WorldWideScience

Sample records for dental devices prosthetic

  1. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  2. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  3. [Prosthetic rehabilitation: needs in Senegalese dental offices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbodj, E B; Diouf, M; Faye, D; Ndiaye, A; Seck, M T; Ndiaye, C; Diallo, P D

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of dental prosthetic needs will develop strategies for prevention and treatment through a package of individual, community and professional policies. The aim of this study was to evaluate prosthetic needs in Senegalese dental offices. The survey was conducted among people aged 15 years and more attending Senegalese dental clinics. The mean number of missing teeth was 4.4. Only 55.3% of the sample expressed the need for dentures and 81.8% had a diagnosed need for prosthesis. A statistically significant difference was noticed between the needs diagnosed and the expressed needs (p dental offices.

  4. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  5. Cortical control for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew B.; Kipke, D. W.; Perepelkin, P. D.

    1996-05-01

    The work presented in this session is part of a project to develop an arm-control system based on neuronal activity recorded from the cerebral cortex. This will make it possible for amputees or paralyzed individuals to move a prosthetic arm or, using functional neural stimulation, their own limbs as effortlessly and with as much skill as intact individuals. We are developing and testing this system in monkeys and hope to have a prototype working in the next couple of years. This project has been made more feasible because we have been able, in the last 15 years to extract, from the brain, a signal that represents arm trajectory accurately. In this paper, we describe how this technique was developed and how we use this as the basis for our control signal. An alternative approach using a self-organizing feature map, an algorithm to deduce arm configuration given an endpoint trajectory and the development of a telemetry system to transmit the neuronal data is described in subsequent papers.

  6. 76 FR 18472 - Medicare Program; Revisions to the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... the Act. Prosthetic devices are defined in this section of the Act as ``devices (other than dental... lens.'' Other examples of prosthetic devices include cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants,...

  7. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciù, M.; Cervino, G.; Bramanti, E.; Lauritano, F.; Lo Gudice, G.; Scappaticci, L.; Rapparini, A.; Guglielmino, E.; Risitano, G.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  8. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cicciù

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results.

  9. An Evaluation of Dental Prosthetic Status and Prosthetic Needs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Nov-Dec | Vol 4 | Issue 6 | ... Department of Public Health Dentistry, People's Dental Academy, People's ... Background: Eunuchs are considered as the most vulnerable, frustrated, and insecure community. ... among eunuchs residing in Bhopal city, Madhya Pradesh, India.

  10. An extremely lightweight fingernail worn prosthetic interface device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkin, Oguz; Ahluwalia, Simranjit; Silva, Dinithi; Kasi-Okonye, Isioma; Volker, Rachael; Baptist, Joshua R.; Popa, Dan O.

    2016-05-01

    Upper limb prosthetics are currently operated using several electromyography sensors mounted on an amputee's residual limb. In order for any prosthetic driving interface to be widely adopted, it needs to be responsive, lightweight, and out of the way when not being used. In this paper we discuss the possibility of replacing such electrodes with fingernail optical sensor systems mounted on the sound limb. We present a prototype device that can detect pinch gestures and communicate with the prosthetic system. The device detects the relative position of fingers to each other by measuring light transmitted via tissue. Applications are not limited to prosthetic control, but can be extended to other human-machine interfaces.

  11. Toxicology of antimicrobial nanoparticles for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Vilar-Pineda, Jorge; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier; Castaño, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology are producing an accelerated proliferation of new nanomaterial composites that are likely to become an important source of engineered health-related products. Nanoparticles with antifungal effects are of great interest in the formulation of microbicidal materials. Fungi are found as innocuous commensals and colonize various habitats in and on humans, especially the skin and mucosa. As growth on surfaces is a natural part of the Candida spp. lifestyle, one can expect that Candida organisms colonize prosthetic devices, such as dentures. Macromolecular systems, due to their properties, allow efficient use of these materials in various fields, including the creation of reinforced nanoparticle polymers with antimicrobial activity. This review briefly summarizes the results of studies conducted during the past decade and especially in the last few years focused on the toxicity of different antimicrobial polymers and factors influencing their activities, as well as the main applications of antimicrobial polymers in dentistry. The present study addresses aspects that are often overlooked in nanotoxicology studies, such as careful time-dependent characterization of agglomeration and ion release. PMID:25187703

  12. Copper release from dental prosthetic crowns, dental materials, and human teeth into acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicanin, Biljana M; Nikolić, Ruzica S

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the dilution of the ion of copper from human teeth and dental prosthetic crowns in 4% CH(3)COOH during a period of 24 hr at room temperature. The content of the diluted copper in an acetate extract, as well as the overall content of this metal in the samples, was determined by means of a potentiometric stripping analysis. The comparative measurements were carried out using the furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique, which is recommended by the International Standards (ISO 6872:2008; ISO 24234:2004) as a method for quality control of dental-prosthetic material (dental ceramic, metal restorative materials, dental amalgams) in the process of checking for heavy metals. During a 24-hr period in 4% CH(3)COOH at a temperature of 25 degrees C, approximately 72% of the overall copper was released from the tooth. The percentage of the released copper from baby teeth is higher, ranging from 88 to 92%, which is probably a consequence of the bone tissue being in development, its infirmity, and inadequate stability. On these conditions, approximately 72% of the overall copper was released from the dental-ceramic prosthetic crowns.

  13. Toxicology of antimicrobial nanoparticlesfor prosthetic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuñez-Anita RE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosa Elvira Nuñez-Anita,1 Laura Susana Acosta-Torres,2 Jorge Vilar-Pineda,2 Juan Carlos Martínez-Espinosa,3 Javier de la Fuente-Hernández, 2 Víctor Manuel Castaño4 1Facultad de Medicina Veterinariay Zootecnia, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Tarìmbaro Municipio de Morelia, Michoacán, México; 2Escuela Nacionalde Estudios Superiores, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad León, Leòn Guanajuato, México; 3Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria Campus Guanajuato, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Leòn Guanajuato, México; 4Departamento de Materiales Moleculares, Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Juriquilla, Querètaro, México Abstract: Advances in nanotechnology are producing an accelerated proliferation of new nanomaterial composites that are likely to become an important source of engineered health-related products. Nanoparticles with antifungal effects are of great interest in the formulation of microbicidal materials. Fungi are found as innocuous commensals and colonize various habitats in and on humans, especially the skin and mucosa. As growth on surfaces is a natural part of the Candida spp. lifestyle, one can expect that Candida organisms colonize prosthetic devices, such as dentures. Macromolecular systems, due to their properties, allow efficient use of these materials in various fields, including the creation of reinforced nanoparticle polymers with antimicrobial activity. This review briefly summarizes the results of studies conducted during the past decade and especially in the last few years focused on the toxicity of different antimicrobial polymers and factors influencing their activities, as well as the main applications of antimicrobial polymers in dentistry. The present study addresses aspects that are often overlooked in nanotoxicology studies, such as careful time-dependent characterization of agglomeration

  14. Which mesh or graft? Prosthetic devices for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Shazia; El-Hayek, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews the ever-increasing number of prosthetic devices--both synthetic mesh and biologic grafts--now in use for abdominal wall reconstruction. It also introduces a novel hybrid synthetic/biologic graft (Zenapro) and suture passer device (Novapass).

  15. Real-time decision fusion for multimodal neural prosthetic devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Robert White

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The field of neural prosthetics aims to develop prosthetic limbs with a brain-computer interface (BCI through which neural activity is decoded into movements. A natural extension of current research is the incorporation of neural activity from multiple modalities to more accurately estimate the user's intent. The challenge remains how to appropriately combine this information in real-time for a neural prosthetic device. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we propose a framework based on decision fusion, i.e., fusing predictions from several single-modality decoders to produce a more accurate device state estimate. We examine two algorithms for continuous variable decision fusion: the Kalman filter and artificial neural networks (ANNs. Using simulated cortical neural spike signals, we implemented several successful individual neural decoding algorithms, and tested the capabilities of each fusion method in the context of decoding 2-dimensional endpoint trajectories of a neural prosthetic arm. Extensively testing these methods on random trajectories, we find that on average both the Kalman filter and ANNs successfully fuse the individual decoder estimates to produce more accurate predictions. CONCLUSIONS: Our results reveal that a fusion-based approach has the potential to improve prediction accuracy over individual decoders of varying quality, and we hope that this work will encourage multimodal neural prosthetics experiments in the future.

  16. Analysis of maxillofacial prosthetics at university dental hospitals in the capital region of Korea

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the demographic patterns of maxillofacial prosthetic treatment to identify the characteristics and geographic distribution of patients with maxillofacial prosthetics in the capital region of Korea. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective analytical multicenter study was performed by chart reviews. This study included patients who visited the department of prosthodontics at four university dental hospitals for maxillofacial prosthetic rehab...

  17. PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH ORTHOPEDIC AND PROSTHETIC MEDICAL DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Malovecká

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Collecting information about patient satisfaction with orthopedic and prosthetic medical devices in terms of utility, tolerance, and compliance is essential for verifying and improving the quality of these devices. In addition, such information is useful for improving the patients’ quality of life, and the quality management systems of health care providers. This study assessed patient satisfaction with these devices from a sample of patients with orthopedic, neurologic, and rheumatic diseases at the Specialized Hospital for Orthopedic Prosthetics and at the premises of the Dispenser of Orthopedic and Prosthetic Medical Devices, both in Bratislava in the Slovak Republic. The assessment involved a translated and validated questionnaire about patient satisfaction with orthopedic and prosthetic medical devices to evaluate key factors of weight, fit, appearance, comfort, pain free, free of abrasiveness, ease of application, and durability of each device. The study samples consisted of patients with lower limb problems (42.5%, spine problems (26.9%, and a combination of leg and spine issues (25.9%. Orthopedic disease occurred in 73.6% of these patients, a combination of orthopedic and neurologic disease in 13.5%, and neurologic disease in 7.3%. Orthopedic insoles (36.3%, hip belts (17.6%, and the corset on the spine (5.2% were the most used devices. Overall, the medical devices rated highly, with a high proportion of patients voting “strongly satisfied” in five of the eight key factors (range 51.8 to 63.2%, followed by a moderately lower proportion for durability (43.5%, comfort (37.3%, and appearance (31.1%. The comfort in wearing the device received the greatest patient dissatisfaction (22.8% of patients, followed by appearance (12.4%, and then fit (7.3%.

  18. 77 FR 14989 - Medicare Program; Revisions to the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... Act. Prosthetic devices are defined as devices (other than dental) which replace all or part of an... devices include cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants, electrical continence aids, electrical...

  19. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ...-AG21 Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation of Special Controls for Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food... classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and...

  20. Potentiometric stripping analysis of lead and cadmium leaching from dental prosthetic materials and teeth

    OpenAIRE

    GORAN M. NIKOLIC; BILJANA M. KALICANIN; RUZICA S. NIKOLIC

    2004-01-01

    Potentiometric stipping analysis (PSA) was applied for the determination of lead and cadmium leaching from dental prosthetic materials and teeth. The soluble lead content in finished dental implants was found to be much lower than that of the individual components used for their preparation. Cadmium was not detected in dental implants and materials under the defined conditions. The soluble lead and cadmium content of teeth was slightly lower than the lead and cadmium content in whole teeth (w...

  1. Contribution of prosthetic treatment considerations for dental extractions of permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barrera, Miguel Ángel; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Casanova-Rosado, Juan Fernando; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Escoffié-Ramírez, Mauricio; Casanova-Rosado, Alejandro José; Navarrete-Hernández, José de Jesús; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tooth loss is an easily identifiable outcome that summarizes a complex suite of factors in an individual's history of dental disease and its treatment by dental services over a lifetime. Assessment of overall tooth loss data is essential for epidemiologically evaluating the adequacy of dental care provided at a systems level, as well as for placing in context tooth loss for non-disease causes. For example, when derived from prosthetic treatment planning, the latter may unfortunately lead to some teeth being extracted (pulled) for the sake of better comprehensive clinical results. The objective of the present manuscript was to identify the contribution to overall tooth loss, by extraction of permanent teeth because of prosthetic treatment reasons. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study included sex, age, total number of extractions performed by subject, sextant (anterior vs. posterior), group of teeth (incisors, canines, premolars and molars), upper or lower arch, and the main reason underlying extraction (extraction for any reason vs. prosthetic treatment), in patients 18 years of age and older seeking care at a dental school clinic in Mexico. A multivariate logistic regression model was generated. Results. A total of 749 teeth were extracted in 331 patients; 161 teeth (21.5% of total) were extracted for explicit prosthetic treatment indications. As age increased, the likelihood of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons increased 3% (OR = 1.03, p dental school clinical environment; age, sex, type of tooth, and the total number of extractions moderated such pattern.

  2. NIRS monitoring of muscle contraction to control a prosthetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Thomas; Zambarbieri, Daniela; Beltrami, Giorgio; Verni, Gennaro

    1999-01-01

    The fitting of upper-extremity amputees requires special efforts, and its significance has been increased by the development of the myoelectrically controlled prosthetic arm. This solution is not free of problems due to the nature of the amputation, to the electromagnetic noise affecting the myelectrical signal and to the perspiration due to the contact between socket and the residual limb. Starting from the fact that NIRS and electromyographic signals are similar during a muscle contraction, we have first studied the NIRS signal during forearm muscle contractions in normal and amputee subjects. Then a new system to interface the NIRS unit and the myoelectrical prosthetic hand has been developed. The NIRS unit has been used as optical sensor and all the operations (I/O and signal processing) are performed via software. This system has been tested on normal and amputee subjects performing hand grasping using a visual biofeedback control scheme. All the subjects have been able to perform these operations demonstrating the NIRS technique. This could represent an alternative solution for controlling a prosthetic device.

  3. Potentiometric stripping analysis of lead and cadmium leaching from dental prosthetic materials and teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORAN M. NIKOLIC

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Potentiometric stipping analysis (PSA was applied for the determination of lead and cadmium leaching from dental prosthetic materials and teeth. The soluble lead content in finished dental implants was found to be much lower than that of the individual components used for their preparation. Cadmium was not detected in dental implants and materials under the defined conditions. The soluble lead and cadmium content of teeth was slightly lower than the lead and cadmium content in whole teeth (w/w reported by other researchers, except in the case of a tooth with removed amalgam filling. The results of this work suggest that PSA may be a good method for lead and cadmium leaching studies for investigation of the biocompatibility of dental prosthetic materials.

  4. Dental prosthetic status and treatment needs of green marble mine laborers, Udaipur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessment of prosthetic needs in a special population would aid in planning the oral health service programs. The aim of this study was to assess the dental prosthetic status and prosthetic needs in a sample of green marble mine laborers of Udaipur, India. Methods: The study population comprised of 513 green marble mine laborers who were divided into four age groups (15-24, 25-34, 35-44 and 45-54. Prosthetic status and treatment needs along with dentition status were recorded using WHO oral health assessment form. The examination was done by two examiners who were calibrated for inter examiner variability with kappa statistic of 86%. Chi-square test was used to compare the proportions. The significance level was set at α= 0.05. Results: Mean number of missing teeth due to any reason for the whole sample was 0.82. Approximately, 96.5% of the subjects were free from any kind of prosthesis and only the rest of sample (3.5% had single fixed prosthesis. The overall prosthetic treatment needs was 15.5%. Prosthetic needs increased as the age increased with the age group 45-54 showing the greatest. Prosthetic needs in the lower arch were found to be greater than that of the upper arch. Single unit prosthesis comprised a greater percentage of the whole prosthetic needs (41%. Conclusion: Most of the prosthetic needs of the study population were unmet. The prosthetic needs being four and half-fold greater than the status.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component...

  6. Analysis of maxillofacial prosthetics at university dental hospitals in the capital region of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the demographic patterns of maxillofacial prosthetic treatment to identify the characteristics and geographic distribution of patients with maxillofacial prosthetics in the capital region of Korea. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective analytical multicenter study was performed by chart reviews. This study included patients who visited the department of prosthodontics at four university dental hospitals for maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation. Patients with facial and congenital defects or with insufficient medical data were excluded. The patients were classified into three categories based on the location of the defect. Patients' sex, age, and residential area were analyzed. Pearson's chi-square test with a significance level of 0.05 was used to analyze the variables. RESULTS Among 540 patients with maxillofacial prosthetics, there were 284 (52.59%) male patients and 256 (47.41%) female patients. The number of the patients varied greatly by hospital. Most patients were older than 70, and the most common defect was a hard palate defect. Chi-square analysis did not identify any significant differences in sex, age, and distance to hospital for any defect group (P>.05). CONCLUSION The results of this study indicated that there was imbalance in the distribution of patients with maxillofacial prosthetic among the hospitals in the capital region of Korea. Considerations on specialists and insurance policies for the improvement of maxillofacial prosthetics in Korea are required. PMID:27350859

  7. Contribution of prosthetic treatment considerations for dental extractions of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Fernández-Barrera

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tooth loss is an easily identifiable outcome that summarizes a complex suite of factors in an individual’s history of dental disease and its treatment by dental services over a lifetime. Assessment of overall tooth loss data is essential for epidemiologically evaluating the adequacy of dental care provided at a systems level, as well as for placing in context tooth loss for non-disease causes. For example, when derived from prosthetic treatment planning, the latter may unfortunately lead to some teeth being extracted (pulled for the sake of better comprehensive clinical results. The objective of the present manuscript was to identify the contribution to overall tooth loss, by extraction of permanent teeth because of prosthetic treatment reasons. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study included sex, age, total number of extractions performed by subject, sextant (anterior vs. posterior, group of teeth (incisors, canines, premolars and molars, upper or lower arch, and the main reason underlying extraction (extraction for any reason vs. prosthetic treatment, in patients 18 years of age and older seeking care at a dental school clinic in Mexico. A multivariate logistic regression model was generated. Results. A total of 749 teeth were extracted in 331 patients; 161 teeth (21.5% of total were extracted for explicit prosthetic treatment indications. As age increased, the likelihood of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons increased 3% (OR = 1.03, p < 0.001. Women (OR = 1.57, p < 0.05 were more likely to be in this situation, and molars (OR = 2.70, p < 0.001 were most at risk. As the total number of extractions increased, the risk of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons decreased (OR = 0.94, p < 0.05. Conclusions. A significant amount (21.5% of the extractions of permanent teeth were performed for prosthetic reasons in this dental school clinical environment; age, sex, type of tooth, and the total number of extractions

  8. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  9. An evaluation of dental prosthetic status and prosthetic needs among eunuchs (trans genders) residing in bhopal city, madhya pradesh, India: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongal, S; Torwane, Na; Chandrashekhar, Br; Saxena, V; Chavan, Kr

    2014-11-01

    Eunuchs are considered as the most vulnerable, frustrated, and insecure community. The accessibility to medical and dental facilities for the eunuchs is nearly nonexistent. Due to these reasons, they might be at a high risk of developing severe dental problems like tooth loss. The present cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the dental prosthetic status and prosthetic needs among eunuchs residing in Bhopal city, Madhya Pradesh, India. On the basis of convenient nonprobability snowball sampling technique, all the self-identified eunuchs residing in the city of Bhopal along with a matched control consisting of cross section of the general population residing in the same locality was examined to evaluate the prosthetic status and prosthetic needs of the population. All the obtained data were entered into a personal computer on Microsoft excel sheet and analyzed using the software; Statistical Package for Social Science version 20. Data comparison was done by applying Chi-square test. A total of 639 subjects comprised of 207 eunuchs, 218 males and 214 females. Among all participants, 2.8% (18/639) were having prosthesis. The overall prosthetic status among males was 3.2% (7/218) followed by 2.9% (6/207) eunuchs and 2.3% (5/214) females. However, need for multi-unit and combination of one and more unit prosthesis for upper and lower jaws was higher in males compared to females and eunuchs, but the difference was not statistically significant. The findings of this study clearly demonstrate a high unmet need for prosthetic care among the population surveyed.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or...

  12. Dental prosthetic status and prosthetic need of the institutionalized elderly living in geriatric homes in mangalore: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Rekha P; Hegde, Vijaya

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. To promote oral health among the elderly, we need to know their prosthetic status and prosthetic need. Hence, a survey of prosthetic status and need of elderly inmates of old age homes in Mangalore was done. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was undertaken, and 133 subjects aged 60 years and above were examined (54.9% males and 45.1% females). Results. Eighty-eight percent of those examined were fully edentulous, and only 12% had complete dentures; none of the study subjects had partial dentures. Prosthetic status was significantly associated with gender (P = .024), while prosthetic need and gender were not significantly associated (P = .395). Conclusions. A high unmet need for prosthetic care existed among the institutionalized elderly surveyed.

  13. The future of dental devices is digital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Major changes are taking place in dental laboratories as a result of new digital technologies. Our aim is to provide an overview of these changes. In this article the reader will be introduced to the range of layered fabrication technologies and suggestions are made how these might be used in dentistry. Key publications in English from the past two decades are surveyed. The first digital revolution took place many years ago now with the production of dental restorations such as veneers, inlays, crowns and bridges using dental CAD-CAM systems and new improved systems appear on the market with great rapidity. The reducing cost of processing power will ensure that these developments will continue as exemplified by the recent introduction of a new range of digital intra-oral scanners. With regard to the manufacture of prostheses this is currently dominated by subtractive machining technology but it is inevitable that the additive processing routes of layered fabrication, such as FDM, SLA, SLM and inkjet printing, will start to have an impact. In principle there is no reason why the technology cannot be extended to all aspects of production of dental prostheses and include customized implants, full denture construction and orthodontic appliances. In fact anything that you might expect a dental laboratory to produce can be done digitally and potentially more consistently, quicker and at a reduced cost. Dental device manufacturing will experience a second revolution when layered fabrication techniques reach the point of being able to produce high quality dental prostheses. The challenge for the dental materials research community is to marry the technology with materials that are suitable for use in dentistry. This can potentially take dental materials research in a totally different direction. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices intended...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  17. 75 FR 14510 - Implementation of Device Registration and Listing Requirements Enacted in the Public Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... hospital, clinic, dental laboratory, orthoepic or prosthetic retail facility whose primary responsibility... as whether the device contains materials from animal sources, is an implanted device, and...

  18. Anatomical sciences: A foundation for a solid learning experience in dental technology and dental prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, Mahmoud M; Thompson, C Mark; Massadiq, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    Basic science courses are extremely important as a foundation for scaffolding knowledge and then applying it in future courses, clinical situations as well as in a professional career. Anatomical sciences, which include tooth morphology, oral histology, oral embryology, and head and neck anatomy form a core part of the preclinical courses in dental technology programs. In this article, the importance and relevance of anatomical sciences to dental personnel with no direct contact with patients (dental technicians) and limited discipline related contact with patients (dental prosthetists) is highlighted. Some light is shed on the role of anatomical sciences in the pedagogical framework and its significance in the educational process and interprofessional learning of dental technicians and prosthetists using oral biology as an example in the dental curriculum. To conclude, anatomical sciences allow dental technicians and prosthetists to a gain a better insight of how tissues function, leading to a better understanding of diagnosis, comprehensive treatment planning and referrals if needed. Patient communication and satisfaction also increases as a result of this deep understanding of oral tissues. Anatomical sciences bridge the gap between basic science, preclinical, and clinical courses, which leads to a holistic approach in patient management. Finally, treatment outcomes are positively affected due to the appreciation of the macro and micro structure of oral tissues. Anat Sci Educ. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices : 24 years of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerwin; Bongers, Raoul M.; Van der Sluis, Corry K.; Plettenburg, Dick H.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adultsize voluntary opening (VU) prosthetic terminal devices and select the

  20. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices, 24 years of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Bongers, R.M.; Van der Sluis, C.K.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adult-size voluntary opening (VO) prosthetic terminal devices and select the

  1. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices : 24 years of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerwin; Bongers, Raoul M.; Van der Sluis, Corry K.; Plettenburg, Dick H.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adultsize voluntary opening (VU) prosthetic terminal devices and select the be

  2. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices, 24 years of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Bongers, R.M.; Van der Sluis, C.K.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adult-size voluntary opening (VO) prosthetic terminal devices and select the b

  3. Device to monitor sock use in people using prosthetic limbs: Technical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Sanders, PhD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A device using radio frequency identification (RFID technology was developed to continuously monitor sock use in people who use prosthetic limbs. RFID tags were placed on prosthetic socks worn by subjects with transtibial limb loss, and a high-frequency RFID reader and antenna were placed in a portable unit mounted to the outside of the prosthetic socket. Bench testing showed the device to have a maximum read range between 5.6 cm and 12.7 cm, depending on the RFID tag used. Testing in a laboratory setting on three participants with transtibial amputation showed that the device correctly monitored sock presence during sitting, standing, and walking activity when one or two socks were worn but was less reliable when more socks were used. Accurate detection was sensitive to orientation of the tag relative to the reader, presence of carbon fiber in the prosthetic socket, pistoning of the limb in the socket, and overlap among the tags. Use of ultra-high-­frequency RFID may overcome these limitations. With improvements, the technology may prove useful to practitioners prescribing volume accommodation strategies for patients by providing information about sock use between clinical visits, including timing and consistency of daily sock-ply changes.

  4. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... temporomandibular joint sounds for the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders and associated orofacial pain... information to be considered with data from other diagnostic components. (2) Classification. Class II (special...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a)...

  5. Featuring dental education research: applying the principles of action research to improve teaching of dental prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S B

    2009-11-01

    This article focuses on educational research conducted at the newly merged UWC faculty of dentistry. The research emphasises the change in teaching methods employed to address the concerns experienced in teaching the new large classes as observed in the prosthetic techniques module. These educational interventions were conducted over 5 years and the study design included the principles of action research. Students were assisted in learning the theory of the practical procedures and the subsequent completion of these procedures with the accurate application of the theoretical concepts. Changes in the teaching methods enhanced students learning and successful translation of the theory into practical work. The active learning exercises incorporated into the teaching further motivated and assisted students with deep learning. The debates indicated that students know and accept the value of the module as part of their training.

  6. Dental prosthetic status and prosthetic needs of institutionalised elderly population in oldage homes of jabalpur city, madhya pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deogade, Suryakant C; Vinay, S; Naidu, Sonal

    2013-12-01

    Oral disorders are cumulative throughout life and hence unfavourable outcomes are likely to be greatest among the elderly. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among institutionalized geriatric population in old-age homes of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, to assess their prosthetic status and prosthetic needs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in all the four old-age homes of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh state, India. All residents aged 60 years and above formed the study population. The recording of prosthetic status and prosthetic needs was carried out according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) Oral Health Assessment Form (1997). A total of 224 individuals were included in the study of which 123 were females and 101 were males. Seventy five percent of the females and 55 % of the males had no prostheses in their upper arch and 61 % of the females and 76 % of the males had no prostheses in their lower arch. More number of males presented with 'Bridges' in their upper arch when compared to females (P value = 0.006). Highest prosthetic need in males was multi-unit prosthesis (42 % in upper arch and 41 % in lower arch) whereas, females' required full prosthesis (39 % in both the upper arch and lower arches). Ageing presents some formidable challenges, particularly with the institutionalised. This study clearly demonstrates a high insufficiency of prosthetic care among the institutionalized elderly population. Any preparation towards the provision of oral health care should not be limited to treatment alone but, more importantly focus on empowering this elderly community with information and education programmes.

  7. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. (a) Identification. Dental amalgam is a device that consists of a combination...

  8. Surface EMG and intra-socket force measurement to control a prosthetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Joe; Patterson, Rita; Popa, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been shown to be a robust and reliable interaction method allowing for basic control of powered prosthetic devices. Research has shown a marked decrease in EMG-classification efficiency throughout activities of daily life due to socket shift and movement and fatigue as well as changes in degree of fit of the socket throughout the subject's lifetime. Users with the most severe levels of amputation require the most complex devices with the greatest number of degrees of freedom. Controlling complex dexterous devices with limited available inputs requires the addition of sensing and interaction modalities. However, the larger the amputation severity, the fewer viable SEMG sites are available as control inputs. Previous work reported the use of intra-socket pressure, as measured during wrist flexion and extension, and has shown that it is possible to control a powered prosthetic device with pressure sensors. In this paper, we present data correlations of SEMG data with intra-socket pressure data. Surface EMG sensors and force sensors were housed within a simulated prosthetic cuff fit to a healthy-limbed subject. EMG and intra-socket force data was collected from inside the cuff as a subject performed pre-defined grip motions with their dominant hand. Data fusion algorithms were explored and allowed a subject to use both intra-socket pressure and SEMG data as control inputs for a powered prosthetic device. This additional input modality allows for an improvement in input classification as well as information regarding socket fit through out activities of daily life.

  9. Hybrid nanostructured coating for increased resistance of prosthetic devices to staphylococcal colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ion; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic medical device-associated infections are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality rates. Novel improved materials and surfaces exhibiting inappropriate conditions for microbial development are urgently required in the medical environment. This study reveals the benefit of using natural Mentha piperita essential oil, combined with a 5 nm core/shell nanosystem-improved surface exhibiting anti-adherence and antibiofilm properties. This strategy reveals a dual role of the nano-oil system; on one hand, inhibiting bacterial adherence and, on the other hand, exhibiting bactericidal effect, the core/shell nanosystem is acting as a controlled releasing machine for the essential oil. Our results demonstrate that this dual nanobiosystem is very efficient also for inhibiting biofilm formation, being a good candidate for the design of novel material surfaces used for prosthetic devices.

  10. Hybrid nanostructured coating for increased resistance of prosthetic devices to staphylococcal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ion; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2013-01-02

    Prosthetic medical device-associated infections are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality rates. Novel improved materials and surfaces exhibiting inappropriate conditions for microbial development are urgently required in the medical environment. This study reveals the benefit of using natural Mentha piperita essential oil, combined with a 5 nm core/shell nanosystem-improved surface exhibiting anti-adherence and antibiofilm properties. This strategy reveals a dual role of the nano-oil system; on one hand, inhibiting bacterial adherence and, on the other hand, exhibiting bactericidal effect, the core/shell nanosystem is acting as a controlled releasing machine for the essential oil. Our results demonstrate that this dual nanobiosystem is very efficient also for inhibiting biofilm formation, being a good candidate for the design of novel material surfaces used for prosthetic devices.

  11. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a collimator...

  12. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  13. A new in-built device for one-point stepless prosthetic alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, P; Lind, L; Lind, K; Rennerfeldt, G; Kreicbergs, A

    1988-08-01

    The authors have developed a new in-built device for alignment of below-knee prostheses. The device allows one-point, stepless adjustment of angle and slide, independently of each other and also after completed prosthetic manufacture. Principally, the device consists of a half-sphere for angle adjustment and a plate for both slide adjustment and socket application. If the socket has to be exchanged, the whole device can be re-used, apart from the plate, which forms part of the socket bottom. The device is light, compact, cosmetically easy to cover and cheap. The design incorporates a combination of the most important facilities for alignment as well as for exchange of socket, and by its simplicity seems to offer major advantages over other designs.

  14. On the applicability of fluidic flexible matrix composite variable impedance materials for prosthetic and orthotic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philen, M.

    2009-10-01

    The applicability of variable impedance fluidic flexible matrix composites (F2MC) is investigated for development of prosthetic and orthotic devices. The F2MC material is an innovative combination of high performance composite tubes containing high bulk modulus fluids. The new material system can potentially achieve a change in stiffness of several orders of magnitude through valve control. The F2MC material system is investigated in this research through analytical studies for active impedance control for load transfer reduction in transtibial prosthetic sockets and impedance joint control for ankle-foot orthoses (AFO). Preliminary analysis results indicate that the variable modulus system can reduce the load transfer between the limb and transtibial socket and can provide impedance tailoring for improving foot-slap in an AFO.

  15. 78 FR 2647 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Blade-Form Endosseous Dental Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ...-Form Endosseous Dental Implant AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed order... dental implant, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls). On its own initiative... published a proposed rule for classification of endosseous dental implants (without distinguishing implants...

  16. A training platform for many-dimensional prosthetic devices using a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putrino, David; Wong, Yan T; Weiss, Adam; Pesaran, Bijan

    2015-04-15

    Brain machine interfaces (BMIs) have the potential to assist in the rehabilitation of millions of patients worldwide. Despite recent advancements in BMI technology for the restoration of lost motor function, a training environment to restore full control of the anatomical segments of an upper limb extremity has not yet been presented. Here, we develop a virtual upper limb prosthesis with 27 independent dimensions, the anatomical dimensions of the human arm and hand, and deploy the virtual prosthesis as an avatar in a virtual reality environment (VRE) that can be controlled in real-time. The prosthesis avatar accepts kinematic control inputs that can be captured from movements of the arm and hand as well as neural control inputs derived from processed neural signals. We characterize the system performance under kinematic control using a commercially available motion capture system. We also present the performance under kinematic control achieved by two non-human primates (Macaca Mulatta) trained to use the prosthetic avatar to perform reaching and grasping tasks. This is the first virtual prosthetic device that is capable of emulating all the anatomical movements of a healthy upper limb in real-time. Since the system accepts both neural and kinematic inputs for a variety of many-dimensional skeletons, we propose it provides a customizable training platform for the acquisition of many-dimensional neural prosthetic control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  18. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices: 24 years of development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Gerwin; Bongers, Raoul M; Van der Sluis, Corry K; Plettenburg, Dick H

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adult-size voluntary opening (VO) prosthetic terminal devices and select the best tested device. A second goal was to see whether VO devices have improved in the last two decades. Nine devices (four hooks and five hands) were quantitatively tested (Hosmer model 5XA hook, Hosmer Sierra 2 Load VO hook, RSL Steeper Carbon Gripper, Otto Bock model 10A60 hook, Becker Imperial hand, Hosmer Sierra VO hand, Hosmer Soft VO hand, RSL Steeper VO hand, Otto Bock VO hand). We measured the pinch forces, activation forces, cable displacements, mass, and opening span and calculated the work and hysteresis. We compared the results with data from 1987. Hooks required lower activation forces and delivered higher pinch forces than hands. The activation forces of several devices were very high. The pinch forces of all tested hands were too low. The Hosmer model 5XA hook with three bands was the best tested hook. The Hosmer Sierra VO hand was the best tested hand. We found no improvements in VO devices compared with the data from 1987.

  19. A Novel Scheme and Evaluations on a Long-Term and Continuous Biosensor Platform Integrated with a Dental Implant Fixture and Its Prosthetic Abutment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Jung; Lu, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    A miniature intra-oral dental implant system including a built-in biosensor device is proposed in this article. The dental implant system, or platform, is replaced over maxilla and allows relatively non-invasive procedures for a novel biosensing scheme for human blood analysis. Due to placement of the implant fixture, periodontal ligaments and the pulp structure, which are regarded as the main origin of pain, are thus removed, and long-term, continuous blood analysis and management through maxillary bone marrow becomes achievable through the dental implant platform. The new pathway of biological sensing is for the first time presented to realize an accurate and painless approach without injections. The dental implant system mainly consists of an implant fixture and a prosthetic abutment, a biosensor module, a bluetooth 4.0 wireless module and a dc button cell battery. The electrochemical biosensor possesses three electrodes, including working, reference and counter ones, which are arranged to pass through the titanium implant fixture below the biosensor module. The electrodes are exposed to the blood pool inside the maxillary bone marrow and perform oxidation/reduction reactions with the coating of biosensing enzyme. To prove the proposed platform, the immobilization process of glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme and in vitro detections of glucose levels are successfully carried out, and proven sensitivity, linearity and repeatability of the glucose biosensor system are obtained. Moreover, a preliminary canine animal model adopting the new pathway shows significant consistency with the traditional method through dermal pricks for blood sugar detection. Despite the prospective results, further challenges in engineering implementation and clinical practices are addressed and discussed. In brief, the novel biosensing pathway and intra-oral biosensor platform may increasingly reveal their promising value and feasibilities in current bio-medical analysis, diagnosis, drug

  20. A rationale method for evaluating unscrewing torque values of prosthetic screws in dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Miguel Saliba

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Previous studies that evaluated the torque needed for removing dental implant screws have not considered the manner of transfer of the occlusal loads in clinical settings. Instead, the torque used for removal was applied directly to the screw, and most of them omitted the possibility that the hexagon could limit the action of the occlusal load in the loosening of the screws. The present study proposes a method for evaluating the screw removal torque in an anti-rotational device independent way, creating an unscrewing load transfer to the entire assembly, not only to the screw. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty hexagonal abutments without the hexagon in their bases were fixed with a screw to 20 dental implants. They were divided into two groups: Group 1 used titanium screws and Group 2 used titanium screws covered with a solid lubricant. A torque of 32 Ncm was applied to the screw and then a custom-made wrench was used for rotating the abutment counterclockwise, to loosen the screw. A digital torque meter recorded the torque required to loosen the abutment. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the means of Group 1 (38.62±6.43 Ncm and Group 2 (48.47±5.04 Ncm, with p=0.001. CONCLUSION: This methodology was effective in comparing unscrewing torque values of the implant-abutment junction even with a limited sample size. It confirmed a previously shown significant difference between two types of screws.

  1. Pilot Study for OCT Guided Design and Fit of a Prosthetic Device for Treatment of Corneal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Gam T. Le

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess optical coherence tomography (OCT for guiding design and fit of a prosthetic device for corneal disease. Methods. A prototype time domain OCT scanner was used to image the anterior segment of patients fitted with large diameter (18.5–20 mm prosthetic devices for corneal disease. OCT images were processed and analyzed to characterize corneal diameter, corneal sagittal height, scleral sagittal height, scleral toricity, and alignment of device. Within-subject variance of OCT-measured parameters was evaluated. OCT-measured parameters were compared with device parameters for each eye fitted. OCT image correspondence with ocular alignment and clinical fit was assessed. Results. Six eyes in 5 patients were studied. OCT measurement of corneal diameter (coefficient of variation, %, cornea sagittal height (%, and scleral sagittal height (% is highly repeatable within each subject. OCT image-derived measurements reveal strong correlation between corneal sagittal height and device corneal height ( and modest correlation between scleral and on-eye device toricity (. Qualitative assessment of a fitted device on OCT montages reveals correspondence with slit lamp images and clinical assessment of fit. Conclusions. OCT imaging of the anterior segment is suitable for custom design and fit of large diameter (18.5–20 mm prosthetic devices used in the treatment of corneal disease.

  2. 21 CFR 807.65 - Exemptions for device establishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dispenser, optician, clinical laboratory, assembler of diagnostic x-ray systems, and personnel from a hospital, clinic, dental laboratory, orthotic or prosthetic retail facility, whose primary responsibility... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ESTABLISHMENT REGISTRATION AND DEVICE LISTING FOR MANUFACTURERS AND INITIAL...

  3. [Prosthetic replacement of missing teeth. Indications for fixed and removable dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, D.J.; Gerritsen, A.E.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic replacement of missing teeth aims to improve health. This can be achieved by improving the patient's well-being and quality of life and by restoring the biological balance in terms ofocclusal and mandibular stability in the occlusal and the orofacial system. In occlusal systems with a com

  4. [Prosthetic replacement of missing teeth. Indications for fixed and removable dental prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, D.J.; Gerritsen, A.E.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic replacement of missing teeth aims to improve health. This can be achieved by improving the patient's well-being and quality of life and by restoring the biological balance in terms ofocclusal and mandibular stability in the occlusal and the orofacial system. In occlusal systems with a

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment after prosthetic joint replacement: exploring the orthopaedic surgeon's opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. McNally, MPhil(Dent

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Australian orthopaedic surgeons continue to recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment. The recording of PJI in relation to dental procedures into clinical registries would enable the development of consistent guidelines between professional groups responsible for the care of this patient group.

  6. Breaking the fixed-arrival-time restriction in reaching movements of neural prosthetic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Lakshminarayan; da Silva, Marco

    2011-06-01

    We routinely generate reaching arm movements to function independently. For paralyzed users of upper extremity neural prosthetic devices, flexible, high-performance reaching algorithms will be critical to restoring quality-of-life. Previously, algorithms called real-time reach state equations (RSE) were developed to integrate the user's plan and execution-related neural activity to drive reaching movements to arbitrary targets. Preliminary validation under restricted conditions suggested that RSE might yield dramatic performance improvements. Unfortunately, real-world applications of RSE have been impeded because the RSE assumes a fixed, known arrival time. Recent animal-based prototypes attempted to break the fixed-arrival-time assumption by proposing a standard model (SM) that instead restricted the user's movements to a fixed, known set of targets. Here, we leverage general purpose filter design (GPFD) to break both of these critical restrictions, freeing the paralyzed user to make reaching movements to arbitrary target sets with various arrival times and definitive stopping. In silico validation predicts that the new approach, GPFD-RSE, outperforms the SM while offering greater flexibility. We demonstrate the GPFD-RSE against SM in the simulated control of an overactuated 3-D virtual robotic arm with a real-time inverse kinematics engine.

  7. Dental procedures, antibiotic prophylaxis, and endocarditis among people with prosthetic heart valves: nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, Sarah; Blotière, Pierre-Olivier; Hoen, Bruno; Lesclous, Philippe; Millot, Sarah; Rudant, Jérémie; Weill, Alain; Coste, Joel; Alla, François; Duval, Xavier

    2017-09-07

    Objective To assess the relation between invasive dental procedures and infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci among people with prosthetic heart valves.Design Nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.Setting French national health insurance administrative data linked with the national hospital discharge database.Participants All adults aged more than 18 years, living in France, with medical procedure codes for positioning or replacement of prosthetic heart valves between July 2008 and July 2014.Main outcome measures Oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was identified using primary discharge diagnosis codes. In the cohort study, Poisson regression models were performed to estimate the rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis during the three month period after invasive dental procedures compared with non-exposure periods. In the case crossover study, conditional logistic regression models calculated the odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals comparing exposure to invasive dental procedures during the three month period preceding oral streptococcal infective endocarditis (case period) with three earlier control periods.Results The cohort included 138 876 adults with prosthetic heart valves (285 034 person years); 69 303 (49.9%) underwent at least one dental procedure. Among the 396 615 dental procedures performed, 103 463 (26.0%) were invasive and therefore presented an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis, which was performed in 52 280 (50.1%). With a median follow-up of 1.7 years, 267 people developed infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci (incidence rate 93.7 per 100 000 person years, 95% confidence interval 82.4 to 104.9). Compared with non-exposure periods, no statistically significant increased rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was observed during the three months after an invasive dental procedure (relative rate 1.25, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1

  8. The carriage of Candida species on the dorsal surface of the tongue: the correlation with the dental, periodontal and prosthetic status in elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Ohshima, Tomoko; Yasunari, Utako; Namikoshi, Satoko; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Hideo; Maeda, Nobuko

    2006-09-01

    To screen the carriage status of Candida species, especially Candida albicans and its genotype in an epidemiological survey and to investigate its correlation with the dental, periodontal and prosthetic status of healthy elderly subjects. Microbiological samples were collected from the dorsum of the tongue of 366 subjects, aged 75, and cultured on CHROMagar medium. The carriage status of Candida spp. and the distribution of C. albicans genotypes by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method were analysed and compared with the dental, periodontal and prosthetic status of the subjects. A high carriage rate (68.6%) of Candida spp. and the predominant species of C. albicans (72.1%) were found in this study. The prevalence, density and multi-species of Candida spp. were significantly related to the presence of a dental prosthesis. In C. albicans, genotype A predominated (56.4%) and genotype D showed a higher prevalence (12.5%) than previous reports. When comparing Candida spp. carriage with the oral status, significant positive correlations were found with the presence of any dental prosthesis, missing teeth, the number of retained roots and the percentage of sites showing bleeding on probing (BOP), while significant negative correlations were found with the number of teeth present, sound and filled teeth. Candida carriage on the dorsum of the tongue in healthy elderly is significantly associated with the dental, periodontal and prosthetic status, especially the presence of a dental prosthesis. As the complexity of the prosthesis being worn increased, the relative risk of Candida carriage and the numbers and multi-species of Candida increased accordingly.

  9. Development and testing of new upper-limb prosthetic devices: Research designs for usability testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this article are to describe usability testing and introduce designs and methods of usability testing research as it relates to upper-limb prosthetics. This article defines usability, describes usability research, discusses research approaches to and designs for usability testing, and highlights a variety of methodological considerations, including sampling, sample size requirements, and usability metrics. Usability testing is compared with other types of study designs used in prosthetic research.

  10. A novel prosthetic device and method for guided tissue preservation of immediate postextraction socket implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Stephen J; Hochman, Mark N; Tan-Chu, Jocelyn Hui-Ping; Mieleszko, Adam J; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of the surrounding hard and soft tissues associated with an immediate postextraction socket implant to replace a nonrestorable tooth in the esthetic zone is one of the greatest challenges facing the dental team. Several studies have documented the biologic and esthetic benefits of bone graft containment with either a custom healing abutment or provisional restoration. Use of a prefabricated shell that replicates the extracted tooth at the cervical region can help achieve guided tissue preservation and sustainable esthetic outcomes in an easy, simple, consistent, and less time consuming way. The following case report of a hopeless maxillary right central incisor in a female patient possessing adjacent teeth with a thin periodontal phenotype illustrates this new treatment device, method, and concept.

  11. The Color Stability of Dental Prosthetic Material%口腔修复材料的颜色稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨桂梅

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究在唾液、茶、红酒等溶液中口腔修复材料的颜色稳定性.方法:制备树脂、烤瓷、聚合瓷试件各12个,进行稳定性检测,并对其进行对比分析.结果:不同时间、溶液、材料对口腔修复材料的颜色稳定性存在明显差异.结论:三组口腔修复材料中,树脂材料和聚合瓷材料均随时间增加而产生色差增加,并显示出初始色差增加明显的特征.%Objective: To study the total dental prosthetic material in the solution of the saliva, tea, red wine and other color stability. Method: Preparation of resin, porcelain, polymer ceramic specimen 12, stability testing, and comparative analysis. Result: The different time, solution, material for color stability of dental prosthetic material was significantly different. Conclusion: The three groups of dental prosthetic material , resin and polymer ceramic material increase in chromatic aberration increase with time, and shows the characteristics of the initial component increased significantly.

  12. Prosthetic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Zach T; Potter, Benjamin K; Vandersea, James; Wolf, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Much of the current prosthetic technology is based on developments that have taken place during or directly following times of war. These developments have evolved and improved over the years, and now there are many more available options to provide a comfortable, cosmetic, and highly functional prosthesis. Even so, problems with fit and function persist. Recent developments have addressed some of the limitations faced by some military amputees. On-board microprocessor-controlled joints are making prosthetic arms and legs more responsive to environmental barriers and easier to control by the user. Advances in surgical techniques will allow more intuitive control and secure attachment to the prosthesis. As surgical techniques progress and permeate into standard practice, more sophisticated powered prosthetic devices will become commonplace, helping to restore neuromuscular loss of function. Prognoses following amputation will certainly rise, factoring into the surgeon's decision to attempt to save a limb versus perform an amputation.

  13. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule classifying dental amalgam into class II, reclassifying dental mercury from class I to class II, and designating a special control to support the class II classifications of these two devices, as well as the current class II classification of amalgam alloy. The three devices are now classified in a single regulation. The special control for the devices is a guidance document entitled, "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy." This action is being taken to establish sufficient regulatory controls to provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of these devices. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for the devices.

  14. Surface modification of neural prosthetic devices by conducting polymers and biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xinyan

    Micromachined neural prosthetic devices facilitate the functional stimulation of and recording from the peripheral and central nervous systems. The microelectrode sites on the neural probes are the actual interface to communicate with neurons. The surfaces of the devices should provide intimate interfacial contact between electrodes and neurons, facilitate the charge transport from ionically conductive tissue to electronically conductive electrode and induce selected neurons or neuron processes to attach onto the microelectrode. Traditional metal electrode materials do not fulfill these functions. Biocompatible conducting polymers were therefore used to modify the surface of the microelectrodes. An electrochemical polymerization approach was developed to directly deposit conductive polymers, such as polypyrrole and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), together with biopolymers, such as protein polymers and bioactive peptides, onto the microelectrode sites. It was found that the deposition of conducting polymer significantly lowered the electrode impedance which is beneficial to neural signal transport. The electronic properties of the conductive polymers were found to be influenced by the film morphology, which could be tailored by controlling the polymerization conditions. The incorporation of biopolymers was confirmed by microfocused Fourier-Transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Rat glia and human neuroblastoma cells were shown to preferentially attach and grow on the coated electrode site area of the neural probes. The chemical stability of conducting polymer/biomolecule coatings was studied using FTIR, impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The biomolecules were stable in the film after seven weeks of soaking in deionized water, while polypyrrole underwent some subtle changes in chemical structure. PEDOT was proven to be a more stable material under potential cycling and provided even lower impedance. The adhesion between the coating and

  15. A Triservice Comparison of Dental Scaling Devices: Sonic and Ultrasonic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    literature and contains a short history of the development of power scalers. It also contains a discus- sion of the relationship between dental scalers and...phenomenon caused by ultrasound. High intensity, alternating pressure waves passing through water at the tip of the scaler force air bub- bles in the...devices such as microwave ovens, electric shavers, electro- cautery, diathermy , vitalometers, and even electric toothbrushes have the potential to

  16. 78 FR 27971 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dental Products Panel of the Medical... and make recommendations on the proposed regulatory classification for dental devices known as...

  17. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy; technical amendment. Final rule; technical amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a final rule in the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and designated special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. The effective date of the rule was November 2, 2009. The final rule was published with an inadvertent error in the codified section. This document corrects that error. This action is being taken to ensure the accuracy of the agency's regulations.

  18. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to Mexicali... Dental/Sybron Dental Specialities, Formally Known as Customedix Corporation, Including On-Site Leased...

  19. Micrometric precision of prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves, Flávio Domingues; de Almeida Prado Naves Carneiro, Thiago; do Prado, Célio Jesus; Prudente, Marcel Santana; Zancopé, Karla; Davi, Letícia Resende; Mendonça, Gustavo; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-08-01

    The current study evaluated prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and a computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system using micro-computed tomography to compare the marginal fit. The virtual models were obtained with four different scanning surfaces: typodont (T), regular impressions (RI), master casts (MC), and powdered master casts (PMC). Five virtual models were obtained for each group. For each model, a crown was designed on the software and milled from feldspathic ceramic blocks. Micro-CT images were obtained for marginal gap measurements and the data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. The mean vertical misfit was T=62.6±65.2 μm; MC=60.4±38.4 μm; PMC=58.1±38.0 μm, and RI=89.8±62.8 μm. Considering a percentage of vertical marginal gap of up to 75 μm, the results were T=71.5%, RI=49.2%, MC=69.6%, and PMC=71.2%. The percentages of horizontal overextension were T=8.5%, RI=0%, MC=0.8%, and PMC=3.8%. Based on the results, virtual model acquisition by scanning the typodont (simulated mouth) or MC, with or without powder, showed acceptable values for the marginal gap. The higher result of marginal gap of the RI group suggests that it is preferable to scan this directly from the mouth or from MC.

  20. Treatment of persistent corneal epithelial defect with overnight wear of a prosthetic device for the ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pauline; Ridges, Ryan; Jacobs, Deborah S; Rosenthal, Perry

    2013-12-01

    To report experience in the treatment of persistent corneal epithelial defect using overnight wear of a prosthetic device for the ocular surface. Retrospective interventional case series. A clinical database of patients who underwent prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem (PROSE) treatment from March 2003 to August 2008 was searched to identify patients treated for persistent corneal epithelial defect. In early 2003, overnight wear of a PROSE device and addition of commercially available, nonpreserved, topical ophthalmic moxifloxacin to the saline in the device reservoir became standard practice at this center when treating persistent corneal epithelial defect. Medical records were abstracted to obtain underlying diagnoses, previous treatments, days to re-epithelialization, and complications for subsequent analysis. PROSE treatment incorporating overnight wear, with adjunctive use of moxifloxacin, was employed in 20 eyes of 19 patients for a total of 372 days. Re-epithelialization occurred in 17 of 20 eyes. Median duration of treatment incorporating overnight wear was 8.5 days (range = 2-76 days). Healing occurred in ≤7 days in 12 eyes, 8-14 days in 3 eyes, and >14 days in 2 eyes (range = 1-35 days). There were no cases of microbial keratitis. Overnight wear of a PROSE device is effective in promoting healing of persistent corneal epithelial defect. In comparison to an earlier series from this center, the rate of microbial keratitis as a complication of treatment has been reduced with the use of a nonpreserved topical fourth-generation fluoroquinolone in the device reservoir. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and testing of new upper-limb prosthetic devices: Research designs for usability testing

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this article are to describe usability testing and introduce designs and methods of usability testing research as it relates to upper-limb prosthetics. This article defines usability, describes usability research, discusses research approaches to and designs for usability testing, and highlights a variety of methodological considerations, including sampling, sample size requirements, and usability metrics. Usability testing is compared with other types of study designs used in...

  2. 75 FR 33315 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... received by FDA concerning the final rule on the classification of dental amalgam, which published in the... adequacy of the risk assessment performed by FDA in classifying dental amalgam in light of a new report on... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices...

  3. Prosthetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview CoE for Limb Loss Prevention and Prosthetic Engineering Menu Menu VA Center of Excellence for Limb ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Prosthetic Engineering - Overview Our aim is to improve prosthetic prescription ...

  4. 78 FR 9010 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 872 Dental Devices; Reclassification of... class III, based on the recommendation of a Dental Products Panel (the Panel) meeting on February 11... mandibular condyle prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to replace...

  5. Case Study on Human Walking during Wearing a Powered Prosthetic Device: Effectiveness of the System “Human-Robot”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Grosu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that force exchanges between a robotic assistive device and the end-user have a direct impact on the quality and performance of a particular movement task. This knowledge finds a special reflective importance in prosthetic industry due to the close human-robot collaboration. Although lower-extremity prostheses are currently better able to provide assistance as their upper-extremity counterparts, specific locomotion problems still remain. In a framework of this contribution the authors introduce the multibody dynamic modelling approach of the transtibial prosthesis wearing on a human body model. The obtained results are based on multibody dynamic simulations against the real experimental data using AMP-Foot 2.0, an energy efficient powered transtibial prosthesis for actively assisted walking of amputees.

  6. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaki, Veeramalai Nadu; Balu, Kandasamy; Ramesh, Sadashiva Balakrishnapillai; Arvind, Ramraj Jayabalan; Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges. PMID:23066301

  7. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeramalai Naidu Devaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges.

  8. Post-operative orbital imaging: a focus on implants and prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Ashok [Royal London Hospital, Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Mankad, Kshitij [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Diagnostic Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); Poitelea, Cornelia; Verity, David H. [Moorfields Eye Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Davagnanam, Indran [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Accurate interpretation of orbital imaging in the presence of either orbital implants requires a sound knowledge of both the surgical approach used and the imaging characteristics of the implanted devices themselves. In this article, the radiological appearance of the various devices used in ophthalmology, and their relationship to other orbital structures, is reviewed. In addition, the intended anatomical location, function of these devices, and clinical indications for their use are provided. (orig.)

  9. Comment on "dental prosthetic status and prosthetic need of the institutionalized elderly living in geriatric homes in mangalore: a pilot study".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Ashutosh; Arora, Varun; Loomba, Kapil; Birmani Gaunkar, Ridhima; Dixit, Seema K; Agarwal, Bhaskar; Misra, Alok; Gupta, Narendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Public Health Dentistry is a speciality which is targeted towards the larger benefit of community and society. Dental health surveys in specific population groups should be planned adequately and the data should be analyzed in such a way so that it may help in making strategies for the intervention to improve the existing status. This could be only done with the help of proper planning, analysis and interpretation of a sample survey. The present study highlights the research design, statistical and inferential errors in a published work of public health dentistry in order to bring about the common mistakes and errors made. The renewed suggested approach helps in interpreting the results in a better way and makes them objective-oriented.

  10. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  11. Prevention of dental anomalies in children by prosthetics defects hard tooth tissues and dentitions: the need to possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Suetenkov D.Ye.; Pudovkina Е.А.; Venatovskaya N.V.; Proshin A.G.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the possibility of restore the function and anatomy of the tooth and replacement of defects of dentition by prosthesis in children under the removable bite as a method of prevention of dentoalveolar anomalies. Identified the need for prosthetic treatment of children and the willingness of dentists as primary health care professional to address the problems identified. A clinical analysis of complex treatment of defects in the teeth with fixed restorations

  12. Prevention of dental anomalies in children by prosthetics defects hard tooth tissues and dentitions: the need to possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetenkov D.Ye.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the possibility of restore the function and anatomy of the tooth and replacement of defects of dentition by prosthesis in children under the removable bite as a method of prevention of dentoalveolar anomalies. Identified the need for prosthetic treatment of children and the willingness of dentists as primary health care professional to address the problems identified. A clinical analysis of complex treatment of defects in the teeth with fixed restorations

  13. A case study of technology transfer: Rehabilitative engineering at Rancho Los Amigos Hospital. [prosthetic devices engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildred, W.

    1973-01-01

    The transfer of NASA technolgy to rehabilitative applications of artificial limbs is studied. Human factors engineering activities range from orthotic manipulators to tiny dc motors and transducers to detect and transmit voluntary control signals. It is found that bicarbon implant devices are suitable for medical equipment and artificial limbs because of their biological compatibility with human body fluids and tissues.

  14. Diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection with alpha-defensin using a lateral flow device: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, P; Van Cauter, M; Driesen, R; Neyt, J; Cornu, O; Bellemans, J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this current multicentre study is to analyse the presence of alpha-defensin proteins in synovial fluid using the Synovasure lateral flow device and to determine its diagnostic reliability and accuracy compared with the prosthetic joint infection (PJI) criteria produced by the Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS). A cohort of 121 patients comprising 85 total knee arthroplasties and 36 total hip arthroplasties was prospectively evaluated between May 2015 and June 2016 in three different orthopaedic centres. The tests were performed on patients with a chronically painful prosthesis undergoing a joint aspiration in a diagnostic pathway or during revision surgery. Based on the MSIS criteria, 34 patients (28%) would have had a PJI, and 87 patients had no PJI. Testing with the lateral flow device had a sensitivity of 97.1% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 84.5 to 99.9) and a specificity of 96.6% (95% CI 90.3 to 99.2). The positive predictive value was 91.7% (95% CI 77.7% to 98.3), and the negative predictive value was 98.8% (95% CI 93.6 to 99.9). Receiver operator characteristics analysis demonstrated an area under the curve for the Synovasure test of 0.97 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.00). Our findings suggest that the Synovasure test has an excellent diagnostic performance to confirm or reject the diagnosis of a PJI. The results are promising for the care of the painful or problematic knee and hip joint arthroplasty and the test should be considered as part of the diagnostic toolbox for PJIs. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1176-82. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of visual prostheses, as showcased in this special feature of Journal of Neural Engineering , have led to promising results from clinical trials of a number of devices. However, as noted by these groups there are many challenges involved in assessing vision of people with profound vision loss. As such, it is important that there is consistency in the methodology and reporting standards for clinical trials of visual prostheses and, indeed, the broader vision restoration research field. Two visual prosthesis research groups, the Boston Retinal Implant Project (BRIP) and Bionic Vision Australia (BVA), have agreed to work cooperatively to establish a multi-national Joint Task Force. The aim of this Task Force will be to develop a consensus statement to guide the methods used to conduct and report psychophysical and clinical results of humans who receive visual prosthetic devices. The overarching goal is to ensure maximum benefit to the implant recipients, not only in the outcomes of the visual prosthesis itself, but also in enabling them to obtain accurate information about this research with ease. The aspiration to develop a Joint Task Force was first promulgated at the inaugural 'The Eye and the Chip' meeting in September 2000. This meeting was established to promote the development of the visual prosthetic field by applying the principles of inclusiveness, openness, and collegiality among the growing body of researchers in this field. These same principles underlie the intent of this Joint Task Force to enhance the quality of psychophysical research within our community. Despite prior efforts, a critical mass of interested parties could not congeal. Renewed interest for developing joint guidelines has developed recently because of a growing awareness of the challenges of obtaining reliable measurements of visual function in patients who are severely visually impaired (in whom testing is inherently noisy), and of the importance of

  16. [Experience with prosthetic disc nucleus device in Mexico. Final report of a 4-year follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel; Pérez-Víquez, Ariel; Miramontes-Martínez, Víctor; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Discal hernia is generally treated by discectomies that are mutilating and cause instability and low back pain in 50% of the patients. Partial arthroplasty is used in an attempt to avoid degeneration after a discectomy. Nineteen patients from the INR (National Institute of Rehabilitation) were selected with extruded discal hernia. All inclusion criteria were met, with a minimal follow-up of 4 years. Evolution was evaluated with the Oswestry scale (OS) and x-ray studies. Statistical analysis was done with Student's t-test. Sixteen men and three women were included in the study, with an average age of 35.4 years. OS before surgery was 57.37% and improved to 22% (p < 0.001). The results obtained in the Prolo scale 4 years later were for the economy scale, p < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Z = 3.87) and for the functional scale, p < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Z = -3.94). The intervertebral space height (IS) before surgery was 6 and 8 mm, and 4 years later, in 12 patients it remained between 8 and 10 mm. The prosthesis had variations according to its initial placement in seven patients, and in all there was subsidence. In two cases migration surpassed the limits of the vertebral body without clinical repercussion. None of the patients required re-operation. Prosthetic disc nucleus device improved clinical conditions and x-rays of the patients using Oswestry, Prolo and intersomatic space height enhancement after 4 years of follow-up in 12/19 patients.

  17. Evaluating dental status and prosthetic need in relation to medical findings in Greek patients suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadou, Vassiliki; Katsarou, Zoi; Naka, Olga; Bostanzopoulou, Maria

    2002-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the common neurological conditions which predominantly affects the elderly but increasingly also younger people. Sufferers present persistent problems with oral health aggravated by extensive tooth loss leading to an impaired dentition. Greece and other countries experiencing the same demographic trends, face growing numbers of sufferers. This study surveyed the dental status and the need for dental treatment of a sample of Greek patients with Parkinson's disease. A structured questionnaire was used. 30% of the participants were younger sufferers. 80% of the elderly group were young elderly. 98% of the participants were denture wearers. Extensive oral problems were recorded in all participants.

  18. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  19. Prosthetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Costs Copays Means Test Health Insurance Make a Payment Annual Income Thresholds Non-VA Care Purchased Care ... center of pressure under the prosthetic foot; enhancing balance and stability of lower limb amputees. Foot-Ankle ...

  20. Effect of different types of prosthetic platforms on stress-distribution in dental implant-supported prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minatel, Lurian; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Kudo, Guilherme Abu Halawa; de Faria Almeida, Daniel Augusto; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Santiago, Joel Ferreira

    2017-02-01

    A biomechanical analysis of different types of implant connections is relevant to clinical practice because it may impact the longevity of the rehabilitation treatment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the Morse taper connections and the stress distribution of structures associated with the platform switching (PSW) concept. It will do this by obtaining data on the biomechanical behavior of the main structure in relation to the dental implant using the 3-dimensional finite element methodology. Four models were simulated (with each containing a single prosthesis over the implant) in the molar region, with the following specifications: M1 and M2 is an external hexagonal implant on a regular platform; M3 is an external hexagonal implant using PSW concept; and M4 is a Morse taper implant. The modeling process involved the use of images from InVesalius CT (computed tomography) processing software, which were refined using Rhinoceros 4.0 and SolidWorks 2011 CAD software. The models were then exported into the finite element program (FEMAP 11.0) to configure the meshes. The models were processed using NeiNastram software. The main results are that M1 (regular diameter 4mm) had the highest stress concentration area and highest microstrain concentration for bone tissue, dental implants, and the retaining screw (P<0.05). Using the PSW concept increases the area of the stress concentrations in the retaining screw (P<0.05) more than in the regular platform implant. It was concluded that the increase in diameter is beneficial for stress distribution and that the PSW concept had higher stress concentrations in the retaining screw and the crown compared to the regular platform implant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Wear resistance and hardness of dental prosthetics materials versus native teeth%齿科修复材料耐磨性及硬度与天然牙齿的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈霜; 李国强

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are frictions between native tooth and dental prosthetics materials. In order to protect the native tooth from wear out and lengthen the in-service life of dental prosthetic restorations simultaneously, it is necessary to understand tribological characteristics between native tooth and dental prosthetics materials. Accordingly, we can select the matching prosthetics materials.OBJECTIVE: To compare wear resistance and hard ness of native teeth and dental prosthetics materials.METHODS: A computer searched of PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed) and Wanfang database (http://www.wanfangdata.com.cn) from 2000 to 2010 was performed to retrieve articles about tribological characteristics between native tooth and dental prosthetics materials, with key words of "enamel, dental restorative material, zirconia, wear resistance,hardness" in English and in Chinese. A total of 46 articles were screened out, and 30 ones according to the inclusive criteria were involved for further summary.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION : The dental enamel has excellent tribology performance and wear resistance, but the dentin has poor wear resistance, once the dentin of native teeth exposes in wearing process, the abrasion will speed up. Therefore, it is extremely necessary to chose ideal dental prosthetic restoration materials which have similar wearing characteristic with native teeth. The abradability of dental enamel is fantastically higher than composite resin. The abradability of composite resin itself is not very good, so it wears little to the native tooth. The physical performance of new type composite resin is raising up unceasingly, and the abradability of some composite resins is approaching to the enamel. The specimens made from Bayer tooth,thermosetting plastic, copper base alloy, titanium and its alloy are thus idea prosthetic materials. Zirconium ceramics belong to biological inertia ceramics, and have good biocompatibility, strong intensity and tenacity

  2. Dental management of a patient fitted with subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator device and concomitant warfarin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Shah

    2015-07-01

    This article presents the dental management of a 60 year-old person with an ICD and concomitant anticoagulant therapy. The patient was on multiple medications and was treated for a grossly neglected mouth with multiple carious root stumps. This case report outlines the important issues in managing patients fitted with an ICD device and at a risk of sudden cardiac death.

  3. Prosthetics in Paediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulićević Zoran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature loss of teeth in children may lead to both functional and esthetic problems. Missing teeth in both anterior and posterior regions may cause malfunctions in mastication and proper pronunciation. If the missing teeth are not replaced, further complications may occur, including adjacent tooth migration, loss of alveolar bone, and irregular occlusion. Considering the sensitive nature of children, loss of teeth may cause the development of insecurities and low self esteem problems. Due to dynamic nature of growth in children and adolescents, prosthetic appliances must not hinder development of orofacial system, and must meet adequate esthetic and functional standards. Dental prosthetic appliances in paediatrics must be planned with respect to the special conditions that led to tooth loss or damage. Multi-disciplinary approach is needed, under constant supervision of paediatric dentist and orthodontist, as well as regular checkups with clinical and radiographical examinations.

  4. Advanced Implant-Prosthetic Rehabilitation: How to Obtain a Correct Restoration of Both Functions and Aesthetics in Patients with Complex Combined Dental and Maxillofacial Trauma: A Case Report and Topical Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, L.

    2017-01-01

    Aim. This study aims to explain the main steps that characterize the implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in complex combined dental and maxillofacial trauma. Material and Methods. A 20-year-old patient reported an extensive facial trauma which also involved the alveolar process of the maxillary bone. The patient reported a maxillofacial fracture and the loss of teeth 1.3, 1.2, 1.1, and 2.1. A “Le Fort” type 2 fracture was also reported, with the malar bone involvement. After reduction and containment of bone fractures, through appropriate mounting plates, appropriate functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the patient were replaced thanks to a temporary removable prosthesis. After 6 months, the patient performed numerous clinical investigations, aimed at a proper planning of implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper dental arch. Conclusion. With the planning of the case, as well as respecting the surrounding biological structures, the surgery of implants can be carried out with the most appropriate procedure. Lastly, new dental implants with highly bioactive surfaces have been developed, providing an excellent and rapid bone integration. PMID:28392948

  5. Theoretical study on the mechanics of the conjunct gnatoprothetic devices in the context of occlusive function rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M R; Trană, F; Manolea, H; Rauten, Ane-Marie; Șurlin, Petra; Dragomir, L P

    2014-01-01

    The partially intercalated edentation offers the practitioner the possibility of the functional rehabilitation of the dental arcades through conjunct gnato-prosthetic devices. The functions of the dento-maxilar device, disturbed by the presence of edentation, require a treatment approach so that, without pre-planning or estimating, the result can lead most of the times to failure in terms of functionality. Clinical evaluation associated with pre- and proprosthetic treatment can also impose, in some situations the evaluation of the dental units involved in prosthetic rehabilitation. The association and implementation of the prosthetic construction in the occlusive-articular ensemble, as well as the counterbalancing of the mastication forces per dental unit and whole interarch system, linked to the distribution of the forces at the level of the pillar teeth and prosthetic construction, represent the goal of this theoretical study.

  6. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT angiography in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis and cardiac device infection in adult patients with congenital heart disease and prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, María N; Dos-Subirà, L; Roque, Albert; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Cuéllar-Calabria, Hug; Pijuan Domènech, Antonia; Gonzàlez-Alujas, María T; Subirana-Domènech, M T; Miranda-Barrio, B; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; González-López, Juan J; Igual, Albert; Maisterra-Santos, Olga; García-Dorado, David; Castell-Conesa, Joan; Almirante, Benito; Escobar Amores, Manuel; Tornos, Pilar; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and cardiac device infection (CDI) are a major complication in the growing number of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching adulthood. We aimed to evaluate the added value of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT angiography (PET/CTA) in the diagnosis of IE-CDI in adults with CHD and intravascular or intracardiac prosthetic material, in whom echocardiography (ECHO) and modified Duke Criteria (DC) have limitations because of the patients' complex anatomy. A prospective study was conducted in a referral center with multidisciplinary IE and CHD Units. PET/CTA and ECHO findings were compared in consecutive adult (≥18years) patients with CHD who have prosthetic material and suspected IE-CDI. The initial diagnosis using the DC and the diagnosis with the additional PET/CTA data (DC+PET/CTA) were compared with the final diagnostic consensus established by an expert team at three months. Between November-2012 and April-2017, 25 patients (15 men; median age 40years) were included. Cases were initially classified as definite in 8 (32%), possible in 14 (56%) and rejected in 3 (12%). DC+PET/CTA allowed reclassification of 12/14 (86%) cases initially identified as possible IE. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of DC at IE suspicion were 39.1%/83.3%/90.4%/25.5%/61.2%, respectively. The diagnostic performance increased significantly with addition of PET/CTA data: 87%/83.3%/95.4%/61.5%/85.1%, respectively. PET/CTA also provided an alternative diagnosis in 3 patients with rejected IE, and detected pulmonary embolisms in 3 patients. PET/CTA was a useful diagnostic tool in the complex group of adult patients with CHD who have cardiac or intravascular prosthetic material and suspected IE or CDI, providing added diagnostic value to the modified DC (increased sensitivity) and improving case classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rehabilitation and Prosthetic Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Service » Prosthetic & Sensory Aids Service (PSAS) Rehabilitation and Prosthetic Services Menu Menu Rehabilitation and Prosthetics Rehabilitation and ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Prosthetic & Sensory Aids Service (PSAS) Our Mission The mission ...

  8. Subgingival distribution of yeast and their antifungal susceptibility in immunocompetent subjects with and without dental devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewtuchowicz, Virginia M; Brusca, Maria I; Mujica, Maria T; Gliosca, Laura A; Finquelievich, Jorge L; Lovannitti, Cristina A; Rosa, Alcira C

    2007-01-01

    Yeasts colonize the subgingival biofilm, which becomes a reservoir that favors their reproduction. The purpose of the present work was to determine the prevalence of yeasts of the Candida genus in the subgingival biofilm of gingivoperiodontal disease patients, including users and non-users of dental devices, and their susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole. Samples of subgingival pockets of immunocompetent nonsmokers showing gingivitis and periodontitis were inoculated in a differential chromogenic medium. Sixty three percent of subjects used dental devices. Yeasts were identified and susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole was tested following CLSI M44-A standards. The prevalence of yeasts in the subgingival biofilm was 40% CI 95% (30.5-50.3); 10% were patients who did not use dental appliances. The most frequently observed yeasts were C. albicans, and C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis and C. guilliermondii. Only C. dubliniensis and C. guilliermondii showed resistance to azoles. The use of dental devices significantly increased the prevalence of yeasts in periodontal pockets inpatients presenting gingivitis. It is noteworthy that non albicans Candida species, such as C. dubliniensis and C. guilliermondii, considered emerging species, which have a diminished susceptibility to antifungal agents were found in the crevicular fluid of immunocompetent patients.

  9. IN VITRO TESTING – AN ESENTIAL METHOD FOR EVALUATING THE PERFORMANCE OF DENTAL MATERIALS AND DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca VIŢALARIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry is unique among biomaterials specialties as to the large variety of materials used, and nature of the challenges they must resist. Intra-oral service demands materials adapted to a warm and moist environment, resisting the attack of digestive acids and enzymes. The materials subjected to mechanical forces should preserve their strength, fatigue and wear characteristics, for accomplishing their function. The wide range of materials available for restorative dentistry demands knowledge of their relative strengths and trade-offs, and offers the opportunity for many interesting lines of research. The spectrum extensively ranges from elastic impression materials to extremely stiff metal and ceramic appliances, so that familiarity with a variety of mechanical testing situations is required from a well-rounded dental materials laboratory. Evaluating the mechanical and wear characteristics of dental restorative materials and analyzing the durability of adhesives is critical to the development of improved dental devices

  10. Correlation between improper dental prosthetic restoration and temporomandibular disorders%不良修复体与颞下颌关节紊乱病的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志明; 付东杰; 张周文; 彭友俭

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究不良修复体导致颞下颌关节紊乱病(TMD)的因素。方法选择199例佩戴不良修复体并导致 TMD 的患者,根据不良修复体引起的症状分为3组:咬合垂直距离改变组、咬合紊乱组、基牙损伤组。治疗后随访12个月,通过分析 TMD 治疗的有效性,探讨不良修复体引起 TMD 的因素。结果咬合垂直距离改变、咬合紊乱、基牙损伤3组治疗有效率分别为89.55%、89.06%、32.35%,基牙损伤组治疗有效率与其他2组比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05),提示咬合垂直距离改变和咬合紊乱更容易导致 TMD 。结论不良修复体所导致的上下颌垂直距离改变、咬合关系紊乱与基牙损伤与颞下颌关节滑膜炎、关节盘移位及骨关节病存在相关性。%Objective To investigate the factors of temporomandibular disorders(TMD) caused by the improp‐er dental prosthetic restoration .Methods 199 cases of improper dental prosthetic restoration and TMD were selected and divided into 3 groups according to the symptoms caused by improper dental prosthetic restoration :occlusion ver‐tical distance change ,occlusion disorders and abutment tooth injury .The follow up after treatment lasted for 12 months .The factors of improper dental prosthetic restoration caused TMD were investigated by analyzing the TMD treatment effectiveness .Results The treatment effective rates in the occlusion vertical distance change group ,occlu‐sion disorders group and abutment tooth injury group were 89 .55% ,89 .06% and 32 .35% respectively ,the effective rate had statistical difference between the abutment tooth injury group with the other two groups(P< 0 .05) ,which prompting that occlusion vertical distance change and occlusion disorders could more easily lead to TMD .Conclusion The occlusion vertical distance change ,occlusion disorders and abutment tooth injury caused by improper dental prosthetic restoration have

  11. Interference of cardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator activity during electronic dental device use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedig, Jason J; Shah, Jignesh; Elayi, Claude Samy; Miller, Craig S

    2010-05-01

    The authors conducted a study to determine if electromagnetic interference of cardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) activity occurs during the operation of electronic dental devices. The authors tested nine electronic dental devices in vitro to assess their ability to interfere with the function of two pacemakers and two ICDs as determined by electrocardiographic telemetry. The pacing activity of both pacemakers and the dual-chamber ICD were inhibited during operation of the battery-operated composite curing light at between 2 and 10 centimeters from the generator or leads. The use of the ultrasonic scaler interfered with the pacing activity of the dual-chamber pacemaker at between 17 and 23 cm from the generator or leads, the single-chamber pacemaker at 15 cm from the generator or leads and both ICDs at 7 cm from the leads. The operation of the ultrasonic cleaning system interfered with the activity of the dual-chamber pacemaker at between 15 and 23 cm from the generator or leads, and of the single-chamber pacemaker at 12 cm. Operation of the electric toothbrush, electrosurgical unit, electric pulp tester, high- and low-speed handpieces, and an amalgamator did not alter pacing function. Select electronic dental devices interfere with pacemakers' and ICDs' sensing and pacing activity in vitro. Use of the ultrasonic scaler, ultrasonic cleaning system and battery-operated composite curing light may produce deleterious effects in patients who have pacemakers or ICDs.

  12. Oral prosthetics from a Nordic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, Asbjørn

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe oral prosthetics in a context intended for other, primarily Nordic, health professionals and health authorities. An article describing oral prosthetics for the general public was formulated on the basis of recent data and publications in prosthodontics from Scandinavian authors. A draft was presented to the educational committee of the Scandinavian Society for Prosthetic Dentistry for verification and consensus. Following modifications and amendments by representatives from the 11 dental schools in the Nordic countries, the educational committee has approved the present article. The report consists of four sections describing oral prosthetics, prosthetic therapy, undergraduate teaching in oral prosthetics, and advanced oral prosthetics, from a Nordic perspective. The report appraises the various factors in context with demographic, cultural, and professional circumstances and suggests strategies for improvement of present conditions. The relationship between the undergraduate curriculum in oral prosthetics and the public need for advanced oral prosthetics must continuously be monitored so that patients can obtain optimal care from the profession.

  13. Human postmortem device retrieval and analysis--orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and dental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, J; Brott, B; Eberhardt, A

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of decades of analyzing implant devices, tissues, and clinical records from revision surgical explants (called device failure), studies now include postmortem donors and in situ conditions (called success). A key issue has been information exchange from an interdisciplinary team where basic physical and biological studies complement details of the clinical conditions for each device. Overall, the summary information has shown that most revisions were based on factors associated with the patient health, disease, and compliance, with few outcomes directly correlated with technology and device-specific factors. However, because of the large numbers of devices implanted annually (millions), any sampling that reveals adverse circumstances could result in a high level of importance and the need for additional studies of this type. Experience from prior retrieval and analysis demonstrates significant value where peer reviewed results from investigations have altered the discipline and have improved the quality and longevity of health care associated with implanted devices. This report summarizes completed and ongoing studies of cardiovascular, dental, and orthopaedic systems. Endovascular stents from autopsies showed damage including fretting and corrosion from overlapping and intersecting conditions, plus some corrosion and element transfers to tissues from individual stents. Studies are proposed to increase numbers to evaluate clinical significance. Dental implants from postmortem donors that functioned more than 10 years provided evaluations of cobalt alloy devices and calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes originally investigated in the 1970s. Tissue integration and stability correlated with data from prior laboratory in vitro and in vivo investigations. Studies of articulation and fixation from orthopaedic total joint arthroplasties showed some limitations related to surface changes of YTZ zirconia, specific damage due to implantation procedures, which

  14. Surgical and Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Combination Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Carlino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report is to analyze the clinical symptoms, ethologic factors, and prosthetic rehabilitation in a case of Combination Syndrome (CS. The treatment of CS can be conventional or surgical, with or without the bone reconstruction of maxilla. The correct prosthetic treatment helps this kind of patients to restore the physiologic occlusion plane to allow a correct masticatory and aesthetic function. Management of this kind of patients can be a challenge for a dental practitioner.

  15. Circuit For Control Of Electromechanical Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed circuit for control of electromechanical prosthetic hand derives electrical control signals from shoulder movements. Updated, electronic version of prosthesis, that includes two hooklike fingers actuated via cables from shoulder harness. Circuit built around favored shoulder harness, provides more dexterous movement, without incurring complexity of computer-controlled "bionic" or hydraulically actuated devices. Additional harness and potentiometer connected to similar control circuit mounted on other shoulder. Used to control stepping motor rotating hand about prosthetic wrist to one of number of angles consistent with number of digital outputs. Finger-control signals developed by circuit connected to first shoulder harness transmitted to prosthetic hand via sliprings at prosthetic wrist joint.

  16. 基于特征映射的义齿表面三维变形设计方法%3D Deformation Design Method for Prosthetic Dental Surface Based on Feature Mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑淑贤; 李佳; 孙庆丰

    2011-01-01

    The prosthetic tooth surface design is an important issue in dental computer aided design systems(CAD). The designed tooth shape should fit to the patient's tooth articulation environment and keep the topological features of the generic teeth. Aiming at the problem, a 3D deformation approach for prosthetic dental surface design based on feature mapping is presented. The main idea is by identifying the corresponding feature points between the preparation tooth and the standard tooth firstly, using a suitable radial basis function to define the feature mapping relations in both teeth, then through the corresponding features alignment and the surface interpolation deformation, the prosthetic tooth surface deformation is realized. The result of case study of the first molar in lower jaw shows that the design process is simple, the standard tooth surface deformation is reasonable, the surface distortion can be avoided and the final inlay surface matches well with the preparation tooth. The feature mapping design method provides a new way for clinic application in dental CAD.%义齿表面设计是牙科计算机辅助设计和制造系统的一个重要环节,设计的义齿形状必须符合患者的口腔咬合环境并能保持牙齿的拓扑结构特征.针对这一问题,在此提出一种基于特征映射的义齿表面三维变形设计方法.该方法主要思想是首先识别预备体与同名标准牙的重要特征点,采用径向基函数建立两者的特征映射关系,再通过对应特征点的位置对齐和表面的插值变形,实现义齿表面的变形设计.下颌第一磨牙嵌体的设计案例结果表明,该方法设计程序简单,标准牙曲面变形合理,能有效地避免曲面失真,最终生成的嵌体与预备体匹配良好,为牙科计算机辅助设计和制造系统的临床应用提供一种新的方法.

  17. Development of a mobile device optimized cross platform-compatible oral pathology and radiology spaced repetition system for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Wisam; Easterling, Lauren; Edwards, Paul C

    2015-04-01

    Combining active recall testing with spaced repetition increases memory retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare students' perception and utilization of an electronic spaced repetition oral pathology-radiology system in dental hygiene education and predoctoral dental education. The study employed an open-source suite of applications to create electronic "flashcards" that can be individually adjusted for frequency of repetition, depending on a user's assessment of difficulty. Accessible across multiple platforms (iOS, Android, Linux, OSX, Windows) as well as via any web-based browser, this framework was used to develop an oral radiology-oral pathology database of case-based questions. This system was introduced in two courses: sophomore oral pathology for dental students and sophomore radiology for dental hygiene students. Students were provided free software and/or mobile tablet devices as well as a database of 300 electronic question cards. Study participants were surveyed on frequency and extent of use. Perception-based surveys were used to evaluate their attitudes towards this technology. Of the eligible students, 12 of 22 (54.5%) dental hygiene and 49 of 107 (45.8%) dental students responded to the surveys. Adoption rates and student feedback were compared between the two groups. Among the respondents, acceptance of this technology with respect to educational usefulness was similar for the dental and dental hygiene students (median=5 on a five-point scale; dental hygiene interquartile range (IQR)=0; dental IQR=1). Only a minority of the survey respondents (25% dental, 33% dental hygiene) took advantage of one of the main benefits of this technology: automated spaced repetition.

  18. Creative mechanism design for a prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Tung; Tseng, Ching-Huan; Wu, Long-Long

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, an auxiliary methodology called the creative mechanism design is introduced into the innovation of gripping devices for prosthetic hands. This methodology is a systematic approach based on modification of existing devices for the generation of all possible topological structures of mechanisms and mechanical devices. An existing gripping device (Teh Lin ATG-5F prosthetic hand) constructed by a planar six-bar linkage with one degree of freedom is dealt with by using this methodology. Through the processes of generalization, number synthesis, specialization and particularization for the existing design, five new mechanisms are created in this study to apply to anthropomorphic prosthetic hands. The results show that the methodology for creative mechanism design is a powerful tool for creating new categories of mechanisms to avoid existing designs that have patent protection and can help designers in the conceptual phase. Also, this methodology is validated as a useful way to improve prosthetic hands for amputees.

  19. Mini dental implants for long-term fixed and removable prosthetics: a retrospective analysis of 2514 implants placed over a five-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatkin, Todd E; Shatkin, Samuel; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D; Oppenheimer, Adam J

    2007-02-01

    Over the past decade, endosseous implants of increasingly smaller diameters have been introduced into the field of dentistry. Small diameter implants (SDIs) are generally 2.75 mm to 3.3 mm in diameter. They are frequently used in cases of limited alveolar anatomy Mini dental implants (MDIs) are smaller than their SDI counterparts, with diameters ranging from 1.8 mm to 2.4 mm. They are suitable for long-term use-a task for which the device was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The following study describes the authors' experience with MDIs under this indication. Over a 5-year period, 2514 MDIs were placed in 531 patients. The mean duration of follow-up was 2.9 years. The implants supported fixed (1278) and removable prostheses (1236), with nearly equal placement in the mandible and maxilla (1256 and 1258, respectively). The overall implant survival was 94.2%. Based on a Cox proportional hazards model, statistically significant predictors of failure include use in removable prostheses (hazard ratio = 4.28), the posterior maxilla (3.37), atrophic bone (3.32), and cigarette smokers (2.28). Implant failures (145) were attributed to mobility with or without suppuration (19% vs 81%, respectively). The mean failure time for these implants was approximately 6.4 months (193+/-42 days). This temporally correlates with the osseointegration period. A learning curve was established for this procedure, and implant survival improved with placement experience. Based on these results, the authors have devised treatment guidelines for the use of MDIs in long-term fixed and removable prostheses. MDIs are not a panacea; however, proper training enables the general dentist to successfully implement MDIs into clinical practice.

  20. Evaluation of reliability and validity of three dental color-matching devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiliagkou, Aikaterini; Diamantopoulou, Sofia; Papazoglou, Efstratios; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2016-01-01

    To assess the repeatability and accuracy of three dental color-matching devices under standardized and freehand measurement conditions. Two shade guides (Vita Classical A1-D4, Vita; and Vita Toothguide 3D-Master, Vita), and three color-matching devices (Easyshade, Vita; SpectroShade, MHT Optic Research; and ShadeVision, X-Rite) were used. Five shade tabs were selected from the Vita Classical A1-D4 (A2, A3.5, B1, C4, D3), and five from the Vita Toothguide 3D-Master (1M1, 2R1.5, 3M2, 4L2.5, 5M3) shade guides. Each shade tab was recorded 15 continuous, repeated times with each device under two different measurement conditions (standardized, and freehand). Both qualitative (color shade) and quantitative (L, a, and b) color characteristics were recorded. The color difference (ΔE) of each recorded value with the known values of the shade tab was calculated. The repeatability of each device was evaluated by the coefficient of variance. The accuracy of each device was determined by comparing the recorded values with the known values of the reference shade tab (one sample t test; α = 0.05). The agreement between the recorded shade and the reference shade tab was calculated. The influence of the parameters (devices and conditions) on the parameter ΔE was investigated (two-way ANOVA). Comparison of the devices was performed with Bonferroni pairwise post-hoc analysis. Under standardized conditions, repeatability of all three devices was very good, except for ShadeVision with Vita Classical A1-D4. Accuracy ranged from good to fair, depending on the device and the shade guide. Under freehand conditions, repeatability and accuracy for Easyshade and ShadeVision were negatively influenced, but not for SpectroShade, regardless of the shade guide. Based on the total of the color parameters assessed per device, SpectroShade was the most reliable of the three color-matching devices studied.

  1. A newly developed removable dental device for fused 3-D MRI/Meg imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuboki, Takuo [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Dental School; Clark, G.T.; Akhtari, M.; Sutherling, W.W.

    1999-06-01

    Recently 3-D imaging techniques have been used to shed light on the role of abnormal brain functions in such conditions as nocturnal bruxism and orofacial pain. In order to achieve precise 3-D image fusion between magnetic resonance images (MRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we developed a removable dental device which attaches rigidly to the teeth. Using this device, correlation of MEG and MRI data points was achieved by the co-registration of 3 or more fiducial points. Using a Polhemus 3-space digitizer the locations of the points were registered on MEG and then a small amount of high-water-content material was placed at each point for registering these same points on MRI. The mean reproducibility of interpoint distances, determined for 2 subjects, was between 0.59 and 0.82 mm. Using a Monte Carlo statistical analysis we determined that the accuracy of a posterior projection from the fiducial points to any point within the strata of the brain is {+-}3.3 mm. The value of this device is that it permits reasonably precise and repeatable co-registration of these points and yet it is easily removed and replaced by the patient. Obviously such a device could also be adapted for use in diagnosis and analysis of brain functions related with other various sensory and motor functions (e.g., taste, pain, clenching) in maxillofacial region using MRI and MEG. (author)

  2. FABRICATION OF A RETINAL PROSTHETIC TEST DEVICE USING ELECTRODEPOSITED SILICON OVER POLYPYRROLE PATTERNED WITH SU-8 PHOTORESIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric; Ellis, Daniel; Charles, Duran; McKenzie, Jason

    2015-01-01

    A materials fabrication study of a photodiode array for possible application of retina prosthesis was undertaken. A test device was fabricated using a glassy carbon electrode patterned with SU-8 photoresist. In the openings, p-type polypyrrole was first electrodeposited using 1-butyl-1-methylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid. The polypyrrole was self-doped with imide ion at ~1.5 mole %, was verified as p-type, and had a resistivity of ~20 Ωcm. N-type Silicon was then electrodeposited over this layer using silicon tetrachloride / phosphorus trichloride in acetonitrile and passivated in a second electrodeposition using trimethylchlorosilane. Electron microscopy revealed the successful electrodeposition of silicon over patterned polypyrrole. Rudimentary photodiode behavior was observed. The passivation improved but did not completely protect the electrodeposited silicon from oxidation by air.

  3. Prosthetic devices shaped as tubular chambers for the treatment of large diaphyseal defects by guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli Aldini, N; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Guzzardella, G A; Giardino, R

    2005-01-01

    Guided tissue regeneration is based on the hypothesis that the different tissues have unequal abilities to penetrate a wounded area during the healing process. The use of a device acting as a chamber allows the growth of a particular tissue and prevents the ingrowth of other tissues which impair the healing process. At the same time the chamber protects and maintains in situ the intrinsic growth factors so that they may perform their specific activity. Guided tissue regeneration currently plays a well-recognized role mostly in dentistry and peripheral nerve surgery but interesting perspectives have also opened up in orthopedics. Considering the possibility of using guided bone regeneration in the repair of diaphyseal bone defects, this updated survey highlights some critical points and pathways related to the state-of-the-art of this promising procedure, focusing particularly on the properties of the material to make the tubular chamber, the use of osteopromotive factors and the most appropriate animal model to be used for the experimental evaluation.

  4. Wear of nanofilled dental composites in a newly-developed in vitro testing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C.

    Purpose. In vivo wear of dental composites can lead to loss of individual tooth function and the need to replace a composite restoration. To evaluate the wear performance of new and existing dental composites, we developed a novel system for measuring in vitro wear and we used this system to analyze the mechanisms of wear of nanofilled composite materials. Methods. A modified wear testing device was designed based on the Alabama wear testing machine. The new device consists of: (1) an antagonist which is lowered to and raised from the composite specimen by weight loading, (2) a motorized stage to cause the antagonist to slide 2mm on the composite surface, and (3) pumps for applying lubricant to the specimens. Various testing parameters of the device were examined before testing, including the impulse force, the third-body medium, the lubricant and antagonist. The parameters chosen for this study were 20N at 1Hz with a 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist. Three nano-composites were fabricated with a BisGMA polymer matrix and 40nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25%, 50% and 65%). The mechanical properties of the composites were measured. The materials were then tested in the modified wear testing device under impact wear, sliding wear and a combination of impact and sliding wear. The worn surfaces were then analyzed with a non-contact profilometer and SEM. Results. The volumetric wear data indicated that increasing filler content beyond 25% decreased the wear resistance of the composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and decreased toughness. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the 25% filled materials failed by fatigue and the 50% and 65% filled materials failed by abrasive wear. Impact wear produced fretting in this device and sliding wear is more aggressive than impact wear. Conclusion. Based on the results of this study and previous studies on this topic, manufacturers are recommended to use a filler

  5. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  6. Oral and dental restoration of wide alveolar cleft using distraction osteogenesis and temporary anchorage devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmiel, Adi; Emodi, Omri; Gutmacher, Zvi; Blumenfeld, Israel; Aizenbud, Dror

    2013-12-01

    Closure of large alveolar clefts and restoration by a fixed bridge supported by implants is a challenge in cleft alveolus treatment. A major aesthetic concern with distraction osteogenesis is obtaining a predictable position of the implant in relation to the newly generated bony alveolar ridge. We describe the treatment of a large cleft alveolus and palate reconstruction by distraction osteogenesis utilizing temporary anchorage devices (TADs) followed by a fixed implant-supported bridge. The method consists of segmental bone transport by distraction osteogenesis using a bone-borne distractor to minimize the alveolar cleft, followed by closure of the residual small defect by bone grafting three months later. During the active transport distraction, TADs were used exerting multidirectional forces to control the distraction vector forward and laterally for better interarch relation. A vertical alveolar distraction of the newly reconstructed bone of 15 mm facilitated optimal implant placement. The endosseous implants were osteointegrated and supported a fixed dental prosthesis. In conclusion, the large cleft alveolus defect was repaired in three dimensions by distraction osteogenesis assisted by TADs, and the soft tissues expanded simultaneously. Endosseous implants were introduced in the newly reconstructed bone for a fixed dental prosthesis enabling, rehabilitation of aesthetics, eating and speaking.

  7. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations - dental milling machines from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. Part A: chairside milling machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The dental milling machine is an important device in the dental CAD/CAM chain. Nowadays, dental numerical controlled (NC) milling machines are available for dental surgeries (chairside solution). This article provides a mechanical engineering approach to NC milling machines to help dentists understand the involvement of technology in digital dentistry practice. First, some technical concepts and definitions associated with NC milling machines are described from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. The technical and economic criteria of four chairside dental NC milling machines that are available on the market are then described. The technical criteria are focused on the capacities of the embedded technologies of these milling machines to mill both prosthetic materials and types of shape restorations. The economic criteria are focused on investment costs and interoperability with third-party software. The clinical relevance of the technology is assessed in terms of the accuracy and integrity of the restoration.

  8. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  9. Prosthetic Knee Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Prosthetic Knee Systems Translated into plain language by Helen Osborne of ... Consulting Original article by Bill Dupes Prosthetic knee systems are among the most complex of all components. ...

  10. The effect of steam sterilization on the accuracy of spring-style mechanical torque devices for dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Minoo Mahshid,1 Aboulfazl Saboury,1 Ali Fayaz,1 Seyed Jalil Sadr,1 Friedrich Lampert,2 Maziar Mir2,31Department of Prosthodontics, Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Department of Conservative Dentistry, Aachen RWTH Hospital, Aachen, Germany; 3Beckman Laser Institute, UCI, Irvine, CA, USABackground: Mechanical torque devices (MTDs are one of the most commonly recommended devices used to deliver optimal torque to the screw of dental implants. Recently, high variability has been reported about the accuracy of spring-style mechanical torque devices (S-S MTDs. Joint stability and survival rate of fixed implant supported prosthesis depends on the accuracy of these devices. Currently, there is limited information on the steam sterilization influence on the accuracy of MTDs. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of steam sterilization on the accuracy (±10% of the target torque of spring-style mechanical torque devices for dental implants.Materials and methods: Fifteen new S-S MTDs and their appropriate drivers from three different manufacturers (Nobel Biocare, Straumann [ITI], and Biomet 3i [3i] were selected. Peak torque of devices (5 in each subgroup was measured before and after autoclaving using a Tohnichi torque gauge. Descriptive statistical analysis was used and a repeated-measures ANOVA with type of device as a between-subject comparison was performed to assess the difference in accuracy among the three groups of spring-style mechanical torque devices after sterilization. A Bonferroni post hoc test was used to assess pairwise comparisons.Results: Before steam sterilization, all the tested devices stayed within 10% of their target values. After 100 sterilization cycles, results didn't show any significant difference between raw and absolute error values in the Nobel Biocare and ITI devices; however the results demonstrated an increase of error values in the 3i group (P < 0.05. Raw error

  11. A study on developpement of guideline on writing technical document for electrical medical devices: Dental x-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Youl; Kim, Jae Ryang; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Chang Won [Division of Medical Device Research, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Mnistry of Food and Drug Safety (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Due to recent population aging, the number of check-up for senior citizens has increased steadily. According to this trend, the market size of dental X-ray equipment and the number of approval and review for these devices have simultaneously increased. The technical document of medical device is required for approval and review for medical device, and medical device companies needs to have work comprehension and expertise, as the document needs to include the overall contents such as performances, test criteria, etc.. Yet, since most of domestic manufacturers or importers of medical devices are small businesses, it is difficult for them to recruit professional manpower for approval of medical devices, and submission of inaccurate technical documents has increased. These problems lead to delay of the approval process and to difficulties in quick entering into the market. Especially, the Ministry of Food and Drug safety (MFDS) standards of a dental extra-oral X-ray equipment, a dental intra-oral X-ray equipment, an arm-type computed tomography, and a portable X-ray system have been recently enacted or not. this guideline of dental X-ray equipment adjusting revised standards was developed to help relative companies and reviewers. For this study, first, the methods to write technical document have been reviewed with revised international and domestic regulations and system. Second, the domestic and foreign market status of each item has been surveyed and analyzed. Third, the contents of technical documents already approved by MFDS have been analyzed to select the correct example, test items, criteria, and methods. Finally, the guideline has been developed based on international and domestic regulation, through close review of a consultative body composed of academic, industrial, research institute and government experts.

  12. Coated with nanomaterials intraocular lenses, ophthalmic and human body implantable devices with high catalytic antioxidant activities: a new nanotechnology strategy of peroxidase cellular enzyme mimics increasing the biocompatibility and therapeutic deployment of the medical prosthetic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    attack. Coated IOLs according to the patented nanotechnology can address the vast majority of cataract surgery-induced complications, such as secondary cataract, intraocular inflammation (endophthalmitis) and foreign body reactions, cystoid macular oedema, corneal edema. The nanotechnology offers physicians and surgeons to develop and commercialize costeffective therapeutic medical implantable devices, products and support systems with metabolic activities for the treatment of ophthalmic diseases and of a wide range of pathological states and disorders which are treated by insertion of the implantable and prosthetic (polymeric) devices.

  13. Precautionary practices of healthcare workers who disinfect medical and dental devices using high-level disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Scott A; Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L

    2015-02-01

    BACKGROUND High-level disinfectants (HLDs) are used throughout the healthcare industry to chemically disinfect reusable, semicritical medical and dental devices to control and prevent healthcare-associated infections among patient populations. Workers who use HLDs are at risk of exposure to these chemicals, some of which are respiratory and skin irritants and sensitizers. OBJECTIVE To evaluate exposure controls used and to better understand impediments to healthcare workers using personal protective equipment while handling HLDs. DESIGN Web-based survey. PARTICIPANTS A targeted sample of members of professional practice organizations representing nurses, technologists/technicians, dental professionals, respiratory therapists, and others who reported handling HLDs in the previous 7 calendar days. Participating organizations invited either all or a random sample of members via email, which included a hyperlink to the survey. METHODS Descriptive analyses were conducted including simple frequencies and prevalences. RESULTS A total of 4,657 respondents completed the survey. The HLDs used most often were glutaraldehyde (59%), peracetic acid (16%), and ortho-phthalaldehyde (15%). Examples of work practices or events that could increase exposure risk included failure to wear water-resistant gowns (44%); absence of standard procedures for minimizing exposure (19%); lack of safe handling training (17%); failure to wear protective gloves (9%); and a spill/leak of HLD during handling (5%). Among all respondents, 12% reported skin contact with HLDs, and 33% of these respondents reported that they did not always wear gloves. CONCLUSION Findings indicated that precautionary practices were not always used, underscoring the importance of improved employer and worker training and education regarding HLD hazards.

  14. Clinical and radiological 12-year follow-up of full arch maxilla prosthetic restoration supported by dental implants positioned through guide flapless surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soardi, C M; Bramanti, E; Cicciù, M

    2014-03-01

    The computer-guided flapless surgery for implant placement using stereolithographic templates is going to be considered a daily practice technique. The advantages of this kind of surgery are related with its no flap opening, with the precision of the implant positioning and with the possibility of having a quick rehabilitation and low post-surgical discomfort. The introduction of digital planning programs has made it possible to place dental implants in preplanned positions and being immediately functionally loaded by using prefabricated prostheses. This case presented a 12-year follow-up of a maxillary prosthesis supported by dental implant immediately loading and positioned with the first kind of guided flapless surgery technique. Aim of this paper was to report how the guide surgery implant position technique can be considered a predictable and safe technique giving the surgeon excellent long-term results.

  15. Comparative Study of the Friction and Wear Behavior of Natura lTooth and Several Dental Prosthetic Materials%天然牙及几种牙科修复材料的摩擦磨损性能比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎红; 周仲荣; 张杰; 陈光雄

    2001-01-01

    The friction and wear behaviour of natural living tooth and several dental prosthetic materials made of polymer, metal, and ceram ics in sliding against SAE52100 steel was investigated on a modified fretting fr iction and wear test rig. The worn surface morphologies of the living tooth and several dental prosthetic materials were observed with an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope. The results show that natural tooth records a l ow friction coefficient and a small wear scar depth in sliding against the steel ball. The specimens made from Bayer tooth, thermosetting plastic, copper-base alloy, titanium and its alloy have relatively good wear-resistance as well and are thus idea prosthetic materials. Especially, titanium and its alloy are prosp ective dental prosthetic materials because of the desirable bio-compatibility a nd similar tribological behaviour as the natural tooth.%在改进的微动摩擦磨损试验台上,模拟人体牙齿摩擦副,考察了天然牙以及牙科用高分子、金属和陶瓷修复材料与GCr15钢对摩的摩擦磨损性能.结果表明:天然牙的摩擦学性能优良;拜尔牙、热固塑料、铜基合金、钛及钛合金是较为理想的牙科修复材料;尤其是钛及钛合金,不但生物相容性优异,而且与天然牙摩擦学性能匹配,是最具有发展前景的牙科修复材料

  16. Dental management of a patient fitted with subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator device and concomitant warfarin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; Khalil, Hesham Saleh; Kola, Mohammed Zaheer

    2015-07-01

    Automated Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (AICD), simply known as an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD), has been used in patients for more than 30 years. An Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) is a small battery-powered electrical impulse generator that is implanted in patients who are at a risk of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia or any such related event. Typically, patients with these types of occurrences are on anticoagulant therapy. The desired International Normalized Ratio (INR) for these patients is in the range of 2-3 to prevent any subsequent cardiac event. These patients possess a challenge to the dentist in many ways, especially during oral surgical procedures, and these challenges include risk of sudden death, control of post-operative bleeding and pain. This article presents the dental management of a 60 year-old person with an ICD and concomitant anticoagulant therapy. The patient was on multiple medications and was treated for a grossly neglected mouth with multiple carious root stumps. This case report outlines the important issues in managing patients fitted with an ICD device and at a risk of sudden cardiac death.

  17. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  18. DENTAL CLINICIAN’S CRITICAL ROLE WHEN CONSIDERING FIXED AND REMOVABLE DENTAL PROSTHESES FOR THE PACIENT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Georgieva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the most common as well as the most severe complications due to outdated prosthetic restorations. It is based on 38 clinical cases, examined at Faculty of Dental Medicine - Varna. The conclusions outline the mistakes which cause such dramatic results and the leading role of the dental clinician in considering the treatment prosthetic plan.

  19. Slow-release fluoride devices for the control of dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lee Yee; Clarkson, Jan E; Dobbyn-Ross, Lorna; Bhakta, Smriti

    2014-11-28

    Slow-release fluoride devices have been investigated as a potentially cost-effective method of reducing dental caries in people with high risk of disease. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different types of slow-release fluoride devices on preventing, arresting, or reversing the progression of carious lesions on all surface types of primary (deciduous) and permanent teeth. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 13 August 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 7), MEDLINE via Ovid (1946 to 13 August 2014), and EMBASE via Ovid (1980 to 13 August 2014). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases.We first published the review in 2006. The update in 2013 found 302 abstracts, but none of these met the inclusion criteria of the review. Parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing slow-release fluoride devices with an alternative fluoride treatment, placebo, or no intervention in all age groups. The main outcomes measures sought were changes in numbers of decayed, missing, and filled teeth or surfaces (DMFT/DMFS in permanent teeth or dmft/dmfs in primary teeth), and progression of carious lesions through enamel and into dentine. We conducted data collection and analysis using standard Cochrane review methods. At least two review authors independently performed all the key steps in the review such as screening of abstracts, application of inclusion criteria, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment. We resolved discrepancies through discussions or arbitration by a third or fourth review author. We found no evidence comparing slow-release fluoride devices against other types of fluoride therapy.We found only one double-blind RCT involving

  20. Maxillofacial Prosthetic Materials- An Inclination Towards Silicones

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Aparajita; Choudhary, Sunita; Garg, Hemlata; H.G., Jagadeesh

    2014-01-01

    There have been constant searches and researches which are taking place in the field of dental materials to best suit the ideal selection criteria to satisfy the functionality, biocompatibility, aesthetics as well as the durability as a maxillofacial material. Among all the different materials, Silicone is the most popularly used, but still studies are carried out to overcome their weaknesses and to come out with a material which can be labeled as the “ideal maxillofacial prosthetic material”...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section 870.3935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold...

  2. Principles of obstacle avoidance with a transfemoral prosthetic limb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keeken, Helco G.; Vrieling, Aline H.; Hof, At L.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2012-01-01

    In this study, conditions that enable a prosthetic knee flexion strategy in transfemoral amputee subjects during obstacle avoidance were investigated. This study explored the hip torque principle and the static ground principle as object avoidance strategies. A prosthetic limb simulator device was u

  3. Changes of Periodontal Condition after Dental Ni-Cr Alloy Prosthetic Restoration%镍铬修复体前后牙周状况变化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈爱和; 邓秋明; 李惠山

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate changes of periodontal condition after dental Ni-Cr alloy prosthetic restoration.Methods Patients who accepted half Ni-Cr alloy crowns or fixed bridges were selected. One year later the crowns or fixed bridges were observed through detecting the periodontal condition, and recording the sulcus bleeding index, plaque index and periodontal depth.Results The rate of gingiva discoloration after Ni-Cr alloy crowns/fixed bridges prosthesis was 6.98%, and had no direct relationship with patients’ gender, age, prosthetic category(P>0.05). Compared with control teeth group, plaque index of Ni-Cr alloys group was not obviously variance(P>0.05), but sulcus bleeding index and periodontal depth were significantly increased (P<0.05). Conclusion Ni-Cr alloys have no obvious influence on dental plaque foemation, but the adverse effect of Ni-Cr alloys on periodontal tissue is objectively existing, that could induce gingivitis, and to the gingiva tissue being in activated inflammatory state.%目的:研究镍铬合金修复体修复前后牙周组织状况的变化。方法选择需要单侧镍铬合金冠/桥修复的患者,进行固定修复。修复前进行牙周洁治,病例在牙冠戴入1年后复诊检查患牙及对侧同名牙的菌斑指数、牙龈出血指数、牙周探诊深度,进行比较。结果修复前后比较,有6.98%的病例出现金属基底烤瓷冠边缘周围牙龈变色;牙龈颜色发生变化与患者性别、年龄及修复体类型均无直接关系(P>0.05);菌斑指数在患牙和对照牙间差异无显著性(P>0.05),而患牙的探诊深度、龈沟出血指数与对照牙比较,差异有显著性(P<0.05)。结论实验中发现镍铬合金修复体对口腔菌斑形成无明显影响,患者可均衡地保持患牙和对照牙的卫生状况;但镍铬合金冠对患牙牙周组织的影响是客观存在的,会促使牙龈组织炎症的发生,使修复体周围组织处于炎症激活状态。

  4. Effect of the gonadal integrity and the gender on responses of bone crestal levels in dogs with two dental prosthetic abutment types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Valenzuela Vásquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catorce perros mestizos adultos (5 intactos y 9 esterilizados, compuestos por siete machos y siete hembras fueron utilizadas para evaluar el efecto de dos tipos de aditamentos protésicos de implantes dentales sobre el nivel de la cresta ósea alveolar. Los implantes dentales fueron colocados quirúrgicamente en zonas de cuartos premolares inferiores y restaurados con aditamentos protésicos convencionales (CONV y de cambio de plataforma (PFS. Ambos aditamentos protésicos fueron evaluados en cada perro. El estudio duró 180 días, en los que se realizó la restauración al día 60 post-quirúrgicamente colocados los implantes, la evaluación del nivel de la cresta ósea alveolar se realizó en los días 0, 30, 60 y 90 después de la restauración (corona cementada a través de medición indirecta utilizando un sensor radiográfico digital. Los datos experimentales se analizaron mediante un diseño completamente al azar, la unidad experimental fue el perro (efecto aleatorio, el tratamiento era el tipo de pilar protésico (efectos fijos, y el nivel de la cresta ósea de cada lado del implante (mesial y distal fue la observación. Además, factores como la condición gonadal (intactos y castrados y el género (masculino y femenino se incluyeron en el análisis estadístico para evaluar su papel en la magnitud de los cambios (interacciones en los niveles de cresta ósea alveolar. El promedio de pérdida de hueso crestal fue 0.400 ± 0.186 mm. En general, los perros con CONV tuvieron una mayor pérdida de la cresta ósea que los perros con PFS. En los perros intactos que recibieron PFS se observó una menor pérdida ósea, pero en perros castrados, el tipo de aditamento no tuvo efecto (P = 0,98 en el nivel de pérdida de la cresta ósea; por lo tanto, se detectó una interacción (P 0.77 entre el género y el tipo de aditamento, de manera similar, analizado como único factor de variación, el género no tuvo efecto (P = 0,26 en las respuestas del

  5. Perda dentária e expectativa da reposição protética: estudo qualitativo Dental loss and prosthetic replacement expectation: qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa de Souza e Silva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo qualitativo analisou as repercussões da perda dentária total de usuários do serviço público. Aplicou-se o Oral Health Impact Profile simplificado(OHIP14 a cinquenta voluntários e, após a apuração dos resultados, foram selecionados treze pacientes para entrevistas individuais baseadas em um roteiro com questões abertas. A seleção das pessoas foi de acordo com o grau de percepção do impacto da condição bucal na qualidade de vida, medida pela pontuação OHIP, de forma a incluir a maior variedade de perfis da amostra inicial. Da análise do conteúdo dos depoimentos, verificou-se que a perda dentária total tem forte impacto na vida das pessoas e implica consequências negativas como vergonha, dificuldade em se alimentar, prejuízo ao relacionamento social e sentimento de incompletude. A possibilidade de reposição protética dos dentes gera ansiedade nas pessoas e, embora elas saibam que a utilização das próteses possa representar sacrifícios, a expectativa de retorno ao padrão social geralmente aceito e de recuperação de sua própria imagem rejuvenescida faz valer a pena quaisquer sacrifícios.This qualitative research analyses the repercussions of total dental loss on people's quality of life. The Oral Health Impact Profile short-form (OHIP14 was applied to 50 volunteers, and after analyzing the results, 13 out of those 50, were selected to be individually interviewed in an opened questions script. The criteria to select these 13 people were: perception of the impact of mouth condition on quality of life measured by the score reached on OHIP. We tried to comprise the sample with a good variety, according to the profile of the initial sample. After analyzing people's statements, it was possible to verify that dental loss had strong negative consequences on people's life, like shame, difficulty to eat, impact on social relationship and feeling of not being complete. The possibility of having their teeth replaced

  6. A study on a dental device for the prevention of mucosal dose enhancement caused by backscatter radiation from dental alloy during external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Kouji; Utsunomiya, Satoru; Abe, Eisuke; Sakai, Hironori; Kushima, Naotaka; Tanabe, Satoshi; Yamada, Takumi; Hayakawa, Takahide; Yamanoi, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Syuhei; Wada, Shinichi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Hayashi, Takafumi

    2016-11-01

    The changes in dose distribution caused by backscatter radiation from a common commercial dental alloy (Au-Ag-Pd dental alloy; DA) were investigated to identify the optimal material and thicknesses of a dental device (DD) for effective prevention of mucositis. To this end, 1 cm(3) of DA was irradiated with a 6-MV X-ray beam (100 MU) in a field size of 10 × 10 cm(2) using a Novalis TX linear accelerator. Ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer, polyolefin elastomer, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were selected as DD materials. The depth dose along the central axis was determined with respect to the presence/absence of DA and DDs at thicknesses of 1-10 mm using a parallel-plate ionization chamber. The dose in the absence of DDs showed the lowest value at a distance of 5 mm from the DA surface and gradually increased with distance between the measurement point and the DA surface for distances of ≥5 mm. Except for PET, no significant difference between the DA dose curves for the presence and absence of DDs was observed. In the dose curve, PET showed a slightly higher dose for DA with DD than for DA without DD for thicknesses of ≥4 mm. The findings herein suggest that the optimal DD material for preventing local dose enhancement of the mucosa caused by DA backscatter radiation should have a relatively low atomic number and physical density and that optimal DD thickness should be chosen considering backscatter radiation and percentage depth dose.

  7. Polymerization Shrinkage of Dental Composites Registered by a Video-imaging Device. A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Afaag, Ali; Sandelin, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    The use of composite materials for dental fillings has become more common due to demands for more esthetic filling materials and a national ban against using mercury-containing products, among others dental amalgam. However, one of the drawbacks with composites is their polymerization shrinkage. Filler particles are incorporated into composites among other things to minimize the shrinkage. The sizes of the filler particles have in recent years become smaller and most composites have nano-part...

  8. Prosthetic cost projections for servicemembers with major limb loss from Vietnam and OIF/OEF

    OpenAIRE

    David K. Blough, PhD; Sharon Hubbard, MS; Lynne V. McFarland, PhD; Douglas G. Smith, MD; Jeffrey M. Gambel, MD, MPH, MSW; Gayle E. Reiber, PhD

    2010-01-01

    This study projects prosthetic- and assistive-device costs for veterans with limb loss from Vietnam and injured servicemembersreturning from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) to inform the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for these veterans’ future care. The 2005 Medicare prosthetic device component prices were applied to current prosthetic and assistive-device use obtained from a national survey of 581 veterans and servicemembers with major traumatic amput...

  9. Prosthetic Modalities Used to Treat Cleft Palate Patients in a University Clinic: A 10-Year Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kranjčić, Josip; Žabarović, Domagoj; Čelebić, Asja; Mehulić, Ketij; Komar, Daniel; Vojvodić, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Cleft palate patients are not usually seen in general dental clinics, but this congenital anomaly is one of the most frequent of cases. General dental practitioners are usually unwilling or/and not sufficiently trained to treat such patients for whom rehabilitation and interdisciplinary cooperation is often needed. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of prosthetic modalities most frequently used by licensed prosthodontists for prosthetic rehabilitation of cleft palate patient...

  10. Prosthetic helping hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees, having a C-shaped clamping mechanism for grasping cylindrical objects, is described. The clamping mechanism is pivotally mounted to a cuff that fits on the amputee's lower arm. The present invention is utilized by placing an arm that has been amputated below the elbow into the cuff. The clamping mechanism then serves as a hand whenever it becomes necessary for the amputee to grasp a cylindrical object such as a handle, a bar, a rod, etc. To grasp the cylindrical object, the object is jammed against the opening in the C-shaped spring, causing the spring to open, the object to pass to the center of the spring, and the spring to snap shut behind the object. Various sizes of clamping mechanisms can be provided and easily interchanged to accommodate a variety of diameters. With the extension that pivots and rotates, the clamping mechanism can be used in a variety of orientations. Thus, this invention provides the amputee with a clamping mechanism that can be used to perform a number of tasks.

  11. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  12. Comparing high speed dental turbine and endoscopic device in crack formation following cavity preparation in periapical surgeries in Cat teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Razmi

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available   In Present research study, 44 canine teeth of with completely formed apex was selected in 11 cats. Jaw bones were removed while teeth were kept intra alveolar sockets and routine root canal therapy was performed on each root. Afterwards, 3mm of each root were cut apically. 20 teeth underwent cavity preparation via high speed dental turbine and round diamond bur, 20 via endosonic device and 4 (10% of all remained untreated as control group. Then, the cavity walls were assessed with stereomicroscope while the teeth were still kept in their alveolar sockets in order to detect cracks.

  13. Incidence of Prosthetic Complications associated with Implant-borne Prosthesis in a Sleep Disorder Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneel, Venkatesh B; Kotian, Santhosh; Jujare, Ravikanth H; Shetty, Adarsh K; Nidhi, Sneh; Grover, Shehkar

    2017-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is one of the common prevalent conditions present worldwide. The process of abnormal habits related to clenching and grinding of teeth is referred to as bruxism and is characterized under the heading of parafunctional activity of the masticatory system. Osseointegrated dental implants represent advancements in the field of odontology. Despite its high success rate, failure and complications are often associated with dental implant treatment due to a number of factors. Hence, we aimed for the present study to assess the incidence of prosthetic complications in patients rehabilitated with implant-borne prosthesis in a sleep disorder unit. The present study included the assessment of all the patients who underwent prosthetic rehabilitation by dental implants. An experienced registered prosthodontist was given duty for examination of all the cases from the record file data. Prosthetic complications in the patients were identified using photographs, radiographs, and all other relevant data of the patients obtained from the record files. All types of complications and other factors were recorded separately and analyzed. While correlating the prosthetic complications in OSA patients grouped based on number of dental implants, nonsignificant results were obtained. Significant correlation was observed while comparing the prosthetic complications divided based on type of prosthesis. Fracture of the porcelain was observed in four and eight cases respectively, of screwed and cemented dental implant cases. Some amount of significant correlation existed between the incidences of prosthetic complications and OSA. Proper history of the patients undergoing dental implant procedures should be taken to avoid failure.

  14. Genitourinary Prosthetics: A Primer for the Non-urologic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavien, Garjae; Zaid, Uwais; Peterson, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary prosthetics are used for correction of functional deficits and to improve the quality of lives of affected patients. General surgeons must evaluate patients scheduled for nonurologic surgery with urologic devices that can impact their perioperative management. Lack of recognition of these prosthetics preoperatively can lead to unnecessary morbidity for the patient and have legal implications for the surgeon. Close consultation with a urologist may avoid common complications associated with these devices and allows for surgical assistance when operative misadventures do occur. This article reviews 3 common urologic prosthetics: testicular prosthesis, artificial urinary sphincter, and penile prosthesis.

  15. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  16. Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Jalaj; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Sarungbam, Judy; Jain, Diwakar

    2016-01-01

    St. Jude mechanical prosthesis is the most commonly used prosthetic device with least valvular complications with excellent hemodynamics. However, prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the serious complications, with rates between 0.03% and 0.13% per patient-year depending on the type of anticoagulation used and compliance to the therapy. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the initial screening tool (class I) that would provide clues for the assessment of valvular hemodynamics. Fluoroscopy is an alternate imaging modality for the assessment of mechanical leaflet motion, especially in patients when prosthetic valves are difficult to image on TTE or transesophageal echocardiography. A complete fluoroscopic evaluation of a prosthetic valve includes assessment of valvular motion and structural integrity. Opening and closing angles can be measured fluoroscopically to determine whether a specific valve is functioning properly. We discuss a case of a 91-year-old man with thrombosis of bileaflet mechanical mitral prosthesis that was demonstrated on real-time fluoroscopy (not evident on TTE). An algorithmic approach to diagnosis and management of prosthetic heart valve thrombosis is outlined.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outcompetes other bacteria in the manifestation and maintenance of a biofilm in polyvinylchloride tubing as used in dental devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Christoph Gert; Nagl, Markus; Nogler, Michael; Coraça-Huber, Débora Cristina

    2016-05-01

    In a PVC tube as a model system for dental devices, Pseudomonas aeruginosa outcompetes Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae for the biofilm formation. P. aeruginosa has advantage over the other strains due to higher tolerance for low-nutrient situations or direct killing by the production of soluble factors like pyocyanin.

  18. Orthodontic Space Closure Versus Prosthetic Replacement of Missing Upper Lateral Incisors in Patients With Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, Barbara C. M.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Remmelink, Hendrik J.; van Oort, Robert P.; Sandham, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare dental aesthetics and function of orthodontic space closure versus prosthetic replacement of upper lateral incisors in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate The predominant mode of prosthetic replacement was resin-bonded bridges Patients and Methods The retrospective stud

  19. Orthodontic Space Closure Versus Prosthetic Replacement of Missing Upper Lateral Incisors in Patients With Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, Barbara C. M.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Remmelink, Hendrik J.; van Oort, Robert P.; Sandham, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare dental aesthetics and function of orthodontic space closure versus prosthetic replacement of upper lateral incisors in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate The predominant mode of prosthetic replacement was resin-bonded bridges Patients and Methods The retrospective

  20. Optimization of dental implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  1. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  2. Matching prosthetics order records in VA National Prosthetics Patient Database to healthcare utilization databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark W; Su, Pon; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2010-01-01

    The National Prosthetics Patient Database (NPPD) is the national Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) dataset that records characteristics of individual prosthetic and assistive devices. It remains unknown how well NPPD records can be matched to encounter records for the same individuals in major VA utilization databases. We compared the count of prosthetics records in the NPPD with the count of prosthetics-related procedures for the same individuals recorded in major VA utilization databases. We then attempted to match the NPPD records to the utilization records by person and date. In general, 40% to 60% of the NPPD records could be matched to outpatient utilization records within a 14-day window around the NPPD dataset entry date. Match rates for inpatient data were lower: 10% to 16% within a 14-day window. The NPPD will be particularly important for studies of certain veteran groups, such as those with spinal cord injury or blast-related polytraumatic injury. Health services researchers should use both the NPPD and utilization databases to develop a full understanding of prosthetics use by individual patients.

  3. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  4. Evaluation of a new device for sterilizing dental high-speed handpieces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T; Andersen, H K; Fiehn, N E

    1997-01-01

    contaminated with suspensions of Streptococcus salivarius or endospores of Bacillus stearothermophilus. The effect of flushing and/or autoclaving performed by a new device combining both procedures was evaluated by counting the number of viable bacteria recovered from these devices. Further, the effect...... on clinically used handpieces was evaluated. In an initial experiment, the device partially reduced S. salivarius, and the endospores survived. In a second experiment, a 5 to 6 log reduction of S. salivarius in air and water channels was obtained. No growth was observed in clinically used high-speed handpieces......, and both S. salivarius and endospores were eliminated from the turbine chambers. Thus, the method of validation proved capable of discriminating between different levels of bacterial reduction....

  5. The Prosthetic Workflow in the Digital Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Tordiglione

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study was to clinically evaluate the benefits of adopting a full digital workflow for the implementation of fixed prosthetic restorations on natural teeth. To evaluate the effectiveness of these protocols, treatment plans were drawn up for 15 patients requiring rehabilitation of one or more natural teeth. All the dental impressions were taken using a Planmeca PlanScan® (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland intraoral scanner, which provided digital casts on which the restorations were digitally designed using Exocad® (Exocad GmbH, Germany, 2010 software and fabricated by CAM processing on 5-axis milling machines. A total of 28 single crowns were made from monolithic zirconia, 12 vestibular veneers from lithium disilicate, and 4 three-quarter vestibular veneers with palatal extension. While the restorations were applied, the authors could clinically appreciate the excellent match between the digitally produced prosthetic design and the cemented prostheses, which never required any occlusal or proximal adjustment. Out of all the restorations applied, only one exhibited premature failure and was replaced with no other complications or need for further scanning. From the clinical experience gained using a full digital workflow, the authors can confirm that these work processes enable the fabrication of clinically reliable restorations, with all the benefits that digital methods bring to the dentist, the dental laboratory, and the patient.

  6. The Prosthetic Workflow in the Digital Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franco, Michele; Bosetti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to clinically evaluate the benefits of adopting a full digital workflow for the implementation of fixed prosthetic restorations on natural teeth. To evaluate the effectiveness of these protocols, treatment plans were drawn up for 15 patients requiring rehabilitation of one or more natural teeth. All the dental impressions were taken using a Planmeca PlanScan® (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland) intraoral scanner, which provided digital casts on which the restorations were digitally designed using Exocad® (Exocad GmbH, Germany, 2010) software and fabricated by CAM processing on 5-axis milling machines. A total of 28 single crowns were made from monolithic zirconia, 12 vestibular veneers from lithium disilicate, and 4 three-quarter vestibular veneers with palatal extension. While the restorations were applied, the authors could clinically appreciate the excellent match between the digitally produced prosthetic design and the cemented prostheses, which never required any occlusal or proximal adjustment. Out of all the restorations applied, only one exhibited premature failure and was replaced with no other complications or need for further scanning. From the clinical experience gained using a full digital workflow, the authors can confirm that these work processes enable the fabrication of clinically reliable restorations, with all the benefits that digital methods bring to the dentist, the dental laboratory, and the patient. PMID:27829834

  7. 78 FR 79308 - Dental Devices; Reclassification of Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... Temporary Mandibular Condyle Prosthesis AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final order... mandibular condyle prosthesis, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and rename... section 513(b) of the FD&C Act with respect to temporary mandibular condyle prosthesis (the 1997...

  8. Surgical-prosthetic treatment of large mandibular cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džambas Ljubiša D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a combined surgical-prosthetic procedure of reconstructing mandibular bone defect in a 53 year old patient, following enucleation of a mandibular cyst (Cystectomy Partsch II. After a thorough diagnostic evaluation, a surgical procedure was planned with the particular attention to the nature of the disease, patient’s condition, size and extension of the cyst, tissue loss, and the possibilities of prosthetic management of a mandibular bone defect with partial postresection dental prosthesis. It is of great importance to point to the significance of teamwork of a maxillofacial surgeon and a specialist in prosthodontics. This kind of cooperation provided very effective and less risky soft tissue, as well as bone tissue regeneration (osteogenesis. The patient’s recovery was fast, and he could return to his daily activities and work without significant changes regarding quality of life after surgery and prosthetic treatment.

  9. ELECTROCHEMICAL AND MECHANICAL EVALUATION OF SOME DENTAL MATERIALS EMPLOYED FOR IMMOBILIZATION DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARIA FATU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of corrosion potential is a relatively simple concept, an unanimously accepted notion in industry for the monitorization of steel corrosion, in building industry and in other structures. Equally, in the last decades, this parameter has been intensively utilized for characterizing dental alloys in either natural oral environment or in simulated solutions. The corrosion potential may be measured directly versus a reference electrode, characterized by a highly stable semi-cell potential. In this respect, a reference electrode (or a separated sensor of the material to be monitorized is introduced in the corrosive medium together with the metal or alloy under study, and the potential is measured directly with a millivoltmeter with very high input impedance. Additional details on the processes occurring in the system may be acquired if analyzing the curves of cyclic polarization, for whose obtaining the potential of the electrode formed with the investigated alloy is increased, at constant rate, in positive direction, up to a pre-established value, followed by its scavenging in reverse direction (towards negative values until reaching the initial value or some other value. During scavenging of the potential, the electric power passing through the solution between the working electrode and an auxilliary (platinum-made electrode is measured.

  10. 21 CFR 872.4130 - Intraoral dental drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral dental drill. 872.4130 Section 872.4130...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4130 Intraoral dental drill. (a) Identification. An intraoral dental drill is a rotary device intended to be attached to a dental handpiece to drill holes...

  11. Theoretical and practical aspects regarding the development and control of microbial biofilms attached to the surface of dental materials and dental prostheses in particular

    OpenAIRE

    Zisi, Sonila; Bortollini, Sergio; Muntianu, Ligia; Papakoca, Kiro; Mihai BURLIBASA

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biofilms play an essential role in oral pathology, in the etiology of dental caries, periodontopathy, but also in surface contamination of dental materials (and here we refer to prosthetic material such as acrylic materials usedfor dentures, occlusal rims, try-in dentures, dental alloys used in fixed dental restorations, impression materials, etc.)

  12. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  13. DARPA Revolutionizing Prosthetics 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    therapeutic applications  System performance validation and design compliance  End-to-end interactive simulation  Acquires control signals ( myoelectric ...Cortical Control for Hand Movement CalTech • Higher Cortex Signal /Intent Extraction Otto Bock • Prosthetic Components • Control Bus Architecture...Clinical Support APL • Program Management • System Engineering & Integration • Signal & Image processing • Virtual Reality & Controls RIC • Virtual

  14. Magnets in prosthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M A; Walmsley, A D; Harris, I R

    2001-08-01

    Magnetic retention is a popular method of attaching removable prostheses to either retained roots or osseointegrated implants. This review chronicles the development of magnets in dentistry and summarizes future research in their use. The literature was researched by using the Science Citation Index and Compendex Web from 1981 to 2000. Articles published before 1981 were hand researched from citations in other publications. Articles that discussed the use of magnets in relation to prosthetic dentistry were selected.

  15. [Dental ceramics: its history and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau, Thomas; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an historical background of dental ceramics. It synthesises the evolution of such material and its technical improvements from the stone-age to our time. Focusing on the importance of dental aesthetics, it shows the investigations realised to upgrade the prosthetic results.

  16. Development of prosthetic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilaru, Rohit

    The objective of this research was to embed tactile sensors in polyimides. This novel method could be utilized to realize prosthetic skin for sensing different kinds of mechanical stimuli. Tactile sensors have an increasing demand in medical sectors: upper and lower-limb prosthetics and in the industrial sectors: robot end-effectors, grippers and manipulators. The sensors developed are targeted for prosthetic arm tactile sensing applications. Current work presents piezoresistive differential pressure sensors fabricated on flexible polyimide film or substrate. A unique technique to bond a flexible superstrate polyimide layer to a MEMS tactile sensor array is presented in this thesis. The sensor is made of aluminium oxide membrane layer with nichrome piezoresistors as the half-Wheatstone bridge elements. Four different types of sensor designs have been characterized to obtain gauge factor of thin film nichrome. The sensor arrays with and without the superstrate film were simulated for obtaining the maximum stress, average strain and deflection of the membrane. The maximum change in output voltage was 0.8 mV. The gauge factors calculated for tactile sensor with superstrate range between 2.2 to 7.8 and without superstrate range 1.5 to 5.7.

  17. Design of a Compact, Reconfigurable, Prosthetic Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Zinck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a prosthetic wrist is the result of compromises between the function and the practicality of the device. Conventional prosthetic wrists use a single degree of freedom to produce pro/supination of the hand. It has not been demonstrated that this is the most functional alignment for a single axis. Previous work by the authors suggests that if the wrist must have only one rotatory axis then a more oblique orientation would be more functional. To test this idea, a compact wrist with a single axis and spherical design has been made that will allow any axis of rotation to be selected and the functional performance of the resulting arm be tested.

  18. Use of SIG device to accurately place permanent miniature dental implants to retain mandibular overdenture. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Harold I; Goodridge, Opal F

    2006-01-01

    A case of mini-dental implant insertion for retention of a mandibular overdenture in a hospitalized patient has been documented. The additional use of the SIG (drill guide) directional device in the implant placement protocol gave the practitioner more confidence and resulted in the proper alignment of the three ball-top, one-piece fixtures. The three implants were inserted exactly 1 cm apart and parallel to each other. The distal fixtures were approximately 1 cm away from the mental foramina, thereby eliminating the risk of lip paresthesia. Keeper caps were placed in the denture's intaglio after one month. The keeper caps allowed for proper retention of the overdenture. The caps also enabled the patient to easily insert and withdraw his denture, even though he displayed limited manual dexterity. The tissue response was excellent, and oral hygiene was made easier with adequate spacing of the exposed ball-tops. The overall experience for both the operator and the patient was very positive. General dentists should be able to readily master this technique and add it to their armamentarium for the benefit of all their patients.

  19. Upper extremity amputations and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Steven A; Askari, Morad

    2015-02-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions.

  20. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is a... between the teeth to reduce tooth decay. The fibers of the device may be coated with wax for easier...

  1. (Super)hydrophobic coating of orthodontic dental devices and reduction of early oral biofilm retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Adauê S; Kaizer, Marina R; Azevedo, Marina S; Ogliari, Fabrício A; Cenci, Maximiliano S; Moraes, Rafael R

    2015-11-03

    This study was designed to apply (super)hydrophobic crosslinked coatings by means of a sol-gel process on the surface of orthodontic devices and investigate the potential effect of these coatings in reducing the early retention of oral biofilm. Two organosilane-based hydrophobic solutions (HSs) were prepared containing hexadecyltrimethoxysilane diluted in ethanol (HS1) or 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (HS2). Stainless steel plates and ceramic discs were coated with HS1 or HS2 and heated at 150 °C for 2 h for condensation of a crosslinked SiO x network. Organosilane coatings were applied after previous, or no, surface sandblasting. Commercial stainless steel and ceramic brackets were used to evaluate oral biofilm retention after 12 h or 24 h of biofilm growth, using a microcosm model with human saliva as the inoculum. Surface roughness analysis (Ra, μm) indicated that sandblasting associated with organosilane coatings increased roughness for stainless steel brackets only. Analysis of the water contact angle showed that the stainless steel surface treated with HS1 was hydrophobic (~123°), while the ceramic surface treated with HS2 was superhydrophobic (~155°). Biofilm retention after 24 h was significantly lower in groups treated with hydrophobic coatings. An exponential reduction in biofilm accumulation was associated with increased water contact angle for both stainless steel and ceramic at 24 h. Application of (super)hydrophobic coatings on the surface of stainless steel and ceramic orthodontic devices might reduce the retention of oral biofilm.

  2. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  3. Nanoscale Properties of Neural Cell Prosthetic and Astrocyte Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, D. A.; Ayres, V. M.; Delgado-Rivera, R.; Ahmed, I.; Meiners, S. A.

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data from in-vivo investigations (rat model) suggest that a nanofiber prosthetic device of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-modified nanofibers can correctly guide regenerating axons across an injury gap with aligned functional recovery. Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy (SPRM) with auto-tracking of individual nanofibers is used for investigation of the key nanoscale properties of the nanofiber prosthetic device for central nervous system tissue engineering and repair. The key properties under SPRM investigation include nanofiber stiffness and surface roughness, nanofiber curvature, nanofiber mesh density and porosity, and growth factor presentation and distribution. Each of these factors has been demonstrated to have global effects on cell morphology, function, proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and differentiation. The effect of FGF-2 modification on the key nanoscale properties is investigated. Results from the nanofiber prosthetic properties investigations are correlated with astrocyte response to unmodified and FGF-2 modified scaffolds, using 2D planar substrates as a control.

  4. Thermoplastics for prosthetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, R B; Davies, R M

    1981-10-01

    The rapid and accurate thermoforming of plastics for prosthetic applications has been the subject of considerable research and development by the Bioengineering Centre. This paper outlines the progress in the general concepts that have been effected to date. The original below knee (B/K) socket vacuum forming technique has been extended to above knee (A/K) and supracondylar cases, and there have been developments in rotational casting technology. The work is necessarily based on a sound understanding of the properties of the materials concerned and of the associated manufacturing processes. The contribution of the Bioengineering Centre is outlined together with summaries of collaborative work carried out with other organizations.

  5. Pulsatile prosthetic valve flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W M; Snyder, A; Alchas, P; Rosenberg, G; Pierce, W S

    1980-01-01

    The laser Doppler system has been established as a useful tool for eliciting the properties of simulated cardiovascular flows, and thus for comparative studies of flow properties of prosthetic valves. Significant differences among valve types and between models of one type have been documented. The complex variations of velocity profiles with time show that comparisons must be made for unsteady pulsatile rather than steady flow, despite the volume and complexity of the data required. Future studies will include methods of compacting the data presentation and improving the details of the experimental stimulation.

  6. Preferences and flexibility in decision-making among dental clinicians regarding the treatment of multirooted teeth: an interactive communication device-based survey at two academic conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Decision-making by dental and medical experts can be influenced by their biases, interests, and experiences, and academic arguments about controversial issues may additionally be considered indirect experiences capable of affecting decision-making. This study reports on the use of interactive communication devices to evaluate preferences and flexibility in decision-making among dental care providers who attended two distinct academic conferences. Methods Two debates were presented by a team of two lecturers at two academic conferences (focusing on periodontology and implant dentistry, respectively) and the audience members of each session were surveyed. Before each lecture, two case modules about the diagnosis and treatment of multirooted molar lesions were provided, and interactive communication devices were used to collect responses about decision-making preferences in treatment planning immediately before and after a debate about treatment strategies. Results In total, 81 and 84 completed answers from both conferences were obtained for the first and second case modules, respectively. The preferred treatment plan differed significantly according to the focus of the conference, and a tendency emerged for the clinicians participating in each conference to express uniform preferences. However, attending the debates resulted in significant changes in decision-making preferences regardless of the conference focus or the characteristics of the participants. Conclusions Our findings suggest that providing continuing education via debates on controversial issues may be effective in widening conceptual knowledge and reducing biases among experts in the dental and medical fields. PMID:27382505

  7. New developments in prosthetic arm systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujaklija I

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Vujaklija,1 Dario Farina,1 Oskar C Aszmann2 1Institute of Neurorehabilitation Systems, Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Göttingen, Germany; 2Christian Doppler Laboratory for Restoration of Extremity Function, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Abstract: Absence of an upper limb leads to severe impairments in everyday life, which can further influence the social and mental state. For these reasons, early developments in cosmetic and body-driven prostheses date some centuries ago, and they have been evolving ever since. Following the end of the Second World War, rapid developments in technology resulted in powered myoelectric hand prosthetics. In the years to come, these devices were common on the market, though they still suffered high user abandonment rates. The reasons for rejection were trifold – insufficient functionality of the hardware, fragile design, and cumbersome control. In the last decade, both academia and industry have reached major improvements concerning technical features of upper limb prosthetics and methods for their interfacing and control. Advanced robotic hands are offered by several vendors and research groups, with a variety of active and passive wrist options that can be articulated across several degrees of freedom. Nowadays, elbow joint designs include active solutions with different weight and power options. Control features are getting progressively more sophisticated, offering options for multiple sensor integration and multi-joint articulation. Latest developments in socket designs are capable of facilitating implantable and multiple surface electromyography sensors in both traditional and osseointegration-based systems. Novel surgical techniques in combination with modern, sophisticated hardware are enabling restoration of dexterous upper limb

  8. Maxillofacial prosthetic materials- an inclination towards silicones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aparajita; Choudhary, Sunita; Garg, Hemlata; H G, Jagadeesh

    2014-12-01

    There have been constant searches and researches which are taking place in the field of dental materials to best suit the ideal selection criteria to satisfy the functionality, biocompatibility, aesthetics as well as the durability as a maxillofacial material. Among all the different materials, Silicone is the most popularly used, but still studies are carried out to overcome their weaknesses and to come out with a material which can be labeled as the "ideal maxillofacial prosthetic material". This article comprises the materials which were and are in use and the reason for their unpopularity. It also gives us a scope to understand the major fields where the materials lack and thus needs improvement to render an individual with the best maxillo-facial prosthesis.

  9. Toxicology of antimicrobial nanoparticles for prosthetic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Nuñez-Anita RE; Acosta-Torres LS; Vilar-Pineda J; Martínez-Espinosa JC; de la Fuente-Hernández J; Castaño VM

    2014-01-01

    Rosa Elvira Nuñez-Anita,1 Laura Susana Acosta-Torres,2 Jorge Vilar-Pineda,2 Juan Carlos Martínez-Espinosa,3 Javier de la Fuente-Hernández, 2 Víctor Manuel Castaño4 1Facultad de Medicina Veterinariay Zootecnia, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Tarìmbaro Municipio de Morelia, Michoacán, México; 2Escuela Nacionalde Estudios Superiores, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de M...

  10. Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in prosthetic infective endocarditis and cardiac implantable electronic device infection: comparison of different interpretation criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Ballve, Ana; Jesus Perez-Castejon, Maria; Carreras-Delgado, Jose L. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto C. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), University of La Rioja, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, La Rioja (Spain); Sanchez-Enrique, Cristina; Vilacosta, Isidre; Vivas, David; Olmos, Carmen [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Madrid (Spain); Ferrer, Manuel E.F. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Research Unit, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve (PV) infective endocarditis (IE) and infection of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) remains challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in these patients and analyse the interpretation criteria. We included 41 patients suspected of having IE by the Duke criteria who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The criteria applied for classifying the findings as positive/negative for IE were: (a) visual analysis of only PET images with attenuation-correction (AC PET images); (b) visual analysis of both AC PET images and PET images without AC (NAC PET images); (c) qualitative analysis of NAC PET images; and (d) semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was considered positive for IE independently of the intensity and distribution of FDG uptake. The gold standard was the Duke pathological criteria (if tissue was available) or the decision of an endocarditis expert team after a minimum 4 months follow-up. We studied 62 areas with suspicion of IE, 28 areas (45 %) showing definite IE and 34 (55 %) showing possible IE. Visual analysis of only AC PET images showed poor diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 20 %, specificity 57 %). Visual analysis of both AC PET and NAC PET images showed excellent sensitivity (100 %) and intermediate specificity (73 %), focal uptake being more frequently associated with IE. The accuracy of qualitative analysis of NAC PET images depended on the threshold: the maximum sensitivity, specificity and accuracy achieved were 88 %, 80 %, 84 %, respectively. In the semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images, SUVmax was higher in areas of confirmed IE than in those without IE (∇SUVmax 2.2, p < 0.001). When FDG uptake was twice that in the liver, IE was always confirmed, and SUVmax 5.5 was the optimal threshold for IE diagnosis using ROC curve analysis (area under the curve 0.71). The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected IE of PVs

  11. 21 CFR 868.5820 - Dental protector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental protector. 868.5820 Section 868.5820 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5820 Dental protector. (a) Identification. A dental protector is a device intended to protect a patient's teeth during manipulative procedures within...

  12. Devising the prosthetic prescription and typical examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passero, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Limb deficiency has a significant impact on the involved person, with upper limb absence presenting a materially different set of issues than lower limb absence. The primary objectives in fitting a patient with a prosthesis are to enhance their independence in performing daily activities, and to improve their quality of life. For lower limb absence, the primary issues are safety, stability, and the ability to ambulate in a manner consistent with their overall health. The primary objectives in prescribing upper limb prosthetics are function, durability, appearance, comfort, and usability of the device. This article discusses the nuances associated with managing these patients.

  13. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... intended for medical purposes to support, protect, or aid in the use of a cast, orthosis (brace), or prosthesis. Examples of prosthetic and orthotic accessories include the following: A pelvic support band and belt, a cast shoe, a cast bandage, a limb cover, a prosthesis alignment device, a postsurgical pylon,...

  14. Prosthetic arm monitoring system using a programmable interface controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaro, B A; Schoenberg, J S; Self, B P; Bagley, A

    2001-01-01

    Children with upper extremity limb deficiency are often prescribed a prosthetic arm to assist with daily function. Three types of prostheses are available: passive, active body-powered, and active myoelectric; costs range from $3,000 to $15,000. Clinicians rely on parent and child feedback regarding the usefulness of the prosthesis, and may assess the child's skill in using the device in a controlled setting. However, these methods do not provide an objective quantification of the wear and use of the device during daily activities. The purpose of this project is to develop a sensor to record the amount of time per day the prosthetic arm is worn, and to count the number of times per day the child activates (closes) the prosthetic hand (or terminal device). The system that has been developed can be integrated unobtrusively into a child's prosthetic arm. A programmable interface controller (PIC) with interface circuitry and memory was developed to record the daily wear pattern and hand usage of the prosthesis at 15-minute intervals. Memory and battery capacities are sufficient to record data over a three-month period. A personal computer interface downloads the collected data and may be used to reprogram the device for different time periods of data collection. All components, including the battery, have a mass of 87 grams and fit inside the forearm cavity of a 9-year old's prosthesis. Controlled trials are underway at Shriners Hospital for Children, Northern California, to determine system reliability.

  15. Dental practice during a world cruise: characterisation of oral health at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Bernhard A J; John, Mike T; Nitschke, Ina

    2006-01-01

    To describe oral health of passengers and crew attending the dental service aboard during a two months world cruise. In a retrospective, descriptive epidemiologic study design the routine documentation of all dental treatment provided at sea was analysed after the voyage. Subjects were n = 57 passengers (3.5 % of 1619) with a mean age of 71 (+/- 9.8) years and n =56 crew (5.6 % of 999) with a mean age of 37 (+/- 12.0) years. Age, gender, nationality, number of natural teeth and implants were extracted. The prosthetic status was described by recording the number of teeth replaced by fixed prosthesis and number of teeth replaced by removable prosthesis. Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) was measured using the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and characterised by the OHIP sum score. Women attended for treatment more often than men. Passengers had a mean number of 20 natural teeth plus substantial fixed and removable prosthodontics. Crew had a mean of 26 teeth. British crew and Australian passengers attended the dental service above average. Crew tended to have a higher average OHIP-14 sum score than passengers indicating an increased rate of perceived problems. Emergency patients from both crew and passengers have a higher sum score than patients attending for routine treatment. In passengers the average number of teeth appears to be higher than that of an age matched population of industrialized countries. However, the passengers' socioeconomic status was higher which has an effect on this finding. Socioeconomic factors also serve to explain the high standard of prosthetic care in passengers. Crew in general present with less sophisticated prosthetic devices. This is in line with their different socioeconomic status and origin from developing countries. The level of dental fees aboard in comparison to treatment costs in home countries may explain some of the differences in attendance. Passengers have enjoyed high standards of prosthetic care in

  16. Anticoagulation for Prosthetic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kaneko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of prosthetic valve requires consideration for anticoagulation. The current guideline recommends warfarin on all mechanical valves. Dabigatran is the new generation anticoagulation medication which is taken orally and does not require frequent monitoring. This drug is approved for treatment for atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism, but the latest large trial showed that this drug increases adverse events when used for mechanical valve anticoagulation. On-X valve is the new generation mechanical valve which is considered to require less anticoagulation due to its flow dynamics. The latest study showed that lower anticoagulation level lowers the incidence of bleeding, while the risk of thromboembolism and thrombosis remained the same. Anticoagulation poses dilemma in cases such as pregnancy and major bleeding event. During pregnancy, warfarin can be continued throughout pregnancy and switched to heparin derivative during 6–12 weeks and >36 weeks of gestation. Warfarin can be safely started after 1-2 weeks of discontinuation following major bleeding episode.

  17. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image.

  18. Surgical templates for dental implant positioning; current knowledge and clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zaheer Kola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants have been used in a variety of different forms for many years. Since the mid-20 th century, there has been an increase in interest in the implant process for the replacement of missing teeth. Branemark was one of the initial pioneers who applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms an immobile connection with bone. The need for a dental implant to completely address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the surgical and handling protocol. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have serious shortcomings related to their bony union and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. However, anatomic limitation and restorative demands encourage the surgeon to gain precision in planning and surgical positioning of dental implants. Ideal placement of the implant facilitates the establishment of favorable forces on the implants and the prosthetic component as well as ensures an aesthetic outcome. Therefore, it is advisable to establish a logical continuity between the planned restoration and the surgical phases, it is essential to use a transfer device that for sure increases the predictability of success. The surgical guide template is fabricated by a dental technician after the presurgical restorative appointments that primarily include determination of occlusal scheme and implant angulations. Here, authors genuinely attempted to review the evolution and clinical applicability of surgical templates used in the placement of dental implants.

  19. 21 CFR 872.6890 - Intraoral dental wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral dental wax. 872.6890 Section 872.6890...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6890 Intraoral dental wax. (a) Identification. Intraoral dental wax is a device made of wax intended to construct patterns from which custom made...

  20. 21 CFR 872.4620 - Fiber optic dental light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fiber optic dental light. 872.4620 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4620 Fiber optic dental light. (a) Identification. A fiber optic dental light is a device that is a light, usually AC-powered, that consists of glass or...

  1. 21 CFR 872.4630 - Dental operating light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental operating light. 872.4630 Section 872.4630...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4630 Dental operating light. (a) Identification. A dental operating light, including the surgical headlight, is an AC-powered device intended to illuminate...

  2. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872.6640... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6640 Dental operative unit and accessories. (a) Identification. A dental operative unit and accessories is an AC-powered device that is...

  3. Rehabilitation regimes based upon psychophysical studies of prosthetic vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. C.; Suaning, G. J.; Morley, J. W.; Lovell, N. H.

    2009-06-01

    Human trials of prototype visual prostheses have successfully elicited visual percepts (phosphenes) in the visual field of implant recipients blinded through retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Researchers are progressing rapidly towards a device that utilizes individual phosphenes as the elementary building blocks to compose a visual scene. This form of prosthetic vision is expected, in the near term, to have low resolution, large inter-phosphene gaps, distorted spatial distribution of phosphenes, restricted field of view, an eccentrically located phosphene field and limited number of expressible luminance levels. In order to fully realize the potential of these devices, there needs to be a training and rehabilitation program which aims to assist the prosthesis recipients to understand what they are seeing, and also to adapt their viewing habits to optimize the performance of the device. Based on the literature of psychophysical studies in simulated and real prosthetic vision, this paper proposes a comprehensive, theoretical training regime for a prosthesis recipient: visual search, visual acuity, reading, face/object recognition, hand-eye coordination and navigation. The aim of these tasks is to train the recipients to conduct visual scanning, eccentric viewing and reading, discerning low-contrast visual information, and coordinating bodily actions for visual-guided tasks under prosthetic vision. These skills have been identified as playing an important role in making prosthetic vision functional for the daily activities of their recipients.

  4. Parameter Estimation Technique of Nonlinear Prosthetic Hand System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.Jali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrated the parameter estimation technique of motorized prosthetic hand system. Prosthetic hands have become importance device to help amputee to gain a normal functional hand. By integrating various types of actuators such as DC motor, hydraulic and pneumatic as well as mechanical part, a highly useful and functional prosthetic device can be produced. One of the first steps to develop a prosthetic device is to design a control system. Mathematical modeling is derived to ease the control design process later on. This paper explained the parameter estimation technique of a nonlinear dynamic modeling of the system using Lagrangian equation. The model of the system is derived by considering the energies of the finger when it is actuated by the DC motor. The parameter estimation technique is implemented using Simulink Design Optimization toolbox in MATLAB. All the parameters are optimized until it achieves a satisfactory output response. The results show that the output response of the system with parameter estimation value produces a better response compare to the default value

  5. The scientific justification of the preparation's algorithm of the patients for oral prosthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Antonova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic and diagnostic activity is a collective work that is carried out jointly by specialists in different directions of dentistry and support units. The main goal of this type of activity is to improve the dental health by preventing dental diseases. It includes the treatment and rehabilitation using various ways of replacement of the lost integrity of the dentition and restoration of the teeth using a prosthetic. In order to do this, it is necessary to prepare the teeth and the pulp of the oral cavity for prosthetics. The sequence of preparatory activities includes a series of steps carried out in sequence: preventive, hygienic, therapeutic (including periodontal, surgical and orthopedic (including orthodontics. Each of these stages includes a series of manipulations, the sequence and number of which is determined by the individual dental status of each patient. The inspection and preparation of a comprehensive plan for the treatment involves a sequence of all these actions carried out by a team of experts in agreement with the patient, evidenced by the «informed consent» subscription. After the preparatory activities, it is possible to go to the final stage, that is to make a prosthetic appliance to the patient. The total duration of all phases of preparatory activities preceding the prosthetics depends on the complexity of the steps themselves, and is determined by the severity of the related dental diseases. The treatment of these diseases is the main part of the preparatory activities.

  6. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    technologies pursued in Task 1: Reconfigurable Sockets was determined to have promise in allowing sockets to be adjusted after manufacture . The most likely...overheating in the socket, and this concept may be suitable for commercialization efforts in the future. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing ...and manufacturing of prosthetic systems to increase durability and comfort, and on giving medical personnel tools to aid in the care of our most

  7. Methods for characterization of mechanical and electrical prosthetic vacuum pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolafe, Oluseeni; Wood, Sean; Caldwell, Ryan; Hansen, Andrew; Fatone, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasingly widespread adoption of vacuum-assisted suspension systems in prosthetic clinical practices, there remain gaps in the body of scientific knowledge guiding clinicians' choices of existing products. In this study, we identified important pump-performance metrics and developed techniques to objectively characterize the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pumps. The sensitivity of the proposed techniques was assessed by characterizing the evacuation performance of two electrical (Harmony e-Pulse [Ottobock; Duderstadt, Germany] and LimbLogic VS [Ohio Willow Wood; Mt. Sterling, Ohio]) and three mechanical (Harmony P2, Harmony HD, and Harmony P3 [Ottobock]) prosthetic pumps in bench-top testing. Five fixed volume chambers ranging from 33 cm(3) (2 in.(3)) to 197 cm(3) (12 in.(3)) were used to represent different air volume spaces between a prosthetic socket and a liner-clad residual limb. All measurements were obtained at a vacuum gauge pressure of 57.6 kPa (17 inHg). The proposed techniques demonstrated sensitivity to the different electrical and mechanical pumps and, to a lesser degree, to the different setting adjustments of each pump. The sensitivity was less pronounced for the mechanical pumps, and future improvements for testing of mechanical vacuum pumps were proposed. Overall, this study successfully offers techniques feasible as standards for assessing the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pump devices.

  8. Methods for characterization of mechanical and electrical prosthetic vacuum pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluseeni Komolafe, PhD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasingly widespread adoption of vacuum-assisted suspension systems in prosthetic clinical practices, there remain gaps in the body of scientific knowledge guiding clinicians’ choices of existing products. In this study, we identified important pump-performance metrics and developed techniques to objectively characterize the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pumps. The sensitivity of the proposed techniques was assessed by characterizing the evacuation performance of two electrical (Harmony e-Pulse [Ottobock; Duderstadt, Germany] and LimbLogic VS [Ohio Willow Wood; Mt. Sterling, Ohio] and three mechanical (Harmony P2, Harmony HD, and Harmony P3 [Ottobock] prosthetic pumps in bench-top testing. Five fixed volume chambers ranging from 33 cm3 (2 in.3 to 197 cm3 (12 in.3 were used to represent different air volume spaces between a prosthetic socket and a liner-clad residual limb. All measurements were obtained at a vacuum gauge pressure of 57.6 kPa (17 inHg. The proposed techniques demonstrated sensitivity to the different electrical and mechanical pumps and, to a lesser degree, to the different setting adjustments of each pump. The sensitivity was less pronounced for the mechanical pumps, and future improvements for testing of mechanical vacuum pumps were proposed. Overall, this study successfully offers techniques feasible as standards for assessing the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pump devices.

  9. The use of underactuation in prosthetic grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Kyberd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Underactuation as a method of driving prosthetic hands has a long history. The pragmatic requirements of such a device to be light enough to be worn and used regularly have meant that any multi degree of freedom prosthetic hand must have fewer actuators than the usable degrees of freedom. Aesthetics ensures that while the hand needs five fingers, five actuators have considerable mass, and only in recent years has it even been possible to construct a practical anthropomorphic hand with five motors. Thus there is an important trade off as to which fingers are driven, and which joints on which fingers are actuated, and how the forces are distributed to create a functional device. This paper outlines some of the historical solutions created for this problem and includes those designs of recent years that are now beginning to be used in the commercial environment.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  10. Nitinol for Prosthetic and Orthotic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emma; Buis, Arjan

    2011-07-01

    As global populations age, conditions such as stroke and diabetes require individuals to use rehabilitation technology for many years to come due to chronic musculoskeletal, sensory, and other physical impairments. One in four males currently aged 45 will experience a stroke within 40 years and will often require access to prolonged rehabilitation. In addition, worldwide, one individual loses a limb every 30 s due to the complications of diabetes. As a result, innovative ideas are required to devise more effective prosthetic and orthotic devices to enhance quality of life. While Nitinol has already found much favor within the biomedical industry, one area, which has not yet exploited its unique properties, is in the field of physical rehabilitation, ranging from prosthetic and orthotic devices to assistive technology such as wheelchairs. Improved intervention capabilities based on materials such as Nitinol have the potential to vastly improve patients' quality of life and in the case of orthoses, may even reduce the severity of the condition over time. It is hoped that this study will spark discussion and interest for the materials community in a field which has yet to be fully exploited.

  11. Prosthetic stomatitis with removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozalieva Yu.Yu.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Research Objective: To study patients with prosthetic stomatitis, who use the removable laminar dentures. Materials: The consultations and treatment of 79 patients aged 47-65 years have been conducted. The patients have been divided into two clinical groups. The first clinical group (39 persons with the performance of immediate prosthet-ics; the second control clinical group (40 persons — the permanent dentures were produced without the preliminary instruction. Results: All the patients, having the laminar dentures without the preliminary use of immediate constructions of dentures, in spite of repeated correction of them, have had changes of dentures and transitory fold. Patients have been exposed to prosthetic stomatitis of different etiology (without trauma; the single-shot or multiple correction of dentures by the method of rebasing with using of cold cure plastics has been made. Conclusion: Structural and functional changes of dentition during the prosthetic stomatitis lead to disorders, associated by the mucositis. Use of the term of «prosthetic stomatitis» reflects etiological and pathogenetic component of changes in the denture-supporting tissues

  12. An illusionary prosthetic design for a unilateral cleft palate patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andaç Barkın Bavbek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosthetic rehabilitation is an important part of the cleft lip and palate therapy assisting orthodontic and orthognathic treatments. Prosthesis does not only help to improve function and aesthetics but also needs to facilitate a better oral health. The aim of this report is to introduce the prosthetic approach of a 21-year-old female unilateral cleft palate patient that considered reinforcing the mobile canine adjacent to the cleft, easing the elimination of dental plaque from the remaining fistula and reaching an accurate occlusion. Facial aesthetics was established by the illusionary effect of a removable crown complex which is joined onto a fixed partial denture with a precision attachment system.

  13. A newer approach in positioning teeth for dental prosthetics using lateral cephalometric, trans-cranial radiographs, and the Denar-Witzig articulator: a case of hypodontia in an adolescent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapra, A; White, G E

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally in full denture prosthetics, anterior teeth are set on the models, independent of the effects on the face. More enlightened dentists, will then adjust the wax-up for speech, and some effects on the lips. Consideration is infrequently given to restoring the face by repositioning the teeth and mandible. Rarely is thought given to the effects of occlusion on the posture of the body. This report uses several techniques to restore facial esthetics and body posture. The techniques used include a cephalometric radiograph, transcranial radiographs, an articulator that has an adjustable "TMJ" (Denar-Witzig), and Symmetrigraf Posture Chart. This clinical report describes a newer approach in the positioning of maxillary anterior teeth for a patient with hypodontia and nail dysplasia syndrome, and the overall effect of this approach on the face and posture of the patient. Conventionally the precise form of the maxillary wax rim is fabricated with considerable variation from technician to another, based on the technicians training. This variation is evident on the position of the labial aspect of the rim horizontally and vertically. The wax rim is then further adjusted chair side based on subjective evaluation of the face. The maxillary anterior teeth position is established without considering that the lip position is not yet accustomed to the wax rim.

  14. Amputations and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzur, M S

    1999-01-01

    The author presents in a condensed way an overview of the principles of limb amputations and further treatment of patients who underwent such a procedure. The metabolic cost of walking, load transfer, and wound healing are reviewed in a concise manner. Particular attention is given to blood supply to the wound and methods to determine adequate perfusion with a clear analysis of the pro and cons of the Doppler method. Pediatric amputations, because of their specificity, are considered apart. Disarticulation of limbs is the method of choice in children, because of it retains growth potential of the bone and prevents bony overgrowth of the stump. The article discusses the main indications for limb amputations: trauma, peripheral vascular disease, musculoskeletal tumors and gas gangrene. In every case the specificity of the amputation is considered by the author. Postoperative care is also presented, with a short description of possible complications. Pain is the most common and treatment strategies should be similar to those used in treating patients with major reflex sympathetic causalgia. Edema, joint contracture, wound failure and dermatologic problems are all shortly reviewed. The last part of the article treats with the principles of prosthetics in both the upper and lower limb. These principles are presented basing on the level of amputation: for the upper limb hand, transradial, transhumeral amputations and shoulder disarticulation. For the lower limb foot and ankle, transtibial and transfemoral amputations are considered.

  15. Impact of advanced manufacturing technology on prosthetic and orthotic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D

    1988-04-01

    Radical changes in the technology applied to prosthetics and orthotics are being proposed. This paper attempts to define the scope and character of advanced manufacturing technology and examines the rehabilitation problems which are or could be tackled. Lower-limb prosthetics has been the major area under investigation so far, but orthopaedic footwear, spinal orthotics and custom seating for the disabled have also been investigated using similar technological approaches. The whole process of patient measurement, device design, and component manufacture is conceived as an integrated system relying upon shape or tissue property sensing, computer based device design and computer-numerically-controlled or robot manufacturing processes. The aim is to retain flexibility for custom design which is necessary to provide for individual patients, and yet improve the rapidity and precision of overall device manufacture and service delivery.

  16. Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been broadly termed dental fluorosis. What is dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is a condition that causes ... less than 2 milligrams per liter. What causes dental fluorosis? Dental fluorosis is caused by taking in ...

  17. Smartphones as image processing systems for prosthetic vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Marc P; Matteucci, Paul B; Lovell, Nigel H; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of implants for prosthetic vision has been demonstrated by research and commercial organizations. In most devices, an essential forerunner to the internal stimulation circuit is an external electronics solution for capturing, processing and relaying image information as well as extracting useful features from the scene surrounding the patient. The capabilities and multitude of image processing algorithms that can be performed by the device in real-time plays a major part in the final quality of the prosthetic vision. It is therefore optimal to use powerful hardware yet to avoid bulky, straining solutions. Recent publications have reported of portable single-board computers fast enough for computationally intensive image processing. Following the rapid evolution of commercial, ultra-portable ARM (Advanced RISC machine) mobile devices, the authors investigated the feasibility of modern smartphones running complex face detection as external processing devices for vision implants. The role of dedicated graphics processors in speeding up computation was evaluated while performing a demanding noise reduction algorithm (image denoising). The time required for face detection was found to decrease by 95% from 2.5 year old to recent devices. In denoising, graphics acceleration played a major role, speeding up denoising by a factor of 18. These results demonstrate that the technology has matured sufficiently to be considered as a valid external electronics platform for visual prosthetic research.

  18. Development of a prototype over-actuated biomimetic prosthetic hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Williams

    Full Text Available The loss of a hand can greatly affect quality of life. A prosthetic device that can mimic normal hand function is very important to physical and mental recuperation after hand amputation, but the currently available prosthetics do not fully meet the needs of the amputee community. Most prosthetic hands are not dexterous enough to grasp a variety of shaped objects, and those that are tend to be heavy, leading to discomfort while wearing the device. In order to attempt to better simulate human hand function, a dexterous hand was developed that uses an over-actuated mechanism to form grasp shape using intrinsic joint mounted motors in addition to a finger tendon to produce large flexion force for a tight grip. This novel actuation method allows the hand to use small actuators for grip shape formation, and the tendon to produce high grip strength. The hand was capable of producing fingertip flexion force suitable for most activities of daily living. In addition, it was able to produce a range of grasp shapes with natural, independent finger motion, and appearance similar to that of a human hand. The hand also had a mass distribution more similar to a natural forearm and hand compared to contemporary prosthetics due to the more proximal location of the heavier components of the system. This paper describes the design of the hand and controller, as well as the test results.

  19. Development of a prototype over-actuated biomimetic prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Matthew R; Walter, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The loss of a hand can greatly affect quality of life. A prosthetic device that can mimic normal hand function is very important to physical and mental recuperation after hand amputation, but the currently available prosthetics do not fully meet the needs of the amputee community. Most prosthetic hands are not dexterous enough to grasp a variety of shaped objects, and those that are tend to be heavy, leading to discomfort while wearing the device. In order to attempt to better simulate human hand function, a dexterous hand was developed that uses an over-actuated mechanism to form grasp shape using intrinsic joint mounted motors in addition to a finger tendon to produce large flexion force for a tight grip. This novel actuation method allows the hand to use small actuators for grip shape formation, and the tendon to produce high grip strength. The hand was capable of producing fingertip flexion force suitable for most activities of daily living. In addition, it was able to produce a range of grasp shapes with natural, independent finger motion, and appearance similar to that of a human hand. The hand also had a mass distribution more similar to a natural forearm and hand compared to contemporary prosthetics due to the more proximal location of the heavier components of the system. This paper describes the design of the hand and controller, as well as the test results.

  20. Combined orthognathic surgery and prosthetic treatment for class III skeletal malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Dias Wellar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical report discusses the case of a partially edentulous patient with class III skeletal malocclusion, suffering from poor masticatory function and esthetic appearance caused by severe anteroposterior discrepancy between the dental arches and loss of occlusal vertical dimension. The functional and esthetic rehabilitation was performed with orthognathic surgery followed by prosthetic treatment using an overlay removable partial denture. At the end of the treatment, the patient was successfully rehabilitated, both functionally and esthetically, through reestablishment of the occlusal vertical dimension and correction of the anteroposterior discrepancy between the dental arches. The overlay removable partial denture is a simple and time-efficient alternative in the treatment of partially edentulous patients with class III skeletal malocclusions and small anteroposterior discrepancies between dental arches. Additionally, an esthetic smile and functional rehabilitation of the stomatognathic system was satisfactorily obtained with orthognathic surgery followed by prosthetic treatment.

  1. Compact prosthetic hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, W. A.; Wiker, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    Device combines tilt, wrist-rotation, and grasping mechanisms in single housing. Main body is about 15 centimeters long and 7.5 centimeters wide. Reduced weight and increased flexibility result from redesign and rearrangement of components.

  2. Reprocessing of dental instruments in washer-disinfectors: does a representative test soil exist in dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Alexander; Bristela, Margit; Stauffer, Fritz

    2012-01-01

    Reprocessing of medical devices, being classified as semi-critical B is recommended to be performed in a washer-disinfector. In order to estimate, whether the expected contaminants of the various medical disciplines can be effectively removed by this washer-disinfector, different so called "test soils" have been proposed to be tested as a marker of cleaning efficacy of the disinfector. Todays described test soils are optimised for the testing of contaminations occurring in surgical procedures, but not for dental procedures. In this study the test soils being proposed in the EN 15883-5 (e.g. KMNE soil, recipe by Koller and coagulated sheep's blood) were compared with 8 reference substances used in the conservative-prosthetic dental practice. The success of the cleaning efficacy in the washer-disinfector was checked visually and by determining the residual protein concentration on the contaminated instruments after the cleaning procedure. It could be shown that in contrast to the proposed test soils of the EN 15883-5, the used reference substances of the dental practice could not be removed by the washer-disinfector. Removal of these reference substances was only possible after manual or ultrasonic cleaning. Since blood plays a subordinate role as a contaminant of instruments during conservative-prosthetic dental treatments, testing of the cleaning efficacy of the washer-disinfector with test soils according to the proposals of the EN 15883-5 is not representative in this discipline of dentistry. Most of the materials used in dental practice can only be removed manually or with the help of the ultrasound bath.

  3. The role of virtual articulator in prosthetic and restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralakunte, Pavankumar Ravi; Aljanakh, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Virtual reality is a computer based technology linked with the future of dentistry and dental practice. The virtual articulator is one such application in prosthetic and restorative dentistry based on virtual reality that will significantly reduce the limitations of the mechanical articulator, and by simulation of real patient data, allow analyses with regard to static and dynamic occlusion as well as to jaw relation. It is the purpose of this article to present the concepts and strategies for a future replacement of the mechanical articulator by a virtual one. Also, a brief note on virtual reality haptic system has been highlighted along with newly developed touch enabled virtual articulator.

  4. 21 CFR 872.4565 - Dental hand instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... chisel, endodontic broach, dental wax carver, endodontic pulp canal file, hand instrument for calculus... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental hand instrument. 872.4565 Section 872.4565...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4565 Dental hand instrument. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 872.4920 - Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4920 Dental electrosurgical unit and accessories. (a) Identification. A dental electrosurgical unit and accessories is an AC-powered...

  6. Is the Prosthetic Homologue Necessary for Embodiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Chelsea; Swanston, Michelle; Cassella, Joseph; Beasley, Casey; Green, Jacob; Moshayev, Yonatan; Wininger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of five hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology) is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered) set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures). Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation. PMID:28066228

  7. Is the prosthetic homologue necessary for embodiment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Dornfeld

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of 5 hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures. Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation.

  8. Gaitography applied to prosthetic walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Cutti, Andrea G; Summa, Aurora; Monari, Davide; Veronesi, Davide; van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Beek, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    During walking on an instrumented treadmill with an embedded force platform or grid of pressure sensors, center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories exhibit a characteristic butterfly-like shape, reflecting the medio-lateral and anterior-posterior weight shifts associated with alternating steps. We define "gaitography" as the analysis of such COP trajectories during walking (the "gaitograms"). It is currently unknown, however, if gaitography can be employed to characterize pathological gait, such as lateralized gait impairments. We therefore registered gaitograms for a heterogeneous sample of persons with a trans-femoral and trans-tibial amputation during treadmill walking at a self-selected comfortable speed. We found that gaitograms directly visualize between-person differences in prosthetic gait in terms of step width and the relative duration of prosthetic and non-prosthetic single-support stance phases. We further demonstrated that one should not only focus on the gaitogram's shape but also on the time evolution along that shape, given that the COP evolves much slower in the single-support phase than in the double-support phase. Finally, commonly used temporal and spatial prosthetic gait characteristics were derived, revealing both individual and systematic differences in prosthetic and non-prosthetic step lengths, step times, swing times, and double-support durations. Because gaitograms can be rapidly collected in an unobtrusive and markerless manner over multiple gait cycles without constraining foot placement, clinical application of gaitography seems both expedient and appealing. Studies examining the repeatability of gaitograms and evaluating gaitography-based gait characteristics against a gold standard with known validity and reliability are required before gaitography can be clinically applied.

  9. Myoelectric control of prosthetic hands: state-of-the-art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geethanjali P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purushothaman Geethanjali School of Electrical Engineering Department of Control and Automation VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India Abstract: Myoelectric signals (MES have been used in various applications, in particular, for identification of user intention to potentially control assistive devices for amputees, orthotic devices, and exoskeleton in order to augment capability of the user. MES are also used to estimate force and, hence, torque to actuate the assistive device. The application of MES is not limited to assistive devices, and they also find potential applications in teleoperation of robots, haptic devices, virtual reality, and so on. The myoelectric control-based prosthetic hand aids to restore activities of daily living of amputees in order to improve the self-esteem of the user. All myoelectric control-based prosthetic hands may not have similar operations and exhibit variation in sensing input, deciphering the signals, and actuating prosthetic hand. Researchers are focusing on improving the functionality of prosthetic hand in order to suit the user requirement with the different operating features. The myoelectric control differs in operation to accommodate various external factors. This article reviews the state of the art of myoelectric prosthetic hand, giving description of each control strategy. Keywords: EMG, assistive device, amputee, myoelectric control, electric powered, body ­powered, bioelectric signal control

  10. Resource-efficient proces chains to manufacture patient-specific prosthetic fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Hagedorn-Hansen, D.; Oosthuizen, G. A.; Gerhold, T.

    2016-01-01

    The high cost of quality prostheses, together with the lack of trained prosthetists, makes it challenging to obtain prosthetic devices in developing communities. Modern 3D digitising techniques and additive manufacturing (AM) technologies are gaining popularity in the bio-medical industry and, in the case of prosthesis production, reduce the need for a trained prosthetist. The objective of this research was to develop a new resource-efficient process chain for the manufacturing of prosthetic ...

  11. The effect of sterilization and number of use on the accuracy of friction-style mechanical torque limiting devices for dental implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fayaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mechanical torque limiting devices (MTLDs are necessary tools to control a peak torque and achieving target values of screw component of dental implants. Due to probable effect of autoclaving and number of use on the accuracy of these devices, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of sterilization and number of use on the accuracy of friction-style mechanical torque limiting devices (F-S MTLDs in achieving their target torque values. Materials and Methods: Peak torque measurements of 15 new F-S MTLDs from three different manufacturers (Astra Tech, BioHorizons, Dr. Idhe were measured ten times before and after 100 steam sterilization using a digital torque gauge. To simulate the clinical situation of aging (number of use target torque application process was repeated 10 times after each sterilization cycle and the peak torque values were registered. Comparison of the mean differences with target torque in each cycle was performed using one sample t test. Considering the type of MTLDs as inter subject comparison, One-way repeated measure ANOVA was used to evaluate the absolute values of differences between devices of each manufacturer in each group (α = 0.05. Results: The results of this study in Dr. Idhe group showed that, mean of difference values significantly differed from the target torque (P = 0.002 until 75 cycles. In Astra Tech group, also mean of difference values with under estimation trend, showed a significant difference with the target torque (P < 0.001. Mean of difference values significantly differed from the target torque with under estimation trend during all the 100 cycles in BioHorizons group (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The torque output of each individual device stayed in 10% difference from target torque values before 100 sterilization cycles, but more than 10% difference from the target torque was seen in varying degrees during these consequent cycles.

  12. Artifacts by dental materials on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jung [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a valuable method for evaluation of the head and neck. Unfortunately, metallic devices associated with certain dental fillings and appliances often cause variable artifacts that can obscure normal or pathologic conditions on MR and computed tomography. In this work, we assessed the MR appearance of dental prosthetic materials in vitro and in vivo including precious alloys, nonprecions alloys, resin, amalgam and titanium alloy. For in vivo studies, these materials were placed in healthy volunteer's mouths and then images were assessed. Analysis of the appearance of shape and extent of artifact, and observed influence of these artifacts on the image interpretation at 0.2 Tesla permanent type MR scanner were valuated. Material used as temporary or permanent filling of crowns such as amalgam, precious alloy and, microfilled resin did not cause artifact on the image. The size of the artifact produced by the nonprecious alloys was influenced by the ferromagnetism of the object and the volume prosthesis, and was related to the scanning sequence. Nonprecious alloys produced minimal local signal distortion, where precious alloys, and dental resin had no effect on the MR images in vivo. These results were mainly from a low field strength MR scanner used in this study.

  13. Neural-Network Control Of Prosthetic And Robotic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic neural networks proposed for use in controlling robotic and prosthetic hands and exoskeletal or glovelike electromechanical devices aiding intact but nonfunctional hands. Specific to patient, who activates grasping motion by voice command, by mechanical switch, or by myoelectric impulse. Patient retains higher-level control, while lower-level control provided by neural network analogous to that of miniature brain. During training, patient teaches miniature brain to perform specialized, anthropomorphic movements unique to himself or herself.

  14. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    regions either smeared unacceptably or the joint between the disparate regions was unacceptably weak during thermoforming events. The solution was to...The thin sheets were able to survive the thermoforming process and function as sensors. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI

  15. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  16. Myoelectric control of prosthetic hands: state-of-the-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geethanjali, Purushothaman

    2016-01-01

    Myoelectric signals (MES) have been used in various applications, in particular, for identification of user intention to potentially control assistive devices for amputees, orthotic devices, and exoskeleton in order to augment capability of the user. MES are also used to estimate force and, hence, torque to actuate the assistive device. The application of MES is not limited to assistive devices, and they also find potential applications in teleoperation of robots, haptic devices, virtual reality, and so on. The myoelectric control-based prosthetic hand aids to restore activities of daily living of amputees in order to improve the self-esteem of the user. All myoelectric control-based prosthetic hands may not have similar operations and exhibit variation in sensing input, deciphering the signals, and actuating prosthetic hand. Researchers are focusing on improving the functionality of prosthetic hand in order to suit the user requirement with the different operating features. The myoelectric control differs in operation to accommodate various external factors. This article reviews the state of the art of myoelectric prosthetic hand, giving description of each control strategy.

  17. Description of Causes and Treatment Types Made in Teeth with Biological Space Invasion and/or in Need of Pre-Prosthetic Surgery: Case series

    OpenAIRE

    Machón, Lourdes; Universidad Evangélica de El Salvador; Hernández, Morena; Universidad Evangélica de El Salvador; Espinoza, Manuel Antonio; Universidad Evangélica de El Salvador; Hidalgo de Andrade, Laura Elena; Universidad Evangélica de El Salvador; Andrade Acevedo, Roberto Antonio; Universidad Evangélica de El Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Background: The decision to rehabilitate or extract a tooth is determined by the knowledge of the causes of dental destruction affecting treatment plan and prognosis. Aim: Describe indications, surgical periodontal therapy prior to dental restoration, most affected teeth and age of the patients with invasion of biological space (IBS) and/or pre-prosthetic surgery. Methods: This is a case series report of 162 patients, male and female, who were treated at the predoctoral dental program of Univ...

  18. Impact testing of the residual limb: System response to changes in prosthetic stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Boutwell, PhD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, it is unknown whether changing prosthetic limb stiffness affects total limb stiffness and/or influences the shock absorption of an individual with transtibial amputation. The hypotheses tested within this study are that a decrease in longitudinal prosthetic stiffness will produce (1 reduced total limb stiffness and (2 reduced magnitude of peak impact forces and increased time delay to peak force. Fourteen subjects with a transtibial amputation participated in this study. Prosthetic stiffness was modified by means of a shock-absorbing pylon that provides reduced longitudinal stiffness through compression of a helical spring within the pylon. A sudden loading evaluation device was built to examine changes in limb loading mechanics during a sudden impact event. No significant change was found in the peak force magnitude or timing of the peak force between prosthetic limb stiffness conditions. Total limb stiffness estimates ranged from 14.9 to 17.9 kN/m but were not significantly different between conditions. Thus, the prosthetic-side total limb stiffness was unaffected by changes in prosthetic limb stiffness. The insensitivity of the total limb stiffness to prosthetic stiffness may be explained by the mechanical characteristics (i.e., stiffness and damping of the anatomical tissue within the residual limb.

  19. ServoSEA concept: Cheap, miniature series-elastic actuators for orthotic, prosthetic and robotic hands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ates, S.; Sluiter, V.I.; Lammertse, P.; Stienen, A.H.A.

    2014-01-01

    For interactive humanoids, rehabilitation robots, and orthotic and prosthetic devices, the human-robot interaction is an essential but challenging element. Compliant Series-Elastic Actuators (SEAs) are ideal to power such devices due to their low impedance and smoothness of generated forces. In this

  20. The method and device for thermoregulation and optimization of dental material′s quality and working time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ashnagar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: No one can cast a shadow of doubt on the fact that temperature is a key element in dentistry. Temperature control enable dentists in a variety of clinical fields to perform more convenient. Frozen slab is a known method for manipulating temperature before mixing cements. But lack of precise temperature and infection control is bolded. Clinical innovation: The present apparatus determines a method for temperature control in routine dentistry tasks; namely restorative dentistry, prosthesis and even injections. This device is capable of whether heating or cooling materials using low voltage electricity. Peltier or thermoelectric effect is the mechanism behind this device. As operator sets a temperature, device would provide it via metal pads arranged on it in seconds. Discussion: Other common methods used in dentistry have some issues regarding power usage, infection control, size and etc. However, this device is small, cost effective, simple to use and has fast action. Infection control can be actively be maintained with it. This device is a promising alternative for this purpose. Present manuscript summarizes device properties and its potential utilities in dentistry.

  1. CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION AND ESTIMATION OF IATROGENIC PROSTHETIC FACTORS – SEMIOLOGY AND SYMPTOMATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. LUCA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The principles lying at the basis of a balanced dental occlusion cannot be analyzed separately, but only if considering the teeth (and, implicitly, dental occlusion as integrated into the masticatory system, which includes the masticatory muscles, the temporo-mandibu‑ lary joint and the maxillary bones. Scope: The scope of the present study was to correlate and establish the interde‑ pendence between the morpholgically-incorrect prosthetic works and the tissular and functional damages suffered by the neighbouring structures, as a result of some incor‑ rectly-made prosthetic works. Also, the study aims at iden‑ tifying the factors and limits responsible for a prolongued maintenance of such irreversible pathological modificati‑ ons within an asymptomatic zone for the patient. Materials and method: The working hypothesis of the present inves‑ tigation started from the analysis of the various objective signs, versus the morphology of the incorrectly performed prosthetic works. The study, initiated as early as 2009, in a private stomatological clinics (DentEstet, Bucuresti, includes a number of 500 patients (250 women and 250 men, selected among the patients having addressed the stomatological office from various reasons (not always related to the prosthetic pathology of the cases here under investigation. Included in the study have been only the patients with fixed prosthetic works associated with one or several of the previously described objective signs, potentially induced by the iatrogeneicity of the prosthetic works. Results: The pathological effects of the iatrogenic works here under analysis, upon both the antagonistic and prosthetic support teeth, may be clinically identified during a minute examination performed prior to produ‑ cing irreversible final effects (abrasions, fractures, dental mobility, etc.. Such noxious effects of the iatrogenic pros‑ thetic works appear as a false masticatory comfort and as a

  2. Suppression effects of dental glass-ceramics with polarization-induced highly dense surface charges against bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Kosuke; Koizumi, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Naohiro; Nakamura, Miho; Okura, Toshinori; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nagai, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and antibacterial ability capacity of surface-improved dental glass-ceramics by an electrical polarization process. Commercially available dental glass-ceramic materials were electrically polarized to induce surface charges in a direct current field by heating. The surface morphology, chemical composition, crystal structure, and surface free energy (SFE) were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and water droplet methods, respectively. The antibacterial capacity was assessed by a bacterial adhesion test using Streptococcus mutans. Although the surface morphology, chemical composition, and crystal structure were not affected by electrical polarization, the polar component and total SFE were enhanced. After 24 h incubation at 37ºC, bacterial adhesion to the polarized samples was inhibited. The electrical polarization method may confer antibacterial properties on prosthetic devices, such as porcelain fused to metal crowns or all ceramic restorations, without any additional bactericidal agents.

  3. Finite element analysis of the contact interface between trans-femoral stump and prosthetic socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Ming; Shen, Ling; Zheng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Transfemoral amputees need prosthetic devices after amputation surgery, and the interface pressure between the residual limb and prosthetic socket has a significant effect on an amputee's satisfaction and comfort. The purpose of this study was to build a nonlinear finite element model to investigate the interface pressure between the above-knee residual limb and its prosthetic socket. The model was three-dimensional (3D) with consideration of nonlinear boundary conditions. Contact analysis was used to simulate the friction conditions between skin and the socket. The normal stresses up to 80.57 kPa at the distal end of the soft tissue. The longitudinal and circumferential shear stress distributions at the limb-socket interface were also simulated. This study explores the influences of load transfer between trans-femoral residual limb and its prosthetic socket.

  4. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; 10.1186/1743-0003-8-16

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG) signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with th...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... amalgamator is a device, usually AC-powered, intended to mix, by shaking, amalgam capsules containing mercury and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  6. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Musso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE.

  7. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Maria; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE. PMID:25695043

  8. Fixed dental prostheses with vertical tooth preparations without finish lines: A report of two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Solá-Ruíz, María Fernanda; Chust, César; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Tooth abutments can be prepared to receive fixed dental prostheses with different types of finish lines. The literature reports different complications arising from tooth preparation techniques, including gingival recession. Vertical preparation without a finish line is a technique whereby the abutments are prepared by introducing a diamond rotary instrument into the sulcus to eliminate the cementoenamel junction and to create a new prosthetic cementoenamel junction determined by the prosthetic margin. This article describes 2 patients whose dental abutments were prepared to receive ceramic restorations using vertical preparation without a finish line. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New Design for Rapid Prototyping of Digital Master Casts for Multiple Dental Implant Restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Luis; Jiménez, Mariano; Espinosa, María del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study proposes the replacement of all the physical devices used in the manufacturing of conventional prostheses through the use of digital tools, such as 3D scanners, CAD design software, 3D implants files, rapid prototyping machines or reverse engineering software, in order to develop laboratory work models from which to finish coatings for dental prostheses. Different types of dental prosthetic structures are used, which were adjusted by a non-rotatory threaded fixing system. Method From a digital process, the relative positions of dental implants, soft tissue and adjacent teeth of edentulous or partially edentulous patients has been captured, and a maser working model which accurately replicates data relating to the patients oral cavity has been through treatment of three-dimensional digital data. Results Compared with the conventional master cast, the results show a significant cost savings in attachments, as well as an increase in the quality of reproduction and accuracy of the master cast, with the consequent reduction in the number of patient consultation visits. The combination of software and hardware three-dimensional tools allows the optimization of the planning of dental implant-supported rehabilitations protocol, improving the predictability of clinical treatments and the production cost savings of master casts for restorations upon implants. PMID:26696528

  10. Development of an underactuated prosthetic hand with the step motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Dawei; Jin Minghe; Jiang Li; Shi Shicai; Liu Hong

    2006-01-01

    We present the development of a novel prosthetic hand based on the underactuated mechanism. The aim is focused on increasing its dexterity while keeping the same dimension and weight of a traditional prosthetic device. The hybrid step motor is used as the actuator, which enables the finger to keep enough high contact torque on the grasped object with less energy consumption provided by the holding torque. The grasping force of the finger is estimated from the base joint torque, and the adoption of impedance control has provided compliance in the grasping. Also a parallel observer is used to switch over between the impedance control and the torque holding mode. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the design and control strategy.

  11. Combined orthognathic surgery and prosthetic treatment for class III skeletal malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Luka Dias Wellar; Leandro Reinhardt; Marcos Antonio Torriani; Tatiana Pereira-Cenci; Noéli Boscato

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report discusses the case of a partially edentulous patient with class III skeletal malocclusion, suffering from poor masticatory function and esthetic appearance caused by severe anteroposterior discrepancy between the dental arches and loss of occlusal vertical dimension. The functional and esthetic rehabilitation was performed with orthognathic surgery followed by prosthetic treatment using an overlay removable partial denture. At the end of the treatment, the patient...

  12. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a preschooler with induced anodontia - A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivayogi M Hugar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of prosthetic rehabilitation with complete dentures for a three year nine months old child is presented. Dental prosthesis are frequently used to avoid psychologic, speech, or swallowing problems in preschooler children. The case was followed up for a period of three years. These prosthesis were modified as the child grew and as the permanent teeth erupted into the oral cavity the dentures were trimmed from the areas of erupting teeth to facilitate their eruption.

  13. Validation of the prosthetic esthetic index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özhayat, Esben B; Dannemand, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In order to diagnose impaired esthetics and evaluate treatments for these, it is crucial to evaluate all aspects of oral and prosthetic esthetics. No professionally administered index currently exists that sufficiently encompasses comprehensive prosthetic esthetics. This study aimed...... to validate a new comprehensive index, the Prosthetic Esthetic Index (PEI), for professional evaluation of esthetics in prosthodontic patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The content, criterion, and construct validity; the test-retest, inter-rater, and internal consistency reliability; and the sensitivity...

  14. Modulation of grasping force in prosthetic hands using neural network-based predictive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasluosta, Cristian F; Chiu, Alan W L

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the implementation of a neural network-based predictive control system for driving a prosthetic hand. Nonlinearities associated with the electromechanical aspects of prosthetic devices present great challenges for precise control of this type of device. Model-based controllers may overcome this issue. Moreover, given the complexity of these kinds of electromechanical systems, neural network-based modeling arises as a good fit for modeling the fingers' dynamics. The results of simulations mimicking potential situations encountered during activities of daily living demonstrate the feasibility of this technique.

  15. Dental Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  16. Dental Implant Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Oshida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities.

  17. Computer Aided Facial Prosthetics Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial deformities can impose burden to the patient. There are many solutions for facial deformities such as plastic surgery and facial prosthetics. However, current fabrication method of facial prosthetics is high-cost and time consuming. This study aimed to identify a new method to construct a customized facial prosthetic. A 3D scanner, computer software and 3D printer were used in this study. Results showed that the new developed method can be used to produce a customized facial prosthetics. The advantages of the developed method over the conventional process are low cost, reduce waste of material and pollution in order to meet the green concept.

  18. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that...

  19. Adjunctive screening devices for oral lesions: their use by Canadian Dental Hygienists and the need for knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laronde, D M; Corbett, K K

    2015-12-22

    Screening for oral cancer and other mucosal conditions is a knowledge-to-action objective that should be easy: there is supportive evidence, it is fast and non-invasive, and the oral cavity is easy to visualize. However, over 60% of oral cancers are diagnosed late, when treatment is complex and prognosis poor. Adjunctive screening devices (ASDs), e.g. toluidine blue (TB), fluorescence visualization (FV), chemiluminescence (CL) and brush biopsies, were designed to assess risk of oral lesions or aid in identification and localization of oral premalignant and malignant lesions. Little is known on how clinicians feel about using ASDs.

  20. Anti-cross-infection Design and Standard Requirements of Dental Devices and Equipments%口腔器械设备防交叉感染设计与标准要求

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹荣

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzed the main factors that cause cross-infection of oral clinical, and presented the design requirements of anti-cross-infection dental devices and equipments. It focused on the requirements of dental devices and equipments standards involved in anti-cross-infection, as wel as the latest international standardization progress.%  本文分析了引起口腔临床交叉感染的主要因素,提出了口腔器械设备防交叉感染的设计要求,重点讲述了口腔器械设备涉及防交叉感染的标准要求,以及国际最新标准化进展。

  1. Consumer satisfaction with the services of prosthetics and orthotics facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Joline; Geertzen, Jan; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2009-03-01

    Consumer satisfaction with the services provided in a prosthetics and orthotics (P&O) facility has seldom been studied. The aim of this study was to analyze consumer satisfaction regarding the services provided by 15 P&O facilities in The Netherlands. Consumers (n = 1,364) of these P&O facilities who were fitted with a prosthesis, orthopaedic shoes, an orthosis, or another device, were asked to rate the overall services provided and whether they were satisfied with the device provided and its delivery time. Additionally, they filled in a modified SERVQUAL questionnaire (see Appendix). Consumers gave the service provided by P&O facilities a mean overall rating of 8.1. The highest ratings were given by consumers fitted with a prosthesis (mean overall rating of services: 8.4). In total, 78% of the consumers were satisfied with the device provided and 93% with the delivery time. The results of our study showed that, on the SERVQUAL, 50% of the statements fulfilled the criteria for a satisfactory quality of the services. The overall consumer rating of the service provided by P&O facilities is high and depends on the device provided. The outcomes on the SERVQUAL were moderate. In future, it is important to study consumer satisfaction more extensively in order to improve the quality of P&O services in daily practice. Additionally, specific questionnaires need to be developed to measure all aspects of prosthetic and orthotic care, with the aim to improve the services.

  2. STUDY OF SURFACE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS OF PROSTHETIC RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela-Păpuşa Vasiliu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As a direct consequence of their application domain – the oral cavity – dental materials are subjected to the corosive action of saliva, being surrounded by microorganisms, fluids and alimentary rests, which modify their surface characteristics. Concerns on the quality of the dental materials explain the numeorus interdisciplinary studies, characterized by a close relation among various scientific domains (physics, chemistry, biology, science of biomaterials, techniques also applied in clinical stomatology. Analysis of the saliva–dental materials interface made use of ceramic surfaces, composites and artificial saliva, permitting to determine the main surface parameters of the materials of prosthetic restoration, calculated with some physical models, starting from measurements of the contact angle: surface energy, its polar and dispersive components, surface rugosity, adhesion mechanic work. All composites showed low values of the adhesion mechanic work, the conclusion being that they are much more hydrophobic than the ceramic materials. Such a property is especially important from an aesthetic perspective, as the hydrophobic materials have a better colour stability in time.

  3. Radio frequency identification--an innovative solution to guide dexterous prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Matthew S; Singhal, Girish; Kaliki, Rahul; Smith, Ryan J; Thakor, Nitish V

    2011-01-01

    Dexterous manipulation of a multi-fingered prosthetic hand requires far more cognitive effort compared to typical 1 degree of freedom hands, which hinders their acceptance clinically. This paper presents a Myoelectrically-Operated Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Prosthetic Hand (MORPH); an implementation of RFID with a myoelectric prosthetic hand as a means to amplify the controllable degrees of freedom. Contextual information from an object equipped with an RFID tag allows automatic preshaping along with dexterous control in an attempt to reduce the cognitive effort required to operate the terminal device. The myoelectric-RFID hybrid has been demonstrated in a proof-of-concept case study where an amputee was fitted with the device and subjected to activities adapted from the Jebsen Hand Function Test and the Smith Hand Function Evaluation with RFID-tagged and untagged items. Evaluation tests revealed that the MORPH system performed significantly better in 4 of the 8 tasks, and comparable to the control in the remainder.

  4. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Domb, Ivor

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  5. Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  6. [Prosthetic rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients: fixed - removable - combined? Metal - ceramics - all - ceramics? Implants? Anything goes! Part 2: two case studies represent the fixed, respectively the combined fixed-removable prosthetic restoration by utilization of implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabl, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    The prosthetic rehabilitation of two partially edentulous patients is presented: one Patient was restored by permanent crowns and bridges attached to natural teeth and to implants, the second was treated by crowns attached to natural teeth and removable implant- supported prostheses. Depending on esthetic requirements and the localization of preparation margins all- or metal-ceramics were used for single crowns, metal-ceramics was used for bridges. In general, a well coordinated cooperation of dentist, surgeon and dental technician in treatment planning and realization is required for a successful prosthetic rehabilitation.

  7. Prosthetic rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Rodigues, Polyana Barbara; Marcello-Machado, Raissa Micaella; Pinto, Luciana Rezende; Faot, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult today to find older patients without their cleft palate prosthetically rehabilitated. This case report presents the rehabilitation by conventional dental prostheses of a cleft palate patient who had no prior treatment. A 52-year-old male presented himself to have his fissured palate obturated and occlusion restored. He reported difficulties in swallowing food and liquids, along with a severe speech disability. The patient's medical history revealed diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, low vision due to macular atrophic lesions, and xerostomia. The upper and lower arches were completely and partially edentulous, respectively. The treatment plan involved a conventional denture to be placed in the upper arch, and a removable partial denture to be placed in the lower arch.

  8. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular embolization device. (a) Identification. A vascular embolization device is an intravascular implant intended to...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body fusion device. (a) Identification. An intervertebral body fusion device is an implanted single or...

  10. Prosthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokpong Amornvit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular trauma can be caused by road traffic accidents, falls, assaults, or work-related accidents. Enucleation is often indicated after ocular injury or for the treatment of intraocular tumors, severe ocular infections, and painful blind eyes. Rehabilitation of an enucleated socket without an intraocular implant or with an inappropriately sized implant can result in superior sulcus deepening, enophthalmos, ptosis, ectropion, and lower lid laxity, which are collectively known as post-enucleation socket syndrome. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of post-enucleation socket syndrome with a modified ocular prosthesis. Modifications to the ocular prosthesis were performed to correct the ptosis, superior sulcus deepening, and enophthalmos. The rehabilitation procedure produced satisfactory results.

  11. Prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper limb amputee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard O′Keeffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of all or part of the arm is a catastrophic event for a patient and a significant challenge to rehabilitation professionals and prosthetic engineers. The large, upper extremity amputee population in India has, historically, been poorly served, with most having no access to support or being provided with ineffective prostheses. In recent years, the arrival of organisations like Otto Bock has made high quality service standards and devices accessible to more amputees. This review attempts to provide surgeons and other medical professionals with an overview of the multidisciplinary, multistage rehabilitation process and the solution options available. With worldwide upper extremity prosthesis rejection rates at significant levels, the review also describes some of the factors which influence the outcome. This is particularly relevant in the Indian context where the service can involve high cost investments. It is the responsibility of all contributing professionals to guide vulnerable patients through the process and try to maximise the benefit that can be obtained within the resources available.

  12. Maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation of the oral cancer patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfaardt, J.F.; Monteith, B.D. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Prosthetic Dentistry)

    1982-08-01

    The victim of orofacial cancer is frequently subjected to severe morphological and functional disturbance: a condition which the maxillofacial prosthetist can do much to alleviate through the use of various prosthetic devices. The successful rehabilitation of these patients, however, is often compromised by the presence of psychosocial and other problems, the solution of which extends beyond the limits of a single clinical discipline. The modern approach to orofacial cancer, therefore, is organised within the context of interdisciplinary co-operation: each phase of patient management being planed and executed according to the co-ordinated efforts of the various members of a head and neck cancer team.

  13. 75 FR 52629 - Medicare Program; Establishing Additional Medicare Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ..., hospital beds, nebulizers, oxygen delivery systems, and wheelchairs. Prosthetic devices are included in the... using wheelchairs. In Sec. 424.57(c)(8), we proposed to clarify this provision by revising (c)(8) to... for inventory, storage, including patient records, a desk and chairs, and in most cases a restroom for...

  14. A CLINICAL STUDY ON THE PERIODONTAL-IMPLANTO-PROSTHETIC REHABILITATION IN PATIENTS WITH PERIODONTAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana RADU-GHICA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Scope of the study: A comparative analysis on the reliability of the methods of oral rehabilitation of partial edentation through fixed prostheses on dental support vs. prostheses on implants in patients with periodontal diseases. Materials and method: The experimental group was formed of 56 patients (25 men and 31 women, with ages between 23 and 68 years, and different classes of partial edentation in patients with a periodontopathed field. Mention should be made of the fact that, in the case of terminal edentations, a corresponding number of implants has been used, so that to reduce, as much as possible, the number of intermediates involved in the bridge bodies entering the structure of the prosthetic works with dental-implantary support. Results: The survival ratio for the implants substituting the periodontally-induced dental losses was of 90.5%, while that of the implants for the replacement of the teeth lost from other causes (caries, fractures, traumatisms was of 96.5%. Conclusions: The present study supports the assertion that, if the specific conditions of the clinical case under discussion permit it, fixed prosthesizing on a mixed implanto-dental support is more indicated, if considering that this type of prosthesis causes less negative modifications of the prosthetic field, comparatively with the partially-mobile one.

  15. Influence of anatomic reference on the buccal contour of prosthetic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Sabrina Queirós Vasconcelos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available During clinical practice, when performing prosthetic rehabilitation with single crowns, improper reproduction of the dental contour by the dental laboratory is a common occurrence. Therefore, the present study evaluated the fidelity of the reproduction of the buccal contour in an upper left canine performed by three Dental Prosthesis Technicians (DPT using the indirect laminate veneer technique. First, the DPTs confected the veneers based on a model obtained from the upper arch of a dental dummy, containing a replica of an upper left canine with a prosthetic preparation for a laminate veneer. Then, the same DPTs received other identical models, now with the replica of the upper left canine with no preparation, to be used as an anatomical reference for confecting the laminate veneers. The laminate veneers were then bonded to the plaster models and had their buccal contour individually measured. Measurements were also made of the buccal contour of the reference canine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and the t-test (p = 0.05. Results showed 100% of buccal overcontour when the laminate veneers were compared to the reference canine, regardless of which DPT confected the veneer and regardless of using or not the anatomical reference. The DPTs who participated in the present study were unable to acomplish a faithful anatomical reproduction of the buccal contour, creating an overcontour in all samples. This situation may be responsible for increasing the probability of periodontal and esthetic harm in clinical practice.

  16. Development of prosthetic arm with pneumatic prosthetic hand and tendon-driven wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Kan, Hiroto; Hirano, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    Recently, various prosthetic arms have been developed, but few are both attractive and functional. Considering human coexistence, prosthetic arms must be both safe and flexible. In this research, we developed a novel prosthetic arm with a five-fingered prosthetic hand using our original pneumatic actuators and a slender tendon-driven wrist using a wire drive and two small motors. Because the prosthetic hand's driving source is comprised of small pneumatic actuators, the prosthetic hand is safe when it makes contact with people; it can also operate flexibly. In addition, the arm has a tendon-driven wrist to expand its motion space and to perform many operations. First, we explain the pneumatic hand's drive mechanism and its tendon-driven wrist. Next, we identify the characteristics of the hand and the wrist and construct a control system for this arm and verify its control performance.

  17. Dynamic balance changes within three weeks of fitting a new prosthetic foot component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jenny A; Stergiou, Nicholas; Wurdeman, Shane R

    2017-07-05

    Balance during walking is of high importance to prosthesis users and may affect walking during baseline observation and evaluation. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in walking balance occurred during an adaptation period following the fitting of a new prosthetic component. Margin of stability in the medial-lateral direction (MOSML) and an anterior instability margin (AIM) were used to quantify the dynamic balance of 21 unilateral transtibial amputees during overground walking. Participants trialled two prosthetic feet presenting contrasting movement/balance constraints; a Higher Activity foot similar to that of their own prosthesis, and a Lower Activity foot. Participants were assessed before (Visit 1) and after (Visit 2) a 3-week adaptation period on each foot. With the Higher Activity component, MOSML decreased on the prosthetic side, and increased on the sound side from Visit 1 to Visit 2, eliminating a significant inter-limb difference apparent at Visit 1 (Visit 1-sound=0.062m, prosthetic=0.075m, p=0.018; Visit 2-sound=0.066m, prosthetic=0.074m, p=0.084). No such change was seen with the Lower Activity foot (Visit 1-sound=0.064m, prosthetic=0.077m, p=0.007; Visit 2-sound=0.063m, prosthetic=0.080m, pbalance during walking can occur following the initial receipt of a device regardless of whether the component is of the same functional category as the one an individual is accustomed to using. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Tracheobronchial Foreign Body Aspiration: Dental Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataman Köse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to extract foreign bodies for avoiding life-threatening complications. They can lead to death if they are not treated. Different signs and symptoms could occur according to the complete or partial airway obstruction. Foreign body aspiration is a rare incident in adults. The organic foreign materials such as foods are found to be aspirated more commonly and are usually settled in the right bronchial system. However, dental prosthesis and teeth aspirations are rare in literature. In our study, a 52-year-old male patient who had aspirated the front part of his lower dental prosthesis accidentally is presented and the foreign body is extracted by using rigid bronchoscopy. There are many causes of aspiration but dental prosthetic aspirations should be kept in mind during sleep. For this reason, dental apparatus must be taken out while asleep.

  19. Fully 3-dimensional digitally planned reconstruction of a mandible with a free vascularized fibula and immediate placement of an implant-supported prosthetic construction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Rutger H.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan; Lahoda, Lars U.; Van der Meer, W. Joerd; Roodenburg, Jan L.; Reintsema, Harry; Witjes, Max J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of craniofacial defects becomes complex when dental implants are included for functional rehabilitation. We describe a fully 3-dimensional (3D) digitally planned reconstruction of a mandible and immediate prosthetic loading with a fibula graft in a 2-step surgical approach.

  20. Development of a Multi-DOF Electromyography Prosthetic System Using the Adaptive Joint Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernandez Arieta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an electrically powered prosthetic system controlled by electromyography (EMG signal detected from the skin surface of the human body. The research of electrically powered prosthetic systems is divided into two main subjects. One is the design of the joint mechanism. We propose the use of an adaptive joint mechanism based on the tendon-driven architecture. This mechanism includes mechanical torque–velocity converters and a mechanism to assist the proximal joint torque by distal actuators. The other subject is the recognition of the EMG signal. For the discrimination of many patterns and nonlinear properties of the EMG signal, we propose a controller based on a simple pattern recognition information process. The system also drives 12 servomotors to move the adaptive joint mechanism. In this paper, we show the proposed system and describe the mechanical design of the prosthetic hand. The experimental results show that the electrically powered devices can be controlled using the proposed method.

  1. Auditory display as a prosthetic hand sensory feedback for reaching and grasping tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Natsumi, Nakayama; Sekine, Masashi; Yu, Wenwei

    2012-01-01

    Upper limb amputees have to rely extensively on visual feedback in order to monitor and manipulate successfully their prosthetic device. This situation leads to high consciousness burden, which generates fatigue and frustration. Therefore, in order to enhance motor-sensory performance and awareness, an auditory display was used as a sensory feedback system for the prosthetic hand's spatio-temporal and force information in a complete reaching and grasping setting. The main objective of this study was to explore the effects of using the auditory display to monitor the prosthetic hand during a complete reaching and grasping motion. The results presented in this paper point out that the usage of an auditory display to monitor and control a robot hand improves the temporal and grasping performance greatly, while reducing mental effort and improving their confidence.

  2. Advanced prosthetic techniques for below knee amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, T B

    1985-02-01

    Recent advances in the evaluation of the amputation stump, the materials that are available for prosthetic application, techniques of improving socket fit, and prosthetic finishings promise to dramatically improve amputee function. Precision casting techniques for providing optimal fit of the amputation stump using materials such as alginate are described. The advantages of transparent check sockets for fitting the complicated amputation stump are described. Advances in research that promise to provide more functional prosthetic feet and faster and more reliable socket molding are the use of CAD-CAM (computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing) and the use of gait analysis techniques to aid in the alignment of the prosthesis after socket fitting. Finishing techniques to provide a more natural appearing prosthesis are described. These advances will gradually spread to the entire prosthetic profession.

  3. Computed Tomography of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, J.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is an infrequent but potentially life-threatening disease with a heterogeneous clinical presentation. Patients with PHV dysfunction clinically can present with symptoms of congestive heart failure (dyspnea, fatigue, edema), fever, angina pectoris, dizziness d

  4. Ultrasound imaging in lower limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Tania; Solomonidis, Stephan; Sandham, William; Spence, William

    2002-03-01

    The biomechanical interaction between the residual limb and the prosthetic socket determines the quality of fit of the socket in lower limb prosthetics. An understanding of this interaction and the development of quantitative measures to predict the quality of fit of the socket are important for optimal socket design. Finite-element modeling is used widely for biomechanical modeling of the limb/socket interaction and requires information on the internal and external geometry of the residual limb. Volumetric imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound have been used to obtain residual limb shape information. Of these modalities, ultrasound has been introduced most recently and its development for visualization in prosthetics is the least mature. This paper reviews ultrasound image acquisition and processing methods as they have been applied in lower limb prosthetics.

  5. DME Prosthetics Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics-Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule. The list contains the fee schedule amounts, floors, and ceilings for all procedure codes...

  6. Tenecteplase in prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In the few reported cases of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, where surgical intervention was considered as high risk, fibrinolytic therapy had proved life saving. The authors present clinical, laboratory, and imaging data from such a patient, with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and its successful management with tenecteplase. The use of tenecteplase as a viable fibrinolytic agent for the first time was justified, due to the lack of immunogenicity concerns compared to streptokinase.

  7. Tenecteplase in prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyub Ghori, Masood; Bakir, Sherif; Ellahham, Samer; Al Nassir, Adnan; Al Zubaidi, Abdulmajeed; Augustin, Norbert; Abdelaziz, Moataz Ayman; Turrin, Nicolas Patrick; Al Mahmeed, Wael Abdulrahman

    2011-04-01

    In the few reported cases of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, where surgical intervention was considered as high risk, fibrinolytic therapy had proved life saving. The authors present clinical, laboratory, and imaging data from such a patient, with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and its successful management with tenecteplase. The use of tenecteplase as a viable fibrinolytic agent for the first time was justified, due to the lack of immunogenicity concerns compared to streptokinase.

  8. Advances in lower-limb prosthetic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laferrier, Justin Z; Gailey, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The boundaries once faced by individuals with amputations are quickly being overcome through biotechnology. Although there are currently no prosthetics capable of replicating anatomic function, there have been radical advancements in prosthetic technology, medical science, and rehabilitation in the past 30 years, vastly improving functional mobility and quality of life for individuals with lower-limb amputations. What once seemed impossible is rapidly becoming reality. The future seems limitless, and the replication of anatomic function now seems possible.

  9. Graduates’ perceptions of prosthetic and orthotic education and clinical practice in Tanzania and Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Magnusson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maintaining and improving the quality of prosthetics and orthotics education at the Tanzania Training Centre for Orthopaedic Technologists is essential for the provision of appropriate prosthetics and orthotics services in African countries.Objectives: To describe how Tanzanian and Malawian graduates’ of the Diploma in Orthopaedic Technology perceive their education and how it could be improved or supplemented to facilitate clinical practice of graduates.Methods: Nineteen graduates from the diploma course in orthopaedic technology were interviewed and phenomenographic analysis was applied to the data.Results: Seven descriptive categories emerged, namely varied awareness of the profession before starting education, well-equipped teaching facilities, aspects lacking in the learning context, need for changes in the curriculum, enabling people to walk is motivating, obstacles in working conditions and the need for continuous professional development. All participants perceived possible improvements to the content and learning environment.Conclusions: Prosthetic and orthotic education can be better provided by modifying the content of the diploma programme by dedicating more time to the clinical management of different patient groups and applied biomechanics as well as reducing the programme content focusing on technical aspects of prosthetic and orthotic practice. Graduates were not prepared for the rural working conditions and the graduates desired continued training.Keywords: orthotic; prosthetic; education; Malawi; Tanzania; assistive device; assistive technology; developing countries; low-income country

  10. Development of a Tactile and Slip Sensor Controlled Prosthetic Hand System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Wang, R. C.; Zhang, J. C.; Jin, D. W.

    2008-10-01

    Supported by the latest sensor and microcontroller technologies, prosthetic hands have been widely used to reclaim the human functionaries. Among these, the most advanced prosthetic hand was controlled by the tactile and EMG singles. However, for a slippery object, attention has to be taken for the inexperienced users who need to control the shrinkage of the wrist flexor carefully. In this paper, the authors presented a prosthetic hand control system using PVDF film sensor to provide both tactile and slip force feedback signals to operate the hand. The PVDF film sensor used for this control system was specifically developed to detect both tactile and slip force between the prosthetic finger and object. The method of distinguishing two signals was described. A prototype system was constructed using a microcontroller to process the signal from the sensor and provide control signal to the motors operate the prosthetic hand. The test result of the prototype device shown that comparing with the one without slippery signal feedback, this system was easy to operate for an inexperienced user.

  11. Rechargeable wireless EMG sensor for prosthetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter, P A; Lange, E H; Riehle, T H; Anderson, S M; Hedin, D S

    2010-01-01

    Surface electrodes in modern myoelectric prosthetics are often embedded in the prosthesis socket and make contact with the skin. These electrodes detect and amplify muscle action potentials from voluntary contractions of the muscle in the residual limb and are used to control the prosthetic's movement and function. There are a number of performance-related deficiencies associated with external electrodes including the maintenance of sufficient electromyogram (EMG) signal amplitude, extraneous noise acquisition, and proper electrode interface maintenance that are expected to be improved or eliminated using the proposed implanted sensors. This research seeks to investigate the design components for replacing external electrodes with fully-implantable myoelectric sensors that include a wireless interface to the prosthetic limbs. This implanted technology will allow prosthetic limb manufacturers to provide products with increased performance, capability, and patient-comfort. The EMG signals from the intramuscular recording electrode are amplified and wirelessly transmitted to a receiver in the prosthetic limb. Power to the implant is maintained using a rechargeable battery and an inductive energy transfer link from the prosthetic. A full experimental system was developed to demonstrate that a wireless biopotential sensor can be designed that meets the requirements of size, power, and performance for implantation.

  12. Development and evaluation of a digital dental modeling method based on grating projection and reverse engineering software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qin; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jun; Song, Jun; Chen, Lu; Lu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    For reasons of convenience and economy, attempts have been made to transform traditional dental gypsum casts into 3-dimensional (3D) digital casts. Different scanning devices have been developed to generate digital casts; however, each has its own limitations and disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to develop an advanced method for the 3D reproduction of dental casts by using a high-speed grating projection system and noncontact reverse engineering (RE) software and to evaluate the accuracy of the method. The methods consisted of 3 main steps: the scanning and acquisition of 3D dental cast data with a high-resolution grating projection system, the reconstruction and measurement of digital casts with RE software, and the evaluation of the accuracy of this method using 20 dental gypsum casts. The common anatomic landmarks were measured directly on the gypsum casts with a Vernier caliper and on the 3D digital casts with the Geomagic software measurement tool. Data were statistically assessed with the t test. The grating projection system had a rapid scanning speed, and smooth 3D dental casts were obtained. The mean differences between the gypsum and 3D measurements were approximately 0.05 mm, and no statistically significant differences were found between the 2 methods (P>.05), except for the measurements of the incisor tooth width and maxillary arch length. A method for the 3D reconstruction of dental casts was developed by using a grating projection system and RE software. The accuracy of the casts generated using the grating projection system was comparable with that of the gypsum casts. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShahrani, Mohammed Thamer; Haralur, Satheesh B; Alqarni, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  14. Restorative Rehabilitation of a Patient with Dental Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Thamer AlShahrani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is the chemical dissolution of the tooth structure. Factors like eating disorders and gastrointestinal diseases are recognized as intrinsic factors for dental erosion. Advanced stages of dental erosion extensively damage the tooth morphology, consequently affecting both esthetics and functions. Reports indicate the growing prevalence of erosion, and hence knowledge of restorative rehabilitation of tooth erosion is an integral part of the contemporary dental practice. This clinical report describes an adult patient with gastroesophageal reflux induced dental erosion involving the palatal surface of the maxillary anterior teeth. The extensive involvement of the palatal surfaces compromised the esthetics, incisal guidance, and functional occlusal efficiency. Indirect all-ceramic restorations were utilized to restore the esthetics and occlusal reconstruction. In conclusion, patients affected by severe dental erosion require prosthetic rehabilitation besides the management of the associated medical condition.

  15. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  16. Dental Sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write a Grant) Questions and Answers Grant Writing Tips ... offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants ...

  17. Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z INDEX | OOH SITE MAP | EN ESPAÑOL Healthcare > Dental Assistants PRINTER-FRIENDLY EN ESPAÑOL Summary What They ... of workers and occupations. What They Do -> What Dental Assistants Do About this section Assistants prepare and ...

  18. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  19. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  20. Recent advancements in prosthetic hand technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Angana; Mazumdar, Sushmi; Sahai, Nitin; Paul, Sudip; Bhatia, Dinesh; Verma, Suresh; Rohilla, Punit Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Recently, significant advances over the past decade have been made in robotics, artificial intelligence and other cognitive related fields, allowing development of highly sophisticated bio-mimetic robotics systems. In addition, enormous number of robots have been designed and assembled by explicitly realising their biological oriented behaviours. To enhance skill behaviours and adequate grasping abilities in these devices, a new phase of dexterous hands has been developed recently with bio-mimetically oriented and bio-inspired functionalities. The aim in writing this review paper is to present a detailed insight towards the development of the bio-mimetic based dexterous robotic multi-fingered artificial hand. An "ideal" upper limb prosthesis should be perceived as a part of their natural body by the amputee and should replicate sensory-motor capabilities of the amputated limb. Upper-limb amputations are most often the result of sudden trauma to the body, although they also can be caused by malignancy, congenital deficiencies and vascular diseases. This paper discusses the different bio-mimetic approaches using a framework that permits for a common description of biological and technical based hand manipulation behaviour. In particular, the review focuses on a number of developments in the inspired robotic systems. In conclusion, the study found that a huge amount of research efforts in terms of kinematics, dynamics, modelling and control methodologies are being put in to improve the present hand technology, thereby providing more functionality to the prosthetic limb of the amputee. This would improve their quality-of-life and help in performing activities of daily living (ADL) tasks with comparative ease in the near future.

  1. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  2. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  3. Simulation of a sensor array for multiparameter measurements at the prosthetic limb interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Gabriel I.; Mamishev, Alexander V.

    2004-07-01

    Sensitive skin is a highly desired device for biomechanical devices, wearable computing, human-computer interfaces, exoskeletons, and, most pertinent to this paper, for lower limb prosthetics. The measurement of shear stress is very important because shear effects are key factors in developing surface abrasions and pressure sores in paraplegics and users of prosthetic/orthotic devices. A single element of a sensitive skin is simulated and characterized in this paper. Conventional tactile sensors are designed for measurement of the normal stress only, which is inadequate for comprehensive assessment of surface contact conditions. The sensitive skin discussed here is a flexible array capable of sensing shear and normal forces, as well as humidity and temperature on each element.

  4. New electromagnetic methods for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valves (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udpa, Satish

    2002-05-01

    Prosthetic devices are being implanted at record levels as the nation "ages" and advances in prosthetic science are made. Devices that are implanted range from artificial limbs and hips to devices such as heart valves. Periodic evaluation of the state of the devices is of significant interest particularly in the case of prosthetics whose failure can be fatal. An example of such a device is the artificial heart valve. Heart valves are usually replaced when stenosis or incompetence is indicated. This article presents a selection of some new techniques that are being developed for the detection of outlet strut failures in Bjork-Shiley heart valves. Methods that show particular promise include a noninvasive electromagnetic method that relies on the excitation and measurement of the resonant vibration modes of the strut. An alternate approach involves the induction of currents in the outlet strut using a pair of external excitation coils. The field generated by the current induced in the strut perturbs the field generated by the excitation coils. The field perturbations are measured using a catheter-mounted gradiometer. Test results obtained using an experimental rig designed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept are presented.

  5. [Study of remains and dental wastes of a First World War German rest camp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, R; Tzortzis, S; Desfosses, Y; Signoli, M; Tardivo, D

    2014-12-01

    This article presents the analysis of dental remains and waste from the dental office of a German rest camp of the First World War in order to study the living conditions of the soldiers, the care policy and the prosthetic rehabilitation techniques used in this context. The study included both dental and prosthetic remains, revealed during the excavation. The criteria to determine dental and periodontal health were the presence or absence of caries, wear, tartar and periodontal lesion. Location, severity and frequency of each of these parameters were examined. Regarding the prosthetic remains, the type of prosthesis and the materials used were determined. Three hundred and twenty seven (327) dental remains were analyzed. A high prevalence of large caries, especially in the molar areas, was highlighted. The incisal areas had however more wear and tartar. 183 casts of plaster dental arcade allowed to highlight a significant proportion of posterior edentulous. Prosthetic remains and laboratory waste revealed the use of vulcanite and porcelain for making dentures.

  6. The use of physiotherapy in the regeneration of periapical bone structures of the teeth, prepared to load the prosthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Lietz-Kijak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate whether the use of magnetoledotherapy will accelerate the elimination of osteolytic lesions of the dental periapical area, and provide for prosthetic treatment. What impact on time of healing does the inflammatory change location, type of treatment or patient’s age have? 69 patients underwent the examination. The problem of osteolytic lesions in the course of protracted or protracted acute dental periapical tissue inflammation was determined. Patients were divided into two research groups: group L – treated with magnetoledotherapy and group K – treated without the support of magnetoledotherapy. In the first group we applied the electromagnetic field, generated using the Viofor JPS Clinic apparatus.Our studies have confirmed the effectiveness of magnetoledotherapy in the accelerated decommissioning of the osteolytic lesion. This provides evidence of the appropriateness of this method in the treatment of protracted dental periapical tissue inflammation, in teeth qualified for prosthetic load. Magnetostimulation combined with LED energy is an adjunctive procedure, adopted in order to eliminate osteolytic inflammatory changes of dental periapical tissues. It can be used in all age groups with the same good result. After applying magnetoledotherapy, in the course of the dental periapical tissue repair process of tooth treated endodontically for the first time as well as reendodontically, no differences were found. This shows the opportunity of using magnetoledotherapy in all cases of protracted periapical tissue inflammation.

  7. Development and measurement properties of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey (OPUS): a comprehensive set of clinical outcome instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, A W; Bode, R K; O'Reilly, C

    2003-12-01

    The need to measure and evaluate orthotics and prosthetics (O&P) practice has received growing recognition in the past several years. Reliable and valid self-report instruments are needed that can help facilities evaluate patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to develop a set of self-report instruments that assess functional status, quality of life, and satisfaction with devices and services that can be used in an orthotics and prosthetics clinic. Selecting items from a variety of existing instruments, the authors developed and revised four instruments that differentiate patients with varying levels of lower limb function, quality of life, and satisfaction with devices and services. Evidence of construct validity is provided by hierarchies of item difficulty that are consistent with clinical experience. For example, with the lower limb function instrument, running one block was much more difficult than walking indoors. The instruments demonstrate adequate internal consistency (0.88 for lower limb function, 0.88 for quality of life, 0.74 for service satisfaction, 0.78 for device satisfaction). The next steps in their research programme are to evaluate sensitivity and construct validity. The Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey (OPUS) is a promising self-report instrument which may, with further development, allow orthotic and prosthetic practitioners to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their services as required by accreditation standards such as those of the American Board for Certification in Orthotics and Prosthetics that mandate quality assessment.

  8. Dynamic Facial Prosthetics for Sufferers of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal Coulter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis paper discusses the various methods and the materialsfor the fabrication of active artificial facial muscles. Theprimary use for these will be the reanimation of paralysedor atrophied muscles in sufferers of non-recoverableunilateral facial paralysis.MethodThe prosthetic solution described in this paper is based onsensing muscle motion of the contralateral healthy musclesand replicating that motion across a patient’s paralysed sideof the face, via solid state and thin film actuators. Thedevelopment of this facial prosthetic device focused onrecreating a varying intensity smile, with emphasis ontiming, displacement and the appearance of the wrinklesand folds that commonly appear around the nose and eyesduring the expression.An animatronic face was constructed with actuations beingmade to a silicone representation musculature, usingmultiple shape-memory alloy cascades. Alongside theartificial muscle physical prototype, a facial expressionrecognition software system was constructed. This formsthe basis of an automated calibration and reconfigurationsystem for the artificial muscles following implantation, soas to suit the implantee’s unique physiognomy.ResultsAn animatronic model face with silicone musculature wasdesigned and built to evaluate the performance of ShapeMemory Alloy artificial muscles, their power controlcircuitry and software control systems. A dual facial motionsensing system was designed to allow real time control overmodel – a piezoresistive flex sensor to measure physicalmotion, and a computer vision system to evaluate real toartificial muscle performance.Analysis of various facial expressions in real subjects wasmade, which give useful data upon which to base thesystems parameter limits.ConclusionThe system performed well, and the various strengths andshortcomings of the materials and methods are reviewedand considered for the next research phase, when newpolymer based artificial muscles are constructed

  9. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, John Kyle P [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Farquhar, Ethan [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

  10. A geometrical optimization of a magneto-rheological rotary brake in a prosthetic knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, K. H.; Jonsdottir, F.; Thorsteinsson, F.

    2010-03-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) fluids have been successfully introduced to prosthetic devices. One such device is a biomechanical prosthetic knee that uses MR fluids to actively control its rotary stiffness. The brake is rotational, utilizing the MR fluid in shear mode. In this study, the geometrical design of the MR brake is addressed. This includes the design of the magnetic circuit and the geometry of the fluid chamber. Mathematical models are presented that describe the rotary torque of the brake. A novel perfluorinated polyether (PFPE)-based MR fluid is introduced, whose properties are tailored for the prosthetic knee. On-state and off-state rheological measurements of the MR fluid are presented. The finite element method is used to evaluate the magnetic flux density in the MR fluid. The design is formulated as an optimization problem, aiming to maximize the braking torque. A parametric study is carried out for several design parameters. Subsequently, a multi-objective optimization problem is defined that considers three design objectives: the field-induced braking torque, the off-state rotary stiffness and the weight of the brake. Trade-offs between the three design objectives are investigated which provides a basis for informed design decisions on furthering the success of the MR prosthetic knee.

  11. Adaptive prosthetics for the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, K

    2001-06-01

    The potential for lifestyle recovery is tremendous for most lower extremity amputees. The amazing and ever-expanding array of adaptive prosthetics can help make the devastating loss of amputation more bearable for patients, their families, and their health care team. The new amputee, in a state of shock and grief, does not know what his or her prosthetic options are. It is crucial that the surgeon is knowledgeable about what the patient can have and what the patient needs to ask for. Dana Bowman stated: Ideally, the new amputee should say to their doctor, "I'd like my leg to be lightweight, flexible, durable, comfortable. I want to do sports or I want to ride bikes with my kids." Whatever it is they like to do. I was told I would never be able to wear two dynamic feet and that my sky diving days were over. I said, "Well how do you know? Can't I try?" It took years to find out what I could have and then to find people to help me get it. The prosthetic prescription the physician writes is the patient's gateway to the kind of prosthetics that will enable him or her to pursue the activities of their life. Often, new amputees end up with the bare minimum prosthesis, which can cause problems with comfort and mobility. A poorly designed or badly fitting prosthesis is as disabling as the actual amputation. When the surgeon can help the amputee and his or her family understand what kind of prosthetic choices are available, it establishes an optimistic outlook that is highly beneficial to the entire recovery process physically and mentally. "When I lost my leg, if someone would have told me that I could at least try to run again, that would have meant a lot," said Brian Frasure. "Getting that positive mental attitude is every bit as important as having good medical and prosthetic care." By asking probing questions about the patient's preamputation lifestyle and postamputation goals, the physician can write a prescription for truly adaptive prosthetics. The surgeon should

  12. Color matching in facial prosthetics: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranabhatt, Rani; Singh, Kamleshwar; Siddharth, Ramashanker; Tripathi, Shuchi; Arya, Deeksha

    2017-01-01

    Color matching to the surrounding skin is extremely important in patients wearing maxillofacial prostheses. It is of utmost importance to know the different techniques of color matching and coloring in maxillofacial prostheses. The purpose of this study is to review the literature data with regard to color matching in maxillofacial prosthetics. An electronic search of peer review restricted to English language dental literature was conducted to identify the relevant scientific article on color matching and coloring in maxillofacial prostheses. The publication year was up to December 2015 so that the search could include all the articles provided in that particular database. Two independent observers independently read the abstracts and later preselected full-text articles. A full-text review was carried out only for 15 articles. Out of the 15 articles, 7 were related to coloring using tinting, spraying, milling, and use of commercial cosmetics. Three studies were related to shade matching in maxillofacial prostheses. Two studies conducted the measurement of color in maxillofacial prostheses. Only one study had explained color and its relevance in maxillofacial prosthetics. Only one study was done for reproducing silicone shade guide matching Indian skin color. In addition, a single pilot study was done to measure facial skin and lip color in a human population sample stratified by race, gender, and age. Currently, there is no evidence discussing the best technique available for perfectly matching the color for the fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses. However, the latest instruments such as spectrophotometer and colorimeters are believed to have improved efficiency in matching the color.

  13. Comparison of satisfaction with current prosthetic care in veterans and servicemembers from Vietnam and OIF/OEF conflicts with major traumatic limb loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Gary M; Fergason, John; Milani, John R; Hattingh, John; McDowell, Martin; Nguyen, Viet; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Prosthetic care is a vital aspect of healthcare and rehabilitation for veterans and servicemembers with major traumatic limb loss. Our survey queried 581 veterans and servicemembers with limb loss from the Vietnam and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)/Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) conflicts. Among survey participants, 78.2% from the Vietnam conflict and 90.5% from the OIF/OEF conflict currently use prosthetic devices. In Vietnam respondents, 78% received prosthetic care from private sources, 16% from Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) prosthetic laboratories, 0.9% from Department of Defense (DOD), and 5% from multiple sources. In OIF/OEF respondents, 42% received prosthetic care from private sources, 9% percent from VA, 39% from DOD, and 10% from multiple sources. Participants identified their satisfaction with current prosthetic devices and prosthetic services. Reports of pain, sweating, skin irritation, and problems with socket fit continue to be significant issues for participants from both conflicts regardless of level of amputation or site of service. In those with upper-limb loss who used myoelectric prostheses, minimal effect on prosthesis use and satisfaction was noted. Among lower-limb loss participants from both conflicts, notable differences existed in prosthesis satisfaction by source of care.

  14. Comparison of satisfaction with current prosthetic care in veterans and servicemembers from Vietnam and OIF/OEF conflicts with major traumatic limb loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary M. Berke, MS, CP, FAAOP

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic care is a vital aspect of healthcare and rehabilitation for veterans and servicemembers with major traumaticlimb loss. Our survey queried 581 veterans and servicememberswith limb loss from the Vietnam and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF/Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF conflicts. Among survey participants, 78.2% from the Vietnam conflict and 90.5% from the OIF/OEF conflict currently use prosthetic devices. In Vietnam respondents, 78% received prosthetic care from private sources, 16% from Department of Veterans Affairs (VA prosthetic laboratories, 0.9% from Department of Defense (DOD, and 5% from multiple sources. In OIF/OEF respondents,42% received prosthetic care from private sources, 9% percent from VA, 39% from DOD, and 10% from multiple sources. Participants identified their satisfaction with current prosthetic devices and prosthetic services. Reports of pain, sweating, skin irritation, and problems with socket fit continue to be significant issues for participants from both conflicts regardless of level of amputation or site of service. In those with upper-limb loss who used myoelectric prostheses, minimal effect on prosthesis use and satisfaction was noted. Among lower-limb loss participants from both conflicts, notable differencesexisted in prosthesis satisfaction by source of care.

  15. Dental extraction for patients presenting at oral surgery student clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqain, Zaid H; Khraisat, Ameen; Sawair, Faleh; Ghanam, Sana; Shaini, Firas J; Rajab, Lamis D

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reasons for dental extraction and to determine the pattern of tooth loss in patients seeking care at the oral surgery teaching clinics in the Faculty of Dentistry of the University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, over a 3-year period. Data pertaining to the dental extractions of 2435 patients were analyzed. The results showed that 63.8% of the teeth included in this study were extracted because of dental caries, 22.9% because of periodontal disease, and 11.0% for prosthetic reasons. Pericoronitis, orthodontic treatment, trauma, and eruption problems accounted for 2.4% of the reported extractions. The upper premolars were the teeth most commonly extracted, and the lower first and second molars were the teeth most commonly extracted because of dental caries. The logistic regression test revealed that extraction because of dental caries occurred mostly in the group aged 21 to 30 years (P Periodontal disease was not likely the cause of extraction in patients younger than 40 years. Mandibular incisors were the teeth least likely extracted because of dental caries (P periodontal disease (P orthodontic reasons mostly involved the premolars (P periodontal disease (P < .05 and P < .001, respectively) and were more likely to lose teeth for prosthetic reasons and trauma. The information gained from this study is useful to shift oral health planning toward emphasizing the importance of maintaining natural dentition and preventing dental disease.

  16. Raoultella ornithinolytica: An unusual pathogen for prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Piseth; Theron, Françoise; Honnorat, Estelle; Prost, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the first case of a prosthetic joint infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica in an immunocompetent patient. The clinical outcome was favorable after a two-stage prosthetic exchange and a six-month course of antimicrobial therapy.

  17. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luigi, Arthur Jason; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-08-01

    With the technologic advances in medicine and an emphasis on maintaining physical fitness, the population of athletes with impairments is growing. It is incumbent upon health care practitioners to make every effort to inform these individuals of growing and diverse opportunities and to encourage safe exercise and athletic participation through counseling and education. Given the opportunities for participation in sports for persons with a limb deficiency, the demand for new, innovative prosthetic designs is challenging the clinical and technical expertise of the physician and prosthetist. When generating a prosthetic prescription, physicians and prosthetists should consider the needs and preferences of the athlete with limb deficiency, as well as the functional demands of the chosen sporting activity. The intent of this article is to provide information regarding the current advancements in the adaptive sports technology and biomechanics in the field of prosthetics, and to assist clinicians and their patients in facilitating participation in sporting activities.

  18. Changes in lower extremity prosthetic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trower, Ted A

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to the revolution in new materials for prosthetics and the components that they have made possible. The average weight of a delivered prosthesis has decreased, currently available components offer improved function and superior symmetry of gait, and limb interfaces provide superior skin protection and comfort. The focus on the features of these components sometimes has led to neglect of the basic elements of prosthetic design--the fit and the alignment. If the fit and alignment are on the mark, an amputee can function at remarkably high levels with rudimentary components. This article discusses the basics of lower extremity prosthetic practice and addresses challenges for the future.

  19. Pediatric unilateral below-elbow amputees: retrospective analysis of 34 patients given multiple prosthetic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Robin C; Tomhave, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-four unilateral below-elbow amputees from the Shriners Hospitals for Children/Twin Cities were retrospectively analyzed in long-term follow-up. All of these patients were provided with a variety of prosthetic options, including a "passive" cosmetic upper extremity device. Most of the patients were also fitted with conventional prostheses using a body-powered voluntary closing terminal device (97%) as well as myoelectric prostheses (82%). These patients were considered consistent prosthetic users by the clinic team. The average follow-up was 14 years, with many of the patients being followed up throughout their entire childhood. All patients were sent questionnaires, and the authors carried out patient interviews and chart review. Final analysis indicated that 15 patients (44%) selected a simple cosmetic "passive hand" as their prosthesis of choice. In long-term follow-up 14 patients (41%) continued as multiple users. Fourteen patients (41%) selected the conventional prosthesis using a voluntary closing terminal device as the prosthesis of choice. Only five patients (15%) selected the myoelectric device as their primary prosthesis. The authors conclude that successful unilateral pediatric amputees may choose multiple prostheses on the basis of function and that frequently the most functional prosthesis selected in the long term is the simplest in design. The authors believe strongly that unilateral pediatric amputees should be offered a variety of prosthetic options to help with normal activities of daily living.

  20. Optimising the prescription of prosthetic technologies (opptec): Outcome measures for evidence based prosthetic practice and use

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryall, Dr Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This study provided a forum for patients and service providers to voice their opinions in what they believe to be the important predictors and outcomes involved in successful rehabilitation following limb loss. To develop a consensus on the most important outcomes and factors to address for both the lower limb and upper limb prosthetic prescription process, the above data relating to lower limb and upper prosthetics were subsequently used in the next phase of the research involving two Delphi surveys of 23 and 53 experts within the lower limb and upper limb amputation and prosthetic field respectively, including users, service providers and researchers.\\r\

  1. Prosthetic clone and natural human tooth comparison by speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slangen, Pierre; Corn, Stephane; Fages, Michel; Raynal, Jacques; Cuisinier, Frederic J. G.

    2010-09-01

    New trends in dental prosthodontic interventions tend to preserve the maximum of "body" structure. With the evolution of CAD-CAM techniques, it is now possible to measure "in mouth" the remaining dental tissues. The prosthetic crown is then designed using this shape on which it will be glued on, and also by taking into account the contact surface of the opposite jaw tooth. Several theories discuss on the glue thickness and formulation, but also on the way to evolve to a more biocompatible crown and also new biomechanical concepts. In order to validate these new concepts and materials, and to study the mechanical properties and mechanical integrity of the prosthesis, high resolution optical measurements of the deformations of the glue and the crown are needed. Samples are two intact premolars extracted for orthodontics reasons. The reference sample has no modifications on the tooth while the second sample tooth is shaped to receive a feldspathic ceramic monoblock crown which will be glued. This crown was manufactured with a chairside CAD-CAM system from an intra-oral optical print. The software allows to realize a nearly perfect clone of the reference sample. The necessary space for the glue is also entered with ideal values. This duplication process yields to obtain two samples with identical anatomy for further processing. The glue joint thickness can also be modified if required. The purpose is to compare the behaviour of a natural tooth and its prosthetic clone manufactured with "biomechanical" concepts. Vertical cut samples have been used to deal with planar object observation, and also to look "inside" the tooth. We have developed a complete apparatus enabling the study of the compressive mechanical behaviour of the concerned tooth by speckle interferometry. Because in plane displacements are of great interest for orthodontic measurements1, an optical fiber in-plane sensitive interferometer has been designed. The fibers are wrapped around piezoelectric

  2. The Prosthetic Experience Between Body and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2018-01-01

    for an experience-based analysis of experimental practices operating between body and technology. These practices, which, rather than falling into the category of science fiction or horror cinema as some recent critique from post-human studies would have it, are pointing towards a genealogy of prosthetic experience......In this paper, I argue that a prosthetic aesthetic instigated by experimental art practices operate with and within a ‘second nature’ – in-between science and art. Drawing on theories from Dewey and Edelman and examples from Da Vinci, Brancusi, Man Ray, Dali and Stelarc, I am calling...

  3. Design and properties of maxillofacial prosthetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreopoulos, A G; Theophanides, T

    1993-11-01

    Maxillofacial reconstruction by prosthetic means is a valuable contribution that medicine offers to the public. Materials design and properties are the main problems faced by scientists in this field. Materials used for intraoral prostheses are not ideal, but they have been perfected to the point of practical use. Denture resins, gold, chromium-cobalt alloys, and porcelain are widely used and produce acceptable results in the oral cavity. In this review, the properties and performance of some polymeric materials used in maxillofacial prosthetics are discussed, and new trends in research and development are also reported.

  4. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  5. Capability Enhancement and Amputee Care in Operation Iraqi Freedom: The Role of a Rehabilitation and Prosthetics Assistance Team in Reconstruction Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    prosthetic devices were delivered (21% of patients seen) with the remainder of patients either BK (36% Multiple (1%) Bilateral Upper (1% Partial Foot (2% KD...femoral limb loss KO- knee disarticulation Seines- ankle disarticulation P;u1ial Foot - Carpal-in et a carpal amputation Bilateral lower extremity limb loss...prosthetic limb lypi- cally marked the transition in rehabilitation goals to functional outcomes such as using an upper extremity prosthesis to per

  6. Comparative roll-over analysis of prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L.; van Keeken, Helco G.; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2009-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is a key element of a prosthetic leg, literally forming the basis for a stable and efficient amputee gait. We determined the roll-over characteristics of a broad range of prosthetic feet and examined the effect of a variety of shoes on these characteristics. The body weight of a pe

  7. 21 CFR 872.1905 - Dental x-ray film holder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental x-ray film holder. 872.1905 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1905 Dental x-ray film holder. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray film holder is a device intended to position and to hold x-ray film inside the...

  8. Method of making self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, John T.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Shibata, Jason

    2017-06-06

    An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

  9. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: 4-Year Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coelho Okida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the main causes of dental erosion. The aim of this case presented is to describe the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with GERD after 4 years of followup. A 33-year-old male patient complained about tooth sensitivity. The lingual surface of the maxillary anterior teeth and the cusps of the upper and lower posterior teeth presented wear. It was suspected that the feeling of heartburn reported by the patient associated with the intake of sports supplements (isotonics was causing gastroesophageal changes. The patient was referred to a gastroenterologist and was diagnosed with GERD. Dental treatment was performed with metal-free crowns and porcelain veneers after medical treatment of the disease. With the change in eating habits, the treatment of GERD and lithium disilicate ceramics provided excellent cosmetic results after 4 years and the patient reported satisfaction with the treatment.

  10. A comparison of the traditional casting method and the galvanoforming technique in gold alloy prosthetic restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarna-Boś Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold is a dental material with very good mechanical properties. It is also aesthetic and biocompatible with the tissues of the oral cavity even at 100% purity. Prosthetic restorations made of pure gold or its alloys can be practiced either through a normal casting, as well as through using the galvanoforming technique. The electrolytic method was first introduced into dentistry about 20 years ago and it allows for producing “pure” gold (which means 99.99% Au. The lack of additions of other metals improves the properties of dental prostheses, such as marginal tightness, esthetics, biocompatibility, and it helps in eliminating any allergic reactions. The literature review presented in this paper is a comparison of the traditional casting method with the newer galvanoforming technique.

  11. The agenetic body: prosthetics or the new Promethean ideal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmeyer, Cristina

    2016-07-04

    In our rapidly changing world, we are often encouraged to treat our bodies as objects of constant improvement by means of various facilities and innovations. As part of this "Promethean tendency," the present-day alliance between medicine and technology has opened up a new perspective on the ill and disabled body, by providing access to sophisticated prosthetics that are increasingly seen as ideal remedies. These devices allow patients to benefit from previously unimaginable treatments and inestimable scientific advances, yet they also create new forms of dependency that go beyond simply forming a habit. They are part of a complex process which results in the construction of a body full of paradoxes and whose effects go beyond the subject's image construction. Based on the case of Mathilde, a little girl with a partial arm agenesis, the author traces some elements of the psychic process of constructing a body: from a congenital malformation towards a body "supplemented" by a prosthesis.

  12. Custom design in lower limb prosthetics for athletic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergason, J R; Boone, D A

    2000-08-01

    In summary, the prosthetist is the best source of information with regard to the fast-changing lower extremity prosthetics technology for sports. The needs and desires of the amputee should be outlined and balanced with the cost of the desired components and design. In many cases, one carefully designed prosthesis can serve in dual roles for everyday ambulation and certain athletic activities. In other cases, the amputee is limited severely by a prosthesis that is not designed for a specific activity. Using a prosthesis for activities that it was not designed to accommodate can cause physical injury to the amputee as well as structural failure of the device. A properly designed and fitted prosthesis can open a whole new world of activity to the amputee and helps him or her to reach the desired a vocational goals.

  13. Minimizing incisional dehiscence following 2-stage prosthetic breast reconstruction in the setting of radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y.

    2013-01-01

    Incisional dehiscence is a potential complication following prosthetic breast reconstruction. This is exacerbated in the setting of previous radiation therapy (RT) at the time of exchange of the tissue expander to a permanent implant. A technical modification is described that has successfully minimized this adverse event. Twenty-nine patients that had tissue expanders and RT underwent exchange of the device through a laterally based incision along the inframammary fold (IMF) rather than thro...

  14. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking

    OpenAIRE

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R.; Nickel, Eric A.; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data...

  15. The traumatic lower extremity amputee: surgical challenges and advances in prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannada, Lisa K; Vaidya, Rahul; Covey, Dana C; Hanna, Kathryn; Dougherty, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The mangled lower extremity is a challenging injury to treat. Orthopaedic surgeons treating patients with these severe injuries must have a clear understanding of contemporary advantages and disadvantages of limb salvage versus amputation. It is helpful to review the acute management of mangled extremity injuries in the civilian and military populations, to be familiar with current postoperative protocols, and to recognize recent advances in prosthetic devices.

  16. Zirconia: Established facts and perspectives for a biomaterial in dental implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisbergues, Michael; Vendeville, Sophie; Vendeville, Philippe

    2009-02-01

    Currently, zirconia is widely used in biomedical area as a material for prosthetic devices because of its good mechanical and chemical properties. Largely employed in clinical area for total hip replacement, zirconia ceramics (ZrO(2)) are becoming a prevalent biomaterial in dentistry and dental implantology. Although titanium is used in dental implantology currently, there is a trend to develop new ceramic-based implants as an alternative to monolithic titanium. This article reviews the evolution and development of zirconia through data published between 1963 and January 2008 in English language. Articles were identified via a MEDLINE search using the following keywords: zirconia, zirconia/biocompatibility, zirconia/osseointegration, zirconia/periointegration, zirconia/review, and zirconia/bacterial adhesion or colonization. This review of the literature aims at highlighting and discussing zirconia properties in biological systems for their future use in dental implantology. In conclusion, zirconia with its interesting microstructural properties has been confirmed to be a material of choice for the "new generation" of implants, thanks to its biocompatibility, osseoconductivity, tendency to reduce plaque accumulation, and interaction with soft tissues, which leads to periointegration. However, scientific studies are promptly needed to fulfill gaps like long-term clinical evaluations of "all zirconia implants," currently leading to propose an alternative use of "hybrid systems" (i.e., titanium screw with zirconia collar) and also bacterial colonization of zirconia. Moreover, there is a permanent need for consistent information about topography and chemistry of zirconia allowing easier cross-product comparisons of clinical devices. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Consumer satisfaction in prosthetics and orthotics facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; Gankema, H.G.J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess consumer/patient satisfaction with the services of the prosthetics and orthotics (P&O) facilities in the north of the Netherlands, using a modified SERVQUAL questionnaire. In this questionnaire, consumer interests and experiences are assessed on a 5-point Likert s

  18. The Prosthetic Experience Between Body and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that a prosthetic aesthetic instigated by experimental art practices operate with and within a ‘second nature’ – in-between science and art. Drawing on theories from Dewey and Edelman and examples from Da Vinci, Brancusi, Man Ray, Dali and Stelarc, I am calling for an exper...

  19. Multimodality Imaging Assessment of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suchá, D.; Symersky, Petr; Tanis, W; Mali, Willem P Th M; Leiner, Tim; van Herwerden, LA; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the main techniques for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) evaluation, but because of specific limitations they may not identify the morphological substrate or the extent of PHV pathology. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have emerg

  20. Proceedings, 1972 Carahan Conference on Electronic Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John S., Ed.; DeVore, R. William, Ed.

    Presented are 28 papers given at a 1972 conference on electronic prosthetics for the handicapped. Among the papers are the following titles: "Therapy for Cerebral Palsy Employing Artifician Sense Organs for Alternatives to Proprioceptive Feedback"; "Excessive Neuromuscular Time Delay as a Possible Cause of Poor Hand-Eye Coordination and…

  1. Design and characterization of a biologically inspired quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Lai, Cara H; Rouse, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    By design, commonly worn energy storage and release (ESR) prosthetic feet cannot provide biologically realistic ankle joint torque and angle profiles during walking. Additionally, their anthropomorphic, cantilever architecture causes their mechanical stiffness to decrease throughout the stance phase of walking, opposing the known trend of the biological ankle. In this study, the design of a quasi-passive pneumatic ankle-foot prosthesis is detailed that is able to replicate the biological ankle's torque and angle profiles during walking. The prosthetic ankle is comprised of a pneumatic piston, bending spring and solenoid valve. The mechanical properties of the pneumatic ankle prosthesis are characterized using a materials testing machine and the properties are compared to those from a common, passive ESR prosthetic foot. The characterization spanned a range of ankle equilibrium pressures and testing locations beneath the foot, analogous to the location of center of pressure within the stance phase of walking. The pneumatic ankle prosthesis was shown to provide biologically appropriate trends and magnitudes of torque, angle and stiffness behavior, when compared to the passive ESR prosthetic foot. Future work will focus on the development of a control system for the quasi-passive device and clinical testing of the pneumatic ankle to demonstrate efficacy.

  2. 21 CFR 872.6010 - Abrasive device and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6010 Abrasive device and accessories... disk, guard for an abrasive disk, abrasive point, polishing agent strip, and polishing wheel....

  3. Specialty choice among dental students in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K K Kanmodi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The unequal distribution of workforce across dental specialties in Nigeria poses a significant problem in the delivery of specialists’ oral healthcare to the Nigerian population. Objectives. To determine dental specialties preferences among dental students at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, and to explore the factors that influence their choices. Methods. We obtained ethical approval to conduct this study. Only the dental students who rotated through all the dental specialties were selected to participate in this questionnaire-based study. Data were analysed using SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc., USA. Results. The majority of dental students at the University of Ibadan preferred the oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS specialty above all other dental specialties, while prosthetic dentistry was least preferred. Of all the factors to take into consideration when choosing a dental specialty, personal interest was the only factor considered by nearly all respondents. Only male respondents considered prestige as an influencing factor in their choice of a specialty. Lifestyle and job description were factors considered by a higher proportion of the male respondents (10/13 than females (5/14. The mean age of the 27 respondents who participated in this study was 22.6 years, 52% of whom were females. Conclusion. OMS was the most preferred specialty among our respondents (n=8. Nearly all dental students chose residency training in the specialty that most appealed to them. The interest of dental students towards the least appealing dental specialties needs to be developed to solve the problem of skewed distribution of the dental workforce in Nigeria. Our findings suggest that this may be accomplished by changing dental students’ perceptions of certain specialties, building on male students’ interests in job security and private practice potential, and the female students’ interests in family-friendly specialties and increasing flexibility

  4. Radiopacity of Dental Materials: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekkan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context This study aimed to provide an overview of the literature on the radiopacity of dental materials in order to emphasize its importance. Evidence Acquisition English-language literature was investigated using manual and electronic searches for the terms “radiopacity,” “dental material,” “cement,” “composite,” “ceramic,” “endodontic root canal sealer,” “bone graft,” and “acrylic resin” in the databases of Medline, google scholar, and Scopus up to April 2016. Seventy-nine selected publications, including review articles, original articles, and books, were evaluated. Results The radiopacity of different dental materials may be lower or higher than that of the replaced tissue depending on the restorative material used. The research revealed that highly-radiopaque materials should not be used in dental restorations, except as bone graft and endodontic root canal filling materials. For most of the dental restorative materials, moderate radiopacity within the range of the replaced dental tissue is recommended. However, the lower radiopacity of polymer-based restorative or prosthetic dental materials is still a significant clinical problem. Conclusions The author recommends using highly-radiopaque materials whenever possible for treatment of bone defects and root canals. For dental materials that replace clinical crowns, the radiopacity should be within the range of that of the replaced tooth structure (dentin or enamel. The radiopacity of dental cements should be much higher than that of the enamel in order to facilitate detection of the thin cement remnants.

  5. Dental Hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  6. Cyborg beast: a low-cost 3d-printed prosthetic hand for children with upper-limb differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Jorge; Katsavelis, Dimitrios; Peck, Jean; Stollberg, John; Petrykowski, Marc; Carson, Adam; Fernandez, Cristina

    2015-01-20

    There is an increasing number of children with traumatic and congenital hand amputations or reductions. Children's prosthetic needs are complex due to their small size, constant growth, and psychosocial development. Families' financial resources play a crucial role in the prescription of prostheses for their children, especially when private insurance and public funding are insufficient. Electric-powered (i.e., myoelectric) and body-powered (i.e., mechanical) devices have been developed to accommodate children's needs, but the cost of maintenance and replacement represents an obstacle for many families. Due to the complexity and high cost of these prosthetic hands, they are not accessible to children from low-income, uninsured families or to children from developing countries. Advancements in computer-aided design (CAD) programs, additive manufacturing, and image editing software offer the possibility of designing, printing, and fitting prosthetic hands devices at a distance and at very low cost. The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to describe a low-cost three-dimensional (3D)-printed prosthetic hand for children with upper-limb reductions and to propose a prosthesis fitting methodology that can be performed at a distance. No significant mean differences were found between the anthropometric and range of motion measurements taken directly from the upper limbs of subjects versus those extracted from photographs. The Bland and Altman plots show no major bias and narrow limits of agreements for lengths and widths and small bias and wider limits of agreements for the range of motion measurements. The main finding of the survey was that our prosthetic device may have a significant potential to positively impact quality of life and daily usage, and can be incorporated in several activities at home and in school. This investigation describes a low-cost 3D-printed prosthetic hand for children and proposes a distance fitting procedure. The Cyborg Beast

  7. Relationship between oral health-related quality of life, satisfaction, and personality in patients with prosthetic rehabilitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Karasneh, Jumana

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between oral health-related quality of life, satisfaction with dentition, and personality profiles among patients with fixed and/or removable prosthetic rehabilitations. Thirty-seven patients (13 males, 24 females; mean age 37.6 +/- 13.3 years) with fitted prosthetic rehabilitations and 37 controls who matched the patients by age and gender were recruited into the study. The Dental Impact on Daily Living (DIDL) questionnaire was used to assess dental impacts on daily living and satisfaction with the dentition. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) was used to measure self-reported discomfort, disability, and dysfunction caused by oral conditions. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed by the United Kingdom Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHQoL-UK) measure. Moreover, the NEO five-factor inventory was used to assess participants' personality profiles. Prosthetic factors had no relationship to the DIDL, OHIP, and OHQoL-UK scores. Patients with the least oral health impacts had better oral health-related quality of life (p= 0.023, r =-0.37), higher levels of total satisfaction, and satisfaction with appearance, pain, oral comfort, general performance, and eating (p level of neuroticism.

  8. The effects of prosthetic ankle dorsiflexion and energy return on below-knee amputee leg loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Jessica D; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2011-03-01

    Prosthetic devices are intended to return lower limb amputees to their pre-amputation functional status. However, prosthetic devices designed for unilateral below-knee amputees have yet to completely restore the biomechanical functions normally provided by the ankle muscles, leading to gait asymmetries and increased reliance on their intact leg. In an effort to improve amputee gait, energy storage and return feet have been developed that store mechanical energy in elastic structures in early to mid-stance and return it in late stance. However, little is known regarding how ankle compliance and the level of energy return influences walking mechanics. The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of prosthetic ankle dorsiflexion and energy storage and return on leg loading during steady-state walking. Compliant ankles with different stiffness levels were attached to a Seattle Lightfoot2 in different orientations (forward- and reverse-facing). The ankles decreased residual leg vertical ground reaction forces in late stance, increased residual leg propulsive ground reaction force impulses and increased residual leg knee joint extensor moments. The reverse-facing ankles increased residual leg vertical ground reaction forces in early stance, and the compliant forward-facing ankle increased residual leg braking impulses. In contrast to previous studies, increased energy storage and return from compliant ankles did not decrease hip joint powers or the intact leg vertical ground reaction forces. These results provide insight into the relationships between ankle dorsiflexion, energy storage and return, and leg loading, which may lead to more effective prosthetic devices to improve amputee gait. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intraoral Laser Welding (ILW) in Implant Prosthetic Dentistry: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Cernavin, Igor; Lòpez de Castro, Gonzalo; Vescovi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to describe the possibility of using the Nd:YAG laser device utilized in the dental offices to weld metals intraorally. The authors, before applying this technique “in vivo” on human subjects, tested the “in vitro” metal welding efficacy of dental Nd:YAG device firstly by interferometry, SEM, and EDS and subsequently by thermal camera and thermocouples in order to record temperature changes during the welding process on bovine jaws. Four implants were inserted in the edentulous maxillary arch of a 67 years old male patient. Immediately after that, a bar previously made by the dental technician was intraorally welded to the abutments by Nd:YAG laser (Fidelis Plus III, Fotona, Slovenia) with these parameters: 9.90 mJ, 1 Hz, 15 msec, 0.6 mm spot. Then the prosthesis was connected to the bar with four OT Caps. This clinical study, even if preliminary, suggests that laser welding technique may be intraorally used without side effects. PMID:22924134

  10. Intraoral Laser Welding (ILW in Implant Prosthetic Dentistry: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Fornaini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this clinical study was to describe the possibility of using the Nd:YAG laser device utilized in the dental offices to weld metals intraorally. The authors, before applying this technique “in vivo” on human subjects, tested the “in vitro” metal welding efficacy of dental Nd:YAG device firstly by interferometry, SEM, and EDS and subsequently by thermal camera and thermocouples in order to record temperature changes during the welding process on bovine jaws. Four implants were inserted in the edentulous maxillary arch of a 67 years old male patient. Immediately after that, a bar previously made by the dental technician was intraorally welded to the abutments by Nd:YAG laser (Fidelis Plus III, Fotona, Slovenia with these parameters: 9.90 mJ, 1 Hz, 15 msec, 0.6 mm spot. Then the prosthesis was connected to the bar with four OT Caps. This clinical study, even if preliminary, suggests that laser welding technique may be intraorally used without side effects.

  11. Considerations on dental bridges’ stability and balance for mandibulary teeth with coronary-root amputation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Dental occlusion represent the function of dentomaxillary system at which realization participate all the components of that system holding the equilibrium between them. Setting up the treatment with dental bridges in partial edentuluous is rule by some principles that have aims like restore the morphology and functions change by edentuluous condition and also prevention disorders of remaining teeth and other structures and functions of dentomaxillary system. During the prosthetic treatment w...

  12. [Dental prostheses and dental impressions from a hygienic viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, J P

    1986-12-01

    Dentures, dental impressions, removable orthodontic appliances and all dental technical devices, which are part of any dental treatment are parts as well of a potential crosscontamination chain in dental treatment. Most of those items do not tolerate heat as a sure sterilization medium. For disinfection, chemical disinfectant solutions may be used as far as they work properly and as they are tolerated by the materials in question. Though, one can report some progress in disinfection of dentures and impressions, there are still questions open depending on safety and/or compatibility of the particular materials. For disinfection of removable dentures chlorine-yielding preparations such as Maranon can be recommended. Peracid preparations, such as Sekusept, Sekusept steril and Dentavon may be useful for disinfection of dental impressions. To do the possible means to reduce the infection risk for all persons involved in the dental treatment, patient, dentist, dental technician and all auxiliary persons. This includes both, active hygiene provisions as sterilization and disinfection, as well as possible passive self protection.

  13. Dental OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  14. SURGICAL CORRECTION OF ATROPHIC MAXILLA FOR INSERTION OF ENDOSSEOUS DENTAL IMPLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijel Žerdoner

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alveolar process atrophy is a physiological process in edentulous patients that may heavily compromise the succes of dental prosthetic rehabilitation. This is particulary important for insertion of endosseous implants. Because of the direct vicinity of maxillary sinuses, implantation is often impossible without previous pre-prosthetic surgical intervention.Methods. Two types of pre-prosthetic surgical procedures are described and their relative advantages are discussed. An illustrative case report is presented, describing the patient’s problems, his treatment and clinical outcome.Conclusions. In cases when maxillary alveolar process atrophy is so severe that insertion of dental implants is impossible, surgical correction with sinus floor lift is necessary. In our institution, the results of this procedure are good. Good quality of the antral mucosa and normal anatomic shape of the maxillary sinuses are two prerequisites for its success.

  15. History of the prosthetic treatment of impotence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretan, P N

    1989-02-01

    Early records of observations of the os penis or baculum in mammals go back to Aristotle. These heritable cartilaginous supports were noted to help the penis during copulation. Prosthetic surgery for treatment of impotence was born from the initial experience with the use of the "artificial os penis" (rib cartilage) in post-traumatic reconstruction in 1936. Slow progress was made with the use of extracavernosal acrylic stents, followed by intracavernosal polypropylene rods, and finally the silicone prosthesis over the next 20 years. The introduction in 1973 of the inert silicone semirigid prosthesis and inflatable prosthesis met with great successes. Most recently (1985), there has been development of self-contained prostheses that are technically more simple to insert. Today, much more is known about specific organic causes of impotence that are amenable to many successful nonprosthetic alternative therapies, adding more stimuli to continued innovations in prosthetic surgery for erectile dysfunction.

  16. Measuring the color of maxillofacial prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; Johnston, W M; Seghi, R R

    2010-12-01

    Color information from different color-measuring systems varies during color matching in maxillofacial prosthetics. We studied the hypothesis that a non-contact measuring system and 4 contact color-measuring instruments perform comparably in accuracy and precision on measurements of pigmented maxillofacial elastomer specimens having human skin colors. Measurement comparisons in accuracy on opaque standard color patches were made in Phase I. In Phase II, the system with the best accuracy was used as the reference instrument, and comparisons in accuracy and precision on elastomer specimens were made. The CIEDE2000 color difference formula was used. Repeated-measures ANOVA with Tukey testing and linear regression analysis for CIELAB and color differences among the instruments were performed. The contact measuring systems perform differently in accuracy, possibly due to edge loss and other factors, but performed comparably in precision with the non-contact measuring instrument. This non-contact system is recommended for color measurement of maxillofacial prosthetic materials.

  17. Prosthetic management of an ocular defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddesh Kumar Chintal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The disfigurement associated with the loss of an eye can cause significant physical and emotional problems. Various treatment modalities are available, one of which is implants. Although implant has a superior outcome, it may not be advisable in all patients due to economic factors. The present article describes the prosthetic management of an ocular defect with a custom-made ocular prosthesis.

  18. Retinal prosthetics, optogenetics, and chemical photoswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Robert; Pfeiffer, Rebecca; Jones, Bryan

    2014-10-15

    Three technologies have emerged as therapies to restore light sensing to profoundly blind patients suffering from late-stage retinal degenerations: (1) retinal prosthetics, (2) optogenetics, and (3) chemical photoswitches. Prosthetics are the most mature and the only approach in clinical practice. Prosthetic implants require complex surgical intervention and provide only limited visual resolution but can potentially restore navigational ability to many blind patients. Optogenetics uses viral delivery of type 1 opsin genes from prokaryotes or eukaryote algae to restore light responses in survivor neurons. Targeting and expression remain major problems, but are potentially soluble. Importantly, optogenetics could provide the ultimate in high-resolution vision due to the long persistence of gene expression achieved in animal models. Nevertheless, optogenetics remains challenging to implement in human eyes with large volumes, complex disease progression, and physical barriers to viral penetration. Now, a new generation of photochromic ligands or chemical photoswitches (azobenzene-quaternary ammonium derivatives) can be injected into a degenerated mouse eye and, in minutes to hours, activate light responses in neurons. These photoswitches offer the potential for rapidly and reversibly screening the vision restoration expected in an individual patient. Chemical photoswitch variants that persist in the cell membrane could make them a simple therapy of choice, with resolution and sensitivity equivalent to optogenetics approaches. A major complexity in treating retinal degenerations is retinal remodeling: pathologic network rewiring, molecular reprogramming, and cell death that compromise signaling in the surviving retina. Remodeling forces a choice between upstream and downstream targeting, each engaging different benefits and defects. Prosthetics and optogenetics can be implemented in either mode, but the use of chemical photoswitches is currently limited to downstream

  19. Tactile Sensing Reflexes for Advanced Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Quad Chart 37 1. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this research is to equip a myoelectric prosthetic hand with contact detecting sensors and a...controller to perform contact detection reflex (11-13 mos.) 80% • Program controller to perform software functions for clinical studies (12-13 mos.) 60...candidates have been ordered, and are having pressure relief holes laser drilled . A custom flexible component board that holds the pressure sensor

  20. Image Processing Techniques for Assessment of Dental Trays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Dimensional Tooth Movement During Orthodontic Treatment�, IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 38, no 4, pp. 360-365, April 1991. [2...in a Complete Dental Arch Cast�, The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Vol 61, no 1, pp. 54-58, January 1989. [3] Saunders, W. P., Sharkey, S. W...Polyvinyl Siloxane Impression Material�, Journal of Dentistry, Vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 283-289, October 1991. [4] Johnson, G.H., Craig, R. G., �Accuracy

  1. Dynamics of dental check-ups among the population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimova D.Y.

    2015-09-01

    of countries have not produced any free prosthetics. Conclusion. Reduced the number of patients who received pros-theses, especially for free. The most unfavorable situation is observed in the North Caucasus Federal District (-64.9%, mainly due to the Chechen Republic and the Republic of Dagestan, where the figure is zero. The current situation in the field of dental care, requires a differentiated approach and to adequately address problems from a regional perspective.

  2. Influence of shape and finishing on the corrosion of palladium-based dental alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milheiro, A.; Muris, J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the surface treatment and shape of the dental alloy on the composition of the prosthetic work and its metallic ion release in a corrosive medium after casting. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Orion Argos (Pd-Ag) and Orion Vesta (Pd-Cu) were us

  3. Influence of shape and finishing on the corrosion of palladium-based dental alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milheiro, A.; Muris, J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the surface treatment and shape of the dental alloy on the composition of the prosthetic work and its metallic ion release in a corrosive medium after casting. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Orion Argos (Pd-Ag) and Orion Vesta (Pd-Cu) were us

  4. [The impact of frailty on the oral care behaviour and dental service use of elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, D.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Gerritsen, A.E.

    2015-01-01

    In order to explore how the level of frailty and various frailty factors affect the dental service use and oral self-care behaviour of frail elderly people, 51 frail elderly people were interviewed. Additional information on age, gender, living situation, prosthetic status, self-reported health and

  5. Prosthetic reconstruction to restore function in transcarpal amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminger, S; Roche, A D; Hruby, L A; Sturma, A; Riedl, O; Bergmeister, K D; Aszmann, O C

    2016-03-01

    Mutilated hands at the distal level may pose a challenge for reconstruction. Biological treatment options may require multiple surgical interventions and a long rehabilitation course with little hope of good functional outcome. Standard hand prostheses are also not an ideal solution, as they are too long and cumbersome for partial hand injuries. This paper outlines the functional outcomes of prosthetic reconstruction with devices customized for the transcarpal amputation levels. The functional outcome was evaluated with the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH). Functional evaluation was performed at least 12 months after final fitting. Psychological assessment was performed with the Short Form-36. The three patients achieved a mean ARAT score of 35.67 ± 0.58. The average SHAP score was 74 ± 7.81. The average DASH score was found to be 16.11 ± 12.03. The reconstructed hand achieved a score of 75.27 ± 8.16% in SHAP and 62.57 ± 1.02% in ARAT in relation to the healthy hand. All patients exhibited average physical and mental component summary scales in the Short Form-36. The majority of transcarpal amputations are seen in manual laborers due to work-related trauma. Returning to work is the main goal in such young and otherwise-healthy patients. As shown with this study, prosthetic fitting results in quick and reliable functional reconstruction. Therefore, this treatment should be considered as an option during the initial decision-making process of reconstructing difficult traumatic injuries of the hand.

  6. [Optogenetics and prosthetic treatment of retinal degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovskiy, M A

    2015-01-01

    This is a review of the current state of optogenetics-based research in the field of ophthalmology and physiology of vision. Optogenetics employs an interdisciplinary approach that amalgamates gene engineering, optics, and physiology. It involves exogenous expression of a light-activated protein in a very particular retinal cell enabling regulation (stimulation vs. inhibition) of its physiological activity. The experience with gene therapy came in very useful for optogenetics. However, unlike gene therapy, which is aimed at repairing damaged genes or replacing them with healthy ones, optogenetics is focused on protein genes delivery for further molecular control of the cell. In retina, the loss of photoreceptors is not necessarily followed by neuronal loss (at least ganglion cells remain intact), which determines the practicability of prosthetic treatment. Clinical trials can now be considered, owing to the first successful conversion of ganglion cells of mouse degenerative retinas into artificial photoreceptive cells with ON and OFF receptive fields, which is crucial for spatial vision. The following issues are reviewed here in detail: 1. Choice of cell targets within the degenerative retina. 2. Strategy of utilizing the existing light-sensitive agents and development of new optogenetic tools. 3. Gene delivery and expression in retinal cells. 4. Methods of evaluating the treatment success. 5. Selection criteria for optogenetic prosthetics. The conclusion discusses currently unsolved problems and prospects for optogenetic approaches to retinal prosthetics.

  7. High torque ultrasonic motors for hand prosthetics: current status and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, J L; Rodríguez, H; Luyckx, I; Reynaerts, D; Ceres, R; Van Brussel, H

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the work carried out at the Instituto de Automática Industrial, in the framework of the EU MANUS project and with the co-operation of the Katholieke Universiteit of Leuven, to develop a specifically designed TWUM for driving our prototype of hand prosthesis. The application of TWUM to prosthetic devices has clear advanteges, namely, noiseless operation, self-braking drive, high torque and low speed characteristics. Here we analyse main actuation advantages, point out main drawbacks of this technology and describe our research in the area of specific design of TWUM for high torque actuation, improved control characteristics and enhanced overall performance. We intend to provide a concurrent approach to the overall actuator design involving electronics, mechanical design as well as improved control strategies having in mind the prosthetic application.

  8. Molecular characterization of an early invasive Staphylococcus epidermidis prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marnie E; Dever, Lisa L; Moucha, Calin S; Chavda, Kalyan D; Otto, Michael; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2011-09-01

    Historically regarded as a skin commensal, Staphylococcus epidermidis has been increasingly implicated in invasive foreign body infections such as catheter-related bloodstream infections, indwelling device infections, and prosthetic joint infections. We report a case of an aggressive, difficult-to-eradicate, invasive prosthetic hip infection occurring early after hardware implant and associated with a high-grade bacteremia and assess its salient molecular characteristics. The clinical and molecular characteristics of this isolate mirror the pathogenesis and persistence commonly seen with invasive methicillin-resistant S. aureus and may be attributed to the combination of resistance genes (SCCmec type IV), putative virulence factors (arcA and opp3a), cytolytic peptide production (α-type phenol-soluble modulins), and biofilm adhesion, interaction, and maturation (bhp, aap, and β-type phenol-soluble modulins).

  9. Committing to Memory: Memory Prosthetics Show Promise in Helping Those with Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Cell phone chimes, sticky notes, even the proverbial string around a finger-these timehonored external cues help guard against our inevitable memory lapses. But some internal help to the brain itself may be on the way in the form of what's being called memory prosthetics. Once considered to be on the fringes of neuroscience, the idea of adding hardware to the brain to help with memory has gathered steam. In 2014, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) made a US$30 million investment in memory prosthetic research as part of the Obama administration's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies initiative. In August 2016, Kernel, a startup based in Los Angeles, California, announced its goal to develop a clinical memory device for those debilitated by neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a look at prosthetics--past, present and possible future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Randy; MacDonald, Peter B

    2008-01-01

    Biological tissue autograft reconstruction using the patellar tendon or quadrupled semitendinosus/gracilis tendons has become the most popular procedure in surgical treatment of a ruptured ACL. This article provides a review of the history of the use of prosthetics with respect to ACL reconstruction grafts including Carbon Fibre, Gore-Tex and Dacron prosthetics as well as the Leeds-Keio Artificial Ligament and the Kennedy Ligament Augmentation Device (LAD). Emphasis is placed on the Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) as preliminary investigations of its use have been encouraging. Significant progress has been made recently with respect to the understanding of ACL anatomy, composition, biomechanics, and healing processes, leading to innovative techniques using approaches based in tissue engineering principles and computer - assisted surgery. While research into improved ACL treatment options continues, the synthesis of recent advancements provides a new optimism towards the regeneration of an ACL mirroring its original stability, function, and longevity.

  11. Below knee prosthetic socket designs and suspension systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, M L

    2000-08-01

    The prosthetic socket must act as a customized connection between the residual limb's surrounding tissues and the prosthetic components. The socket must be designed to control weight bearing, suspension, and ambulation stability. When making a below-the-knee socket, the prosthetist attempts to maximize loading and minimize displacements, such as vertical, transverse, or rotational. This article discusses the engineering designs or shapes of the two basic forms of below-the-knee prosthetic sockets used today.

  12. 100 top-cited scientific papers in limb prosthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Eshraghi, Arezoo; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Ali, Sadeeq; Shadgan, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Research has tremendously contributed to the developments in both practical and fundamental aspects of limb prosthetics. These advancements are reflected in scientific articles, particularly in the most cited papers. This article aimed to identify the 100 top-cited articles in the field of limb prosthetics and to investigate their main characteristics. Articles related to the field of limb prosthetics and published in the Web of Knowledge database of the Institute for Scientific Information (...

  13. Prosthetic options available for the diabetic lower limb amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitragari, Gautham; Mahler, David B; Sumpio, Brandon J; Blume, Peter A; Sumpio, Bauer E

    2014-01-01

    Although the rate of lower limb amputation in patients with diabetes is decreasing, amputation still remains a major complication of diabetes. Prosthetics have been long used to help amputees ambulate. The last decade has seen many advances in prostheses with the enhanced understanding of the mechanics of ambulation and improved use of technology. This review describes the different types of prosthetic options available for below knee, ankle, and foot amputees, emphasizing the latest advances in prosthetic design.

  14. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  15. Infant dental care (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma can result ...

  16. Oral health-related quality of life and prosthetic status of nursing home residents with or without dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klotz AL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Anna-Luisa Klotz,1 Alexander Jochen Hassel,1 Johannes Schröder,2,3 Peter Rammelsberg,1 Andreas Zenthöfer1 1Department of Prosthodontics, Dental School, 2Institute of Gerontology, 3Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Purpose: The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the effect of prosthetic status on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL of nursing home residents with or without dementia.Methods: The study was performed in 14 nursing homes across the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. All eligible participants were included, and general and medical information and information about their dental and prosthetic statuses were collected. The Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI was administered to evaluate OHRQoL. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE served to classify participants into living or not living with dementia according to the established cutoff value for dementia (MMSE <24. Parametric bivariate statistics and logistic regression models were used to analyze data at P<0.05.Results: A total of 169 participants were included in this study. The mean age of the participants was 82.9 years. A total of some 70% of the sample was living with dementia. The mean GOHAI score along the sample was 49.1 (8.3, and 41% of the sample reported substantially compromised OHRQoL (GOHAI <50. OHRQoL was statistically similar for people with or without dementia (P=0.234; objective oral health was also similar in both groups (P>0.05. The number of teeth (odds ratio [OR]: 2.0, the type of prosthetic status (OR: 6.5, and denture-related treatment needs (OR: 2.4 were the major factors significantly affecting OHRQoL (P<0.05.Conclusion: The OHRQoL of elderly nursing home residents is substantially compromised. Several prosthetic treatment needs for residents living with or without dementia were identified. Edentulism without tooth replacement and having <5 teeth resulted

  17. In vitro study of biofilm growth on biologic prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Charles; Smith, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Biologic prosthetics are increasingly used for the repair of abdominal wall hernia defects but can become infected as a result of peri- or early post-operative bacterial contamination. Data evaluating biofilm formation on biologic prosthetics is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different biologic prosthetics on the growth behavior of two different bacterial species and their ability to form biofilms. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Pseudomrnonas aeruginosa were incubated on disks of two biologic prosthetics-human acellular dermis (ADM), and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). The bacteria were allowed to attach to the prosthetics and propagate into mature biofilms for 24 hours at 370C. Images of biofilms were obtained using confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The number of viable cells and the biofilm biomass were quantified by colony forming units (CFUs) and crystal violet staining respectively. Analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean values for the different prosthetics. Each biologic matrix had a distinct surface characteristic. SEM visualized mature biofilms characterized by highly organized multi-cellular structures on surface of both biologic prosthetics. Quantification of bacterial growth over time showed that ADM had the lowest CFUs and biofilm biomass at 24 hours post-inoculation compared to SIS for both bacterial strains. MRSA and P. aeruginosa can form mature biofilms on biologic prosthetics but the relative abundance of the biofilm varies on different prosthetic constructs. Biologic material composition and manufacturing methods may influence bacterial adherence.

  18. The role of osteoblasts in peri-prosthetic osteolysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, S C

    2013-08-01

    Peri-prosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening is the most common reason for revising total hip replacements. Wear particles originating from the prosthetic components interact with multiple cell types in the peri-prosthetic region resulting in an inflammatory process that ultimately leads to peri-prosthetic bone loss. These cells include macrophages, osteoclasts, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. The majority of research in peri-prosthetic osteolysis has concentrated on the role played by osteoclasts and macrophages. The purpose of this review is to assess the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis. In peri-prosthetic osteolysis, wear particles may affect osteoblasts and contribute to the osteolytic process by two mechanisms. First, particles and metallic ions have been shown to inhibit the osteoblast in terms of its ability to secrete mineralised bone matrix, by reducing calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity and its ability to proliferate. Secondly, particles and metallic ions have been shown to stimulate osteoblasts to produce pro inflammatory mediators in vitro. In vivo, these mediators have the potential to attract pro-inflammatory cells to the peri-prosthetic area and stimulate osteoclasts to absorb bone. Further research is needed to fully define the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis and to explore its potential role as a therapeutic target in this condition.

  19. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... total prosthesis. Examples of external limb prosthetic components include the following: Ankle, foot... shoulder joint components; and cable and prosthesis suction valves. (b) Classification. Class I...

  20. Design of a prosthetic hand with remote actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kurt; Perez-Gracia, Alba

    2012-01-01

    One of the main issues of prosthetic hands is to be able to fulfill all the specifications about speed, torque, weight and inertia while placing all the components within the prosthetic hand. This is especially true when full dexterity is required in the prosthesis. In this paper, a new design for a prosthetic hand is presented, which uses remote actuation in order to satisfy most of those requirements. The actuators are to be located in the back of the subject and the transmission is implemented via cables. Other characteristics of this new prosthetic hand include torque limitation and the possibility of switching between underactuated and fully actuated functions.

  1. A personalized 3D-printed prosthetic joint replacement for the human temporomandibular joint: From implant design to implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, David C; Robinson, Dale; Redhead, Michael; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Moskaljuk, Adrian; Dimitroulis, George

    2017-05-01

    Personalized prosthetic joint replacements have important applications in cases of complex bone and joint conditions where the shape and size of off-the-shelf components may not be adequate. The objective of this study was to design, test and fabricate a personalized 3D-printed prosthesis for a patient requiring total joint replacement surgery of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The new 'Melbourne' prosthetic TMJ design featured a condylar component sized specifically to the patient and fixation screw positions that avoid potential intra-operative damage to the mandibular nerve. The Melbourne prosthetic TMJ was developed for a 58-year-old female recipient with end-stage osteoarthritis of the TMJ. The load response of the prosthesis during chewing and a maximum-force bite was quantified using a personalized musculoskeletal model of the patient's masticatory system developed using medical images. The simulations were then repeated after implantation of the Biomet Microfixation prosthetic TMJ, an established stock device. The maximum condylar stresses, screw stress and mandibular stress at the screw-bone interface were lower in the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ (259.6MPa, 312.9MPa and 198.4MPa, respectively) than those in the Biomet Microfixation device (284.0MPa, 416.0MPa and 262.2MPa, respectively) during the maximum-force bite, with similar trends also observed during the chewing bite. After trialing surgical placement and evaluating prosthetic TMJ stability using cadaveric specimens, the prosthesis was fabricated using 3D printing, sterilized, and implanted into the female recipient. Six months post-operatively, the prosthesis recipient had a normal jaw opening distance (40.0 mm), with no complications identified. The new design features and immediate load response of the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ suggests that it may provide improved clinical and biomechanical joint function compared to a commonly used stock device, and reduce risk of intra-operative nerve damage

  2. 21 CFR 872.5580 - Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque... adhesion of dental plaque. (a) Identification. The device is assigned the generic name oral rinse to reduce the adhesion of dental plaque and is identified as a device intended to reduce the presence...

  3. Needs and demands of prosthetic treatment among two groups of individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukatash Gadeer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The level of knowledge, awareness, and attitude about teeth-replacement options among a group of medical and paramedical subjects and to compare them with the general population. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaires using simple Arabic language were distributed to two groups of subjects. Questions focused on the willingness to replace the missing teeth, the preferable methods of choice for replacement, and the reasons for these choices. The first group (G-I was from the medical and paramedical staff who work in a military hospital at Jordan Royal medical services, the dental staff was excluded from the study. The other group (G-II was from the general population who attended the dental department in the same hospital with comparable level of education. All the participants were partially edentulous excluding the third molars. Clinical examination was done by qualified prosthodontist to evaluate the possible prosthetic treatment options for replacement. A total of 612 questionnaires were distributed, of which 533 questionnaires were returned (response rate 87.09%. The results were analyzed and comparison was made between the two groups. Results: Responses to questions about awareness and attitude about prosthetic management of missing teeth revealed that G-I have more awareness than G-II to the probable causes for tooth/teeth replacement and limitation of the preferable method for replacement (P<0.05. More than 80% of the participants believed that replacement of anterior teeth is more important than the posterior teeth. Implants and fixed partial denture (FPD, respectively, were more preferable than removable prosthesis, although clinically was not indicated in cases (P<0.05. There was no clinical benefit from replacement of missing teeth in 33.4% while only 6% believe this. Conclusions: This study showed that the awareness and attitude between the medical and paramedical staff to prosthetic needs is better than

  4. 21 CFR 872.1740 - Caries detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Caries detection device. 872.1740 Section 872.1740...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1740 Caries detection device. (a) Identification. The caries detection device is a device intended to show the existence of decay in a patient's...

  5. Microtomography evaluation of dental tissue wear surface induced by in vitro simulated chewing cycles on human and composite teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Bedini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a 3D microtomography display of tooth surfaces after in vitro dental wear tests has been obtained. Natural teeth have been compared with prosthetic teeth, manufactured by three different polyceramic composite materials. The prosthetic dental element samples, similar to molars, have been placed in opposition to human teeth extracted by paradontology diseases. After microtomography analysis, samples have been subjected to in vitro fatigue test cycles by servo-hydraulic mechanical testing machine. After the fatigue test, each sample has been subjected again to microtomography analysis to obtain volumetric value changes and dental wear surface images. Wear surface images were obtained by 3D reconstruction software and volumetric value changes were measured by CT analyser software. The aim of this work has been to show the potential of microtomography technique to display very clear and reliable wear surface images. Microtomography analysis methods to evaluate volumetric value changes have been used to quantify dental tissue and composite material wear.

  6. Dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D

    2017-01-01

    , exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental......Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life...... caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries...

  7. Orthopedic Prosthetic Infections: Plastic Surgery Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaike, Jesse D; Kaufman, Matthew G; Izaddoost, Shayan A

    2016-05-01

    Orthopedic prosthetic infections are potentially devastating complications. Plastic surgeons are frequently consulted to aid in the management of the soft tissue defects that are created by these infections. A review of the existing literature was performed to identify established treatment methods for soft tissue coverage of orthopedic hardware infections for a variety of anatomic locations. The following treatment guidelines and soft tissue reconstructive options were identified as viable options for the management of exposed or infected orthopedic hardware. This review provides descriptions of the various soft tissue reconstructive options available as well as adjunctive treatment methods.

  8. Injectible bodily prosthetics employing methacrylic copolymer gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Anderson, Brian C.

    2007-02-27

    The present invention provides novel block copolymers as structural supplements for injectible bodily prosthetics employed in medical or cosmetic procedures. The invention also includes the use of such block copolymers as nucleus pulposus replacement materials for the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and spinal injuries. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of a tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic.RTM. polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether polymer.

  9. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  10. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

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    Ge Shuzhi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Methods Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with that of the experimental results from the human and prosthetic finger phalanges. The simulation models were used to investigate the effects of (a varying the internal topology of the finger phalanx and (b varying different materials for the internal and external layers. Results and Conclusions During handshake, the high magnitudes of contact forces were observed at the areas where the full grasping enclosure of the other person's hand can be achieved. From these areas, the middle phalanges of the (a little, (b ring, and (c middle fingers were selected. The indentation experiments on these areas showed that a 2 N force corresponds to skin tissue displacements of more than 2 mm. The results from the simulation model show that introducing an open pocket with 2 mm height on the internal structure of synthetic finger phalanges increased the skin compliance of the silicone material to 235% and the polyurethane material to

  11. Use of tenecteplase in recurrent prosthetic valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariram, Vuppaladadhiam; Sharma, Nuthi Prashanthi

    2013-11-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) is a serious complication of mechanical prosthetic heart valves, the available treatment options for which are either thrombolytic therapy or surgery. In patients who have already received streptokinase to treat a previous episode of PVT, the therapeutic options are limited. Herein, the case is reported of an elderly female patient with a second episode of PVT treated successfully with tenecteplase.

  12. Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. lwoffi.

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberger, I. (Ingeburg); Davidson, E.; Rotenberg, Z; Fuchs, J; Agmon, J

    1987-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are uncommon etiologic agents of prosthetic valve endocarditis. Two patients with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. lwoffi prosthetic valve endocarditis are described. The patients were successfully treated with antibiotics (cefotaxime sodium and gentamicin sulfate); thus, we suggest medical treatment rather than early valve replacement in this particular type of infection.

  13. Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Children: An Alternative Clinical Technique

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    Nádia Carolina Teixeira Marques

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete and partial removable dentures have been used successfully in numerous patients with oligodontia and/or anodontia. However, there is little information in the literature regarding the principles and guidelines to prosthetic rehabilitation for growing children. This case report describes the management of a young child with oligodontia as well as the treatment planning and the prosthetic rehabilitation technique.

  14. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, H.W.L.; Grootenboer, H.J.; de Vries, J.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the hyster

  15. Raoultella ornithinolytica: An unusual pathogen for prosthetic joint infection

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    Piseth Seng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein report the first case of a prosthetic joint infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica in an immunocompetent patient. The clinical outcome was favorable after a two-stage prosthetic exchange and a six-month course of antimicrobial therapy.

  16. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsveld, van H.W.L.; Grootenboer, H.J.; Vries, de J.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the hyst

  17. Prosthetic prescription in the Netherlands : an interview with clinical experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Linde, H; Geertzen, JHB; Hofstad, CJ; Postema, K

    2004-01-01

    In the process of guideline development for prosthetic prescription in the Netherlands the authors made a study of the daily clinical practice of lower limb prosthetics. Besides the evidence-based knowledge from literature the more implicit knowledge from clinical experts is of importance for guidel

  18. Skin-inspired electronic devices

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    Alex Chortos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Electronic devices that mimic the properties of skin have potential important applications in advanced robotics, prosthetics, and health monitoring technologies. Methods for measuring tactile and temperature signals have progressed rapidly due to innovations in materials and processing methods. Imparting skin-like stretchability to electronic devices can be accomplished by patterning traditional electronic materials or developing new materials that are intrinsically stretchable. The incorporation of sensing methods with transistors facilitates large-area sensor arrays. While sensor arrays have surpassed the properties of human skin in terms of sensitivity, time response, and device density, many opportunities remain for future development.

  19. Gesture recognition in upper-limb prosthetics: a viability study using dynamic time warping and gyroscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermitzakis, Konstantinos; Arieta, Alejandro Hernandez; Pfeifer, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in the upper-limb-prosthetics research field is to identify appropriate interfaces that utilize the full potential of current state-of-the-art neuroprostheses. As the new generation of such prostheses paces towards approximating the human physiological performance in terms of movement dexterity and sensory feedback, it is clear that current non-invasive interfaces are still severely limited. Surface electromyography, the interface ubiquitously used in the field, is riddled with several shortcomings. Gesture recognition, an interface pervasively used in wearables and mobile devices, shows a strong potential as a non-invasive upper-limb prosthetic interface. This study aims at showcasing its potential in the field by using gyroscope sensors. To this end, we (1) explore the viability of Dynamic Time Warping as a classification method for upper-limb prosthetics and (2) look for appropriate sensor locations on the body. Results indicate an optimal classification rate of 97.53%, σ = 8.74 using a sensor located proximal to the endpoint performing a gesture.

  20. Resource-efficient proces chains to manufacture patient-specific prosthetic fingers

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    Hagedorn-Hansen, D.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The high cost of quality prostheses, together with the lack of trained prosthetists, makes it challenging to obtain prosthetic devices in developing communities. Modern 3D digitising techniques and additive manufacturing (AM technologies are gaining popularity in the bio-medical industry and, in the case of prosthesis production, reduce the need for a trained prosthetist. The objective of this research was to develop a new resource-efficient process chain for the manufacturing of prosthetic fingers using additive manufacturing technologies, and to compare it with the traditional (Sculptor process chain. Fused deposition modelling (FDM, open-source FDM, 3-dimensional printing (3DP, and stereolithography (SLA were evaluated in terms of their costs, time, material usage, and aesthetic quality. The surface qualities produced with the different additive manufacturing technologies were also compared. The results showed that 3DP was the preferred technology and was the best candidate for the production of prosthesis in terms of cost, quality, and time for developing communities. SLA produced the highest aesthetic quality prosthesis, but was the most expensive. It was concluded that using the additive manufacturing technology process chain to produce prosthetic fingers is faster and more cost effective than the traditional method.

  1. EFFICIENCY OF PROSTHETIC TREATMENT WITH POST RESECTION PROSTHESES WITH SOLID SUBSTITUTE PART

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    Ivan Gerdzhikov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to track the effectiveness of prosthetic treatment with post resection dentures with solid substitute part and their role in the restoration of damaged functions. Materials and methods: The study included 14 patients (9 men and 5 women with different size and location of defects in the upper jaw treated in the period 2010-2016 with post resection prostheses with a solid substitute part. The impressions were taken with irreversible hydrocolloid impression material. The prostheses were completed by heat-curing acrylic with low quantity residual monomer. The effectiveness of prosthetics was evaluated by the method of Mihaylov for both oral-nasal examination of the pressure with the device "Oronasopneumotest." For objectifying and assess the occlusal-articulation ratios was held computerized occlusal analysis with the system T-SCAN 8. Results: The results showed successful obturation and sealing of defects in all patients. It was found satisfactory recovery of the speaking function and normalization of occlusal-articulation ratios. Conclusion: The prosthetic treatment with post resection prostheses with a solid substitute part allows successful recovery of the lost speech and chewing functions, helping to restore self esteem and social rehabilitation of patients.

  2. Impact of Prosthetic Care on Oral Health Related Quality of Life - A Follow-Up Study

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    S Geetha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure the impact of the type of prosthetic treatment on oral health related quality of life (OHR QoL using 0ral Health impact Profile-14(0HIP-14. Materials & Method: A follow-up study was conducted amongst 105 patients attending the Department of Prosthodontics of M.R Ambedkar Dental College & Hospital, Bangalore for replacement of missing teeth. Initially, they were interviewed by a single calibrated interviewer to collect demographic details and subsequently, OHIP-14 questionnaire was used to assess their pre- prosthetic and one month post-prosthetic quality of life. Information regarding dentate status and type of prostheses was collected from their case records and based on this information the patients were divided into 3 groups i.e., Complete Denture (CD group, Removable Partial Denture (RPD group and Fixed Partial Denture (FPD group. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test was used to compare between groups using SPSS version 20. Results: This study revealed that there was improved taste sensation (0.82±0.76, less irritability with others (1.61±0.49, more comfortable to eat (1.42±0.70, less self-conscious (1.48±0.61, had a satisfactory diet (1.58±0.61 and less embarrassment (1.36±0.5 among the CD group as compared RPD and FPD groups. Conclusions: The results indicated that the type of prostheses placed had a major influence on improving OHR QoL among denture users.

  3. Connector design in a long-span-fixed dental prosthesis: A three-dimensional finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    B H Harshitha Gowda; C L Satish Babu

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of every prosthetic management is to simulate nature and be in harmony with nature within the physiological limits. The occlusal forces on a fixed dental prosthesis are transmitted to the surrounding structures through pontics, connectors and retainers and more stresses are seen at the connector region. To analyze the stress patterns in cast and soldered connectors between the two pontics and between the retainer and pontic of a four unit fixed dental prosthesis on axial ...

  4. Surgical and prosthetic treatment for microphthalmia syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wavreille, O; François Fiquet, C; Abdelwahab, O; Laumonier, E; Wolber, A; Guerreschi, P; Pellerin, P

    2013-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of prosthetic treatment and orbital expansion in the management of microphthalmia syndromes. We did a retrospective single-centre study of all cases of microphthalmia treated between 1989 and 2010. The patients were divided into three groups: isolated microphthalmia, microphthalmia associated with micro-orbitism, and complex microphthalmia syndrome. To evaluate the results a score was computed for each patient by assessing the length of the palpebral fissure, the depth of the conjunctival fornix, and local complications together with an evaluation of the satisfaction of patients and their families. Forty-four children were included (27 boys and 17 girls). Twenty-seven had unilateral microphthalmia (61%) and 17 bilateral microphthalmia (39%). Twelve patients were lost to follow up. The mean duration of follow-up was 12 years (range 4-21). Management involved an ocular conformer in only 31 patients (71%). The treatment was deemed satisfactory in all except 10 children. Surgical treatment with orbital expansion permitted good symmetry of the orbital cavities with a final mean difference of 9% (range 3-17) compared with the initial 16.8% (range 13.6-20.3). The prosthetic treatment gives satisfactory results. Despite limited indications and difficult follow-up, our experience emphasises the value of surgical treatment for severe micro-orbitism.

  5. Prevention of Adhesion to Prosthetic Mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    van ’t Riet, Martijne; de Vos van Steenwijk, Peggy J.; Bonthuis, Fred; Marquet, Richard L.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jeekel, Johannes; Bonjer, H. Jaap

    2003-01-01

    Objective To assess whether use of antiadhesive liquids or coatings could prevent adhesion formation to prosthetic mesh. Summary Background Data Incisional hernia repair frequently involves the use of prosthetic mesh. However, concern exists about development of adhesions between viscera and the mesh, predisposing to intestinal obstruction or enterocutaneous fistulas. Methods In 91 rats, a defect in the muscular abdominal wall was created, and mesh was fixed intraperitoneally to cover the defect. Rats were divided in five groups: polypropylene mesh only (control group), addition of Sepracoat or Icodextrin solution to polypropylene mesh, Sepramesh (polypropylene mesh with Seprafilm coating), and Parietex composite mesh (polyester mesh with collagen coating). Seven and 30 days postoperatively, adhesions were assessed and wound healing was studied by microscopy. Results Intraperitoneal placement of polypropylene mesh was followed by bowel adhesions to the mesh in 50% of the cases. A mean of 74% of the mesh surface was covered by adhesions after 7 days, and 48% after 30 days. Administration of Sepracoat or Icodextrin solution had no influence on adhesion formation. Coated meshes (Sepramesh and Parietex composite mesh) had no bowel adhesions. Sepramesh was associated with a significant reduction of the mesh surface covered by adhesions after 7 and 30 days. Infection was more prevalent with Parietex composite mesh, with concurrent increased mesh surface covered by adhesions after 30 days (78%). Conclusions Sepramesh significantly reduced mesh surface covered by adhesions and prevented bowel adhesion to the mesh. Parietex composite mesh prevented bowel adhesions as well but increased infection rates in the current model. PMID:12496539

  6. Enhanced ultrasound for advanced diagnostics, ultrasound tomography for volume limb imaging and prosthetic fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging methods hold the potential to deliver low-cost, high-resolution, operator-independent and nonionizing imaging systems - such systems couple appropriate algorithms with imaging devices and techniques. The increasing demands on general practitioners motivate us to develop more usable and productive diagnostic imaging equipment. Ultrasound, specifically freehand ultrasound, is a low cost and safe medical imaging technique. It doesn't expose a patient to ionizing radiation. Its safety and versatility make it very well suited for the increasing demands on general practitioners, or for providing improved medical care in rural regions or the developing world. However it typically suffers from sonographer variability; we will discuss techniques to address user variability. We also discuss our work to combine cylindrical scanning systems with state of the art inversion algorithms to deliver ultrasound systems for imaging and quantifying limbs in 3-D in vivo. Such systems have the potential to track the progression of limb health at a low cost and without radiation exposure, as well as, improve prosthetic socket fitting. Current methods of prosthetic socket fabrication remain subjective and ineffective at creating an interface to the human body that is both comfortable and functional. Though there has been recent success using methods like magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical modeling, a low-cost, streamlined, and quantitative process for prosthetic cup design and fabrication has not been fully demonstrated. Medical ultrasonography may inform the design process of prosthetic sockets in a more objective manner. This keynote talk presents the results of progress in this area.

  7. Local signaling from a retinal prosthetic in a rodent retinitis pigmentosa model in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, James W.; Pangeni, Gobinda; Pardue, Machelle T.; McCall, Maureen A.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. In clinical trials, retinitis pigmentosa patients implanted with a retinal prosthetic device show enhanced spatial vision, including the ability to read large text and navigate. New prosthetics aim to increase spatial resolution by decreasing pixel/electrode size and limiting current spread. To examine spatial resolution of a new prosthetic design, we characterized and compared two photovoltaic array (PVA) designs and their interaction with the retina after subretinal implantation in transgenic S334ter line 3 rats (Tg S334ter-3). Approach. PVAs were implanted subretinally at two stages of degeneration and assessed in vivo using extracellular recordings in the superior colliculus (SC). Several aspects of this interaction were evaluated by varying duration, irradiance and position of a near infrared laser focused on the PVA. These characteristics included: activation threshold, response linearity, SC signal topography and spatial localization. The major design difference between the two PVA designs is the inclusion of local current returns in the newer design. Main results. When tested in vivo, PVA-evoked response thresholds were independent of pixel/electrode size, but differ between the new and old PVA designs. Response thresholds were independent of implantation age and duration (⩽7.5 months). For both prosthesis designs, threshold intensities were within established safety limits. PVA-evoked responses require inner retina synaptic transmission and do not directly activate retinal ganglion cells. The new PVA design evokes local retinal activation, which is not found with the older PVA design that lacks local current returns. Significance. Our study provides in vivo evidence that prosthetics make functional contacts with the inner nuclear layer at several stages of degeneration. The new PVA design enhances local activation within the retina and SC. Together these results predict that the new design can potentially harness the inherent processing within

  8. STUDENTS' SELF-ASSESSMENT IN PRE-CLINICAL AND CLINICAL EDUCATION OF PROSTHETIC DENTISTRY

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    Dimiter Kirov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ability to self-assess is a critical skill that all health professionals must be able to do, in order to achieve competence. This is essential for the doctors of dental medicine. During their education and practice they apply different clinical and para-clinical procedures. The aim is to evaluate the students' self-assessment skills during the education of clinic and pre-clinic of prosthetic dentistry. Material and methods: After the completion of certain work - preparation for full veneer crown, a questionnaire was provided to each student in preclinical course (n=30 and clinical course (n=30 for self-evaluation. The questionnaire involved: axial reduction, occlusal reduction, facial and lingual reduction, smoothing and finishing. The answers were based on the standard for the university grading scale. Than, the same questionnaire was fulfilled by the assistant professor without seeing students' self-evaluation. Results and Discussion: Results have been reported in percentages. 100% respond rate has been achieved. The students from the preclinical course tend to overestimate their performance (50%. The students from the clinical course tend to submit overall lower grades than the faculty evaluation (25%. Conclusions: The students from clinics have better self-assessment skills. The discrepancy was most pronounced in the junior students. The different evaluations (self-assessment and assistant professor's help students to improve their understanding of certain principles and improve the teaching effectiveness of education of prosthetic dentistry.

  9. Computational biomechanics of bone's responses to dental prostheses - osseointegration, remodeling and resorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Rungsiyakull, Chaiy; Field, Clarice; Lin, Daniel; Zhang, Leo; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Clinical and experimental studies showed that human bone has the ability to remodel itself to better adapt to its biomechanical environment by changing both its material properties and geometry. As a consequence of the rapid development and extensive applications of major dental restorations such as implantation and fixed partial denture (FPD), the effect of bone remodeling on the success of a dental restorative surgery is becoming critical for prosthetic design and pre-surgical assessment. This paper aims to provide a computational biomechanics framework to address dental bone's responses as a result of dental restoration. It explored three important issues of resorption, apposition and osseointegration in terms of remodeling simulation. The published remodeling data in long bones were regulated to drive the computational remodeling prediction for the dental bones by correlating the results to clinical data. It is anticipated that the study will provide a more predictive model of dental bone response and help develop a new design methodology for patient-specific dental prosthetic restoration.

  10. Implant-Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Bilateral Agenesis of Maxillary Lateral Incisors with a Mini Split Crest

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    M. M. Figliuzzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reported clinical case describes the surgical procedure of ridge augmentation by using a “split crest” technique with a partial thickness flap and a subsequent implant-prosthetic rehabilitation aimed at treating a bilateral agenesis of the upper lateral incisors. In such cases with vestibule-palatal and mesial-distal scarce bone thicknesses associated with the need of a proper functional and aesthetic rehabilitation, the split crest technique is particularly suitable. In the case we reported, because of the poor bone thicknesses, we performed a minimally invasive split crest which allowed a correct insertion of the fixtures. This technique allowed us to achieve an optimal functional and aesthetic rehabilitation; moreover, we obtained a good emergency profile, ensuring the vitality of the close teeth and ensuring a good primary stability and the following osseointegration of dental implants.

  11. Effects of RTC-silicone maxillofacial prosthetic elastomers on cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, G L; Hensten-Pettersen, A; Kullman, A

    1994-05-01

    The use of a wide variety of materials in the construction of maxillofacial prostheses makes biocompatibility testing a necessity. However, the dental literature contains few reports of biocompatibility testing of maxillofacial prosthetic materials. The cytotoxic profiles of five room-temperature cross-linking (RTC)-silicone elastomers were investigated by means of two in vitro cell culture techniques. Mouse fibroblast cells (L929) were used, and the results indicated that RTC-silicone elastomers adversely affected cells in culture and that storage of samples for 1 week in saline solution did not alter this effect. Clinical follow-up of patients wearing prostheses made of these silicone materials is warranted to evaluate host reactions in long-term contact with human mucous membrane and skin tissue.

  12. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CERAMIC PROSTHETIC RESTORATIONS ON A ZIRCONIUM STRUCTURE AFTER 4 YEARS

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    Delia Cristina Bahrim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of zirconium are optimum, comparatively with the other ceramic materials. Initial and fracture resistance, as well as its resistance to flexion, the white, opaque colour, permitting several shades, the special biological properties, largely recommend largescale utilization of zirconium in prosthetic restorations. Zirconium crowns and bridges were realized in 129 patients (81 women and 48 boys, with ages between 15 and 57 years, along 4 years. The working method applied in the laboratory made use of the CAD-CAM system, followed by scanning on a Dental Wings scanner and a CAM burring system from Wieland 917, 18. In a few cases, repeated evaluations demonstrated accidents and complications, such as skeletal fractures, ceramic chipping, decementation, etc.

  13. Prosthetic Oral Rehabilitation of a Child With S-ECC: A Case Report with Histopathologic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannure, P N; Moraes, G G; Borba, McU; Abrahão, A; Andrade, Mtrc; Fidalgo, Tks

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the treatment planning of a young child with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC) as well as the prosthetic rehabilitation technique. A 3-year-old female child was referred to the pediatric dentistry clinic with the chief complaint of tooth pain, difficulty in eating and recurrent hospitalizations caused by dental infections. The mother reported intermittent episodes of fever and recurrent swelling of child's face. The girl presented angular cheilitis and was referred to a dietitian. The treatment plain consisted on a behavior changes in oral hygiene habits, exodontias of all primary teeth and oral rehabilitation with a prosthesis. The extracted teeth with periapical lesions were submitted to histopathologic analysis (hematoxilin and eosin staining) and revealed an inflammatory infiltrate. The aesthetic requirement of children with S-ECC has been a challenge to pediatric dentists. In the present case, the oral rehabilitation provided for the children better aesthetic, nutrition, phonation, and functional conditions.

  14. Hygiene in dental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, L; Mosca, G; Giuliani, A R

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hygienic quality of dental practices on the basis of the self-awareness expressed by dentists respondents to a self-reported questionnaire about the health/hygiene characteristics of practice, the knowledge of biologic/toxicological risks and the preventive procedures and devices improvements in professional practice. Of the 127 practitioners contacted, 108 (85%) agreed to participate. The knowledge of infective risks was self- evaluated as good only in 24%: even if vaccinated, most of the dentists (57%) considered HBV the main infective agent to fear, not giving the same importance to the air-borne transmission of diseases. The presence of a single dental unit per surgery (90%) was considered an index of good health/hygiene education but, in spite of the use of disposable gloves, caps and masks, the dentists do not always change their coats or wash their hands between patients yet. The management of dental instruments can be considered efficient as long as they are sterilised in an autoclave (97%) and undergo periodic sterilization efficacy tests (76%). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION The results indicate a good structural and organisational status, but there is the need for continuous education concerning the prevention of cross-infections.

  15. Dental expression and role in palliative treatment

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    Rajiv Saini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available World Health Organization defines palliative care as the active total care of patients whose disease is not responding to curative treatment. Palliative care for the terminally ill is based on a multidimensional approach to provide whole-person comfort care while maintaining optimal function; dental care plays an important role in this multidisciplinary approach. The aim of the present study is to review significance of dentist′s role to determine whether mouth care was effectively assessed and implemented in the palliative care setting. The oral problems experienced by the hospice head and neck patient clearly affect the quality of his or her remaining life. Dentist plays an essential role in palliative care by the maintenance of oral hygiene; dental examination may identify and cure opportunistic infections and dental disease like caries, periodontal disease, oral mucosal problems or prosthetic requirement. Oral care may reduce not only the microbial load of the mouth but the risk for pain and oral infection as well. This multidisciplinary approach to palliative care, including a dentist, may reduce the oral debilities that influence the patient′s ability to speak, eat or swallow. This review highlighted that without effective assessment of the mouth, the appropriate implementation of care will not be delivered. Palliative dental care has been fundamental in management of patients with active, progressive, far-advanced disease in which the oral cavity has been compromised either by the disease directly or by its treatment; the focus of care is quality of life.

  16. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

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    Sangeeta Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals - clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human studies, abstracts, review articles.

  17. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals – clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human) studies, abstracts, review articles. PMID:23633764

  18. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS AND PROSTHETIC REHABILITATION IN HEREDITARY SENSORY AND AUTONOMIC NEUROPATHY (HSANTYPE IV:A CASE REPORT*

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    Duygu OFLUOĞLU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN are rare genetic syndromes of unknown etiology. They are seen in early childhood and are categorized into six different types by their symptoms. HSAN type 4 demonstrates autosomal recessive transmission pattern, with such major characteristics as loss of sense of pain, self-mutilation, anhydrosis and mental retardation. Sympathetic innervations are deficient despite the existence of sweat glands. Sufferers are hypotonic without any tendon reflexes, and neuro-motor development is retarded. In some cases tactile sensation and vibration may be intact. Biting injuries due to lack of pain sensation cause laceration, ulceration and scarring of the tongue, lips and other parts of oral mucosa. Tooth luxation and severe dental attrition have been observed. This case report presents oral and dental findings, surgical treatments and prosthetic rehabilitation of an 11- year-old boy with HSAN type 4.

  19. 30-Year Outcomes of Dental Implants Supporting Mandibular Fixed Dental Prostheses: A Retrospective Review of 4 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser; Tözüm, Tolga F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to present the 30-year outcomes of 28 implants supporting mandibular screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Dental charts of the 4 patients were carefully reviewed, and it was noticed that they received 28 implants and 5 screw-retained FDPs in 1983 and 1984. The chief concerns raised by these patients were poor retention of their complete dentures and decreased masticatory function at the time of treatment planning. Each dental care they received was recorded in the last 30 years. Implant survival, radiographic, and prosthodontic examinations were performed. No implants were lost after 30 years, giving the implant a survival rate of 100%. The average marginal bone level was 2.6 ± 0.5 mm at the last recall appointment. Of the 5 FDPs delivered, 1 needed replacement, indicating a prosthesis survival rate of 80%. The patients needed 21 repairs such as replacement of denture teeth/gold screws and hard relining, and 19 adjustments such as occlusal adjustments and acrylic resin contouring, over 30 years. This clinical report shows that machined-surface dental implants can successfully support screw-retained fixed dental prostheses for over 30 years, making dental implants an important dental treatment alternative compared to the traditional prosthetic treatment methods.

  20. Smartphones and dental trauma: the current availability of apps for managing traumatic dental injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemal, Serpil; Singh, Parmjit

    2016-02-01

    There is a general consensus regarding the lack of awareness regarding the emergency management of traumatic dental injuries amongst laypersons and dental professionals. This article aims to provide an overview of the apps available for traumatic dental injuries using smartphones. These apps may serve as a gateway for raising awareness of traumatic dental injuries. Three smartphone devices were used to access their respective app stores (Nokia Lumia 635 with Windows Phone OS 8.1; iPhone 5 with iOS 8.1; Samsung Galaxy Ace II with Android OS v2.3.6 Gingerbread). Nine phrases were searched: broken tooth/teeth; chipped tooth/teeth; dental emergency; dental injury; dental trauma; fractured tooth/teeth; knocked-out tooth/teeth; tooth/teeth injury; and tooth/teeth trauma. Seven apps for the Android and one app for the Apple operating system were relevant. The only Apple iOS app retrieved (Dental Trauma) was also found for the Android OS (Dental Trauma First Aid) and had the endorsement of the International Association of Dental Traumatology. AcciDent was the only app dedicated to traumatic dental injuries targeted solely towards dental professionals. Five other apps (Chipped Tooth Solution, Dental Crown Repair, Fixing Cracked Tooth, Repairing the Front Tooth and Solution to Broken Tooth) appeared to come from the same source (KBES). No traumatic dental injury apps were found for the Windows Phone OS. There are apps available for both patients and dentists that range in quality and on the whole lack real-life photographs. Future apps should continue to provide good quality, evidence-based and validated material. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Transtibial prosthetic suspension: Less pistoning versus easy donning and doffing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Gholizadeh, MEngSc

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Poor suspension increases slippage of the residual limb inside the socket during ambulation. The main purpose of this article is to evaluate the pistoning at the prosthetic liner-socket interface during gait and assess patients’ satisfaction with two different liners. Two prostheses with seal-in and locking liners were fabricated for each of the 10 subjects with transtibial amputation. The Vicon motion system was used to measure the pistoning during gait. The subjects were also asked to complete a Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire. The results revealed higher pistoning inside the socket during gait with the locking liner than with the seal-in liner (p < 0.05. The overall satisfaction with the locking liner was higher (p < 0.05 because of the relative ease with which the patients could don and doff the device. As such, pistoning may not be the main factor that determines patients’ overall satisfaction with the prosthesis and other factors may also contribute to comfort and satisfaction with prostheses. The article also verifies the feasibility of the Vicon motion system for measuring pistoning during gait.

  2. Development of a BIONic muscle spindle for prosthetic proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Nicholas A; Loeb, Gerald E

    2007-06-01

    The replacement of proprioceptive function, whether for conscious sensation or feedback control, is likely to be an important aspect of neural prosthetic restoration of limb movements. Thus far, however, it has been hampered by the absence of unobtrusive sensors. We propose a method whereby fully implanted, telemetrically operated BIONs monitor muscle movement, and thereby detect changes in joint angle(s) and/or limb posture without requiring the use of secondary components attached to limb segments or external reference frames. The sensor system is designed to detect variations in the electrical coupling between devices implanted in neighboring muscles that result from changes in their relative position as the muscles contract and stretch with joint motion. The goal of this study was to develop and empirically validate mathematical models of the sensing scheme and to use computer simulations to provide an early proof of concept and inform design of the overall sensor system. Results from experiments using paired dipoles in a saline bath and finite element simulations have given insight into the current distribution and potential gradients exhibited within bounded anisotropic environments similar to a human limb segment and demonstrated an anticipated signal to noise ratio of at least 8:1 for submillimeter resolution of relative implant movement over a range of implant displacements up to 15 cm.

  3. State-space control of prosthetic hand shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velliste, M; McMorland, A J C; Diril, E; Clanton, S T; Schwartz, A B

    2012-01-01

    In the field of neuroprosthetic control, there is an emerging need for simplified control of high-dimensional devices. Advances in robotic technology have led to the development of prosthetic arms that now approach the look and number of degrees of freedom (DoF) of a natural arm. These arms, and especially hands, now have more controllable DoFs than the number of control DoFs available in many applications. In natural movements, high correlations exist between multiple joints, such as finger flexions. Therefore, discrepancy between the number of control and effector DoFs can be overcome by a control scheme that maps low-DoF control space to high-DoF joint space. Imperfect effectors, sensor noise and interactions with external objects require the use of feedback controllers. The incorporation of feedback in a system where the command is in a different space, however, is challenging, requiring a potentially difficult inverse high-DoF to low-DoF transformation. Here we present a solution to this problem based on the Extended Kalman Filter.

  4. Design for a three-fingered hand. [robotic and prosthetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, F. R. E.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the construction of a prototype mechanical hand or 'end effector' for use on a remotely controlled robot, but with possible application as a prosthetic device. An analysis of hand motions is reported, from which it is concluded that the two most important manipulations (apart from grasps) are to be able to pick up a tool and draw it into a nested grip against the palm, and to be able to hold a pistol-grip tool such as an electric drill and pull the trigger. One of our models was tested and found capable of both these operations.

  5. Dental Abnormalities in Pituitary Dwarfism: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Ferrante

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypopituitarism is a disorder caused by a reduced level of trophic hormones that may be consequent on different destructive processes. The clinical manifestations depend on the type of hormone involved. A deficiency of growth hormone (GH in children causes the lack of growth known as pituitary dwarfism. The case is reported of a patient with pituitary dwarfism, multiple dental anomalies, functional prosthetic problems, and a revision of the literature. She was subjected to prosthetic rehabilitation without surgical intervention, using zirconium substructures, thus eliminating the potential complications that may require trauma surgery. The therapeutic approach adopted led to excellent results and restored an aesthetic smile.

  6. Cyborg beast: a low-cost 3d-printed prosthetic hand for children with upper-limb differences

    OpenAIRE

    Zuniga, Jorge; Katsavelis, Dimitrios; Peck, Jean; Stollberg, John; Petrykowski, Marc; Carson, Adam; Fernandez, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Background There is an increasing number of children with traumatic and congenital hand amputations or reductions. Children's prosthetic needs are complex due to their small size, constant growth, and psychosocial development. Families’ financial resources play a crucial role in the prescription of prostheses for their children, especially when private insurance and public funding are insufficient. Electric-powered (i.e., myoelectric) and body-powered (i.e., mechanical) devices have been deve...

  7. Dental Training Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  8. Swing Phase Control of Semi-Active Prosthetic Knee Using Neural Network Predictive Control With Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkachai, Kittipong; Nilkhamhang, Itthisek

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, intelligent prosthetic knees have been developed that enable amputees to walk as normally as possible when compared to healthy subjects. Although semi-active prosthetic knees utilizing magnetorheological (MR) dampers offer several advantages, they lack the ability to generate active force that is required during some states of a normal gait cycle. This prevents semi-active knees from achieving the same level of performance as active devices. In this work, a new control algorithm for a semi-active prosthetic knee during the swing phase is proposed to reduce this gap. The controller uses neural network predictive control and particle swarm optimization to calculate suitable command signals. Simulation results using a double pendulum model show that the generated knee trajectory of the proposed controller is more similar to the normal gait than previous open-loop controllers at various ambulation speeds. Moreover, the investigation shows that the algorithm can be calculated in real time by an embedded system, allowing for easy implementation on real prosthetic knees.

  9. Did we push dental ceramics too far? A brief history of ceramic dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubenreich, James E; Robinson, Fonda G; West, Karen P; Frazer, Robert Q

    2005-01-01

    Humankind has developed and used ceramics throughout history. It currently has widespread industrial applications. Dental ceramics are used for fabricating highly esthetic prosthetic denture teeth, crowns, and inlays. However, ceramic's biocompatibility and compressive strength are offset by its hardness and brittleness. Nonetheless, a single crystal sapphire aluminum oxide endosseous implant was developed in 1972 as an alternative to metal. It was more esthetic than its metallic counterparts and was eventually produced in a variety of shapes and sizes. Clinical studies demonstrated its excellent soft and hard tissue biocompatibility, yet the range of problems included fractures during surgery, fractures after loading, mobility, infection, pain, bone loss, and lack of osseointegration. Ultimately, single crystal sapphire implants fell into irredeemable disfavor because of its poor impact strength, and dentists and surgeons eventually turned to other implant materials. However, bioactive ceramic coatings on metal implants have kept ceramics as a key component in dental implantology.

  10. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF THE POLYMER PROSTHETIC BASE PRESSURE OVER THE PROSTHETIC FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.T. Cigu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Partially mobile polymeric prostheses constitute absolutely necessary therapeutical means in all forms of partial edentations. As known, polymeric partial prostheses constitute temporary solutions for the treatment of edentaton states. Nowadays, this treatment includes traditional acrylic prostheses, as well as elastic prostheses made of different material systems. Such a system is Valplast, which uses a polyamide for the realization of the prosthetic base. Both the rigid and the elastic materials are nowadays under debate, different – positive or negative – opinions being uttered in relation with their utilization. The scope of the present study is to support the intensive application of the elastic materials. Extremely important is the identification of the intrinsic qualities of the materials influencing the behaviour in the oral cavity, especially the effects of pressure upon the biological structures of the prosthetic field.

  11. 78 FR 48941 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs, Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics and...

  12. 77 FR 65609 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics and...

  13. 76 FR 21107 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The...) that a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will be held... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the art prosthetics and...

  14. 78 FR 69176 - Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... AFFAIRS Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs; Notice of Meeting The..., that a meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on Prosthetics and Special-Disabilities Programs will... Veterans Affairs on VA's prosthetics programs designed to provide state-of-the- art prosthetics and...

  15. Viability of Controlling Prosthetic Hand Utilizing Electroencephalograph (EEG) Dataset Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskon, Azizi; A/L Thanakodi, Suresh; Raihan Mazlan, Mohd; Mohd Haziq Azhar, Satria; Nooraya Mohd Tawil, Siti

    2016-11-01

    This project presents the development of an artificial hand controlled by Electroencephalograph (EEG) signal datasets for the prosthetic application. The EEG signal datasets were used as to improvise the way to control the prosthetic hand compared to the Electromyograph (EMG). The EMG has disadvantages to a person, who has not used the muscle for a long time and also to person with degenerative issues due to age factor. Thus, the EEG datasets found to be an alternative for EMG. The datasets used in this work were taken from Brain Computer Interface (BCI) Project. The datasets were already classified for open, close and combined movement operations. It served the purpose as an input to control the prosthetic hand by using an Interface system between Microsoft Visual Studio and Arduino. The obtained results reveal the prosthetic hand to be more efficient and faster in response to the EEG datasets with an additional LiPo (Lithium Polymer) battery attached to the prosthetic. Some limitations were also identified in terms of the hand movements, weight of the prosthetic, and the suggestions to improve were concluded in this paper. Overall, the objective of this paper were achieved when the prosthetic hand found to be feasible in operation utilizing the EEG datasets.

  16. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p < 0.001. African American race, longer length of hospital stay, older age, congestive heart failure, paralysis, other neurological disease, renal failure, and admission from a nursing facility were negatively associated with prosthetic prescription. Being married was positively associated. After adjusting for patient characteristics, people with ankle amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  17. Neuro-Prosthetic Implants With Adjustable Electrode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay; DelCastillo, Linda Y.; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Johnson, Travis; West, William; Andersen, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Brushlike arrays of electrodes packaged with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) are undergoing development for use as electronic implants especially as neuro-prosthetic devices that might be implanted in brains to detect weak electrical signals generated by neurons. These implants partly resemble the ones reported in Integrated Electrode Arrays for Neuro-Prosthetic Implants (NPO-21198), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 2 (February 2003), page 48. The basic idea underlying both the present and previously reported implants is that the electrodes would pick up signals from neurons and the ASICs would amplify and otherwise preprocess the signals for monitoring by external equipment. The figure presents a simplified and partly schematic view of an implant according to the present concept. Whereas the electrodes in an implant according to the previously reported concept would be microscopic wires, the electrodes according to the present concept are in the form of microscopic needles. An even more important difference would be that, unlike the previously reported concept, the present concept calls for the inclusion of microelectromechanical actuators for adjusting the depth of penetration of the electrodes into brain tissue. The prototype implant now under construction includes an array of 100 electrodes and corresponding array of electrode contact pads formed on opposite faces of a plate fabricated by techniques that are established in the art of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). A mixed-signal ASIC under construction at the time of reporting the information for this article will include 100 analog amplifier channels (one amplifier per electrode). On one face of the mixed-signal ASIC there will be a solder-bump/micro-pad array that will have the same pitch as that of the electrode array, and that will be used to make the electrical and mechanical connections between the electrode array and the ASIC. Once the electrode array and the ASIC are soldered

  18. 21 CFR 872.1745 - Laser fluorescence caries detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laser fluorescence caries detection device. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1745 Laser fluorescence caries detection device. (a) Identification. A laser fluorescence caries detection device is a laser,...

  19. Predictability of short dental implants: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alves de Almeida Júnior

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In clinical situations where severe bone resorption has occurred following tooth loss, implant treatment options may comprise either a previous bone reconstruction or only the use of short implants. Objective: This non-systematic review summarizes and discusses some aspects of the use of short implants, such as: biomechanical aspects, success rate, longevity and surgical-prosthetic planning. Literature review: Current and relevant references were selected in order to compare short dental implants to conventional ones. Several studies have highlighted the great importance of wide-diameter implants. Dental short implants have shown high predictability and success rates when some biomechanical aspects are taken into consideration. Conclusion: Placement of short dental implants is a viable treatment method for patients with decreased bone height.

  20. Upper limb prosthetic use in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, H; Marincek, C

    1994-04-01

    The article deals with the use of different types of upper limb prostheses in Slovenia. Four hundred and fourteen upper limb amputees were sent a questionnaire on the type of their prosthesis, its use and reasons for non-use, respectively. The replies were subject to statistical analysis. Most of the questioned upper limb amputees (70%) wear a prosthesis only for cosmesis. The use of a prosthesis depends on the level of upper limb amputation, loss of the dominant hand, and time from amputation. Prosthetic success appears to be unrelated to age at the time of amputation and the rehabilitation programme. The most frequent reason for not wearing a prosthesis is heat and consequent sweating of the stump. More than a third of amputees are dissatisfied with their prostheses.

  1. A Miniature Force Sensor for Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Robert; Chu, Mars; Diftler, Myron; Martin, Toby; Valvo, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Tactile sensing is an important part of the development of new prosthetic hands. A number of approaches to establishing an afferent pathway back to the patient for tactile information are becoming available including tactors and direct stimulation of the afferent nerves. Tactile information can also be used by low-level control systems that perform simple tasks for the patient such as establishing a stable grasp and maintaining the grasping forces needed to hold an object. This abstract reports on the design of a small fingertip load cell based on semi-conductor strain gauges. Since this load cell is so small (measuring only 8.5mm in diameter and 6.25 mm in height), it easily fits into the tip of an anthropomorphic mechatronic hand. This load cell is tested by comparing a time series of force and moment data with reference data acquired from a much larger high-precision commercial load cell.

  2. [Improving the speech with a prosthetic construction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, M J; Engelen, M; van der Stappen, J A A M; Weijs, W L J; Takes, R P; van Heumen, C C M

    2016-03-01

    A 12-year-old boy had problems with his speech due to a defect in the soft palate. This defect was caused by the surgical removal of a synovial sarcoma. Testing with a nasometer revealed hypernasality above normal values. Given the size and severity of the defect in the soft palate, the possibility of improving the speech with speech therapy was limited. At a centre for special dentistry an attempt was made with a prosthetic construction to improve the performance of the palate and, in that way, the speech. This construction consisted of a denture with an obturator attached to it. With it, an effective closure of the palate could be achieved. New measurements with acoustic nasometry showed scores within the normal values. The nasality in the speech largely disappeared. The obturator is an effective and relatively easy solution for palatal insufficiency resulting from surgical resection. Intrusive reconstructive surgery can be avoided in this way.

  3. Gait analysis in lower-limb amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquenazi, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Gait analysis combined with sound clinical judgment plays an important role in elucidating the factors involved in the pathologic prosthetic gait and the selection and effects of available interventions to optimize it. Detailed clinical evaluation of walking contributes to the analysis of the prosthetic gait, but evaluation in the gait laboratory using kinetic and kinematic data is often necessary to quantify and identify the particular contributions of the variables impacting the gait with confidence and assess the results of such intervention. The same approach can be considered when selecting prosthetic components and assessing leg length in this patient population.

  4. Diabetes: Dental Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes and Oral Health > Diabetes: Dental Tips Diabetes: Dental Tips Main Content Diabetes can cause serious problems ... FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institutes of Health Bethesda, ...

  5. Dental Exam for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they're most treatable. When to have a dental exam Various factors might determine how frequently your ... wisdom teeth (third molars) at the appropriate age. Dental X-ray A dental X-ray (radiograph) allows ...

  6. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share with Women Dental Care in Pregnancy Why is dental care in pregnancy important? During pregnancy, you are more likely to have problems ... There are 2 major reasons women can have dental problems during pregnancy: Pregnancy gingivitis— During pregnancy, changes ...

  7. American Dental Education Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Interest Groups ADEA Governance Documents and Publications ADEA Dental Faculty Code of Conduct ADEA Bylaws ADEAGies Foundation ... Benefits for Faculty ADEA Member Benefits for Allied Dental Programs ADEA Member Benefits for Dental Schools ADEA ...

  8. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Conditions » Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dental care is important for everybody, but people ... is Different About the Teeth of People With Down Syndrome? Delayed Eruption The teeth of people with Down ...

  9. Dental Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Implant Utilization and Time to Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Conventional and Advanced Fibular Free Flap Reconstruction of the Maxilla and Mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuka, Richelle; Abdullah, Wael; Rieger, Jana; Nayar, Suresh; Seikaly, Hadi; Osswald, Martin; Wolfaardt, Johan

    Precisely designed jaw reconstruction rehabilitation (JRR) is important to the integrity of the jaw structure and oral functions. Advanced three-dimensional (3D) digital surgical design and simulation (SDS) techniques have the potential to reduce time to reconstructive and dental treatment completion, thereby promoting early functional oral rehabilitation. This study investigated the use of SDS in JRR procedures. A retrospective chart review was conducted on adult head and neck tumor (HNT) participants who completed JRR treatment with a fibular free flap (FFF) reconstruction. Two treatment approaches, advanced 3D SDS technique (with-SDS) and conventional, nondigitally planned technique (without-SDS), included the use of osseointegrated implants. Data were collected from adult patients treated between January 2000 and March 2014 at the Institute for Reconstructive Sciences in Medicine (iRSM). Participants were excluded if they underwent a bone-containing augmentation to the FFF reconstruction. The without-SDS group underwent a conventional, nonguided FFF reconstruction followed by nonguided implant placement. The with-SDS group underwent a guided FFF reconstruction with guided implant placement during the reconstructive surgery. The outcome measures included implant utilization (ratio of implants placed to connected) and time to prosthetic connection after FFF reconstruction. Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the data. The digital SDS technique (with-SDS) group completed prosthetic treatment with a significantly higher utilization of implants as well as a significantly shorter time to prosthetic delivery. SDS allows an interdisciplinary treatment team to work together to create a virtual plan that leads to greater efficiency in patient treatment time and utilization of dental implants.

  11. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  12. Dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Nigel B; Zero, Domenick T; Marsh, Phil D; Ekstrand, Kim; Weintraub, Jane A; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Tagami, Junji; Twetman, Svante; Tsakos, Georgios; Ismail, Amid

    2017-05-25

    Dental caries is a biofilm-mediated, sugar-driven, multifactorial, dynamic disease that results in the phasic demineralization and remineralization of dental hard tissues. Caries can occur throughout life, both in primary and permanent dentitions, and can damage the tooth crown and, in later life, exposed root surfaces. The balance between pathological and protective factors influences the initiation and progression of caries. This interplay between factors underpins the classification of individuals and groups into caries risk categories, allowing an increasingly tailored approach to care. Dental caries is an unevenly distributed, preventable disease with considerable economic and quality-of-life burdens. The daily use of fluoride toothpaste is seen as the main reason for the overall decline of caries worldwide over recent decades. This Primer aims to provide a global overview of caries, acknowledging the historical era dominated by restoration of tooth decay by surgical means, but focuses on current, progressive and more holistic long-term, patient-centred, tooth-preserving preventive care.

  13. Analysis of vector models in quantification of artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różyło-Kalinowska, Ingrid; Miechowicz, Sławomir; Sarna-Boś, Katarzyna; Borowicz, Janusz; Kalinowski, Paweł

    2014-11-17

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new, but highly efficient imaging method applied first in dentistry in 1998. However, the quality of the obtained slices depends among other things on artifacts generated by dental restorations as well as orthodontic and prosthetic appliances. The aim of the study was to quantify the artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in CBCT images. The material consisted of 17 standard prosthetic inlays mounted in dental roots embedded in resin. The samples were examined by means of a large field of view CBCT unit, Galileos (Sirona, Germany), at 85 kV and 14 mAs. The analysis was performed using Able 3DDoctor software for data in the CT raster space as well as by means of Materialise Magics software for generated vector models (STL). The masks generated in the raster space included the area of the inlays together with image artifacts. The region of interest (ROI) of the raster space is a set of voxels from a selected range of Hounsfield units (109-3071). Ceramic inlay with zirconium dioxide (Cera Post) as well as epoxy resin inlay including silica fibers enriched with zirconium (Easy Post) produced the most intense artifacts. The smallest image distortions were created by titanium inlays, both passive (Harald Nordin) and active (Flexi Flange). Inlays containing zirconium generated the strongest artifacts, thus leading to the greatest distortions in the CBCT images. Carbon fiber inlay did not considerably affect the image quality.

  14. Analysis of Vector Models in Quantification of Artifacts Produced by Standard Prosthetic Inlays in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT – a Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Różyło-Kalinowska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT is a relatively new, but highly efficient imaging method applied first in dentistry in 1998. However, the quality of the obtained slices depends among other things on artifacts generated by dental restorations as well as orthodontic and prosthetic appliances. The aim of the study was to quantify the artifacts produced by standard prosthetic inlays in CBCT images. The material consisted of 17 standard prosthetic inlays mounted in dental roots embedded in resin. The samples were examined by means of a large field of view CBCT unit, Galileos (Sirona, Germany, at 85 kV and 14 mAs. The analysis was performed using Able 3DDoctor software for data in the CT raster space as well as by means of Materialise Magics software for generated vector models (STL. The masks generated in the raster space included the area of the inlays together with image artifacts. The region of interest (ROI of the raster space is a set of voxels from a selected range of Hounsfield units (109-3071. Ceramic inlay with zirconium dioxide (Cera Post as well as epoxy resin inlay including silica fibers enriched with zirconium (Easy Post produced the most intense artifacts. The smallest image distortions were created by titanium inlays, both passive (Harald Nordin and active (Flexi Flange. Inlays containing zirconium generated the strongest artifacts, thus leading to the greatest distortions in the CBCT images. Carbon fiber inlay did not considerably affect the image quality.

  15. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  16. Danish dental education:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed.......The effects of Danish cultural traditions on dental education in Denmark are described, as well as the system's current structure and developing issues. Some Danish ideas for future exports of dental education programs and dental personnel are also discussed....

  17. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Sathyam, Ujwal S. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  18. Performance of Zirconia for Dental Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf J. Kohal

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The positive results of the performance of zirconia for orthopedics devices have led the dental community to explore possible esthetical and mechanical outcomes using this material. However, questions regarding long-term results have opened strong and controversial discussions regarding the utilization of zirconia as a substitute for alloys for restorations and implants. This narrative review presents the current knowledge on zirconia utilized for dental restorations, oral implant components, and zirconia oral implants, and also addresses laboratory tests and developments, clinical performance, and possible future trends of this material for dental healthcare.

  19. American Dental Hygienists' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Student Resources National Exam Student Advisor Resources Dental Hygiene Programs Scholarships and Grants Research Center Transforming Dental Hygiene Education Advocacy Practice Issues Direct Access Scope ...

  20. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht’s Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht’s DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates’ of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%. However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%. Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P=0.004. “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services.

  1. Dental students--dental advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  2. Methods for characterization of mechanical and electrical prosthetic vacuum pumps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Komolafe, Oluseeni; Wood, Sean; Caldwell, Ryan; Hansen, Andrew; Fatone, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasingly widespread adoption of vacuum-assisted suspension systems in prosthetic clinical practices, there remain gaps in the body of scientific knowledge guiding clinicians' choices of existing products...

  3. Fixed prosthetic treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajevska Jagoda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prosthetic treatment of patients with cleft palate includes various treatment options such as fixed partial dentures, removable partial prosthesis, etc. The type of prosthetic appliance is determined by the oral health of each individual and the circumstances. We presented three adult patients with the cleft lip and palate subjected to prosthetic treatment. Case report. From the possible prosthetic solutions according to the conditions in the oral cavity and the circumstances, fixed partial dentures veneered with composite or ceramic were chosen. A proper relationship between the teeth was reached with the fixed partial dentures, and function established, the phonetics improved and satisfying aesthetics effect accomplished improving the profile appearance of the patient’s face. Plastic surgery of the nose was performed after that. Conclusion. Multidisclipinary treatment is necessary for favourable long-term outcome in cleft lip and palate patients.

  4. Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients with Prosthetic Heart Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed HA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with mechanical valve prostheses require a lifelong anticoagulant treatment. The combined use of Warfarin and low-dose aspirin appears to reduce the risk of valve thrombosis and systemic embolism at a low risk of bleeding. The management of women with prosthetic heart valves during pregnancy poses a particular challenge, as there are no available controlled clinical trials to provide guidelines for effective antithrombotic therapy. Oral anticoagulants, such as Warfarin, cause foetal embryopathy; unfractionated heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin have been reported to be ineffective in preventing thromboembolic complications.This article discusses the available data and the most recent guidelines in the antithrombotic management of patients with prosthetic valves, and antithrombotic therapy in various clinical situations such as pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves, and patients with prosthetic heart valves undergoing noncardiac surgery.

  5. Two-degree-of-freedom powered prosthetic wrist

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kyberd, Peter J; Lemaire, Edward D; Scheme, Erik; MacPhail, Catherine; Goudreau, Louis; Bush, Greg; Brookeshaw, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    .... This prosthetic wrist uses two motors arranged across the arm within the envelope of the hand. The drive is transmitted by a differential so that it produces wrist flexion and extension, pronation and supination, or a combination of both...

  6. Long-term stability of neural prosthetic control signals from silicon cortical arrays in rhesus macaque motor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestek, Cynthia A.; Gilja, Vikash; Nuyujukian, Paul; Foster, Justin D.; Fan, Joline M.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Churchland, Mark M.; Rivera-Alvidrez, Zuley; Cunningham, John P.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2011-08-01

    Cortically-controlled prosthetic systems aim to help disabled patients by translating neural signals from the brain into control signals for guiding prosthetic devices. Recent reports have demonstrated reasonably high levels of performance and control of computer cursors and prosthetic limbs, but to achieve true clinical viability, the long-term operation of these systems must be better understood. In particular, the quality and stability of the electrically-recorded neural signals require further characterization. Here, we quantify action potential changes and offline neural decoder performance over 382 days of recording from four intracortical arrays in three animals. Action potential amplitude decreased by 2.4% per month on average over the course of 9.4, 10.4, and 31.7 months in three animals. During most time periods, decoder performance was not well correlated with action potential amplitude (p > 0.05 for three of four arrays). In two arrays from one animal, action potential amplitude declined by an average of 37% over the first 2 months after implant. However, when using simple threshold-crossing events rather than well-isolated action potentials, no corresponding performance loss was observed during this time using an offline decoder. One of these arrays was effectively used for online prosthetic experiments over the following year. Substantial short-term variations in waveforms were quantified using a wireless system for contiguous recording in one animal, and compared within and between days for all three animals. Overall, this study suggests that action potential amplitude declines more slowly than previously supposed, and performance can be maintained over the course of multiple years when decoding from threshold-crossing events rather than isolated action potentials. This suggests that neural prosthetic systems may provide high performance over multiple years in human clinical trials.

  7. [Prevention of complications fixed restorations in prosthetic patients with hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The author on the basis of clinical and laboratory methods justified, that the use of locally cream "Solcoseryl-Denta" persons suffering from arterial hypertension, increase the speed of recovery of normal epithelial layer of the cells of the mucous membranes of the oral cavity, and, consequently, prevents the development of complications in prosthetics. On the basis of research identified the need in developing a method of prevention of inflammatory complications in prosthetic patients with arterial hypertension.

  8. Prosthetic Knee Septic Arthritis due to Pseudomonas stutzeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihad Bishara

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic joint infection is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci and, less commonly, by Gram-negative bacilli and anaerobes. A case of prosthetic joint infection due to Pseudomonas stutzeri in a 73-year-old female with acute promyelocytic leukemia is presented, and the pertinent literature is reviewed. Although the patient had prolonged neutropenia, the infection was successfully treated with antibiotics and without artificial joint replacement.

  9. Prosthetic abutment influences bone biomechanical behavior of immediately loaded implants

    OpenAIRE

    Camargos, Germana de Villa; SOTTO-MAIOR,Bruno Salles; Silva,Wander José da; Priscilla Cardoso LAZARI; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the type of prosthetic abutment associated to different implant connection on bone biomechanical behavior of immediately and delayed loaded implants. Computed tomography-based finite element models comprising a mandible with a single molar implant were created with different types of prosthetic abutment (UCLA or conical), implant connection (external hexagon, EH or internal hexagon, IH), and occlusal loading (axial or oblique), for both i...

  10. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Amputated Thumb: A Simplified Approach

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents a case of prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated thumb. It emphasizes that prosthetic replacement is a better option for aesthetic and psychological improvement, particularly in cases where the victim is unwilling to undergo complicated surgical procedures for reconstruction of thumb or where functioning of thumb cannot be restored even by multiple surgeries. In the present case, a 20 years old female patient, with missing thumb of her right hand was rehabilitated...

  11. Preparation of an Adhesive in Emulsion for Maxillofacial Prosthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Palacios-Alquisira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA‑MMA‑EA and (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA‑MMA‑2EHA with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives.

  12. Preparation of an Adhesive in Emulsion for Maxillofacial Prosthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, Judith A.; Ortega, Alejandra; Barceló-Santana, Federico H.; Palacios-Alquisira, Joaquín

    2010-01-01

    Maxillofacial prostheses is a dental medicine specialty aimed at restoring anatomical facial defects caused by cancer, trauma or congenital malformations through an artificial device, which is commonly attached to the skin with the help of an adhesive. The purpose of our research was to develop a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) based on acrylic monomers, characterizing and determining its drying kinetics, that is to say the time it takes to lose 50 to 90% of its moisture. The adhesive synthesis was realized by means of emulsion polymerization; the composition of formulations was: (AA-MMA-EA) and (AA-MMA-2EHA) with different molar ratios. The formulation based on (AA-MMA-2EHA) with 50 w% of solids, presented good adhesive properties such as tack, bond strength, and short drying time. We propose this formulation as a PSA, because it offers an alternative for systemically compromised patients, by less irritation compared to organic solvent-based adhesives. PMID:21152308

  13. The design, development, and evaluation of a prototypic, prosthetic venous valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rittgers Stanley E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic venous insufficiency is a serious disease for which there is no clearly successful surgical treatment. Availability of a proven prosthetic vein valve could provide such an option by reducing venous reflux while permitting normal antegrade flow. Methods A new prosthetic vein valve design has been developed which mimics the function of a natural valve by ensuring complete closure of the leaflets with minimal obstruction for antegrade flow. A 2:1 mock-up of the device was tested to evaluate its ability to prevent regurgitation and several key modifications were made. A subsequently re-designed 1:1 prototype was then built in 4 slightly different size configurations and then each tested under physiologic conditions of pulsatile flow in both supine and standing positions. Results Each of the configurations showed acceptable amounts of antegrade resistance and effective orifice area and showed low values of regurgitation and % reflux with two of the prototype configurations (flange lengths of 2.5 mm and 3.75 mm having corresponding values of 97%, 11 mL, and 36%, respectively. These values are particularly striking when compared to the corresponding regurgitation and % reflux values of 60 mL and 205%, respectively, when no device is present. Conclusion The results of this study show that this prototype vein valve design is capable of providing significant relief of reflux under realistic conditions without inducing any increase in antegrade flow resistance and warrants further testing with in vivo models.

  14. Simulated Prosthetic Vision: The Benefits of Computer-Based Object Recognition and Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Marc J-M; Guivarch, Valérian; Denis, Grégoire; Jouffrais, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Clinical trials with blind patients implanted with a visual neuroprosthesis showed that even the simplest tasks were difficult to perform with the limited vision restored with current implants. Simulated prosthetic vision (SPV) is a powerful tool to investigate the putative functions of the upcoming generations of visual neuroprostheses. Recent studies based on SPV showed that several generations of implants will be required before usable vision is restored. However, none of these studies relied on advanced image processing. High-level image processing could significantly reduce the amount of information required to perform visual tasks and help restore visuomotor behaviors, even with current low-resolution implants. In this study, we simulated a prosthetic vision device based on object localization in the scene. We evaluated the usability of this device for object recognition, localization, and reaching. We showed that a very low number of electrodes (e.g., nine) are sufficient to restore visually guided reaching movements with fair timing (10 s) and high accuracy. In addition, performance, both in terms of accuracy and speed, was comparable with 9 and 100 electrodes. Extraction of high level information (object recognition and localization) from video images could drastically enhance the usability of current visual neuroprosthesis. We suggest that this method-that is, localization of targets of interest in the scene-may restore various visuomotor behaviors. This method could prove functional on current low-resolution implants. The main limitation resides in the reliability of the vision algorithms, which are improving rapidly.

  15. Reflection photoelasticity: a new method for studies of clinical mechanics in prosthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Cláudio P; Glantz, Per Olof J; Svensson, Stig A; Bergmark, Anders

    2003-03-01

    This research was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of reflective photoelasticity as an in vivo technique for monitoring the strain/stress distribution in prosthetic devices during function. Seven subjects were selected for this study and divided into three groups according to the design of the prostheses. The buccal surfaces of the experimental prostheses were coated with a birefringent resin 2mm thick. Using a reflection polariscope, fringe patterns were documented on video tape during standardized in vivo loadings. Strain and stress levels (gamma(max) and tau(max)) were calculated from isochromatic fringe order determinations. The intra-observer variability in counting fringe orders and the accuracy level of reflective photoelasticity as compared to strain gauge results were also studied. The strain results of in vivo loading of the prostheses were analyzed with ANOVA and Scheffés tests. The intra-observer variability was analyzed with the Friedman nonparametric test. Comparisons of photoelastic data and strain gauges were tested with Pearson's correlation. Coated areas accessible to normally incident light, produced comprehensive maps of strain distribution. Significant differences were found in the in vivo gamma(max) values for the prostheses designs (preflective photoelasticity showed a high correlation r=0.98 and 0.99) with values obtained at the same areas using strain gauges. Reflective photoelasticity is a valid, reliable and accurate technique to be used for in vivo studies on the biomechanical behavior of prosthetic devices.

  16. Analysis of voluntary opening Ottobock Hook and Hosmer Hook for upper limb prosthetics: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Nur Afiqah; Abd Razak, Nasrul Anuar Bin; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2016-11-19

    There are a number of prosthetic terminal devices which offer functional restoration to individuals with upper limb deficiencies. Hosmer and Ottobock are major commercial hook providers for prosthetic terminal devices. The concern of this paper is to analyse the voluntary opening (VO) Ottobock model 10A18 and Hosmer model 99P hooks (one band) during opening operation and to find out favourable features in the design. Two tests were conducted to analyse the performance of both hooks. The first test used a simple bench tool to investigate cable excursion and hook opening angle and the second test used force sensor to find out the force supplied at a different hook opening angle. The study found that the average cable excursion for both hooks is approximately 30% less than the hook's opening span with the force at the hook's tip section being inversely proportional to the force at the lateral section. Ottobock 10A18 has a better control for grasping larger objects, while Hosmer 99P has the highest average force at the tip section but yet less efficient in generating adequate force for activities of daily living. Favourable features identified are low cable excursion per hook opening span and balance lateral to hook tip pinch force.

  17. Transforming Dental Technology Education: Skills, Knowledge, and Curricular Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobich, Anita M; Mitchell, Betty L

    2017-09-01

    Dental technology is one of the core allied dental health professions supporting the practice of dentistry. By definition, it is the art, science, and technologies that enable the design and fabrication of dental prostheses and/or corrective devices to restore natural teeth and supporting structures to fulfill a patient's physiological and esthetic needs. Dental technology educational programs are faced with serious challenges, including rapid changes in technology, inadequate funding for educational programs, and the need to develop curricula that reflect current industry needs. Better communications between dental technologists and practitioners are needed to gain greater recognition of the contribution that technologists make to patient health. Amid these challenges, the technology workforce is dedicated to providing patients with the best possible restorative dental prostheses. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  18. Ceramics in Restorative and Prosthetic DENTISTRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. Robert

    1997-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the ceramic engineer with information about the history and current use of ceramics in dentistry, contemporary research topics, and potential research agenda. Background material includes intra-oral design considerations, descriptions of ceramic dental components, and the origin, composition, and microstructure of current dental ceramics. Attention is paid to efforts involving net-shape processing, machining as a forming method, and the analysis of clinical failure. A rationale is presented for the further development of all-ceramic restorative systems. Current research topics receiving attention include microstructure/processing/property relationships, clinical failure mechanisms and in vitro testing, wear damage and wear testing, surface treatments, and microstructural modifications. The status of the field is critically reviewed with an eye toward future work. Significant improvements seem possible in the clinical use of ceramics based on engineering solutions derived from the study of clinically failed restorations, on the incorporation of higher levels of "biomimicry" in new systems, and on the synergistic developments in dental cements and adhesive dentin bonding.

  19. Development of a New Type of Incisal Table for Prosthetic Articulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Tasora

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study illustrates the effectiveness of an advanced incisal table surface, featuring adjustable curvature, in the sake of more accurate articulator kinematics in anterior teeth reconstruction. Prosthetic articulators, used by dental technicians in reconstructive dentistry, are adjustable instruments that simulate the motion of mastication between dental casts: usually, the forward motion (protrusion of the mandible is guided by sliding a pin over a flat table in order to recreate those movements when incisal teeth are missing. However, such protrusion is an approximation of the exact motion, since flat incisal tables have a limited set of adjustments. Customized software has been developed in order to simulate the kinematics of articulators in three-dimensional space: animations and measures of the envelope of teeth profiles show the unfeasibility of reconstructing with good approximation the profile of incisive teeth, when a simple ‘flat’ incisal table is used. A new incisal table with an adjustable curvature has been proposed, simulated, and built, and computer simulations demonstrated the superior precision of the new design when compared to a conventional articulator which uses a flat incisal table.

  20. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  1. Rotationplasty with Vascular Reconstruction for Prosthetic Knee Joint Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Fujiki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotationplasty is used most often as a function-preserving salvage procedure after resection of sarcomas of the lower extremity; however, it is also used after infection of prosthetic knee joints. Conventional vascular management during rotationplasty is to preserve and coil major vessels, but recently, transection and reanastomosis of the major vessels has been widely performed. However, there has been little discussion regarding the optimal vascular management of rotationplasty after infection of prosthetic knee joints because rotationplasty is rarely performed for this indication. We reviewed four patients who had undergone resection of osteosarcomas of the femur, placement of a prosthetic knee joint, and rotationplasty with vascular reconstruction from 2010 to 2013. The mean interval between prosthetic joint replacement and rotationplasty was 10.4 years and the mean interval between the diagnosis of prosthesis infection and rotationplasty was 7.9 years. Rotationplasty was successful in all patients; however, in one patient, arterial thrombosis developed and necessitated urgent surgical removal and arterial reconstruction. All patients were able to walk independently with a prosthetic limb after rehabilitation. Although there is no consensus regarding the most appropriate method of vascular management during rotationplasty for revision of infected prosthetic joints, vascular transection and reanastomosis is a useful option.

  2. Mechanical efficiency during gait of adults with transtibial amputation: a pilot study comparing the SACH, Seattle, and Golden-Ankle prosthetic feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, F; Winter, D A; Sjonnensen, G; Powell, C; Wheeldon, R K

    1998-06-01

    As more and more prosthetic feet become commercially available, the selection of the appropriate device is a more difficult task for clinical team members. To date, ranking prosthetic feet based on biomechanical parameters has been done using the spring efficiency. The current analytical technique for calculating spring efficiency has two flaws: first, prosthetic feet with a bendable flexible keel are analyzed the same way as those with an articulated ankle and a rigid foot, and second, there is no accounting for the energy losses in the viscoelastic cosmetic material surrounding the keel. This paper develops a rigorous technique to calculate the net energy stored or dissipated and then recovered during the stance phase of gait. Five adults with transtibial amputation were tested with three different prosthetic feet: SACH, Seattle, and Golden-Ankle. The subjects walked at self-selected cadence and stepped on a force plate while two-dimensional segmental kinematic and kinetic data were collected. The results showed that the Golden-Ankle stored or dissipated and then recovered significantly more energy than either the SACH or Seattle. The time to reach foot flat was also significantly reduced for the Golden-Ankle in comparison to both the others. Because the cosmetic material of the SACH foot can store or dissipate and then recover as much energy as the Seattle foot, the SACH foot should be considered an energy-storing foot. Finally, the net efficiency alone can not discriminate adequately among different types of prosthetic feet; therefore, one should consider the time to reach foot flat and the amount of energy recovered as additional objective criteria (weight, maintenance, and cosmesis) for selection of a prosthetic foot device.

  3. Smart dental practice: capitalising on smart mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangger, K; Bredican, J; Mills, A J; Armstrong, J

    2015-08-14

    To keep pace with consumer adoption of smart mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and the applications ('apps') developed for these devices, dental professionals should consider how this technology could be used to simultaneously improve both patient service experiences and dental practice management. Using U-Commerce as a theoretical lens, this article discusses the potential value of smart mobile technology to the dental practice context, with a particular focus on the unique and customisable capabilities of apps. To take full advantage of this technology, a process is outlined for identifying and designing bespoke dental apps that takes into account the unique advantages of these devices. Dental practices, with increasing financial and competitive pressures, may improve the efficiency and profitability of operations and better manage patients, employees and stakeholders by integrating smart mobile technology.

  4. Dental erozyon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özen, B.; Yönel, N.; Çetiner, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dental erozyon, plak içermeyen diş yüzeyleri üzerinde içsel ve dışsal asitlerin veya şelatların etkileriyle oluşan kimyasal bir aşınmadır. İçsel ve/veya dışsal kaynaklar nedensel faktörler olarak tanımlanırken tükürük ve pelikıl gibi biyolojik faktörler, yeme ve içme alışkanlıkları ve ağız hijyeni

  5. The role of ionic interactions in the adherence of the Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesin SdrF to prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Faustino A; Visai, Livia; Trivedi, Sheetal; Lowy, Franklin D

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are common complications of prosthetic device implantation. SdrF, a surface protein, appears to play a critical role in the initial colonization step by adhering to type I collagen and Dacron™. The role of ionic interactions in S. epidermidis adherence to prosthetic material was examined. SdrF was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis. The effect of pH, cation concentration, and detergents on adherence to different types of plastic surfaces was assessed by crystal violet staining and bacterial cell counting. SdrF, in contrast with controls and other S. epidermidis surface proteins, bound to hydrophobic materials such as polystyrene. Binding was an ionic interaction and was affected by surface charge of the plastic, pH, and cation concentration. Adherence of the SdrF construct was increased to positively charged plastics and was reduced by increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and Na(+). Binding was optimal at pH 7.4. Kinetic studies demonstrated that the SdrF B domain as well as one of the B subdomains was sufficient to mediate binding. The SdrF construct also bound more avidly to Goretex™ than the lacotococcal control. SdrF is a multifunctional protein that contributes to prosthetic devices infections by ionic, as well as specific receptor-ligand interactions.

  6. The Role of Ionic Interactions in the Adherence of the S. epidermidis Adhesin SdrF to Prosthetic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toba, Faustino A.; Visai, Livia; Trivedi, Sheetal; Lowy, Franklin D.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are common complications of prosthetic device implantation. SdrF, a surface protein, appears to play a critical role in the initial colonization step by adhering to type I collagen and Dacron™. The role of ionic interactions in S. epidermidis adherence to prosthetic material was examined. SdrF was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis. The effect of pH, cation concentration and detergents on adherence to different types of plastic surfaces was assessed by crystal violet staining and bacterial cell counting. SdrF, in contrast with controls and other S. epidermidis surface proteins, bound to hydrophobic materials such as polystyrene. Binding was an ionic interaction and was affected by surface charge of the plastic, pH and cation concentration. Adherence of the SdrF construct was increased to positively charged plastics and was reduced by increasing concentrations of Ca2+ and Na+. Binding was optimal at pH 7.4. Kinetic studies demonstrated that the SdrF B domain, as well as one of the B subdomains was sufficient to mediate binding. The SdrF construct also bound more avidly to Goretex™ than the lacotococcal control. SdrF is a multifunctional protein that contributes to prosthetic devices infections by ionic, as well as specific receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:23039791

  7. Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Home > Medicaid > Benefits > Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care Dental Care for Medicaid and CHIP Enrollees Dental health ... services and opportunities and challenges to obtaining care. Dental Benefits for Children in Medicaid Medicaid covers dental ...

  8. Complete oral rehabilitation of a deep bite patient with Ewing’s sarcoma; surgical and prosthetic phases: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Bahrami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ewings sarcoma (ES is an unusual, aggressive malignant neoplasm occurring primarily in the long bones of the lower and upper extremities followed by pelvis, ribs, vertebrae, skull, and jaws-bones. Patients with ES tumor need long-term complete oral reconstruction. The location of the primary tumor in the face is predominantly in the mandible, and usually in the posterior mandible. Case Report: Here, both surgical procedures and prosthetic reconstruction in three stages of a 10-year-old childs life presented. Definitive prosthetic reconstruction is extremely challenging in such patients after previous excessive surgical resection, especially when the patient has complex dental abnormality. Fixed dental prostheses and implant-supported fixed restorations have been selected as the preferred treatment option in this case after increasing occlusal vertical dimension (OVD to create sufficient interocclusal space (IOS. Discussion: In this case, ES patient treated in three phases. In the first-stage, only surgical resection of tumor and bone graft reconstruction with titanium plate fixation was performed. In the second-stage, Lefort I surgery for maxilla with dental implants insertion in mandible was done simultaneously. For definitive restorations fabrication, it was mandatory to increase occlusal vertical dimension (OVD to create sufficient inter-occlusal space (IOS for the restorations. OVD has been altered to achieve more stable relationship of mandibular teeth with maxillary teeth, and to obtain an optimum esthetic and functional result. Several factors should be considered as determinants for increasing the OVD such as remaining tooth structure, the space available for the restorations such as the current situation, occlusal variables, and esthetics.

  9. Child Indicators: Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewit, Eugene M.; Kerrebrock, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews measures of dental health in children and the evidence on child dental health. Although children's dental health has improved over the past two decades, many poor children do not receive necessary dental health services, and reasons for this failure are summarized. (SLD)

  10. A survey on the experience with dental tourism in a sample of Italian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, D; Filippucci, L; Celestino, S; Carrassi, A; Delia, S; Lodi, G

    2012-01-01

    Dentistry in Italy is mainly private and therefore perceived as forcedly expensive. Dental tourism is becoming popular in order to get cheap dental care. The aim of this study was to carry out a survey aimed at investigating the perception of dental tourism by Italian patients who have recently received such dental care abroad. A questionnaire was posted on the web site of an Italian consumers association (Altroconsumo) and members were invited to fill in the questionnaire in case they had experienced dental treatment abroad. Eighty-one complete forms were included in the study. The main motivation for turning to dental tourism was saving money. Another frequent reason for choosing dental tourism was that full rehabilitation was offered in a short time span, usually one week. Patients have often underlined that they appreciated different aspects of the foreign dentists, like speed, kindness, humanity, interest in the course of the treatment, the feeling of ease conveyed by the environment and the personnel. Past negative experiences with Italian dentists were in some cases advocated as reasons for searching dental care abroad. Such negative experiences resulted in a lack of trust in Italian dentists. Some patients reported that while the overall treatment abroad was carried out in a short time, single prosthetic sessions were very long, up to 6 hours. Most patients were satisfied with dental tourism.

  11. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  12. Quality improvement program reduces perioperative dental injuries – A review of 64,718 anesthetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wei Kuo

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Dental injury incidence was significantly reduced and remained at low levels after implementation of the quality improvement program. We suggest the implementation of a standardized dental examination into the preoperative evaluation system adding pathologic teeth fixed or protected devices to minimize dental injury associated with anesthesia.

  13. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruce, Jesse R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erwin, Jenny R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remick, Kevin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornwell, Phillip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menegini, R. Michael [INDIANA UNIV.; Racanelli, Joe [STRYKER ORTHOPARDICS

    2010-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  14. Surface EMG in advanced hand prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Claudio; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    One of the major problems when dealing with highly dexterous, active hand prostheses is their control by the patient wearing them. With the advances in mechatronics, building prosthetic hands with multiple active degrees of freedom is realisable, but actively controlling the position and especially the exerted force of each finger cannot yet be done naturally. This paper deals with advanced robotic hand control via surface electromyography. Building upon recent results, we show that machine learning, together with a simple downsampling algorithm, can be effectively used to control on-line, in real time, finger position as well as finger force of a highly dexterous robotic hand. The system determines the type of grasp a human subject is willing to use, and the required amount of force involved, with a high degree of accuracy. This represents a remarkable improvement with respect to the state-of-the-art of feed-forward control of dexterous mechanical hands, and opens up a scenario in which amputees will be able to control hand prostheses in a much finer way than it has so far been possible.

  15. Design and Analysis of New Prosthetic Foot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadhim K.Al-Kinani,MSc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a variety of artificial foot designs variable for use with prosthetic legs . Most of the design can be divided into two classes, articulated and non-articulated feet. one common non-articulated foot is the SACH . The solid ankle cushion heel foot referred to as the SACH foot has a rigid keelOne key or the key factor in designing a new prosthesis is in the analysis of a patients response This view is the most important because if the foot does not provide functional , practical or cosmetically acceptable characteristics the patient will not feel comfortable with the prosthesis , therefore design and manufacturing a new foot is essential, this foot made from polyethylene, its different shape and characteristics The characteristics deemed important by patients in achieving natural gait motion include:Dorsiflexion Energy return Fatigue test In this study, including all these characteristics test, design fatigue foot tester according to ISO 10328 and design new foot .Also, the testometric crosshead was modified to find dorsiflexion angle and energy return .The fatigue criteria for polymer was proposed, in mathematical solution. Finally , the characteristics of SACH foot was compared with new foot by mathematical solution and used visual basic program and experimental method by different tests. From these test that the new foot is better than SACH foot for all test .

  16. [Surgical Treatment of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Sugaya, Akira; Kurumisawa, Soki; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Ohki, Shinichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-11-01

    Between 2003 and 2014, at Jichi Medical University Hospital, 11 patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) underwent re-operation. There was 1 in-hospital death and 2 late deaths. The cause of death was cirrhosis, heart failure and sepsis, respectively. Emergency surgery, previous double valve replacement (DVR) and Staphylococcus infection were common risk factors for all 3 cases. Two cases of patients that survived who underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) and DVR for PVE after DVR were treated with multiple antibiotic courses for bacteremia associated with hemodialysis and colon cancer. One patient who underwent DVR after mitral valve plasty which was complicated with cerebral hemorrhage, had survived and was discharged. Of the aortic PVE patients, 2 cases of aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a mechanical valve, 1 case of aortic root replacement (ARR) using a mechanical valve, and 1 ARR using the homograft, were considered cured and never relapsed. A patient with aortic PVE, who underwent AVR after cesarean section for heart failure in birth period, has received ARR twice with the mechanical valve for recurrent pseudo-aneurysm of the left ventricular outflow tract. Since hemodialysis and colon cancer is a risk factor for recurrent PVE, it is necessary to consider the long-term administration of antibiotics after surgery.

  17. Prototyping Cognitive Prosthetics for People with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Richard; Nugent, Chris D.; Donnelly, Mark

    In the COGKNOW project, a cognitive prosthetic has been developed through the application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-based services to address the unmet needs and demands of persons with dementia. The primary aim of the developed solution was to offer guidance with conducting everyday activities for persons with dementia. To encourage a user-centred design process, a three-phased methodology was introduced to facilitate cyclical prototype development. At each phase, user input was used to guide the future development. As a prerequisite to the first phase of development, user requirements were gathered to identify a small set of functional requirements from which a number of services were identified. Following implementation of these initial services, the prototype was evaluated on a cohort of users and, through observing their experiences and recording their feedback, the design was refined and the prototype redeveloped to include a number of additional services in the second phase. The current chapter provides an overview of the services designed and developed in the first two phases.

  18. 77 FR 6028 - Taxable Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... adhesives and snake bite kits.'' The Technical Explanation also emphasizes that ``items would only be exempt... subject to an IDE is not a ``taxable medical device'' under the proposed regulations. VI. Dental... for dental instruments and equipment. The proposed regulations do not adopt this suggestion. There is...

  19. Prevalence of dental erosion among people with gastroesophageal reflux disease in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhao; Liu, Jingming; Chen, Su; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Zhenting

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is typically diagnosed based on symptoms of regurgitation and heartburn, although it may also manifest as asthma-like symptoms, laryngitis, or dental erosion. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of dental erosion in people with GERD and to evaluate the association between GERD and dental erosion. The presence, severity, and pattern of dental erosion was assessed in 51 participants with GERD and 50 participants without GERD using the Smith and Knight tooth wear index. Medical, dietary, and dental histories were collected by questionnaire. Factors potentially related to dental erosion, including GERD, were evaluated by logistic regression. Dental erosion was observed in 31 (60.8%) participants with GERD and 14 (28%) participants without GERD. Bivariate analysis revealed that participants with GERD were more likely to experience dental erosion (crude odds ratio [cOR]: 2.74; 95% CI: 1.19, 6.32) than participants without GERD. Multivariate analysis also revealed that participants with GERD had a higher risk of dental erosion (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.97; 95% CI: 1.45, 10.89). Consumption of grains and legumes, the most frequently consumed foods in China, did not correlate with dental erosion. However, carbonated beverage consumption was significantly associated with GERD and dental erosion (aOR: 3.34; 95% CI: 1.01, 11.04; P=.04). GERD was positively correlated with dental erosion. Carbonated beverage consumption can increase the risk of both GERD and dental erosion. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 100 top-cited scientific papers in limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Arezoo; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Ali, Sadeeq; Shadgan, Babak

    2013-11-17

    Research has tremendously contributed to the developments in both practical and fundamental aspects of limb prosthetics. These advancements are reflected in scientific articles, particularly in the most cited papers. This article aimed to identify the 100 top-cited articles in the field of limb prosthetics and to investigate their main characteristics. Articles related to the field of limb prosthetics and published in the Web of Knowledge database of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) from the period of 1980 to 2012. The 100 most cited articles in limb prosthetics were selected based on the citation index report. All types of articles except for proceedings and letters were included in the study. The study design and level of evidence were determined using Sackett's initial rules of evidence. The level of evidence was categorized either as a systematic review or meta-analysis, randomized controlled trial, cohort study, case-control study, case series, expert opinion, or design and development. The top cited articles in prosthetics were published from 1980 to 2012 with a citation range of 11 to 90 times since publication. The mean citation rate was 24.43 (SD 16.7) times. Eighty-four percent of the articles were original publications and were most commonly prospective (76%) and case series studies (67%) that used human subjects (96%) providing level 4 evidence. Among the various fields, rehabilitation (47%), orthopedics (29%), and sport sciences (28%) were the most common fields of study. The study established that studies conducted in North America and were written in English had the highest citations. Top cited articles primarily dealt with lower limb prosthetics, specifically, on transtibial and transradial prosthetic limbs. Majority of the articles were experimental studies.