mei; Mitha, Shahid; Al-Waeli, Haider Abdulameer

    2017-04-01

    Empathy has been identified as a crucial foundation in building an effective dentist-patient relationship. The aim of this study was to assess patients' perceptions of dental students' empathic care in the primary oral health care clinic at International Medical University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in May-October 2014. The study also assessed the validity and reliability of the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure in this setting; the association between number of encounters and students' CARE Measure scores; and the association between students' empathy (measured by the Toronto Empathy Questionnaire) and CARE Measure scores. Participants were 283 patients (aged ≥18 years) who were asked to self-complete the ten-item CARE Measure immediately after their clinical encounter with students who provided care under supervision of the teaching staff. The results showed that the CARE Measure demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.95). A single factor solution emerged, accounting for 69% of the variance. The mean CARE Measure score in the consultations was 43.55±6.14, and 26% of the students achieved the maximum possible score of 50. The mean number of encounters with each student was 2.33±2.78. An increase of one episode was associated with an insignificant average CARE score decrease of 0.05 (-0.28, 0.38), whereas students' empathy was associated with a small increase in average CARE Measure score of 0.63 (0.08, 1.18). These results provide evidence of the measure's ability to support feedback to dental students on their empathy when interacting with patients.

  1. Prevalence and self perception of Dental Fluorosis among 15 year old school children in Prakasham district of south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Guntipalli M; Rahamthullah, S A K Uroof; Kopuri, Raj Kumar Chowdary; Kumar, Y Anil; Suman, S V; Balaga, Ramesh Naidu

    2013-12-01

    To assess the Prevalence and self perception of dental fluorosis among 15 - year old school children. A cross sectional study was conducted on 840, 15 - year old school children from 12 schools of Prakasam district. After taking informed consent from their parents or legal representatives, an interview was conducted using a pretested questionnaire to collect the data regarding self perception of dental fluorosis, dental behaviour, and source of water and diet and socio demographic characters. Oral examination was done under natural light to score Deans fluorosis index. Statistical test used was chisquare test. Study revealed that 82.04% of the study population were having dental fluorosis. Out of which only 42.3% were aware of the existing situations. 47.90% of boys are aware of dental fluorosis where as 40.50% of girls are aware of dental fluorosis. Fluorosis score in relation to gender is not statistically significant (chisquare (8.796);p=0.117). Dental fluorosis is a public health problem in Kanigiri town. As there was no study conducted in Kanigiri town even though it is one of the severely affected area in our country. Active steps must be taken to De fluoridate the water before distribution to reduce the morbidity associated with dental fluorosis in this area. How to cite this article: Naidu GM, Rahamthullah SA, Kopuri RK, Kumar YA, Suman SV, Balaga RN. Prevalence and self perception of Dental Fluorosis among 15 year old school children in Prakasham district of south India. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):67-71.

  2. Faktor pendorong motivasi orang tua merawatkan gigi anak di klinik Fakultas Kedokteran Gigi Unair (Stimulating factor of parents' motivation to take their children's dental health for treatment in the Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University

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    Dita Anggriana

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Children dental health is very beneficial for children's growth Parent’s motivation for taking their children dental for treatment before more serious dental damage can help to decrease the prevalence of children's dental damage, especially for patients who came to pedodontia clinic in the faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University. This study aimed to know the parents' motivation to take their children dental for treatment in Pedodontia clinic in the faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University by giving questionnaire to 42 patient’s parents. The result of this study suggested that clinic’s facilities (scored: 2.86 as the stimulating factor had the biggest influence in motivating patient’s parents.

  3. ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION OF FACULTIES TOWARDS TEACHING EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE TO PRE - CLINICAL & PARA - CLINICAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

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    Bhavita Patel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Evidence - based medicine (EBM is defined as the „conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence‟. It i s an important tool for lifelong learning in medicine, and medical students can develop the skills necessary to understand and use EBM. The teaching of EBM in Sumandeep Vidyapeeth is as part of Evidence Based Education System (EBES. The university has imp lemented the 16 hours of teaching with project work on Evidence Based Medicine in 1st MBBS and 2nd MBBS curriculum in addition to MBBS syllabus. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: This study was planned to take feedback from all the faculties those who are involved in Evi dence based Medicine teaching to evaluate their attitude and perception towards this innovative teaching method and to recommend improvements. MATERIAL & METHODS: A Descriptive, self - structured , pilot pretested questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in the year 2013 - 2014 among 40 faculties from 7 Departments like Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Pathology and Forensic Medicine teaching Evidence Base d Medicine to students at S.B.K.S MI & RC, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth. Data was expressed as percentage. RESULTS: The response rate for the study was 75%. Almost 87% of faculties agreed that teaching EBM is a welcoming development during pre and para clinical ye ars. About 80% faculties agreed that it will help them in future clinical learning. 87% faculties agreed that literature and research searching improves their day to day teaching. About 77% of faculties have attended workshop and training held in Universit y and 83% of faculties agreed that they are interested in more learning and improving skills necessary to incorporate Evidence based medicine into their discipline. Barriers included shortage of time and need for training in teaching EBM. CONCLUSION: Facul ties of this University teaching Pre - clinical and Para - clinical medical students recognized

  4. STUDENTS‘ PERCEPTIONS OF CHANGE READINESS OF A TURKISH EDUCATION FACULTY REGARDING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

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    Yavuz AKBULUT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study investigated the degree of involvement in new teaching and learning methods by the academic staff of a large privileged Turkish state university, and revealed that faculties of education and open education were better in terms of change readiness than other faculties. The current study builds on that study, and investigates the involvement of the institution and teaching staff in technology integration from observers’ perspectives through administering a personal information form and a 31-item Likert questionnaire to 475 senior students of the Faculty of Education. Findings revealed that what were reported by instructors in the previous study seem somewhat different from what is being reported by their students in the current study. More specifically, students found their instructors and the infrastructure of the faculty quite inadequate in terms of the integration of information and communication technologies (ICT within classroom settings. Implications and suggestions regarding the integration process are provided.

  5. Faculty and Student Expectations/Perceptions of the Adviser-Advisee Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Lawrence B.; Nadler, Marjorie Keeshan

    1999-01-01

    Asks how advisees and advisers view adviser empathy in terms of perspective taking, empathic concern, and communicative responsiveness. Examines advisee perceptions/evaluations and the relationship between adviser perceptions of adviser empathy and adviser perceptions/evaluations of communication behavior in advising interaction. Finds that…

  6. Students' Perceptions of Teaching Methods That Bridge Theory to Practice in Dental Hygiene Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Denise M; Smallidge, Dianne; Boyd, Linda D; Giblin, Lori

    2015-10-01

    Health care education requires students to connect classroom learning with patient care. The purpose of this study was to explore dental hygiene students' perceptions of teaching tools, activities and teaching methods useful in closing the gap between theory and practice as students transition from classroom learning into the clinical phase of their training. This was an exploratory qualitative study design examining retrospective data from journal postings of a convenience sample of dental hygiene students (n=85). Open-ended questions related to patient care were given to junior and senior students to respond in a reflective journaling activity. A systematic approach was used to establish themes. Junior students predicted hands-on experiences (51%), critical thinking exercises (42%) and visual aids (27%) would be the most supportive in helping them connect theory to practice. Senior students identified critical thinking exercises (44%) and visual aids (44%) as the most beneficial in connecting classroom learning to patient care. Seniors also identified barriers preventing them from connecting theory to patient care. Barriers most often cited were not being able to see firsthand what is in the text (56%) and being unsure that what was seen during clinical practice was the same as what was taught (28%). Students recognized the benefits of critical thinking and problem solving skills after having experienced patient care and were most concerned with performance abilities prior to patient care experiences. This information will be useful in developing curricula to enhance critical thinking and problem solving skills. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  7. Self-perception regarding dental aesthetics, knowledge and attitude of traumatic dental injury and halitosis among people of Aurabani, Sunsari district of Eastern Nepal

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    S Dahal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Increased concern over dental appearance has been observed during childhood and adolescence to early adulthood. The study was conducted with objectives to assess the self-perception of dental aesthetics, knowledge, attitude and management of dental trauma and halitosis.Materials and Methods: Self-administered questionnaire translated in Nepali language consisting of 32 questions was used. The completed questionnaires were analyzed using descriptive statistics.Results: Out of the total study population, 63% were satisfied with their overall tooth appearance and 71.7% with their tooth color. Twenty-nine percent had experienced dental trauma. More than half of the study population thought that immediate treatment was required after dental trauma. Fifty seven percent of the villagers had halitosis.Conclusion: The research clearly shows that the people of Aurabani VDC were satisfied with their tooth color and overall tooth appearance; however the knowledge regarding emergency management of dental trauma, the cause and management of halitosis was insufficient.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(1:6-8

  8. Perceptions of dental outpatients toward cross-infection control measures in Jabalpur city

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    Suryakant C Deogade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infection control practices are crucial and important elements in clinical dentistry as there is an enormous increase in the prevalence of infectious diseases among dental patients. This necessitates the application of recommended procedures for infection control in the dental schools and clinics. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess patients' perception toward the use of protective barriers (such as gloves, face masks, and eye goggles by working dentists in a private dental teaching school in Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh (India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study of a convenient sample of patients visiting the dental school of RDU was conducted in 2015. A structured, close-ended, self-administered questionnaire was distributed among 700 patients and a response rate of 89% was obtained. The questionnaire consisted of a series of questions related to awareness, knowledge, attitude, and perception of patients toward infection control measures. Data analysis included frequency distribution tables. Results: Of 664 patients (298 males and 366 females, 97.7%, 93.5%, and 43.6% of the patients believed that dentist should wear gloves, face masks, and eye goggles, respectively, when treating patients. The majority of them (95.3% refused to undergo treatment if the dentist is not wearing gloves and face masks. More than two-thirds (73.3% denied receiving treatment from a dentist, who is not immunized against hepatitis B. Nearly 79.2% of patients refused to attend school if they knew that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV patients treated there. The majority of patients (92.7%, 72.3%, and 23.1% believed that gloves, facemasks, and eye goggles protect both dentist and patient, respectively. Only 44.9% said that autoclave is the best method of sterilization. A significantly higher knowledge of infection control was observed among the previous dental visitors compared to the first-time visitors

  9. Achievement of non-cognitive goals of undergraduate medical education: perceptions of medical students, residents, faculty and other health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Karen V; Ruedy, John; Millar, Noreen; Andreou, Pantelis

    2005-01-01

    Professionalism is increasingly emphasised in medical education. Non-cognitive goals, including values, attitudes and skills, remain challenging to define and measure. The purpose of this study was to better understand these goals and their achievement in the MD programme. Graduating medical students, faculty preceptors, residents and other health professionals (OHPs) completed a systematically developed mailed survey, rating achievement of 25 attribute statements. Following analyses of means and standard deviations, factor analysis of responses was conducted. Responses were compared across respondent groups. The overall response rate was 50.1% (191/396), comprising 57.5% of the students, 54.1% of the faculty members, 30.9% of the residents and 50% of the OHPs. Five items received mean ratings over 4/5; none were below 3/5. Five factors explained 65% of variance. They were: 'Teamwork and interprofessional skills'; 'Duty and responsibility'; 'Communication and interpersonal skills'; 'Professionalism and values', and 'Trustworthiness and ethical behaviour'. The groups differed significantly on 2 factors: Teamwork and interprofessional skills (P < or = 0.0001) and Communication and interpersonal skills (P < or = 0.001). Important curriculum goals received high mean ratings. Ratings differed significantly across groups, suggesting differing perceptions of the extent to which goals were met. More study is needed to understand the basis of these perceptions.

  10. Dental students' perceptions of the use of digital microscopy as part of an oral pathology curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCready, Zachary R; Jham, Bruno C

    2013-12-01

    Recent technological advances have allowed the computer to be turned into a microscope and therefore entailed a shift from light microscopy to digital microscopy (DM). Recent studies have shown that DM is gaining popularity in multiple academic fields, including dentistry. The aim of this study was to assess the perceptions of Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Illinois second-year dental students of the use of DM as a component of the institution's oral and maxillofacial pathology curriculum. After 129 students utilized DM in an oral and maxillofacial pathology course, they were asked to complete a voluntary survey regarding their perceptions of the use of DM. A total of 123 students responded, for a response rate of 95 percent; 112 of these were included in the final analysis. Nearly all the respondents (92 percent) favored DM over light microscopy. Almost all (98 percent) agreed that the digital microscope enhanced their learning, and 97 percent agreed that it allowed for greater collaboration among peers. These findings support the implementation of DM as the primary teaching methodology in the field of oral and maxillofacial pathology.

  11. Perception of children and mothers regarding dental aesthetics and orthodontic treatment need: a cross-sectional study

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    Emerson Tavares de Sousa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The normative orthodontic treatment need, established by dental professionals during the dental appointment, becomes ineffective when it does not evaluate all the factors that influence the decision-making process, including individuals’ perception and satisfaction with their dental appearance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of children and their mothers as regards orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental aesthetics and test if these variables are associated with the objective orthodontic treatment needs, assessed by the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 308 children aged 12 years, and their mothers were randomly selected by cluster sampling (primary schools. The variables “orthodontic treatment need,” “satisfaction with chewing,” and “dental appearance” were assessed by means of a questionnaire. The questions were answered individually at school or home, in cases of children or mothers, respectively. DAI was assessed to make an objective clinical assessment. The variables were dichotomized and statistically analyzed by the chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests, contingency coefficient C, and logistic regression. Results The results of the clinical evaluation (DAI were statistically associated with the perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental appearance in children (p ≤ 0.01. However, no association was observed with regard to satisfaction with chewing and DAI (p = 0.10. The children’s perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with the appearance of their teeth was statistically associated (p ≤ 0.01 with their mothers’ perception. Maxillary overjet, maxillary and mandibular misalignment, and dental crowding were associated with the orthodontic treatment need by children and their mothers, with p value −0.05 and 5 % level of significance. Maxillary

  12. Radiation Protection at the dental clinic of the Faculty of Dentistry of the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala in the year 2001

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    Valiente, D

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis the procedures of radiation protection used by students of dentistry, also the infrastructure of equipment, protective barriers and protective devices at the clinic of the faculty was evaluated. A sample of 76 students and two technicians were evaluated, also 7 dental units with x-ray tubes were evaluated. The conclusions are that only 2 equipment of x-rays meets the requirements of radiation safety and radiology techniques used by the students need to be improved to obtain good image quality and therefore better diagnostic by the students could be made.

  13. The influence of polymorphism of the MUC7 gene on the teeth and dental hygiene of students at a faculty of dentistry in Poland

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    Jadwiga Buczkowska-Radlińska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of the study was to analyze polymorphism of the MUC7 gene and its correlation with the DMFT value and the Plaque Control Record by O’Leary.Material/Methods:The study was carried out on 158 students of a faculty of dentistry in Poland. Students were subjected to a clinical oral examination. The status of caries was determined using the decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT value. The status of dental hygiene was examined by the Plaque Control Record (PCR Plaque Index by O’Leary T, Drake R, Naylor, 1972 index. Sherlock AX, a universal kit for DNA isolation from biological tracks (A

  14. Perceptions of academic administrators of the effect of involvement in doctoral programs on faculty members' research and work-life balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy; Jenkinson, Amanda

    2017-05-10

    Support for research strongly predicts doctoral program faculty members' research productivity. Although academic administrators affect such support, their views of faculty members' use of support are unknown. We examined academic administrators' perceptions of institutional support and their perceptions of the effects of teaching doctoral students on faculty members' scholarship productivity and work-life balance. An online survey was completed by a random sample of 180 deans/directors of schools of nursing and doctoral programs directors. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis, and analysis of variance. Deans and doctoral program directors viewed the level of productivity of program faculty as high to moderately high and unchanged since faculty started teaching doctoral students. Deans perceived better administrative research supports, productivity, and work-life balance of doctoral program faculty than did program directors. Findings indicate the need for greater administrative support for scholarship and mentoring given the changes in the composition of doctoral program faculty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Perception of dental practitioners regarding the use of antioxidants in oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Ravneet Kaur; Gupta, Nidhi; Bansal, Mohit; Arora, Vikram; Gupta, Preety; Thakar, Sahil

    Free radicals play a key role in the development of several pathological conditions. Therefore, antioxidants (AOs) are the first line of defense against free radical damage and are critical for maintaining optimum health and well-being. To assess the perception of dental practitioners regarding use of antioxidants in oral health. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted among 296 dental practitioners in Tricity (Chandigarh, Mohali, Panchkula, India). A self-structured close-ended questionnaire was used to assess the perception of dentists regarding the use of antioxidants in their patients. It consisted of 12 questions with dichotomous response and five point likert scale ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data, followed by the Chi-square test to check significant differences between the responses. Correlation between responses were analysed through the Spearman's rank correlation. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20 (Illinois, Chicago, USA). A statistically significant difference was observed between genders, with females 181 (61%) having more knowledge than males 115 (39%) regarding the use of antioxidants in their clinical practice. It has been found that dental professionals in academics prescribes more antioxidants to their patients than the private practitioners. Postgraduates 76 (77.6%) had a higher level of knowledge than graduates 86 (43%). Knowledge about antioxidants should be highlighted in the health sciences curriculum. It is recommended to expand the use of antioxidants in oral health to bring down the burden of chronic diseases like periodontitis and catastrophic diseases like precancerous lesions and oral cancer. antioxidants, free radicals, mouth neoplasms, oral health.

  16. Correlation of quantity of dental students' clinical experiences with faculty evaluation of overall clinical competence: a twenty-two-year retrospective investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Michael; Holmes, David C; Doering, John V

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the quantity of a student's clinical experiences in the final year of dental school and the student's overall clinical competence at graduation, as evaluated by faculty at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. Further, the authors sought to determine whether this correlation changed over time, as new generations of students come to dental school. Information including year of graduation, age at graduation, final grade in the course Clinical Competencies in Comprehensive Care, and final total Clinical Experience Units (CEUs) earned by each student in the D4 Family Dentistry Clinic was collected for 1987-2008 graduates of the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r(s)) was computed for the association of final clinical course grade and final CEU total for each graduation year. The correlation between final course grade and final CEU total was variable, ranging from moderately strong (r(s)=0.614, Class of 1991) to negligible (r(s)=-0.013, Class of 2008). This correlation generally tended to become weaker over time. The results of this study suggest that the terminal quality of a dental student's work is not solely a function of repetitions of prescribed procedures and that repetition of procedures may have even less influence on the quality of clinical performance for the new generation of dental students.

  17. Incentives and barriers to OER adoption: A qualitative analysis of faculty perceptions

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    Olga Maria Belikov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, 218 U.S faculty responses regarding Open Educational Resources (OER were qualitatively analyzed. Ten categories emerged in the coding process. The top three categories that indicated barriers to the adoption of OER were need more information (faculty wanted more information before they would be willing to adopt OER, lack of discoverability (faculty wanted to be able to easily find repositories of OER, and confusing OER with digital resources (faculty were unaware of the difference between digital resources and OER. The top incentives identified in this analysis to overcome these barriers include student cost benefits (saving students money, student pedagogical benefits (faculty being able to make changes to OER to improve course content and instruction, and institutional support for the adoption of OER (whether in the form of course load reduction, curricular research assistance, or library support for finding and adopting OER. Future research is needed to better understand how to address and overcome these barriers to OER adoption.

  18. Dental care and treatment needs of elderly in nursing homes in Saarland: perceptions of the homes managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbo, Mohammad Abed; Mitov, Gergo; Gebhart, Florian; Pospiech, Peter

    2012-06-01

    To investigate nursing home managers' perceptions and attitudes towards oral health care and access to dental services for aged care facility residents. Questionnaires containing 28 closed-ended questions were mailed to all 114 nursing homes in Saarland, Germany. Descriptive statistics were calculated for response items. Facility response rate was 39%. None of the nursing homes in this study offered systematic dental health care. Initial dental screening was carried out only in one facility. In 81%, dental examinations only took place if required. Although stationary dental equipment was available only in one home, dental treatment was carried out in 71% of the cases by a dentist in the nursing home. Eighty-four per cent of the homes' managements rated the state of the dentition of the inhabitants as satisfying. Over half of the managers indicated satisfaction with the know-how of their nursing staff concerning oral hygiene procedures. The most significant barriers to provision of dental care in the facilities according to their managers were staff shortage, lack of interest of the inhabitants and financial concerns. The results of this study showed an urgent need for estimating a programme for systematic dental care for institutionalised elder people in the federal state of Saarland. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Special needs dentistry: perception, attitudes and educational experience of Malaysian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M S; Razak, I A; Borromeo, G L

    2015-02-01

    A compromised oral health condition amongst patients with special health care needs (SHCN) has been associated with the reluctance and shortage of skills of dental professionals in managing such patients. Lack of training and experience at the undergraduate level are reported barriers to the provision of care for this patient cohort. Undergraduate education therefore, plays an important role in producing professionals with the knowledge, skills and positive attitude in treating patients with SHCN. This study aims to determine the level of knowledge, comfort and attitudes of Malaysian undergraduate dental students towards caring for patients with SHCN, as well as their perception on education in this field. A self-administered questionnaire was administered in the classroom style to final year undergraduate dental students in Malaysian public dental schools. Most students were aware of Special Needs Dentistry (SND) as a specialty after being informed by academic staff. The majority of the students demonstrated poor knowledge in defining SND and felt uncomfortable providing care for such patients. They perceived their undergraduate training in SND as inadequate with most students agreeing that they should receive didactic and clinical training at undergraduate level. A high percentage of students also expressed interest in pursuing postgraduate education in this area of dentistry despite the lack of educational exposure during undergraduate years. The study supports a need for educational reform to formulate a curriculum that is more patient-centred, with earlier clinical exposure in various clinical settings for students to treat patients with special health care needs, applying the concept of holistic care in a variable clinical condition.

  20. Perceptions of Indian dental hygiene students toward their profession and its relationship with their explicit self-esteem scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shipra; Jain, Ashish; Garg, Sakshi; Sood, Shaveta; Kumari, Bindiya

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions toward the profession, the level of explicit self-esteem (ESE) of Indian students pursuing the course of dental hygienists, to evaluate the relationship between the two and to develop educational strategies to positively influence students' perceptions. We also wished to evaluate the level of satisfaction of the students to the current status of professional employment in the country. Students in the second year of the dental hygienist 2-year course were asked to participate in a cross-sectional survey study. An instrument was used to obtain students' perceptions about the profession by estimating the dimensions of "Motivation," "Expectation" and "Environment". Their self-esteem was evaluated using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale. Relationship of self esteem scores with perceptions towards profession was then evaluated. Scores for dimensions including "Motivation," "Expectation" and "Environment" were significantly high, as were the self-esteem scores. The level of ESE was positively correlated with their perceptions of the profession. The perception of the Indian dental hygienist students was significantly high and positively correlated to the ESE scores. We also conclude that environmental factors may be more influential than innate cultural factors for the development of self-esteem.

  1. Teaching Skill Acquisition and Development in Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucinda J; Hoover, Terry E; Giusti, Lola; Booth, Mark T; Mahdavi, Elham

    2016-08-01

    Development of dental faculty members is paramount to providing outstanding education and role modeling for students. With the large number of second career educators in dental schools, an efficient method of acquiring teaching skills is important for new faculty members. Knowing the skill progression and learning experiences identified by dental educators of varying rank may lead to more efficient, effective faculty development. The aims of this study were to identify the perceptions of a group of faculty members about the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and learning experiences that contribute to developing teaching expertise and to compare and contrast the perceptions of new and more senior faculty members on these subjects. The Dreyfus skill acquisition continuum of novice to expert performance was used as a construct reference. The study used a mixed-methods approach in which qualitative and quantitative data were collected concurrently in an electronic survey of faculty members at one U.S. dental school. Of the 492 total faculty members, 80 survey responses were received, for a 16% response rate. Open coding and analysis of responses revealed some common themes. Building rich content knowledge and learning varied methodologies for teaching and assessment, supported by an awareness of peer role models, were perceived to be features of early growth. Content prioritization, clarity, and customization appropriate for the learner characterized mid growth. As theorized in the Dreyfus model, more experienced faculty members described a fluid, less structured teaching process, increased reflection, and appreciation of the strength of the educational community. The results of this study may help increase dental educators' understanding of teaching skill acquisition and inform faculty development and support.

  2. Analysis of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Textbook Costs in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Troy Martin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The cost of textbooks has continued to impact students in higher education. Students have reported that they make decisions on which courses to take based on the specific cost of textbooks. Faculty have reported willingness to use open textbooks to help ease the burden on students but are unsure where to find viable options. We examined the responses of 676 students and 573 faculty from a large private university (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah to understand the real impact of textbooks costs to students and how they are dealing with this ongoing problem. We found that 66% of students at this institution have not purchased a textbook due to cost. We also discovered that 91% of faculty at this institution would be willing to use OER alternatives and that 53% of them would welcome assistance identifying and adapting materials for their course.

  3. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness of Full-time and Part-time Associate Degree Nursing Faculty, Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Allison-Jones, Lisa L.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of full-time and part-time faculty is an area of major interest in education, especially in light of the dramatic rise of part-time faculty on the nation's campuses. In the period between 1976 and 1994, the use of full-time faculty increased by 21% while the use of part-time faculty increased by 91% (Clery, 1998). The quality of instruction is the primary concern surrounding the use of part-time faculty (Clery, 1998; Fedler, 1989; Gappa & Leslie, 1997; Leslie, 1998; Mell...

  4. Environmental Risk Perception of Last Grade Students in Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Within 2005-2006 Education Period

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    Nazim Ercument Beyhun

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the the level of environmental risk perception and its some determinants of last grade students in Hacettepe University Medical Faculty within 2005-2006 education period. The universe of this cross-sectional study were last grade students of Hacettepe University Medical Faculty within 2005-2006 education period. The data was collected with a structured questionnaire (Environment Awareness Questionnairre via face to face interview. Environment Awareness Questionnairre is a structured Lickert scale including 47 questions which measures the perception levels of environmental risks. The 55.9% of the last grade students who participated to the study were male and the median age was 23. The first three prior environmental risk factors which were perceived as high/very high risks were stres (79.8%, damage of ozone layer (76.9% and motor vehicle accidents (70.2%. The first three prior environmental risk factors which were perceived as low/very low risks were bottled water (57.6%, climatic change (42.9% and lack of house to live in (39.9%. The main source of information about environmental risks for students were physicians and scientific journals and books.It was determined that most of environmental risk factor were not perceived as risk factors by students. The evolution of environmental risk perception and the increase of educations about environmental risks towards doctors who are the important sources of knowledge and counselling for the public will be beneficial. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(5.000: 345-350

  5. Environmental Risk Perception of Last Grade Students in Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Within 2005-2006 Education Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazim Ercument Beyhun

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the the level of environmental risk perception and its some determinants of last grade students in Hacettepe University Medical Faculty within 2005-2006 education period. The universe of this cross-sectional study were last grade students of Hacettepe University Medical Faculty within 2005-2006 education period. The data was collected with a structured questionnaire (Environment Awareness Questionnairre via face to face interview. Environment Awareness Questionnairre is a structured Lickert scale including 47 questions which measures the perception levels of environmental risks. The 55.9% of the last grade students who participated to the study were male and the median age was 23. The first three prior environmental risk factors which were perceived as high/very high risks were stres (79.8%, damage of ozone layer (76.9% and motor vehicle accidents (70.2%. The first three prior environmental risk factors which were perceived as low/very low risks were bottled water (57.6%, climatic change (42.9% and lack of house to live in (39.9%. The main source of information about environmental risks for students were physicians and scientific journals and books.It was determined that most of environmental risk factor were not perceived as risk factors by students. The evolution of environmental risk perception and the increase of educations about environmental risks towards doctors who are the important sources of knowledge and counselling for the public will be beneficial. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(5: 345-350

  6. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Effective Clinical Instructors in ADN Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignac-Caille; Anne Marie; Oermann, Marilyn H.

    2001-01-01

    Associate degree nursing students (n=292) and faculty (n=59) agreed on 6 of 10 characteristics of effective clinical instructors. Effective instructors are clinically competent, use effective evaluation strategies, explain clearly, are approachable, are well prepared to teach, and communicate clear expectations. (Contains 28 references.) (SK)

  7. Faculty Perceptions and Use of Social Media in the Medical Imaging Curriculum in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBose, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Social media networks are a worldwide phenomenon encompassing multiple generations of faculty and students. As the World Wide Web has developed and grown, so has the ability of individuals to communicate across hundreds and thousands of miles via these social media networks. An exploratory survey of members in the Association of Educators in…

  8. Faculty Perception of Stress and Coping Strategies in a Saudi Private University: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Adnan; Kokash, Husam

    2011-01-01

    Teaching profession was once viewed as a "low stress occupation" and they have been envied for tenure, light workloads, flexibility and other perks such as foreign trips for study and conference. However, some recent studies suggest that university faculty is among the most stressed occupational group. The present study was conducted to…

  9. Exploring Women Faculty's Experiences and Perceptions in Higher Education: The Effects of Feminism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midkiff, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    This study analyses women faculty's discourse about feminism, themselves, and their professional experiences as scholars in the North American university context. This case study pushes at the boundaries of what we believe we know about "the gender question" in the academy, opening a discursive space for scholars to examine university…

  10. Exploring Women Faculty's Experiences and Perceptions in Higher Education: The Effects of Feminism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midkiff, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    This study analyses women faculty's discourse about feminism, themselves, and their professional experiences as scholars in the North American university context. This case study pushes at the boundaries of what we believe we know about "the gender question" in the academy, opening a discursive space for scholars to examine university…

  11. Beyond Teaching and Research: Faculty Perceptions of Service Roles at Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiseishvili, Ketevan; Miller, Michael T.; Lee, Donghun

    2016-01-01

    Faculty members in higher education institutions frequently have the responsibility of providing service activities to their institutions, professional societies, and external communities. This responsibility, however, generally carries little reward in the workplace and does not play a major role in promotion criteria. For the study we report…

  12. Nursing doctoral faculty perceptions of factors that affect their continued scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2014-01-01

    This focus group study was undertaken as part of a larger investigation of how the demand for increased production of nurses with doctorates affects doctoral faculty's scholarly productivity. This study provided a basis for development of the national survey questionnaire. Two focus groups that included 29 faculty teaching in doctor of philosophy and/or doctor of nursing practice programs took place at one of two national conferences. The focus group interviews were transcribed and content analyzed for the identification of themes; all members of the research team reached consensus. The three major themes were the demands of teaching, the importance of institutional structure and climate, and the sustainability of one's self, the institution, and the discipline. Participants identified strategies for enhancing scholarly productivity. Findings are limited by the small sample size and the voluntary participation of conference attendees. The strength of emotion that participants revealed underscores the need for nursing leaders to address the increasing academic expectations for faculty. If the profession does not address the needs of its current and future faculty, goals explicated by the Institute of Medicine in The Future of Nursing cannot be achieved, and the health of the nation will suffer.

  13. Exploring Community College Students' and Faculty Members' Perceptions on Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is a well-documented problem in higher education. While numerous actions and/or behaviors are attributed to threatening academic integrity, the vernacular term used by both students and faculty is "cheating". Although there has been a substantial amount of research on academic integrity and dishonesty in general,…

  14. Assessing Faculty Perceptions and Techniques to Combat Academic Dishonesty in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paullet, Karen; Chawdhry, Adnan A.; Douglas, David M.; Pinchot, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Online Education is growing as it provides an added convenience to students, especially ones who have life circumstances that prevent them from attending traditional classes. With this growing trend, faculty and universities are facing increased risks with validating student identities in online courses and combatting unethical student behavior.…

  15. Exploring Community College Students' and Faculty Members' Perceptions on Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is a well-documented problem in higher education. While numerous actions and/or behaviors are attributed to threatening academic integrity, the vernacular term used by both students and faculty is "cheating". Although there has been a substantial amount of research on academic integrity and dishonesty in general,…

  16. Effects of the Virtual Environment on Online Faculty Perceptions of Leadership: A Grounded Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how faculty members, teaching in the virtual environment of higher education, perceived the effectiveness of leader actions to understand how principles of existing leadership theory in critical areas such as communication effectiveness, development of trust, and ability to motivate faculty…

  17. Scholarship Perceptions of Academic Department Heads: Implications for Promoting Faculty Community Engagement Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrero, Patricia; Jayaratne, K. S. U.

    2014-01-01

    After North Carolina State University developed recommendations for departments and faculty to integrate learning, discovery, and engagement through the scholarship of engagement, the issue was raised: "What do department heads think, and how do they support engagement especially during promotion, tenure, and reappointment of engaged…

  18. Effectively Preparing College Bound Students for College-Level Mathematics: University Math Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    Visit with any university math faculty member throughout the United States, and you will soon hear how the freshman students are not prepared to be successful in introductory college algebra classes. The opinions are varied regarding why the students are unsuccessful; however, the concern and frustration is universal. According to American College…

  19. Influence of work role and perceptions of climate on faculty organizational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Denise K; Kennerly, Susan

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how organizational commitment is influenced by organizational climate and nurse faculty work role in departments/colleges of nursing. The research was based on Meyer and Allen's Multidimensional Model of Organizational Commitment. The sample was comprised of full-time tenure track, doctorally prepared nurse faculty. Descriptive analyses were used to summarize institutional and nursing program data. ANOVA and t-tests were performed to determine differences between faculty information and study variables. A significant difference was found between teaching work role, and role ambiguity, role conflict and organizational climate. Pearson correlation analyses examined relationships between nurse faculty work role balance, role ambiguity, role conflict, and affective, continuance, and normative organizational commitment. A moderately strong negative relationship was present between role ambiguity and role conflict, and affective and continuance organizational commitment. Significant relationships were observed between subscales of organizational climate and role ambiguity and role conflict. The study's findings offer interesting insights into the dynamic relationships between organizational commitment and climate, work role balance, role ambiguity, and role conflict.

  20. A Delphi Study: Exploring Faculty Perceptions of the Best Practices Influencing Student Persistence in Blended Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Kim Elise

    2010-01-01

    This Delphi study explored the instructional practices of community college faculty who were teaching blended or Web-assisted courses and how these practices influenced student persistence. The Delphi method provided qualitative data in the form of expert advice through consensus building on the instructional practices most likely to influence…

  1. Evaluating Faculty Perceptions of Student Learning Outcomes: A Rasch Measurement Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The importance of assessing student learning outcomes has demanded attention from most everyone involved in the higher education enterprise, as accreditation and funding implications are often linked to the results. Faculty, however, are often critical of the assessment process because outcomes assessment is costly with regard to time,…

  2. Synchronous and Asynchronous Communication in an Online Environment: Faculty Experiences and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoxia; Hsiao, E-Ling

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine online instructors' experiences and perceptions of online teaching and their communication with students in an online environment. More specifically, the study focused on the questions regarding: (1) instructors' general experiences and perceptions of online teaching; (2) instructors' general experiences…

  3. QUESTIONNAIRE FOR STUDENTS FROM FACULTIES OF DENTAL MEDICINE IN BULGARIA REGARDING THEIR MOTIVATION FOR PARTICIPATION IN AND THE WAY THEY ARE FAMILIAR WITH RESEARCH PROJECTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Garov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years there has been a significant increase in the number and value of projects implemented by medical universities in Bulgaria. The involvement of representatives of the student community in the research teams increases their knowledge and skills and in this way they also gain experience in team work and become motivated to further develop their science careers. Aim: The purpose of our study is by analyzing data from our questionnaire to examine the level of students’ willingness to participate in research project activities performed by Bulgarian faculties of Dental Medicine. Material and methods: The written examination technique has been applied as a primary empirical sociological information registration method. For that purpose a 13-question survey (questionnaire has been prepared. The survey is anonymous and it has been completed by 190 students in their 4th and 5th year of studying in medical universities in Sofia, Plovdiv and Varna. Data was collected during the period from January to May 2013. Results: In order for us to achieve the goal of this study we focused on the questions from the questionnaire.Conclusion: The role that research projects play in medical universities and in particular in the faculties of dental medicine in Bulgaria is of key importance for their accreditation. The scientific cooperation between lecturers and students is a prerequisite for developing a competitive environment that defines the future scientific achievements in the relevant research institution.

  4. Assessment of self-perceived and normative dental needs among teaching faculty of Visveswarapura Group of Institutions: A cross-sectional study

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    Verma Shikha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess and compare self-perceived and normative dental needs among teaching faculty of Visveswarapura Group of Institutions, Bangalore, India. Materials and Methods: The study population included 217 teaching faculty from four Visveswarapura Group of Institutions namely Arts and Commerce, Law, Science College and Engineering College. The study population was subjected to a self-administered closed-ended questionnaire inquiring about their socioeconomic status, Oral health status and treatment needs. Clinical examinations, employing WHO dentition status and community periodontal index were performed to determine normative status and needs. Perceived and normative assessments were compared for sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values using Kappa statistics. Results: The degree of agreement (κ values and sensitivity was seen in filled teeth (0.839, 80%, missing teeth (0.696, 85.2%, and mobile teeth (0.57, 55.6%. However, the disagreement was seen with all other questions with average κ = 0.20. Regarding overall proportions, a large discrepancy was found between self-perceived and normative needs for both dental and periodontal health status. Conclusion: Self-assessment questionnaires were of low value in evaluating oral health status and treatment needs compared with clinical examination.

  5. [Career history and perceptions of dental hygiene education programs--questionnaire mail-in survey of alumni of the School of Dental Hygiene in Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

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    Yoshida, Naomi; Endo, Keiko; Kondo, Keiko; Sugimoto, Kumiko; Shimoyama, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yuzo

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the career history and perceptions about dental hygiene education programs among the alumni (1952-1999 graduates) of the School of Dental Hygiene in Tokyo Medical and Dental University. A questionnaire containing demographic, practice characteristics and views on the programs was mailed to 997 alumni in 1999, and 576 alumni (57.8%) responded. Three hundred and forty-one respondents worked as dental hygienists. The majority who responded were in clinical practice. One hundred and thirty-one of the respondents worked in private clinics, 76 in public health centers, and 72 in clinics in companies. The rate of them who worked in public health centers was much higher than the national average cited in the Statistical Report on Public Health Administration and Services. Two hundred and ninety-one respondents reported inadequate programs. The rate of them who reported inadequate programs was significantly higher in alumni who were working than in alumni who were not. The items cited as insufficiently taught at the school were clinical practice, instrumentation, foreign language, psychology, counseling, and nursing related subjects. Thus, many alumni suggested the need for better programs and continuing education. From these results, it was suggested that dental hygienists need to change their education programs in order to meet the present and future needs of more diversified society. This view was particularly prevalent among alumni who were working. The result showed that dental hygiene educators and dental hygienists urgently need to reconsider the professionalism of their field.

  6. Perceptions of Undergraduate Students and Faculty Regarding the Impact of Electronic Communication on the Written-Communication Skills of Undergraduate Students

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    Houser, Laura Ann Camlet

    2012-01-01

    This narrative-qualitative study investigated the perceived impact that electronic communication has on the written-communication skills of undergraduate students. Open-ended survey questions queried the experiences of undergraduate students who use electronic communication, as well as the perceptions of faculty who teach undergraduate students.…

  7. Perceptions of Undergraduate Students and Faculty Regarding the Impact of Electronic Communication on the Written-Communication Skills of Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Laura Ann Camlet

    2012-01-01

    This narrative-qualitative study investigated the perceived impact that electronic communication has on the written-communication skills of undergraduate students. Open-ended survey questions queried the experiences of undergraduate students who use electronic communication, as well as the perceptions of faculty who teach undergraduate students.…

  8. Attitude of Dental Prostheses Residents of Faculty of Dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences to Objective Structured Clinical Examination(OSCE

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    Ali Hafezeqoran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE is one of the most authentic ways to evaluate clinical skills. The present study aimed at evaluating the attitude of dental prostheses residents of the faculty of dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences toward this kind of examination. Methods: In this cross sectional-descriptive study, two questionnaires were designed. One questionnaire dealt with nature of OSCE and the other dealt with the attitude of residents about OSCE. After holding the OSCE in July 2012, 2013, and 2014, the questionnaires were delivered to all dental prostheses residents of the Tabriz dental faculty. In total, 40 questionnaires were filled out within three years. Questions included five-choice items based on a Likert scale. Furthermore, the students’ scores in each exam were recorded to evaluate any possible relationship between the acquired grade and the student’s attitude toward the exam. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS17 software (α=5%. Results: Most residents (62.5% referred to the large number of questions as a positive factor. In addition, a majority of residents (90% suffered from high levels of stress during OSCE. There was a close relation between the grade acquired by the residents in the examination and their attitude to OSCE as well as their evaluation about the examination. The students with better grades had more positive attitudes toward OSCE. Conclusion: Considering the satisfaction level of the students in this study, OSCE was held efficiently and may be considered as part of the training program of the residents.

  9. Balancing Costs and Patients' Health: Dental Students’ Perception of Economics in Dentistry

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    Cecilia Franzén

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One aim of higher education is to develop professional identities in students to equip them for future working life. Health professional students will work under financial pressures in a market-based environment, which can lead to conflicts with professional ethical values. This study explores how Swedish dental students perceive economic aspects of dentistry. The article is based on a study of undergraduate research projects. In the analysis of the projects, two themes were identified: (1 cost-effective organizing of dentistry and (2 costs and benefits of interventions. The students displayed socially responsible values by emphasizing the need for dentists to utilize resources effectively, which implies that professional education can support the development of the perception that economic values can be compatible with professional ethical values.Keywords: cost-effectiveness, ethics, healthcare, higher education, social responsibility 

  10. Academic perceptions amongst educators towards eLearning tools in dental education.

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    Handal, Boris; Groenlund, Catherine; Gerzina, Tania

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports an explorative study about academic educators' perceptions towards learning management systems (LMS) and eLearning tools as used in dental education. Fifty-five educators participated in an online survey which explored their views on eLearning tools within the context of their own professional training background and teaching needs. In general, educators felt that the eLearning LMS (also known as WebCT/Blackboard) was a tool that suited their teaching and learning needs in terms of flexibility, interactivity and accessibility despite a significant level of self-reported lack of competence in the technology. The paper describes current eLearning professional development initiatives in light of these findings.

  11. Cyber-bullying and incivility in the online learning environment, Part 1: Addressing faculty and student perceptions.

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    Clark, Cynthia M; Werth, Loredana; Ahten, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Online learning has created another potential avenue for incivility. Cyber-bullying, a form of incivility that occurs in an electronic environment, includes posting rumors or misinformation, gossiping, or publishing materials that defame and humiliate others. This is the first of 2 articles detailing a study to empirically measure nursing faculty and student perceptions of incivility in an online learning environment (OLE). In this article, the authors discuss the quantitative results including the types and frequency of uncivil behaviors and the extent to which they are perceived to be a problem in online courses. Part 2 in the September/October issue will describe challenges and advantages of the OLE, discuss specific ways to foster civility, and present strategies to promote student success and retention.

  12. Now You See It, Now You Don't: Faculty and Student Perceptions of Classroom Incivility in a Social Work Program

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    Angela R. Ausbrooks

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Classroom incivility is identified as a concern in the higher education literature; however, the extent to which these concerns apply to social work education has not been empirically addressed. This initial, exploratory study examined the perceptions of classroom behaviors in a small convenience sample of faculty and students in one social work program. Quantitative results indicated that faculty tended to perceive incivility as generally less serious and frequent than did student participants. Qualitative findings suggested that while faculty believed they were addressing incivility, students did not. Students expressed the desires for instructors to be more aware of behaviors, especially distracting use of electronic devices, and to take stronger actions to enforce guidelines. Social work programs may need to consider developing uniform policies for addressing incivility as well as helping faculty to find more effective ways to address the problem. Future research is needed with larger, more representative samples.

  13. Competence, commitment and opportunity: an exploration of faculty views and perceptions on community- based education.

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    Ladhani, Zahra; Stevens, Fred J; Scherpbier, Albert J

    2013-12-13

    Community-Based Education (CBE) is an instructional approach designed and carried out in a community context and environment in which not only students, but also faculty and Health Professionals' Education (HPE) institutions must be actively engaged throughout the educational experience. Despite the growing evidence of CBE being an effective approach for contemporary HPE, doubts about its successful implementation still exist. This study has explored HPE structure, policies and curriculum from the point of view of faculty members to gain understanding about the prevailing practices and to propose recommendations that nurtures and promotes CBE. A purposive sample was drawn from three major cities of Pakistan- Karachi, Rawalpindi and Islamabad. Out of twelve HPE institutions present in these cities we selected six, which provided a sound representation of medical and nursing colleges around the country. At each institution we had two Focus Group Discussions; in addition we interviewed registrars of medical and nursing councils and two CBE experts. The factors effecting implementation of CBE as perceived by study participants are categorized as: preparation of faculty members; institutional commitment and enthusiasm; curricular priorities and external milieu. Within each theme, participants recurrently described structural and curricular deficiencies, and lack of commitment and appreciation for community based teaching, service and research permeating at all levels: regulatory bodies, institutional heads and faculty members. The factors highlighted by our study and many others suggest that CBE could not perpetuate effectively within HPE. To enhance the effectiveness of CBE approach in a way that mutually benefits local communities as well as HPE institutions and health professionals, it is important that reforms in HPE must be strategized in a holistic fashion i.e. restructuring and aligning its polices, curriculum and research priorities.

  14. English faculty' s perception of their role in ICT-Oriented classroom at Majma'ah University

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    El-Sadig Yahya Ezza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The teacher was once considered “an educational authority”, “a dispenser of knowledge”, “someone in charge of telling”, etc. However, with the integration of information and communication technology (ICT in the classroom, knowledge resources have become accessible to the student in ways that are beyond teacher’s control. This fact has led to a new perception of teachers' roles among educational researchers. In other words, teachers have come to be conceived as facilitators, learners, collaborators, etc. In the light of these developments, the present study attempts to investigate English faculty’s view on the possible impact that ICT could have on their role at Majma’ah University. A questionnaire comprising sixteen traditional and ICT-oriented roles was administered to thirty participants in different campuses of Majma’ah University to collect data to verify two research hypotheses: (1 Most EFL faculty at Majma'ah University (MU favour ICT-oriented roles over traditional roles. (2 All ICT-oriented roles are equally valuable to EFL faculty at MU in enhancing teaching practices. Statistical analysis of the study data confirmed the first hypothesis but rejected second one.

  15. Self-perceptions of cultural competence among dental students and recent graduates.

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    Aleksejuniene, Jolanta; Zed, Chris; Marino, Rodrigo

    2014-03-01

    This study assessed self-perceptions of cultural competence in dental students and recent graduates of the University of British Columbia. The sample consisted of 106 predoctoral students (response rate 98 percent) and thirty-three recent graduates (response rate 43 percent). The two cohorts completed similar questionnaires. Over 80 percent of responding predoctoral students reported encountering patients from culturally different groups, 50 percent of them admitted that their communication is not effective, two-thirds were not confident in caring for patients from diverse cultural groups, and over 60 percent perceived that sociocultural differences affect the provision of care. Some significant differences between the genders and study years were observed. Exploratory Factor Analyses validated multiple indicators in five domains: 1) encountering culturally diverse patients, 2) communication challenges in sociocultural situations, 3) cultural competence-related skills, 4) cultural competence related to diagnosis and patient treatment, and 5) training in cultural competence. Through qualitative assessments, important culturally relevant topics and interactive training methods preferred by students for developing cultural competence were identified. This study concluded that cultural competence was perceived as important by both dental students and recent graduates but also as partly deficient, particularly by predoctoral students. For teaching cultural competence, participants recommended various topics and interactive teaching modalities.

  16. Student perceptions of syndicate learning: tutor-less group work within an undergraduate dental curriculum.

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    McKerlie, R A; Cameron, D A; Sherriff, A; Bovill, C

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the implementation of syndicate learning (tutor-less group working) to teach the basic principles and skills of removable partial denture design within an undergraduate dental curriculum at the University of Glasgow. Student perceptions of syndicate group learning were collected through using questionnaires with Likert scales and through focus group interviews. The majority of students expressed positive views of syndicate learning that focused on the following themes: the added value of the group in terms of learning and in terms of social cohesion; the sense of responsibility to peers that led them to work harder; the autonomy of tutor-less groups that led them to improve their ability to justify their work; and the effectiveness of the syndicate groups in comparison with other learning methods. On the basis of these findings along with reports from students that learning about group roles enhanced their preparation for future work, we argue that syndicate learning can offer some valuable benefits to the undergraduate dental curriculum.

  17. Dental and Medical Students' Use and Perceptions of Learning Resources in a Human Physiology Course.

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    Tain, Monica; Schwartzstein, Richard; Friedland, Bernard; Park, Sang E

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the use and perceived utility of various learning resources available during the first-year Integrated Human Physiology course at the dental and medical schools at Harvard University. Dental and medical students of the Class of 2018 were surveyed anonymously online in 2015 regarding their use of 29 learning resources in this combined course. The learning resources had been grouped into four categories to discern frequency of use and perceived usefulness among the categories. The survey was distributed to 169 students, and 73 responded for a response rate of 43.2%. There was no significant difference among the learning resource categories in frequency of use; however, there was a statistically significant difference among categories in students' perceptions of usefulness. No correlation was found between frequency of use and perceived usefulness of each category. Students seemingly were not choosing the most useful resources for them. These results suggest that, in the current educational environment, where new technologies and self-directed learning are highly sought after, there remains a need for instructor-guided learning.

  18. Social media use, attitudes, behaviours and perceptions of online professionalism amongst dental students.

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    Kenny, P; Johnson, I G

    2016-11-18

    Use of social media has increased amongst health professionals. This has benefits for patient care but also introduces risks for confidentiality and professional fitness to practise. This study aimed to examine dental student attitudes towards professional behaviour on social media. The secondary aim was to establish the extent and nature of social media use and exposure to potentially unprofessional behaviours. A cross-sectional study was carried out in one dental school. Data were collected using questionnaires to examine social media use, perceptions and attitudes towards social media and professional behaviours online. Students who responded (N = 155) all used social media at least once per week; most used more than one platform. Students were aware of the relationship between social media use and professional practice. Posting drunken photographs and interacting with staff and patients online were widely considered as unprofessional. Security settings affected behaviour and most had seen inappropriate behaviours online. The study found that students use social media extensively.. Students are aware of the risks but there is a greater sense of safety in closed groups and many students are exposed to potentially inappropriate content online. This suggests that training should be implemented to help students manage these risks.

  19. Actions for Promoting Vocational Guidance in Medical Sciences: Student and Faculty Perceptions of their Quality

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    Belkis Rosa Vilaboy Pérez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: there are problems with enrollment in medical science programs due to the lack of proper vocational guidance. Objective: to evaluate a set of actions to promote vocational guidance in 12th-grade students attending senior high schools in Cienfuegos province. Methods: a qualitative and quantitative research was conducted comprising 523 students in the preparatory groups for entering medical school programs in Cienfuegos, 105 faculty members and 20 officials of the Provincial Education Department. The research study was divided into two parts, one devoted to the organization and planning of activities with the students, and the second part focused on their implementation and evaluation. The level of student and faculty satisfaction with the set of actions was analyzed. A Chi-square test of independence was used with a 95% confidence interval. Results: student’s expectations were met. The level of knowledge about the profession increased and the links between ministries and institutions (MINED-MINSAP were strengthened. There was a correspondence between the level of satisfaction of faculty members, students, and the administrators of the senior high schools, but all believed that family involvement should increase. Conclusions: a well-conceived set of actions favors vocational guidance in medical sciences; however, family involvement should increase, as well as the participation of students attending senior high schools distant from the capital city of the province.

  20. Demographical Differences in Perceptions of Leadership Practices for Department Chairs and Job Satisfaction of Faculty Members at a Historically Black University

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    Edwin Quinn Jr.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine the leadership practices (Kouzes and Posner, 2002 of the department chairs as perceived by the faculty and the job satisfaction (Spector, 2007 of faculty members at a historically black university located in the State of Mississippi. The role of the gender and ethnicity of faculty members’ perceived leadership practices of department chairs and job satisfaction is explored. A total of 100 faculty responded to the study. An ANOVA test found that there is a significant difference in leadership practices of department chairs by faculty members between ethnicity: modeling the way (F = 242.529, p = .001, inspiring a shared vision (F = 289.658, p = .001, challenging the process (F = 386.177, p = .001, enabling others to act (F = 272.504, p = .001, and encouraging the heart (F = 339.685, p = .001. There is a significant difference in subscales of job satisfaction for faculty members between ethnicity: promotion (F = 12.953, p = .00, supervision (F = 1.819, p = .00, contingent rewards (F = 25.379, p = .00, operating procedures (F = 34.334, p = .00, co-workers (F = 34.406, p = .00, nature of work (F = 3.020, p = .054, and communication (F = 46.118, p = .00. There was not a significant difference in Leadership Practices of department chairs and Job Satisfaction of faculty members based on gender. The implications of the study resulted in gender differences and ethnicity having a statistical impact on the perceptions of leadership practices of department chairs and job satisfaction of faculty member. Future studies might expand the study to include more historically black university to gain a broader perception.

  1. Perceptions of autistic children’s parents about dental care: Preliminary study. Concepción, 2012.

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    Carolina Hernández

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions of parents of children with autistic disorder (AD of the school of Association of Parents and Friends of Autistics (ASPAUT Chiguayante. A cross-sectional and exploratory study was conducted. The target population were the parents of 60 schoolchildren at ASPAUT school. The measuring instrument was a survey of thirty closed questions and one open question. Of the 60 surveys sent out 26 were recovered with varying degrees of response to each of the questions. Almost all children with AD receives dental care, about 1 time per year and mostly by pediatric dentists. There is generally a good perception of the care provided, but the need for specialized in autism spectrum disorders professionals, the existence of specific dental programs and reducing the associated costs are recognized. The issues identified by parents as most relevant for improving care were: a specialized dental care (26.9%, more humane treatment (19.2% and using distracting techniques (11.5%. 15.4% of parents believe good dental care as well as excellent. In Chile the dental care of this population is just beginning and there are many areas that need improvements.

  2. Patient management: measuring patients' expectations and perceptions of service quality in a dental training hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J G; Slabber, J; Schreuder, A

    2001-04-01

    The difference between service quality expectations and perceptions (experiences) of patients (customers) attending a dental training hospital was investigated by using a modified version of the Parasuraman SERVQUAL model. A questionnaire comprising 28 service quality-related statements and four open-ended questions was used at the interviews. The study showed that 11.6% of respondents experienced problems with the service. A principal component factor analysis indicated that two of the five dimensions of service quality, namely reliability and assurance, contributed to 59% of service level variance. Female patients showed larger mean differences than male patients. The greater the number of visits to the hospital, the smaller the difference between expectations and perceptions. Patients in the category 36-45 years of age, showed larger mean differences than younger or older patients. Respondents with no academic qualifications had lower expectations of the service, while professional people seemed to have more realistic expectations prior to a visit to the hospital than respondents in the technical/clerical category.

  3. Dental student perceptions of the educational value of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary OSCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Roseanna; Zubiaurre Bitzer, Laureen A; Mensah, Felicia Moore; Anderson, O Roger

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine student perceptions of the educational value of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). The examination is administered after the second year of the curriculum, prior to the beginning of clinical training at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine. The quantitative component of the study consisted of a survey administered to students who had taken the OSCE (N=78). Due to the ordinal level of data produced by the Likert-scale survey, statistical analysis was performed through calculation of the median and interquartile range (IQR). Overall, student perceptions of the educational value of the OSCE, as measured using a five-point scale (1=strongly disagree to 5=strongly agree) were positive, demonstrating students' agreement that the exam required the ability to think critically and problem-solve (median=4, IQR=1), assessed clinically relevant skills (median=5, IQR=1), and was a learning experience (median=5, IQR=1). A statistically significant chi-square value (pOSCE was an authentic assessment that required integration and application of knowledge.

  4. Problem-based learning: Dental student's perception of their education environments at Qassim University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhuwaiter, Shahad S; Aljuailan, Roqayah I; Banabilh, Saeed M

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess perceptions of the Saudi dental students of the problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum and to compare their perceptions among different sex and academic years. Data was collected through a questionnaire-based survey at Qassim College of dentistry. The questionnaire consisted of 19 questions regarding the perception of PBL curriculum and was distributed to 240 students. The chi-square test was used for statistical analysis of the data. Out of the 240 students recruited for this study, 146 returned a complete questionnaire (the response rate was 60.8%). The majority of the students perceived that PBL enhances the ability to speak in front of people (91.1%); improved the ability to find the information using the internet/library (81.5%); enhances the problem-solving skills (71.3%); increases the practice of cooperative and collaborative learning (69.2%); improves the decision-making skills (66.4%). Sixty-five percent (n = 96) noted that some students dominate whereas others are passive during PBL discussion session. Statistically, significant differences were found in the following variables according to the academic year students assuming before responsibility for their own learning (P helping in identifying the areas of weakness for improvement (P student understanding the objectives of the PBL session better than the conventional way (P speak in front of people (P students regarding their education environments at Qassim College of dentistry using PBL hybrid curriculum were more positive than negative. However, improvements are still required to provide students with stimulating favorable learning environment and to take the students recommendations into consideration.

  5. Teaching the process of science: faculty perceptions and an effective methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coil, David; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Cunningham, Matthew; Dirks, Clarissa

    2010-01-01

    Most scientific endeavors require science process skills such as data interpretation, problem solving, experimental design, scientific writing, oral communication, collaborative work, and critical analysis of primary literature. These are the fundamental skills upon which the conceptual framework of scientific expertise is built. Unfortunately, most college science departments lack a formalized curriculum for teaching undergraduates science process skills. However, evidence strongly suggests that explicitly teaching undergraduates skills early in their education may enhance their understanding of science content. Our research reveals that faculty overwhelming support teaching undergraduates science process skills but typically do not spend enough time teaching skills due to the perceived need to cover content. To encourage faculty to address this issue, we provide our pedagogical philosophies, methods, and materials for teaching science process skills to freshman pursuing life science majors. We build upon previous work, showing student learning gains in both reading primary literature and scientific writing, and share student perspectives about a course where teaching the process of science, not content, was the focus. We recommend a wider implementation of courses that teach undergraduates science process skills early in their studies with the goals of improving student success and retention in the sciences and enhancing general science literacy.

  6. Faculty Members and Students Perceptions of E-Learning in the English Department: A Project Evaluation

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    Hamad Al-Dosari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: With the brisk technology developments, e-learning is revolutionalising the educational industry by leaps and bounds, thus becoming a popular method of education for many universities and colleges around the world. In Saudi Arabian universities, there is a tangible presence of Web-based curricular provisions within the traditional university known as blended learning. There is a growing call advocating the inclusion of online learning in every university to provide distance education. There are many issues that arise problematically. Some of these issues include study overload, lack of technological skills and feelings of isolation, problems in course design and course delivery formats. There are other organizational issues related to accreditation and quality assurance procedures. Approach: This study examines this progressive trend by literature review and survey and whether it is promising for the future of English Language Teaching (ELT in Saudi Arabia. The study also assesses the effectiveness of and preference for, webbased learning as perceived by faculty and students. Results: Faculty and student responses were generally positive overall and indicated that learning improved in an e-learning environment compared to a traditional approach. Conclusion/Recommendations: The results of this study will inform EFL educators as to whether this mode of learning would serve as viable component of future ELT university programmes in English departments in Saudi universities and guide future research efforts towards more efficient and competitive online learning environments.

  7. Performance, Rewards, and Perceptions of Sex Discrimination among Male and Female Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, Marianne A.; Loab, Jane W.

    1973-01-01

    Married women with or without children appear to experience less success in academic life. Marital and, for men, parental status may enter reward decisions as a possible indicator of perceived financial need. Perception of sex discrimination appears to be more accurate among women than men. (Author/JB)

  8. Virtual Simulations and Serious Games in a Laptop-Based University: Gauging Faculty and Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapralos, Bill; Hogan, Michelle; Pribetic, Antonin I.; Dubrowski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Gaming and interactive virtual simulation environments support a learner-centered educational model allowing learners to work through problems acquiring knowledge through an active, experiential learning approach. To develop effective virtual simulations and serious games, the views and perceptions of learners and educators must be…

  9. Counseling Instruction in the Online Classroom: A Survey of Student and Faculty Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicco, Gina

    2012-01-01

    This article will review the design, procedures, and results of a recent study conducted to survey the perceptions of counseling students and professionals regarding the delivery of counseling instruction in online courses. Few studies have addressed the appropriateness, effectiveness, and evaluation procedures of counseling skills instruction via…

  10. Perceptions and Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Faculty towards the Scholarship of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinetz, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators have been encouraged to engage in the scholarship of teaching as a form of best practice in education. Despite professional documents and encouragement by leaders in the field of occupational therapy, there is very little known about occupational therapy educators' perceptions, attitudes, and engagement in the…

  11. Virtual Simulations and Serious Games in a Laptop-Based University: Gauging Faculty and Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapralos, Bill; Hogan, Michelle; Pribetic, Antonin I.; Dubrowski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Gaming and interactive virtual simulation environments support a learner-centered educational model allowing learners to work through problems acquiring knowledge through an active, experiential learning approach. To develop effective virtual simulations and serious games, the views and perceptions of learners and educators must be…

  12. Perceptions of Higher Education Faculty Members on Bilingual Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Dilek; Aydin, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, bilingual education has been a crucial phenomenon in the educational community in Turkey. This study aims to investigate whether academics have positive perceptions towards bilingual education or not. Regarding this issue, it is important to get the opinions of academics that are responsible for training future teachers. An online…

  13. Perceptions and Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Faculty towards the Scholarship of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinetz, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators have been encouraged to engage in the scholarship of teaching as a form of best practice in education. Despite professional documents and encouragement by leaders in the field of occupational therapy, there is very little known about occupational therapy educators' perceptions, attitudes, and engagement in the…

  14. Perceptions of University Mission Statement by Senior Administrators: Relating to Faculty Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velcoff, Jessica; Ferrari, Joseph R.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about how senior administrators at a university (i.e., vice-presidents and deans) perceive their institution's mission, vision, and values. In the present study, we focused on perceptions of institutional mission statement and activities proposed to support that mission among senior leaders (18 vice-presidents, 17 deans) from a…

  15. Teaching with technology: learning outcomes for a combined dental and dental hygiene online hybrid oral histology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Singh, Amul H; Overman, Pamela R

    2013-06-01

    Among the challenges leaders in dental and allied dental education have faced in recent years is a shortage of well-qualified faculty members, especially in some specialty areas of dentistry. One proposed solution has been the use of technology. At the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry, the departure of a faculty member who taught the highly specialized content in oral histology and embryology provided the opportunity to implement distance delivery of that course. The course is taught once a year to a combined group of dental and dental hygiene students. Previous to spring semester of 2009, the course was taught using traditional face-to-face, in-class lectures and multiple-choice examinations. During the spring semesters of 2009, 2010, and 2011, the course was taught using synchronous and asynchronous distance delivery technology. Outcomes for these courses (including course grades and performance on the National Board Dental Examination Part I) were compared to those from the 2006, 2007, and 2008 courses. Students participating in the online hybrid course were also given an author-designed survey, and the perceptions of the faculty member who made the transition from teaching the course in a traditional face-to-face format to teaching in an online hybrid format were solicited. Overall, student and faculty perceptions and student outcomes and course reviews have been positive. The results of this study can provide guidance to those seeking to use technology as one method of curricular delivery.

  16. Mentoring and Pretenure Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Alan A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The University of British Columbia (Canada) Dental School uses teaching and research mentors for new faculty, together with a structured semiannual review process, to clearly identify faculty expectations for tenure. Pretenure faculty have appreciated the clear and regular input concerning their progress, and mentors enjoy the interaction with…

  17. PowerPoint or chalk and talk: Perceptions of medical students versus dental students in a medical college in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Seth

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Vikas Seth, Prerna Upadhyaya, Mushtaq Ahmad, Vijay MogheDepartment of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan, IndiaPurpose: To assess students’ perceptions of the impact of PowerPoint (PPT presentations in lectures in comparison to the traditional chalk and talk method and lectures using ­transparencies and overhead projector (TOHP. The study analyzes the preferences for teaching aids of medical students versus dental students.Methods: Second year medical and dental undergraduates were asked to fill in a nine-item questionnaire about their perceptions of the three lecture delivery methods. Following analysis of the questionnaire the students were interviewed further. The results were analyzed separately for medical and dental students to see if there was any difference in their perceptions.Results: The majority of the medical students (65.33% preferred PPT presentations, while 15.16% of students preferred the lectures using chalkboard, and 19.51% preferred TOHP for teaching (P < 0.001. Of the dental students: 41.84% preferred chalkboard, 31.21% preferred TOHP, and 25.85% students preferred PPT presentations in the lectures (P < 0.05. Some important comments of the students were also recorded on interview which could be valuable for the medical teachers.Conclusion: The medical students clearly preferred the use of PPT presentations while the dental students did not. The study does not bring out evidence based superiority of any lecture delivery method. It appears that in the hands of a trained teacher any teaching aid would be appropriate and effective. This highlights the need for formal training in teaching technologies to develop good presentation skills and thus motivate the students.Keywords: audiovisual aids, medical education, lecture delivery methods, PowerPoint presentations, OHP, chalkboard

  18. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain among postgraduate students and faculties of dental colleges in Bengaluru city, India: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Vanishree

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are problems of the musculoskeletal system that significantly cost workplace problems thus affecting occupational health, productivity, and career of the working population. Dentists are prone to many work related occupational hazards. Aim: To assess the prevalence and distribution of symptoms of MSD among postgraduates and faculties attached to dental colleges in Bengaluru city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among all the postgraduate students and faculties working in various dental colleges of Bengaluru city, India. A self-administered questionnaire was used for recording demographic data and to collect information related to musculoskeletal symptoms and the location of musculoskeletal pain among dentists in Bengaluru city. The data were collected compiled and analyzed using SPSS software version 21. Descriptive statistics was done. The findings were compared across study subjects using Chi-square test and Spearman correlation. Results: The prevalence of MSD among males was 40.25% and females were 59.75% and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.03. The symptoms were higher in dentists practicing for more than 10 years. Lower back pain and shoulder pain were the most commonly reported complaints by dentists. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was 41.35% for dentists in the age group of 26–30 years. The frequency of musculoskeletal pain among female dentists was nearly double that of males (P = 0.009. Conclusion: This study suggests that dentists in Bengaluru do experience a certain amount of occupation-related health problems. The study found overall high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms (64% among dentists in Bengaluru city.

  19. Attitudes and perception of medical and dental preclinical undergraduates in a Nigerian medical school towards cadaveric dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajani, R S; Oladapo, O

    2011-06-01

    Human anatomy is a foundation course in medicine and dentistry with one of its components being gross, of which cadaveric dissection (CD) is an important part. Recently there has been a wide spread debate as to the relevance or otherwise of CD in the learning of anatomy by the students. A feedback from the beneficiaries, i.e., medical and dental students in terms of perception and evaluation is necessary for informed decision to be made oncurriculum review. The objective of this study was to asses medical and dental students' attitude and perception of CD. In achieving this, a structured questionnaire, containing 29 stems was administered to 152 medical and dental students, who were about completing the preclinical phase of the medical and dental programmes respectively. The response rate was 77.6% and the responses were analyzed using absolute numbers, percentages and frequencies. Between 76.3-96.4% were involved in actual dissection of at least one of the regions of the body. About 90.1% had twice to thrice weekly attendance at the dissections. About 96.4% were of the opinion that CD is essential to learning anatomy; while 55.6% found it interesting and 80.1% believed that it has significant contribution to future professional carrier. Results from this study show that the students appreciate the relevance of CD to learning anatomy and in view of limitations of viable alternatives, CD still has a prominent place in the teaching of gross anatomy.

  20. Dental students' perception of their approaches to learning in a PBL programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, H; Ghorbani, A; Rohlin, M

    2017-08-01

    To compare dental students' perceptions of their learning approaches between different years of a problem-based learning (PBL) programme. The hypothesis was that in a comparison between senior and junior students, the senior students would perceive themselves as having a higher level of deep learning approach and a lower level of surface learning approach than junior students would. This hypothesis was based on the fact that senior students have longer experience of a student-centred educational context, which is supposed to underpin student learning. Students of three cohorts (first year, third year and fifth year) of a PBL-based dental programme were asked to respond to a questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) developed to analyse students' learning approaches, that is deep approach and surface approach, using four subscales including deep strategy, surface strategy, deep motive and surface motive. The results of the three cohorts were compared using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). A P-value was set at <0.05 for statistical significance. The fifth-year students demonstrated a lower surface approach than the first-year students (P = 0.020). There was a significant decrease in surface strategy from the first to the fifth year (P = 0.003). No differences were found concerning deep approach or its subscales (deep strategy and deep motive) between the mean scores of the three cohorts. The results did not show the expected increased depth in learning approaches over the programme years. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The role of ultrasound in graduate anatomy education: Current state of integration in the United States and faculty perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Danielle F

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) is increasingly taught in medical schools, where it has been shown to be a valuable adjunct to anatomy training. To determine the extent of US training in nonmedical anatomy programs, and evaluate anatomists' perceptions on the role of US in anatomy education, an online survey was distributed to faculty in anatomy Master's and Doctoral programs. Survey results sampled 71% of anatomy graduate degree programs nationally. Of the faculty surveyed, 65% report little to no experience with US. Thirty-six percent of programs surveyed incorporate exposure to US, while only 15% provide hands-on US training. Opportunities for anatomy trainees to teach with US were found in 12% of programs. Likert responses indicated that anatomists hold overwhelmingly positive views on the contributions of US to anatomy education: 91% agreed US reinforces anatomical concepts (average 4.33 ± 0.68), 95% agreed it reinforces clinical correlates (average 4.43 ± 0.65). Anatomists hold moderately positive views on the value of US to the future careers of anatomy graduates: 69% agreed US increases competitiveness on the job market (average 3.91 ± 0.90), 85% agreed US is a useful skill for a medical school teaching career (average 4.24 ± 0.75), and 41% agreed that US should be required for a medical education career (average 3.34 ± 1.09). With continued improvements in technology and the widespread adoption of US into diverse areas of clinical practice, medical education is on the cusp of a paradigm shift with regards to US. Anatomists must decide whether US is an essential skills for the modern anatomist. Anat Sci Educ 9: 453-467. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  2. Comparison of the pain perception in children using comfort control syringe and a conventional injection technique during pediatric dental procedures

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    M Langthasa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate and compare the pain perception by the pediatric patients, while experiencing computerized injection device comfort control syringe (CCS and the conventional injection technique during dental clinical procedures. Materials and Methods: Fifty children (31 boys and 19 girls aged 6-14 years requiring local anaesthesia on both sides of the dental arch for various treatment procedures were selected for this study. The patients served as their own control, and on the appointed day CCS was used on one side of the dental arch and on the subsequent appointment, i.e., the very next day conventional injection technique was used. Visual analogue scale (VAS and faces pain rating scale (FRS were used to assess the child′s pain perception to each of the techniques immediately after the injection. Various physiological parameters were measured before, during and after the two injection procedures and compared for statistical variation. Results : Paired t-test revealed a statistically significant difference in the pain perception by children using VAS and FRS between computerized and conventional technique. No statistically significant difference was observed when physiological parameters (heart rate, blood pressure and temperature were compared at various intervals between the computerized and the conventional technique. Conclusion: Computerized injection device (CCS provides less painful injections when compared to the conventional injection technique.

  3. Comparing dental and pharmacy students′ perceptions on public health and preventive health care course

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    Aliye Mandiracioglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : A Public health course has an important role in the undergraduate education of pharmacy and dentistry in terms of emphasizing preventive care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the views of pharmacy and dentistry students on a public health course and preventive health care. Methods: 173 students enrolled at Ege University, Faculties of Pharmacy and Dentistry completed a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats analysis and replied to 18 Likert type question to determine their perceptions on a public health course and preventive health care. The comments of the students were reviewed and categorized into key themes. Results: SWOT analysis and the results of quantitative Likert type questions supported each other. According to the quantitative results, there was no significant difference between the scores of students from both schools in terms of their statements about the public health course and preventive care. Both groups of students mentioned the contribution of the public health course to their professions in the future. They also appreciated the importance of preventive care in the health services.

  4. Comparing Dental and Pharmacy Students’ Perceptions on Public Health and Preventive Health Care Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Dogan, Fethi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A Public health course has an important role in the undergraduate education of pharmacy and dentistry in terms of emphasizing preventive care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the views of pharmacy and dentistry students on a public health course and preventive health care. Methods: 173 students enrolled at Ege University, Faculties of Pharmacy and Dentistry completed a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis and replied to 18 Likert type question to determine their perceptions on a public health course and preventive health care. The comments of the students were reviewed and categorized into key themes. Results: SWOT analysis and the results of quantitative Likert type questions supported each other. According to the quantitative results, there was no significant difference between the scores of students from both schools in terms of their statements about the public health course and preventive care. Both groups of students mentioned the contribution of the public health course to their professions in the future. They also appreciated the importance of preventive care in the health services. PMID:22347604

  5. General dental practitioners' perceptions of removable prosthodontics in the undergraduate curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, C T; Pan, N; Tiang, R; Payne, A G; Thomson, W M

    1999-09-01

    The undergraduate dental curriculum is undergoing rapid change and revision in dental schools worldwide. Decreasing edentulism, the advent of the clinical dental technician, and advances in technology (such as dental implantology) have led to changes in patient management and treatment options for general dental practitioners in New Zealand. The current undergraduate removable prosthodontic curriculum has seen very little change in past years at the School of Dentistry, University of Otago, and is under review to facilitate the teaching of general dental practice in the Final Year. A questionnaire-based survey of 150 general dental practitioners (response rate 74.6 percent) supported modification of the existing removable prosthodontics curriculum to improve its relevance to modern general dental practice. Integration of fixed and removable prosthodontic teaching was recommended.

  6. A Case Study: Faculty Perceptions of the Challenges and Successes in Experiential Learning at a Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberville, Kathy A.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty mentoring has been identified as an important component of experiential learning success. However, most higher education institutions lack the support to provide training and guidance to faculty for this type of instructional programming. The identified purpose of the conducted exploratory study was to explore the faculty perceptions…

  7. The Effect on Faculty Research of Theft and Mutilation of Library Materials in an Academic Library: A Study in Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, John A.

    A questionnaire study assessed 143 faculty members at Kent State University to determine if the problem of theft and mutilation of library materials causes faculty members to view the library as well as the miscreants responsible for this behavior in a negative light. It is hypothesized that a majority of faculty members responding to the survey…

  8. Thickness, permeability and tactile perception of commercial latex examination gloves used in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Ashish Warhekar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentists are at an increased risk of being infected. Some patients may be unaware of their infected status while some patients are unwilling to tell the dentists their disease status. Gloves should be worn in almost all patient procedures. Aim: To assess association between thickness, tactile perception, and permeability of commercial latex examination gloves used in dental practice. Materials and Methods: The experimental study was conducted in Central India. A total of 600 gloves, 120 each from five brands (Kaltex, Nulife, Smartcare, Handshield, Medi-image were used. Thickness was measured using stereomicroscope. Permeability to fluids was evaluated through 0.2% erythrosine dye. Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC-25923 was used to check for microbial permeability. Tactile sensibility was assessed by 2-point discriminator test using 2-point-calipers on 30 volunteers. Chi-square test and Binary logistic regression analysis were used. Results: Mean thickness of gloves was 0.1333 (range: 0.1028-0.1799. Dye and microbial test showed 10.6% and 43.3% permeability of gloves, respectively. No significant difference was observed among brands. Thicker gloves (0.1285-0.1542 yielded lower touch sensibility (odds ratio: 0.783, P < 0.05. Decrease in tactility was recorded in 78.6% of volunteers with gloves compared to no gloves. Conclusion: Considerable microbial permeability suggests commercial examination gloves are unsafe. Balance between thickness, permeability and touch sensation should be established to decrease permeability maintaining same touch sensibility.

  9. Association of faculty perceptions of work-life with emotional exhaustion and intent to leave academic nursing: report on a national survey of nurse faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidia, Michael J; Chou, Jolene; Brownlee, Susan; Flynn, Linda; Tanner, Christine A

    2014-10-01

    The current and projected nurse faculty shortage threatens the capacity to educate sufficient numbers of nurses for meeting demand. As part of an initiative to foster strategies for expanding educational capacity, a survey of a nationally representative sample of 3,120 full-time nurse faculty members in 269 schools and programs that offered at least one prelicensure degree program was conducted. Nearly 4 of 10 participants reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, and one third expressed an intent to leave academic nursing within 5 years. Major contributors to burnout were dissatisfaction with workload and perceived inflexibility to balance work and family life. Intent to leave was explained not only by age but by several potentially modifiable aspects of work, including dissatisfaction with workload, salary, and availability of teaching support. Preparing sufficient numbers of nurses to meet future health needs will require addressing those aspects of work-life that undermine faculty teaching capacity. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Dental Hygienists' Perceptions of Preparedness for Clinical Practice: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Lezlie M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify, compile, and describe how community college graduate dental hygienists perceived their initial dental hygiene curriculum preparation and how they subsequently adapted their curriculum preparation in order to perform their responsibilities in their first clinical dental hygiene job.…

  11. Dental Hygienists' Perceptions of Preparedness for Clinical Practice: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Lezlie M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to identify, compile, and describe how community college graduate dental hygienists perceived their initial dental hygiene curriculum preparation and how they subsequently adapted their curriculum preparation in order to perform their responsibilities in their first clinical dental hygiene job.…

  12. Factors That Advance and Restrict Programme Change and Professional Development in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.; Roberts, Kellie W.; Zafar, Mueen A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of a professional development initiative using organisational change research studies to frame the inquiry. Two faculty groups and two student groups participated in a total of four focus group interviews to ascertain their perceptions of a new model of pre-clinical dental education. Using a…

  13. Factors That Advance and Restrict Programme Change and Professional Development in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.; Roberts, Kellie W.; Zafar, Mueen A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of a professional development initiative using organisational change research studies to frame the inquiry. Two faculty groups and two student groups participated in a total of four focus group interviews to ascertain their perceptions of a new model of pre-clinical dental education. Using a…

  14. Training the perception of Hindi dental and retroflex stops by native speakers of American English and Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, John S; Jenkins, James J; Strange, Winifred

    2006-03-01

    Perception of second language speech sounds is influenced by one's first language. For example, speakers of American English have difficulty perceiving dental versus retroflex stop consonants in Hindi although English has both dental and retroflex allophones of alveolar stops. Japanese, unlike English, has a contrast similar to Hindi, specifically, the Japanese /d/ versus the flapped /r/ which is sometimes produced as a retroflex. This study compared American and Japanese speakers' identification of the Hindi contrast in CV syllable contexts where C varied in voicing and aspiration. The study then evaluated the participants' increase in identifying the distinction after training with a computer-interactive program. Training sessions progressively increased in difficulty by decreasing the extent of vowel truncation in stimuli and by adding new speakers. Although all participants improved significantly, Japanese participants were more accurate than Americans in distinguishing the contrast on pretest, during training, and on posttest. Transfer was observed to three new consonantal contexts, a new vowel context, and a new speaker's productions. Some abstract aspect of the contrast was apparently learned during training. It is suggested that allophonic experience with dental and retroflex stops may be detrimental to perception of the new contrast.

  15. The confidence of undergraduate dental students when carrying out prosthodontic treatment and their perception of the quality of prosthodontic education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puryer, J; Woods, K; Terry, J; Sandy, J; Ireland, A J

    2017-05-11

    Despite the falling number of edentulous patients within the UK, there is still a large demand for the provision of removable prostheses. On qualification, dentists should have the knowledge and skills to provide these prostheses, but previous studies have shown that final-year dental undergraduate confidence in treating denture patients is lacking. To explore undergraduate dental student confidence whilst carrying out prosthodontic treatment, and to explore their perceptions of the quality of their prosthodontic education. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all (n=203) dental undergraduates in Years 3 to 5 at the University of Bristol. The questionnaire utilised a range of data collection methods including confidence interval ranked responses and qualitative measures. The data were analysed using SPSS. The response rate was 51%. Undergraduate perception of confidence increased throughout the years of study (Pconfidence levels. Student confidence in carrying out prosthetic treatment increased as students progressed through the course, and confidence levels would be increased further with increased clinical experience. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Computer literacy and E-learning perception in Cameroon: the case of Yaounde Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediang, Georges; Stoll, Beat; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Klohn, Axel M; Stuckelberger, Astrid; Nko'o, Samuel; Chastonay, Philippe

    2013-04-19

    Health science education faces numerous challenges: assimilation of knowledge, management of increasing numbers of learners or changes in educational models and methodologies. With the emergence of e-learning, the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and Internet to improve teaching and learning in health science training institutions has become a crucial issue for low and middle income countries, including sub-Saharan Africa. In this perspective, the Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (FMBS) of Yaoundé has played a pioneering role in Cameroon in making significant efforts to improve students' and lecturers' access to computers and to Internet on its campus.The objective is to investigate how computer literacy and the perception towards e-learning and its potential could contribute to the learning and teaching process within the FMBS academic community. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among students, residents and lecturers. The data was gathered through a written questionnaire distributed at FMBS campus and analysed with routine statistical software. 307 participants answered the questionnaire: 218 students, 57 residents and 32 lecturers. Results show that most students, residents and lecturers have access to computers and Internet, although students' access is mainly at home for computers and at cyber cafés for Internet. Most of the participants have a fairly good mastery of ICT. However, some basic rules of good practices concerning the use of ICT in the health domain were still not well known. Google is the most frequently used engine to retrieve health literature for all participants; only 7% of students and 16% of residents have heard about Medical Subject Headings (MeSH).The potential of e-learning in the improvement of teaching and learning still remains insufficiently exploited. About two thirds of the students are not familiar with the concept of e-leaning. 84% of students and 58% of residents had never had access to

  17. Educational technology for millennial dental hygiene students: a survey of U.S. dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Catherine R R; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Rogo, Ellen J

    2014-06-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that today's learners have changed and education must change as well since Millennial generation students expect technology to be used in their coursework. This study sought to determine what educational technology is being used in U.S. dental hygiene programs, what student and faculty perceptions are of the effectiveness of technology, and what barriers exist to implementing educational technology. A stratified random sample of 120 entry-level dental hygiene programs nationwide were invited to participate in a survey. Fourteen programs participated, yielding a pool of 415 potential individual participants; out of those, eighty-four student and thirty-eight faculty respondents were included in the analysis, a total of 122. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.05). Faculty and student respondents agreed on the effectiveness of educational technology in all areas except clickers and wikis. The faculty members tended to rate the effectiveness of educational technology higher than did the students. The greatest perceived barrier to implementing technology was technical difficulties. This study suggests that support services should be available to faculty and students to ensure successful implementation of technology. Dental hygiene educators have adopted many types of educational technology, but more data are needed to determine best practices.

  18. Medical school deans' perceptions of organizational climate: useful indicators for advancement of women faculty and evaluation of a leadership program's impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannels, Sharon; McLaughlin, Jean; Gleason, Katharine A; McDade, Sharon A; Richman, Rosalyn; Morahan, Page S

    2009-01-01

    The authors surveyed U.S. and Canadian medical school deans regarding organizational climate for faculty, policies affecting faculty, processes deans use for developing faculty leadership, and the impact of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women. The usable response rate was 58% (n = 83/142). Deans perceived gender equity in organizational climate as neutral, improving, or attained on most items and deficient on four. Only three family-friendly policies/benefits were available at more than 68% of medical schools; several policies specifically designed to increase gender equity were available at fewer than 14%. Women deans reported significantly more frequent use than men (P = .032) of practices used to develop faculty leadership. Deans' impressions regarding the impact of ELAM alumnae on their schools was positive (M = 5.62 out of 7), with those having more fellows reporting greater benefit (P = .01). The deans felt the ELAM program had a very positive influence on its alumnae (M = 6.27) and increased their eligibility for promotion (M = 5.7). This study provides a unique window into the perceptions of medical school deans, important policy leaders at their institutions. Their opinion adds to previous studies of organizational climate focused on faculty perceptions. Deans perceive the organizational climate for women to be improving, but they believe that certain interventions are still needed. Women deans seem more proactive in their use of practices to develop leadership. Finally, deans provide an important third-party judgment for program evaluation of the ELAM leadership intervention, reporting a positive impact on its alumnae and their schools.

  19. Impact of Dental Fluorosis, Socioeconomic Status and Self-Perception in Adolescents Exposed to a High Level of Fluoride in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Nevarez-Rascón, Martina; Nevarez-Rascón, Alfredo; González-González, Rogelio; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Sánchez-Pérez, Leonor; López-Verdin, Sandra; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2017-01-12

    Objective: To identify adolescents' self-perception of dental fluorosis from two areas with different socioeconomic levels. Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted with 15-year-old youths by applying a questionnaire designed and validated to assess self-perceptions of dental fluorosis in two areas with different socioeconomic statuses (SESs). Fluorosis was clinically evaluated by applying the Thylstrup and Fejerkov (TF) index on the upper front teeth. Results: A total of 308 adolescents were included in the study. The medium-SES population, which was exposed to 2.5 ppm of fluoride in water, and the low-SES population, which was exposed to 5.1 ppm, presented the following levels of dental fluorosis: TF 2-3 (50%), TF 4-5 (45.6%) and TF 6-7 (4.4%) for medium SES and TF 2-3 (12.3%), TF 4-5 (67.1%) and TF 67 (20.6%) for low SES. A significant association was found between self-perception and dental fluorosis in those with medium and low SESs (p dental fluorosis affect adolescents such that adolescents with a medium SES have more negative perceptions than those with a low SES. Such perceptions increase as the TF index increases.

  20. Giant cell granuloma: a cross- sectional study in oral and maxillofacial pathology department of dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (1986-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalayer Naderi N.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Giant cell granuloma (G.C.G is a reactive lesion which affects the jaws and oral mucosa of gingiva.This lesion is classified to central and peripheral ones. The histopathologic aspects of central and peripheral G.C.G is the same. The central lesions are aggressive and cause osseous destruction. The peripheral G.C.G produces ulcerative swellings similar to pyogenic granuloma or peripheral ossifying fibroma. Since the peripheral and central G.C.G are common lesions, the awareness of dentists of different aspect of G.C.G is very important. Purpose: The aim of this study was a statistical evaluation of variables such as age, gender and location of peripheral and central G.C.G in oral and maxillofacial pathology department of Dental Faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This study was a cross-sectional, case series one. The medical records of oral and maxillofacial pathology department of Dental Faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences was assessed in two steps: In the first stage, the medical records of patients with pathologic report of peripheral and central G.C.G were selected and reviewed. In the next step, the informations such as age, gender and location of peripheral and central G.C.G were registered in data forms. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS statistical software. Results: The results showed that the age range in peripheral and central G.C.G were 2- 90 and 4-70 years, respectively. The peak incidence of peripheral and central G.C.G was in the third and second decades, respectively. The peripheral G.C.G was more common in men (52.70% than women (47.30%. This finding in central G.C.G was 37.19% for men and 62.88% for women. 57.06% of peripheral G.C.G cases were in mandible and 42.94% in maxilla. The occurrence of central G.C.G was 67.07% in mandible and 32.93 % in maxilla. Conclusion: Based on this study, the peripheral lesions were more frequent in men, third decade

  1. Self-Perceptions of Value, Barriers, and Motivations for Graduate Education Among Dental Hygienists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Amy N; Boyd, Linda D; Rogers, Christine Macarelli; Le Jeune, Ronald C

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the knowledge base of its practitioners through formal education is vital to advancing the dental hygiene profession, ensuring practitioners' readiness for participation in future health...

  2. Dental radiology instructors in United States dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farman, A G; Hunter, N; Grammer, S

    1985-09-01

    A survey of dental radiology instructors in accredited United States dental hygiene programs found the majority of such faculty members to be registered dental hygienists with only very limited formal training in radiology. Most of the radiography faculty had less than 5 years' experience teaching that subject. Most instructors spent less than a quarter of each week teaching radiology. Student: faculty ratios varied considerably from program to program.

  3. Adolescents' perceptions of the aesthetic impact of dental fluorosis vs. other dental conditions in areas with and without water fluoridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrady Michael G

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of fluorides for caries prevention is well established but is linked with an increased risk of dental fluorosis, some of which may be considered to be aesthetically objectionable. Patient opinion should be considered when determining impact on aesthetics. The aim of this study was to assess participant rating of dental aesthetics (from photographic images of 11 to 13 year olds participating in an epidemiological caries and fluorosis survey in a fluoridated and a non-fluoridated community in Northern England. Methods Consented participants were invited to rank in order of preference (appearance a collage of 10 computer generated images on a touch-screen laptop. The images comprised an assortment of presentations of teeth that included white teeth, a spectrum of developmental defects of enamel and dental caries. Data were captured directly and exported into SPSS for analysis. Results Data were available for 1553 participants. In general, there were no significant differences in the rank positions between the fluoridated and non-fluoridated communities, with the exception of teeth with caries and teeth with large demarcated opacities. Very white teeth had the highest rating in both localities. Overall, there was a trend for teeth with fluorosis to be ranked more favourably in the fluoridated community; for TF 1 and TF 2 this preference was significant (p Conclusions The results of this study suggest teeth that are uniformly very white have the highest preference. The rankings suggest teeth with a fluorosis score of TF 1 may not be considered aesthetically objectionable to this population and age group. The image depicting a tooth with caries and the image with large demarcated opacities were deemed to be the least favoured. Participant preference of images depicting fluorosis falls with increasing severity of fluorosis.

  4. Adolescents' perceptions of the aesthetic impact of dental fluorosis vs. other dental conditions in areas with and without water fluoridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of fluorides for caries prevention is well established but is linked with an increased risk of dental fluorosis, some of which may be considered to be aesthetically objectionable. Patient opinion should be considered when determining impact on aesthetics. The aim of this study was to assess participant rating of dental aesthetics (from photographic images) of 11 to 13 year olds participating in an epidemiological caries and fluorosis survey in a fluoridated and a non-fluoridated community in Northern England. Methods Consented participants were invited to rank in order of preference (appearance) a collage of 10 computer generated images on a touch-screen laptop. The images comprised an assortment of presentations of teeth that included white teeth, a spectrum of developmental defects of enamel and dental caries. Data were captured directly and exported into SPSS for analysis. Results Data were available for 1553 participants. In general, there were no significant differences in the rank positions between the fluoridated and non-fluoridated communities, with the exception of teeth with caries and teeth with large demarcated opacities. Very white teeth had the highest rating in both localities. Overall, there was a trend for teeth with fluorosis to be ranked more favourably in the fluoridated community; for TF 1 and TF 2 this preference was significant (p fluorosis score of TF 1 may not be considered aesthetically objectionable to this population and age group. The image depicting a tooth with caries and the image with large demarcated opacities were deemed to be the least favoured. Participant preference of images depicting fluorosis falls with increasing severity of fluorosis. PMID:22325055

  5. Curriculum Mapping: A Before-and-After Look at Faculty Perceptions of Their Courses and the Mapping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    The increased interest in program- and university-level assessment over the past few decades has led to increased faculty involvement in developing program learning outcomes and performing program assessment activities. Depending on the level of support and encouragement faculty receive from administration and other entities, they may support or…

  6. A Case Study of the Perceptions of Faculty in a Formalized Mentoring Program at a Private 4-Year College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Sheri E.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study was designed to investigate mentors and mentees and their relationships in a formal group-mentoring program. Results and findings were expected to contribute to the literature on how to best support future new faculty and senior faculty careers by providing data on the opinions of those who participated in the mentoring…

  7. Curriculum Mapping: A Before-and-After Look at Faculty Perceptions of Their Courses and the Mapping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    The increased interest in program- and university-level assessment over the past few decades has led to increased faculty involvement in developing program learning outcomes and performing program assessment activities. Depending on the level of support and encouragement faculty receive from administration and other entities, they may support or…

  8. Faculty Perceptions of Instrumental and Improvement Reasons behind Quality Assessments in Higher Education: The Roles of Participation and Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trullen, Jordi; Rodriguez, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    While the stated aim of quality assessments is to improve the quality of the products and services offered by universities, some faculty view them as instrumental in justifying government budget cuts in education. By means of a survey administered to more than 300 faculty from 20 academic programmes undergoing quality assessments, we studied…

  9. Faculty Perceptions of the Benefits and Costs of Participation in Opencourseware and Their Sense of Institutional Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilges, Dolores C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine college faculty attitudes towards benefits and costs of participation in OpenCourseWare (OCW), and level of content sharing. In addition, relationships among faculty participation in OCW, their assessments of costs and benefits to its use, content feedback, content protection, and their sense of OCW's…

  10. Critical incidents in the teaching-learning process of a nursing course through the perception of students and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Adriana Valongo; Nogueira, Maria Suely

    2006-01-01

    The teaching-learning process is complex and leaves many question marks, mainly when one thinks about quality. Therefore, this study aims at identifying factors that interfere positively or negatively in the teaching-learning process, through the perspective of students and faculty of the Nursing course at the Universidade Norte do Paraná- UNOPAR. This descriptive study with a qualitative approach was carried out through the critical incidents technique. Thirty-six faculty and 140 students participated. Data analysis revealed that the students mentioned 435 critical incidents related to the category faculty behavior, being 317 negative references and 118 positive. According to the faculty members' reports, the category interaction with the group produced 58 references, being 10 positive and 48 negative. An adequate teaching-learning process requires good faculty-student and student-student relationships, favoring good interaction and efficient learning.

  11. The critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students: A grounded theory research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkey, Traci J

    2015-05-01

    As the demographics of the United States change, nursing will need to become more ethnically diverse in order to provide culturally responsive healthcare. Enrollment of English as Second Language nursing students is increasing; however, these students often encounter academic difficulties. The increase in English as Second Language nursing students in the classroom and clinical setting has posed challenges for nurse faculty. To explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students. A grounded theory method based on the philosophical underpinnings of symbolic interactionism and pragmatism was used to explore the critical factors that influence faculty attitudes and perceptions of teaching English as Second Language nursing students. The study took place at various schools of nursing in the Southeast Florida area. Educators teaching in an associate, baccalaureate, and/or graduate nursing program at an accredited school of nursing. Semi-structured interviews and a focus group were conducted to collect data from nurse faculty. Data segments from interviews were coded, categorized, and analyzed. Theoretical sampling and a focus group interview were used to validate the concepts, themes, and categories identified during the individual interviews. A substantive level theory was developed. The core category that developed was conscientization. The three dominant categories that emerged from the data were overcoming, coming to know, and facilitating. The theoretical framework of conscientization provided an explanation of the social processes involved in teaching English as Second Language nursing students. The theoretical framework developed from this study can be used to increase the effectiveness of teaching English as Second Language nursing students, improve their chances of success, and enhance diversity in the nursing profession. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of Dental Fluorosis, Socioeconomic Status and Self-Perception in Adolescents Exposed to a High Level of Fluoride in Water

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    Nelly Molina-Frechero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify adolescents’ self-perception of dental fluorosis from two areas with different socioeconomic levels. Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted with 15-year-old youths by applying a questionnaire designed and validated to assess self-perceptions of dental fluorosis in two areas with different socioeconomic statuses (SESs. Fluorosis was clinically evaluated by applying the Thylstrup and Fejerkov (TF index on the upper front teeth. Results: A total of 308 adolescents were included in the study. The medium-SES population, which was exposed to 2.5 ppm of fluoride in water, and the low-SES population, which was exposed to 5.1 ppm, presented the following levels of dental fluorosis: TF 2–3 (50%, TF 4–5 (45.6% and TF 6–7 (4.4% for medium SES and TF 2–3 (12.3%, TF 4–5 (67.1% and TF 67 (20.6% for low SES. A significant association was found between self-perception and dental fluorosis in those with medium and low SESs (p < 0.05. The multiple regression model found differences between TF levels and self-perception, with a 6–7 TF level for concerns about color (OR = 1.6, smile (OR = 1.2 and appearance (OR = 3.36. Conclusions: Self-perceptions of dental fluorosis affect adolescents such that adolescents with a medium SES have more negative perceptions than those with a low SES. Such perceptions increase as the TF index increases.

  13. Impact of Dental Fluorosis, Socioeconomic Status and Self-Perception in Adolescents Exposed to a High Level of Fluoride in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Nevarez-Rascón, Martina; Nevarez-Rascón, Alfredo; González-González, Rogelio; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Sánchez-Pérez, Leonor; López-Verdin, Sandra; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify adolescents’ self-perception of dental fluorosis from two areas with different socioeconomic levels. Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted with 15-year-old youths by applying a questionnaire designed and validated to assess self-perceptions of dental fluorosis in two areas with different socioeconomic statuses (SESs). Fluorosis was clinically evaluated by applying the Thylstrup and Fejerkov (TF) index on the upper front teeth. Results: A total of 308 adolescents were included in the study. The medium-SES population, which was exposed to 2.5 ppm of fluoride in water, and the low-SES population, which was exposed to 5.1 ppm, presented the following levels of dental fluorosis: TF 2–3 (50%), TF 4–5 (45.6%) and TF 6–7 (4.4%) for medium SES and TF 2–3 (12.3%), TF 4–5 (67.1%) and TF 67 (20.6%) for low SES. A significant association was found between self-perception and dental fluorosis in those with medium and low SESs (p < 0.05). The multiple regression model found differences between TF levels and self-perception, with a 6–7 TF level for concerns about color (OR = 1.6), smile (OR = 1.2) and appearance (OR = 3.36). Conclusions: Self-perceptions of dental fluorosis affect adolescents such that adolescents with a medium SES have more negative perceptions than those with a low SES. Such perceptions increase as the TF index increases. PMID:28085102

  14. Clinical instructors' perception of a faculty development programme promoting postgraduate year-1 (PGY1) residents' ACGME six core competencies: a 2-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Fa-Yauh; Yang, Ying-Ying; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chuang, Chiao-Lin; Lee, Wei-Shin; Chang, Ching-Chih; Huang, Chia-Chang; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Cheng, Hao-Min; Jap, Tjin-Shing

    2011-01-01

    Objective The six core competencies designated by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) are essential for establishing a patient centre holistic medical system. The authors developed a faculty programme to promote the postgraduate year 1 (PGY(1)) resident, ACGME six core competencies. The study aims to assess the clinical instructors' perception, attitudes and subjective impression towards the various sessions of the 'faculty development programme for teaching ACGME competencies.' Methods During 2009 and 2010, 134 clinical instructors participated in the programme to establish their ability to teach and assess PGY(1) residents about ACGME competencies. Results The participants in the faculty development programme reported that the skills most often used while teaching were learnt during circuit and itinerant bedside, physical examination teaching, mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) evaluation demonstration, training workshop and videotapes of 'how to teach ACGME competencies.' Participants reported that circuit bedside teaching and mini-CEX evaluation demonstrations helped them in the interpersonal and communication skills domain, and that the itinerant teaching demonstrations helped them in the professionalism domain, while physical examination teaching and mini-CEX evaluation demonstrations helped them in the patients' care domain. Both the training workshop and videotape session increase familiarity with teaching and assessing skills. Participants who applied the skills learnt from the faculty development programme the most in their teaching and assessment came from internal medicine departments, were young attending physician and had experience as PGY(1) clinical instructors. Conclusions According to the clinical instructors' response, our faculty development programme effectively increased their familiarity with various teaching and assessment skills needed to teach PGY(1) residents and ACGME competencies, and these clinical

  15. Dental fluorosis knowleDge anD perception among stuDents of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    different courses including diploma and undergraduate students. study design: ... Data collection: Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and tables .... There's need for special initiatives at individual and community dental ...

  16. Eliciting students′ perceptions of integrated clinical dental education in Saudi Arabia: A cross-sectional study

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    Mahmoud Al-Dajani

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In the integrated curriculum, our study highlights the importance of clinical training not only in making dental students competent but also in increasing their confidence in performing clinical procedures.

  17. Negative ageing stereotypes in students and faculty members from three health science schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Soraya; Correa-Beltrán, Gloria; Giacaman, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-01

    To explore the ageing stereotypes held by health students and faculty members in three health science schools in Chile. This cross-sectional study surveyed 284 students and faculty members from the dental, physical therapy and speech therapy schools of the University of Talca, Chile. A validated 15-question questionnaire about negative stereotypes was used (CENVE). The questions were divided into three categories: (i) health, (ii) social factors and motivation and (iii) character and personality. The scores for each category were grouped into the following categories: (i) positive, (ii) neutral and (iii) negative. Negative stereotypes were compared across genders, socio-economic status levels, classes, positions (student or faculty member) and schools. The majority of the participants held neutral stereotypes towards ageing, followed by positive perceptions. No differences were detected between the genders, schools or classes. While most of the students had neutral perceptions about ageing, the faculty's perceptions were rather positive (p = 0.0182). In addition, people of lower-middle socio-economic status held more positive stereotypes about ageing than the participants of high and middle status (p = 0.0496). Stereotypes about ageing held by health-related students and faculty members appear to be rather neutral. The stereotypes seem to be better among students with some clinical experience, students of lower socio-economic status and faculty members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dental surgeons: A pilot study

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    Abdul Rahim Shaik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe the work-related musculoskeletal disorders among on-job dental surgeons. Objectives: To identify the musculoskeletal disorders in terms of perception of pain and stiffness experienced by the dental surgeons due to the rigors of dental work, to determine the prevailing working environment with particular reference to dental work station in relation to musculoskeletal disorders, and to find the association between pain and stiffness experienced by the dental surgeons and the selected socio-demographic variables. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 30 graduated dental surgeons having a work experience of 1 year or more, post graduates and faculty members of various specialties at Yenepoya Dental College Hospital, Mangalore. The subjects were selected randomly from the hospital and they were given closed-ended questionnaire to find out perception of pain and stiffness experienced in the past 6 months. The observation of the working environment was done by walk-through observational survey. Results: The study showed that 6.6% dental surgeons always experienced shoulder pain, while 83.3% dental surgeons sometimes experienced back pain and 70% sometimes experienced neck pain. Majority of the dental surgeons (73.3% experienced stiffness in the back and 23.3% experienced severe pain in their neck. It was observed that the number of patients attended per day by the dental surgeons had a significant association (P = 0.024 with the pain they experienced in their hip/thigh region. The frequency of pain experienced by the dental surgeons in the hip/thigh and knee joints also showed a significant association (P = 0.037 with the height of the dental surgeons. Conclusion: The study revealed that various socio-demographic variables contributed to the musculoskeletal disorders experienced by the dental surgeons. However, the number of patients attended per day by the dental surgeons vis-à-vis pain experienced in the back, wrist, and

  19. Faculty beliefs, perceptions, and level of community involvement in their research: a survey at one urban academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg-Freeman, Clara; Kass, Nancy; Gielen, Andrea; Tracey, Patricia; Bates-Hopkins, Barbara; Farfel, Mark

    2010-12-01

    Health researchers are increasingly interested in how best to engage communities in their health-related research studies. To help determine how researchers have interacted with community members in their research, we conducted a survey of full-time faculty from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions regarding researchers' beliefs and experiences with community-based research. Approximately 41% of respondents who conducted human subject studies had enrolled local residents in their research. Researchers whose studies were based in the surrounding community were significantly more likely to involve community members in all stages of their research (e.g., selection of the problem, project planning, data collection, interpretation and dissemination of results, or developing an intervention) than were faculty whose studies enrolled community members as research participants but whose studies were not set in the community. Over 90% of all faculty respondents agree that community involvement improves the relevance of their research, although almost 60% had not done so. Most faculty value community involvement, but they want more institutional support for such activities and they seek better skills to involve community. Few studies have surveyed researchers who enroll community members as research participants to document practices regarding community involvement in the research process. Given that the majority (73.6%) of faculty responded that they intend to include local residents in their upcoming studies, future research to evaluate interventions designed to facilitate community involvement, especially in the inner city, would help stakeholders identify best practices for involving and engaging communities in health research.

  20. Global oral health course: Perception among dental students in central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhinav; Purohit, Bharathi

    2012-07-01

    A questionnaire study was conducted among dental students in Central India. The study population included 264 dental students, who voluntarily completed a questionnaire, comprising of 16 close ended questions. There were 9 questions to judge knowledge and 5 questions for attitude assessment towards global oral health course. Two additional questions were included to assess the willingness to volunteer in international setting; and also, to assess dental student's perspection on global oral health course. Chi Square test was used to compare between categorical variables. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to compare mean of knowledge and attitude scores. P value of ⩽.05 was considered significant for all statistical analysis. Eighty seven percent of the surveyed students (222) stated that they would consider volunteering their dental skills as a future dentist in international setting. Majority of the students in the present study were not aware about the global oral health status (99.2%) and theoral health care systems of industrialized and emerging economies (99.2%), had not been trained to serve underserved population (68%), had not been trained in global health ethics (70.1%) and none of the students had been trained for cultural competence in addressing international oral health issues (100%). Most of the dental students were not aware, that, WHO created basic package of oral care (63%) about the primary health care strategy (59.5%) and about the role and functions of FDI (66.7%). The majority of students expressed a desire to volunteer their professional services in international settings. However few students knew about WHO's BPOC or FDI'S role in global oral health. The findings indicate a need for global oral health course among dental students in Central India.

  1. The impact of social context on the perception of dental appearance in 8-9 years old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Devi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Several studies have tried to clarify the role that malocclusion has on an individual’s selfconcept or on level of satisfaction with one’s dental or facial appearance, but little research on psycho-social attitudes towards malocclusion has been conducted on pre-adolescent children. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of socio-economic status (SES on the perception of dental appearance in third-grade school-children.

    Methods: A pilot survey was conducted in 2008 in order to collect data from a representative sample of 101 eight-nine years-old children (62 M - 39 F, examined by trained orthodontists. Each child filled in the Children’s Orthodontic Attitude Survey (COAS questionnaire, and then they were examined by 3 residents. The clinical parameters were correlated with the questionnaire findings and with the SES. The latter was assessed using a previously validated scale, graded into classes from I to V reflecting the parents’ job activity. Statistical analysis: Statistical analysis was performed by using SPSS 12.0 for Windows, using Chi Square Test for nominal variables and Kruskal-Wallis test for ordinal scales. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05.

    Results: A statistical association was found between clinical status and SES only for the Oral Hygiene level (p = 0.022. Chi-Square test also showed a statistically significant association between SES and R.O.M.A. Index (p = 0.009. The relation between questionnaire findings and SES was significantly observed only for the following question “Does the way your teeth look bother you” (p = 0.022.

    Conclusions: Familial SES is not a determinant in children’s satisfaction with dental appearance. Children with different SES demonstrate they have almost completely the same approach towards braces.

  2. Quality Indicators and Expected Outcomes for Social Work PhD Programs: Perceptions of Social Work Students, Faculty, and Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr, Christopher G.; Harrington, Donna; Kim, Kyeongmo; Black, Beverly; Cunningham-Williams, Renee M.; Bentley, Kia J.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents and discusses the results of a national survey of social work PhD students, faculty, and administrators (n = 416), conducted by the Group for the Advancement of Doctoral Education in Social Work (GADE), in December 2012. The survey was undertaken to inform the updating of GADE's 2003 "Guidelines for Quality in Social…

  3. Faculty Perceptions of Challenges and Enablers of Effective Teaching in a Large Research-Intensive University: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseño-Garzón, Adriana; Han, Andrea; Birol, Gülnur; Bates, Simon; Whitehead, Lorne

    2016-01-01

    In October 2014, the University of British Columbia Vancouver campus (UBCV) ran a campus-wide survey to establish baseline information on teaching practices and attitudes among faculty, to measure the impact of existing teaching and learning initiatives and to identify the conditions leading to change in practices and attitudes around teaching.…

  4. Self-Perceptions of Value, Barriers, and Motivations for Graduate Education Among Dental Hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy N; Boyd, Linda D; Rogers, Christine Macarelli; Le Jeune, Ronald C

    2016-09-01

    Increasing the knowledge base of its practitioners through formal education is vital to advancing the dental hygiene profession, ensuring practitioners' readiness for participation in future health care workforce models, and preparing future dental hygiene educators. The aim of this study was to discover the value of, barriers to, and motivations for graduate education among dental hygienists as a first step toward establishing ways to stimulate enrollment and facilitate program change. A qualitative pilot study design was used, with focus groups used for data collection. Four virtual focus groups were conducted on a video conferencing platform with dental hygienists (N=15) of varying educational levels residing in nine states. Focus group results were examined for emerging themes. The majority of participants placed a high value on graduate education as it related to expanding employment options and satisfying personal goals, but perceived it to have little value regarding advancement in clinical practice. Top barriers to education were reported to be time management, finances, and degree program options. Motivational themes for pursuing education included increased career options, benefits, and salary; personal satisfaction; potential to advance the profession; and financial support. The participants agreed that increased education can lead to more varied career opportunities and advance the profession, but their responses suggested limited motivation to pursue graduate studies. Determining ways to increase the value, reduce barriers, and enhance motivation for a graduate degree should be a priority of academic institutions and professional organizations involved in dental hygiene to ensure a workforce that is qualified for future health care initiatives and prepared to become educators.

  5. Relationship between psychological well-being and perceptions of stress among undergraduate dental students in Bengaluru city: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Anushri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The dental profession has been considered a stressful occupation. The origins of this stress may also lie in the process of dental education. The perception of stress is frequently influenced by one′s personal system of beliefs and attitudes. Aim: The aim was to assess the relationship between psychological well-being and perception of stress among undergraduate dental students in Bangalore city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among 800 1-4 th year dental students. Information on demographics, social background, and health behaviors were collected. The psychological general well-being (PGWB index and the dental environment stress (DES questionnaire were used to measure PGWB and perceptions of stress, respectively. Multiple intergroup comparisons were carried out using ANOVA. Correlation analysis was done to find out relationship between PGWB and DES. Regression analysis to find out the strongest predictor of PGWB. P <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in PGWB among different year of study. Female students had significantly lower PGWB scores and higher DES scores than male students. The stress differed among different year of study with highest stress in final year students in all domains except for clinical/preclinical training, which was highest among 1 st year students. Correlational analysis showed a negative relationship between PGWB and DES score. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that "workload," "patient treatment," "performance pressure" and "others" domains of stress were significant predictors of PGWB. Conclusion: This study revealed that the perception of stress is influenced by gender and health behaviors which in turn affect PGWB.

  6. Cultural competency and communication skills of dental students: clinical supervisors' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, R; Ghanim, A; Morgan, M; Barrow, S

    2016-07-15

    This study explored clinical supervisor's (CS) views and experiences of dental students' cultural competence (CC) at the Melbourne Dental School, The University of Melbourne, Australia. Additionally, this study explored CS insights into how CC could be taught. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were organised with consenting CS. Interview topics included the following: the importance of CC, communication and rapport, the role of culture in oral health and the need for curriculum enhancement. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed to identify key areas using NVivo software. A total of 12 CS participated in this study. CS acknowledged the importance of CC and felt that it was important for good patient management. CS's definition of CC focused primarily on language and communication skills. CS felt that dental students were generally able to manage culturally diverse patients. However, CS indicated that additional training in this area would be beneficial. Concerns were raised about the students' ability to establish good rapport and communication, with CS highlighting areas such as misuse of interpreters and use of jargon. CS felt that clinical experience, confidence and a positive attitude are effective tools for overcoming cultural barriers. Furthermore, some CS also felt that cultural competency was a skill that is learnt through experience. For most CS, cultural competence was an important part of the clinician-patient exchange which would benefit from enhanced curriculum. They also highlighted areas where transcultural education could be improved. The majority of CS believed dental students managed culturally diverse patients well. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Assessment of the University of Michigan's dental hygiene partnership with the Huron Valley Boys & Girls Club: a study of students' and staffs' perceptions and service learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen Brydges, Sarah; Gwozdek, Anne E

    2011-01-01

    The Boys & Girls Club of America (BGCA) requires a health curriculum be taught. With the assistance of the University of Michigan (UM) Dental Hygiene program, these requirements have been addressed at the Huron Valley Boys & Girls Club (HVBGC) through dental hygiene students presenting oral health education to club members throughout the year. This study assessed the outcomes and benefits of the service learning initiative between the UM Dental Hygiene Program and the HVBGC from both the students' and staffs' perceptions. Three surveys were distributed: one to the HVBGC staff, one to UM's Dental Hygiene class of 2012 (with no service learning experience at the HVBGC) and one to UM Dental Hygiene classes of 2010 and 2011 (most of whom had experience at the HVBGC). Qualitative and quantitative data were collected and evaluated. The respondents from the class of 2012 were less knowledgeable about the BGCA and access to care issues. The members of the classes of 2010 and 2011, 79% of whom had HVBGC experience, identified they had benefitted from this service learning experience. The HVBGC staff survey indicated a high level of satisfaction with the student presentations and felt their curricular requirements were being met. Future topics of safety, orthodontics and gardening/nutrition were identified. This study indicates the service learning initiative has been beneficial for both the UM Dental Hygiene students and the HVBGC. Future studies should use a longitudinal design to obtain baseline and post-service learning data.

  8. Faculty and Administrative Partnerships: Disciplinary Differences in Perceptions of Civic Engagement and Service-Learning at a Large, Research-Extensive University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G. Buzinski

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, considerable energy has been expended attempting to define, evaluate and promote active learning pedagogies such as civic engagement and service-learning. Yet much of this scholarship treats civic engagement and service-learning at either a macroscopic level (studying an entire university system or microscopic level (studying a particular course or project. There has been comparably less research examining how different disciplinary cultures influence the conceptualization and implementation of active learning pedagogies within individual institutions. This study draws on quantitative survey methodologies to examine faculty perceptions of civic engagement and service-learning at a major public research university within and across four disciplines: the Humanities, Behavioral and Social Sciences, Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM, and the Applied Professions. Quantitative results reveal significant variance in disciplinary approaches to civic engagement and service-learning across a variety of measures including advocacy, concerns, and goals for active learning pedagogies. The findings suggest several strategies for recognizing disciplinary differences and encouraging collaboration among faculty and between disciplines on civic engagement and service-learning approaches in higher education.

  9. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

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    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  10. Innovation of dental education system for researcher, dentist, dental hygienist and dental technician in Hiroshima University

    OpenAIRE

    Kurihara, Hidemi

    2006-01-01

    Hiroshima University Faculty of Dentistry's goal is to become the worldwide research and education center in Dentistry. It seems to constitute the dental education by two missions: core and characteristic. Hiroshima University Faculty of Dentistry has clarified their characteristic mission and improved dental education system to reinforce the innovative part of the education. We started two programs to cultivate researchers/educators who will be a world-wide leader of dental research and educ...

  11. Perceptions of dental students regarding dentistry, the job market and the public healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Simone de Melo; Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Durães, Sarah Jane Alves; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães de; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti

    2012-05-01

    The scope was to analyze the perceptions of dentistry students at the State University of Montes Claros, Brazil, regarding dentistry, the job market and the public healthcare system. For this, a triangulation method was employed, using a self-administered questionnaire and interviews. The quantitative data were submitted to univariate and multivariate analysis, using Poisson regression, where pdentistry course prepares students for this market as the curriculum integrates both teaching and service, reported being in favor of greater experience in the public healthcare system and said they would not take classes in Public Health if they were optional. Contact with the social context through teaching/service integration in the advanced semesters of the dentistry course appears to contribute to the development of new professional skills for working in the public sector. However, the students' perceptions revealed contradictions, considering the low value they attributed to the classes on Public Health and their perception of the public system as a residual job option.

  12. Dental student perception and assessment of their clinical knowledge in educating patients about preventive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, M J; Miller, C J; Lin, W S; Abdel-Azim, T; Zandinejad, A; Crim, G A

    2015-05-01

    In today's dental school curricula, an increasing amount of time is dedicated to technological advances, and preventive dentistry topics may not be adequately addressed. Freshman (D1) students participated in a new Introduction to Preventive Dentistry course, which consisted of didactic lectures, active learning breakout sessions and case-based studies. The goal of this study was to determine if D1 dental students completing the course had a better knowledge and comfort level with basic preventive dentistry concepts and caries risk assessment than the upcoming graduating senior dental students. Following the completion of the course, D1 students were administered a survey that assessed their comfort level describing preventive dentistry topics to patients. This was immediately followed by an unannounced examination over the same topics. Senior (D4) students, who had not taken a formal course, reported statistically significant higher comfort levels than D1 students. However, the D4s scored significantly lower in all of the examination areas than the D1 students. Higher scores in D1s may have been due to recent exposure to the course material. However, the basic nature of the content-specific questions should be easily answered by novice practitioners educating their patients on oral disease prevention. As the current data shows lower content-specific scores of basic preventive dentistry knowledge amongst graduating D4 students, this may indicate a need for more guidance and education of students during the patient care. This study showed that implementation of a formalised course for D1 students can successfully ameliorate deficiencies in knowledge of preventive dentistry topics.

  13. Curriculum Guidelines for Clinical Dental Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools curriculum guidelines for clinical dental hygiene include definitions, notes on the interrelationship of courses, an overview of course objectives, and suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific objectives, sequencing, faculty, and facilities. (MSE)

  14. Instructor and Dental Student Perceptions of Clinical Communication Skills via Structured Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Carly T

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use structured assessments to assess dental students' clinical communication skills exhibited during patient appointments. Fourth-year dental students (n=55) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham evaluated their own interpersonal skills in a clinical setting utilizing the Four Habits Coding Scheme. An instructor also assessed student-patient clinical communication. These assessments were used to identify perceived strengths and weaknesses in students' clinical communication. Both instructor assessments and student self-assessments pinpointed the following clinical communication skills as effective the most often: patient greeting, avoidance of jargon, and non-verbal behavior. There was also relative agreement between instructor assessments and student self-assessments regarding clinical communication skills that were rated as not effective most frequently: ensuring patient comprehension, identification of patient feelings, and exploration of barriers to treatment. These resulted pointed to strengths and weaknesses in the portion of the curriculum designed to prepare students for effective provider-patient communication. These results may suggest a need for the school's current behavioral science curriculum to better address discussion of potential treatment barriers and patient feelings as well as techniques to ensure patient comprehension.

  15. A Qualitative Analysis of Faculty and Student Perceptions of Effective Online Class Communities Using Herzberg's Motivator-Hygiene Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Rebecca; Welch, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative approach in understanding factors that are evident in effective online class communities. Instructors and students in the same class were asked about their perceptions regarding what constitutes an effective online experience. The analysis was done using both Herzberg's (1962, 1965) motivator-hygiene factors…

  16. Understanding the Negative Graduate Student Perceptions of Required Statistics and Research Methods Courses: Implications for Programs and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Charles; Conrad, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    The authors of this study endeavor to explore the negative opinions and perceptions of graduate students in business and social science programs, regarding their required statistics and research methods courses. The general sense of instructors of such courses is that students dread and resent having to take courses dealing with statistics and…

  17. Dental students' and lecturers' perception of the degree of difficulty of caries detection associated learning topics in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Juan Sebastian; Braga, Mariana Minatel; Shitsuka, Caleb; Wen, Chao Lung; Haddad, Ana Estela

    2015-01-01

    It aimed to explore the degree of difficulty of caries-detection-associated-topics perceived by dental students and lecturers as pedagogical step in the development of learning objects for e-learning. A convenience sample comprising ninety-eight subjects from different academic levels (undergraduate/graduate students and pediatric dentistry lecturers) participated. Two spreadsheets (isolated/relative) were created considering key topics in the caries detection process. The isolated evaluation intended to explore each topic in an isolated way, while the relative intended to classify, comparatively, the participants' perceived difficulty per topic. Afterwards, data were analyzed. All values on spreadsheets were combined obtaining the subject's final perception. Associations between the subjects' degree of the perceived difficulty and academic level were estimated. ANOVA was used to determine differences regarding the perception among evaluated topics in distinct groups. Caries histopathology and detection of proximal carious lesions were the topics perceived as the most difficult in the process of caries detection by both students and lecturers. Differentiation between an extrinsic pigmentation and a brown-spot (caries lesion) as well as differential diagnosis between caries and enamel developmental defects or non-carious lesions were considered as more difficult by undergraduates in comparison to graduates/lecturers (regression-coefficient=14.54; Standard Error=3.34; PTopics as histopathology and detection of proximal caries lesions were identified as the most difficult despite the academic level. However, some topics are differently perceived according to the group. These results are useful for developing pedagogical material, based on the students real learning needs/expectations.

  18. Examining the aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans: a qualitative study of faculty and staff perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Joy J; Hooper, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have reported how Hurricane Katrina has affected teachers who work with Kindergarten to Grade 12 (K-12), yet little is known about how the natural disaster has affected other important K-12 faculty and staff (e.g., coaches, librarians, school counselors, and cafeteria workers). Missing from the literature is the impact that this natural disaster has had on these formal (school counselors) and informal (coaches, librarians) helpers of K-12 students. Using a focus group methodology, the authors examined the aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina on 12 school employees in New Orleans, Louisiana, 18 months after the hurricane. Informed by qualitative content analysis, three emergent themes were identified: emotion-focused aftereffects, positive coping, and worry and fear. The implications for future research and promoting hope in mental health counseling are discussed.

  19. Examining the Aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans: A Qualitative Study of Faculty and Staff Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy J. Burnham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have reported how Hurricane Katrina has affected teachers who work with Kindergarten to Grade 12 (K-12, yet little is known about how the natural disaster has affected other important K-12 faculty and staff (e.g., coaches, librarians, school counselors, and cafeteria workers. Missing from the literature is the impact that this natural disaster has had on these formal (school counselors and informal (coaches, librarians helpers of K-12 students. Using a focus group methodology, the authors examined the aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina on 12 school employees in New Orleans, Louisiana, 18 months after the hurricane. Informed by qualitative content analysis, three emergent themes were identified: emotion-focused aftereffects, positive coping, and worry and fear. The implications for future research and promoting hope in mental health counseling are discussed.

  20. Students Perceptions on the quality of clinical supervision among the 12 affiliated hospital of Medical Faculty of UNISSULA

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    Dian Apriliana Rahmawatie

    2011-12-01

    Design and Methods: This study involved 181 students of clinical internship of the year 2003, 2004 and 2005 of medical faculty of Islamic Sultan Agung University having the clinical rotation at the stage of surgery, obsgyn, pediatrics, internal medicine, ENT, neurology, dermatology and venerology, psychiatry, across the affiliated hospitals. The subject were divided into groups based on the hospital they were placed. Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Instrument (CTEI adapted in bahasa Indonesia was used. The Descriptive and Kruskal-Wallis test were applied for the data analysis. Results: Means of the effectiveness of clinical supervision for 12 affiliated hospitals ranged from 3.25 to 4.02. Kruskal-Wallis test resulted in the value of Chi-S=13.32 and p=0.27. Conclusion: Over all the clinical supervision for the 12 affiliated hospitals is perceived good and shows no significant difference. However the practice of clinical supervision varies among the hospitals (Sains Medika, 3(2:135-149.

  1. 正畸患者对牙列中线偏移的审美认知评价%Orthodontic patients' esthetic perception of dental midline deviation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭丛丛; 周晨; 全春天; 包柏成

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the orthodontic patients'esthetic perception of dental midline deviation.Methods Dental midline deviation models were set up in male and female persons.The electronic questionnaire was designed and used to investigate the orthodontic patients'esthetic perception of dental midline deviation.Results There was a total of 203 samples in this survey.The ideal value of dental midline deviation was 0.012 mm for male model and - 0.017 mm for female model.The detectable values in male and female were 1.42 mm and 1.31 mm,respectively.The tolerable levels in male and female were 2.50 mm and 2.62 mm,respectively.Conclusions The ideal value,detectable value and tolerable level could be used to evaluate the dental midline deviation quantitatively and had clinical significance.%目的 调查正畸患者对牙列中线偏移的关注程度与审美评价.方法 建立男女性牙列中线偏移模型,利用电子问卷对正畸患者进行调查.结果 调查样本共计 203例,男性牙列中线偏移的审美理想值、察觉值、容忍度分别为-0.012 mm、1.42 mm、2.50 mm;女性为-0.017 mm、1.31mm、2.62 mm.结论 理想值、察觉值和容忍度三个指标可以对牙列中线偏移的审美影响进行定量评价,其量化值具有一定的临床指导意义.

  2. PERCEPTION OF Er-YAG LASER DENTAL CARIES TREATMENT IN ADOLESCENTS - A CLINICAL EVALUATION.

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    Galia G. Zhegova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate adolescents’ acceptance and pain perception of Er-YAG laser preparation in comparison to conventional mechanical preparation. Material and methods: Forty four adolescents between the age of 16 and 18 years with bilateral matched pairs of carious permanent molars participated in this study. In each patient one of the 2 cavities was prepared conventionally, the other with the Er-YAG laser. All cavities were restored with light-cured composite resin following the application of acid etch and a bonding agent. The patients were instructed to rate pain (sensitivity during treatment according to visual analogue scale and to decide which method they would prefer for their future caries treatment. Results: The patients rated lower pain perception during laser treatment. It was found that 86.36 % of the adolescents indicated that they would prefer the Er:YAG laser preparation for further caries treatment. Conclusion: The application of the Er-YAG laser for carious tissue removal, compared to conventional mechanical preparation, is perceived as more comfortable and the adolescents prefer it for a future treatment.

  3. Malocclusion, dental aesthetic self-perception and quality of life in a 18 to 21 year-old population: a cross section study

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    Claudino Dikson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aesthetic alterations in the face can be self-perceived and can affect quality of life. For young people, physical attractiveness is an important factor affecting social relationships. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of malocclusion, identify the most common types and test its association with oral aesthetic self-perception in 18 to 21 year-old population of male young adults. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 138 Brazilian Army soldiers. Data collection included socio demographic profile, malocclusion status through the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI and oral aesthetic self-perception as indicated by the Oral Aesthetic Subjective Impact Scale (OASIS. The chi-square and Fisher’s exact test were used to test for homogeneity of proportions. The stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to test for the relationship between the poorer oral aesthetic self-perception and parental and soldier’s education, per capita income, history of caries in all teeth and only on anterior teeth, dental trauma, previous orthodontic treatment and malocclusion. Results The prevalence of malocclusion was 45.6%. Incisor teeth crowding and misalignment of lower incisors were the most common types of malocclusions. A statistically significant and independent association between malocclusion and poorer oral aesthetic self-perception in the multivariate analysis was observed. Subjects with severe malocclusion conditions showed 88% higher prevalence [prevalence ratio =1.88 (95% CI, 1.30 – 2.72; p = 0.001] of poorer aesthetic self-perception comparing to those with minor malocclusion. Conclusions A high prevalence of malocclusion was observed. The young adults presenting severe malocclusion had a higher and independent prevalence of poorer oral aesthetic self-perception.

  4. Assessment of the Self-Perception of Dental Appearance, Its Comparison with Orthodontist’s Assessment and Demand for Treatment in Eastern Nepalese Patients

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    Varun Pratap Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The aim of this study was to assess the self-perception of dental appearance among Eastern Nepalese patients using aesthetic component (AC of the index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN and to compare it with that of an orthodontist’s assessment using the same scale and determine whether gender, area of residence, and level of education influence subject’s self-perception and orthodontist’s ratings. Methods. A total of 252 subjects (equal number of male and female were conveniently selected. The average ages of subjects were 22.33±2.114 years. The level of subject’s perception and orthodontist’s assessment was analyzed by nonparametric Chi square test. Kappa coefficient was done to verify its agreement. The Spearman’s correlation test was used to check the association of educational level and age. Mann-Whitney test was used to check the associations of sex and areas of residence. Results. The demand for treatment was significantly associated with the perception of the subject and orthodontist’s assessment. However, age, gender, and educational level were statistically insignificant in influencing subject perception and orthodontist’s assessment. Conclusion. Patient’s self-perception should be given equal importance while planning orthodontic treatment.

  5. University Faculty Describe Their Use of Moving Images in Teaching and Learning and Their Perceptions of the Library's Role in That Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Jane Johnson

    2014-01-01

    The moving image plays a significant role in teaching and learning; faculty in a variety of disciplines consider it a crucial component of their coursework. Yet little has been written about how faculty identify, obtain, and use these resources and what role the library plays. This study, which engaged teaching faculty in a dialogue with library…

  6. Alumni's perception of public health informatics competencies: lessons from the Graduate Program of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Anis; Sanjaya, Guardian Yoki; Lazuardi, Lutfan; Rahmanti, Annisa Ristya; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Public health informatics has been defined as the systematic application of information and computer science and technology to public health practice, research, and learning [1]. Unfortunately, limited reports exist concerning to the capacity building strategies to improve public health informatics workforce in limited-resources setting. In Indonesia, only three universities, including Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM), offer master degree program on related public health informatics discipline. UGM started a new dedicated master program on Health Management Information Systems in 2005, under the auspice of the Graduate Program of Public Health at the Faculty of Medicine. This is the first tracer study to the alumni aiming to a) identify the gaps between curriculum and the current jobs and b) describe their perception on public health informatics competencies. We distributed questionnaires to 114 alumni with 36.84 % response rate. Despite low response rate, this study provided valuable resources to set up appropriate competencies, curriculum and capacity building strategies of public health informatics workforce in Indonesia.

  7. [Effectiveness and difficulty of education on nosocomial infection control for pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for students in the Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2009-03-01

    It has been planned to give pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for fifth-grade students in the School of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, to give them the clinical training needed to perform dental practice and clinical practicum for comprehensive patient care, namely inclusive clinical practice phase II. This study analyzed the educative efficiency of the class on nosocomial infection control (NIC) by comparing achievements pre- and post-test, and discussed appropriate education planning on the NIC for dental students. Sixty-two fifth-grade students in the 2007 academic year sat the pre- and post-tests; the mean score and standard deviation of these tests were 5.30 +/- 1.26 (n = 56) and 8.59 +/- 1.18 (n = 59), respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between them (paired t-test, p < 0.01). Another finding was that students with high scores in the post-test did not necessarily achieve high ratings in the pre-test. It is suggested that the introduction of pre- and post-tests and the clarification of main points in the class as a theme of NIC could be a useful tool for increasing the comprehension of students on the theme. Since students at lower grades will attend clinical practice in the university hospital, it is thought that students should be given NIC training early in the clinical course, and the current curriculum should be improved to increase the opportunity for students to study this important issue.

  8. A Relational Study of Principal Leadership Styles, Faculty Morale, and Faculty Job Satisfaction at Selected Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey Hearn, Dawn Vyola

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a significant relationship existed between principal leadership styles, faculty morale, and faculty job satisfaction at selected elementary schools. Specifically, the study examined if the perception teachers had of their principals. leadership styles had an impact on faculty morale and faculty job…

  9. Knowledge, attitude, and perception of mothers towards emergency management of dental trauma in Salem district, Tamil Nadu: A questionnaire study

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    Kruthika Murali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental trauma is one of the main oral health problems in childhood, and can cause pain and distress. It is important to provide emergency care to combat the aftermaths of trauma. Aim: The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge and attitude of mothers regarding dental trauma and its management. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 33 closed-ended questions were used to interview 150 mothers who participated in the study. The questions assessed the knowledge and attitude of mothers towards their child′s dental visit, dental trauma, and its management. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 17.0. Results: Mother′s previous experience of dental trauma when associated with the preservation of avulsed tooth of the child, those mothers who had the experience of dental trauma reported that they would discard the tooth which was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05 when compared to the mothers with no experience of trauma. The education status of the study population when associated with the knowledge variables of avulsion, it was found that most of the variables had statistically significant association with P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study reveals that there is a lack of awareness among the mothers regarding the emergency management of dental trauma. This warrants the need of an effective communication between dental professionals and mothers for better handling of dental emergencies.

  10. Cognitive vulnerability and dental fear

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    Spencer A John

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cognitive Vulnerability Model proposes that perceptions of certain characteristics of a situation are critical determinants of fear. Although the model is applicable to all animal, natural environment and situational fears, it has not yet been applied specifically to dental fear. This study therefore aimed to examine the association between dental fear and perceptions of dental visits as uncontrollable, unpredictable and dangerous. Methods The study used a clustered, stratified national sample of Australians aged 15 years and over. All participants were asked in a telephone interview survey to indicate their level of dental fear. Participants who received an oral examination were subsequently provided with a self-complete questionnaire in which they rated their perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness associated with dental visiting. Results 3937 participants were recruited. Each of the three vulnerability-related perceptions was strongly associated with the prevalence of high dental fear. In a logistic regression analysis, uncontrollability and dangerousness perceptions were significantly associated with high dental fear after controlling for age and sex. However, unpredictability perceptions did not have a statistically significant independent association with dental fear after controlling for all other variables. Conclusion Results are mostly consistent with the Cognitive Vulnerability Model of the etiology of fear, with perceptions of uncontrollability, unpredictability and dangerousness each showing a strong bivariate relationship with high dental fear prevalence. However, more extensive measures of vulnerability perceptions would be valuable in future investigations.

  11. Psychological well-being, health, and stress sources in Turkish dental students.

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    Uraz, Ahu; Tocak, Yasemin Sezgin; Yozgatligil, Ceylan; Cetiner, Sedat; Bal, Belgin

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the psychological well-being and overall health of a group of Turkish dental students and their sources of stress. Two hundred and seventy-seven students (57 percent female) from Gazi University Dental Faculty completed the Dental Environment Stress (DES) questionnaire, the Psychological General Well-Being (PGWB) index, and the SF-36 Health Survey. The results showed that the DES scores increased over the five-year period. Pressure to perform, faculty and administration, workload, and students' perceptions of their self-efficacy were the most stress-provoking factors. Students whose first choice was dentistry experienced less stress and fewer health problems (pstudents whose first choice had not been dentistry. Psychological well-being and overall health were significantly associated with year of study. Statistically significant gender differences were observed on depressed mood and anxiety dimension scores of PGWB. Female students experienced greater stress than males, while male students had better overall health than females (pStudents who lived with their parents had lower PGWB scores (pstress among these Turkish dental students was influenced by gender, year of study, social background, and lifestyle. Based on the results of this study, recommendations can be made for changes in the dental education system in order to reduce stress among dental students especially during the last two years of study.

  12. What is the Future of Pediatric Neurology in Canada? Resident and Faculty Perceptions of Training and Workforce Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Clarkin, Chantalle; Whiting, Sharon; Moharir, Mahendranath

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric neurology trainee numbers have grown considerably in Canada; recent research, however, has shown that the number of pediatric neurology graduates is outpacing the need for future pediatric neurologists. The purpose of this study was to seek the opinion of pediatric neurology program directors and trainees regarding possible solutions for this issue. Two focus groups were convened during the Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation annual congress in June 2012; one consisted of current and former program directors, and the other of current pediatric neurology trainees. Groups were asked for their perceptions regarding child neurology manpower issues in Canada as well as possible solutions. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed for analysis. Theme-based qualitative analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Major themes emerging from both focus groups included the emphasis on community pediatric neurology as a viable option for trainees, including the need for community mentors; recognizing the needs of underserviced areas; and establishing academic positions for community preceptors. The need for career mentoring and support structures during residency training was another major theme which arose. Program directors and trainees also gave examples of ways to reduce the current oversupply of trainees in Canada, including limiting the number of trainees entering programs, as well as creating a long-term vision of child neurology in Canada. A nationwide dialogue to discuss the supply and demand of manpower in academic and community pediatric neurology is essential. Career guidance options for pediatric neurology trainees across the country merit further strengthening.

  13. Extraction of maxillary canines: Esthetic perceptions of patient smiles among dental professionals and laypeople.

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    Thiruvenkatachari, Badri; Javidi, Hanieh; Griffiths, Sarah Elizabeth; Shah, Anwar A; Sandler, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    Maxillary canines are generally considered important both cosmetically and functionally. Most claims on the importance of maxillary canines, however, have been based on expert opinions and clinician-based studies. There are no scientific studies in the literature reporting on their cosmetic importance or how laypeople perceive a smile treated by maxillary canine extractions. Our objective was to investigate whether there is any difference in the perceptions of patients' smiles treated by extracting either maxillary canines or first premolars, as judged by orthodontists, dentists, and laypeople. This retrospective study included 24 participants who had unilateral or bilateral extraction of maxillary permanent canines and fixed appliances in the maxillary and mandibular arches to comprehensively correct the malocclusion, selected from orthodontic patients treated at Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS trust in the United Kingdom over the last 20 years. The control group of patients had extraction of maxillary first premolars followed by fixed appliances and finished to an extremely high standard judged by the requirement that they had been submitted for the Membership in Orthodontics examination. The finished Peer Assessment Rating scores for this group were less than 5. The end-of-treatment frontal extraoral smiling and frontal intraoral views were presented for both groups. The photographs were blinded for extraction choice and standardized for size and brightness using computer software (Adobe Photoshop CC version 14.0; Adobe Systems, San Jose, Calif). The work file was converted to an editable pdf file and e-mailed to the assessors. The assessor panel consisted of 30 members (10 orthodontists, 10 dentists, and 10 laypeople), who were purposely selected. The measures were rated on a 10-point Likert scale. The attractiveness ratings were not statistically significantly different between the canine extraction and premolar extraction groups, with a mean difference of 0

  14. Students' perceptions of materials and techniques used at European dental schools in the education of fixed prosthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Kamell, H.; Kharbanda, A.; Dozic, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the materials and procedures used by students in dental schools across Europe for teaching fixed prosthodontics. An online questionnaire, containing twenty-eight dichotomous, multiple-choice, and Likert scale rating questions, was sent to students in forty dental

  15. Students' perceptions of materials and techniques used at European dental schools in the education of fixed prosthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Kamell, H.; Kharbanda, A.; Dozic, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the materials and procedures used by students in dental schools across Europe for teaching fixed prosthodontics. An online questionnaire, containing twenty-eight dichotomous, multiple-choice, and Likert scale rating questions, was sent to students in forty dental

  16. Comparison of Shade Match Compatibility between Vitapan Classical and 3D Master Shade Guide Systems by Dental Students in Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry

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    Ramin Negahdari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Dentists perform color-match process during indirect and direct restorations. Color research has shown that shade guides do not always match the color of natural teeth. Moreover, visual evaluation of dental colors has been found to be inconsistent and unreliable. In fact, it has always been important when using different shade guides. Our purpose in this study was to compare shade selection using two shade guide systems of Vitapan Classical and 3D Master by dental students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Materials and methods: In this analytical, cross-sectional descriptive study, 20 male and 20 female senior dental students with a little clinical experience in working with shade guides were selected. Each student used two shade guides (Vitapan Classical and 3D Master separately for shade matching. Shade selection was randomly repeated one week later by the same protocol. T-test was used to compare repeatability of color matching (α=0.05. Comparison of the repeatability percentage was done with t-test. Results: Comparison of repeatability percentages of shade matching irrespective of gender showed that percentage of repeatability of shade match in 3D Master system was significantly high (P=0.00. In addition comparison of repeatability means of shade match with different shade guide systems on the basis of gender showed no significant differences (P=0.68. Conclusion: In general, the repeatability percentages of shade matching in 3D Master system was high and shade matching in females with this system was not different than males.   Key words: Color vision; indirect restorations; dental students

  17. Patients' Perceptions of Dehumanization of Patients in Dental School Settings: Implications for Clinic Management and Curriculum Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sheela; Shah, Raveena; Hamad, Judy; Van Kanegan, Mona; Kupershmidt, Alexandra; Kruthoff, Mariela

    2015-10-01

    Although the importance of empathy, rapport, and anxiety/pain awareness in dentist-patient relations has been well documented, these factors continue to be an issue with patients in many dental school clinics. The aim of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding of how patients at an urban, university-affiliated medical center and its dental school's clinic experienced oral health care and to generate ideas for improving the dental school's clinical curriculum and management of the clinic. Although patient satisfaction surveys are common, in-depth patient narratives are an underutilized resource for improving dental education. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 uninsured or underinsured dental patients at these sites, and the results were analyzed using content analysis. Major phenomena that participants discussed were the importance of empathy and good rapport with their oral health providers and provider awareness of dental pain and anxiety. Many patients also discussed feeling dehumanized during dental visits. Based on their positive and negative experiences, the participants made suggestions for how oral health professionals can successfully engage patients in treatment.

  18. 齿间辅音知觉的任务效应研究%Task Types and the Perception of English Inter-dental Fricatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙翀

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigated the perception of inter-dental fricatives by Chinese students as regards the influence of phonet- ic experience and langnage transfer on the processing of the stimuli through three perception tasks, i.e. General Pronunciation Error Perception Test, Categorical Discrimination Test and Alternative Forced Choice Identification Test. The findings showed that task types play a significant role in perception, as a meaning-focused input seems to ignore phonetic accuracy while form-focused input tend to lead to higher scores, lit also showed that listeners tend to be more sensitive to voiceless than the voiced counterpart. L2 experience seems to significantly influence the perception of the voiceless phoneme while the perception of the voiced one appears to be selective fossilization.%文章通过错误发音的总体感知、范畴区分和标记辨别三个知觉实验,考察不同任务类型下中国学生对英语齿间辅音的知觉情况,探讨语音经验和语言迁移之间的关系。结果发现,任务类型对知觉有较大影响,注重意义的输入会忽视语音的准确性,侧重形式的输入能获得更高的听音正确率;听音人对齿间清辅音的知觉比浊音更为敏感;语音经验对齿间清辅音的知觉加工起积极的促进作用,对浊音的知觉处理二语者呈选择性石化。

  19. Developing Teaching Expertise in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to develop a baseline model of expertise in dental education utilizing the Dreyfus and Dreyfus continuum of skill acquisition. The goal was the development of a baseline model of expertise, which will contribute to the body of knowledge about dental faculty skill acquisition and may enable dental schools to…

  20. Developing Teaching Expertise in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucinda J.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to develop a baseline model of expertise in dental education utilizing the Dreyfus and Dreyfus continuum of skill acquisition. The goal was the development of a baseline model of expertise, which will contribute to the body of knowledge about dental faculty skill acquisition and may enable dental schools to…

  1. Faculty Perceptions of the National Undergraduate Teaching and Learning Evaluation at Regular Higher Education Institutions from 2003 to 2008 in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jumei

    2012-01-01

    This study explored how faculty members at regular higher education institutions in China perceived the National Undergraduate Teaching and Learning Evaluation (NUTLE). Specifically, this study examined how the NUTLE influenced faculty teaching and research and how the NUTLE influenced student learning outcomes. Primarily descriptive and…

  2. A Multiple Case Study Discovering Part-Time Faculties' Perceptions of Their Professional Needs, Working Conditions, Social Network, and Job Satisfaction at Three Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner-Harlee, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    This study employed a multiple case study design to evaluate the perspectives of part-time faculties at three community colleges in the Northeast. The purpose of this study was to discover how needs, working conditions, and social networks influence the part-time faculties' job satisfaction. Maslow (1954), Bourdieu (1986), and Herzberg, Mausner,…

  3. Sabotaging Our Sisters: Perceptions of Female Relational Aggression in Higher Education among Female Faculty and Administrators at Three Western U.S. Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyborg, Deborah G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and understand relational workplace aggression among female faculty and administrators at three western U.S. universities. This study was designed to address the gap in empirical knowledge of the phenomenon by elucidating how workplace relational aggression affects the lives of female university faculty and…

  4. Academic Library Administration: A Case Examination of Faculty-Librarian Perceptions of Journal Cancellations and the Decision-Making Process in a Large, Urban Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, James Harmon

    As the academic library plays the roles of intermediary and adjudicator of collection purchases and cancellations, faculty involvement in library resource decisions is not only commonplace, but essential to making such decisions. Faculty involvement in cancellation projects is often enhanced by a thorough explanation of the depth of financial…

  5. Job Satisfaction and its Influential Factors in Dental Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    members was assessed using a Likert scale questionnaire from 0 to 4, with 4 representing very satisfied and ... Keywords: Academic members, Dental, Job satisfaction. Access this ..... Rose W, et al. The quality of dental faculty work‑life: Report.

  6. Percepción de ingesta de flúor a través del cepillado dental en niños colombianos Perception of fluoride ingestion by dental brushing in Colombian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farith González Martínez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: describir la percepción de los padres sobre la ingesta de flúor a través del cepillado dental en los niños residentes en la ciudad de Cartagena de Indias, Colombia. Métodos: el universo del estudio lo constituyeron todos los padres residentes en la ciudad de Cartagena de Indias, con hijos en edades entre uno y cinco años. La muestra estuvo integrada por 420 individuos. Se utilizó un cuestionario estructurado, diligenciado por los participantes, con el cual se midieron tópicos relacionados con el uso de las cremas dentales a través del cepillado. Además se tuvieron en cuenta la edad, el género y el estrato socioeconómico. Los datos fueron analizados a través de pruebas de frecuencia; se asumieron intervalos de confianza al 95 %. Para encontrar significación estadística se utilizó la prueba de X². Resultados: el 88,0 % de los padres encuestados refiere usar el cepillado con crema dental. La edad promedio de cepillado es de 2,3 años (DE= 1,6. El 46 % se cepilla dos veces al día; el tipo de crema dental más usada es la de adultos. La mayoría de los encuestados afirma que los niños han ingerido la pasta durante el cepillado. Con respecto al análisis bivariado, se encontraron diferencias entre el cepillado con crema dental y la edad (p= 0,0001, y con el estrato (p= 0,04. Además, el tipo de crema dental con la edad, (p= 0,0001 y la cantidad de pasta utilizada con la edad (p= 0,0001 y el estrato (p= 0,01. Conclusión: se perciben hábitos poco favorables, asociados al cepillado con pasta dental, los cuales pueden ser responsables de la ingestión de cantidades de flúor consideradas nocivas para la salud.Objective: To describe the parents perception on the fluoride ingestion with the use of dental brushing in the children residents in the city of Cartagena de Indias. Methods: Study universe included al parents residents in the city above mentioned whose children were aged 1-5. Sample included 420 subjects. A structural

  7. An Analysis of Patient Perceptions and Expectations to Dental Implants: Is There a Significant Effect on Long-Term Satisfaction Levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Here we present an analysis of patient perceptions and expectations to dental implant placement and their prosthetic reconstruction, to then consider whether they have an effect on long-term satisfaction levels. A Post-Treatment Completion Questionnaire was designed to analyse whether patient satisfaction is influenced by age and/or gender; has an effect on patient-reported self-confidence levels; contributes to increased levels of oral hygiene; provides further insight into the average pain levels during and after the surgical intervention; or influences further acceptance of dental implant surgery. And then whether relationships exist between any of these factors. 182 consecutive patients completed the survey: 68 males and 114 females (age mean 64.68 years ± 11.23 SD); the average number of months since treatment completion was 37.4 (males) and 62.6 (females). There is a significant relationship between comfort rating and “how well informed” the patient was (p = 0.015). A significantly positive relationship exists between “considering dental implants in the future” and “overall experience” (p = 0.001). A significantly positive relationship exists between “overall satisfaction with appearance” and “satisfaction with comfort” (p = 0.011). A significant relationship exists between “overall satisfaction with appearance,” “satisfaction with comfort,” and “overall satisfaction with experience” (p = 0.001). The results amplify the need to transmit logical, truthful information to patients when dental implant treatment is being considered. The “fully informed” patient will have realistic expectations that lead to high degrees of satisfaction. PMID:28928771

  8. Knowledge, attitude, and perception of mothers towards emergency management of dental trauma in Salem district, Tamil Nadu: A questionnaire study

    OpenAIRE

    Kruthika Murali; Ramesh Krishnan; Suresh Kumar, V.; Shankar Shanmugam; Prakash Rajasundharam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental trauma is one of the main oral health problems in childhood, and can cause pain and distress. It is important to provide emergency care to combat the aftermaths of trauma. Aim: The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge and attitude of mothers regarding dental trauma and its management. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 33 closed-ended questions were used to interview 150 mothers who participated in the study. The questions assessed the knowledge and...

  9. Undergraduate education in endodontology at two European dental schools. A comparison between the Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden and Faculty of Odontology, Paris 5 University (René Descartes), France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Kerstin; Olsson, Helena; Söderström, Christina; Fouilloux, Isabelle; Jegat, Nadège; Lévy, Gérard

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the courses in endodontics and to assess the treatment quality in the student clinics in two dental schools, in Malmö, Sweden and Paris, France. A further aim was to improve the curriculum development in Paris 5 and Malmö by testing student exchange programmes. The comparison was based on the guidelines for undergraduate education set up by the European Society of Endodontology (ESE) [Int. Endod. J. 25 (1992) 169] and on the criteria formulated by Qualtrough and Dummer [Int. Endod. J. 30 (1997) 234]. The latter criteria covered the following aspects: educational methods, the timing of endodontic teaching, pre-clinical practical exercises, student assessment, recommended literature, clinical/practical procedures, the education of the staff and number of students per teacher. The quality guidelines for endodontic treatment set up by the ESE [Int. Endod. J. 27 (1994) 115] were used for the assessment of the quality of the treatment. The following aspects were covered: history, diagnosis and treatment planning, records, infection control, root-canal treatment, assessment of endodontic treatment. The undergraduate education in endodontics was fundamentally similar in Paris 5 and Malmö. The main differences observed were related to: Educational methods: In Malmö, problem-based learning and in Paris 5, traditional. Assessment of student performance. In Malmö, self-assessment and in Paris 5, credits for clinical/practical procedures. Clinical/practical procedures relating to infection control. Aseptic treatment regimens were more meticulously performed in Malmö than in Paris 5. Assessment (follow-up) of all endodontic treatments was a routine only in Malmö.

  10. A Systematic Review of the Use of Self-Assessment in Preclinical and Clinical Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Keith A; Branch-Mays, Grishondra L

    2016-08-01

    A desired outcome of dental and dental hygiene programs is the development of students' self-assessment skills. To that end, the Commission on Dental Accreditation states that "graduates must demonstrate the ability to self-assess." However, it is unclear that merely providing opportunity for self-assessment actually leads to the desired outcome. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature on self-assessment in dental education. A search of English-language articles for the past 25 years (January 1, 1990, to June 30, 2015) was performed using MEDLINE Medical Subject Heading terms. Each abstract and/or article was validated for inclusion. The data collected included student classification, self-assessment environment, faculty assessment, training, faculty calibration, predictive value, and student perceptions. A qualitative analysis was also performed. From an initial list of 258 articles, 19 were selected for inclusion; exclusion criteria included studies that evaluated a non-preclinical or non-clinical exercise or whose subjects were not predoctoral dental or dental hygiene students. The results showed limited information regarding any kind of systematic training of students on how to perform a self-assessment. The majority of the studies also did not specify the impact of self-assessment on student performance. Self-assessment was primarily performed in the second year and in the preclinical environment. Students received feedback through a correlated faculty assessment in 73% of the studies, but 64% did not provide information regarding students' perceptions of self-assessment. There was a trend for students to be better self-assessors in studies in which a grade was connected to the process. In addition, there was a trend for better performing students to underrate themselves and for poorer performing students to overrate themselves and, overall, for students to score themselves higher than did their faculty evaluators. These findings

  11. Self-perception and satisfaction with dental appearance and aesthetics with respect to patients’ age, gender, and level of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strajnić Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patient’s subjective evaluation of dental appearance and aesthetics is becoming an increasingly important factor in aesthetic treatments and prosthetic therapy. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of age, education level, gender, and different dental status and the appearance of the upper anterior teeth (color, size, shape, position and alignment of the anterior teeth on the satisfaction of the respondents with dental appearance and aesthetics of their upper anterior teeth and their desire for improvement. Methods. The study encompassed 480 people aged 20 to 50 years with an average age of 30.84 years. There were 236 male and 244 female subjects. The respondents were interviewed using a questionnaire specially designed for the purpose of this research. For the study, the subjects were divided into the following three age groups: the younger age group (20-30 years of age, the middle age group (31-40 years of age, and the older age group (41-50 years of age. Results. The conducted study did not reveal statistical significance with respect to gender in any of the examined parameters (p > 0.05. A little more than one half of the respondents in each age group were satisfied with their dental appearance and aesthetics (60.3% of the respondents in the age group of 20-30 years, 55.7% in the age group of 31-40, and 53.7% in the age group of 41-50 years of age. Satisfaction with dental appearance and aesthetics increases linearly with the increase in the level of education and was the highest among the respondents with university degree (33.3%. Conclusion. Female respondents were more dissatisfied with their dental appearance and aesthetics as compared with male respondents, but the difference was found to be non-significant. Patients with higher education level were more satisfied with their dental appearance and aesthetics than those with lower education.

  12. Business Students' Ethical Evaluations of Faculty Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Sean; Kidwell, Roland E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to gauge business school student perceptions of the academic conduct of college professors, to determine students' ethical evaluations of certain potential faculty behaviors. The relationships between perceived faculty misconduct and several student demographic characteristics including sex and academic classification were…

  13. Relationship between self- perception of malodour and actual estimation of malodour in a group of dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehizele, A O; Ojehanon, P I

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the concentration of volatile sulphur compounds in mouth air of young adult and their self perception of malodour and also to determine the relationship between the organoleptic assessment of young adult and their perception of malodour. A total of 400 willing participants were studied and they were grouped into two based on the health of their periodontium. Subjects were asked for self perception of malodour and organoleptic assessment was done to assess the level of malodour using the Rosenberg 0-5 scoring system. The concentration of volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) was determined objectively using the Halimeter. Eighty subjects reported self perception of malodour i.e. 39 males (48.7%) and 41 females (51.3%). Only 9% of the subjects without periodontal diseases reported self perception of oral malodour while 31% of subjects with periodontal disease had similar claims. Majority (86%) of those who had VSC concentration less than 181 ppb claimed to have no self perception of malodour while 41% of those who had VSC concentration greater than 250 ppb had self perception of malodour. More than half (53.8%) of subjects with VSC concentration greater than 250 ppb had organoleptic score of 3. Half of subjects with organoleptic assessment score of 3 had self perception of malodour. It can be concluded from this study that a relationship exists between self-perception of oral malodour, organoleptic assessment and the concentration of volatile sulphur compounds in mouth air of subjects.

  14. Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been broadly termed dental fluorosis. What is dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is a condition that causes ... less than 2 milligrams per liter. What causes dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in ...

  15. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  16. Does curricular change improve faculty perceptions of student experiences with the educational environment? A preliminary study in an institution undergoing curricular change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ilyas Shehnaz

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The study showed that the faculty perceived the organ system-based integrated curriculum as providing a better educational environment for the students than the discipline based curriculum.

  17. Faculty Preceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friskney, Doyle

    2014-01-01

    The project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  18. Faculty Preceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friskney, Doyle

    2014-01-01

    The project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  19. Full-Time Faculty View Information Literacy as Important but Are Unlikely to Incorporate it Into Their Teaching. A Review of: Bury, S. (2011. Faculty attitudes, perceptions and experiences of information literacy: A study across multiple disciplines at York University, Canada. Journal of Information Literacy, 5(1. Retrieved from http://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JIL/article/view/PRA-V5-I1-2011-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamon C. Tewell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To explore faculty attitudes towards information literacy (IL; in particular,faculty perception of student IL competencies, importance of IL skills and instruction, and ideal means of planning and delivering IL instruction.Design – Online survey questionnaire.Setting – Large public research university located in Toronto, Canada.Subjects – 221 full-time faculty.Methods – The author designed and distributed an online survey to all full-time York University faculty (n=1,451 in March 2007 using Zoomerang software. The survey consisted of between 26 and 36 questions depending on responses selected by respondents, and included both open- and closed-ended questions. The author handcoded the qualitative data and used SPSS to analyze the quantitative data. The survey had 221 usable responses giving a response rate of 15.2%.Main Results – The study revealed a high degree of concern among survey respondents regarding undergraduate students’ information literacy skills, accompanied by a perceived gradual increase in IL abilities corresponding to student year. Faculty ranked each of the Association of College and Research Libraries’ (ACRL Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education as being extremely important. No ACRL standard ranked below 6 on a scale of 1 to 7, suggesting full agreement with the value of IL proficiency. Of the faculty 78.7% felt that IL education should be a joint collaboration between faculty and librarians. A considerable majority of respondents (81.7% answered that IL instruction should be required for all students. Far fewer faculty incorporated IL teaching in practice, with 52.9% engaging in IL instruction and 47.1% not incorporating IL instruction at all. Of the faculty who incorporated librarian-led IL sessions into their courses, 85% of faculty perceived a “substantial impact” or “some impact” on their students’ IL competencies.Conclusions – The author concludes that this study adds

  20. Implementation of evidence-based dentistry into practice: analysis of awareness, perceptions and attitudes of dentists in the World Dental Federation-European Regional Organization zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamalik, Nermin; Nemli, Secil Karakoca; Carrilho, Eunice; Dianiskova, Simona; Melo, Paulo; Lella, Anna; Trouillet, Joel; Margvelashvili, Vladimer

    2015-06-01

    Based on evidence-based dentistry (EBD) being a relatively new concept in dentistry, the attitudes, perceptions and level of awareness of dentists regarding EBD, and perceived barriers to its implementation into daily practice, were comparatively analysed in six countries of the FDI (World Dental Federation-Federation Dentaire Internationale)-European Regional Organization (ERO) zone (France, Georgia, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia and Turkey). For this purpose, a questionnaire, 'The Relationship Between Dental Practitioners and Universities', was developed by the FDI-ERO Working Group and applied by National Dental Associations (NDAs). A total of 850 valid responses were received, and cumulative data, comparisons between countries and potential impact of demographic variables were analysed. Regarding EBD, similar percentages of respondents reported that they 'know what it is' (32.8%) and 'they practice' (32.1%). Most respondents believed that 'EBD is beneficial' (89.1%); however, they had different thoughts regarding 'who actually benefited from EBD'. Of the participants, 60% believed that 'dentists experience difficulties in implementing EBD'. Although lack of time, lack of education and limited availability of evidence-based clinical guidelines were among the major barriers, there were differences among countries (P<0.05). Significant differences were also observed between countries regarding certain questions such as 'where EBD needed to be taught' (P<0.05), as both undergraduate and continuing education were suggested to be suitable. Age, practice mode and years of practice significantly affected many of the responses (P<0.05). There was a general, positive attitude toward EBD; however, there was also a clear demand for more information and support to enhance dentists' knowledge and use of EBD in everyday practice and a specific role for the NDAs.